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Sample records for factor arf gtpases

  1. Role of Arf GTPases in fungal morphogenesis and virulence

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    Labbaoui, Hayet; Bogliolo, Stéphanie; Ghugtyal, Vikram; Solis, Norma V.

    2017-01-01

    Virulence of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans depends on the switch from budding to filamentous growth, which requires sustained membrane traffic and polarized growth. In many organisms, small GTPases of the Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) family regulate membrane/protein trafficking, yet little is known about their role in fungal filamentous growth. To investigate these GTPases in C. albicans, we generated loss of function mutants in all 3 Arf proteins, Arf1-Arf3, and 2 Arf-like proteins, Arl1 and Arl3. Our results indicate that of these proteins, Arf2 is required for viability and sensitivity to antifungal drugs. Repressible ARF2 expression results in defects in filamentous growth, cell wall integrity and virulence, likely due to alteration of the Golgi. Arl1 is also required for invasive filamentous growth and, although arl1/arl1 cells can initiate hyphal growth, hyphae are substantially shorter than that of the wild-type, due to the inability of this mutant to maintain hyphal growth at a single site. We show that this defect does not result from an alteration of phospholipid distribution and is unlikely to result from the sole Golgin Imh1 mislocalization, as Imh1 is not required for invasive filamentous growth. Rather, our results suggest that the arl1/arl1 hyphal growth defect results from increased secretion in this mutant. Strikingly, the arl1/arl1 mutant is drastically reduced in virulence during oropharyngeal candidiasis. Together, our results highlight the importance of Arl1 and Arf2 as key regulators of hyphal growth and virulence in C. albicans and identify a unique function of Arl1 in secretion. PMID:28192532

  2. The Arabidopsis ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) and ARF-like (ARL) system and its regulation by BIG2, a large ARF-GEF

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    Nielsen, Michael; Albrethsen, Jacob; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann

    2006-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) and ARF-like (ARL) proteins are small GTPases that undergo a GDP/GTP nucleotide exchange cycle. ARF proteins are important regulators of cellular trafficking. Knowledge of plant ARF proteins and their regulators is emerging from genetic and cellular studies. The Arab......ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) and ARF-like (ARL) proteins are small GTPases that undergo a GDP/GTP nucleotide exchange cycle. ARF proteins are important regulators of cellular trafficking. Knowledge of plant ARF proteins and their regulators is emerging from genetic and cellular studies......2 fraction was detected in membranes, especially those deriving from the Golgi apparatus. The activity of the BIG2 Sec7 domain was unaffected by the Sec7 inhibitor brefeldin A, suggesting that BIG2 is a BFA-insensitive GEF for ARF1 or a close homolog. These studies contribute to our understanding...... of the biochemical and physiological specificity of ARF and ARF-GEF interactions in plants....

  3. Regulators and Effectors of Arf GTPases in Neutrophils.

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    Gamara, Jouda; Chouinard, François; Davis, Lynn; Aoudjit, Fawzi; Bourgoin, Sylvain G

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are key innate immune cells that represent the first line of defence against infection. They are the first leukocytes to migrate from the blood to injured or infected sites. This process involves molecular mechanisms that coordinate cell polarization, delivery of receptors, and activation of integrins at the leading edge of migrating PMNs. These phagocytes actively engulf microorganisms or form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to trap and kill pathogens with bactericidal compounds. Association of the NADPH oxidase complex at the phagosomal membrane for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and delivery of proteolytic enzymes into the phagosome initiate pathogen killing and removal. G protein-dependent signalling pathways tightly control PMN functions. In this review, we will focus on the small monomeric GTPases of the Arf family and their guanine exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) as components of signalling cascades regulating PMN responses. GEFs and GAPs are multidomain proteins that control cellular events in time and space through interaction with other proteins and lipids inside the cells. The number of Arf GAPs identified in PMNs is expanding, and dissecting their functions will provide important insights into the role of these proteins in PMN physiology.

  4. Regulators and Effectors of Arf GTPases in Neutrophils

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    Jouda Gamara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs are key innate immune cells that represent the first line of defence against infection. They are the first leukocytes to migrate from the blood to injured or infected sites. This process involves molecular mechanisms that coordinate cell polarization, delivery of receptors, and activation of integrins at the leading edge of migrating PMNs. These phagocytes actively engulf microorganisms or form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs to trap and kill pathogens with bactericidal compounds. Association of the NADPH oxidase complex at the phagosomal membrane for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and delivery of proteolytic enzymes into the phagosome initiate pathogen killing and removal. G protein-dependent signalling pathways tightly control PMN functions. In this review, we will focus on the small monomeric GTPases of the Arf family and their guanine exchange factors (GEFs and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs as components of signalling cascades regulating PMN responses. GEFs and GAPs are multidomain proteins that control cellular events in time and space through interaction with other proteins and lipids inside the cells. The number of Arf GAPs identified in PMNs is expanding, and dissecting their functions will provide important insights into the role of these proteins in PMN physiology.

  5. The Arf GTPase-Activating Protein Family Is Exploited by Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium To Invade Nonphagocytic Host Cells

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    Davidson, Anthony C.; Humphreys, Daniel; Brooks, Andrew B. E.; Hume, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To establish intracellular infections, Salmonella bacteria trigger host cell membrane ruffling and invasion by subverting cellular Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that activate Arf1 and Arf6 GTPases by promoting GTP binding. A family of cellular Arf GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) can downregulate Arf signaling by stimulating GTP hydrolysis, but whether they do this during infection is unknown. Here, we uncovered a remarkable role for distinct Arf GAP family members in Salmonella invasion. The Arf6 GAPs ACAP1 and ADAP1 and the Arf1 GAP ASAP1 localized at Salmonella-induced ruffles, which was not the case for the plasma membrane-localized Arf6 GAPs ARAP3 and GIT1 or the Golgi-associated Arf1 GAP1. Surprisingly, we found that loss of ACAP1, ADAP1, or ASAP1 impaired Salmonella invasion, revealing that GAPs cannot be considered mere terminators of cytoskeleton remodeling. Salmonella invasion was restored in Arf GAP-depleted cells by expressing fast-cycling Arf derivatives, demonstrating that Arf GTP/GDP cycles facilitate Salmonella invasion. Consistent with this view, both constitutively active and dominant-negative Arf derivatives that cannot undergo GTP/GDP cycles inhibited invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Arf GEFs and GAPs colocalize at invading Salmonella and collaborate to drive Arf1-dependent pathogen invasion. This study revealed that Salmonella bacteria exploit a remarkable interplay between Arf GEFs and GAPs to direct cycles of Arf GTPase activation and inactivation. These cycles drive Salmonella cytoskeleton remodeling and enable intracellular infections. PMID:25670778

  6. ARF1 and SAR1 GTPases in endomembrane trafficking in plants.

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    Cevher-Keskin, Birsen

    2013-09-05

    Small GTPases largely control membrane traffic, which is essential for the survival of all eukaryotes. Among the small GTP-binding proteins, ARF1 (ADP-ribosylation factor 1) and SAR1 (Secretion-Associated RAS super family 1) are commonly conserved among all eukaryotes with respect to both their functional and sequential characteristics. The ARF1 and SAR1 GTP-binding proteins are involved in the formation and budding of vesicles throughout plant endomembrane systems. ARF1 has been shown to play a critical role in COPI (Coat Protein Complex I)-mediated retrograde trafficking in eukaryotic systems, whereas SAR1 GTPases are involved in intracellular COPII-mediated protein trafficking from the ER to the Golgi apparatus. This review offers a summary of vesicular trafficking with an emphasis on the ARF1 and SAR1 expression patterns at early growth stages and in the de-etiolation process.

  7. The small GTPase Arf1 modulates mitochondrial morphology and function.

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    Ackema, Karin B; Hench, Jürgen; Böckler, Stefan; Wang, Shyi Chyi; Sauder, Ursula; Mergentaler, Heidi; Westermann, Benedikt; Bard, Frédéric; Frank, Stephan; Spang, Anne

    2014-11-18

    The small GTPase Arf1 plays critical roles in membrane traffic by initiating the recruitment of coat proteins and by modulating the activity of lipid-modifying enzymes. Here, we report an unexpected but evolutionarily conserved role for Arf1 and the ArfGEF GBF1 at mitochondria. Loss of function of ARF-1 or GBF-1 impaired mitochondrial morphology and activity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Similarly, mitochondrial defects were observed in mammalian and yeast cells. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aberrant clusters of the mitofusin Fzo1 accumulated in arf1-11 mutants and were resolved by overexpression of Cdc48, an AAA-ATPase involved in ER and mitochondria-associated degradation processes. Yeast Arf1 co-fractionated with ER and mitochondrial membranes and interacted genetically with the contact site component Gem1. Furthermore, similar mitochondrial abnormalities resulted from knockdown of either GBF-1 or contact site components in worms, suggesting that the role of Arf1 in mitochondrial functioning is linked to ER-mitochondrial contacts. Thus, Arf1 is involved in mitochondrial homeostasis and dynamics, independent of its role in vesicular traffic.

  8. ArfGAP1 is a GTPase Activating Protein for LRRK2: Reciprocal Regulation of ArfGAP1 by LRRK2

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    Xiong, Yulan; Yuan, Changqing; Chen, Rong; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2012-01-01

    Both sporadic and autosomal dominant forms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) have been causally linked to mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), a large protein with multiple domains. The kinase domain plays an important role in LRRK2 mediated toxicity. While a number of investigations have focused on LRRK2 kinase activity, less is known about the GTPase function of LRRK2. The activity of GTPases is regulated by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) and GTP exchange factors (GEFs). Here, we identify ArfGAP1 as the first GAP for LRRK2. ArfGAP1 binds LRRK2 predominantly via the WD40 and kinase domain of LRRK2 and it increases LRRK2 GTPase activity and regulates LRRK2 toxicity both in vitro and in vivo in Drosophila melanogaster. Unexpectedly, ArfGAP1 is a LRRK2 kinase substrate whose GAP activity is inhibited by LRRK2, while wild type and G2019S LRRK2 autophosphorylation and kinase activity are significantly reduced in the presence of ArfGAP1. Overexpressed ArfGAP1 exhibits toxicity that is reduced by LRRK2 both in vitro and in vivo. Δ64-ArfGAP1, a dominant negative ArfGAP1, and shRNA knockdown of ArfGAP1 reduce LRRK2 toxicity. Thus, LRRK2 and ArfGAP1 reciprocally regulate the activity of each other. Our results provide insight into the basic pathobiology of LRRK2 and indicate an important role for the GTPase domain and ArfGAP1 in LRRK2 mediated toxicity. These data suggest that agents targeted towards regulation of LRRK2 GTP hydrolysis might be therapeutic agents for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:22423108

  9. Physiological functions of the small GTPase Arf6 in the nervous system.

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    Akiyama, Masahiro; Kanaho, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) plays important roles in membrane dynamics-based neuronal cell events such as neurite outgrowth and spine formation. However, physiological functions of Arf6 in the nervous system at whole animal level have not yet been explored. We have recently generated conditional knockout mice lacking Arf6 in neurons or oligodendrocytes of central nervous system (CNS) or both cell lineages, and analyzed them. We found that ablation of Arf6 gene from neurons, but not from oligodendrocytes, caused the defect in axon myelination at the fimbria of hippocampus (Fim) and corpus callosum (CC). We also found that migration of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) from the subventricular zone to the Fim and CC in mice lacking Arf6 in neurons was impaired. Finally, it was found that secretion of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a guidance factor for OPC migration, from hippocampi lacking Arf6 was impaired. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that Arf6 in neurons of the CNS plays an important role in OPC migration by regulating secretion of FGF-2 from neurons, thereby contributing to the axon myelination. Here, we discuss our current understanding of physiological functions of Arf6 in the nervous system.

  10. GTPase activity and neuronal toxicity of Parkinson's disease-associated LRRK2 is regulated by ArfGAP1.

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    Klodjan Stafa

    Full Text Available Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene are the most common cause of autosomal dominant familial Parkinson's disease (PD and also contribute to idiopathic PD. LRRK2 encodes a large multi-domain protein with GTPase and kinase activity. Initial data indicates that an intact functional GTPase domain is critically required for LRRK2 kinase activity. PD-associated mutations in LRRK2, including the most common G2019S variant, have variable effects on enzymatic activity but commonly alter neuronal process morphology. The mechanisms underlying the intrinsic and extrinsic regulation of LRRK2 GTPase and kinase activity, and the pathogenic effects of familial mutations, are incompletely understood. Here, we identify a novel functional interaction between LRRK2 and ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein 1 (ArfGAP1. LRRK2 and ArfGAP1 interact in vitro in mammalian cells and in vivo in brain, and co-localize in the cytoplasm and at Golgi membranes. PD-associated and functional mutations that alter the GTPase activity of LRRK2 modulate the interaction with ArfGAP1. The GTP hydrolysis activity of LRRK2 is markedly enhanced by ArfGAP1 supporting a role for ArfGAP1 as a GTPase-activating protein for LRRK2. Unexpectedly, ArfGAP1 promotes the kinase activity of LRRK2 suggesting a potential role for GTP hydrolysis in kinase activation. Furthermore, LRRK2 robustly and directly phosphorylates ArfGAP1 in vitro. Silencing of ArfGAP1 expression in primary cortical neurons rescues the neurite shortening phenotype induced by G2019S LRRK2 overexpression, whereas the co-expression of ArfGAP1 and LRRK2 synergistically promotes neurite shortening in a manner dependent upon LRRK2 GTPase activity. Neurite shortening induced by ArfGAP1 overexpression is also attenuated by silencing of LRRK2. Our data reveal a novel role for ArfGAP1 in regulating the GTPase activity and neuronal toxicity of LRRK2; reciprocally, LRRK2 phosphorylates ArfGAP1 and is

  11. Four GTPases differentially regulate the Sec7 Arf-GEF to direct traffic at the trans-golgi network.

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    McDonold, Caitlin M; Fromme, J Christopher

    2014-09-29

    Traffic through the Golgi complex is controlled by small GTPases of the Arf and Rab families. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) proteins activate these GTPases to control Golgi function, yet the full assortment of signals regulating these GEFs is unknown. The Golgi Arf-GEF Sec7 and the homologous BIG1/2 proteins are effectors of the Arf1 and Arl1 GTPases. We demonstrate that Sec7 is also an effector of two Rab GTPases, Ypt1 (Rab1) and Ypt31/32 (Rab11), signifying unprecedented signaling crosstalk between GTPase pathways. The molecular basis for the role of Ypt31/32 and Rab11 in vesicle formation has remained elusive. We find that Arf1, Arl1, and Ypt1 primarily affect the membrane localization of Sec7, whereas Ypt31/32 exerts a dramatic stimulatory effect on the nucleotide exchange activity of Sec7. The convergence of multiple signaling pathways on a master regulator reveals a mechanism for balancing incoming and outgoing traffic at the Golgi.

  12. High yield production of myristoylated Arf6 small GTPase by recombinant N-myristoyl transferase

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    Padovani, Dominique; Zeghouf, Mahel; Traverso, José A.; Giglione, Carmela; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Small GTP-binding proteins of the Arf family (Arf GTPases) interact with multiple cellular partners and with membranes to regulate intracellular traffic and organelle structure. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms requires in vitro biochemical assays to test for regulations and functions. Such assays should use proteins in their cellular form, which carry a myristoyl lipid attached in N-terminus. N-myristoylation of recombinant Arf GTPases can be achieved by co-expression in E. coli with a eukaryotic N-myristoyl transferase. However, purifying myristoylated Arf GTPases is difficult and has a poor overall yield. Here we show that human Arf6 can be N-myristoylated in vitro by recombinant N-myristoyl transferases from different eukaryotic species. The catalytic efficiency depended strongly on the guanine nucleotide state and was highest for Arf6-GTP. Large-scale production of highly pure N-myristoylated Arf6 could be achieved, which was fully functional for liposome-binding and EFA6-stimulated nucleotide exchange assays. This establishes in vitro myristoylation as a novel and simple method that could be used to produce other myristoylated Arf and Arf-like GTPases for biochemical assays. PMID:23319116

  13. Structure of the catalytic domain of Plasmodium falciparum ARF GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, William J.; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish (UAB)

    2012-03-26

    The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the ADP ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP) from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined and refined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) data were collected utilizing the Zn{sup 2+} ion bound at the zinc-finger domain and were used to solve the structure. The overall structure of the domain is similar to those of mammalian ARFGAPs. However, several amino-acid residues in the area where GAP interacts with ARF1 differ in P. falciparum ARFGAP. Moreover, a number of residues that form the dimer interface in the crystal structure are unique in P. falciparum ARFGAP.

  14. Interactions between Rab and Arf GTPases regulate endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate during endocytic recycling.

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    Shi, Anbing; Grant, Barth D

    2013-01-01

    After endocytosis, a selective endocytic recycling process returns many endocytosed molecules back to the plasma membrane. The RAB-10/Rab10 GTPase is known to be a key recycling regulator for specific cargo molecules. New evidence, focused on C. elegans RAB-10 in polarized epithelia, points to a key role of RAB-10 in the regulation of endosomal phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) levels. In turn, PI(4,5)P2 levels strongly influence the recruitment of many peripheral membrane proteins, including those important for vesicle budding through their membrane bending activities. Part of the effect of RAB-10 on endosomal PI(4,5)P2 is through its newly identified effector CNT-1, a predicted GTPase activating protein (GAP) of the small GTPase ARF-6/Arf6. In mammals PI(4,5)P2 generating enzymes are known Arf6 effectors. In C. elegans we found that RAB-10, CNT-1 and ARF-6 are present on the same endosomes, that RAB-10 recruits CNT-1 to endosomes, and that loss of CNT-1 or RAB-10 leads to overaccumulation of endosomal PI(4,5)P2, presumably via hyperactivation of endosomal ARF-6. In turn this leads to over-recruitment of PI(4,5)P2-dependent membrane-bending proteins RME-1/Ehd and SDPN-1/Syndapin/PACSIN. Conversely, in arf-6 mutants, endosomal PI(4,5)P2 levels were reduced and endosomal recruitment of RME-1 and SDPN-1 failed. This work makes an unexpected link between distinct classes of small GTPases that control endocytic recycling, and provides insight into how this interaction affects endosome function at the level of lipid phosphorylation.

  15. Molecular basis of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and ARF1 GTPase recognition by the FAPP1 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain.

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    He, Ju; Scott, Jordan L; Heroux, Annie; Roy, Siddhartha; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Stahelin, Robert V; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2011-05-27

    Four-phosphate-adaptor protein 1 (FAPP1) regulates secretory transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane. FAPP1 is recruited to the Golgi through binding of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) and a small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). Despite the critical role of FAPP1 in membrane trafficking, the molecular basis of its dual function remains unclear. Here, we report a 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the FAPP1 PH domain and detail the molecular mechanisms of the PtdIns(4)P and ARF1 recognition. The FAPP1 PH domain folds into a seven-stranded β-barrel capped by an α-helix at one edge, whereas the opposite edge is flanked by three loops and the β4 and β7 strands that form a lipid-binding pocket within the β-barrel. The ARF1-binding site is located on the outer side of the β-barrel as determined by NMR resonance perturbation analysis, mutagenesis, and measurements of binding affinities. The two binding sites have little overlap, allowing FAPP1 PH to associate with both ligands simultaneously and independently. Binding to PtdIns(4)P is enhanced in an acidic environment and is required for membrane penetration and tubulation activity of FAPP1, whereas the GTP-bound conformation of the GTPase is necessary for the interaction with ARF1. Together, these findings provide structural and biochemical insight into the multivalent membrane anchoring by the PH domain that may augment affinity and selectivity of FAPP1 toward the TGN membranes enriched in both PtdIns(4)P and GTP-bound ARF1.

  16. The Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor ARNO mediates the activation of ARF and phospholipase D by insulin

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    Li, Hai-Sheng; Shome, Kuntala; Rojas, Raúl; Rizzo, Mark A; Vasudevan, Chandrasekaran; Fluharty, Eric; Santy, Lorraine C; Casanova, James E; Romero, Guillermo

    2003-01-01

    Background Phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in many signaling pathways. In most systems, the activity of PLD is primarily regulated by the members of the ADP-Ribosylation Factor (ARF) family of GTPases, but the mechanism of activation of PLD and ARF by extracellular signals has not been fully established. Here we tested the hypothesis that ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factors (ARF-GEFs) of the cytohesin/ARNO family mediate the activation of ARF and PLD by insulin. Results Wild type ARNO transiently transfected in HIRcB cells was translocated to the plasma membrane in an insulin-dependent manner and promoted the translocation of ARF to the membranes. ARNO mutants: ΔCC-ARNO and CC-ARNO were partially translocated to the membranes while ΔPH-ARNO and PH-ARNO could not be translocated to the membranes. Sec7 domain mutants of ARNO did not facilitate the ARF translocation. Overexpression of wild type ARNO significantly increased insulin-stimulated PLD activity, and mutations in the Sec7 and PH domains, or deletion of the PH or CC domains inhibited the effects of insulin. Conclusions Small ARF-GEFs of the cytohesin/ARNO family mediate the activation of ARF and PLD by the insulin receptor. PMID:12969509

  17. The Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor ARNO mediates the activation of ARF and phospholipase D by insulin

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    Fluharty Eric

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phospholipase D (PLD is involved in many signaling pathways. In most systems, the activity of PLD is primarily regulated by the members of the ADP-Ribosylation Factor (ARF family of GTPases, but the mechanism of activation of PLD and ARF by extracellular signals has not been fully established. Here we tested the hypothesis that ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factors (ARF-GEFs of the cytohesin/ARNO family mediate the activation of ARF and PLD by insulin. Results Wild type ARNO transiently transfected in HIRcB cells was translocated to the plasma membrane in an insulin-dependent manner and promoted the translocation of ARF to the membranes. ARNO mutants: ΔCC-ARNO and CC-ARNO were partially translocated to the membranes while ΔPH-ARNO and PH-ARNO could not be translocated to the membranes. Sec7 domain mutants of ARNO did not facilitate the ARF translocation. Overexpression of wild type ARNO significantly increased insulin-stimulated PLD activity, and mutations in the Sec7 and PH domains, or deletion of the PH or CC domains inhibited the effects of insulin. Conclusions Small ARF-GEFs of the cytohesin/ARNO family mediate the activation of ARF and PLD by the insulin receptor.

  18. Analysis of Arf1 GTPase-dependent membrane binding and remodeling using the exomer secretory vesicle cargo adaptor

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    Paczkowski, Jon E.; Fromme, J. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Summary Protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions play a critical role in shaping biological membranes through direct physical contact with the membrane surface. This is particularly evident in many steps of membrane trafficking, in which proteins deform the membrane and induce fission to form transport carriers. The small GTPase Arf1 and related proteins have the ability to remodel membranes by insertion of an amphipathic helix into the membrane. Arf1 and the exomer cargo adaptor coordinate cargo sorting into subset of secretory vesicle carriers in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we detail the assays we used to explore the cooperative action of Arf1 and exomer to bind and remodel membranes. We expect these methods are broadly applicable to other small GTPase/effector systems where investigation of membrane binding and remodeling is of interest. PMID:27632000

  19. Active ADP-ribosylation Factor-1 (ARF1) Is Required for Mitotic Golgi Fragmentation*S

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    Xiang, Yi; Seemann, Joachim; Bisel, Blaine; Punthambaker, Sukanya; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian cells the Golgi apparatus undergoes an extensive disassembly process at the onset of mitosis that is believed to facilitate equal partitioning of this organelle into the two daughter cells. However, the underlying mechanisms for this fragmentation process are so far unclear. Here we have investigated the role of the ADP-ribosylation factor-1 (ARF1) in this process to determine whether Golgi fragmentation in mitosis is mediated by vesicle budding. ARF1 is a small GTPase that is required for COPI vesicle formation from the Golgi membranes. Treatment of Golgi membranes with mitotic cytosol or with purified coatomer together with wild type ARF1 or its constitutive active form, but not the inactive mutant, converted the Golgi membranes into COPI vesicles. ARF1-depleted mitotic cytosol failed to fragment Golgi membranes. ARF1 is associated with Golgi vesicles generated in vitro and with vesicles in mitotic cells. In addition, microinjection of constitutive active ARF1 did not affect mitotic Golgi fragmentation or cell progression through mitosis. Our results show that ARF1 is active during mitosis and that this activity is required for mitotic Golgi fragmentation. PMID:17562717

  20. Active ADP-ribosylation factor-1 (ARF1) is required for mitotic Golgi fragmentation.

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    Xiang, Yi; Seemann, Joachim; Bisel, Blaine; Punthambaker, Sukanya; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2007-07-27

    In mammalian cells the Golgi apparatus undergoes an extensive disassembly process at the onset of mitosis that is believed to facilitate equal partitioning of this organelle into the two daughter cells. However, the underlying mechanisms for this fragmentation process are so far unclear. Here we have investigated the role of the ADP-ribosylation factor-1 (ARF1) in this process to determine whether Golgi fragmentation in mitosis is mediated by vesicle budding. ARF1 is a small GTPase that is required for COPI vesicle formation from the Golgi membranes. Treatment of Golgi membranes with mitotic cytosol or with purified coatomer together with wild type ARF1 or its constitutive active form, but not the inactive mutant, converted the Golgi membranes into COPI vesicles. ARF1-depleted mitotic cytosol failed to fragment Golgi membranes. ARF1 is associated with Golgi vesicles generated in vitro and with vesicles in mitotic cells. In addition, microinjection of constitutive active ARF1 did not affect mitotic Golgi fragmentation or cell progression through mitosis. Our results show that ARF1 is active during mitosis and that this activity is required for mitotic Golgi fragmentation.

  1. WAVE regulatory complex activation by cooperating GTPases Arf and Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koronakis, Vassilis; Hume, Peter J; Humphreys, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) is a critical element in the control of actin polymerization at the eukaryotic cell membrane, but how WRC is activated remains uncertain. While Rho GTPase Rac1 can bind and activate WRC in vitro, this interaction is of low affinity, suggesting other factors may b...

  2. A review of auxin response factors (ARF in plants

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    Si-bei eLi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Auxin is a key regulator of virtually every aspect of plant growth and development from embryogenesis to senescence. Previous studies have indicated that auxin regulates these processes by controlling gene expression via a family of functionally distinct DNA-binding auxin response factors (ARFs. ARFs are likely components that confer specificity to auxin response through selection of target genes as transcription factors. They bind to auxin response DNA elements (AuxRE in the promoters of auxin-regulated genes and either activate or repress transcription of these genes depending on a specific domain in the middle of the protein. Genetic studies have implicated various ARFs in distinct developmental processes through loss-of-function mutant analysis. Recent advances have provided information on the regulation of ARF gene expression, the role of ARFs in growth and developmental processes, protein–protein interactions of ARFs and target genes regulated by ARFs in plants. In particular, protein interaction and structural studies of ARF proteins have yielded novel insights into the molecular basis of auxin-regulated transcription. These results provide the foundation for predicting the contributions of ARF genes to the biology of other plants.

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of an ADP-ribosylation factor 6 gene (ptARF6) from Pisolithus tinctorius.

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    Wang, Liling; Li, Haibo; Zhou, Yifeng; Qin, Yuchuan; Wang, Yanbin; Liu, Bentong; Qian, Hua

    2016-05-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) is an evolutionarily conserved molecule that has an essential function in intracellular trafficking and organelle structure. To better understand its role during presymbiosis between plant roots and compatible filamentous fungi, the full-length cDNA sequence of ARF6 from Pisolithus tinctorius was cloned and a variety of bioinformatics analyses performed. The full-length sequence was 849 bp long and contained a 549 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 182 amino acids. A phylogenetic analysis showed that ptARF6 was the ortholog of the ADP ribosylation factor 6/GTPase SAR1 gene from the white-rot basidiomycete Trametes versicolor. A domain architecture analysis of the ARF6 protein revealed a repeat region, which is a common feature of ARF6 in other species. Recombinant ARF6 protein was expressed with an N-terminal 6×His tag and purified using Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography. The molecular mass of the recombinant protein was estimated by SDS-PAGE to be 25 kDa. The recombinant ARF6 protein bound strongly to 18:1 and 18:2 phosphatidic acids. Thus, ARF6 may participate in the signaling pathways involved in membrane phospholipid composition. The intracellular distribution of ptADP6 in HEK239T cells also indicates that ptADP6 may function not only in plasma membrane events but also in endosomal membranes events. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed that the differential expression of ptARF6 was associated with the presymbiotic stage. ptARF6 may be induced by presymbiosis during the regulation of mycorrhizal formation.

  4. The Drosophila Arf1 homologue Arf79F is essential for lamellipodium formation

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    Humphreys, Daniel; Liu, Tao; Davidson, Anthony C.; Hume, Peter J.; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2012-01-01

    Summary The WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) drives the polymerisation of actin filaments located beneath the plasma membrane to generate lamellipodia that are pivotal to cell architecture and movement. By reconstituting WRC-dependent actin assembly at the membrane, we recently discovered that several classes of Arf family GTPases directly recruit and activate WRC in cell extracts, and that Arf cooperates with Rac1 to trigger actin polymerisation. Here, we demonstrate that the Class 1 Arf1 homologue Arf79F colocalises with the WRC at dynamic lamellipodia. We report that Arf79F is required for lamellipodium formation in Drosophila S2R+ cells, which only express one Arf isoform for each class. Impeding Arf function either by dominant-negative Arf expression or by Arf double-stranded RNA interference (dsRNAi)-mediated knockdown uncovered that Arf-dependent lamellipodium formation was specific to Arf79F, establishing that Class 1 Arfs, but not Class 2 or Class 3 Arfs, are crucial for lamellipodia. Lamellipodium formation in Arf79F-silenced cells was restored by expressing mammalian Arf1, but not by constitutively active Rac1, showing that Arf79F does not act via Rac1. Abolition of lamellipodium formation in Arf79F-silenced cells was not due to Golgi disruption. Blocking Arf79F activation with guanine nucleotide exchange factor inhibitors impaired WRC localisation to the plasma membrane and concomitant generation of lamellipodia. Our data indicate that the Class I Arf GTPase is a central component in WRC-driven lamellipodium formation. PMID:22992458

  5. Structurally Distinct Bacterial TBC-like GAPs Link Arf GTPase to Rab1 Inactivation to Counteract Host Defenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Na; Zhu, Yongqun; Lu, Qiuhe; Hu, Liyan; Zheng, Yuqing; Shao, Feng (NIBS-China); (Zhejiang)

    2012-10-10

    Rab GTPases are frequent targets of vacuole-living bacterial pathogens for appropriate trafficking of the vacuole. Here we discover that bacterial effectors including VirA from nonvacuole Shigella flexneri and EspG from extracellular Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) harbor TBC-like dual-finger motifs and exhibits potent RabGAP activities. Specific inactivation of Rab1 by VirA/EspG disrupts ER-to-Golgi trafficking. S. flexneri intracellular persistence requires VirA TBC-like GAP activity that mediates bacterial escape from autophagy-mediated host defense. Rab1 inactivation by EspG severely blocks host secretory pathway, resulting in inhibited interleukin-8 secretion from infected cells. Crystal structures of VirA/EspG-Rab1-GDP-aluminum fluoride complexes highlight TBC-like catalytic role for the arginine and glutamine finger residues and reveal a 3D architecture distinct from that of the TBC domain. Structure of Arf6-EspG-Rab1 ternary complex illustrates a pathogenic signaling complex that rewires host Arf signaling to Rab1 inactivation. Structural distinctions of VirA/EspG further predict a possible extensive presence of TBC-like RabGAP effectors in counteracting various host defenses.

  6. Identification of a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Arf3, the yeast orthologue of mammalian Arf6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison K Gillingham

    Full Text Available Small G proteins of the Arf and Rab families are fundamental to the organisation and activity of intracellular membranes. One of the most well characterised of these G proteins is mammalian Arf6, a protein that participates in many cellular processes including endocytosis, actin remodelling and cell adhesion. Exchange of GDP for GTP on Arf6 is performed by a variety of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, principally of the cytohesin (PSCD and EFA6 (PSD families. In this paper we describe the characterisation of a GEF for the yeast orthologue of Arf6, Arf3, which we have named Yel1 (yeast EFA6-like-1 using yeast genetics, fluorescence microscopy and in vitro nucleotide exchange assays. Yel1 appears structurally related to the EFA6 family of GEFs, having an N-terminal Sec7 domain and C-terminal PH and coiled-coil domains. We find that Yel1 is constitutively targeted to regions of polarised growth in yeast, where it co-localises with Arf3. Moreover the Sec7 domain of Yel1 is required for its membrane targeting and for that of Arf3. Finally we show that the isolated Yel1 Sec7 domain strongly stimulates nucleotide exchange activity specifically on Arf3 in vitro.

  7. Genome-wide identification and expression profiling of auxin response factor (ARF gene family in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yirong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Auxin signaling is vital for plant growth and development, and plays important role in apical dominance, tropic response, lateral root formation, vascular differentiation, embryo patterning and shoot elongation. Auxin Response Factors (ARFs are the transcription factors that regulate the expression of auxin responsive genes. The ARF genes are represented by a large multigene family in plants. The first draft of full maize genome assembly has recently been released, however, to our knowledge, the ARF gene family from maize (ZmARF genes has not been characterized in detail. Results In this study, 31 maize (Zea mays L. genes that encode ARF proteins were identified in maize genome. It was shown that maize ARF genes fall into related sister pairs and chromosomal mapping revealed that duplication of ZmARFs was associated with the chromosomal block duplications. As expected, duplication of some ZmARFs showed a conserved intron/exon structure, whereas some others were more divergent, suggesting the possibility of functional diversification for these genes. Out of these 31 ZmARF genes, 14 possess auxin-responsive element in their promoter region, among which 7 appear to show small or negligible response to exogenous auxin. The 18 ZmARF genes were predicted to be the potential targets of small RNAs. Transgenic analysis revealed that increased miR167 level could cause degradation of transcripts of six potential targets (ZmARF3, 9, 16, 18, 22 and 30. The expressions of maize ARF genes are responsive to exogenous auxin treatment. Dynamic expression patterns of ZmARF genes were observed in different stages of embryo development. Conclusions Maize ARF gene family is expanded (31 genes as compared to Arabidopsis (23 genes and rice (25 genes. The expression of these genes in maize is regulated by auxin and small RNAs. Dynamic expression patterns of ZmARF genes in embryo at different stages were detected which suggest that maize ARF genes may

  8. Membrane association of the Arabidopsis ARF exchange factor GNOM involves interaction of conserved domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anders, Nadine; Nielsen, Michael M.; Keicher, Jutta;

    2008-01-01

    The GNOM protein plays a fundamental role in Arabidopsis thaliana development by regulating endosome-to-plasma membrane trafficking required for polar localization of the auxin efflux carrier PIN1. GNOM is a family member of large ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factors (ARF-GEFs), which regulate...

  9. Decisive factors affecting plasma resistance and roughness formation in ArF photoresist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinnai, Butsurin; Uesugi, Takuji; Koyama, Koji; Samukawa, Seiji [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kato, Keisuke; Yasuda, Atsushi; Maeda, Shinichi [Yokohama Research Laboratories, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd, 10-1 Daikoku-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama 230-0053 (Japan); Momose, Hikaru, E-mail: samukawa@ifs.tohoku.ac.j [Corporate Research Laboratories, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd, 2-1 Miyuki-cho, Otake, Hiroshima 739-0693 (Japan)

    2010-10-06

    Low plasma resistance and roughness formation in an ArF photoresist are serious issues in plasma processes. To resolve these issues, we investigated several factors that affect the roughness formation and plasma resistance in an ArF photoresist. We used our neutral beam process to categorize the effects of species from the plasma on the ArF photoresist into physical bombardment, chemical reactions and ultraviolet/vacuum ultraviolet (UV/VUV) radiation. The UV/VUV radiation drastically increased the etching rates of the ArF photoresist films, and, in contrast, chemical reactions increased the formation of surface roughness. FTIR analysis indicated that the UV/VUV radiation preferentially dissociates C-H bonds in the ArF photoresist, rather than C=O bonds, because of the dissociation energies of the bonds. This indicated that the etching rates of the ArF photoresist are determined by the UV/VUV radiation because this radiation can break C-H bonds, which account for the majority of structures in the ArF photoresist. In contrast, FTIR analysis showed that chemical species such as radicals and ions were likely to react with C=O bonds, in particular C=O bonds in the lactone groups of the ArF photoresist, due to the structural and electronic effects of the lactone groups. As a result, the etching rates of the ArF photoresist can vary in different bond structures, leading to increased surface roughness in the ArF photoresist.

  10. The Solanum lycopersicum auxin response factor SlARF2 participates in regulating lateral root formation and flower organ senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhenxin; Liu, Ruiyuan; Gu, Wenting; Dong, Xicun

    2017-03-01

    ARF2 as apleiotropic developmental regulator has been reported in Arabidopsis thaliana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The present study showed SlARF2 transcripts in all tomato plant tissues but with higher accumulation in flowers. During bud-anthesis stages, SlARF2 transcripts showed a dynamic expression pattern in sepal, stamen, ovary and petal. Hormone treatment analysis suggested that SlARF2 transcript accumulation was positively regulated by auxin and gibberellic acid, and negatively regulated by ethylene in tomato seedlings. Phenotypes and molecular analyses of SlARF2-upregulated transgenic tomato indicated that SlARF2 regulated tomato lateral root formation and flower organ senescence may be partially mediated by regulating the gene expression of auxin and ethylene response factors. The data enlarges the functional characterization of SlARF2 in tomato, and broadens our understanding of auxin signaling in regulating plant growth and development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Genome-wide identification, isolation and expression analysis of auxin response factor (ARF) gene family in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si-Bei; OuYang, Wei-Zhi; Hou, Xiao-Jin; Xie, Liang-Liang; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs) are an important family of proteins in auxin-mediated response, with key roles in various physiological and biochemical processes. To date, a genome-wide overview of the ARF gene family in citrus was not available. A systematic analysis of this gene family in citrus was begun by carrying out a genome-wide search for the homologs of ARFs. A total of 19 nonredundant ARF genes (CiARF) were found and validated from the sweet orange. A comprehensive overview of the CiARFs was undertaken, including the gene structures, phylogenetic analysis, chromosome locations, conserved motifs of proteins, and cis-elements in promoters of CiARF. Furthermore, expression profiling using real-time PCR revealed many CiARF genes, albeit with different patterns depending on types of tissues and/or developmental stages. Comprehensive expression analysis of these genes was also performed under two hormone treatments using real-time PCR. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and N-1-napthylphthalamic acid (NPA) treatment experiments revealed differential up-regulation and down-regulation, respectively, of the 19 citrus ARF genes in the callus of sweet orange. Our comprehensive analysis of ARF genes further elucidates the roles of CiARF family members during citrus growth and development process.

  12. Auxin Response Factor SlARF2 Is an Essential Component of the Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Fruit Ripening in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yanwei; Hu, Guojian; Breitel, Dario; Liu, Mingchun; Mila, Isabelle; Frasse, Pierre; Fu, Yongyao; Aharoni, Asaph; Bouzayen, Mondher; Zouine, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    Ethylene is the main regulator of climacteric fruit ripening, by contrast the putative role of other phytohormones in this process remains poorly understood. The present study brings auxin signaling components into the mechanism regulating tomato fruit ripening through the functional characterization of Auxin Response Factor2 (SlARF2) which encodes a downstream component of auxin signaling. Two paralogs, SlARF2A and SlARF2B, are found in the tomato genome, both displaying a marked ripening-associated expression but distinct responsiveness to ethylene and auxin. Down-regulation of either SlARF2A or SlARF2B resulted in ripening defects while simultaneous silencing of both genes led to severe ripening inhibition suggesting a functional redundancy among the two ARFs. Tomato fruits under-expressing SlARF2 produced less climacteric ethylene and exhibited a dramatic down-regulation of the key ripening regulators RIN, CNR, NOR and TAGL1. Ethylene treatment failed to reverse the non-ripening phenotype and the expression of ethylene signaling and biosynthesis genes was strongly altered in SlARF2 down-regulated fruits. Although both SlARF proteins are transcriptional repressors the data indicate they work as positive regulators of tomato fruit ripening. Altogether, the study defines SlARF2 as a new component of the regulatory network controlling the ripening process in tomato.

  13. Auxin Response Factor SlARF2 Is an Essential Component of the Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Fruit Ripening in Tomato.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Hao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene is the main regulator of climacteric fruit ripening, by contrast the putative role of other phytohormones in this process remains poorly understood. The present study brings auxin signaling components into the mechanism regulating tomato fruit ripening through the functional characterization of Auxin Response Factor2 (SlARF2 which encodes a downstream component of auxin signaling. Two paralogs, SlARF2A and SlARF2B, are found in the tomato genome, both displaying a marked ripening-associated expression but distinct responsiveness to ethylene and auxin. Down-regulation of either SlARF2A or SlARF2B resulted in ripening defects while simultaneous silencing of both genes led to severe ripening inhibition suggesting a functional redundancy among the two ARFs. Tomato fruits under-expressing SlARF2 produced less climacteric ethylene and exhibited a dramatic down-regulation of the key ripening regulators RIN, CNR, NOR and TAGL1. Ethylene treatment failed to reverse the non-ripening phenotype and the expression of ethylene signaling and biosynthesis genes was strongly altered in SlARF2 down-regulated fruits. Although both SlARF proteins are transcriptional repressors the data indicate they work as positive regulators of tomato fruit ripening. Altogether, the study defines SlARF2 as a new component of the regulatory network controlling the ripening process in tomato.

  14. Arf6 coordinates actin assembly through the WAVE complex, a mechanism usurped by Salmonella to invade host cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Daniel; Davidson, Anthony C.; Hume, Peter J.; Makin, Laura E.; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    ADP ribosylation factor (Arf) 6 anchors to the plasma membrane, where it coordinates membrane trafficking and cytoskeleton remodelling, but how it assembles actin filaments is unknown. By reconstituting membrane-associated actin assembly mediated by the WASP family veroprolin homolog (WAVE) regulatory complex (WRC), we recapitulated an Arf6-driven actin polymerization pathway. We show that Arf6 is divergent from other Arf members, as it was incapable of directly recruiting WRC. We demonstrate that Arf6 triggers actin assembly at the membrane indirectly by recruiting the Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) ARNO that activates Arf1 to enable WRC-dependent actin assembly. The pathogen Salmonella usurped Arf6 for host cell invasion by recruiting its canonical GEFs EFA6 and BRAG2. Arf6 and its GEFs facilitated membrane ruffling and pathogen invasion via ARNO, and triggered actin assembly by generating an Arf1–WRC signaling hub at the membrane in vitro and in cells. This study reconstitutes Arf6-dependent actin assembly to reveal a mechanism by which related Arf GTPases orchestrate distinct steps in the WRC cytoskeleton remodelling pathway. PMID:24085844

  15. A presynaptic role for the ADP ribosylation factor (ARF)-specific GDP/GTP exchange factor msec7-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashery, U; Koch, H; Scheuss, V; Brose, N; Rettig, J

    1999-02-01

    ADP ribosylation factors (ARFs) represent a family of small monomeric G proteins that switch from an inactive, GDP-bound state to an active, GTP-bound state. One member of this family, ARF6, translocates on activation from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane and has been implicated in regulated exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells. Because GDP release in vivo is rather slow, ARF activation is facilitated by specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors like cytohesin-1 or ARNO. Here we show that msec7-1, a rat homologue of cytohesin-1, translocates ARF6 to the plasma membrane in living cells. Overexpression of msec7-1 leads to an increase in basal synaptic transmission at the Xenopus neuromuscular junction. msec7-1-containing synapses have a 5-fold higher frequency of spontaneous synaptic currents than control synapses. On stimulation, the amplitudes of the resulting evoked postsynaptic currents of msec7-1-overexpressing neurons are increased as well. However, further stimulation leads to a decline in amplitudes approaching the values of control synapses. This transient effect on amplitude is strongly reduced on overexpression of msec7-1E157K, a mutant incapable of translocating ARFs. Our results provide evidence that small G proteins of the ARF family and activating factors like msec7-1 play an important role in synaptic transmission, most likely by making more vesicles available for fusion at the plasma membrane.

  16. Structural Basis for DNA Binding Specificity by the Auxin-Dependent ARF Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, D.R.; Freire Rios, A.; Berg, van den W.A.M.; Saaki, T.; Manfield, I.W.; Kepinski, S.; López-Vidrieo, I.; Franco-Zorilla, J.M.; Vries, de S.C.; Solano, R.; Weijers, D.; Coll, M.

    2014-01-01

    Auxin regulates numerous plant developmental processes by controlling gene expression via a family of functionally distinct DNA-binding auxin response factors (ARFs), yet the mechanistic basis for generating specificity in auxin response is unknown. Here, we address this question by solving

  17. IGF-1 drives chromogranin A secretion via activation of Arf1 in human neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzberg, Christin; Höhn, Katharina; Krndija, Denis; Maaß, Ulrike; Bartsch, Detlef K; Slater, Emily P; Oswald, Franz; Walther, Paul; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz

    2015-05-01

    Hypersecretion is the major symptom of functional neuroendocrine tumours. The mechanisms that contribute to this excessive secretion of hormones are still elusive. A key event in secretion is the exit of secretory products from the Golgi apparatus. ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are known to control vesicle budding and trafficking, and have a leading function in the regulation of formation of secretory granula at the Golgi. Here, we show that Arf1 is the predominant Arf protein family member expressed in the neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines BON and QGP-1. In BON cells Arf1 colocalizes with Golgi markers as well as chromogranin A, and shows significant basal activity. The inhibition of Arf1 activity or expression significantly impaired secretion of chromogranin A. Furthermore, we show that the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a major regulator of growth and secretion in BON cells, induces Arf1 activity. We found that activation of Arf1 upon IGF-1 receptor stimulation is mediated by MEK/ERK signalling pathway in BON and QGP-1 cells. Moreover, the activity of Arf1 in BON cells is mediated by autocrinely secreted IGF-1, and concomitantly, autocrine IGF1 secretion is maintained by Arf1 activity. In summary, our data indicate an important regulatory role for Arf1 at the Golgi in hypersecretion in neuroendocrine cancer cells.

  18. The Solanum lycopersicum auxin response factor 7 (SlARF7) regulates auxin signaling during tomato fruit set and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Maaike; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Feron, Richard; Mariani, Celestina; Vriezen, Wim H

    2009-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs) are encoded by a gene family of transcription factors that specifically control auxin-dependent developmental processes. A tomato ARF gene, homologous to Arabidopsis NPH4/ARF7 and therefore designated as Solanum lycopersicum ARF7 (SlARF7), was found to be expressed at a high level in unpollinated mature ovaries. More detailed analysis of tomato ovaries showed that the level of SlARF7 transcript increases during flower development, remains at a constant high level in mature flowers, and is down-regulated within 48 h after pollination. Transgenic plants with decreased SlARF7 mRNA levels formed seedless (parthenocarpic) fruits. These fruits were heart-shaped and had a rather thick pericarp due to increased cell expansion, compared with the pericarp of wild-type fruits. The expression analysis, together with the parthenocarpic fruit phenotype of the transgenic lines, suggests that, in tomato, SlARF7 acts as a negative regulator of fruit set until pollination and fertilization have taken place, and moderates the auxin response during fruit growth.

  19. Trs65p, a subunit of the Ypt1p GEF TRAPPII, interacts with the Arf1p exchange factor Gea2p to facilitate COPI-mediated vesicle traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuliang; Cai, Huaqing; Park, Sei-Kyoung; Menon, Shekar; Jackson, Catherine L; Ferro-Novick, Susan

    2011-10-01

    The TRAPP complexes are multimeric guanine exchange factors (GEFs) for the Rab GTPase Ypt1p. The three complexes (TRAPPI, TRAPPII, and TRAPPIII) share a core of common subunits required for GEF activity, as well as unique subunits (Trs130p, Trs120p, Trs85p, and Trs65p) that redirect the GEF from the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi pathway to different cellular locations where TRAPP mediates distinct membrane trafficking events. Roles for three of the four unique TRAPP subunits have been described before; however, the role of the TRAPPII-specific subunit Trs65p has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that Trs65p directly binds to the C-terminus of the Arf1p exchange factor Gea2p and provide in vivo evidence that this interaction is physiologically relevant. Gea2p and TRAPPII also bind to the yeast orthologue of the γ subunit of the COPI coat complex (Sec21p), a known Arf1p effector. These and previous findings reveal that TRAPPII is part of an Arf1p GEF-effector loop that appears to play a role in recruiting or stabilizing TRAPPII to membranes. In support of this proposal, we show that TRAPPII is more soluble in an arf1Δ mutant.

  20. Adenosine Diphosphate Ribosylation Factor-GTPaseActivating Protein Stimulates the Transport of AUX1Endosome, Which Relies on Actin Cytoskeletal Organization in Rice Root DevelopmentF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Du; Yunyuan XU; Yingdian Wang; Kang Chong

    2011-01-01

    Polar auxin transport,which depends on polarized subcellular distribution of AUXIN RESISTANT 1/LIKE AUX1 (AUX1/LAX) influx carriers and PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux carriers,mediates various processes of plant growth and development.Endosomal recycling of PIN1 is mediated by an adenosine diphosphate (ADP)ribosylation factor (ARF)-GTPase exchange factor protein,GNOM.However,the mediation of auxin influx carrier recycling is poorly understood.Here,we report that overexpression of OsAGAP,an ARF-GTPase-activating protein in rice,stimulates vesicle transport from the plasma membrane to the Golgi apparatus in protoplasts and transgenic plants and induces the accumulation of early endosomes and AUX1.AUX1 endosomes could partially colocalize with FM4-64 labeled early endosome after actin disruption.Furthermore,OsAGAP is involved in actin cytoskeletal organization,and its overexpression tends to reduce the thickness and bundling of actin filaments.Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis revealed exocytosis of the AUX1 recycling endosome was not affected in the OsAGAP overexpression cells,and was only slightly promoted when the actin filaments were completely disrupted by Lat B.Thus,we propose that AUX1 accumulation in the OsAGAP overexpression and actin disrupted cells may be due to the fact that endocytosis of the auxin influx carrier AUX1 early endosome was greatly promoted by actin cytoskeleton disruption.

  1. Structure of an ADP-ribosylation factor, ARF1, from Entamoeba histolytica bound to Mg(2+)-GDP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbzhinskiy, Dmitry A; Clifton, Matthew C; Sankaran, Banumathi; Staker, Bart L; Edwards, Thomas E; Myler, Peter J

    2015-05-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the etiological agent of amebiasis, a diarrheal disease which causes amoebic liver abscesses and amoebic colitis. Approximately 50 million people are infected worldwide with E. histolytica. With only 10% of infected people developing symptomatic amebiasis, there are still an estimated 100,000 deaths each year. Because of the emergence of resistant strains of the parasite, it is necessary to find a treatment which would be a proper response to this challenge. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) is a member of the ARF family of GTP-binding proteins. These proteins are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells; they generally associate with cell membranes and regulate vesicular traffic and intracellular signalling. The crystal structure of ARF1 from E. histolytica has been determined bound to magnesium and GDP at 1.8 Å resolution. Comparison with other structures of eukaryotic ARF proteins shows a highly conserved structure and supports the interswitch toggle mechanism of communicating the conformational state to partner proteins.

  2. [The structural characteristics, alternative splicing and genetic experession analysis of ADP-ribosylation-factor 1 (arf1) in cotton].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Mao-Zhi; Chen, Quan-Jia; Zhang, Rui; Guo, San-Dui

    2004-08-01

    The full-length cDNA,DNA and promoter of ADP-ribosylation-factor 1 (arf1) was isolated from Gossypium hirsutum Y18 by means of isocaudarner inverse PCR (II-PCR) and rapid isolating cDNA 5' unknown sequence and promoter (RICUP) established in our lab. Results indicated that the gene is 4 360 bp in size, including seven exons and six introns. Interestingly, alterative splicing occurs at intron I. Differential processing of intron 1 yields three different transcripts with 1 026 bp, 1103 bp and 1 544 bp in sizes, respectively. Arf1 encodes 181 amino acids. Sequence analysis indicated that sequence upstream transcription initiation site of arf1 includes typical initiator, TATA box, CCAAT box, GC box and several forward and reverse repeat sequences. And typical promoter structures, such as AT-rich sequence and palindrome structure have been detected in the sequence downstream transcription initiation site. Southern blot analysis indicated that the gene has two copies in the genome of cotton. Northern blot confirmed the predominate expression of arf1 in reproductive organs of cotton, including bud, flower, fiber and boll. Also, the feature and character of arf1 and its promoter have been studied. This study will lay foundation for the other research on function of arf1 in the development of reproductive organs in cotton.

  3. Assembling the archaeal ribosome: roles for translation-factor-related GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blombach, Fabian; Brouns, Stan J J; van der Oost, John

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits from their individual components (rRNA and ribosomal proteins) requires the assistance of a multitude of factors in order to control and increase the efficiency of the assembly process. GTPases of the TRAFAC (translation-factor-related) class constitute a major type of ribosome-assembly factor in Eukaryota and Bacteria. They are thought to aid the stepwise assembly of ribosomal subunits through a 'molecular switch' mechanism that involves conformational changes in response to GTP hydrolysis. Most conserved TRAFAC GTPases are involved in ribosome assembly or other translation-associated processes. They typically interact with ribosomal subunits, but in many cases, the exact role that these GTPases play remains unclear. Previous studies almost exclusively focused on the systems of Bacteria and Eukaryota. Archaea possess several conserved TRAFAC GTPases as well, with some GTPase families being present only in the archaeo-eukaryotic lineage. In the present paper, we review the occurrence of TRAFAC GTPases with translation-associated functions in Archaea.

  4. Small GTPases and cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yujie; Hu, Jinghua

    2011-01-01

    Small GTPases are key molecular switches that bind and hydrolyze GTP in diverse membrane- and cytoskeleton-related cellular processes. Recently, mounting evidences have highlighted the role of various small GTPases, including the members in Arf/Arl, Rab, and Ran subfamilies, in cilia formation and function. Once overlooked as an evolutionary vestige, the primary cilium has attracted more and more attention in last decade because of its role in sensing various extracellular signals and the association between cilia dysfunction and a wide spectrum of human diseases, now called ciliopathies. Here we review recent advances about the function of small GTPases in the context of cilia, and the correlation between the functional impairment of small GTPases and ciliopathies. Understanding of these cellular processes is of fundamental importance for broadening our view of cilia development and function in normal and pathological states and for providing valuable insights into the role of various small GTPases in disease processes, and their potential as therapeutic targets.

  5. Genome-wide identification, isolation and expression analysis of auxin response factor(ARF gene family in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    si-bei eli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Auxin response factors (ARFs are an important family of proteins in auxin-mediated response, with key roles in various physiological and biochemical processes. To date, a genome-wide overview of the ARF gene family in citrus was not available. A systematic analysis of this gene family in citrus was begun by carrying out a genome-wide search for the homologues of auxin response genes. A total of 19 non-redundant ARF genes (CiARF were identified and validated from the sweet orange genome. A comprehensive overview of the CiARF gene family was undertaken, including the gene structures, phylogeny, chromosome locations, conserved motifs, and cis-elements in promoter sequences. Furthermore, expression profiling using real-time PCR revealed many CiARF genes, albeit with different patterns depending on types of tissues and/or developmental stages. Comprehensive expression analysis of these genes was also performed under two hormone treatments using real-time PCR. Indole-3-acetic acid and N-1-napthylphthalamic acid treatment experiments revealed differential up-regulation and down-regulation, respectively, of the 19 citrus ARF genes in the callus of sweet orange. Our comprehensive analysis of ARF genes further elucidates the roles of CiARF family members in citrus growth and development.

  6. Regulation of a senescence checkpoint response by the E2F1 transcription factor and p14ARF tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimri, Goberdhan P.; Itahana, Koji; Acosta, Meileen; Campisi, Judith

    1999-11-05

    Normal cells do not divide indefinitely due to a process known as replicative senescence. Human cells arrest growth with a senescent phenotype when they acquire one or more critically short telomere as a consequence of cell division. Recent evidence suggests that certain types of DNA damage, chromatin remodeling, or oncogenic forms of Rasor Raf can also elicit a senescence response. We show here that E2F1, a multifunctional transcription factor that binds the retinoblastoma (pRb) tumor suppressor and can either promote or suppress tumorigenesis, induces a senescent phenotype when overexpressed in normal human fibroblasts. Normal human cells stably arrested proliferation and expressed several markers of replicative senescence in response to E2F1. This activity of E2F1 was independent of its pRb binding activity, but dependent on its ability to stimulate gene expression. The E2F1 target gene critical for the senescence response appeared to be the p14ARF tumor suppressor. Replicatively senescent human fibroblasts overexpressed p14ARF, and ectopic expression of p14ARF in presenescent cells induced a phenotype similar to that induced by E2F1. Consistent with a critical role for p14ARF, cells with compromised p53 function were immune to senescence induction by E2F1, as were cells deficient in p14ARF. Our findings support the idea that the senescence response is a critical tumor suppressive mechanism, provide an explanation for the apparently paradoxical roles of E2F1 in oncogenesis, and identify p14ARF as a potentially important mediator of the senescent phenotype.

  7. Structure of an ADP-ribosylation factor, ARF1, from Entamoeba histolytica bound to Mg2+–GDP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbzhinskiy, Dmitry A.; Clifton, Matthew C.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Staker, Bart L.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Myler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the etiological agent of amebiasis, a diarrheal disease which causes amoebic liver abscesses and amoebic colitis. Approximately 50 million people are infected worldwide with E. histolytica. With only 10% of infected people developing symptomatic amebiasis, there are still an estimated 100 000 deaths each year. Because of the emergence of resistant strains of the parasite, it is necessary to find a treatment which would be a proper response to this challenge. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) is a member of the ARF family of GTP-binding proteins. These proteins are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells; they generally associate with cell membranes and regulate vesicular traffic and intracellular signalling. The crystal structure of ARF1 from E. histolytica has been determined bound to magnesium and GDP at 1.8 Å resolution. Comparison with other structures of eukaryotic ARF proteins shows a highly conserved structure and supports the interswitch toggle mechanism of communicating the conformational state to partner proteins. PMID:25945714

  8. Role of host GTPases in infection by Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireton, Keith; Rigano, Luciano A; Dowd, Georgina C

    2014-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes induces internalization into mammalian cells and uses actin-based motility to spread within tissues. Listeria accomplishes this intracellular life cycle by exploiting or antagonizing several host GTPases. Internalization into human cells is mediated by the bacterial surface proteins InlA or InlB. These two modes of uptake each require a host actin polymerization pathway comprised of the GTPase Rac1, nucleation promotion factors, and the Arp2/3 complex. In addition to Rac1, InlB-mediated internalization involves inhibition of the GTPase Arf6 and participation of Dynamin and septin family GTPases. After uptake, Listeria is encased in host phagosomes. The bacterial protein GAPDH inactivates the human GTPase Rab5, thereby delaying phagosomal acquisition of antimicrobial properties. After bacterial-induced destruction of the phagosome, cytosolic Listeria uses the surface protein ActA to stimulate actin-based motility. The GTPase Dynamin 2 reduces the density of microtubules that would otherwise limit bacterial movement. Cell-to-cell spread results when motile Listeria remodel the host plasma membrane into protrusions that are engulfed by neighbouring cells. The human GTPase Cdc42, its activator Tuba, and its effector N-WASP form a complex with the potential to restrict Listeria protrusions. Bacteria overcome this restriction through two microbial factors that inhibit Cdc42-GTP or Tuba/N-WASP interaction.

  9. Assembling the archaeal ribosome: roles for translation-factor-related GTPases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blombach, F.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    The assembly of ribosomal subunits from their individual components (rRNA and ribosomal proteins) requires the assistance of a multitude of factors in order to control and increase the efficiency of the assembly process. GTPases of the TRAFAC (translation-factor-related) class constitute a major typ

  10. RhoC GTPase Overexpression Modulates Induction of Angiogenic Factors in Breast Cells

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    Kenneth L. van Golen

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC is a distinct and aggressive form of locally advanced breast cancer. IBC is highly angiogenic, invasive, and metastatic at its inception. Previously, we identified specific genetic alterations of IBC that contribute to this highly invasive phenotype. RhoC GTPase was overexpressed in 90% of archival IBC tumor samples, but not in stage-matched, non-IBC tumors. To study the role of RhoC GTPase in contributing to an IBC-like phenotype, we generated stable transfectants of human mammary epithelial cells overexpressing the RhoC gene, and studied the effect of RhoC GTPase overexpression on the modulation of angiogenesis in IBC. Levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and interleukin-8 (IL-8 were significantly higher in the conditioned media of the HME-RhoC transfectants than in the untransfected HME and HME-β-galactosidase control media, similar to the SUM149 IBC cell line. Inhibition of RhoC function by introduction of C3 exotransferase decreased production of angiogenic factors by the HME-RhoC transfectants and the SUM149 IBC cell line, but did not affect the control cells. These data support the conclusion that overexpression of RhoC GTPase is specifically and directly implicated in the control of the production of angiogenic factors by IBC cells.

  11. ARF6-Regulated Endocytosis of Growth Factor Receptors Links Cadherin-Based Adhesion to Canonical Wnt Signaling in Epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    Pellon-Cardenas, Oscar; Clancy, James; Uwimpuhwe, Henriette; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2013-01-01

    Wnt signaling has an essential role in embryonic development as well as stem/progenitor cell renewal, and its aberrant activation is implicated in many diseases, including several cancers. β-Catenin is a critical component of Wnt-mediated transcriptional activation. Here we show that ARF6 activation during canonical Wnt signaling promotes the intracellular accumulation of β-catenin via a mechanism that involves the endocytosis of growth factor receptors and robust activation of extracellular ...

  12. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum ADP-ribosylation factor 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, William J.; Smith, Craig D.; Senkovich, Olga; Holder, Anthony A.; Chattopadhyay, Debasish (UAB); (NIMR)

    2011-09-26

    Vesicular trafficking may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and survival of the malaria parasite. ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are among the major components of vesicular trafficking pathways in eukaryotes. The crystal structure of ARF1 GTPase from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined in the GDP-bound conformation at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution and is compared with the structures of mammalian ARF1s.

  13. Golgi enlargement in Arf-depleted yeast cells is due to altered dynamics of cisternal maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Madhura; Papanikou, Effrosyni; Iyer, Prasanna; Pandya, Koushal; Jain, Bhawik Kumar; Ganguly, Abira; Sharma, Chandrakala; Pawar, Ketakee; Austin, Jotham; Day, Kasey J.; Rossanese, Olivia W.; Glick, Benjamin S.; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Regulation of the size and abundance of membrane compartments is a fundamental cellular activity. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, disruption of the ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) gene yields larger and fewer Golgi cisternae by partially depleting the Arf GTPase. We observed a similar phenotype with a thermosensitive mutation in Nmt1, which myristoylates and activates Arf. Therefore, partial depletion of Arf is a convenient tool for dissecting mechanisms that regulate Golgi structure. We found that in arf1Δ cells, late Golgi structure is particularly abnormal, with the number of late Golgi cisternae being severely reduced. This effect can be explained by selective changes in cisternal maturation kinetics. The arf1Δ mutation causes early Golgi cisternae to mature more slowly and less frequently, but does not alter the maturation of late Golgi cisternae. These changes quantitatively explain why late Golgi cisternae are fewer in number and correspondingly larger. With a stacked Golgi, similar changes in maturation kinetics could be used by the cell to modulate the number of cisternae per stack. Thus, the rates of processes that transform a maturing compartment can determine compartmental size and copy number. PMID:24190882

  14. GTPases in intracellular trafficking: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Nava

    2011-02-01

    Small GTPases that belong to the ras sub-families of Rab, Arf, and Rho, and the large GTPase dynamin, regulate intracellular trafficking. This issue of Seminars of Cell and Developmental Biology highlights topics regarding mechanisms by which these GTPases regulate the different steps of vesicular transport: vesicle formation, scission, targeting and fusion. In addition, the emerging roles of GTPases in coordination of individual transport steps as well as coordination of intracellular trafficking with other cellular processes are reviewed. Finally, common structures and mechanisms underlying the function of the ras-like GTPases and the importance of their function to human health and disease are discussed.

  15. The domain architecture of large guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the small GTP-binding protein Arf

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    Geldner Niko

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small G proteins, which are essential regulators of multiple cellular functions, are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs that stimulate the exchange of the tightly bound GDP nucleotide by GTP. The catalytic domain responsible for nucleotide exchange is in general associated with non-catalytic domains that define the spatio-temporal conditions of activation. In the case of small G proteins of the Arf subfamily, which are major regulators of membrane trafficking, GEFs form a heterogeneous family whose only common characteristic is the well-characterized Sec7 catalytic domain. In contrast, the function of non-catalytic domains and how they regulate/cooperate with the catalytic domain is essentially unknown. Results Based on Sec7-containing sequences from fully-annotated eukaryotic genomes, including our annotation of these sequences from Paramecium, we have investigated the domain architecture of large ArfGEFs of the BIG and GBF subfamilies, which are involved in Golgi traffic. Multiple sequence alignments combined with the analysis of predicted secondary structures, non-structured regions and splicing patterns, identifies five novel non-catalytic structural domains which are common to both subfamilies, revealing that they share a conserved modular organization. We also report a novel ArfGEF subfamily with a domain organization so far unique to alveolates, which we name TBS (TBC-Sec7. Conclusion Our analysis unifies the BIG and GBF subfamilies into a higher order subfamily, which, together with their being the only subfamilies common to all eukaryotes, suggests that they descend from a common ancestor from which species-specific ArfGEFs have subsequently evolved. Our identification of a conserved modular architecture provides a background for future functional investigation of non-catalytic domains.

  16. BEX1/ARF1A1C is Required for BFA-Sensitive Recycling of PIN Auxin Transporters and Auxin-Mediated Development in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hirokazu; Nodzyński, Tomasz; Kitakura, Saeko; Feraru, Mugurel I.; Sasabe, Michiko; Ishikawa, Tomomi; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Friml, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Correct positioning of membrane proteins is an essential process in eukaryotic organisms. The plant hormone auxin is distributed through intercellular transport and triggers various cellular responses. Auxin transporters of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) family localize asymmetrically at the plasma membrane (PM) and mediate the directional transport of auxin between cells. A fungal toxin, brefeldin A (BFA), inhibits a subset of guanine nucleotide exchange factors for ADP-ribosylation factor small GTPases (ARF GEFs) including GNOM, which plays a major role in localization of PIN1 predominantly to the basal side of the PM. The Arabidopsis genome encodes 19 ARF-related putative GTPases. However, ARF components involved in PIN1 localization have been genetically poorly defined. Using a fluorescence imaging-based forward genetic approach, we identified an Arabidopsis mutant, bfa-visualized exocytic trafficking defective1 (bex1), in which PM localization of PIN1–green fluorescent protein (GFP) as well as development is hypersensitive to BFA. We found that in bex1 a member of the ARF1 gene family, ARF1A1C, was mutated. ARF1A1C localizes to the trans-Golgi network/early endosome and Golgi apparatus, acts synergistically to BEN1/MIN7 ARF GEF and is important for PIN recycling to the PM. Consistent with the developmental importance of PIN proteins, functional interference with ARF1 resulted in an impaired auxin response gradient and various developmental defects including embryonic patterning defects and growth arrest. Our results show that ARF1A1C is essential for recycling of PIN auxin transporters and for various auxin-dependent developmental processes. PMID:24369434

  17. The Endosome Localized Arf-GAP AGAP1 Modulates Dendritic Spine Morphology Downstream of the Neurodevelopmental Disorder Factor Dysbindin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Miranda; Cross, Rebecca; Singleton, Kaela S.; Zlatic, Stephanie; Chapleau, Christopher; Mullin, Ariana P.; Rolle, Isaiah; Moore, Carlene C.; Theibert, Anne; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Faundez, Victor; Larimore, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    AGAP1 is an Arf1 GTPase activating protein that interacts with the vesicle-associated protein complexes adaptor protein 3 (AP-3) and Biogenesis of Lysosome Related Organelles Complex-1 (BLOC-1). Overexpression of AGAP1 in non-neuronal cells results in an accumulation of endosomal cargoes, which suggests a role in endosome-dependent traffic. In addition, AGAP1 is a candidate susceptibility gene for two neurodevelopmental disorders, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia (SZ); yet its localization and function in neurons have not been described. Here, we describe that AGAP1 localizes to axons, dendrites, dendritic spines and synapses, colocalizing preferentially with markers of early and recycling endosomes. Functional studies reveal overexpression and down-regulation of AGAP1 affects both neuronal endosomal trafficking and dendritic spine morphology, supporting a role for AGAP1 in the recycling endosomal trafficking involved in their morphogenesis. Finally, we determined the sensitivity of AGAP1 expression to mutations in the DTNBP1 gene, which is associated with neurodevelopmental disorder, and found that AGAP1 mRNA and protein levels are selectively reduced in the null allele of the mouse ortholog of DTNBP1. We postulate that endosomal trafficking contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders affecting dendritic spine morphology, and thus excitatory synapse structure and function. PMID:27713690

  18. The Endosome Localized Arf-GAP AGAP1 Modulates Dendritic Spine Morphology Downstream of the Neurodevelopmental Disorder Factor Dysbindin

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    Miranda Arnold

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available AGAP1 is an Arf1 GTPase activating protein that interacts with the vesicle-associated protein complexes adaptor protein 3 (AP-3 and Biogenesis of Lysosome Related Organelles Complex-1 (BLOC-1. Overexpression of AGAP1 in non-neuronal cells results in an accumulation of endosomal cargoes, which suggests a role in endosome-dependent traffic. In addition, AGAP1 is a candidate susceptibility gene for two neurodevelopmental disorders, autism spectrum disorder (ASD and schizophrenia (SZ; yet its localization and function in neurons have not been described. Here, we describe that AGAP1 localizes to axons, dendrites, dendritic spines, and synapses, colocalizing preferentially with markers of early and recycling endosomes. Functional studies reveal overexpression and down-regulation of AGAP1 affects both neuronal endosomal trafficking and dendritic spine morphology, supporting a role for AGAP1 in the recycling endosomal trafficking involved in their morphogenesis. Finally, we determined the sensitivity of AGAP1 expression to mutations in the DTNBP1 gene, which is associated with neurodevelopmental disorder, and found that AGAP1 mRNA and protein levels are selectively reduced in the null allele of the mouse orthologue of DTNBP1. We postulate that endosomal trafficking contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders affecting dendritic spine morphology, and thus excitatory synapse structure and function.

  19. MicroRNA167-Directed Regulation of the Auxin Response Factors GmARF8a and GmARF8b Is Required for Soybean Nodulation and Lateral Root Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youning; Li, Kexue; Chen, Liang; Zou, Yanmin; Liu, Haipei; Tian, Yinping; Li, Dongxiao; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Fang; Ferguson, Brett J; Gresshoff, Peter M; Li, Xia

    2015-07-01

    Legume root nodules convert atmospheric nitrogen gas into ammonium through symbiosis with a prokaryotic microsymbiont broadly called rhizobia. Auxin signaling is required for determinant nodule development; however, the molecular mechanism of auxin-mediated nodule formation remains largely unknown. Here, we show in soybean (Glycine max) that the microRNA miR167 acts as a positive regulator of lateral root organs, namely nodules and lateral roots. miR167c expression was up-regulated in the vasculature, pericycle, and cortex of soybean roots following inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain USDA110 (the microsymbiont). It was found to positively regulate nodule numbers directly by repressing the target genes GmARF8a and GmARF8b (homologous genes of Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana] AtARF8 that encode auxin response factors). Moreover, the expression of miR167 and its targets was up- and down-regulated by auxin, respectively. The miR167-GmARF8 module also positively regulated nodulation efficiency under low microsymbiont density, a condition often associated with environmental stress. The regulatory role of miR167 on nodule initiation was dependent on the Nod factor receptor GmNFR1α, and it acts upstream of the nodulation-associated genes nodule inception, nodulation signaling pathway1, early nodulin40-1, NF-YA1 (previously known as HAEM activator protein2-1), and NF-YA2. miR167 also promoted lateral root numbers. Collectively, our findings establish a key role for the miR167-GmARF8 module in auxin-mediated nodule and lateral root formation in soybean. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. MicroRNA167-Directed Regulation of the Auxin Response Factors GmARF8a and GmARF8b Is Required for Soybean Nodulation and Lateral Root Development1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youning; Li, Kexue; Chen, Liang; Zou, Yanmin; Tian, Yinping; Li, Dongxiao; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Fang; Ferguson, Brett J.; Gresshoff, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Legume root nodules convert atmospheric nitrogen gas into ammonium through symbiosis with a prokaryotic microsymbiont broadly called rhizobia. Auxin signaling is required for determinant nodule development; however, the molecular mechanism of auxin-mediated nodule formation remains largely unknown. Here, we show in soybean (Glycine max) that the microRNA miR167 acts as a positive regulator of lateral root organs, namely nodules and lateral roots. miR167c expression was up-regulated in the vasculature, pericycle, and cortex of soybean roots following inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain USDA110 (the microsymbiont). It was found to positively regulate nodule numbers directly by repressing the target genes GmARF8a and GmARF8b (homologous genes of Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana] AtARF8 that encode auxin response factors). Moreover, the expression of miR167 and its targets was up- and down-regulated by auxin, respectively. The miR167-GmARF8 module also positively regulated nodulation efficiency under low microsymbiont density, a condition often associated with environmental stress. The regulatory role of miR167 on nodule initiation was dependent on the Nod factor receptor GmNFR1α, and it acts upstream of the nodulation-associated genes NODULE INCEPTION, NODULATION SIGNALING PATHWAY1, EARLY NODULIN40-1, NF-YA1 (previously known as HAEM ACTIVATOR PROTEIN2-1), and NF-YA2. miR167 also promoted lateral root numbers. Collectively, our findings establish a key role for the miR167-GmARF8 module in auxin-mediated nodule and lateral root formation in soybean. PMID:25941314

  1. Structural Insights into Arl1-Mediated Targeting of the Arf-GEF BIG1 to the trans-Golgi

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    Antonio Galindo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The GTPase Arf1 is the major regulator of vesicle traffic at both the cis- and trans-Golgi. Arf1 is activated at the cis-Golgi by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF GBF1 and at the trans-Golgi by the related GEF BIG1 or its paralog, BIG2. The trans-Golgi-specific targeting of BIG1 and BIG2 depends on the Arf-like GTPase Arl1. We find that Arl1 binds to the dimerization and cyclophilin binding (DCB domain in BIG1 and report a crystal structure of human Arl1 bound to this domain. Residues in the DCB domain that bind Arl1 are required for BIG1 to locate to the Golgi in vivo. DCB domain-binding residues in Arl1 have a distinct conformation from those in known Arl1-effector complexes, and this plasticity allows Arl1 to interact with different effectors of unrelated structure. The findings provide structural insight into how Arf1 GEFs, and hence active Arf1, achieve their correct subcellular distribution.

  2. IAA8 involved in lateral root formation interacts with the TIR1 auxin receptor and ARF transcription factors in Arabidopsis.

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    Fumi Arase

    Full Text Available The expression of auxin-responsive genes is regulated by the TIR1/AFB auxin receptor-dependent degradation of Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors, which interact with auxin-responsive factors (ARFs. Most of the 29 Aux/IAA genes present in Arabidopsis have not been functionally characterized to date. IAA8 appears to have a distinct function from the other Aux/IAA genes, due to its unique transcriptional response to auxin and the stability of its encoded protein. In this study, we characterized the function of Arabidopsis IAA8 in various developmental processes governed by auxin and in the transcriptional regulation of the auxin response. Transgenic plants expressing estrogen-inducible IAA8 (XVE::IAA8 exhibited significantly fewer lateral roots than the wild type, and an IAA8 loss-of-function mutant exhibited significantly more. Ectopic overexpression of IAA8 resulted in abnormal gravitropism. The strong induction of early auxin-responsive marker genes by auxin treatment was delayed by IAA8 overexpression. GFP-fusion analysis revealed that IAA8 localized not only to the nucleus, but, in contrast to other Aux/IAAs, also to the cytosol. Furthermore, we demonstrated that IAA8 interacts with TIR1, in an auxin-dependent fashion, and with ARF proteins, both in yeast and in planta. Taken together, our results show that IAA8 is involved in lateral root formation, and that this process is regulated through the interaction with the TIR1 auxin receptor and ARF transcription factors in the nucleus.

  3. The Qb-SNARE Memb11 interacts specifically with Arf1 in the Golgi apparatus of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Claireline; Wattelet-Boyer, Valérie; Bouyssou, Guillaume; Hocquellet, Agnès; Dupuy, Jean-William; Batailler, Brigitte; Brocard, Lysiane; Boutté, Yohann; Maneta-Peyret, Lilly; Moreau, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    The SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins are critical for the function of the secretory pathway. The SNARE Memb11 is involved in membrane trafficking at the ER-Golgi interface. The aim of the work was to decipher molecular mechanisms acting in Memb11-mediated ER-Golgi traffic. In mammalian cells, the orthologue of Memb11 (membrin) is potentially involved in the recruitment of the GTPase Arf1 at the Golgi membrane. However molecular mechanisms associated to Memb11 remain unknown in plants. Memb11 was detected mainly at the cis-Golgi and co-immunoprecipitated with Arf1, suggesting that Arf1 may interact with Memb11. This interaction of Memb11 with Arf1 at the Golgi was confirmed by in vivo BiFC (Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation) experiments. This interaction was found to be specific to Memb11 as compared to either Memb12 or Sec22. Using a structural bioinformatic approach, several sequences in the N-ter part of Memb11 were hypothesized to be critical for this interaction and were tested by BiFC on corresponding mutants. Finally, by using both in vitro and in vivo approaches, we determined that only the GDP-bound form of Arf1 interacts with Memb11. Together, our results indicate that Memb11 interacts with the GDP-bound form of Arf1 in the Golgi apparatus.

  4. The Solanum lycopersicum AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (SlARF7) mediates cross-talk between auxin and gibberellin signalling during tomato fruit set and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Maaike; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; García-Martínez, José L.; Mariani, Celestina; Vriezen, Wim H.

    2011-01-01

    Transgenic tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.) with reduced mRNA levels of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (SlARF7) form parthenocarpic fruits with morphological characteristics that seem to be the result of both increased auxin and gibberellin (GA) responses during fruit growth. This paper presents a more detailed analysis of these transgenic lines. Gene expression analysis of auxin-responsive genes show that SlARF7 may regulate only part of the auxin signalling pathway involved in tomato fruit set and development. Also, part of the GA signalling pathway was affected by the reduced levels of SlARF7 mRNA, as morphological and molecular analyses display similarities between GA-induced fruits and fruits formed by the RNAi SlARF7 lines. Nevertheless, the levels of GAs were strongly reduced compared with that in seeded fruits. These findings indicate that SlARF7 acts as a modifier of both auxin and gibberellin responses during tomato fruit set and development. PMID:20937732

  5. ARF6 promotes the formation of Rac1 and WAVE-dependent ventral F-actin rosettes in breast cancer cells in response to epidermal growth factor.

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    Valentina Marchesin

    Full Text Available Coordination between actin cytoskeleton assembly and localized polarization of intracellular trafficking routes is crucial for cancer cell migration. ARF6 has been implicated in the endocytic recycling of surface receptors and membrane components and in actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Here we show that overexpression of an ARF6 fast-cycling mutant in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer-derived cells to mimick ARF6 hyperactivation observed in invasive breast tumors induced a striking rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton at the ventral cell surface. This phenotype consisted in the formation of dynamic actin-based podosome rosette-like structures expanding outward as wave positive for F-actin and actin cytoskeleton regulatory components including cortactin, Arp2/3 and SCAR/WAVE complexes and upstream Rac1 regulator. Ventral rosette-like structures were similarly induced in MDA-MB-231 cells in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF stimulation and to Rac1 hyperactivation. In addition, interference with ARF6 expression attenuated activation and plasma membrane targeting of Rac1 in response to EGF treatment. Our data suggest a role for ARF6 in linking EGF-receptor signaling to Rac1 recruitment and activation at the plasma membrane to promote breast cancer cell directed migration.

  6. The ArfGEF GBF-1 Is Required for ER Structure, Secretion and Endocytic Transport in C. elegans.

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    Karin B Ackema

    Full Text Available Small GTPases of the Sar/Arf family are essential to generate transport containers that mediate communication between organelles of the secretory pathway. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEFs activate the small GTPases and help their anchorage in the membrane. Thus, GEFs in a way temporally and spatially control Sar1/Arf1 GTPase activation. We investigated the role of the ArfGEF GBF-1 in C. elegans oocytes and intestinal epithelial cells. GBF-1 localizes to the cis-Golgi and is part of the t-ER-Golgi elements. GBF-1 is required for secretion and Golgi integrity. In addition, gbf-1(RNAi causes the ER reticular structure to become dispersed, without destroying ER exit sites (ERES because the ERES protein SEC-16 was still localized in distinct punctae at t-ER-Golgi units. Moreover, GBF-1 plays a role in receptor-mediated endocytosis in oocytes, without affecting recycling pathways. We find that both the yolk receptor RME-2 and the recycling endosome-associated RAB-11 localize similarly in control and gbf-1(RNAi oocytes. While RAB5-positive early endosomes appear to be less prominent and the RAB-5 levels are reduced by gbf-1(RNAi in the intestine, RAB-7-positive late endosomes were more abundant and formed aggregates and tubular structures. Our data suggest a role for GBF-1 in ER structure and endosomal traffic.

  7. GEP100/Arf6 is required for epidermal growth factor-induced ERK/Rac1 signaling and cell migration in human hepatoma HepG2 cells.

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    ZhenZhen Hu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidermal growth factor (EGF signaling is implicated in the invasion and metastasis of hepatoma cells. However, the signaling pathways for EGF-induced motility of hepatoma cells remain undefined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that EGF dose-dependently stimulated the migration of human hepatoma cells HepG2, with the maximal effect at 10 ng/mL. Additionally, EGF increased Arf6 activity, and ectopic expression of Arf6 T27N, a dominant negative Arf6 mutant, largely abolish EGF-induced cell migration. Blocking GEP100 with GEP100 siRNA or GEP100-△PH, a pleckstrin homology (PH domain deletion mutant of GEP100, blocked EGF-induced Arf6 activity and cell migration. EGF also increased ERK and Rac1 activity. Ectopic expression GEP100 siRNA, GEP100-△PH, or Arf6-T27N suppressed EGF-induced ERK and Rac1 activity. Furthermore, blocking ERK signaling with its inhibitor U0126 remarkably inhibited both EGF-induced Rac1 activation as well as cell migration, and ectopic expression of inactive mutant form of Rac1 (Rac1-T17N also largely abolished EGF-induced cell migration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, this study highlights the function of the PH domain of GEP100 and its regulated Arf6/ERK/Rac1 signaling cascade in EGF-induced hepatoma cell migration. These findings could provide a rationale for designing new therapy based on inhibition of hepatoma metastasis.

  8. PIKE GTPase Signaling and Function

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    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available PIKE (PI 3-Kinase Enhancer is a recently identified brain specific nuclear GTPase, which binds PI 3-kinase and stimulates its lipid kinase activity. Nerve growth factor treatment leads to PIKE activation by triggering the nuclear translocation of phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1, which acts as a physiologic guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF for PIKE through its SH3 domain. To date, three forms of PIKE have been characterized: PIKE-S, PIKE-L and PIKE-A. PIKE-S is initially identified shorter isoform. PIKE-L, a longer isoform of PIKE gene, differs from PIKE-S by C-terminal extension containing Arf-GAP (ADP ribosylation factor-GTPase Activating Protein and two ankyrin repeats domains. In contrast to the exclusive nuclear localization of PIKE-S, PIKE-L occurs in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. PIKE-L physiologically associates with Homer 1, an mGluR I binding adaptor protein. The Homer/PIKE-L complex couples PI 3-kinase to mGluR I and regulates a major action of group I mGluRs, prevention of neuronal apoptosis. More recently, a third PIKE isoform, PIKE-A was identified in human glioblastoma multiforme brain cancers. Unlike the brain specific PIKE-L and -S isoforms, PIKE-A distributes in various tissues. PIKE-A contains the same domains present in PIKE-L but lacks N-terminal proline-rich domain (PRD, which binds PI 3-kinase and PLC-γ1. Instead, PIKE-A specifically binds to active Akt and upregulates its activity in a GTP-dependent manner, mediating human cancer cell invasion and preventing apoptosis. Thus, PIKE extends its roles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, mediating cellular processes from cell invasion to programmed cell death.

  9. Tumor suppressor ARF

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    Través, Paqui G.; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    ARF (alternative reading frame) is one of the most important tumor regulator playing critical roles in controlling tumor initiation and progression. Recently, we have demonstrated a novel and unexpected role for ARF as modulator of inflammatory responses. PMID:23162766

  10. Rab, Arf, and Arl-Regulated Membrane Traffic in Cortical Neuron Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-07-01

    The migration of projection neurons from its birthplace in the subventricular zone to their final destination in the cortical plate is a complex process that requires a series of highly coordinated cellular events. Amongst the key factors involved in the processes are modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, as well as cellular membrane traffic. Members of the small GTPases family responsible for the latter process, the Rabs and Arfs, have been recently implicated in cortical neuron migration. Rab5 and Rab11, which are key modulators of endocytosis and endocytic recycling respectively, ensure proper surface expression and distribution of N-cadherin, a key adhesion protein that tethers migrating neurons to the radial glia fiber tracts during pia-directed migration. Rab7, which is associated with lysosomal biogenesis and function, is important for the final step of terminal translocation when N-cadherin is downregulated by lysosomal degradation. Arf6 activity, which is known to be important in neuronal processes outgrowth, may negatively impact the multipolar-bipolar transition of cortical neurons undergoing radial migration, but the downstream effector of Arf6 in this regard is not yet known. In addition to the above, members of the Arl family which have been recently shown to be important in radial glia scaffold formation, would also be important for cortical neuron migration. In this short review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the importance of membrane traffic regulated by the Rab, Arf, and Arl family members in cortical neuron migration.

  11. GTPases in semaphorin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püschel, Andreas W

    2007-01-01

    A hallmark of semaphorin receptors is their interaction with multiple GTPases. Plexins, the signal transducing component of semaphorin receptors, directly associate with several GTPases. In addition, they not only recruit guaninine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) but also are the only known integral membrane proteins that show a catalytic activity as GAPs for small GTPases. GTPases function upstream of semaphorin receptors and regulate the activity of plexins through an interaction with the cytoplasmic domain. The association of Plexin-Al (Sema3A receptor) or Plexin-B1 (Sema4D receptor) with the GTPase Rnd1 and ligand-dependent receptor clustering are required for their activity as R-Ras GAPs. The GTPases R-Ras and Rho function downstream of plexins and are required for the repulsive effects of semaphorins. In this review, I will focus on the role of GTPases in signaling by two plexins that have been analyzed in most detail, Plexin-A1 and Plexin-B1.

  12. Dissection of Arabidopsis ADP-RIBOSYLATION FACTOR 1 Function in Epidermal Cell PolarityW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Scheres, Ben

    2005-01-01

    Vesicle trafficking is essential for the generation of asymmetries, which are central to multicellular development. Core components of the vesicle transport machinery, such as ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) GTPases, have been studied primarily at the single-cell level. Here, we analyze developmental functions of the ARF1 subclass of the Arabidopsis thaliana multigene ARF family. Six virtually identical ARF1 genes are ubiquitously expressed, and single loss-of-function mutants in these genes reveal no obvious developmental phenotypes. Fluorescence colocalization studies reveal that ARF1 is localized to the Golgi apparatus and endocytic organelles in both onion (Allium cepa) and Arabidopsis cells. Apical-basal polarity of epidermal cells, reflected by the position of root hair outgrowth, is affected when ARF1 mutants are expressed at early stages of cell differentiation but after they exit mitosis. Genetic interactions during root hair tip growth and localization suggest that the ROP2 protein is a target of ARF1 action, but its localization is slowly affected upon ARF1 manipulation when compared with that of Golgi and endocytic markers. Localization of a second potential target of ARF1 action, PIN2, is also affected with slow kinetics. Although extreme redundancy precludes conventional genetic dissection of ARF1 functions, our approach separates different ARF1 downstream networks involved in local and specific aspects of cell polarity. PMID:15659621

  13. ARF6-regulated endocytosis of growth factor receptors links cadherin-based adhesion to canonical Wnt signaling in epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellon-Cardenas, Oscar; Clancy, James; Uwimpuhwe, Henriette; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2013-08-01

    Wnt signaling has an essential role in embryonic development as well as stem/progenitor cell renewal, and its aberrant activation is implicated in many diseases, including several cancers. β-Catenin is a critical component of Wnt-mediated transcriptional activation. Here we show that ARF6 activation during canonical Wnt signaling promotes the intracellular accumulation of β-catenin via a mechanism that involves the endocytosis of growth factor receptors and robust activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). ERK promotes casein kinase 2-mediated phosphorylation of α-catenin, leading to destabilization of the adherens junctions and a subsequent increase in cytoplasmic pools of active β-catenin and E-cadherin. ERK also phosphorylates LRP6 to amplify the Wnt transduction pathway. The aforementioned Wnt-ERK signaling pathway initiates lumen filling of epithelial cysts by promoting cell proliferation in three-dimensional cell cultures. This study elucidates a mechanism responsible for the switch in β-catenin functions in cell adhesion at the adherens junctions and Wnt-induced nuclear signaling.

  14. The Tumor-suppressive Small GTPase DiRas1 Binds the Noncanonical Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor SmgGDS and Antagonizes SmgGDS Interactions with Oncogenic Small GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergom, Carmen; Hauser, Andrew D; Rymaszewski, Amy; Gonyo, Patrick; Prokop, Jeremy W; Jennings, Benjamin C; Lawton, Alexis J; Frei, Anne; Lorimer, Ellen L; Aguilera-Barrantes, Irene; Mackinnon, Alexander C; Noon, Kathleen; Fierke, Carol A; Williams, Carol L

    2016-03-18

    The small GTPase DiRas1 has tumor-suppressive activities, unlike the oncogenic properties more common to small GTPases such as K-Ras and RhoA. Although DiRas1 has been found to be a tumor suppressor in gliomas and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas, the mechanisms by which it inhibits malignant phenotypes have not been fully determined. In this study, we demonstrate that DiRas1 binds to SmgGDS, a protein that promotes the activation of several oncogenic GTPases. In silico docking studies predict that DiRas1 binds to SmgGDS in a manner similar to other small GTPases. SmgGDS is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for RhoA, but we report here that SmgGDS does not mediate GDP/GTP exchange on DiRas1. Intriguingly, DiRas1 acts similarly to a dominant-negative small GTPase, binding to SmgGDS and inhibiting SmgGDS binding to other small GTPases, including K-Ras4B, RhoA, and Rap1A. DiRas1 is expressed in normal breast tissue, but its expression is decreased in most breast cancers, similar to its family member DiRas3 (ARHI). DiRas1 inhibits RhoA- and SmgGDS-mediated NF-κB transcriptional activity in HEK293T cells. We also report that DiRas1 suppresses basal NF-κB activation in breast cancer and glioblastoma cell lines. Taken together, our data support a model in which DiRas1 expression inhibits malignant features of cancers in part by nonproductively binding to SmgGDS and inhibiting the binding of other small GTPases to SmgGDS.

  15. Under-expression of the Auxin Response Factor Sl-ARF4 improves postharvest behavior of tomato fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Maha; Chervin, Christian; Roustant, Jean-Paul; Bouzayen, Mondher; Zouine, Mohamed

    2013-10-01

    Auxin is one of the most prominent phytohormones regulating many aspects of fleshy fruit development including fruit set, fruit size through the control of cell division and cell expansion, and fruit ripening. To shed light on the role of auxin fruit ripening, we have previously shown that Sl-ARF4 is a major player in mediating the auxin control of sugar metabolism in tomato fruit (cv MicroTom). Further extending this study, we show here that down-regulation of Sl-ARF4 in tomato alters some ripening-related fruit quality traits including enhanced fruit density at mature stage, increased firmness, prolonged shelf-life and reduced water (weight) loss at red ripe stage. These findings suggest that Sl-ARF4 plays a role in determining fruit cell wall architecture and thus providing a potential genetic marker for improving post-harvest handling and shelf life of tomato fruits.

  16. How not to do kinetics: examples involving GTPases and guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Roger S

    2014-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) are crucial regulators of the action of GTPases in signal transduction and cellular regulation. Although their basic mechanism of action has been apparent for almost 20 years, there are still misconceptions concerning their properties, and these are confounded by superficial or incorrect interpretation of experimental results in individual cases. Here, an example is described in which an incorrect mechanism was derived because of an inadequate analysis of kinetic results. In a second example, a case is discussed where certain GTP analogs were erroneously described as being able to function as low molecular mass GEFs. In both cases, a lack of distinction between rates, rate constants, and apparent rate constants, together with a disregard of relative signal amplitudes, led to the misinterpretations. In a final example, it is shown how the lack of an appropriate kinetic investigation led to the false conclusion that a secreted protein from Legionella pneumophila can act not only as a GEF towards eukaryotic Rab1 but also as a factor that is able to actively dissociate the stable complex between Rab1 and GDP dissociation inhibitor.

  17. ARF1 recruits RAC1 to leading edge in neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaki, Yuichi; Onodera, Yasuhito; Higashi, Tsunehito; Horinouchi, Takahiro; Oikawa, Tsukasa; Sabe, Hisataka

    2017-10-02

    The small GTPase ARF1 mediates membrane trafficking mostly from the Golgi, and is essential for the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated chemotaxis of neutrophils. In this process, ARF1 is activated by the guanine nucleotide exchanger GBF1, and is inactivated by the GTPase-activating protein GIT2. Neutrophils generate the Gβγ-PAK1-αPIX-GIT2 linear complex during GPCR-induced chemotaxis, in which αPIX activates RAC1/CDC42, which then employs PAK1. However, it has remained unclear as to why GIT2 is included in this complex. We investigated the association between ARF1 and RAC1/CDC42 during the fMLP-stimulated chemotaxis of HL60 cells. We found that the silencing of GBF1 significantly impaired the recruitment of RAC1 to the leading edges, but not PAK1, αPIX, RAC2, or CDC42. A significant population of RAC1 colocalized with ARF1 at the leading edges in stimulated cells, whereas fMLP activated both ARF1 and ARF5. Consistently, the silencing of ARF1, but not ARF5, impaired the recruitment of RAC1, whereas the silencing of RAC1 did not affect the recruitment of ARF1 to the leading edges. Our results indicated that the activation of ARF1 triggers the plasma membrane recruitment of RAC1 in GPCR-mediated chemotaxis, which is essential for cortical actin remodeling. Thus, membrane remodeling at the leading edges appears to precede actin remodeling in chemotaxis. Together with the fact that GIT2, which inactivates ARF1, is an integral component of the machinery activating RAC1, we proposed a model in which the ARF1-RAC1 linkage enables the regulation of ARF1 by repetitive on/off cycles during GPCR-mediated neutrophil chemotaxis.

  18. ArfGAP1 function in COPI mediated membrane traffic: currently debated models and comparison to other coat-binding ArfGAPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiba, Yoko; Randazzo, Paul A

    2012-09-01

    The ArfGAPs are a family of proteins containing an ArfGAP catalytic domain that induces the hydrolysis of GTP bound to the small guanine nucleotide binding-protein ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf). Functional models for Arfs, which are regulators of membrane traffic, are based on the idea that guanine nucleotide-binding proteins function as switches: Arf with GTP bound is active and binds to effector proteins; the conversion of GTP to GDP inactivates Arf. The cellular activities of ArfGAPs have been examined primarily as regulatory proteins that inactivate Arf; however, Arf function in membrane traffic does not strictly adhere to the concept of a simple switch, adding complexity to models explaining the role of ArfGAPs. Here, we review the literature addressing the function Arf and ArfGAP1 in COPI mediated transport, focusing on two critical and integrated functions of membrane traffic, cargo sorting and vesicle coat polymerization. We briefly discuss other ArfGAPs that may have similar function in Arf-dependent membrane traffic outside the ER-Golgi.

  19. Initiation factor 2 crystal structure reveals a different domain organization from eukaryotic initiation factor 5B and mechanism among translational GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiler, Daniel; Lin, Jinzhong; Simonetti, Angelita; Klaholz, Bruno P; Steitz, Thomas A

    2013-09-24

    The initiation of protein synthesis uses initiation factor 2 (IF2) in prokaryotes and a related protein named eukaryotic initiation factor 5B (eIF5B) in eukaryotes. IF2 is a GTPase that positions the initiator tRNA on the 30S ribosomal initiation complex and stimulates its assembly to the 50S ribosomal subunit to make the 70S ribosome. The 3.1-Å resolution X-ray crystal structures of the full-length Thermus thermophilus apo IF2 and its complex with GDP presented here exhibit two different conformations (all of its domains except C2 domain are visible). Unlike all other translational GTPases, IF2 does not have an effecter domain that stably contacts the switch II region of the GTPase domain. The domain organization of IF2 is inconsistent with the "articulated lever" mechanism of communication between the GTPase and initiator tRNA binding domains that has been proposed for eIF5B. Previous cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions, NMR experiments, and this structure show that IF2 transitions from being flexible in solution to an extended conformation when interacting with ribosomal complexes.

  20. Free energy simulations of a GTPase: GTP and GDP binding to archaeal initiation factor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpati, Priyadarshi; Clavaguéra, Carine; Ohanessian, Gilles; Simonson, Thomas

    2011-05-26

    Archaeal initiation factor 2 (aIF2) is a protein involved in the initiation of protein biosynthesis. In its GTP-bound, "ON" conformation, aIF2 binds an initiator tRNA and carries it to the ribosome. In its GDP-bound, "OFF" conformation, it dissociates from tRNA. To understand the specific binding of GTP and GDP and its dependence on the ON or OFF conformational state of aIF2, molecular dynamics free energy simulations (MDFE) are a tool of choice. However, the validity of the computed free energies depends on the simulation model, including the force field and the boundary conditions, and on the extent of conformational sampling in the simulations. aIF2 and other GTPases present specific difficulties; in particular, the nucleotide ligand coordinates a divalent Mg(2+) ion, which can polarize the electronic distribution of its environment. Thus, a force field with an explicit treatment of electronic polarizability could be necessary, rather than a simpler, fixed charge force field. Here, we begin by comparing a fixed charge force field to quantum chemical calculations and experiment for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, with the force field giving large errors. Next, we consider GTP and GDP bound to aIF2 and we compare two fixed charge force fields to the recent, polarizable, AMOEBA force field, extended here in a simple, approximate manner to include GTP. We focus on a quantity that approximates the free energy to change GTP into GDP. Despite the errors seen for Mg(2+):phosphate binding in solution, we observe a substantial cancellation of errors when we compare the free energy change in the protein to that in solution, or when we compare the protein ON and OFF states. Finally, we have used the fixed charge force field to perform MDFE simulations and alchemically transform GTP into GDP in the protein and in solution. With a total of about 200 ns of molecular dynamics, we obtain good convergence and a reasonable statistical uncertainty, comparable to the force

  1. Expression and cytoprotective activity of the small GTPase RhoB induced by the Escherichia coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C; Roggenkamp, Dennis; May, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    RhoB is the only member of the Rho subfamily of small GTPases, which is classified as an immediate early gene product. RhoB is up-regulated in response to growth factors as well as cytotoxic and genotoxic agents. Clostridial glucosylating toxins have been reported to evoke pronounced RhoB express......RhoB is the only member of the Rho subfamily of small GTPases, which is classified as an immediate early gene product. RhoB is up-regulated in response to growth factors as well as cytotoxic and genotoxic agents. Clostridial glucosylating toxins have been reported to evoke pronounced Rho......B expression, based on the inactivation of Rho/Ras proteins. In this study, we report on a long lasting expression of RhoB in cultured cells upon activation of Rho proteins by the cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1) from Escherichia coli. The observations of this study highlight a new pathway involving Rac1......, which positively regulates the activity of the rhoB promoter and RhoB expression. Conversely, the isomeric cytotoxic necrotizing factor from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (CNFy) drives GTP-loading of basal RhoB but fails to cause activation of the rhoB promoter and thus its expression. CNF1 inhibits...

  2. Role of the tumor suppressor ARF in macrophage polarization: Enhancement of the M2 phenotype in ARF-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Sandra; Través, Paqui G; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-11-01

    The ARF locus is frequently inactivated in human cancer. The oncosuppressor ARF has indeed been described as a general sensor for different situation of cellular stress. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo, establishing a role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. The aim of the present work was to get further insights into the immune functions of ARF and to evaluate its possible contribution to the polarization of macrophages toward the M1 or M2 phenotype. Our results demonstrate that resting Arf(-/-) macrophages express high levels of Ym1 and Fizz-1, two typical markers of alternatively-activated macrophages (M2). Additionally, Arf(-/-) peritoneal macrophages showed an impaired response to lipopolysaccharide (a classical inducer of M1 polaryzation) and a reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Moreover, upon stimulation with interleukin-4 (IL-4), an inducer of the M2 phenotype, well established M2 markers such as Fizz-1, Ym1 and arginase-1 were upregulated in Arf(-/-) as compared with wild type macrophages. Accordingly, the cytokine and chemokine profile associated with the M2 phenotype was significantly overexpressed in Arf(-/-) macrophages responding to IL-4. In addition, multiple pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF and MMP-9 were also increased. In summary, these results indicate that ARF contributes to the polarization and functional plasticity of macrophages.

  3. Insights into the localization and function of the membrane trafficking regulator GNOM ARF-GEF at the Golgi apparatus in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naramoto, Satoshi; Otegui, Marisa S; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; de Rycke, Riet; Dainobu, Tomoko; Karampelias, Michael; Fujimoto, Masaru; Feraru, Elena; Miki, Daisuke; Fukuda, Hiroo; Nakano, Akihiko; Friml, Jiří

    2014-07-01

    GNOM is one of the most characterized membrane trafficking regulators in plants, with crucial roles in development. GNOM encodes an ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARF-GEF) that activates small GTPases of the ARF (ADP ribosylation factor) class to mediate vesicle budding at endomembranes. The crucial role of GNOM in recycling of PIN auxin transporters and other proteins to the plasma membrane was identified in studies using the ARF-GEF inhibitor brefeldin A (BFA). GNOM, the most prominent regulator of recycling in plants, has been proposed to act and localize at so far elusive recycling endosomes. Here, we report the GNOM localization in context of its cellular function in Arabidopsis thaliana. State-of-the-art imaging, pharmacological interference, and ultrastructure analysis show that GNOM predominantly localizes to Golgi apparatus. Super-resolution confocal live imaging microscopy identified GNOM and its closest homolog GNOM-like 1 at distinct subdomains on Golgi cisternae. Short-term BFA treatment stabilizes GNOM at the Golgi apparatus, whereas prolonged exposures results in GNOM translocation to trans-Golgi network (TGN)/early endosomes (EEs). Malformed TGN/EE in gnom mutants suggests a role for GNOM in maintaining TGN/EE function. Our results redefine the subcellular action of GNOM and reevaluate the identity and function of recycling endosomes in plants.

  4. ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein 4C (ARL4C) interacts with galectin-3 during oocyte development and embryogenesis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein 4 (ARL4) is a GTP-binding protein which belongs to the ADP-ribosylation factor protein (ARF) superfamily of small GTPases. ARL4 has been shown to be mainly related to the development of male germ cells and embryogenesis in mouse. To investigate the role of ARL4 i...

  5. Dissection of Arabidopsis ADP-Ribosylation Factor 1 function in epidermal cell polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, J.; Scheres, B.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    Vesicle trafficking is essential for the generation of asymmetries, which are central to multicellular development. Core components of the vesicle transport machinery, such as ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) GTPases, have been studied primarily at the single-cell level. Here, we analyze developmental

  6. Dissection of Arabidopsis ADP-Ribosylation Factor 1 function in epidermal cell polarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, J.; Scheres, B.J.G.

    2005-01-01

    Vesicle trafficking is essential for the generation of asymmetries, which are central to multicellular development. Core components of the vesicle transport machinery, such as ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) GTPases, have been studied primarily at the single-cell level. Here, we analyze developmental

  7. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of ADP-ribosylation Factors Gene from Haloxylon ammodendron%梭梭ARF1基因的克隆及序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晓燕; 石磊; 甘晓燕; 陈虞超; 宋玉霞

    2012-01-01

    二磷酸腺苷核糖基化作用因子( ADP-ribosylation factors,ARFs)属小G蛋白超级家族中的Arf亚族,是真核细胞囊泡运输通道的关键组成成分,参与细胞运输和信号传导.本试验采用RT-PCR、RACE等方法从超旱生、耐盐植物梭梭(Haloxylon ammodendron)中扩增出ADP- ribosylation factor( ARF1)基因的cDNA序列(命名为HaARF1),其开放阅读框为546 bp,推测氨基酸序列全长为181个氨基酸残基,具有典型的小GTP结合蛋白结构域.其氨基酸序列与GenBank中已发表同源对比相似度达99%以上,表明ARF1基因在不同物种间高度保守.%ADP-ribosylation factor (ADP-ribosylation factors, ARFs) belongs to a small G protein super-family of Arf subfamily, which is a key component of vesicle transport channel components involved in cellular transport and signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. Through RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) , a 546 bp fragment containing entire ARFI gene coding region of 181 amino acid(aa) has been obtained (named as HaARFl ) from the super-xerophytic, salt-tolerant plants Haloxylon (Haloxylon ammodendron) , the deduced amino acid sequences contain a typical small GTP-binding protein domain. Encoded protein by HaARFl and ARF1 protein from GenBank has been published homologous to other species up to 99% similarity comparison, indicating that ARF1 genes are highly conserved among different species.

  8. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Shin, Eun-Young; Schwartz, Martin Alexander; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2010-08-23

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology-pleckstrin homology module, the catalytic site of these GEFs, with dissociation constants of approximately 0.3 microM. Binding to the GEFs required assembly of the MII into filaments and actin-stimulated ATPase activity. Binding of MII suppressed GEF activity. Accordingly, inhibition of MII ATPase activity caused release of GEFs and activation of Rho GTPases. Depletion of betaPIX GEF in migrating NIH3T3 fibroblasts suppressed lamellipodial protrusions and focal complex formation induced by MII inhibition. The results elucidate a functional link between MII and Rac1/Cdc42 GTPases, which may regulate protrusion/adhesion dynamics in migrating cells.

  9. Site-directed mutagenesis of Arg58 and Asp86 of elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli: effects on the GTPase reaction and aminoacyl-tRNA binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1996-01-01

    Elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli was mutated separately at positions Asp86 and Arg58, in order to shed light both on the GTPase mechanism of elongation factor Tu and on the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA. In addition, the binding of guanine nucleotides was investigated by determination...

  10. Site-directed mutagenesis of Arg58 and Asp86 of elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli: effects on the GTPase reaction and aminoacyl-tRNA binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1996-01-01

    Elongation factor Tu from Escherichia coli was mutated separately at positions Asp86 and Arg58, in order to shed light both on the GTPase mechanism of elongation factor Tu and on the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA. In addition, the binding of guanine nucleotides was investigated by determination of th...

  11. PH Domain-Arf G Protein Interactions Localize the Arf-GEF Steppke for Cleavage Furrow Regulation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghoon M Lee

    Full Text Available The recruitment of GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs to specific subcellular sites dictates where they activate small G proteins for the regulation of various cellular processes. Cytohesins are a conserved family of plasma membrane GEFs for Arf small G proteins that regulate endocytosis. Analyses of mammalian cytohesins have identified a number of recruitment mechanisms for these multi-domain proteins, but the conservation and developmental roles for these mechanisms are unclear. Here, we report how the pleckstrin homology (PH domain of the Drosophila cytohesin Steppke affects its localization and activity at cleavage furrows of the early embryo. We found that the PH domain is necessary for Steppke furrow localization, and for it to regulate furrow structure. However, the PH domain was not sufficient for the localization. Next, we examined the role of conserved PH domain amino acid residues that are required for mammalian cytohesins to bind PIP3 or GTP-bound Arf G proteins. We confirmed that the Steppke PH domain preferentially binds PIP3 in vitro through a conserved mechanism. However, disruption of residues for PIP3 binding had no apparent effect on GFP-Steppke localization and effects. Rather, residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins made major contributions to this Steppke localization and activity. By analyzing GFP-tagged Arf and Arf-like small G proteins, we found that Arf1-GFP, Arf6-GFP and Arl4-GFP, but not Arf4-GFP, localized to furrows. However, analyses of embryos depleted of Arf1, Arf6 or Arl4 revealed either earlier defects than occur in embryos depleted of Steppke, or no detectable furrow defects, possibly because of redundancies, and thus it was difficult to assess how individual Arf small G proteins affect Steppke. Nonetheless, our data show that the Steppke PH domain and its conserved residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins have substantial effects on Steppke localization and activity in early Drosophila embryos.

  12. PH Domain-Arf G Protein Interactions Localize the Arf-GEF Steppke for Cleavage Furrow Regulation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Donghoon M; Rodrigues, Francisco F; Yu, Cao Guo; Swan, Michael; Harris, Tony J C

    2015-01-01

    The recruitment of GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs) to specific subcellular sites dictates where they activate small G proteins for the regulation of various cellular processes. Cytohesins are a conserved family of plasma membrane GEFs for Arf small G proteins that regulate endocytosis. Analyses of mammalian cytohesins have identified a number of recruitment mechanisms for these multi-domain proteins, but the conservation and developmental roles for these mechanisms are unclear. Here, we report how the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of the Drosophila cytohesin Steppke affects its localization and activity at cleavage furrows of the early embryo. We found that the PH domain is necessary for Steppke furrow localization, and for it to regulate furrow structure. However, the PH domain was not sufficient for the localization. Next, we examined the role of conserved PH domain amino acid residues that are required for mammalian cytohesins to bind PIP3 or GTP-bound Arf G proteins. We confirmed that the Steppke PH domain preferentially binds PIP3 in vitro through a conserved mechanism. However, disruption of residues for PIP3 binding had no apparent effect on GFP-Steppke localization and effects. Rather, residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins made major contributions to this Steppke localization and activity. By analyzing GFP-tagged Arf and Arf-like small G proteins, we found that Arf1-GFP, Arf6-GFP and Arl4-GFP, but not Arf4-GFP, localized to furrows. However, analyses of embryos depleted of Arf1, Arf6 or Arl4 revealed either earlier defects than occur in embryos depleted of Steppke, or no detectable furrow defects, possibly because of redundancies, and thus it was difficult to assess how individual Arf small G proteins affect Steppke. Nonetheless, our data show that the Steppke PH domain and its conserved residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins have substantial effects on Steppke localization and activity in early Drosophila embryos.

  13. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-06-07

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin.

  14. GTPase domains of ras p21 oncogene protein and elongation factor Tu: analysis of three-dimensional structures, sequence families, and functional sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, A; Kjeldgaard, M; Pai, E F; Sander, C

    1991-06-15

    GTPase domains are functional and structural units employed as molecular switches in a variety of important cellular functions, such as growth control, protein biosynthesis, and membrane traffic. Amino acid sequences of more than 100 members of different subfamilies are known, but crystal structures of only mammalian ras p21 and bacterial elongation factor Tu have been determined. After optimal superposition of these remarkably similar structures, careful multiple sequence alignment, and calculation of residue-residue interactions, we analyzed the two subfamilies in terms of structural conservation, sequence conservation, and residue contact strength. There are three main results. (i) A structure-based alignment of p21 and elongation factor Tu. (ii) The definition of a common conserved structural core that may be useful as the basis of model building by homology of the three-dimensional structure of any GTPase domain. (iii) Identification of sequence regions, other than the effector loop and the nucleotide binding site, that may be involved in the functional cycle: they are loop L4, known to change conformation after GTP hydrolysis; helix alpha 2, especially Arg-73 and Met-67 in ras p21; loops L8 and L10, including ras p21 Arg-123, Lys-147, and Leu-120; and residues located spatially near the N and C termini. These regions are candidate sites for interaction either with the GTP/GDP exchange factor, with a GTPase-affected function, or with a molecule delivered to a destination site with the aid of the GTPase domain.

  15. Cdc42 and Rac family GTPases regulate mode and speed but not direction of primary fibroblast migration during platelet-derived growth factor-dependent chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monypenny, James; Zicha, Daniel; Higashida, Chiharu; Oceguera-Yanez, Fabian; Narumiya, Shuh; Watanabe, Naoki

    2009-05-01

    Cdc42 and Rac family GTPases are important regulators of morphology, motility, and polarity in a variety of mammalian cell types. However, comprehensive analysis of their roles in the morphological and behavioral aspects of chemotaxis within a single experimental system is still lacking. Here we demonstrate using a direct viewing chemotaxis assay that of all of the Cdc42/Rac1-related GTPases expressed in primary fibroblasts, Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoG are required for efficient migration towards platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). During migration, Cdc42-, Rac1-, and RhoG-deficient cells show aberrant morphology characterized as cell elongation and cell body rounding, loss of lamellipodia, and formation of thick membrane extensions, respectively. Analysis of individual cell trajectories reveals that cell speed is significantly reduced, as well as persistence, but to a smaller degree, while the directional response to the gradient of PDGF is not affected. Combined knockdown of Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoG results in greater inhibition of cell speed than when each protein is knocked down alone, but the cells are still capable of migrating toward PDGF. We conclude that, Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoG function cooperatively during cell migration and that, while each GTPase is implicated in the control of morphology and cell speed, these and other Cdc42/Rac-related GTPases are not essential for the directional response toward PDGF.

  16. Topological and functional properties of the small GTPases protein interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Delprato

    Full Text Available Small GTP binding proteins of the Ras superfamily (Ras, Rho, Rab, Arf, and Ran regulate key cellular processes such as signal transduction, cell proliferation, cell motility, and vesicle transport. A great deal of experimental evidence supports the existence of signaling cascades and feedback loops within and among the small GTPase subfamilies suggesting that these proteins function in a coordinated and cooperative manner. The interplay occurs largely through association with bi-partite regulatory and effector proteins but can also occur through the active form of the small GTPases themselves. In order to understand the connectivity of the small GTPases signaling routes, a systems-level approach that analyzes data describing direct and indirect interactions was used to construct the small GTPases protein interaction network. The data were curated from the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes (STRING database and include only experimentally validated interactions. The network method enables the conceptualization of the overall structure as well as the underlying organization of the protein-protein interactions. The interaction network described here is comprised of 778 nodes and 1943 edges and has a scale-free topology. Rac1, Cdc42, RhoA, and HRas are identified as the hubs. Ten sub-network motifs are also identified in this study with themes in apoptosis, cell growth/proliferation, vesicle traffic, cell adhesion/junction dynamics, the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase response, transcription regulation, receptor-mediated endocytosis, gene silencing, and growth factor signaling. Bottleneck proteins that bridge signaling paths and proteins that overlap in multiple small GTPase networks are described along with the functional annotation of all proteins in the network.

  17. Regulation of Rap GTPases in mammalian neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bhavin; Püschel, Andreas W

    2016-10-01

    Small GTPases are central regulators of many cellular processes. The highly conserved Rap GTPases perform essential functions in the mammalian nervous system during development and in mature neurons. During neocortical development, Rap1 is required to regulate cadherin- and integrin-mediated adhesion. In the adult nervous system Rap1 and Rap2 regulate the maturation and plasticity of dendritic spine and synapses. Although genetic studies have revealed important roles of Rap GTPases in neurons, their regulation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that activate them and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that inactivate them by stimulating their intrinsic GTPase activity is just beginning to be explored in vivo. Here we review how GEFs and GAPs regulate Rap GTPases in the nervous system with a focus on their in vivo function.

  18. The processed isoform of the translation termination factor eRF3 localizes to the nucleus to interact with the ARF tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Yoshifumi; Kumagai, Naomichi; Hosoda, Nao; Hoshino, Shin-ichi, E-mail: hoshino@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp

    2014-03-14

    Highlights: • So far, eRF3 has been thought to function exclusively in the cytoplasm. • eRF3 is a nucleo-cutoplasmic shuttling protein. • eRF3 has a leptomycin-sensitive nuclear export signal (NES). • Removal of NES by proteolytic cleavage allows eRF3 to translocate to the nucleus. • The processed eRF3 (p-eRF3) interacts with a nuclear tumor suppressor ARF. - Abstract: The eukaryotic releasing factor eRF3 is a multifunctional protein that plays pivotal roles in translation termination as well as the initiation of mRNA decay. eRF3 also functions in the regulation of apoptosis; eRF3 is cleaved at Ala73 by an as yet unidentified protease into processed isoform of eRF3 (p-eRF3), which interacts with the inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). The binding of p-eRF3 with IAPs leads to the release of active caspases from IAPs, which promotes apoptosis. Although full-length eRF3 is localized exclusively in the cytoplasm, p-eRF3 localizes in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm. We here focused on the role of p-eRF3 in the nucleus. We identified leptomycin-sensitive nuclear export signal (NES) at amino acid residues 61–71 immediately upstream of the cleavage site Ala73. Thus, the proteolytic cleavage of eRF3 into p-eRF3 leads to release an amino-terminal fragment containing NES to allow the relocalization of eRF3 into the nucleus. Consistent with this, p-eRF3 more strongly interacted with the nuclear ARF tumor suppressor than full-length eRF3. These results suggest that while p-eRF3 interacts with IAPs to promote apoptosis in the cytoplasm, p-eRF3 also has some roles in regulating cell death in the nucleus.

  19. Dietary energy balance modulation of Kras- and Ink4a/Arf+/--driven pancreatic cancer: the role of insulin-like growth factor-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashinger, Laura M; Harrison, Lauren M; Rasmussen, Audrey J; Logsdon, Craig D; Fischer, Susan M; McArthur, Mark J; Hursting, Stephen D

    2013-10-01

    New molecular targets and intervention strategies for breaking the obesity-pancreatic cancer link are urgently needed. Using relevant spontaneous and orthotopically transplanted murine models of pancreatic cancer, we tested the hypothesis that dietary energy balance modulation impacts pancreatic cancer development and progression through an insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I-dependent mechanism. In LSL-Kras(G12D)/Pdx-1-Cre/Ink4a/Arf(lox/+) mice, calorie restriction versus overweight- or obesity-inducing diet regimens decreased serum IGF-I, tumoral Akt/mTOR signaling, pancreatic desmoplasia, and progression to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and increased pancreatic tumor-free survival. Serum IGF-I, Akt/mTOR signaling, and orthotopically transplanted PDAC growth were decreased in liver-specific IGF-I-deficient mice (vs. wild-type mice), and rescued with IGF-I infusion. Thus, dietary energy balance modulation impacts spontaneous pancreatic tumorigenesis induced by mutant Kras and Ink4a deficiency, the most common genetic alterations in human pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, IGF-I and components of its downstream signaling pathway are promising mechanistic targets for breaking the obesity-pancreatic cancer link.

  20. ATP hydrolysis by a domain related to translation factor GTPases drives polymerization of a static bacterial morphogenetic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaing, Jean-Philippe; Nagy, Attila; Anantharaman, Vivek; Aravind, L; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S

    2013-01-08

    The assembly of static supramolecular structures is a culminating event of developmental programs. One such structure, the proteinaceous shell (called the coat) that surrounds spores of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, is composed of about 70 different proteins and represents one of the most durable biological structures known. The coat is built atop a basement layer that contains an ATPase (SpoIVA) that forms a platform required for coat assembly. Here, we show that SpoIVA belongs to the translation factors class of P-loop GTPases and has evolutionarily lost the ability to bind GTP; instead, it uses ATP hydrolysis to drive its self-assembly into static filaments. We demonstrate that ATP hydrolysis is required by every subunit for incorporation into the growing polymer by inducing a conformational change that drives polymerization of a nucleotide-free filament. SpoIVA therefore differs from other self-organizing polymers (dynamic cytoskeletal structures and static intermediate filaments) in that it uses ATP hydrolysis to self-assemble, not disassemble, into a static polymer. We further show that polymerization requires a critical concentration that we propose is only achieved once SpoIVA is recruited to the surface of the developing spore, thereby ensuring that SpoIVA polymerization only occurs at the correct subcellular location during spore morphogenesis.

  1. Characterization of the activation of small GTPases by their GEFs on membranes using artificial membrane tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peurois, François; Veyron, Simon; Ferrandez, Yann; Ladid, Ilham; Benabdi, Sarah; Zeghouf, Mahel; Peyroche, Gérald; Cherfils, Jacqueline

    2017-02-14

    Attachment of active, GTP-bound small GTPases to membranes by post-translational lipid modifications is pivotal for their ability to process and propagate information in cells. However, generating and manipulating lipidated GTPases has remained difficult, which has limited our quantitative understanding of their activation by GEFs and their termination by GAPs. Here we replaced the lipid modification by a histidine tag in eleven full-length, human small GTPases belonging to the Arf, Rho and Rab families, which allowed to tether them to nickel-lipid containing membranes and characterize the kinetics of their activation by GEFs. Remarkably this strategy uncovered large effects of membranes on the efficiency and/or specificity in all systems studied. Notably, it recapitulated the release of autoinhibition of Arf1, Arf3, Arf4, Arf5 and Arf6 GTPases by membranes and revealed that all isoforms are efficiently activated by two GEFs with different regulatory regimes, ARNO and Brag2. It demonstrated that membranes stimulate the GEF activity of Trio towards RhoG by ≈30 fold and Rac1 by ≈10 fold, and uncovered a previously unknown broader specificity towards RhoA and Cdc42 that was undetectable in solution. Finally, it demonstrated that the exceptional affinity of the bacterial RabGEF DrrA for the phosphoinositide PI(4)P delimits the activation of Rab1 to the immediate vicinity of the membrane-bound GEF. Our study thus validates the histidine tag strategy as a potent and simple means to mimic small GTPases lipidation, which opens broad perspectives of applications to uncover regulations brought about by membranes.

  2. The TRIP from ULF to ARF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel

    2010-04-13

    ARF is a key activator of p53, and together they form a critical duo for protection against cancer. Previous evidence had recognized the regulatory potential of ubiquitin-mediated degradation of ARF. The recent identification of TRIP12/ULF as a ubiquitin ligase of ARF adds an important missing piece to the ARF/p53 pathway.

  3. Rho GTPases and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hui; Peyrollier, Karine; Kilic, Gülcan;

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases are a family of small GTPases, which play an important role in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Not surprisingly, Rho GTPases are crucial for cell migration and therefore highly important for cancer cell invasion and the formation of metastases. In addition, Rho GTPases...... are involved in growth and survival of tumor cells, in the interaction of tumor cells with their environment, and they are vital for the cancer supporting functions of the tumor stroma. Recent research has significantly improved our understanding of the regulation of Rho GTPase activity, the specificity of Rho...

  4. ADP-ribosylation factor 6 modulates adrenergic stimulated lipolysis in adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingqiu; Zhou, Dequan; Abumrad, Nada A.

    2010-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) is a small GTPase that influences membrane receptor trafficking and the actin cytoskeleton. In adipocytes, Arf6 regulates the trafficking of the glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) and consequently insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Previous studies also indicated a role of Arf6 in adrenergic receptor trafficking, but whether this contributes to the control of lipolysis in adipocytes remains unknown. This was examined in the present study by using RNA interference (RNAi) and pharmaceutical inhibition in murine cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Downregulation of Arf6 by RNAi impairs isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis specifically but does not alter triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis or the insulin signaling pathway. Neither total TAG amounts nor TAG fatty acid compositions are altered. The inhibitory effect on lipolysis is mimicked by dynasore, a specific inhibitor for dynamin, which is required for endocytosis. In contrast, lipolysis triggered by reagents that bypass events at the plasma membrane (e.g., forskolin, isobutylmethylxanthine or 8-bromo-cAMP) is not affected. Moreover, Arf6 protein levels in white adipose tissues are markedly increased in ob/ob mice, whereas they are decreased in obesity-resistant CD36 null mice. These changes reflect at least in part alterations in Arf6 mRNA levels. Collectively, these results suggest a role of the endocytic pathway and its regulation by Arf6 in adrenergic stimulation of lipolysis in adipocytes and potentially in the development of obesity. PMID:20107045

  5. A distinct mechanism regulating a pollen-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small GTPase Rop in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rop/Rac small GTPases are central to diverse developmental and cellular activities in plants, playing an especially important Role in polar growth of pollen tubes. Although it is established that a class of plant-specific RopGEFs promotes the activity of Rop/Rac through the catalytic PRONE (Plant-sp...

  6. Rice GTPase OsRacB: Potential Accessory Factor in Plant Salt-stress Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min LUO; Su-Hai GU; Shu-Hui ZHAO; Fang ZHANG; Nai-Hu WU

    2006-01-01

    As the sole ubiquitous signal small guanosine triphosphate-binding protein in plants, Rop gene plays an important role in plant growth and development. In this study, we focus on the relationship between the novel rice Rop gene OsRacB and plant salt tolerance. Results show that OsRacB transcription is highly accumulated in roots after treatment with salinity, but only slightly accumulated in stems and leaves under the same treatment. Promoter analysis showed that OsRacB promoter is induced by salinity and exogenous salicylic acid, not abscisic acid. To elucidate its physiological function, we generated OsRacB sense and antisense transgenic tobacco and rice. Under proper salinity treatment, sense transgenic plants grew much better than the control. This suggests that overexpression of OsRacB in tobacco and rice can improve plant salt tolerance. But under the same treatment, no difference could be observed between OsRacB antisense plants and the control. The results indicated that OsRacB is only an accessory factor in plant salt tolerance.

  7. ADP-ribosylation factor 1 controls the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway to regulate epidermal growth factor-dependent growth and migration of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulay, Pierre-Luc; Cotton, Mathieu; Melançon, Paul; Claing, Audrey

    2008-12-26

    Activation of intracellular signaling pathways by growth factors is one of the major causes of cancer development and progression. Recent studies have demonstrated that monomeric G proteins of the Ras family are key regulators of cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Using an invasive breast cancer cell lines, we demonstrate that the ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1), a small GTPase classically associated with the Golgi, is an important regulator of the biological effects induced by epidermal growth factor. Here, we show that this ARF isoform is activated following epidermal growth factor stimulation and that, in MDA-MB-231 cells, ARF1 is found in dynamic plasma membrane ruffles. Inhibition of endogenous ARF1 expression results in the inhibition of breast cancer cell migration and proliferation. The underlying mechanism involves the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Our data demonstrate that depletion of ARF1 markedly impairs the recruitment of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase catalytic subunit (p110alpha) to the plasma membrane, and the association of the regulatory subunit (p85alpha) to the activated receptor. These results uncover a novel molecular mechanism by which ARF1 regulates breast cancer cell growth and invasion during cancer progression.

  8. Role of the tumor suppressor ARF in macrophage polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Sandra; Través, Paqui G.; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    The ARF locus is frequently inactivated in human cancer. The oncosuppressor ARF has indeed been described as a general sensor for different situation of cellular stress. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo, establishing a role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. The aim of the present work was to get further insights into the immune functions of ARF and to evaluate its possible contribution to the polarization of macrophages toward the M1 or M2 phenotype. Our results demonstrate that resting Arf−/− macrophages express high levels of Ym1 and Fizz-1, two typical markers of alternatively-activated macrophages (M2). Additionally, Arf−/− peritoneal macrophages showed an impaired response to lipopolysaccharide (a classical inducer of M1 polaryzation) and a reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Moreover, upon stimulation with interleukin-4 (IL-4), an inducer of the M2 phenotype, well established M2 markers such as Fizz-1, Ym1 and arginase-1 were upregulated in Arf−/− as compared with wild type macrophages. Accordingly, the cytokine and chemokine profile associated with the M2 phenotype was significantly overexpressed in Arf−/− macrophages responding to IL-4. In addition, multiple pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF and MMP-9 were also increased. In summary, these results indicate that ARF contributes to the polarization and functional plasticity of macrophages. PMID:23243586

  9. PI3K regulates endocytosis after insulin secretion by mediating signaling crosstalk between Arf6 and Rab27a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Mami; Ando, Tomomi; Terabayashi, Takeshi; Okamoto, Mitsuhiro; Takei, Masahiro; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Matsunaga, Kohichi; Ishizaki, Ray; Izumi, Tetsuro; Niki, Ichiro; Ishizaki, Toshimasa; Kimura, Toshihide

    2016-02-01

    In secretory cells, endocytosis is coupled to exocytosis to enable proper secretion. Although endocytosis is crucial to maintain cellular homeostasis before and after secretion, knowledge about secretagogue-induced endocytosis in secretory cells is still limited. Here, we searched for proteins that interacted with the Rab27a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) EPI64 (also known as TBC1D10A) and identified the Arf6 guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) ARNO (also known as CYTH2) in pancreatic β-cells. We found that the insulin secretagogue glucose promotes phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) generation through phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), thereby recruiting ARNO to the intracellular side of the plasma membrane. Peripheral ARNO promotes clathrin assembly through its GEF activity for Arf6 and regulates the early stage of endocytosis. We also found that peripheral ARNO recruits EPI64 to the same area and that the interaction requires glucose-induced endocytosis in pancreatic β-cells. Given that GTP- and GDP-bound Rab27a regulate exocytosis and the late stage of endocytosis, our results indicate that the glucose-induced activation of PI3K plays a pivotal role in exocytosis-endocytosis coupling, and that ARNO and EPI64 regulate endocytosis at distinct stages.

  10. A Rac1 GTPase is a critical factor in the immune response of shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) to Vibrio alginolyticus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Gui-Hong; Wang, Wei-Na; Peng, Ting; Huang, Ming-Zhu; Liu, Yuan

    2015-08-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 acts as a molecular switch for signal transduction that regulates various cellular functions. However, its functions in crustaceans remain unclear. In this study, a cDNA encoding a RAS GTPase (LvRac1) in the Pacific white shrimp (L. vannamei) was identified and characterized. A recombinant variant of this GTPase, rLvRac1, was expressed in the model organism P. pastoris and its expression was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Biochemical assays indicated that the recombinant protein retained GTPase activity and was expressed in all of the organism's tested tissues. Injection of the bacterium V. alginolyticus into L. vannamei induced hepatopancreatic upregulation of LvRac1 expression. Moreover, knocking down LvRac1 in vivo significantly reduced the expression of the L. vannamei p53 and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase genes (Lvp53 and LvCu/Zn SOD, respectively) while increasing that of the galectin gene (Lvgal). Hemolymph samples from control and LvRac1-silenced L. vannamei individuals were analyzed by flow cytometry, revealing that the latter exhibited significantly reduced respiratory burst activity and total hemocyte counts. Cumulative mortality in shrimp lacking LvRac1 was significantly greater than in control groups following V. alginolyticus challenge. The silencing of LvRac1 by double-stranded RNA injection thus increased the V. alginolyticus challenge sensitivity of L. vannamei and weakened its bacterial clearance ability in vivo. Suppressing LvRac1 also promoted the upregulation of Lvp53, LvCu/ZnSOD, and Lvgal following V. alginolyticus injection. Taken together, these results suggest that LvRac1 is important in the innate immune response of shrimp to V. alginolyticus infection.

  11. Genomewide identification and expression analysis of the ARF gene family in apple

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiao-Cui Luo; Mei-Hong Sun; Rui-Rui Xu; Huai-Rui Shu; Jai-Wei Wang; Shi-Zhong Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Auxin response factors (ARF) are transcription factors that regulate auxin responses in plants. Although the genomewide analysis of this family has been performed in some species, little is known regarding ARF genes in apple (Malus domestica). In this study, 31 putative apple ARF genes have been identified and located within the apple genome. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that MdARFs could be divided into three subfamilies (groups I, II and III). The predicted MdARFs were distributed across 15 of 17 chromosomes with different densities. In addition, the analysis of exon–intron junctions and of the intron phase inside the predicted coding region of each candidate gene has revealed high levels of conservation within and between phylogenetic groups. Expression profile analyses of MdARF genes were performed in different tissues (root, stem, leaf, flower and fruit), and all the selected genes were expressed in at least one of the tissues that were tested, which indicated that MdARFs are involved in various aspects of physiological and developmental processes of apple. To our knowledge, this report is the first to provide a genomewide analysis of the apple ARF gene family. This study provides valuable information for understanding the classification and putative functions of the ARF signal in apple.

  12. The Role of ARF6 in Biliary Atresia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mylarappa Ningappa

    Full Text Available Altered extrahepatic bile ducts, gut, and cardiovascular anomalies constitute the variable phenotype of biliary atresia (BA.To identify potential susceptibility loci, Caucasian children, normal (controls and with BA (cases at two US centers were compared at >550000 SNP loci. Systems biology analysis was carried out on the data. In order to validate a key gene identified in the analysis, biliary morphogenesis was evaluated in 2-5-day post-fertilization zebrafish embryos after morpholino-antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of the candidate gene ADP ribosylation factor-6 (ARF6, Mo-arf6.Among 39 and 24 cases at centers 1 and 2, respectively, and 1907 controls, which clustered together on principal component analysis, the SNPs rs3126184 and rs10140366 in a 3' flanking enhancer region for ARF6 demonstrated higher minor allele frequencies (MAF in each cohort, and 63 combined cases, compared with controls (0.286 vs. 0.131, P = 5.94x10-7, OR 2.66; 0.286 vs. 0.13, P = 5.57x10-7, OR 2.66. Significance was enhanced in 77 total cases, which included 14 additional BA genotyped at rs3126184 only (p = 1.58x10-2, OR = 2.66. Pathway analysis of the 1000 top-ranked SNPs in CHP cases revealed enrichment of genes for EGF regulators (p<1 x10-7, ERK/MAPK and CREB canonical pathways (p<1 x10-34, and functional networks for cellular development and proliferation (p<1 x10-45, further supporting the role of EGFR-ARF6 signaling in BA. In zebrafish embryos, Mo-arf6 injection resulted in a sparse intrahepatic biliary network, several biliary epithelial cell defects, and poor bile excretion to the gall bladder compared with uninjected embryos. Biliary defects were reproduced with the EGFR-blocker AG1478 alone or with Mo-arf6 at lower doses of each agent and rescued with arf6 mRNA.The BA-associated SNPs identify a chromosome 14q21.3 susceptibility locus encompassing the ARF6 gene. arf6 knockdown in zebrafish implicates early biliary dysgenesis as a basis for BA, and also

  13. Genome-wide analysis of Aux/IAA and ARF gene families in Populus trichocarpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalluri, Udaya C [ORNL; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University; Brunner, A. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid (Aux/IAA) and Auxin Response Factor (ARF) transcription factors are key regulators of auxin responses in plants. A total of 35 Aux/IAA and 39 ARF genes were identified in the Populus genome. Comparative phylogenetic analysis revealed that the subgroups PoptrARF2, 6, 9 and 16 and PoptrIAA3, 16, 27 and 29 have differentially expanded in Populus relative to Arabidopsis. Activator ARFs were found to be two fold-overrepresented in the Populus genome. PoptrIAA and PoptrARF gene families appear to have expanded due to high segmental and low tandem duplication events. Furthermore, expression studies showed that genes in the expanded PoptrIAA3 subgroup display differential expression. The gene-family analysis reported here will be useful in conducting future functional genomics studies to understand how the molecular roles of these large gene families translate into a diversity of biologically meaningful auxin effects.

  14. Expression of arf tumor suppressor in spermatogonia facilitates meiotic progression in male germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Churchman

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian Cdkn2a (Ink4a-Arf locus encodes two tumor suppressor proteins (p16(Ink4a and p19(Arf that respectively enforce the anti-proliferative functions of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb and the p53 transcription factor in response to oncogenic stress. Although p19(Arf is not normally detected in tissues of young adult mice, a notable exception occurs in the male germ line, where Arf is expressed in spermatogonia, but not in meiotic spermatocytes arising from them. Unlike other contexts in which the induction of Arf potently inhibits cell proliferation, expression of p19(Arf in spermatogonia does not interfere with mitotic cell division. Instead, inactivation of Arf triggers germ cell-autonomous, p53-dependent apoptosis of primary spermatocytes in late meiotic prophase, resulting in reduced sperm production. Arf deficiency also causes premature, elevated, and persistent accumulation of the phosphorylated histone variant H2AX, reduces numbers of chromosome-associated complexes of Rad51 and Dmc1 recombinases during meiotic prophase, and yields incompletely synapsed autosomes during pachynema. Inactivation of Ink4a increases the fraction of spermatogonia in S-phase and restores sperm numbers in Ink4a-Arf doubly deficient mice but does not abrogate γ-H2AX accumulation in spermatocytes or p53-dependent apoptosis resulting from Arf inactivation. Thus, as opposed to its canonical role as a tumor suppressor in inducing p53-dependent senescence or apoptosis, Arf expression in spermatogonia instead initiates a salutary feed-forward program that prevents p53-dependent apoptosis, contributing to the survival of meiotic male germ cells.

  15. Rho GTPase function in development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Esben; Brakebusch, Cord

    2012-01-01

    Rho GTPase functions have been carefully investigated for many years using cell biological models. In recent years, mouse models with targeted mutations in Rho GTPase genes enabled the study of Rho GTPase function in vivo, partially confirming and partially contradicting expectations based...... on earlier in vitro experiments. This review sums up recent findings on the role of Rho GTPases in development, underlining the importance of in vivo research for our understanding of Rho GTPases in living organisms, and describing challenges for the future....

  16. A tale of two GTPases in cotranslational protein targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraogi, Ishu; Akopian, David; Shan, Shu-Ou

    2011-11-01

    Guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) comprise a superfamily of proteins that provide molecular switches to regulate numerous cellular processes. The "GTPase switch" paradigm, in which a GTPase acts as a bimodal switch that is turned "on" and "off" by external regulatory factors, has been used to interpret the regulatory mechanism of many GTPases. Recent work on a pair of GTPases in the signal recognition particle (SRP) pathway has revealed a distinct mode of GTPase regulation. Instead of the classical GTPase switch, the two GTPases in the SRP and SRP receptor undergo a series of conformational changes during their dimerization and reciprocal activation. Each conformational rearrangement provides a point at which these GTPases can communicate with and respond to their upstream and downstream biological cues, thus ensuring the spatial and temporal precision of all the molecular events in the SRP pathway. We suggest that the SRP and SRP receptor represent an emerging class of "multistate" regulatory GTPases uniquely suited to provide exquisite control over complex cellular pathways that require multiple molecular events to occur in a highly coordinated fashion.

  17. GTPases and the origin of the ribosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Temple F

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper is an attempt to trace the evolution of the ribosome through the evolution of the universal P-loop GTPases that are involved with the ribosome in translation and with the attachment of the ribosome to the membrane. The GTPases involved in translation in Bacteria/Archaea are the elongation factors EFTu/EF1, the initiation factors IF2/aeIF5b + aeIF2, and the elongation factors EFG/EF2. All of these GTPases also contain the OB fold also found in the non GTPase IF1 involved in initiation. The GTPase involved in the signal recognition particle in most Bacteria and Archaea is SRP54. Results 1 The Elongation Factors of the Archaea based on structural considerations of the domains have the following evolutionary path: EF1→ aeIF2 → EF2. The evolution of the aeIF5b was a later event; 2 the Elongation Factors of the Bacteria based on the topological considerations of the GTPase domain have a similar evolutionary path: EFTu→ IF→2→EFG. These evolutionary sequences reflect the evolution of the LSU followed by the SSU to form the ribosome; 3 the OB-fold IF1 is a mimic of an ancient tRNA minihelix. Conclusion The evolution of translational GTPases of both the Archaea and Bacteria point to the evolution of the ribosome. The elongation factors, EFTu/EF1, began as a Ras-like GTPase bringing the activated minihelix tRNA to the Large Subunit Unit. The initiation factors and elongation factor would then have evolved from the EFTu/EF1 as the small subunit was added to the evolving ribosome. The SRP has an SRP54 GTPase and a specific RNA fold in its RNA component similar to the PTC. We consider the SRP to be a remnant of an ancient form of an LSU bound to a membrane. Reviewers This article was reviewed by George Fox, Leonid Mirny and Chris Sander.

  18. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor αPIX leads to activation of the Rac 1 GTPase/glycogen phosphorylase pathway in interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llavero, Francisco; Urzelai, Bakarne; Osinalde, Nerea

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have reported that the active form of Rac 1 GTPase binds to the glycogen phosphorylase muscle isoform (PYGM) and modulates its enzymatic activity leading to T cell proliferation. In the lymphoid system, Rac 1 and in general other small GTPases of the Rho family participate in the sig...

  19. ARF-Aux/IAA interactions through domain III/IV are not strictly required for auxin-responsive gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs), together with auxin/indole acetic acid proteins (Aux/IAAs), are transcription factors that play key roles in regulating auxin-responsive transcription in plants. Current models for auxin signaling predict that auxin response is dependent on ARF-Aux/IAA interactions mediated by the related protein-protein interaction domain (i.e., referred to as the CTD) found in the ARF and Aux/IAA C-terminal regions. When auxin concentrations in a cell are low, ARF activators r...

  20. Integrin-mediated function of Rab GTPases in cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alahari Suresh K

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The RAS (rat sarcoma superfamily of small GTPases is broadly subdivided into five groups: Ras, Rho, Rab, Ran, and Arf. Rab family proteins are important in regulating signal transduction and cellular processes such as differentiation, proliferation, vesicle transport, nuclear assembly, and cytoskeleton formation. However, some Rab proteins have been reported to be necessary for the adhesion and migration of cancer cells. Although Ras and Rho family members have been strongly implicated in cancer progression, knowledge of Rabs action in this regard is limited. Some reports have also linked Rab GTPases with cancer cell migration and invasiveness. This review discusses the implications of the involvement of Rabs in malignant transformation and cancer therapy through integrin-mediated signaling events, with particular emphasis on breast cancer.

  1. PIKE GTPase Signaling and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jee-Yin; Ye, Keqiang

    2005-01-01

    PIKE (PI 3-Kinase Enhancer) is a recently identified brain specific nuclear GTPase, which binds PI 3-kinase and stimulates its lipid kinase activity. Nerve growth factor treatment leads to PIKE activation by triggering the nuclear translocation of phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1), which acts as a physiologic guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for PIKE through its SH3 domain. To date, three forms of PIKE have been characterized: PIKE-S, PIKE-L and PIKE-A. PIKE-S is initially identified shorte...

  2. E2F-dependent induction of p14ARF during cell cycle re-entry in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    del Arroyo, Ana Gutierrez; El Messaoudi, Selma; Clark, Paula A

    2007-01-01

    The ARF protein, encoded by alternate exon usage within the CDKN2A locus, provides a link between the retinoblastoma (pRb) and p53 tumor suppressor pathways. Agents that disable pRb or otherwise impinge on the E2F family of transcription factors induce expression of ARF, resulting in stabilization...... of p53 and activation of p53-regulated genes. However, in some cell types ARF is not induced upon cell cycle re-entry, as expected of a conventional E2F target gene, leading to the suggestion that the ARF promoter only responds to supra-physiological or aberrant levels of E2F. These properties have...

  3. Role of the Sec14-like domain of Dbl family exchange factors in the regulation of Rho family GTPases in different subcellular sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Shuji; Kataoka, Tohru; Satoh, Takaya

    2004-08-01

    Mechanisms underlying subcellular region-specific regulation of Rho family GTPases through Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) remain totally unknown. Here we show that the Sec14-like domain, which lies in the N-terminus of the Dbl family GEFs Dbl and Ost, directs the subcellular localization of these GEFs and also their substrate Cdc42. When coexpressed with Cdc42 in human adenocarcinoma HeLa cells, Dbl-I and Ost-I, which lack the Sec14-like domain, translocated Cdc42 to the plasma membrane, where Dbl-I or Ost-I was colocalized. In marked contrast, Dbl-II and Ost-II, which contain the Sec14-like domain, were colocalized with Cdc42 in endomembrane compartments. Furthermore, ruffle membrane formation upon epidermal growth factor treatment was mediated by Dbl-I or Ost-I, but neither Dbl-II nor Ost-II, supporting a notion that GEFs with or without the Sec14-like domain are linked to different upstream signals. By employing a novel method to detect the active GTP-bound form of Cdc42 in situ, we demonstrate that Dbl-I and Ost-I, but neither Dbl-II nor Ost-II, indeed activate colocalized Cdc42.

  4. Molecular analysis of ARF1 expression profiles during development of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaobo; Lin, Fanrong; Lii, Yifan; Gou, Chunbao; Chen, Fang

    2011-03-01

    A cDNA clone designated arf1 was isolated from a physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) endosperm cDNA library which encodes a small GTP-binding protein and has significant homology to ADP-ribosylation factors (ARF) in plants, animals and microbes. The cDNA contains an open reading frame that encodes a polypeptide of 181 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 20.7 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology to known ARFs from other organisms. The products of the arf1 obtained by overexpression in E. coli revealed the specific binding activity toward GTP. The expression of arf1 was observed in flowers, roots, stems and leaves as analyzed by RT-PCR, and its transcriptional level was highest in flowers. In particular, the accumulation of arf1 transcripts was different under various environmental stresses in seedlings. The results suggest that arf1 plays distinct physiological roles in Jatropha curcas cells.

  5. ARF tumor suppression in the nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Leonard B; Winkeler, Crystal L; Miceli, Alexander P; Apicelli, Anthony J; Brady, Suzanne N; Kuchenreuther, Michael J; Weber, Jason D

    2014-06-01

    Since its discovery close to twenty years ago, the ARF tumor suppressor has played a pivotal role in the field of cancer biology. Elucidating ARF's basal physiological function in the cell has been the focal interest of numerous laboratories throughout the world for many years. Our current understanding of ARF is constantly evolving to include novel frameworks for conceptualizing the regulation of this critical tumor suppressor. As a result of this complexity, there is great need to broaden our understanding of the intricacies governing the biology of the ARF tumor suppressor. The ARF tumor suppressor is a key sensor of signals that instruct a cell to grow and proliferate and is appropriately localized in nucleoli to limit these processes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease.

  6. Atypical GTPases as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Meera; Eswaran, Jeyanthy

    2012-01-01

    The Ras GTPases are the founding members of large Ras superfamily, which constitutes more than 150 of these important class of enzymes. These GTPases function as GDP-GTP-regulated binary switches that control many fundamental cellular processes. There are a number of GTPases that have been identified recently, which do not confine to this prototype termed as "atypical GTPases" but have proved to play a remarkable role in vital cellular functions. In this review, we provide an overview of the crucial physiological functions mediated by RGK and Centaurin class of multi domain atypical GTPases. Moreover, the recently available atypical GTPase structures of the two families, regulation, physiological functions and their critical roles in various diseases will be discussed. In summary, this review will highlight the emerging atypical GTPase family which allows us to understand novel regulatory mechanisms and thus providing new avenues for drug discovery programs.

  7. RHO GTPase in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Plants possess a single subfamily of Rho GTPases, ROP, which does usual things as do Rho-family GTPases in animal and fungal systems, namely participating in the spatial control of cellular processes by signaling to the cytoskeleton and vesicular trafficking. As one would expect, ROPs are modulated by conserved regulators such as DHR2-type GEFs, RhoGAPs and Rho GDIs. What is surprising is that plants have invented new regulators such as PRONE-type GEFs (known as RopGEFs) and effectors such as RICs and ICRs/RIPs in the regulation of the cytoskeleton and vesicular trafficking. This review will discuss recent work on characterizing ROP regulators and effectors as well as addressing why and how a mixture of conserved and novel Rho signaling mechanisms is utilized to modulate fundamental cellular processes such as cytoskeletal dynamics/reorganization and vesicular trafficking. PMID:21686259

  8. Major Host Factors Involved in Epithelial Cell Invasion of Campylobacter jejuni: Role of Fibronectin, Integrin Beta1, FAK, Tiam-1, and DOCK180 in Activating Rho GTPase Rac1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Manja; Krause-Gruszczynska, Malgorzata; Rohde, Manfred; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Takahashi, Seiichiro; Oyarzabal, Omar A.; Backert, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Host cell entry by the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni has been reported as one of the primary reasons of tissue damage in infected humans, however, molecular invasion mechanisms and cellular factors involved in this process are widely unclear. Here we used knockout cell lines derived from fibronectin−/−, integrin beta1−/−, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK)−/− deficient mice and corresponding wild-type (WT) controls, to study C. jejuni-induced signaling cascades involved in the bacterial invasion process. Using high resolution scanning electron microscopy, GTPase pull-downs, G-LISA, and gentamicin protection assays we found that each of these host cell factors is indeed required for activation of the small Rho GTPase member Rac1 and maximal host cell invasion of this pathogen. Interestingly, membrane ruffling, tight engulfment of bacteria and invasion were only seen during infection of WT control cells, but not in fibronectin−/−, integrin beta1−/−, and FAK−/− knockout cell lines. We also demonstrate that C. jejuni activates FAK autophosphorylation activity at Y-397 and phosphorylation of Y-925, which is required for stimulating two downstream guanine exchange factors, DOCK180 and Tiam-1, which are upstream of Rac1. Small interfering (si) RNA studies further show that DOCK180 and Tiam-1 act cooperatively to trigger Rac1 activation and C. jejuni invasion. Moreover, mutagenesis data indicate that the bacterial fibronectin-binding protein CadF and the intact flagellum are involved in Rho GTPase activation and host cell invasion. Collectively, our results suggest that C. jejuni infection of host epithelial target cells hijacks a major fibronectin → integrin beta1 → FAK → DOCK180/Tiam-1 signaling cascade, which has a crucial role for Rac1 GTPase activity and bacterial entry into host target cells. PMID:22919583

  9. Improving plasma resistance and lowering roughness in an ArF photoresist by adding a chemical reaction inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinnai, Butsurin; Uesugi, Takuji; Koyama, Koji; Samukawa, Seiji [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kato, Keisuke; Yasuda, Atsushi; Maeda, Shinichi [Yokohama Research Laboratories, Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd., 10-1 Daikoku-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama 230-0053 (Japan); Momose, Hikaru, E-mail: samukawa@ifs.tohoku.ac.j [Corporate Research Laboratories, Mitsubishi Rayon Co. Ltd., 2-1 Miyuki-cho, Otake, Hiroshima 739-0693 (Japan)

    2010-11-24

    Major challenges associated with 193 nm lithography using an ArF photoresist are low plasma resistance and roughness formation in the ArF photoresist during plasma processes. We have previously found decisive factors affecting the plasma resistance and roughness formation in an ArF photoresist: plasma resistance is determined by UV/VUV radiation, and roughness formation is dominated by chemical reactions. In this study, based on our findings on the interaction between plasma radiation species and ArF photoresist polymers, we proposed an ArF photoresist with a chemical reaction inhibitor, which can trap reactive species from the plasma, and characterized the performances of the resultant ArF photoresist through neutral beam experiments. Hindered amine light stabilizers, i.e. 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (HO-TEMPO), were used as the chemical reaction inhibitor. Etching rates of the ArF photoresist films were not dependent on the HO-TEMPO content in the irradiations without chemical reactions or under UV/VUV radiation. However, in the irradiation with chemical reactions, the etching rates of the ArF photoresist films decreased as the HO-TEMPO content increased. In addition, the surface roughness decreased with the increase in the additive amount of chemical reaction inhibitor. According to FTIR analysis, a chemical reaction inhibitor can inhibit the chemical reactions in ArF photoresist films through plasma radicals. These results indicate that a chemical reaction inhibitor is effective against chemical reactions, resulting in improved plasma resistance and less roughness in an ArF photoresist. These results also support our suggested mechanism of plasma resistance and roughness formation in an ArF photoresist.

  10. 苹果生长素响应因子(ARF)基因家族全基因组鉴定及表达分析%Genome-Wide Identiifcation and Expression Analysis ofAuxin Response Factor (ARF) Gene Family in Apple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李慧峰; 冉昆; 何平; 王海波; 常源升; 孙清荣; 程来亮; 李林光

    2015-01-01

    生长素响应因子(auxin response factor, ARF)基因在调控生长素响应基因和生长素信号转导途径以及其它多个生长发育过程具有重要作用。本研究利用Blast P程序比对并获得苹果ARF基因家族,通过DNAMAN 6.0、MEGA 5.0、WebLogo 3、MapInspect和MEME软件对苹果ARF基因进行分析,采用RT-PCR技术研究基因组织表达情况。结果表明,苹果基因组存在29个ARF基因,进化上可分为I、II、III、IV和V组,每组成员数目分别是4、5、10、6和4个。内含子和外显子结构分析表明,该基因家族由2~15个外显子构成。染色体分布结果显示, MdARF基因在染色体上分布不均匀。分别鉴定出4对和2对MdARF基因经历了串联复制和片段复制,14个MdARF基因经历了全基因组复制。保守元件分析表明,苹果ARF基因家族DBD区域、ARF区域、III元件和IV元件结构高度保守。半定量结果表明,大多数MdARF基因在根、茎、叶、花和果中均有表达。%Auxin response factor (ARF) genes play multiple important roles in the regulation of auxin response genes, auxin signal transduction pathway and other processes. In this study,ARF genes from apple (Malus domestica Borkh) genome were obtained via BlastP analysis, and their amino acid sequences were analyzed with DNAMAN 6.0, MEGA 5.0, WebLogo 3, MapInspect and MEME software, their expression patterns in different tissues were checked by RT-PCR analysis. The results showed that 29MdARF candidate genes were existed in apple genome. The results of phylogenetic analysis revealed thatMdARFgene family was divid-ed into ifve classes: Class I (four members), Class II (ifve members), Class III (ten members), Class IV (six members) and Class V (four members), respectively. The results of intron-exon structure analysis indicated that MdARF gene family members were composed of 2–15 exons. Chromosome mapping analysis revealed that MdARF genes were distributed unevenly on 15 chromosomes. Four

  11. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Shin, Eun-Young; Schwartz, Martin Alexander; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology–pleckstrin homology modu...

  12. Mammalian Mon2/Ysl2 regulates endosome-to-Golgi trafficking but possesses no guanine nucleotide exchange activity toward Arl1 GTPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Divyanshu; Boh, Boon Kim; Zhou, Yan; Chen, Li; Cornvik, Tobias Carl; Hong, Wanjin; Lu, Lei

    2013-11-01

    Arl1 is a member of Arf family small GTPases that is essential for the organization and function of Golgi complex. Mon2/Ysl2, which shares significant homology with Sec7 family Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors, was poorly characterized in mammalian cells. Here, we report the first in depth characterization of mammalian Mon2. We found that Mon2 localized to trans-Golgi network which was dependent on both its N and C termini. The depletion of Mon2 did not affect the Golgi localized or cellular active form of Arl1. Furthermore, our in vitro assay demonstrated that recombinant Mon2 did not promote guanine nucleotide exchange of Arl1. Therefore, our results suggest that Mon2 could be neither necessary nor sufficient for the guanine nucleotide exchange of Arl1. We demonstrated that Mon2 was involved in endosome-to-Golgi trafficking as its depletion accelerated the delivery of furin and CI-M6PR to Golgi after endocytosis.

  13. Invited review: Small GTPases and their GAPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ashwini K; Lambright, David G

    2016-08-01

    Widespread utilization of small GTPases as major regulatory hubs in many different biological systems derives from a conserved conformational switch mechanism that facilitates cycling between GTP-bound active and GDP-bound inactive states under control of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs), which accelerate slow intrinsic rates of activation by nucleotide exchange and deactivation by GTP hydrolysis, respectively. Here we review developments leading to current understanding of intrinsic and GAP catalyzed GTP hydrolytic reactions in small GTPases from structural, molecular and chemical mechanistic perspectives. Despite the apparent simplicity of the GTPase cycle, the structural bases underlying the hallmark hydrolytic reaction and catalytic acceleration by GAPs are considerably more diverse than originally anticipated. Even the most fundamental aspects of the reaction mechanism have been challenging to decipher. Through a combination of experimental and in silico approaches, the outlines of a consensus view have begun to emerge for the best studied paradigms. Nevertheless, recent observations indicate that there is still much to be learned. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 431-448, 2016.

  14. ARF2 coordinates with PLETHORAs and PINs to orchestrate ABA-mediated root meristem activity in Arabidopsis .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promchuea, Sujittra; Zhu, Yujuan; Chen, Zhizhong; Zhang, Jing; Gong, Zhizhong

    2017-01-01

    Multiple hormones, including abscisic acid (ABA) and auxin, regulate cell division and differentiation of Arabidopsis root meristems. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2 (ARF2) functions as a negative regulator of ABA responses, as seed germination and primary root growth of arf2 mutants are hypersensitive to ABA. In this study, we found that ABA treatment reduced the expression levels of the PIN-FORMEDs (PIN) auxin efflux carriers, PIN1, PIN3, PIN4, and PIN7, to a greater extent in the root meristems of arf2-101 mutant than in the wild type. Also, arf2-101 pin1 and arf2-101 pin4 double mutants show less ABA-induced inhibition of root meristem activity than the arf2-101 mutants. Furthermore, ARF2 positively mediates the transcripts of transcription factor PLETHORA 1 (PLT1) gene but negatively mediates PLT2 at protein level in root meristems. Using a dexamethasone (DEX)-inducible transgenic line, Pro35S:PLT2-GR, we showed that PLT2 greatly promotes cell division and completely inhibits cell differentiation in root meristems of the arf2-101 mutant once PLT2 is induced by DEX, which can be partially reversed by ABA treatment, suggesting that ABA regulates root meristem activity in both ARF2-dependent and independent pathways. Our results uncover a complex regulatory architecture in which ARF2 coordinates with PLTs and PINs to orchestrate ABA-mediated regulation of root meristem activity in Arabidopsis. © 2016 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Rho GTPases in platelet function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, J E; McCarty, O J T

    2013-01-01

    The Rho family of GTP binding proteins, also commonly referred to as the Rho GTPases, are master regulators of the platelet cytoskeleton and platelet function. These low-molecular-weight or 'small' GTPases act as signaling switches in the spatial and temporal transduction, and amplification of signals from platelet cell surface receptors to the intracellular signaling pathways that drive platelet function. The Rho GTPase family members RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1 have emerged as key regulators in the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in platelets and play key roles in platelet aggregation, secretion, spreading and thrombus formation. Rho GTPase regulators, including GEFs and GAPs and downstream effectors, such as the WASPs, formins and PAKs, may also regulate platelet activation and function. In this review, we provide an overview of Rho GTPase signaling in platelet physiology. Previous studies of Rho GTPases and platelets have had a shared history, as platelets have served as an ideal, non-transformed cellular model to characterize Rho function. Likewise, recent studies of the cell biology of Rho GTPase family members have helped to build an understanding of the molecular regulation of platelet function and will continue to do so through the further characterization of Rho GTPases as well as Rho GAPs, GEFs, RhoGDIs and Rho effectors in actin reorganization and other Rho-driven cellular processes. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  16. The universally conserved prokaryotic GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Natalie; Fauvart, Maarten; Versées, Wim; Michiels, Jan

    2011-09-01

    Members of the large superclass of P-loop GTPases share a core domain with a conserved three-dimensional structure. In eukaryotes, these proteins are implicated in various crucial cellular processes, including translation, membrane trafficking, cell cycle progression, and membrane signaling. As targets of mutation and toxins, GTPases are involved in the pathogenesis of cancer and infectious diseases. In prokaryotes also, it is hard to overestimate the importance of GTPases in cell physiology. Numerous papers have shed new light on the role of bacterial GTPases in cell cycle regulation, ribosome assembly, the stress response, and other cellular processes. Moreover, bacterial GTPases have been identified as high-potential drug targets. A key paper published over 2 decades ago stated that, "It may never again be possible to capture [GTPases] in a family portrait" (H. R. Bourne, D. A. Sanders, and F. McCormick, Nature 348:125-132, 1990) and indeed, the last 20 years have seen a tremendous increase in publications on the subject. Sequence analysis identified 13 bacterial GTPases that are conserved in at least 75% of all bacterial species. We here provide an overview of these 13 protein subfamilies, covering their cellular functions as well as cellular localization and expression levels, three-dimensional structures, biochemical properties, and gene organization. Conserved roles in eukaryotic homologs will be discussed as well. A comprehensive overview summarizing current knowledge on prokaryotic GTPases will aid in further elucidating the function of these important proteins.

  17. Bacterial Cytotoxins Target Rho GTPases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gudula; Aktories, Klaus

    1998-06-01

    Low molecular mass GTPases of the Rho family, which are involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and in various signal transduction processes, are the eukaryotic targets of bacterial protein toxins. The toxins covalently modify Rho proteins by ADP ribosylation, glucosylation, and deamidation, thereby inactivating and activating the GTPases.

  18. Rho GTPase function in tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, R; Pedersen, Esben Ditlev Kølle; Wang, Zhipeng;

    2009-01-01

    Malignant tumor cells display uncontrolled proliferation, loss of epithelial cell polarity, altered interactions with neighboring cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix, and enhanced migratory properties. Proteins of the Rho GTPase family regulate all these processes in cell culture and......, for that reason, Rho GTPases, their regulators, and their effectors have been suggested to control tumor formation and progression in humans. However, while the tumor-relevant functions of Rho GTPases are very well documented in vitro, we are only now beginning to assess their contribution to cancer in human...... patients and in animal models. This review will give a very brief overview of Rho GTPase function in general and then focus on in vivo evidence for a role of Rho GTPases in malignant tumors, both in human patients and in genetically modified mice....

  19. In vitro comparative kinetic analysis of the chloroplast Toc GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddick, L Evan; Vaughn, Michael D; Wright, Sarah J; Campbell, Ian M; Bruce, Barry D

    2007-04-13

    A unique aspect of protein transport into plastids is the coordinate involvement of two GTPases in the translocon of the outer chloroplast membrane (Toc). There are two subfamilies in Arabidopsis, the small GTPases (Toc33 and Toc34) and the large acidic GTPases (Toc90, Toc120, Toc132, and Toc159). In chloroplasts, Toc34 and Toc159 are implicated in precursor binding, yet mechanistic details are poorly understood. How the GTPase cycle is modulated by precursor binding is complex and in need of careful dissection. To this end, we have developed novel in vitro assays to quantitate nucleotide binding and hydrolysis of the Toc GTPases. Here we present the first systematic kinetic characterization of four Toc GTPases (cytosolic domains of atToc33, atToc34, psToc34, and the GTPase domain of atToc159) to permit their direct comparison. We report the KM, Vmax, and Ea values for GTP hydrolysis and the Kd value for nucleotide binding for each protein. We demonstrate that GTP hydrolysis by psToc34 is stimulated by chloroplast transit peptides; however, this activity is not stimulated by homodimerization and is abolished by the R133A mutation. Furthermore, we show peptide stimulation of hydrolytic rates are not because of accelerated nucleotide exchange, indicating that transit peptides function as GTPase-activating proteins and not guanine nucleotide exchange factors in modulating the activity of psToc34. Finally, by using the psToc34 structure, we have developed molecular models for atToc33, atToc34, and atToc159G. By combining these models with the measured enzymatic properties of the Toc GTPases, we provide new insights of how the chloroplast protein import cycle may be regulated.

  20. A thirty-year quest for a role of R-Ras in cancer: from an oncogene to a multitasking GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wai Nam; Yan, Mingfei; Chan, Andrew M

    2017-09-10

    Since the identification of R-Ras, which is the first Ras-related GTPase isolated based on sequence similarity to the classical RAS oncogene, more than 160 members of the Ras superfamily of GTPases have been identified and classified into the Ras, Rho, Rap, Rab, Ran, Arf, Rheb, RGK, Rad, Rit, and Miro subfamilies. R-Ras belongs to the Ras subfamily of small G-proteins, which are frequently implicated in cell growth and differentiation. Although the roles of R-Ras in cellular transformation and integrin-mediated cell adhesion have been extensively studied, the physiological function of this enigmatic G-protein was only revealed when a mouse strain deficient in R-Ras was generated. In parallel, a plethora of research findings also linked R-Ras with processes including tumor angiogenesis, axon guidance, and immune cell trafficking. Several upstream factors that modulate R-Ras GTP-binding were identified including Notch, semaphorin, and chemokine C-C motif ligand 21. A review of our evolving understanding of the role of R-Ras in oncogenesis is timely, as this year marks the 30th anniversary of the publication describing the cloning of R-Ras. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Signal recognition particle (SRP) and SRP receptor: a new paradigm for multistate regulatory GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shu-ou; Schmid, Sandra L; Zhang, Xin

    2009-07-28

    The GTP-binding proteins or GTPases comprise a superfamily of proteins that provide molecular switches in numerous cellular processes. The "GTPase switch" paradigm, in which a GTPase acts as a bimodal switch that is turned "on" and "off" by external regulatory factors, has been used to interpret the regulatory mechanism of many GTPases for more than two decades. Nevertheless, recent work has unveiled an emerging class of "multistate" regulatory GTPases that do not adhere to this classical paradigm. Instead of relying on external nucleotide exchange factors or GTPase activating proteins to switch between the on and off states, these GTPases have the intrinsic ability to exchange nucleotides and to sense and respond to upstream and downstream factors. In contrast to the bimodal nature of the GTPase switch, these GTPases undergo multiple conformational rearrangements, allowing multiple regulatory points to be built into a complex biological process to ensure the efficiency and fidelity of the pathway. We suggest that these multistate regulatory GTPases are uniquely suited to provide spatial and temporal control of complex cellular pathways that require multiple molecular events to occur in a highly coordinated fashion.

  2. Selective Protection of an ARF1-GTP Signaling Axis by a Bacterial Scaffold Induces Bidirectional Trafficking Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey S. Selyunin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bidirectional vesicular transport between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Golgi is mediated largely by ARF and Rab GTPases, which orchestrate vesicle fission and fusion, respectively. How their activities are coordinated in order to define the successive steps of the secretory pathway and preserve traffic directionality is not well understood in part due to the scarcity of molecular tools that simultaneously target ARF and Rab signaling. Here, we take advantage of the unique scaffolding properties of E. coli secreted protein G (EspG to describe the critical role of ARF1/Rab1 spatiotemporal coordination in vesicular transport at the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment. Structural modeling and cellular studies show that EspG induces bidirectional traffic arrest by tethering vesicles through select ARF1-GTP/effector complexes and local inactivation of Rab1. The mechanistic insights presented here establish the effectiveness of a small bacterial catalytic scaffold for studying complex processes and reveal an alternative mechanism of immune regulation by an important human pathogen.

  3. Repression of ARF10 by microRNA160 plays an important role in the mediation of leaf water loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Dong, Xiufen; Liu, Zihan; Shi, Zihang; Jiang, Yun; Qi, Mingfang; Xu, Tao; Li, Tianlai

    2016-10-01

    Solanum lycopersicum auxin response factor 10 (SlARF10) is post-transcriptionally regulated by Sl-miR160. Overexpression of a Sl-miR160-resistant SlARF10 (mSlARF10) resulted in narrower leaflet blades with larger stomata but lower densities. 35S:mSlARF10-6 plants with narrower excised leaves had greater water loss, which was in contrast to the wild type (WT). Further analysis revealed that the actual water loss was not consistent with the calculated stomatal water loss in 35S:mSlARF10-6 and the WT under the dehydration treatment, indicating that there is a difference in hydraulic conductance. Pretreatment with abscisic acid (ABA) and HgCl2 confirmed higher hydraulic conductance in 35S:mSlARF10, which is related to the larger stomatal size and higher activity of aquaporins (AQPs). Under ABA treatment, 35S:mSlARF10-6 showed greater sensitivity, and the stomata closed rapidly. Screening by RNA sequencing revealed that five AQP-related genes, fourteen ABA biosynthesis/signal genes and three stomatal development genes were significantly altered in 35S:mSlARF10-6 plants, and this result was verified by qRT-PCR. The promoter analysis showed that upregulated AQPs contain AuxRE and ABRE, implying that these elements may be responsible for the high expression levels of AQPs in 35S:mSlARF10-6. The three most upregulated AQPs (SlTIP1-1-like, SlPIP2;4 and SlNIP-type-like) were chosen to confirm AuxRE and ABRE function. Promoters transient expression demonstrated that the SlPIP2;4 and SlNIP-type-like AuxREs and SlPIP2;4 and SlTIP1-1-like ABREs could significantly enhance the expression of the GUS reporter in 35S:mSlARF10-6, confirming that AuxRE and ABRE may be the main factors inducing the expression of AQPs. Additionally, two upregulated transcription factors in 35S:mSlARF10-6, SlARF10 and SlABI5-like were shown to directly bind to those elements in an electromobility shift assay and a yeast one-hybrid assay. Furthermore, transient expression of down-regulated ARF10 or up

  4. Dietary Energy Balance Modulation of Kras– and Ink4a/Arf+/-–Driven Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1

    OpenAIRE

    Lashinger, Laura M.; Lauren M Harrison; Rasmussen, Audrey J.; Logsdon, Craig D.; Fischer, Susan M.; McArthur, Mark J.; Hursting, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    New molecular targets and intervention strategies for breaking the obesity-pancreatic cancer link are urgently needed. Using relevant spontaneous and orthotopically transplanted murine models of pancreatic cancer, we tested the hypothesis that dietary energy balance modulation impacts pancreatic cancer development and progression through an insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1–dependent mechanism. In LSL-KrasG12D/Pdx-1-Cre/Ink4a/Arflox/+ mice, calorie restriction, versus overweight- or obesity-...

  5. Study on the chaperone properties of conserved GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Xue, Jiaying; Sun, Zhe; Qin, Yan; Gong, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    As a large family of hydrolases, GTPases are widespread in cells and play the very important biological function of hydrolyzing GTP into GDP and inorganic phosphate through binding with it. GTPases are involved in cell cycle regulation, protein synthesis, and protein transportation. Chaperones can facilitate the folding or refolding of nascent peptides and denatured proteins to their native states. However, chaperones do not occur in the native structures in which they can perform their normal biological functions. In the current study, the chaperone activity of the conserved GTPases of Escherichia coli is tested by the chemical denaturation and chaperone-assisted renaturation of citrate synthase and α-glucosidase. The effects of ribosomes and nucleotides on the chaperone activity are also examined. Our data indicate that these conserved GTPases have chaperone properties, and may be ancestral protein folding factors that have appeared before dedicated chaperones.

  6. Tumor suppressor ARF: The new player of innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Través, Paqui G; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-09-01

    ARF (alternative reading frame) is one of the most important tumor regulator playing critical roles in controlling tumor initiation and progression. Recently, we have demonstrated a novel and unexpected role for ARF as modulator of inflammatory responses.

  7. Influence of simulated microgravity on the activation of the small GTPase Rho involved in cytoskeletal formation – molecular cloning and sequencing of bovine leukemia-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seki Masaya

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The irregular formation of cytoskeletal fibers in spaceflown experimental cells has been observed, but the disorganization process of fibers is still poorly understood. It is well known that the activation of the small GTPase Rho leads to actin stress fibers assembly. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of simulated microgravity on the activation of Rho that is involved in actin fiber remodeling in cells. Results Clinorotation influences actin fiber remodeling and its related signaling pathways that involve the small GTPase Rho. Actin stress fiber remodeling was significantly inhibited to a greater extent in cells cultured under clinorotation than in static cultured cells. From the gene and protein expression analyses, we found that the expression level of leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG, which activates Rho, was downregulated under clinorotation. Moreover, we identified the full-length LARG cDNA. The amount of GTP-bound RhoA, that is, the active form of RhoA, decreased under this condition. Conclusion The activation of the small GTPase Rho was influenced by simulated microgravity generated by a three-dimensional (3D clinostat. Furthermore, the full-length cDNA of bovine LARG, a member of the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF family, was identified, and its gene expression was observed to be downregulated under clinorotation. This downregulation subsequently resulted in the repression of RhoA activation. These results indicated that the disorganization of the actin fibers was caused by the inhibition of Rho activation by 3D clinorotation.

  8. Polycomb Mediated Epigenetic Silencing and Replication Timing at the INK4a/ARF Locus during Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verthuy, Christophe; Chasson, Lionel; Serrano, Manuel; Djabali, Malek

    2009-01-01

    Background The INK4/ARF locus encodes three tumor suppressor genes (p15Ink4b, Arf and p16Ink4a) and is frequently inactivated in a large number of human cancers. Mechanisms regulating INK4/ARF expression are not fully characterized. Principal Findings Here we show that in young proliferating embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) member EZH2 together with PRC1 members BMI1 and M33 are strongly expressed and localized at the INK4/ARF regulatory domain (RD) identified as a DNA replication origin. When cells enter senescence the binding to RD of both PRC1 and PRC2 complexes is lost leading to a decreased level of histone H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3). This loss is accompanied with an increased expression of the histone demethylase Jmjd3 and with the recruitment of the MLL1 protein, and correlates with the expression of the Ink4a/Arf genes. Moreover, we show that the Polycomb protein BMI1 interacts with CDC6, an essential regulator of DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. Finally, we demonstrate that Polycomb proteins and associated epigenetic marks are crucial for the control of the replication timing of the INK4a/ARF locus during senescence. Conclusions We identified the replication licencing factor CDC6 as a new partner of the Polycomb group member BMI1. Our results suggest that in young cells Polycomb proteins are recruited to the INK4/ARF locus through CDC6 and the resulting silent locus is replicated during late S-phase. Upon senescence, Jmjd3 is overexpressed and the MLL1 protein is recruited to the locus provoking the dissociation of Polycomb from the INK4/ARF locus, its transcriptional activation and its replication during early S-phase. Together, these results provide a unified model that integrates replication, transcription and epigenetics at the INK4/ARF locus. PMID:19462008

  9. Polycomb mediated epigenetic silencing and replication timing at the INK4a/ARF locus during senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanane Agherbi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The INK4/ARF locus encodes three tumor suppressor genes (p15(Ink4b, Arf and p16(Ink4a and is frequently inactivated in a large number of human cancers. Mechanisms regulating INK4/ARF expression are not fully characterized. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that in young proliferating embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2 member EZH2 together with PRC1 members BMI1 and M33 are strongly expressed and localized at the INK4/ARF regulatory domain (RD identified as a DNA replication origin. When cells enter senescence the binding to RD of both PRC1 and PRC2 complexes is lost leading to a decreased level of histone H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3. This loss is accompanied with an increased expression of the histone demethylase Jmjd3 and with the recruitment of the MLL1 protein, and correlates with the expression of the Ink4a/Arf genes. Moreover, we show that the Polycomb protein BMI1 interacts with CDC6, an essential regulator of DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. Finally, we demonstrate that Polycomb proteins and associated epigenetic marks are crucial for the control of the replication timing of the INK4a/ARF locus during senescence. CONCLUSIONS: We identified the replication licencing factor CDC6 as a new partner of the Polycomb group member BMI1. Our results suggest that in young cells Polycomb proteins are recruited to the INK4/ARF locus through CDC6 and the resulting silent locus is replicated during late S-phase. Upon senescence, Jmjd3 is overexpressed and the MLL1 protein is recruited to the locus provoking the dissociation of Polycomb from the INK4/ARF locus, its transcriptional activation and its replication during early S-phase. Together, these results provide a unified model that integrates replication, transcription and epigenetics at the INK4/ARF locus.

  10. Isolation of a Mutant of Fer1 Gene, Acting Synergistically with the ARF8 Gene to Control Development of the Anther and Filament in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-En TIAN; Yu-Ping ZHOU; Shun-Zhi LIU; Kotaro YAMAMOTO

    2005-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs) play a central role in plants as transcriptional factors in response to auxin. The Arabidopsis ARF8 gene is a light-inducible gene and ARF8 protein might control auxin homeostasis in a negative feed-back fashion through regulation of GH3 gene expression. In a double mutant designated infertile line including arf8-1 (a T-DNA insertion mutant of ARF8), we isolatedfertility1-1 (fer1-1), a mutant of Fer1, which acts synergistically with ARF8 to control the development of the anther and filament in Arabidopsis. Genetics analysis has demonstrated thatfer1-1 is a T-DNA insertion line,indicating that Fer1 might be cloned by inverse polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or the TAIL-PCR approach.Phenotypic identification and molecular analysis offer1-1 and the infertile line will be helpful to characterize the function of Fer1, to further study the function of ARF8, and to reveal the molecular mechanism underlying the interaction of Fer1 and ARF8 in controlling development of the anther and filament.

  11. The identification and characterization of specific ARF-Aux/IAA regulatory modules in plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogan, Naden T; Berleth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The current model of auxin-inducible transcription describes numerous regulatory interactions between AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORs (ARFs) and Aux/IAAs. However, specific relationships between individual members of these families in planta remain largely uncharacterized. Using a systems biology approach, the entire suite of Aux/IAA genes directly regulated by the developmentally pivotal ARF MONOPTEROS (MP) was recently determined for multiple Arabidopsis tissue types. This study showed that MP directly targets distinct subclades of Aux/IAAs, revealing potential regulatory modules of redundantly acting Aux/IAAs involved in MP-dependent processes. Further, functional analyses indicated that the protein products of these targeted Aux/IAAs negatively feedback on MP. Thus, comprehensive identification of Aux/IAAs targeted by individual ARFs will generate biologically meaningful networks of ARF-Aux/IAA regulatory modules controlling distinct plant pathways.

  12. Small GTPases and Stress Responses of vvran1 in the Straw Mushroom Volvariella volvacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Jie Yan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Small GTPases play important roles in the growth, development and environmental responses of eukaryotes. Based on the genomic sequence of the straw mushroom Volvariella volvacea, 44 small GTPases were identified. A clustering analysis using human small GTPases as the references revealed that V. volvacea small GTPases can be grouped into five families: nine are in the Ras family, 10 are in the Rho family, 15 are in the Rab family, one is in the Ran family and nine are in the Arf family. The transcription of vvran1 was up-regulated upon hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 stress, and could be repressed by diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI, a NADPH oxidase-specific inhibitor. The number of vvran1 transcripts also increased upon cold stress. Diphenyleneiodonium chloride, but not the superoxide dismutase (SOD inhibitor diethy dithiocarbamate (DDC, could suppress the up-regulation of vvran1 gene expression to cold stress. These results combined with the high correlations between gene expression and superoxide anion (O2− generation indicated that vvran1 could be one of the candidate genes in the downstream of O2− mediated pathways that are generated by NADPH oxidase under low temperature and oxidative stresses.

  13. CVP2- and CVL1-mediated phosphoinositide signaling as a regulator of the ARF GAP SFC/VAN3 in establishment of foliar vein patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carland, Francine; Nelson, Timothy

    2009-09-01

    In foliar organs of dicots, veins are arranged in a highly branched or reticulated pattern for efficient distribution of water, photosynthates and signaling molecules. Recent evidence suggests that the patterns rely in part on regulation of intracellular vesicle transport and cell polarity in selected cells during leaf development. The sorting of vesicle cargos to discrete cellular sites is regulated in yeast and animal cells by the binding of specific phosphoinositides (PIs). We report here that, in the plant Arabidopsis, specific PIs guide the vesicle traffic that is essential for polarized and continuous vein pattern formation. Mutations in SFC/VAN3, an ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein (ARF GAP) with a PI-binding pleckstrin homology domain, result in discontinuous vein patterns. Plants with mutations in both CVP2 and CVL1, which encode inositol polyphosphate 5'-phosphatases that generate the specific PI ligand for the pleckstrin homology domain of SFC/VAN3, phosphatidylinositol-4-monophosphate (PI(4)P), have a discontinuous vein phenotype identical to that of sfc/van3 mutants. Single cvp2 or cvl1 mutants show weak and no discontinuous vein phenotypes, respectively, suggesting that they act redundantly. We propose that these two 5'-phosphatases regulate vein continuity and cell polarity by generating a specific PI ligand for SFC/VAN3.

  14. The phosphatase of regenerating liver 3 (PRL-3) promotes cell migration through Arf-activity-dependent stimulation of integrin α5 recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krndija, Denis; Münzberg, Christin; Maass, Ulrike; Hafner, Margit; Adler, Guido; Kestler, Hans A; Seufferlein, Thomas; Oswald, Franz; von Wichert, Götz

    2012-08-15

    The formation of metastasis is one of the most critical problems in oncology. The phosphatase of regenerating liver 3 (PRL-3) is a new target in colorectal cancer, mediating metastatic behavior through a promigratory function. However, detailed explanations for this effect have remained elusive. Here we show that PRL-3 interacts with the ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1). PRL-3 colocalizes with Arf1 in an endosomal compartment and associates with transmembrane proteins such as the transferrin receptor and α5 integrins. PRL-3 interacts with Arf1 through a distinct motif and regulates activation of Arf1. PRL-3-mediated migration depends on expression and activation of Arf1 and is sensitive to treatment with Brefeldin A. We also demonstrate that PRL-3 modulates recycling of α5 integrins and that its phosphatase activity as well as Arf activation and compartmentalization with Arf1 are required for this effect. In summary our data identify a new function for PRL-3 and show that Arf1 is a new PRL-3-dependent mediator of enhanced migration of cancer cells through enhanced recycling of matrix receptors.

  15. What vibrations tell us about GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    In this review, we discuss how time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is used to understand how GTP hydrolysis is catalyzed by small GTPases and their cognate GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). By interaction with small GTPases, GAPs regulate important signal transduction pathways and transport mechanisms in cells. The GTPase reaction terminates signaling and controls transport. Dysfunctions of GTP hydrolysis in these proteins are linked to serious diseases including cancer. Using FTIR, we resolved both the intrinsic and GAP-catalyzed GTPase reaction of the small GTPase Ras with high spatiotemporal resolution and atomic detail. This provided detailed insight into the order of events and how the active site is completed for catalysis. Comparisons of Ras with other small GTPases revealed conservation and variation in the catalytic mechanisms. The approach was extended to more nearly physiological conditions at a membrane. Interactions of membrane-anchored GTPases and their extraction from the membrane are studied using the attenuated total reflection (ATR) technique.

  16. Over-expression of mango (Mangifera indica L.) MiARF2 inhibits root and hypocotyl growth of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bei; Li, Yun-He; Wu, Jian-Yong; Chen, Qi-Zhu; Huang, Xia; Chen, Yun-Feng; Huang, Xue-Lin

    2011-06-01

    An auxin response factor 2 gene, MiARF2, was cloned in our previous study [1] from the cotyledon section of mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Zihua) during adventitious root formation, which shares an 84% amino acid sequence similarity to Arabidopsis ARF2. This study was to examine the effects of over-expression of the full-length MiARF2 open reading frame on the root and hypocotyl growth in Arabidopsis. Phenotype analysis showed that the T(3) transgenic lines had about 20-30% reduction in the length of hypocotyls and roots of the seedlings in comparison with the wild-type. The transcription levels of ANT and ARGOS genes which play a role in controlling organ size and cell proliferation in the transgenic seedlings also decreased. Therefore, the inhibited root and hypocotyl growth in the transgenic seedlings may be associated with the down-regulated transcription of ANT and ARGOS by the over-expression of MiARF2. This study also suggests that although MiARF2 only has a single DNA-binding domain (DBD), it can function as other ARF-like proteins containing complete DBD, middle region (MR) and carboxy-terminal dimerization domain (CTD).

  17. GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Simon; Muto, Akira; Himeno, Hyouta

    2013-05-01

    The ribosome is an RNA- and protein-based macromolecule having multiple functional domains to facilitate protein synthesis, and it is synthesized through multiple steps including transcription, stepwise cleavages of the primary transcript, modifications of ribosomal proteins and RNAs and assemblies of ribosomal proteins with rRNAs. This process requires dozens of trans-acting factors including GTP- and ATP-binding proteins to overcome several energy-consuming steps. Despite accumulation of genetic, biochemical and structural data, the entire process of bacterial ribosome synthesis remains elusive. Here, we review GTPases involved in bacterial ribosome maturation.

  18. Small GTPases : emerging targets in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira de Abreu, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The studies provided in this thesis show that modulation of small GTPase function regulates cellular activation and inflammation in RA and animal models of the disease. Small GTPases are therefore emerging targets in RA and further studies should explore the development of novel small GTPase modulat

  19. The tumor suppressor ARF regulates innate immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Través, Paqui G; López-Fontal, Raquel; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2011-12-15

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading organisms, and TLRs are the main sensors of microbial components, initiating signaling pathways that induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines and type I IFNs. An antiviral action for the tumor suppressor alternative reading frame (ARF) has been reported; however, the precise role of ARF in innate immunity is unknown. In this study, we show that ARF plays an important role in regulation of inflammatory responses. In peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages from ARF-deficient animals, the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by TLR ligands was severely impaired. The altered responses of ARF(-/-) cells to TLR ligands result from aberrant activation of intracellular signaling molecules including MAPKs, IκBα degradation, and NF-κB activation. Additionally, animals lacking ARF were resistant to LPS-induced endotoxic shock. This impaired activation of inflammation in ARF(-/-) mice was not restricted to TLRs, as it was also shown in response to non-TLR signaling pathways. Thus, ARF(-/-) mice were also unable to trigger a proper inflammatory response in experimental peritonitis or in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced edema. Overexpression of ARF, but not its downstream target p53, rescued the ARF-deficient phenotype, increasing TLR4 levels and restoring inflammatory reaction. An increase in the E2F1 protein levels observed in ARF(-/-) macrophages at basal condition and after LPS stimulation may be involved in the impaired response in this system, as E2F1 has been described as an inflammatory suppressor. These results indicate that tumor suppressor ARF is a new regulator of inflammatory cell signaling.

  20. Decomposition of Plant Debris by the Nematophagous Fungus ARF

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kening; Riggs, R. D.; Crippen, Devany

    2004-01-01

    In the study of the biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes, knowledge of the saprophytic ability of a nematophagous fungus is necessary to understand its establishment and survival in the soil. The objectives of this study were (i) to determine if the nematophagous fungus ARF (Arkansas Fungus) shows differential use of plant residues; and (ii) to determine if ARF still existed in the soil of a field in which ARF was found originally and in which the population level of Heterodera gly...

  1. Retinal rod GTPase turnover rate increases with concentration: a key to the control of visual excitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dratz, E A; Lewis, J W; Schaechter, L E; Parker, K R; Kliger, D S

    1987-07-31

    Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding proteins mediate cellular responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, growth factors and light. Activated GTP binding proteins are shut off by GTPase mediated hydrolysis of GTP. Photoreceptor GTPase rates are reported to be 10-50 times too slow to account for electrophysiological recovery time after light stimulus. Recovery rates of other parts of the system, however, appear fast enough. We present evidence that the GTPase rate increases markedly with photoreceptor membrane concentration implying the existence of a diffusible factor controlling the GTPase. When extrapolated to physiological concentrations, the GTPase turnover rate is fast enough (0.25-1.5 sec) to account for the recovery rate of the light stimulated signal of the photoreceptor cells.

  2. Which Way In? The RalF Arf-GEF Orchestrates Rickettsia Host Cell Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E; Rahman, M Sayeedur; Gillespie, Joseph J; Guillotte, Mark L; Kaur, Simran J; Lehman, Stephanie S; Beier-Sexton, Magda; Azad, Abdu F

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial Sec7-domain-containing proteins (RalF) are known only from species of Legionella and Rickettsia, which have facultative and obligate intracellular lifestyles, respectively. L. pneumophila RalF, a type IV secretion system (T4SS) effector, is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) of ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs), activating and recruiting host Arf1 to the Legionella-containing vacuole. In contrast, previous in vitro studies showed R. prowazekii (Typhus Group) RalF is a functional Arf-GEF that localizes to the host plasma membrane and interacts with the actin cytoskeleton via a unique C-terminal domain. As RalF is differentially encoded across Rickettsia species (e.g., pseudogenized in all Spotted Fever Group species), it may function in lineage-specific biology and pathogenicity. Herein, we demonstrate RalF of R. typhi (Typhus Group) interacts with the Rickettsia T4SS coupling protein (RvhD4) via its proximal C-terminal sequence. RalF is expressed early during infection, with its inactivation via antibody blocking significantly reducing R. typhi host cell invasion. For R. typhi and R. felis (Transitional Group), RalF ectopic expression revealed subcellular localization with the host plasma membrane and actin cytoskeleton. Remarkably, R. bellii (Ancestral Group) RalF showed perinuclear localization reminiscent of ectopically expressed Legionella RalF, for which it shares several structural features. For R. typhi, RalF co-localization with Arf6 and PI(4,5)P2 at entry foci on the host plasma membrane was determined to be critical for invasion. Thus, we propose recruitment of PI(4,5)P2 at entry foci, mediated by RalF activation of Arf6, initiates actin remodeling and ultimately facilitates bacterial invasion. Collectively, our characterization of RalF as an invasin suggests that, despite carrying a similar Arf-GEF unknown from other bacteria, different intracellular lifestyles across Rickettsia and Legionella species have driven divergent roles for Ral

  3. Which Way In? The RalF Arf-GEF Orchestrates Rickettsia Host Cell Invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen E Rennoll-Bankert

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Sec7-domain-containing proteins (RalF are known only from species of Legionella and Rickettsia, which have facultative and obligate intracellular lifestyles, respectively. L. pneumophila RalF, a type IV secretion system (T4SS effector, is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF of ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs, activating and recruiting host Arf1 to the Legionella-containing vacuole. In contrast, previous in vitro studies showed R. prowazekii (Typhus Group RalF is a functional Arf-GEF that localizes to the host plasma membrane and interacts with the actin cytoskeleton via a unique C-terminal domain. As RalF is differentially encoded across Rickettsia species (e.g., pseudogenized in all Spotted Fever Group species, it may function in lineage-specific biology and pathogenicity. Herein, we demonstrate RalF of R. typhi (Typhus Group interacts with the Rickettsia T4SS coupling protein (RvhD4 via its proximal C-terminal sequence. RalF is expressed early during infection, with its inactivation via antibody blocking significantly reducing R. typhi host cell invasion. For R. typhi and R. felis (Transitional Group, RalF ectopic expression revealed subcellular localization with the host plasma membrane and actin cytoskeleton. Remarkably, R. bellii (Ancestral Group RalF showed perinuclear localization reminiscent of ectopically expressed Legionella RalF, for which it shares several structural features. For R. typhi, RalF co-localization with Arf6 and PI(4,5P2 at entry foci on the host plasma membrane was determined to be critical for invasion. Thus, we propose recruitment of PI(4,5P2 at entry foci, mediated by RalF activation of Arf6, initiates actin remodeling and ultimately facilitates bacterial invasion. Collectively, our characterization of RalF as an invasin suggests that, despite carrying a similar Arf-GEF unknown from other bacteria, different intracellular lifestyles across Rickettsia and Legionella species have driven divergent roles

  4. Molecular pathways: targeting the kinase effectors of RHO-family GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudnikova, Tatiana Y; Rawat, Sonali J; Chernoff, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    RHO GTPases, members of the RAS superfamily of small GTPases, are adhesion and growth factor-activated molecular switches that play important roles in tumor development and progression. When activated, RHO-family GTPases such as RAC1, CDC42, and RHOA, transmit signals by recruiting a variety of effector proteins, including the protein kinases PAK, ACK, MLK, MRCK, and ROCK. Genetically induced loss of RHO function impedes transformation by a number of oncogenic stimuli, leading to an interest in developing small-molecule inhibitors that either target RHO GTPases directly, or that target their downstream protein kinase effectors. Although inhibitors of RHO GTPases and their downstream signaling kinases have not yet been widely adopted for clinical use, their potential value as cancer therapeutics continues to facilitate pharmaceutical research and development and is a promising therapeutic strategy.

  5. Coordinated regulation by two VPS9 domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors in small GTPase Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Yuta [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Kagiwada, Satoshi [Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Nara Women' s University, Kitauoyanishi-machi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Shimazu, Sayuri [Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Takegawa, Kaoru [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Noguchi, Tetsuko [Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Nara Women' s University, Kitauoyanishi-machi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Miyamoto, Masaaki, E-mail: miya@kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2015-03-20

    The small GTPase Rab5 is reported to regulate various cellular functions, such as vesicular transport and endocytosis. VPS9 domain-containing proteins are thought to activate Rab5(s) by their guanine-nucleotide exchange activities. Numerous VPS9 proteins have been identified and are structurally conserved from yeast to mammalian cells. However, the functional relationships among VPS9 proteins in cells remain unclear. Only one Rab5 and two VPS9 proteins were identified in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome. Here, we examined the cellular function of two VPS9 proteins and the relationship between these proteins in cellular functions. Vps901-GFP and Vps902-GFP exhibited dotted signals in vegetative and differentiated cells. vps901 deletion mutant (Δvps901) cells exhibited a phenotype deficient in the mating process and responses to high concentrations of ions, such as calcium and metals, and Δvps901Δvps902 double mutant cells exhibited round cell shapes similar to ypt5-909 (Rab5 mutant allele) cells. Deletion of both vps901 and vps902 genes completely abolished the mating process and responses to various stresses. A lack of vacuole formation and aberrant inner cell membrane structures were also observed in Δvps901Δvps902 cells by electron microscopy. These data strongly suggest that Vps901 and Vps902 are cooperatively involved in the regulation of cellular functions, such as cell morphology, sexual development, response to ion stresses, and vacuole formation, via Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast cells. - Highlights: • Roles of Rab5 activator VPS9 proteins in cellular functions. • Cooperation between VPS9 proteins in Rab5 signaling pathway. • Roles of each VPS9 protein in Rab5 signaling pathway are discussed.

  6. Decomposition of Plant Debris by the Nematophagous Fungus ARF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kening; Riggs, R D; Crippen, Devany

    2004-09-01

    In the study of the biological control of plant-parasitic nematodes, knowledge of the saprophytic ability of a nematophagous fungus is necessary to understand its establishment and survival in the soil. The objectives of this study were (i) to determine if the nematophagous fungus ARF (Arkansas Fungus) shows differential use of plant residues; and (ii) to determine if ARF still existed in the soil of a field in which ARF was found originally and in which the population level of Heterodera glycines had remained very low, despite 15 years of continuous, susceptible soybean. Laboratory studies of the decomposition of wheat straw or soybean root by ARF were conducted in two separate experiments, using a CO collection apparatus, where CO-free air was passed through sterilized cotton to remove the microorganisms in the air and then was passed over the samples, and evolved CO was trapped by KOH. Milligrams of C as CO was used to calculate the percentage decomposition of the plant debris by ARF. Data indicated ARF decomposed 11.7% of total organic carbon of the wheat straw and 20.1% of the soybean roots in 6 weeks. In the field soil study, 21 soil samples were taken randomly from the field. Only 3 months after the infestation of the soil with H. glycines, the percentage of parasitized eggs of H. glycines reached 64 +/- 19%, and ARF was isolated from most parasitized eggs of H. glycines. Research results indicated ARF could use plant residues to survive.

  7. Progressive silencing of p14ARF in oesophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yinghui; Peters, Christopher J; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C; Gjerset, Ruth A

    2009-02-01

    The frequency of oesophageal adenocarcinoma is increasing in Western countries for unknown reasons, and correlates with a corresponding increase in the pre-malignant condition, Barrett's Oesophagus, which raises the risk of adenocarcinoma by some 40- to 125-fold. We have examined how disease progression correlates with changes in expression of the p14ARF (ARF) tumour suppressor, a key regulator of the p53 tumour suppressor pathway that is silenced in some 30% of cancers overall, but for which a role in oesophageal cancer is unclear. We have used quantitative PCR, RT-PCR, methylation-specific PCR and chromatin-immunoprecipitation to examine the regulation and function of ARF in oesophageal adenocarcinoma tissue specimens and cell lines. We find highly significant reductions (Poesophageal epithelium to Barrett's Oesophagus to adenocarcinoma, with 57/76 (75%) adenocarcinomas displaying undetectable levels of ARF expression. Retention of ARF expression in adenocarcinoma is a highly significant indicator of increased survival (Padenocarcinoma cell lines and can be reversed by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine. The results suggest that silencing of ARF is involved in the pathogenesis of oesophageal adenocarcinoma and show that either DNA or histone methylation can provide the primary mechanism for ARF gene silencing. Silencing of ARF could provide a useful marker for increased risk of progression and poor prognosis.

  8. Rho GTPases in ameloblast differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi Otsu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During tooth development, ameloblasts differentiate from inner enamel epithelial cells to enamel-forming cells by modulating the signal pathways mediating epithelial–mesenchymal interaction and a cell-autonomous gene network. The differentiation process of epithelial cells is characterized by marked changes in their morphology and polarity, accompanied by dynamic cytoskeletal reorganization and changes in cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesion over time. Functional ameloblasts are tall, columnar, polarized cells that synthesize and secrete enamel-specific proteins. After deposition of the full thickness of enamel matrix, ameloblasts become smaller and regulate enamel maturation. Recent significant advances in the fields of molecular biology and genetics have improved our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the ameloblast cell life cycle, mediated by the Rho family of small GTPases. They act as intracellular molecular switch that transduce signals from extracellular stimuli to the actin cytoskeleton and the nucleus. In our review, we summarize studies that provide current evidence for Rho GTPases and their involvement in ameloblast differentiation. In addition to the Rho GTPases themselves, their downstream effectors and upstream regulators have also been implicated in ameloblast differentiation.

  9. Promiscuous and specific phospholipid binding by domains in ZAC, a membrane-associated Arabidopsis protein with an ARF GAP zinc finger and a C2 domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, R B; Lykke-Andersen, K; Frandsen, G I

    2000-01-01

    containing the ZAC-C2 domain bind anionic phospholipids non-specifically, with some variance in Ca2+ and salt dependence. Similar assays demonstrated specific affinity of the ZAC N-terminal region (residues 1-174) for phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate (PI-3-P). Binding was dependent in part on an intact...... zinc finger motif, but proteins containing only the zinc finger domain (residues 1-105) did not bind PI-3-P. Recombinant ZAC possessed GTPase-activating activity on Arabidopsis ARF proteins. These data identify a novel PI-3-P-binding protein region and thereby provide evidence...

  10. On type sequences and Arf rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Premchand Patil

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article in Section~2 we give an explicit description to compute the type sequence $mathrm{t}_1,ldots,mathrm{t}_{n}$ of a semigroup $Gamma$ generated by an arithmetic sequence (see 2.7; we show that the $i$-th term $mathrm{t}_i$ is equal to $1$ or to the type $au_Gamma$, depending on its position. In Section 3, for analytically irreducible ring $R$ with the branch sequence $R=R_0 subsetneq R_1 subsetneq ldotssubsetneq R_{m-1} subsetneq R_{m} =overline{R}$, starting from a result proved in [4] we give a characterization (see 3.6 of the ``Arf'' property using the type sequence of $R$ and of the rings $R_j$, $1leq jleq m-1$. Further, we prove (see 3.9, 3.10 some relations among the integers $ell^*(R$ and $ell^*(R_j$, $1leq jleq m-1$. These relations and a result of [6] allow us to obtain a new characterization (see 3.12 of semigroup rings of minimal multiplicity with $ell^*(Rleq au(R$ in terms of the Arf property, type sequences and relations between $ell^*(R$ and $ell^*(R_j$, $1leq jleq m-1$.

  11. Concept Framework for Audio Information Retrieval: ARF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI GuoHui(李国辉); WU DeFeng(武德峰); ZHANG Jun(张军)

    2003-01-01

    The majority of researches on content-based retrieval focused on visual media.However audio is also an important medium and information carrier from the viewpoint of humanauditory perception, so it is needed to retrieve for audio collection. Audio is handled by conven-tional methods as an opaque stream medium, which is not suitable for information retrieval byits content. In fact, audio carries rich aural information with the form of speech, musical, andsound effects, so it could be retrieved based on its aural content, such as acoustic features, musicalmelodies and associated semantics. In this paper, a concept framework (ARF) for content-basedaudio retrieval is proposed from systematic perspectives, which describes audio content model,audio retrieval architecture and audio query schemes. Audio contents are represented by a hier-archical model and a set of formal descriptions from physical to acoustic to semantic level, whichdepict acoustic features, logical structure and semantics of audio and audio objects. The archi-tecture consisting of audio meta-database, populating and accessing modules presents a systemstructure view of audio information retrieval. The query schemes give generalized approaches andmodes concerning how users deliver audio information needs to audio collections. Finally, an audioretrieval example implemented is used to explain and specify the application of the components in the proposed ARF.

  12. GTPases in bacterial cell polarity and signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyha, Iryna; Hot, Edina; Huntley, Stuart; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2011-12-01

    In bacteria, large G domain GTPases have well-established functions in translation, protein translocation, tRNA modification and ribosome assembly. In addition, bacteria also contain small Ras-like GTPases consisting of stand-alone G domains. Recent data have revealed that small Ras-like GTPases as well as large G domain GTPases in bacteria function in the regulation of cell polarity, signal transduction and possibly also in cell division. The small Ras-like GTPase MglA together with its cognate GAP MglB regulates cell polarity in Myxococcus xanthus, and the small Ras-like GTPase CvnD9 in Streptomyces coelicolor is involved in signal transduction. Similarly, the large GTPase FlhF together with the ATPase FlhG regulates the localization and number of flagella in polarly flagellated bacteria. Moreover, large dynamin-like GTPases in bacteria may function in cell division. Thus, the function of GTPases in bacteria may be as pervasive as in eukaryotes.

  13. Interconversion of two GDP-bound conformations and their selection in an Arf-family small G protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Hideyasu; Nishikiori, Masaki; Xiang, Hongyu; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Katoh, Etsuko

    2011-07-13

    ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) and other Arf-family small G proteins participate in many cellular functions via their characteristic GTP/GDP conformational cycles, during which a nucleotide(∗)Mg(2+)-binding site communicates with a remote N-terminal helix. However, the conformational interplay between the nucleotides, the helix, the protein core, and Mg(2+) has not been fully delineated. Herein, we report a study of the dynamics of an Arf-family protein, Arl8, under various conditions by means of NMR relaxation spectroscopy. The data indicated that, when GDP is bound, the protein core, which does not include the N-terminal helix, reversibly transition between an Arf-family GDP form and another conformation that resembles the Arf-family GTP form. Additionally, we found that the N-terminal helix and Mg(2+), respectively, stabilize the aforementioned former and latter conformations in a population-shift manner. Given the dynamics of the conformational changes, we can describe the Arl8 GTP/GDP cycle in terms of an energy diagram. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Interaction of LRRK2 with kinase and GTPase signaling cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Y Boon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available LRRK2 is a protein that interacts with a plethora of signaling molecules, but the complexity of LRRK2 function presents a challenge for understanding the role of LRRK2 in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease. Studies of LRRK2 using over-expression in transgenic mice have been disappointing, however studies using invertebrate systems have yielded a much clearer picture, with clear effects of LRRK2 expression, knockdown or deletion in C. elegans and Drosophila on modulation of survival of dopaminergic neurons. Recent studies have begun to focus attention on particular signaling cascades that are a target of LRRK2 function. LRRK2 interacts with members of the MAPK pathway and might regulate the pathway action by acting as a scaffold that directs the location of MAPK pathway activity, without strongly affecting the amount of MAPK pathway activity. Binding to GTPases, GAPs and GEFs are another strong theme in LRRK2 biology, with LRRK2 binding to Rac1, cdc42, rab5, rab7L1, endoA, RGS2, ArfGAP1 and ArhGEF7. All of these molecules appear to feed into a function output for LRRK2 that modulates cytoskeletal outgrowth and vesicular dynamics, including autophagy. These functions likely impact modulation of α-synuclein aggregation and associated toxicity eliciting the disease processes that we term Parkinson’s disease.

  15. Arf and RhoA regulate both the cytosolic and the membrane-bound phospholipase D from human placenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hansen, Harald S.; Provost, J.J.;

    1997-01-01

    proteins 1 µM mArf3 (2-fold) and 0.37 nM RhoA (2-fold). This is the first report to show RhoA activation of a cytosolic PLD. The activation by mArf3 was maintained after partial purification on DEAE Sepharose of the enzyme. We have previously reported the existence of a membrane-bound PLD from human...... for the inhibitory effect. Furthermore, placental membrane PLD was activated by 30 µM GTP¿S (4-fold) and by mArf3 (1 µM) and RhoA (0.37 nM) by a factor of 3 and 2, respectively. The solubilized membrane phospholipase D was partially purified to a basal specific activity of 25-37 nmol/min/mg. This preparation...

  16. Rho family and Rap GTPase activation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Richard T; Knaus, Ulla G

    2014-01-01

    The detection of Ras superfamily GTPase activity in innate immune cells is important when studying signaling events elicited by various ligands and cellular processes. The development of high-affinity probes detecting the activated, GTP-bound form of small GTPases has significantly enhanced our understanding of initiation and termination of GTPase-regulated signaling pathways. These probes are created by fusing a high-affinity GTPase-binding domain derived from a specific downstream effector protein to glutathione S-transferase (GST). Such domains bind preferentially to the GTP-bound form of the upstream Rho or Ras GTPase. Coupling these probes to beads enables extraction of the complex and subsequent quantification of the active GTP-binding protein by immunoblotting. Although effector domains that discriminate efficiently between GDP- and GTP-bound states and highly specific antibodies are not yet available for every small GTPase, analysis of certain members of the Rho and Ras GTPase family is now routinely performed. Here, we describe affinity-based pulldown assays for detection of Rho GTPase (Rac1/2, Cdc42, RhoA/B) and Rap1/2 activity in stimulated neutrophils or macrophages.

  17. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurayoshi, Kenta [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Ozono, Eiko [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary, University of London, John Vane Science Centre, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom); Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Anschutz Medical Campus, 12800 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Komori, Hideyuki [Center for Stem Cell Biology, Life Sciences Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ohtani, Kiyoshi, E-mail: btm88939@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  18. Control of cell growth: Rag GTPases in activation of TORC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huirong; Gong, Rui; Xu, Yanhui

    2013-08-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) is a central regulator controlling cell growth. TOR is highly conserved from yeast to mammals, and is deregulated in human cancers and diabetes. TOR complex 1 (TORC1) integrates signals from growth factors, cellular energy status, stress, and amino acids to control cell growth, mitochondrial metabolism, and lipid biosynthesis. The mechanisms of growth factors and cellular energy status in regulating TORC1 have been well established, whereas the mechanism by which amino acid induces TORC1 remains largely unknown. Recent studies revealed that Rag GTPases play a central role in the regulation of TORC1 activation in response to amino acids. In this review, we will discuss the recent progress in our understanding of Rag GTPase-regulated TORC1 activation in response to amino acids. Particular focus will be given to the function of Rag GTPases in TORC1 activation and how Rag GTPases are regulated by amino acids.

  19. Mutual Regulation of FOXM1, NPM and ARF Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Bulbul; Gartel, Andrei L

    2015-01-01

    ARF, NPM and FOXM1 proteins interact with each other in mammalian cells. We showed previously that proteasome inhibitors suppress not only FOXM1 expression, but also the expression of ARF and NPM proteins. Using RNA interference we found that the depletion of each of these proteins by RNAi in human cancer HeLa cells leads to down-regulation of the two other partners, suggesting that these proteins stabilize each other in human cancer cells. Since the suppression of FOXM1 is one of hallmarks of proteasome inhibition, suppression of ARF and NPM by proteasome inhibitors may be explained in part as a secondary effect of downregulation of FOXM1 that modulate stability of ARF and NPM1 proteins.

  20. 番茄ARF2蛋白的生物信息学分析与亚细胞定位%Bioinformatic Analysis and Subcellular Localization of Solanum lycopersicum ARF2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯媛媛; 侯佩; 李颖楠; 刘永胜

    2012-01-01

    克隆番茄(Solanum lycopersicum)ARF2基因,并分析其分子特性和亚细胞定位,为研究其功能提供基础.通过生物信息学方法分析SlARF2基因编码蛋白的理化性质和分子特性.采用RT-PCR技术从番茄果实cDNA中扩增SIARF2基因全长,并构建与黄色荧光蛋白(YFP)融合的pBA-ARF2-YFP表达载体,进而再通过农杆菌介导的遗传转化方法,将重组质粒转化到野生型番茄中,将得到的T1代转基因种子萌发,然后取根尖通过荧光显微镜观察了融合蛋白在活细胞内分布的特点.生物信息学分析结果表明,S1ARF2是富含Ser、Leu、Gly和Pro以及具有ARF家族典型结构域的可溶性蛋白,其氨基酸序列与葡萄、木薯和拟南芥的同源性分别为70.08%、66.94%和60.87%.经酶切和测序分析证实pBA-ARF2-YFP融合表达载体构建成功,此外,PCR分析表明融合蛋白在转基因植株中得到表达.经荧光显微镜观察,ARF2定位在细胞核中.表明转录因子S1ARF2定位在细胞核中,对番茄果实发育和成熟起重要作用.%Auxin response factors (ARFs) are important transcription factors involved in auxin signal transduction pathway. In order to elucidate the function of tomato ARF2, we isolated the SIARF2 gene and analyzed its molecular features, in addition, we observed the subcellular localization of ARF2 in transgenic tomato plants. Physicochemical properties and molecular features of ARF2 were predicted by bioinformatic approaches including physical and chemical properties analysis, hydrophobicity analysis, domain analysis, phylogenetic tree analysis and subcellular localization analysis. Moreover, the full-length of SLARF2 gene was amplified by RT-PCR, and a binary vector consisting of ARF2 fused with the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) coding sequence was further constructed. Using the method of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, the recombinant vector was transformed into wild-type tomato, and the transgenic tomato

  1. [APACHE II and ATN-ISS in acute renal failure (ARF) in intensive care unit (ICU) and non-ICU].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Natáia Maria da Silva; Pinto, Patrícia dos Santos; Lacet, Thiago Bento de Paiva; Rodrigues, Dominique Fonseca; Bastos, Marcus Gomes; Stella, Sérgio Reinaldo; Cendoroglo Neto, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) remains highly prevalent with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. of this study was to compare use of the APACHE II scoring prognosis with that of the ATN-ISS to determine whether the APACHE II could be used for patients with ARF outside the ICU. For this purpose, 205 patients with ARF were accompanied in a prospective cohort. Demographic data, preexisting conditions, organ failure and characteristics of ARF were analyzed. The prognostic scores were performed with the assessment of a nephrologist. The mean age was 52 +/- 18 years, 50% were male, 69% were white, 45% were treated in ICU and 55% in other units. Mortality in the ICU group was 85% and in the non-ICU group 18%. Factors that correlated with higher mortality were more prevalent in the ICU group: age, male, hospitalization with ARF, organ failure, sepsis, septic IRA, oliguria and need of dialysis. Overall, the prognostic markers were the same for both the ICU and non-ICU groups. The discrimination with the APACHE II was similar in both, ICU and non-ICU groups and calibration was better in the non-ICU group. The ATN-ISS achieved good discrimination in both the ICU and non-ICU groups, but, regarding calibration, there was a discreet over estimating of mortality in the non-ICU group. The ATN-ISS showed a greater capacity for discrimination than the APACHE II in both the ICU and non-ICU groups. It was concluded that the APACHE II and ATN-ISS scores could be used for stratification of risk in patients with ARF treated outside of the ICU in Brazil.

  2. Identification of ARF and AUX/IAA gene families in Rafflesia cantleyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Nur Atiqah Mohd; Goh, Hoe-Han; Isa, Nurulhikma Md; Wan, Kiew-Lian

    2016-11-01

    Rafflesia is a unique plant that produces the largest flowers in the world. It has a short blooming period of 6 to 7 days. Due to its rarity and limited accessibility, little is known about the growth and developmental process in the Rafflesia plant. In all plant species, auxin is the key hormone that is involved in growth and development. The auxin signal transduction involves members of the ARF transcription factor and AUX/IAA regulator families, which activate or inhibit the regulation of auxin response genes, thereby control the developmental process in plants. To gain a better understanding of molecular regulations in the Rafflesia plant development during flowering, members of the ARF and AUX/IAA gene families were identified from the transcriptome data of flower blooming stages in Rafflesia cantleyi. Based on Rafflesia unique transcripts (UTs) against the Arabidopsis TAIR database using BLASTX search, a total of nine UTs were identified as ARF transcription factors, while another seven UTs were identified as AUX/IAA regulators. These genes were found to be expressed in all three R. cantleyi flower stages i.e. days 1 (F1), 3 (F2), and 5 (F3). Gene expression analysis identified three genes that are differentially expressed in stage F1 vs. F2 i.e. IAA4 is upregulated while IAA8 and ARF3 are downregulated. These genes may be involved in the activation and/or inhibition of the auxin signal transduction pathway. Further analysis of these genes may unravel their function in the phenotypic development of the Rafflesia plant.

  3. ADP-ribosylation factor 6 regulates endothelin-1-induced lipolysis in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jonathon C B; Bain, Stephen C; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu

    2014-08-15

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) induces lipolysis in adipocytes, where ET-1 chronic exposure results in insulin resistance (IR) through suppression of glucose transporter (GLUT)4 translocation to the plasma membrane and consequently glucose uptake. ARF6 small GTPase, which plays a vital role in cell surface receptors trafficking, has previously been shown to regulate GLUT4 recycling and thereby insulin signalling. ARF6 also plays a role in ET-1 promoted endothelial cell migration. However, ARF6 involvement in ET-1-induced lipolysis in adipocytes is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the role of ARF6 in ET-1-induced lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. This was achieved by studying the effect of inhibitors for the activation of ARF6 and other signalling proteins on ET-1 induced lipolysis and ARF6 activation in the adipocytes. Our results indicate that ET-1 induces, through endothelin type A receptor (ETAR), lipolysis, the ARF6 activation and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation in adipocytes, further ET-1 stimulated lipolysis is inhibited by the inhibitors of ARF6 activation, ERK phosphorylation and dynamin, which is essential for endocytosis. Our studies also revealed that ARF6 acts upstream of ERK in ET-1-indcued lipolysis. In summary, we determined that ET-1 activation of ETAR signalled through ARF6, which is crucial for lipolysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Auxin response factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, John William

    2016-05-01

    Auxin signalling involves the activation or repression of gene expression by a class of auxin response factor (ARF) proteins that bind to auxin response elements in auxin-responsive gene promoters. The release of ARF repression in the presence of auxin by the degradation of their cognate auxin/indole-3-acetic acid repressors forms a paradigm of transcriptional response to auxin. However, this mechanism only applies to activating ARFs, and further layers of complexity of ARF function and regulation are being revealed, which partly reflect their highly modular domain structure. This review summarizes our knowledge concerning ARF binding site specificity, homodimer and heterodimer multimeric ARF association and cooperative function and how activator ARFs activate target genes via chromatin remodelling and evolutionary information derived from phylogenetic comparisons from ARFs from diverse species. ARFs are regulated in diverse ways, and their importance in non-auxin-regulated pathways is becoming evident. They are also embedded within higher-order transcription factor complexes that integrate signalling pathways from other hormones and in response to the environment. The ways in which new information concerning ARFs on many levels is causing a revision of existing paradigms of auxin response are discussed.

  5. Role of curcumin in PLD activation by Arf6-cytohesin1 signaling axis in U46619-stimulated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborti, Sajal; Sarkar, Jaganmay; Bhuyan, Rajabrata; Chakraborti, Tapati

    2017-08-05

    Phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to produce phosphatidic acid (PA) which in some cell types play a pivotal role in agonist-induced increase in NADPH oxidase-derived [Formula: see text]production. Involvement of ADP ribosylation factor (Arf) in agonist-induced activation of PLD is known for smooth muscle cells of systemic arteries, but not in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Additionally, role of cytohesin in this scenario is unknown in PASMCs. We, therefore, determined the involvement of Arf and cytohesin in U46619-induced stimulation of PLD in PASMCs, and the probable mechanism by which curcumin, a natural phenolic compound, inhibits the U46619 response. Treatment of PASMCs with U46619 stimulated PLD activity in the cell membrane, which was inhibited upon pretreatment with SQ29548 (Tp receptor antagonist), FIPI (PLD inhibitor), SecinH3 (inhibitor of cytohesins), and curcumin. Transfection of the cells with Tp, Arf-6, and cytohesin-1 siRNA inhibited U46619-induced activation of PLD. Upon treatment of the cells with U46619, Arf-6 and cytohesin-1 were translocated and associated in the cell membrane, which were not inhibited upon pretreatment of the cells with curcumin. Cytohesin-1 appeared to be necessary for in vitro binding of GTPγS with Arf-6; however, addition of curcumin inhibited binding of GTPγS with Arf-6 even in the presence of cytohesin-1. Our computational study suggests that although curcumin to some extent binds with Tp receptor, yet the inhibition of Arf6GDP to Arf6GTP conversion appeared to be an important mechanism by which curcumin inhibits U46619-induced increase in PLD activity in PASMCs.

  6. Regulation of cytokinesis by membrane trafficking involving small GTPases and the ESCRT machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    During cell division, cells undergo membrane remodeling to achieve changes in their size and shape. In addition, cell division entails local delivery and retrieval of membranes and specific proteins as well as remodeling of cytoskeletons, in particular, upon cytokinetic abscission. Accumulating lines of evidence highlight that endocytic membrane removal from and subsequent membrane delivery to the plasma membrane are crucial for the changes in cell size and shape, and that trafficking of vesicles carrying specific proteins to the abscission site participate in local remodeling of membranes and cytoskeletons. Furthermore, the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery has been shown to play crucial roles in cytokinetic abscission. Here, the author briefly overviews membrane-trafficking events early in cell division, and subsequently focus on regulation and functional significance of membrane trafficking involving Rab11 and Arf6 small GTPases in late cytokinesis phases and assembly of the ESCRT machinery in cytokinetic abscission.

  7. 人类ARF1蛋白的重组表达及其与GDP/ADP的弱相互作用%Recombinant Expression and Weak Interactions with GDP/ADP of hARF1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑芳芳; 阮路; 刘艳; 吴学记; 赵玉芬

    2011-01-01

    腺苷酸核糖基化因子1(ADP ribosylation factor 1,ARF1)是一种小G蛋白,负责调控细胞内的囊泡运输,从而影响细胞的生长发育.采用分子克隆的方法构建人类ARF1(hARF1)蛋白的重组质粒pET28 a-hARF1,并在大肠杆菌(Escherichia coli)BL21( DE3)中表达纯化,随后利用荧光光谱法和分子对接方法研究hARF1蛋白与嘌呤核苷酸( GDP/ADP)之间的弱相互作用.研究结果表明,重组表达的hARF1蛋白分子质量22 859.29 u,与理论值基本一致,其纯度大于95%,产率为5 mg/L左右;GDP/ADP与hARF1蛋白弱相互作用的结合常数分别为0.022 69和0.007 71(μmol/L)-1,说明hARF1蛋白选择性地结合GDP,这与细胞内hARF1蛋白只结合GDP的结论一致.%ADP ribosylation factor KADP ribosylation factor 1.ARF1) is a small GTP-binding protein,which is widely distributed in eukaryotic cells. ARF1 interacts with Golgi apparatus, plays the role of regulator of vesicle trafficking,and affects the development of various diseases. In this paper, the recombinant plasmid pET28a-hARFl was constructed, and hARFl protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL2KDE3) and purified by affinity chromatograph and gel filtration. The results showed the molecular mass of hARFl protein was 22 859. 29 u,which was consistent with the theoretical value. The purity of hARFl protein was above 95% .while the yield was about 5 mg/L. At the same time, the interactions between hARFl and GDP/ADP were investigated by using fluorescence spectroscopy and MOE-Docking. It was found that hARFl and GDP/ADP had non-covalent interactions, and the binding constants were 0. 022 69 and 0. 007 71 (μmol/L)-1 respectively. It means that hARFl could bind to GDP selectively. The above-mentioned results were useful for the further study on the structure and function of hARFl.

  8. Insights into the classification of small GTPases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Heider

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Dominik Heider1, Sascha Hauke3, Martin Pyka4, Daniel Kessler21Department of Bioinformatics, Center for Medical Biotechnology, 2Institute of Cell Biology (Cancer Research, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; 3Institute of Computer Science, University of Münster, Münster, Germany; 4Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research, University Hospital of Münster, Münster, GermanyAbstract: In this study we used a Random Forest-based approach for an assignment of small guanosine triphosphate proteins (GTPases to specific subgroups. Small GTPases represent an important functional group of proteins that serve as molecular switches in a wide range of fundamental cellular processes, including intracellular transport, movement and signaling events. These proteins have further gained a special emphasis in cancer research, because within the last decades a huge variety of small GTPases from different subgroups could be related to the development of all types of tumors. Using a random forest approach, we were able to identify the most important amino acid positions for the classification process within the small GTPases superfamily and its subgroups. These positions are in line with the results of earlier studies and have been shown to be the essential elements for the different functionalities of the GTPase families. Furthermore, we provide an accurate and reliable software tool (GTPasePred to identify potential novel GTPases and demonstrate its application to genome sequences.Keywords: cancer, machine learning, classification, Random Forests, proteins

  9. Ribosome-associated GTPases: the role of RNA for GTPase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Nina; Polacek, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    The GTPase super-family comprises a variety of G proteins found in all three domains of life. Although they are participating in completely different processes like signal transduction, protein biosynthesis and regulation of cell proliferation, they all share a highly conserved G domain and use a common mechanism for GTP hydrolysis. Exact timing in hydrolyzing the bound GTP serves as a molecular switch to initiate diverse cellular reactions. Classical GTPases depend on external proteins to fire GTP hydrolysis (GAPs), and following the GTPase reaction to exchange GDP for GTP (GEFs), converting the GTPase into the active state again. In recent years it became clear that there are many GTPases that do not follow this classical switch mode scheme. Certain ribosome-associated GTPases are not reliant on other GEF proteins to exchange GDP for GTP. Furthermore many of these G proteins are not activated by external GAPs, but by evolutionarily ancient molecules, namely by RNA.

  10. The interferon-gamma-induced GTPase, mGBP-2, inhibits tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) induction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) by inhibiting NF-kappaB and Rac protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Sujata; Fan, Meiyun; Messmer-Blust, Angela F; Yang, Chuan H; Trendel, Jill A; Jeyaratnam, Jonathan A; Pfeffer, Lawrence M; Vestal, Deborah J

    2011-06-03

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is important in numerous normal and pathological processes, including the angiogenic switch during tumor development and tumor metastasis. Whereas TNF-α and other cytokines up-regulate MMP-9 expression, interferons (IFNs) inhibit MMP-9 expression. We found that IFN-γ treatment or forced expression of the IFN-induced GTPase, mGBP-2, inhibit TNF-α-induced MMP-9 expression in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, by inhibiting MMP-9 transcription. The NF-κB transcription factor is required for full induction of MMP-9 by TNF-α. Both IFN-γ and mGBP-2 inhibit the transcription of a NF-κB-dependent reporter construct, suggesting that mGBP-2 inhibits MMP-9 induction via inhibition of NF-κB-mediated transcription. Interestingly, mGBP-2 does not inhibit TNF-α-induced degradation of IκBα or p65/RelA translocation into the nucleus. However, mGBP-2 inhibits p65 binding to a κB oligonucleotide probe in gel shift assays and to the MMP-9 promoter in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. In addition, TNF-α activation of NF-κB in NIH 3T3 cells is dependent on Rac activation, as evidenced by the inhibition of TNF-α induction of NF-κB-mediated transcription by a dominant inhibitory form of Rac1. A role for Rac in the inhibitory action of mGBP-2 on NF-κB is further shown by the findings that mGBP-2 inhibits TNF-α activation of endogenous Rac and constitutively activate Rac can restore NF-κB transcription in the presence of mGBP-2. This is a novel mechanism by which IFNs can inhibit the cytokine induction of MMP-9 expression.

  11. Rational design of Rho GTPase-targeting inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xun; Zheng, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Rho GTPases have been implicated in diverse cellular functions and are potential therapeutic targets in inflammation, cancer, and neurologic diseases. Virtual screening of compounds that fit into surface grooves of RhoA known to be critical for guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) interaction produced chemical candidates with minimized docking energy. Subsequent screening for inhibitory activity of RhoA binding to the Rho-GEF, LARG, identified a Rho-specific inhibitor as a lead compound capable of blocking RhoA-LARG interaction and RhoA activation by LARG specifically and dose dependently. A microscale thermophoresis analysis was applied to directly quantify the binding interaction of the lead inhibitor with RhoA target. The lead inhibitor highlights the principle that rational targeting of subfamily members of Rho GTPases is feasible and potentially useful in future drug design effort.

  12. Locking GTPases covalently in their functional states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegandt, David; Vieweg, Sophie; Hofmann, Frank; Koch, Daniel; Li, Fu; Wu, Yao-Wen; Itzen, Aymelt; Müller, Matthias P.; Goody, Roger S.

    2015-07-01

    GTPases act as key regulators of many cellular processes by switching between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) states. In many cases, understanding their mode of action has been aided by artificially stabilizing one of these states either by designing mutant proteins or by complexation with non-hydrolysable GTP analogues. Because of inherent disadvantages in these approaches, we have developed acryl-bearing GTP and GDP derivatives that can be covalently linked with strategically placed cysteines within the GTPase of interest. Binding studies with GTPase-interacting proteins and X-ray crystallography analysis demonstrate that the molecular properties of the covalent GTPase-acryl-nucleotide adducts are a faithful reflection of those of the corresponding native states and are advantageously permanently locked in a defined nucleotide (that is active or inactive) state. In a first application, in vivo experiments using covalently locked Rab5 variants provide new insights into the mechanism of correct intracellular localization of Rab proteins.

  13. Rap1 GTPase Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Induced Choroidal Endothelial Migration via NADPH Oxidase- and NF-κB-Dependent Activation of Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Fotheringham, Lori; Wittchen, Erika S; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    Macrophage-derived tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has been found in choroidal neovascularization (CNV) surgically removed from patients with age-related macular degeneration. However, the role of TNF-α in CNV development remains unclear. In a murine laser-induced CNV model, compared with un-lasered controls, TNF-α mRNA was increased in retinal pigment epithelial and choroidal tissue, and TNF-α colocalized with lectin-stained migrating choroidal endothelial cells (CECs). Inhibition of TNF-α with a neutralizing antibody reduced CNV volume and reactive oxygen species (ROS) level around CNV. In CECs, pretreatment with the antioxidant apocynin or knockdown of p22phox, a subunit of NADPH oxidase, inhibited TNF-α-induced ROS generation. Apocynin reduced TNF-α-induced NF-κB and Rac1 activation, and inhibited TNF-α-induced CEC migration. TNF-α-induced Rac1 activation and CEC migration were inhibited by NF-κB inhibitor Bay11-7082. Overexpression of Rap1a prevented TNF-α-induced ROS generation and reduced NF-κB and Rac1 activation. Activation of Rap1 by 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine-2'-O-Me-cAMP prevented TNF-α-induced CEC migration and reduced laser-induced CNV volume, ROS generation, and activation of NF-κB and Rac1. These findings provide evidence that active Rap1a inhibits TNF-α-induced CEC migration by inhibiting NADPH oxidase-dependent NF-κB and Rac1 activation and suggests that Rap1a de-escalates CNV development by interfering with ROS-dependent signaling in several steps of the pathogenic process. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rap1 GTPase Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor-α–Induced Choroidal Endothelial Migration via NADPH Oxidase– and NF-κB–Dependent Activation of Rac1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Fotheringham, Lori; Wittchen, Erika S.; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage-derived tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has been found in choroidal neovascularization (CNV) surgically removed from patients with age-related macular degeneration. However, the role of TNF-α in CNV development remains unclear. In a murine laser-induced CNV model, compared with un-lasered controls, TNF-α mRNA was increased in retinal pigment epithelial and choroidal tissue, and TNF-α colocalized with lectin-stained migrating choroidal endothelial cells (CECs). Inhibition of TNF-α with a neutralizing antibody reduced CNV volume and reactive oxygen species (ROS) level around CNV. In CECs, pretreatment with the antioxidant apocynin or knockdown of p22phox, a subunit of NADPH oxidase, inhibited TNF-α–induced ROS generation. Apocynin reduced TNF-α–induced NF-κB and Rac1 activation, and inhibited TNF-α–induced CEC migration. TNF-α–induced Rac1 activation and CEC migration were inhibited by NF-κB inhibitor Bay11-7082. Overexpression of Rap1a prevented TNF-α–induced ROS generation and reduced NF-κB and Rac1 activation. Activation of Rap1 by 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine-2′-O-Me-cAMP prevented TNF-α–induced CEC migration and reduced laser-induced CNV volume, ROS generation, and activation of NF-κB and Rac1. These findings provide evidence that active Rap1a inhibits TNF-α–induced CEC migration by inhibiting NADPH oxidase-dependent NF-κB and Rac1 activation and suggests that Rap1a de-escalates CNV development by interfering with ROS-dependent signaling in several steps of the pathogenic process. PMID:26476350

  15. Identification and Expression Profiling of the Auxin Response Factors in Dendrobium officinale under Abiotic Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhehao; Yuan, Ye; Fu, Di; Shen, Chenjia; Yang, Yanjun

    2017-05-04

    Auxin response factor (ARF) proteins play roles in plant responses to diverse environmental stresses by binding specifically to the auxin response element in the promoters of target genes. Using our latest public Dendrobium transcriptomes, a comprehensive characterization and analysis of 14 DnARF genes were performed. Three selected DnARFs, including DnARF1, DnARF4, and DnARF6, were confirmed to be nuclear proteins according to their transient expression in epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Furthermore, the transcription activation abilities of DnARF1, DnARF4, and DnARF6 were tested in a yeast system. Our data showed that DnARF6 is a transcriptional activator in Dendrobium officinale. To uncover the basic information of DnARF gene responses to abiotic stresses, we analyzed their expression patterns under various hormones and abiotic treatments. Based on our data, several hormones and significant stress responsive DnARF genes have been identified. Since auxin and ARF genes have been identified in many plant species, our data is imperative to reveal the function of ARF mediated auxin signaling in the adaptation to the challenging Dendrobium environment.

  16. Research Progresses on Auxin Response Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Bin Wei; Bai-Ming Cui; Yan-Li Ren; Juan-Hua Li; Wei-Bin Liao; Nan-Fei Xu; Ming Peng

    2006-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs), a family of transcription factors, have been discovered recently. The ARFs bind specifically to the auxin response elements (AuxREs) within promoters of primary auxin responsive genes and function as activators or repressors. The ARFs contain three domains, namely a conserved Nterminal DNA-binding domain, a non-conserved middle region, and a conserved C-terminal dirnerization domain. The ARFs can form a protein complex with auxin/indoleacetic acid through homodimerization or heterodimerization. The particular protein-protein interaction may play a key role in modulating the expression of early auxin responsive genes. The identification of ARF mutations in Arabidopsis helps to demonstrate/dissect the function of ARFs in the normal growth and development of plants. Phylogenetic analysis also reveals some interesting protein evolution points in the ARF family.

  17. ARF inhibits the growth and malignant progression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, S E; Moser, R D; Gurley, K E; Kelly-Spratt, K S; Liggitt, H D; Kemp, C J

    2014-05-15

    Non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is among the deadliest of human cancers. The CDKN2A locus, which houses the INK4a and ARF tumor suppressor genes, is frequently altered in NSCLC. However, the specific role of ARF in pulmonary tumorigenesis remains unclear. KRAS and other oncogenes induce the expression of ARF, thus stabilizing p53 activity and arresting cell proliferation. To address the role of ARF in Kras-driven NSCLC, we compared the susceptibility of NIH/Ola strain wild-type and Arf-knockout mice to urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis. Lung tumor size, malignancy and associated morbidity were significantly increased in Arf(-/-) compared with Arf(+/+) animals at 25 weeks after induction. Pulmonary tumors from Arf-knockout mice exhibited increased cell proliferation and DNA damage compared with wild-type mice. A subgroup of tumors in Arf(-/-) animals presented as dedifferentiated and metastatic, with many characteristics of pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma, a neoplasm previously undocumented in mouse models. Our finding of a role for ARF in NSCLC is consistent with the observation that benign adenomas from Arf(+/+) mice robustly expressed ARF, while ARF expression was markedly reduced in malignant adenocarcinomas. ARF expression also frequently colocalized with the expression of p21(CIP1), a transcriptional target of p53, arguing that ARF induces the p53 checkpoint to arrest cell proliferation in vivo. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that induction of ARF is an early response in lung tumorigenesis that mounts a strong barrier against tumor growth and malignant progression.

  18. Variation in Efficacy of Isolates of the Fungus ARF Against the Soybean Cyst Nematode Heterodera glycines

    OpenAIRE

    Timper, P.; Riggs, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    An unnamed fungus, designated ARF, that parasitizes eggs and sedentary stages of cyst nematodes is a potential biological control agent of Heterodera glycines. The objectives of this study were to determine whether ARF isolates differ in their ability to suppress nematode numbers in soil and to compare the efficacy of ARF in heat-treated and native soil. The effectiveness of 11 ARF isolates was compared by introducing homogenized mycelium into heat-treated soil. Soybean seedlings were transpl...

  19. Lime pretreatment of sugar beet pulp and evaluation of synergy between ArfA, ManA and XynA from Clostridium cellulovorans on the pretreated substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dredge, Roselyn; Radloff, Sarah E; van Dyk, J Susan; Pletschke, Brett I

    2011-10-01

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP) is a waste product from the sugar beet industry and could be used as a potential biomass feedstock for second generation biofuel technology. Pretreatment of SBP with 'slake lime' (calcium hydroxide) was investigated using a 2(3) factorial design and the factors examined included lime loading, temperature and time. The pretreatment was evaluated for its ability to enhance enzymatic degradation using a combination of three hemicellulases, namely ArfA (an arabinofuranosidase), ManA (an endo-mannanase) and XynA (an endo-xylanase) from C. cellulovorans to determine the conditions under which optimal activity was facilitated. Optimal pretreatment conditions were found to be 0.4 g lime/g SBP, with 36 h digestion at 40 °C. The synergistic interactions between ArfA, ManA and XynA from C. cellulovorans were subsequently investigated on the pretreated SBP. The highest degree of synergy was observed at a protein ratio of 75% ArfA to 25% ManA, with a specific activity of 2.9 U/g protein. However, the highest activity was observed at 4.2 U/g protein at 100% ArfA. This study demonstrated that lime treatment enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of SBP. The ArfA was the most effective hemicellulase for release of sugars from pretreated SBP, but the synergy with the ManA indicated that low levels of mannan in SBP were probably masking the access of the ArfA to its substrate. XynA displayed no synergy with the other two hemicellulases, indicating that the xylan in the SBP was not hampering the access of ArfA or ManA to their substrates and was not closely associated with the mannan and arabinan in the SBP.

  20. Rho GTPase expression in human myeloid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne F G van Helden

    Full Text Available Myeloid cells are critical for innate immunity and the initiation of adaptive immunity. Strict regulation of the adhesive and migratory behavior is essential for proper functioning of these cells. Rho GTPases are important regulators of adhesion and migration; however, it is unknown which Rho GTPases are expressed in different myeloid cells. Here, we use a qPCR-based approach to investigate Rho GTPase expression in myeloid cells.We found that the mRNAs encoding Cdc42, RhoQ, Rac1, Rac2, RhoA and RhoC are the most abundant. In addition, RhoG, RhoB, RhoF and RhoV are expressed at low levels or only in specific cell types. More differentiated cells along the monocyte-lineage display lower levels of Cdc42 and RhoV, while RhoC mRNA is more abundant. In addition, the Rho GTPase expression profile changes during dendritic cell maturation with Rac1 being upregulated and Rac2 downregulated. Finally, GM-CSF stimulation, during macrophage and osteoclast differentiation, leads to high expression of Rac2, while M-CSF induces high levels of RhoA, showing that these cytokines induce a distinct pattern. Our data uncover cell type specific modulation of the Rho GTPase expression profile in hematopoietic stem cells and in more differentiated cells of the myeloid lineage.

  1. Comparison of human and Drosophila atlastin GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fuyun; Hu, Xiaoyu; Bian, Xin; Liu, Xinqi; Hu, Junjie

    2015-02-01

    Formation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network requires homotypic membrane fusion, which involves a class of atlastin (ATL) GTPases. Purified Drosophila ATL is capable of mediating vesicle fusion in vitro, but such activity has not been reported for any other ATLs. Here, we determined the preliminary crystal structure of the cytosolic segment of Drosophila ATL in a GDP-bound state. The structure reveals a GTPase domain dimer with the subsequent three-helix bundles associating with their own GTPase domains and pointing in opposite directions. This conformation is similar to that of human ATL1, to which GDP and high concentrations of inorganic phosphate, but not GDP only, were included. Drosophila ATL restored ER morphology defects in mammalian cells lacking ATLs, and measurements of nucleotide-dependent dimerization and GTPase activity were comparable for Drosophila ATL and human ATL1. However, purified and reconstituted human ATL1 exhibited no in vitro fusion activity. When the cytosolic segment of human ATL1 was connected to the transmembrane (TM) region and C-terminal tail (CT) of Drosophila ATL, the chimera still exhibited no fusion activity, though its GTPase activity was normal. These results suggest that GDP-bound ATLs may adopt multiple conformations and the in vitro fusion activity of ATL cannot be achieved by a simple collection of functional domains.

  2. The glycine brace: a component of Rab, Rho, and Ran GTPases associated with hinge regions of guanine- and phosphate-binding loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuwald Andrew F

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ras-like GTPases function as on-off switches in intracellular signalling pathways and include the Rab, Rho/Rac, Ran, Ras, Arf, Sar and Gα families. How these families have evolutionarily diverged from each other at the sequence level provides clues to underlying mechanisms associated with their functional specialization. Results Bayesian analysis of divergent patterns within a multiple alignment of Ras-like GTPase sequences identifies a structural component, termed here the glycine brace, as the feature that most distinguishes Rab, Rho/Rac, Ran and (to some degree Ras family GTPases from other Ras-like GTPases. The glycine brace consists of four residues: An aromatic residue that forms a stabilizing CH-π interaction with a conserved glycine at the start of the guanine-binding loop; a second aromatic residue, which is nearly always a tryptophan, that likewise forms stabilizing CH-π and NH-π interactions with a glycine at the start of the phosphate-binding P-loop; and two other residues (typically an aspartate and a serine or threonine that, together with a conserved buried water molecule, form a network of interactions connecting the two aromatic residues. Conclusion It is proposed that the two glycine residues function as hinges and that the glycine brace influences guanine nucleotide binding and release by interacting with these hinges.

  3. Juan de Arfe Villafañe y Sebastiano Serlio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heredia Moreno, Mª del Carmen

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Juan de Arfe's awareness and utilization of Italian art treatises, particularly that of Sebastiano Serlio, are analyzed in this study. The author demonstrates that Serlio's influence is perceptible in much of this artisan's production, from the Avila monstrance to that of Valladolid. It is especially manifest in Arfe's creations carried out in Seville, particularly in Books I and IV of his Varia Commensuracion and in the monstrance for the cathedral.

    En este artículo se analiza el conocimiento y la utilización de los tratadistas italianos, particularmente de Sebastiano Serlio, por parte de Juan de Arfe. También se tratará de demostrar que la influencia de Serlio se percibe en buena parte de la producción del artífice, desde la custodia de Ávila hasta la de Valladolid, aunque se manifiesta de manera especial en los trabajos que Arfe realizó en Sevilla, sobre todo en los Libros I y IV de la Varia Commensuracion y en la custodia de la catedral.

  4. ZLL/AGO10 maintains shoot meristem stem cells during Arabidopsis embryogenesis by down-regulating ARF2-mediated auxin response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roodbarkelari, Farshad; Du, Fei; Truernit, Elisabeth; Laux, Thomas

    2015-09-10

    The shoot meristem gives rise to new organs throughout a plant's life by the activity of pluripotent stem cells in the meristem center. Organ initiation at the periphery of the shoot meristem is triggered by the accumulation of the phytohormone auxin at the initiation site. Loss-of-function mutants of the ZWILLE/ARGONAUTE10/PINHEAD (ZLL/AGO10/PNH) gene terminate shoot meristem stem cells late in embryogenesis and can form a leaf or a leaf-like structure instead, indicating that AGO10 activity is required to maintain shoot meristem stem cells undifferentiated. Here, we addressed whether stem cell maintenance by AGO10 involves regulation of auxin. We found that in zll-1 mutants, auxin accumulation and expression of the response reporter DR5:GFP are elevated, and transcription of the Auxin Response Factor 2 (ARF2) gene is upregulated. Downregulation of ARF2 significantly restores stem cells in zll-1 mutants, whereas increased expression of ARF2 enhances differentiation of stem cells in zll-1 mutants. We further found that upregulation of the AGO10 effector gene REVOLUTA restores ARF2 expression and stem cell maintenance in zll-1 embryos. Our results indicate that maintenance of shoot meristem stem cells by AGO10 involves negative regulation of auxin signaling and, via REV-mediated downregulation of ARF2 expression, auxin response.

  5. 小麦生长素响应因子 TaARF6转基因烟草植株分子鉴定%Regulation effects of an auxin response gene in wheat (TaARF6) in mediating plant growth under conditions of normal growth and Pi deprivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    智一鸣; 陈芳; 刘晓曼; 肖凯

    2016-01-01

    系数量增多、主侧根长度、根体积、叶面积和根冠比增加。【结论】TaARF6编码典型的生长素响应因子,其编码蛋白具有生长素响应因子特有结构域。 TaARF6对环境中的低磷胁迫逆境能产生明显应答。上调表达 TaARF6基因,具有增加植株根、叶鲜、干重和改善根叶及植株形态的生物学功能。本研究表明,通过对植株体内生长素响应基因的转录调控,TaARF6在介导植株不同供磷水平下的根叶形态建成和干物质累积过程中发挥着重要作用。%[Objectives] Auxin response factors (ARFs) play a critical role in mediating transduction of auxin signaling and regulating expression of downstream auxin-responsive genes. In this study, an ARF type transcription factor gene referred to TaARF6 identified in a root suppression subtractive cDNA library that enriches the differentially expressed genes under Pi sufficiency as the basis was used to investigate molecular characterization of TaARF6 and its expression patterns under various Pi-supply conditions, as well as its functions in regulating plant phenotypes. The objective of this study was aimed to elucidate biological roles of TaARF6 in mediating plant growth features under the conditions of Pi sufficiency and Pi deficiency. [ Methods] The protein characterization of TaARF6 was predicted by the bioinformatics’ tools. The seedlings of wheat (cv. Shixin 828) were cultured under the sufficient-and deficient-Pi conditions by a hydroponic approach and used to investigate the expression patterns of TaARF6 based on semi-quantitative RT-PCR. A DNA recombinant technique was adopted to construct the expression cassette integrating the TaARF6 open reading frame. The transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing TaARF6 were generated based on a genetic transformation approach mediated by Agobacterium-tumefaciens using the leaf discs as explants. Based on the culture methods of agar medium and hydroponic solution, the

  6. ARF Inhibits the Growth and Malignant Progression of Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Busch, Stephanie E; Moser, Russell D; Gurley, Kay E; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Liggitt, H. Denny; Kemp, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is among the deadliest of human cancers. The CDKN2A locus, which houses the INK4a and ARF tumor suppressor genes, is frequently altered in NSCLC. However, the specific role of ARF in pulmonary tumorigenesis remains unclear. KRAS and other oncogenes induce the expression of ARF, thus stabilizing p53 activity and arresting cell proliferation. To address the role of ARF in Kras-driven NSCLC, we compared the susceptibility of NIH/Ola strain wild-type and Arf ...

  7. Guanylate-Binding Protein 1, an Interferon-Induced GTPase, Exerts an Antiviral Activity against Classical Swine Fever Virus Depending on Its GTPase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lian-Feng; Yu, Jiahui; Li, Yongfeng; Wang, Jinghan; Li, Su; Zhang, Lingkai; Xia, Shui-Li; Yang, Qian; Wang, Xiao; Yu, Shaoxiong; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Zhu, Yan; Munir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many viruses trigger the type I interferon (IFN) pathway upon infection, resulting in the transcription of hundreds of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), which define the antiviral state of the host. Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious viral disease endangering the pig industry in many countries. However, anti-CSFV ISGs are poorly documented. Here we screened 20 ISGs that are commonly induced by type I IFNs against CSFV in lentivirus-delivered cell lines, resulting in the identification of guanylate-binding protein 1 (GBP1) as a potent anti-CSFV ISG. We observed that overexpression of GBP1, an IFN-induced GTPase, remarkably suppressed CSFV replication, whereas knockdown of endogenous GBP1 expression by small interfering RNAs significantly promoted CSFV growth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that GBP1 acted mainly on the early phase of CSFV replication and inhibited the translation efficiency of the internal ribosome entry site of CSFV. In addition, we found that GBP1 was upregulated at the transcriptional level in CSFV-infected PK-15 cells and in various organs of CSFV-infected pigs. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays revealed that GBP1 interacted with the NS5A protein of CSFV, and this interaction was mapped in the N-terminal globular GTPase domain of GBP1. Interestingly, the K51 of GBP1, which is crucial for its GTPase activity, was essential for the inhibition of CSFV replication. We showed further that the NS5A-GBP1 interaction inhibited GTPase activity, which was critical for its antiviral effect. Taking our findings together, GBP1 is an anti-CSFV ISG whose action depends on its GTPase activity. IMPORTANCE Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of classical swine fever (CSF), an economically important viral disease affecting the pig industry in many countries. To date, only a few host restriction factors against CSFV

  8. Are There Rab GTPases in Archaea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surkont, Jaroslaw; Pereira-Leal, Jose B

    2016-07-01

    A complex endomembrane system is one of the hallmarks of Eukaryotes. Vesicle trafficking between compartments is controlled by a diverse protein repertoire, including Rab GTPases. These small GTP-binding proteins contribute identity and specificity to the system, and by working as molecular switches, trigger multiple events in vesicle budding, transport, and fusion. A diverse collection of Rab GTPases already existed in the ancestral Eukaryote, yet, it is unclear how such elaborate repertoire emerged. A novel archaeal phylum, the Lokiarchaeota, revealed that several eukaryotic-like protein systems, including small GTPases, are present in Archaea. Here, we test the hypothesis that the Rab family of small GTPases predates the origin of Eukaryotes. Our bioinformatic pipeline detected multiple putative Rab-like proteins in several archaeal species. Our analyses revealed the presence and strict conservation of sequence features that distinguish eukaryotic Rabs from other small GTPases (Rab family motifs), mapping to the same regions in the structure as in eukaryotic Rabs. These mediate Rab-specific interactions with regulators of the REP/GDI (Rab Escort Protein/GDP dissociation Inhibitor) family. Sensitive structure-based methods further revealed the existence of REP/GDI-like genes in Archaea, involved in isoprenyl metabolism. Our analysis supports a scenario where Rabs differentiated into an independent family in Archaea, interacting with proteins involved in membrane biogenesis. These results further support the archaeal nature of the eukaryotic ancestor and provide a new insight into the intermediate stages and the evolutionary path toward the complex membrane-associated signaling circuits that characterize the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, and specifically Rab proteins. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  9. RhoGTPases in stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    RhoGTPases are small molecules that control a wide variety of signal transduction pathways. Their profound function in regulating the actin cytoskeleton is well recognized. Stem cells are unique in their ability to self-renew and produce progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells. RhoGT-Pases influence stem cell morphology and cell migration as well as stem cell self-renewal, proliferation, transplantation, homing and differentiation. In this review, the multiple roles of the RhoGTPases in stem cells are discussed.

  10. ARF regulates the stability of p16 protein via REGγ-dependent proteasome degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Wang, Jingqiang; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2013-08-01

    The cell-cycle regulatory gene INK4A-ARF (CDKN2A) has two alternative transcripts that produce entirely different proteins, namely p14(ARF) and p16, which have complementary functions as regulators of p53 and pRB tumor suppressor pathways, respectively. The unusual organization of INK4A-ARF has long led to speculation of a need for coordinated regulation of p14(ARF) and p16. We now show that p14(ARF) (ARF) regulates the stability of p16 protein in human cancer cell lines, as well as in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In particular, ARF promotes rapid degradation of p16 protein, which is mediated by the proteasome and, more specifically, by interaction of ARF with one of its subunits, REGγ. Furthermore, this ARF-dependent destabilization of p16 can be abrogated by knockdown of REGγ or by pharmacologic blockade of its nuclear export. Thus, our findings have uncovered a novel crosstalk of 2 key tumor suppressors mediated by a REGγ-dependent mechanism. The ability of ARF to control p16 stability may influence cell-cycle function. The ability of ARF to control p16 stability may influence cell cycle function. Visual Overview: http://mcr.aacrjournals.org/content/current. ©2013 AACR.

  11. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-11-17

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species' regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF -p53 axis activation.

  12. Approaches of targeting Rho GTPases in cancer drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rho GTPases are master regulators of actomyosin structure and dynamics and play pivotal roles in a variety of cellular processes including cell morphology, gene transcription, cell cycle progression and cell adhesion. Because aberrant Rho GTPase signaling activities are widely associated with human cancer, key components of Rho GTPase signaling pathways have attracted increasing interest as potential therapeutic targets. Similar to Ras, Rho GTPases themselves were, until recently, deemed “undruggable” because of structure-function considerations. Several approaches to interfere with Rho GTPase signaling have been explored and show promise as new ways for tackling cancer cells. Areas covered This review focuses on the recent progress in targeting the signaling activities of three prototypical Rho GTPases, i.e. RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. The authors describe the involvement of these Rho GTPases, their key regulators and effectors in cancer. Furthermore, the authors discuss the current approaches for rationally targeting aberrant Rho GTPases along their signaling cascades, upstream and downstream of Rho GTPases and posttranslational modifications at a molecular level. Expert opinion To date, while no clinically effective drugs targeting Rho GTPase signaling for cancer treatment are available, tool compounds and lead drugs that pharmacologically inhibit Rho GTPase pathways have shown promise. Small molecule inhibitors targeting Rho GTPase signaling may add new treatment options for future precision cancer therapy, particularly in combination with other anti-cancer agents. PMID:26087073

  13. Rab GTPases Regulate Vesicle Traffic%Rab蛋白调控胞内囊泡运输

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯婉娟; 徐子静; 孟令锋; 张蓉颖

    2012-01-01

    细胞内各个细胞器之间通过囊泡的膜转运是真核细胞存在的基本.Rab蛋白确保了转运蛋白被运输至正确的目的地.Rab蛋白是小GTP酶中的一大家族,它通过募集其效应物蛋白,其中包括接头蛋白,栓系因子,激酶,磷酸酶以及动力蛋白等,调控了细胞膜的选取,囊泡出芽,去包被,转运以及膜融合等过程.本文主要从Rab蛋白循环着手,依次论述了Rab蛋白在囊泡出芽,去包被,转运和膜融合等过程中起到的作用,从而使读者对Rab蛋白能有一个更加系统的了解.%Rab GTPases is a targe family of small GTPases. Rab GTPases regulate vesicle traffic which is fundamental to the existence of eukaryotic cells. Rab GTPases recruit their effect proteins including sorting adaptors, tethering factors, kinases, phosphatases and motors, control membrane identity and vesicle budding, uncoating, motility and fusion. This paper introduced the circuitry of Rab GTPases and their function in vesicle budding, uncoating, motility and fusion.

  14. Rho GTPases in collective cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, M.M.; Friedl, P.

    2014-01-01

    The family of Rho GTPases are intracellular signal transducers that link cell surface signals to multiple intracellular responses. They are best known for their role in regulating actin dynamics required for cell migration, but in addition control cell-cell adhesion, polarization, vesicle traffickin

  15. Rho GTPases in collective cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, M.M.; Friedl, P.

    2014-01-01

    The family of Rho GTPases are intracellular signal transducers that link cell surface signals to multiple intracellular responses. They are best known for their role in regulating actin dynamics required for cell migration, but in addition control cell-cell adhesion, polarization, vesicle

  16. Interaction between the triglyceride lipase ATGL and the arf1 activator GBF1

    KAUST Repository

    Ellong, Emy Njoh

    2011-07-18

    The Arf1 exchange factor GBF1 (Golgi Brefeldin A resistance factor 1) and its effector COPI are required for delivery of ATGL (adipose triglyceride lipase) to lipid droplets (LDs). Using yeast two hybrid, co-immunoprecipitation in mammalian cells and direct protein binding approaches, we report here that GBF1 and ATGL interact directly and in cells, through multiple contact sites on each protein. The C-terminal region of ATGL interacts with N-terminal domains of GBF1, including the catalytic Sec7 domain, but not with full-length GBF1 or its entire N-terminus. The N-terminal lipase domain of ATGL (called the patatin domain) interacts with two C-terminal domains of GBF1, HDS (Homology downstream of Sec7) 1 and HDS2. These two domains of GBF1 localize to lipid droplets when expressed alone in cells, but not to the Golgi, unlike the full-length GBF1 protein, which localizes to both. We suggest that interaction of GBF1 with ATGL may be involved in the membrane trafficking pathway mediated by GBF1, Arf1 and COPI that contributes to the localization of ATGL to lipid droplets.

  17. Interaction between the triglyceride lipase ATGL and the Arf1 activator GBF1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emy Njoh Ellong

    Full Text Available The Arf1 exchange factor GBF1 (Golgi Brefeldin A resistance factor 1 and its effector COPI are required for delivery of ATGL (adipose triglyceride lipase to lipid droplets (LDs. Using yeast two hybrid, co-immunoprecipitation in mammalian cells and direct protein binding approaches, we report here that GBF1 and ATGL interact directly and in cells, through multiple contact sites on each protein. The C-terminal region of ATGL interacts with N-terminal domains of GBF1, including the catalytic Sec7 domain, but not with full-length GBF1 or its entire N-terminus. The N-terminal lipase domain of ATGL (called the patatin domain interacts with two C-terminal domains of GBF1, HDS (Homology downstream of Sec7 1 and HDS2. These two domains of GBF1 localize to lipid droplets when expressed alone in cells, but not to the Golgi, unlike the full-length GBF1 protein, which localizes to both. We suggest that interaction of GBF1 with ATGL may be involved in the membrane trafficking pathway mediated by GBF1, Arf1 and COPI that contributes to the localization of ATGL to lipid droplets.

  18. New Insights into Rho signaling from plant ROP/Rac GTPases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Christian; Lavagi, Irene; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2012-01-01

    In animal and plant cells, a wide range of key cellular processes that require the establishment of cell polarity are governed by Rho-GTPases. In contrast to animals and yeast, however, plants possess a single Rho-GTPase subfamily called ROP (Rho-like GTPases from plants). This raises the question of how plants achieve the high level of regulation required for polar cellular processes. It is becoming evident that plants have evolved specific regulators, including ROP-Guanine Exchange Factors (GEFs) and the Rop-interactive CRIB motif–containing proteins (RIC) effectors. Recent research shows that the spatiotemporal dynamics of ROPs, the cytoskeleton, endocytosis and exocytosis are intertwined. This review focuses on the proposed self-organizing nature of ROPs in plants and how ROP-mediated cellular mechanisms compare with those responsible for cell polarity in animals and yeast. PMID:22795444

  19. New insights into Rho signaling from plant ROP/Rac GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Christian; Lavagi, Irene; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2012-09-01

    In animal and plant cells, a wide range of key cellular processes that require the establishment of cell polarity are governed by Rho-GTPases. In contrast to animals and yeast, however, plants possess a single Rho-GTPase subfamily called Rho-like GTPases from plants (ROPs). This raises the question of how plants achieve the high level of regulation required for polar cellular processes. It is becoming evident that plants have evolved specific regulators, including ROP-Guanine Exchange Factors (GEFs) and the Rop-interactive CRIB motif-containing protein (RIC) effectors. Recent research shows that the spatiotemporal dynamics of ROPs, the cytoskeleton, endocytosis, and exocytosis are intertwined. This review focuses on the proposed self-organizing nature of ROPs in plants and how ROP-mediated cellular mechanisms compare with those responsible for cell polarity in animals and yeast.

  20. Rab27 GTPases Distribute Extracellular Nanomaps for Invasive Growth and Metastasis: Implications for Prognosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier De Wever

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Rab27 family of small GTPases regulates exocytosis of distinct vesicle types including multivesicular endosomes, which results in the release of exosomes. Exosomes are nanometer-sized membrane vesicles that enclose soluble factors such as proteins and nucleic acids within a lipid bilayer and can travel toward distant tissues to influence multiple aspects of cell behavior. In our view that tumors are endocrine organs producing exosomes, Rab27 GTPases and their effector proteins are critical determinants for invasive growth and metastasis. Rab27 proteins and their effectors may serve as prognostic biomarkers or as targets for patient-tailored therapy.

  1. Rab27 GTPases distribute extracellular nanomaps for invasive growth and metastasis: implications for prognosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, An; De Wever, Olivier

    2013-05-10

    The Rab27 family of small GTPases regulates exocytosis of distinct vesicle types including multivesicular endosomes, which results in the release of exosomes. Exosomes are nanometer-sized membrane vesicles that enclose soluble factors such as proteins and nucleic acids within a lipid bilayer and can travel toward distant tissues to influence multiple aspects of cell behavior. In our view that tumors are endocrine organs producing exosomes, Rab27 GTPases and their effector proteins are critical determinants for invasive growth and metastasis. Rab27 proteins and their effectors may serve as prognostic biomarkers or as targets for patient-tailored therapy.

  2. The puzzle of chloroplast vesicle transport – involvement of GTPases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazzad eKarim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the cytosol of plant cells vesicle transport occurs via secretory pathways among the endoplasmic reticulum (ER network, Golgi bodies, secretory granules, endosome and plasma membrane. Three systems transfer lipids, proteins and other important molecules through aqueous spaces to membrane-enclosed compartments, via vesicles that bud from donor membranes, being coated and uncoated before tethered and fused with acceptor membranes. In addition, molecular, biochemical and ultrastructural evidence indicates presence of a vesicle transport system in chloroplasts. Little is known about the protein components of this system. However, as chloroplasts harbour the photosynthetic apparatus that ultimately supports most organisms on the planet, close attention to their pathways is warranted. This may also reveal novel diversification and/or distinct solutions to the problems posed by the targeted intra-cellular trafficking of important molecules. To date two homologues to well-known yeast cytosolic vesicle transport proteins, CPSAR1 and CPRabA5e, have been shown to have roles in chloroplast vesicle transport, both being GTPases. Bioinformatic data indicate that several homologues of cytosolic vesicle transport system components are putatively chloroplast-localized and in addition other proteins have been implicated to participate in chloroplast vesicle transport, including vesicle-inducing protein in plastids 1 (VIPP1, thylakoid formation 1 (THF1, snowy cotyledon 2/cotyledon chloroplast biogenesis factor (SCO2/CYO1, curvature thylakoid 1 (CURT1 proteins, and a dynamin like GTPase FZO-like (FZL protein. Several putative potential cargo proteins have also been identified, including building blocks of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here we discuss details of the largely unknown putative chloroplast vesicle transport system, focusing on GTPase-related components.

  3. Tumor suppressor ARF regulates tissue microenvironment and tumor growth through modulation of macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-García, Lidia; Herranz, Sandra; Higueras, María Angeles; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2016-10-11

    Tumor microenvironment has been described to play a key role in tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumor stroma, and particularly tumor associated macrophages (TAMs or M2-like macrophages) exert important immunosuppressive activity and a pro-tumoral role within the tumor microenvironment. Alternative-reading frame (ARF) gene is widely inactivated in human cancer. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory response establishing a new role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesized that ARF may also regulates tumor growth through recruitment and modulation of the macrophage phenotype in the tumor microenvironment. Xenograft assays of B16F10 melanoma cells into ARF-deficient mice resulted in increased tumor growth compared to those implanted in WT control mice. Tumors from ARF-deficient mice exhibited significantly increased number of TAMs as well as microvascular density. Transwell assays showed crosstalk between tumor cells and macrophages. On the one hand, ARF-deficient macrophages modulate migratory ability of the tumor cells. And on the other, tumor cells promote the skewing of ARF-/- macrophages toward a M2-type polarization. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that ARF deficiency facilitates the infiltration of macrophages into the tumor mass and favors their polarization towards a M2 phenotype, thus promoting tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. This work provides novel information about the critical role of ARF in the modulation of tumor microenvironment.

  4. SlARF2a plays a negative role in mediating axillary shoot formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Liu, Xin; Wang, Rong; Dong, Xiufen; Guan, Xiaoxi; Wang, Yanling; Jiang, Yun; Shi, Zihang; Qi, Mingfang; Li, Tianlai

    2016-01-01

    SlARF2a is expressed in most plant organs, including roots, leaves, flowers and fruits. A detailed expression study revealed that SlARF2a is mainly expressed in the leaf nodes and cross-sections of the nodes indicated that SlARF2a expression is restricted to vascular organs. Decapitation or the application of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) can initially promote axillary shoots, during which SlARF2a expression is significantly reduced. Down-regulation of SlARF2a expression results in an increased frequency of dicotyledons and significantly increased lateral organ development. Stem anatomy studies have revealed significantly altered cambia and phloem in tomato plants expressing down-regulated levels of ARF2a, which is associated with obvious alterations in auxin distribution. Further analysis has revealed that altered auxin transport may occur via altered pin expression. To identify the interactions of AUX/IAA and TPL with ARF2a, four axillary shoot development repressors that are down-regulated during axillary shoot development, IAA3, IAA9, SlTPL1 and SlTPL6, were tested for their direct interactions with ARF2a. Although none of these repressors are directly involved in ARF2a activity, similar expression patterns of IAA3, IAA9 and ARF2a implied they might work tightly in axillary shoot formation and other developmental processes. PMID:27645097

  5. A Pan-GTPase Inhibitor as a Molecular Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Lin; Guo, Yuna; BasuRay, Soumik; Agola, Jacob O; Romero, Elsa; Simpson, Denise S; Schroeder, Chad E; Simons, Peter; Waller, Anna; Garcia, Matthew; Carter, Mark; Ursu, Oleg; Gouveia, Kristine; Golden, Jennifer E; Aubé, Jeffrey; Wandinger-Ness, Angela; Sklar, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    Overactive GTPases have often been linked to human diseases. The available inhibitors are limited and have not progressed far in clinical trials. We report here a first-in-class small molecule pan-GTPase inhibitor discovered from a high throughput screening campaign. The compound CID1067700 inhibits multiple GTPases in biochemical, cellular protein and protein interaction, as well as cellular functional assays. In the biochemical and protein interaction assays, representative GTPases from Rho, Ras, and Rab, the three most generic subfamilies of the GTPases, were probed, while in the functional assays, physiological processes regulated by each of the three subfamilies of the GTPases were examined. The chemical functionalities essential for the activity of the compound were identified through structural derivatization. The compound is validated as a useful molecular probe upon which GTPase-targeting inhibitors with drug potentials might be developed.

  6. A Pan-GTPase Inhibitor as a Molecular Probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hong

    Full Text Available Overactive GTPases have often been linked to human diseases. The available inhibitors are limited and have not progressed far in clinical trials. We report here a first-in-class small molecule pan-GTPase inhibitor discovered from a high throughput screening campaign. The compound CID1067700 inhibits multiple GTPases in biochemical, cellular protein and protein interaction, as well as cellular functional assays. In the biochemical and protein interaction assays, representative GTPases from Rho, Ras, and Rab, the three most generic subfamilies of the GTPases, were probed, while in the functional assays, physiological processes regulated by each of the three subfamilies of the GTPases were examined. The chemical functionalities essential for the activity of the compound were identified through structural derivatization. The compound is validated as a useful molecular probe upon which GTPase-targeting inhibitors with drug potentials might be developed.

  7. Parallel structural evolution of auxin response factors in the angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finet, Cédric; Fourquin, Chloé; Vinauger, Marion; Berne-Dedieu, Annick; Chambrier, Pierre; Paindavoine, Sandrine; Scutt, Charles P

    2010-09-01

    Here we analyze the structural evolution of the paralogous transcription factors ETTIN (ETT/ARF3) and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 4 (ARF4), which control the development of floral organs and leaves in the model angiosperm Arabidopsis. ETT is truncated at its C terminus, and consequently lacks two regulatory domains present in most other ARFs, including ARF4. Our analysis indicates ETT and ARF4 to have been generated by the duplication of a non-truncated ARF gene prior to the radiation of the extant angiosperms. We furthermore show that either ETT or ARF4 orthologs have become modified to encode truncated ARF proteins, lacking C-terminal regulatory domains, in representatives of three groups that separated early in angiosperm evolution: Amborellales, Nymphaeales and the remaining angiosperm clade. Interestingly, the production of truncated ARF4 transcripts in Amborellales occurs through an alternative splicing mechanism, rather than through a permanent truncation, as in the other groups studied. To gain insight into the potential functional significance of truncations to ETT and ARF4, we tested the capacity of native, truncated and chimeric coding sequences of these genes to restore a wild-type phenotype to Arabidopsis ett mutants. We discuss the results of this analysis in the context of the structural evolution of ARF genes in the angiosperms. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Ras-like family small GTPases genes in Nilaparvata lugens: Identification, phylogenetic analysis, gene expression and function in nymphal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixia; Li, Kailong; Wan, Pinjun; Lai, Fengxiang; Fu, Qiang; Zhu, Tingheng

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-nine cDNAs encoding Ras-like family small GTPases (RSGs) were cloned and sequenced from Nilaparvata lugens. Twenty-eight proteins are described here: 3 from Rho, 2 from Ras, 9 from Arf and 14 from Rabs. These RSGs from N.lugens have five conserved G-loop motifs and displayed a higher degree of sequence conservation with orthologues from insects. RT-qPCR analysis revealed NlRSGs expressed at all life stages and the highest expression was observed in hemolymph, gut or wing for most of NlRSGs. RNAi demonstrated that eighteen NlRSGs play a crucial role in nymphal development. Nymphs with silenced NlRSGs failed to molt, eclosion or development arrest. The qRT-PCR analysis verified the correlation between mortality and the down-regulation of the target genes. The expression level of nuclear receptors, Kr-h1, Hr3, FTZ-F1 and E93 involved in 20E and JH signal pathway was impacted in nymphs with silenced twelve NlRSGs individually. The expression of two halloween genes, Cyp314a1 and Cyp315a1 involved in ecdysone synthesis, decreased in nymphs with silenced NlSar1 or NlArf1. Cyp307a1 increased in nymphs with silenced NlArf6. In N.lugens with silenced NlSRβ, NlSar1 and NlRab2 at 9th day individually, 0.0% eclosion rate and almost 100.0% mortality was demonstrated. Further analysis showed NlSRβ could be served as a candidate target for dsRNA-based pesticides for N.lugens control. PMID:28241066

  9. A-RAF kinase functions in ARF6 regulated endocytic membrane traffic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nekhoroshkova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RAF kinases direct ERK MAPK signaling to distinct subcellular compartments in response to growth factor stimulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of the three mammalian isoforms A-RAF is special in that one of its two lipid binding domains mediates a unique pattern of membrane localization. Specific membrane binding is retained by an N-terminal fragment (AR149 that corresponds to a naturally occurring splice variant termed DA-RAF2. AR149 colocalizes with ARF6 on tubular endosomes and has a dominant negative effect on endocytic trafficking. Moreover actin polymerization of yeast and mammalian cells is abolished. AR149/DA-RAF2 does not affect the internalization step of endocytosis, but trafficking to the recycling compartment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A-RAF induced ERK activation is required for this step by activating ARF6, as A-RAF depletion or inhibition of the A-RAF controlled MEK-ERK cascade blocks recycling. These data led to a new model for A-RAF function in endocytic trafficking.

  10. ARF: a versatile DNA damage response ally at the crossroads of development and tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanassios eKotsinas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available ARF is a tumor suppressor protein that senses oncogenic and other stressogenic signals. It can trigger p53-dependent and -independent responses with cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction being the most prominent ones. Other ARF activities, particularly p53-independent ones, that could help in understanding cancer development and provide potential therapeutic exploitation are underrated. Although ARF is generally not expressed in normal tissues, it is essential for ocular and male germ cells development. The underlying mechanism(s in these processes, while not clearly defined, point towards a functional link between ARF, DNA damage and angiogenesis. Based on a recent study from our group demonstrating a functional interplay between ATM and ARF during carcinogenesis, we discuss the role of ARF at the crossroads of cancer and developmental processes.

  11. Expression of p16INK4A and p14ARF in hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, T; Chikatsu, N; Takahashi, S; Fujita, A; Uchimaru, K; Asano, S; Fujita, T; Motokura, T

    1999-11-01

    The INK4A/ARF locus yields two tumor suppressors, p16INK4A and p14ARF, and is frequently deleted in human tumors. We studied their mRNA expressions in 41 hematopoietic cell lines and in 137 patients with hematological malignancies; we used a quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assay. Normal peripheral bloods, bone marrow and lymph nodes expressed little or undetectable p16INK4A and p14ARF mRNAs, which were readily detected in 12 and 17 of 41 cell lines, respectively. Patients with hematological malignancies frequently lacked p16INK4A expression (60/137) and lost p14ARF expression less frequently (19/137, 13.9%). Almost all patients without p14ARF expression lacked p16INK4A expression, which may correspond to deletions of the INK4A/ARF locus. Undetectable p16INK4A expression with p14ARF expression in 41 patients may correspond to p16INK4A promoter methylation or to normal expression status of the p16INK4A gene. All patients with follicular lymphoma (FL), myeloma or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) expressed p14ARF while nine of 23 patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) lost p14ARF expression. Patients with ALL, AML or blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia expressed abundant p16INK4A mRNAs more frequently than patients with other diseases (12/33 vs 6/104, P < 0.01). Patients with FL and high p14ARF expression had a significantly shorter survival time while survival for patients with DLBCL and increased p14ARF expression tended to be longer. These observations indicate that p16INK4A and p14ARF expression is differentially affected among hemato- logical malignancies and that not only inactivation but also increased expression may have clinical significance.

  12. The ARF Tumor Suppressor Regulates Bone Remodeling and Osteosarcoma Development in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, John C.; Deng, Hongju; Shea, Lauren K.; Eagleton, Mark C.; Niewiesk, Stefan; Lairmore, Michael D.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Rosol, Thomas J.; Weber, Jason D.; Ratner, Lee; Weilbaecher, Katherine N.

    2010-01-01

    The ARF tumor suppressor regulates p53 as well as basic developmental processes independent of p53, including osteoclast activation, by controlling ribosomal biogenesis. Here we provide evidence that ARF is a master regulator of bone remodeling and osteosarcoma (OS) development in mice. Arf-/- mice displayed increased osteoblast (OB) and osteoclast (OC) activity with a significant net increase in trabecular bone volume. The long bones of Arf-/- mice had increased expression of OB genes while Arf-/- OB showed enhanced differentiation in vitro. Mice transgenic for the Tax oncogene develop lymphocytic tumors with associated osteolytic lesions, while Tax+Arf-/- mice uniformly developed spontaneous OS by 7 months of age. Tax+Arf-/- tumors were well differentiated OS characterized by an abundance of new bone with OC recruitment, expressed OB markers and displayed intact levels of p53 mRNA and reduced Rb transcript levels. Cell lines established from OS recapitulated characteristics of the primary tumor, including the expression of mature OB markers and ability to form mineralized tumors when transplanted. Loss of heterozygosity in OS tumors arising in Tax+Arf+/- mice emphasized the necessity of ARF-loss in OS development. Hypothesizing that inhibition of ARF-regulated bone remodeling would repress development of OS, we demonstrated that treatment of Tax+Arf-/- mice with zoledronic acid, a bisphosphonate inhibitor of OC activity and repressor of bone turnover, prevented or delayed the onset of OS. These data describe a novel role for ARF as a regulator of bone remodeling through effects on both OB and OC. Finally, these data underscore the potential of targeting bone remodeling as adjuvant therapy or in patients with genetic predispositions to prevent the development of OS. PMID:21209895

  13. A homogeneous quenching resonance energy transfer assay for the kinetic analysis of the GTPase nucleotide exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopra, Kari; Ligabue, Alessio; Wang, Qi; Syrjänpää, Markku; Blaževitš, Olga; Veltel, Stefan; van Adrichem, Arjan J; Hänninen, Pekka; Abankwa, Daniel; Härmä, Harri

    2014-07-01

    A quenching resonance energy transfer (QRET) assay for small GTPase nucleotide exchange kinetic monitoring is demonstrated using nanomolar protein concentrations. Small GTPases are central signaling proteins in all eukaryotic cells acting as a "molecular switches" that are active in the GTP-state and inactive in the GDP-state. GTP-loading is highly regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). In several diseases, most prominently cancer, this process in misregulated. The kinetics of the nucleotide exchange reaction reports on the enzymatic activity of the GEF reaction system and is, therefore, of special interest. We determined the nucleotide exchange kinetics using europium-labeled GTP (Eu-GTP) in the QRET assay for small GTPases. After GEF catalyzed GTP-loading of a GTPase, a high time-resolved luminescence signal was found to be associated with GTPase bound Eu-GTP, whereas the non-bound Eu-GTP fraction was quenched by soluble quencher. The association kinetics of the Eu-GTP was measured after GEF addition, whereas the dissociation kinetics could be determined after addition of unlabeled GTP. The resulting association and dissociation rates were in agreement with previously published values for H-Ras(Wt), H-Ras(Q61G), and K-Ras(Wt), respectively. The broader applicability of the QRET assay for small GTPases was demonstrated by determining the kinetics of the Ect2 catalyzed RhoA(Wt) GTP-loading. The QRET assay allows the use of nanomolar protein concentrations, as more than 3-fold signal-to-background ratio was achieved with 50 nM GTPase and GEF proteins. Thus, small GTPase exchange kinetics can be efficiently determined in a HTS compatible 384-well plate format.

  14. Arf6 regulates EGF-induced internalization of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Zhang, Yujie; Gu, Luo; Zheng, Jianchao; Cui, Jie; Dong, Jing; Du, Jun

    2015-01-01

    E-cadherin internalization facilitates dissolution of adherens junctions and promotes tumor cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and migration. Our previous results have shown that Arf6 exerts pro-migratory action in breast cancer cells after EGF stimulation. Despite the fact that EGF signaling stimulates EMT of breast cancer cells, the effect of Arf6 on internalization of E-cadherin of breast cancer cells under EGF treatment remains to be determined. Here, we showed that EGF dose-dependently stimulated E-cadherin internalization by MCF-7 cells with the maximal effect at 50 ng/ml. Meanwhile, EGF treatment markedly increased Arf6 activation. Arf6 was involved in complexes of E-cadherin, and more E-cadherin was pulled down with Arf6 when the activity of the latter was increased. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays showed that transfection breast cancer cells with Arf6-T27N or Arf6 siRNA suppressed EGF-induced E-cadherin internalization. Taken together, our study demonstrated that Arf6 activation plays a potential role in EGF-induced E-cadherin internalization, providing new mechanism underlying the effect of Arf6 on promoting breast cancer cell metastasis.

  15. Arf4 is required for Mammalian development but dispensable for ciliary assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Follit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The primary cilium is a sensory organelle, defects in which cause a wide range of human diseases including retinal degeneration, polycystic kidney disease and birth defects. The sensory functions of cilia require specific receptors to be targeted to the ciliary subdomain of the plasma membrane. Arf4 has been proposed to sort cargo destined for the cilium at the Golgi complex and deemed a key regulator of ciliary protein trafficking. In this work, we show that Arf4 binds to the ciliary targeting sequence (CTS of fibrocystin. Knockdown of Arf4 indicates that it is not absolutely required for trafficking of the fibrocystin CTS to cilia as steady-state CTS levels are unaffected. However, we did observe a delay in delivery of newly synthesized CTS from the Golgi complex to the cilium when Arf4 was reduced. Arf4 mutant mice are embryonic lethal and die at mid-gestation shortly after node formation. Nodal cilia appeared normal and functioned properly to break left-right symmetry in Arf4 mutant embryos. At this stage of development Arf4 expression is highest in the visceral endoderm but we did not detect cilia on these cells. In the visceral endoderm, the lack of Arf4 caused defects in cell structure and apical protein localization. This work suggests that while Arf4 is not required for ciliary assembly, it is important for the efficient transport of fibrocystin to cilia, and also plays critical roles in non-ciliary processes.

  16. Serum and urinary insulin-like growth factor-1 and tumor necrosis factor in neonates with and without acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhauser, Carlos; Dubey, Luis-Antonio; Garay, M-Eugenia; Pérez-Luque, Elva-Leticia; Malacara, Juan-Manuel; Vargas-Origel, Arturo

    2002-05-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in neonates may occur after renal ischemia. Growth factors participate in the tubular regeneration process. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is produced in the kidney during the recovery phase of ARF. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) may play a role in renal apoptosis. We examined serum and urinary IGF-1 and TNFalpha in neonates with or without ARF after asphyxia, in order to assess their possible use as markers of renal damage and recovery. We studied 20 full-term asphyxiated neonates, 10 with ARF and 10 without ARF, and compared them with 13 normal newborns for 7 days after birth. Blood urea, creatinine, pH, base deficit, and serum and urine IGF-1 and TNFalpha were assessed. Neonates with ARF had more-severe acidosis than patients without ARF. All patients had lower serum IGF-1 values immediately after birth than control children. Serum IGF-1 remained low in the ARF patients. The initial urinary IGF-1 was higher in all patients compared with control newborns, and remained elevated for the rest of the study only in the ARF neonates. Serum and urinary TNFalpha concentrations were similar for all healthy and diseased neonates. Measurement of serum and urinary IGF-1 levels in ARF neonates might be of additional value for clinical assessment of ARF.

  17. Crosstalk of small GTPases at the Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baschieri, Francesco; Farhan, Hesso

    2012-01-01

    Small GTPases regulate a wide range of homeostatic processes such as cytoskeletal dynamics, organelle homeostasis, cell migration and vesicle trafficking, as well as in pathologic conditions such as carcinogenesis and metastatic spreading. Therefore, it is important to understand the regulation of small GTPase signaling, but this is complicated by the fact that crosstalk exists between different GTPase families and that we have to understand how they signal in time and space. The Golgi apparatus represents a hub for several signaling molecules and its importance in this field is constantly increasing. In this review we will discuss small GTPases signaling at the Golgi apparatus. Then, we will highlight recent work that contributed to a better understanding of crosstalk between different small GTPase families, with a special emphasis on their crosstalk at the Golgi apparatus. Finally, we will give a brief overview of available methods and tools to investigate spatio-temporal small GTPase crosstalk.

  18. Somatotropinomas, but not nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas, maintain a functional apoptotic RET/Pit1/ARF/p53 pathway that is blocked by excess GDNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Rodriguez, Esther; Garcia-Rendueles, Angela R; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Gutierrez-Pascual, Ester; Garcia-Lavandeira, Montserrat; Leal, Alfonso; Japon, Miguel A; Soto, Alfonso; Venegas, Eva; Tinahones, Francisco J; Garcia-Arnes, Juan A; Benito, Pedro; Angeles Galvez, Maria; Jimenez-Reina, Luis; Bernabeu, Ignacio; Dieguez, Carlos; Luque, Raul M; Castaño, Justo P; Alvarez, Clara V

    2014-11-01

    Acromegaly is caused by somatotroph cell adenomas (somatotropinomas [ACROs]), which secrete GH. Human and rodent somatotroph cells express the RET receptor. In rodents, when normal somatotrophs are deprived of the RET ligand, GDNF (Glial Cell Derived Neurotrophic Factor), RET is processed intracellularly to induce overexpression of Pit1 [Transcription factor (gene : POUF1) essential for transcription of Pituitary hormones GH, PRL and TSHb], which in turn leads to p19Arf/p53-dependent apoptosis. Our purpose was to ascertain whether human ACROs maintain the RET/Pit1/p14ARF/p53/apoptosis pathway, relative to nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Apoptosis in the absence and presence of GDNF was studied in primary cultures of 8 ACROs and 3 NFPAs. Parallel protein extracts were analyzed for expression of RET, Pit1, p19Arf, p53, and phospho-Akt. When GDNF deprived, ACRO cells, but not NFPAs, presented marked level of apoptosis that was prevented in the presence of GDNF. Apoptosis was accompanied by RET processing, Pit1 accumulation, and p14ARF and p53 induction. GDNF prevented all these effects via activation of phospho-AKT. Overexpression of human Pit1 (hPit1) directly induced p19Arf/p53 and apoptosis in a pituitary cell line. Using in silico studies, 2 CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (cEBPα) consensus-binding sites were found to be 100% conserved in mouse, rat, and hPit1 promoters. Deletion of 1 cEBPα site prevented the RET-induced increase in hPit1 promoter expression. TaqMan qRT-PCR (real time RT-PCR) for RET, Pit1, Arf, TP53, GDNF, steroidogenic factor 1, and GH was performed in RNA from whole ACRO and NFPA tumors. ACRO but not NFPA adenomas express RET and Pit1. GDNF expression in the tumors was positively correlated with RET and negatively correlated with p53. In conclusion, ACROs maintain an active RET/Pit1/p14Arf/p53/apoptosis pathway that is inhibited by GDNF. Disruption of GDNF's survival function might constitute a new therapeutic route in

  19. Posttranslational lipid modification of Rho family small GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitin, Natalia; Roberts, Patrick J; Chenette, Emily J; Der, Channing J

    2012-01-01

    The Rho family comprises a major branch of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases. A majority of Rho GTPases are synthesized as inactive, cytosolic proteins. They then undergo posttranslational modification by isoprenoid or fatty acid lipids, and together with additional carboxyl-terminal sequences target Rho GTPases to specific membrane and subcellular compartments essential for function. We summarize the use of biochemical and cellular assays and pharmacologic inhibitors instrumental for the study of the role of posttranslational lipid modifications and processing in Rho GTPase biology.

  20. Characterization of two novel ADP ribosylation factors from giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii and their responses to WSSV challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zheng-Feng; Ren, Jie; Tan, Jing-Min; Wang, Zheng; Yin, Shao-Wu; Huang, Ying; Huang, Xin; Wang, Wen; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Ren, Qian

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs) are small GTP-binding proteins that have an essential function in intracellular trafficking and organelle structure. To date, little information is available on the Arfs in the economically important giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii and their relationship to viral infection. Here we identified two Arf genes from M. rosenbergii (MrArf1 and MrArf2) for the first time. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MrArf1, together with MjArf1 from shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus belonged to Class I Arfs. By contrast, MrArf2 didn't not match any of the Arfs classes of I/II/III, although it could be clustered with an Arf protein from M. japonicas called MjArfn, which may represent an analog of the Arf. MrArf1 was ubiquitously expressed in all the examined tissues, with the highest transcription level in the hepatopancreas, whereas MrArf2 was only highly expressed in the hepatopancreas and exhibited very low levels in the heart, stomach, gills and intestine. The expression level of MrArf1 in the gills was down-regulated post 24 h WSSV challenge, and reached the maximal level at 48 h. MrArf1 in the hepatopancreas went up from 24 to 48 h WSSV challenge. MrArf2 transcript in the gill also went down at 24 h and then was upregulated at 48 h WSSV challenge. MrArf2 increased significantly in the hepatopancreas 24 h after infection and then went down at 48 h WSSV challenge. RNAi results showed that knockdown of MrArf1 or MrArf2 could inhibit the expression of the envelope protein gene vp28 of the WSSV. So, it could be speculated that MrArf1 and MrArf2 might play important roles in the innate immune system against WSSV infection.

  1. Genome-wide analysis of auxin response factor gene family members in medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Auxin response factors (ARFs can function as transcriptional activators or repressors to regulate the expression of auxin response genes by specifically binding to auxin response elements (AuxREs during plant development. Based on a genome-wide strategy using the medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, 25 S. miltiorrhiza ARF (SmARF gene family members in four classes (class Ia, IIa, IIb and III were comprehensively analyzed to identify characteristics including gene structures, conserved domains, phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns. In a hybrid analysis of the phylogenetic tree, microRNA targets, and expression patterns of SmARFs in different organs, root tissues, and methyl jasmonate or indole-3-acetic acid treatment conditions, we screened for candidate SmARFs involved in various developmental processes of S. miltiorrhiza. Based on this analysis, we predicted that SmARF25, SmARF7, SmARF16 and SmARF20 are involved in flower, leaf, stem and root development, respectively. With the further insight into the targets of miR160 and miR167, specific SmARF genes in S. miltiorrhiza might encode products that participate in biological processes as described for ARF genes in Arabidopsis. Our results provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis and regulatory mechanisms of SmARFs in S. miltiorrhiza.

  2. ADP-ribosylation factor-like GTPase 15 enhances insulin-induced AKT phosphorylation in the IR/IRS1/AKT pathway by interacting with ASAP2 and regulating PDPK1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Wang, Min; Deng, Wuquan; Zhong, Daping; Jiang, Youzhao; Liao, Yong; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Xiaoli

    2017-05-13

    Decreased phosphorylation in the insulin signalling pathway is a hallmark of insulin resistance. The causes of this phenomenon are complicated and multifactorial. Recently, genomic analyses have identified ARL15 as a new candidate gene related to diabetes. However, the ARL15 protein function remains unclear. Here, we show that ARL15 is upregulated by insulin stimulation. This effect was impaired in insulin-resistant pathophysiology in TNF-α-treated C2C12 myotubes and in the skeletal muscles of leptin knockout mice. In addition, ARL15 localized to the cytoplasm in the resting state and accumulated in the Golgi apparatus around the nucleus upon insulin stimulation. ARL15 overexpression can enhance the phosphorylation of the key insulin signalling pathway molecules IR, IRS1 and AKT in C2C12 myotubes. Moreover, ARL15 knockdown can also specifically inhibit the phosphorylation of PDPK1 Ser241, thereby reducing PDPK1 activity and its downstream phosphorylation of AKT Thr308. Co-immunoprecipitation assays identified ASAP2 as an ARL15-interacting protein. In conclusion, we have identified that ARL15 acts as an insulin-sensitizing effector molecule to upregulate the phosphorylation of members of the canonical IR/IRS1/PDPK1/AKT insulin pathway by interacting with its GAP ASAP2 and activating PDPK1. This research may provide new insights into GTPase-mediated insulin signalling regulation and facilitate the development of new pharmacotherapeutic targets for insulin sensitization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The DNA damage checkpoint precedes activation of ARF in response to escalating oncogenic stress during tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evangelou, K; Bartkova, J; Kotsinas, A

    2013-01-01

    to various oncogenes showed that the delayed upregulation of ARF reflected a requirement for a higher, transcriptionally based threshold of oncogenic stress, elicited by at least two oncogenic ‘hits’, compared with lower activation threshold for DDR. We propose that relative to DDR activation, ARF provides...

  4. AKT regulates NPM dependent ARF localization and p53mut stability in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Garth; Abraham, Aswin G; Morton, Jennifer; Sampson, Oliver; Pefani, Dafni E; Khoronenkova, Svetlana; Grawenda, Anna; Papaspyropoulos, Angelos; Jamieson, Nigel; McKay, Colin; Sansom, Owen; Dianov, Grigory L; O'Neill, Eric

    2014-08-15

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is known to regulate ARF subcellular localization and MDM2 activity in response to oncogenic stress, though the precise mechanism has remained elusive. Here we describe how NPM and ARF associate in the nucleoplasm to form a MDM2 inhibitory complex. We find that oligomerization of NPM drives nucleolar accumulation of ARF. Moreover, the formation of NPM and ARF oligomers antagonizes MDM2 association with the inhibitory complex, leading to activation of MDM2 E3-ligase activity and targeting of p53. We find that AKT phosphorylation of NPM-Ser48 prevents oligomerization that results in nucleoplasmic localization of ARF, constitutive MDM2 inhibition and stabilization of p53. We also show that ARF promotes p53 mutant stability in tumors and suppresses p73 mediated p21 expression and senescence. We demonstrate that AKT and PI3K inhibitors may be effective in treatment of therapeutically resistant tumors with elevated AKT and carrying gain of function mutations in p53. Our results show that the clinical candidate AKT inhibitor MK-2206 promotes ARF nucleolar localization, reduced p53(mut) stability and increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation in a xenograft model of pancreatic cancer. Analysis of human tumors indicates that phospho-S48-NPM may be a useful biomarker for monitoring AKT activity and in vivo efficacy of AKT inhibitor treatment. Critically, we propose that combination therapy involving PI3K-AKT inhibitors would benefit from a patient stratification rationale based on ARF and p53(mut) status.

  5. A short acidic motif in ARF guards against mitochondrial dysfunction and melanoma susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Bartkova, Jirina; Mistrík, Martin

    2014-01-01

    ARF is a small, highly basic protein that can be induced by oncogenic stimuli and exerts growth-inhibitory and tumour-suppressive activities through the activation of p53. Here we show that, in human melanocytes, ARF is cytoplasmic, constitutively expressed, and required for maintaining low steady...

  6. HYPERMETHYLATION OF p14ARF PROMOTER REGION AND EXPRESION OF p14ARF GENE PRODUCT IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Kai-hua; SHEN Yi; LUO Yi-rne; WANG Ming-zhao; LIU Hong-xu; ZHAO Hui-ru; ZHANG Lin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate promoter methylation status and protein expression of p14ARF gene in non-small cell lung cancer, and value the role of p14ARF promoter methylation in carcinogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Promoter methylation status and protein expression of p14ARF gene in 40 cases of non-small cell lung cancer were analyzed by methylation specific polymerase china reaction (MSP), restriction enzyme-related polymerase chain reaction (RE-PCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results: The positive rates of p14ARF promoter methylation in tumor tissues and normal tissues adjacent to cancer were 17.5% (7/40) and 2.5% (1/40) respectively. There were statistically significant differences between them, P<0.05. The results of RE-PCR were consistent with that of MSP. The expression rate of p14ARF protein in tumor tissues was significantly lower than that in normal tissues adjacent to cancer, p<0.01. Promoter methylation status and protein expression of p14ARF gene in non-small cell lung cancer showed significantly an inverse correlation (r=-0.56, P<0.01), and both of them did not relate statistically with the clinicopathologic characteristics of patients such as histological classification, clinical stage, differentiation grade and lymph node involvement. Conclusion: Promoter methylation is a crucial mechanism of inactivation of p14ARF gene. Promoter methylation of p14ARF gene might be involved in carcinogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer, and is an early event in development process of non-small cell lung cancer. It might be used as a new target in gene treatments in the future.

  7. A Novel Domain in Translational GTPase BipA Mediates Interaction with the 70S Ribosome and Influences GTP Hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    deLivron, M.; Makanji, H; Lane, M; Robinson, V

    2009-01-01

    BipA is a universally conserved prokaryotic GTPase that exhibits differential ribosome association in response to stress-related events. It is a member of the translation factor family of GTPases along with EF-G and LepA. BipA has five domains. The N-terminal region of the protein, consisting of GTPase and {beta}-barrel domains, is common to all translational GTPases. BipA domains III and V have structural counterparts in EF-G and LepA. However, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein is unique to the BipA family. To investigate how the individual domains of BipA contribute to the biological properties of the protein, deletion constructs were designed and their GTP hydrolysis and ribosome binding properties assessed. Data presented show that removal of the CTD abolishes the ability of BipA to bind to the ribosome and that ribosome complex formation requires the surface provided by domains III and V and the CTD. Additional mutational analysis was used to outline the BipA-70S interaction surface extending across these domains. Steady state kinetic analyses revealed that successive truncation of domains from the C-terminus resulted in a significant increase in the intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate and a loss of ribosome-stimulated GTPase activity. These results indicate that, similar to other translational GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of BipA are tightly coupled. Such intermolecular regulation likely plays a role in the differential ribosome binding by the protein.

  8. A novel domain in translational GTPase BipA mediates interaction with the 70S ribosome and influences GTP hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deLivron, Megan A; Makanji, Heeren S; Lane, Maura C; Robinson, Victoria L

    2009-11-10

    BipA is a universally conserved prokaryotic GTPase that exhibits differential ribosome association in response to stress-related events. It is a member of the translation factor family of GTPases along with EF-G and LepA. BipA has five domains. The N-terminal region of the protein, consisting of GTPase and beta-barrel domains, is common to all translational GTPases. BipA domains III and V have structural counterparts in EF-G and LepA. However, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the protein is unique to the BipA family. To investigate how the individual domains of BipA contribute to the biological properties of the protein, deletion constructs were designed and their GTP hydrolysis and ribosome binding properties assessed. Data presented show that removal of the CTD abolishes the ability of BipA to bind to the ribosome and that ribosome complex formation requires the surface provided by domains III and V and the CTD. Additional mutational analysis was used to outline the BipA-70S interaction surface extending across these domains. Steady state kinetic analyses revealed that successive truncation of domains from the C-terminus resulted in a significant increase in the intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rate and a loss of ribosome-stimulated GTPase activity. These results indicate that, similar to other translational GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of BipA are tightly coupled. Such intermolecular regulation likely plays a role in the differential ribosome binding by the protein.

  9. Analysis of a minimal Rho-GTPase circuit regulating cell shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, William R; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2016-07-19

    Networks of Rho-family GTPases regulate eukaryotic cell polarization and motility by controlling assembly and contraction of the cytoskeleton. The mutually inhibitory Rac-Rho circuit is emerging as a central, regulatory hub that can affect the shape and motility phenotype of eukaryotic cells. Recent experimental manipulation of the amounts of Rac and Rho or their regulators (guanine nucleotide-exchange factors, GTPase-activating proteins, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors) have been shown to bias the prevalence of these different states and promote transitions between them. Here we show that part of this data can be understood in terms of inherent Rac-Rho mutually inhibitory dynamics. We analyze a spatio-temporal mathematical model of Rac-Rho dynamics to produce a detailed set of predictions of how parameters such as GTPase rates of activation and total amounts affect cell decisions (such as Rho-dominated contraction, Rac-dominated spreading, and spatially segregated Rac-Rho polarization). We find that in some parameter regimes, a cell can take on any of these three fates depending on its environment or stimuli. We also predict how experimental manipulations (corresponding to parameter variations) can affect cell shapes observed. Our methods are based on local perturbation analysis (a kind of nonlinear stability analysis), and an approximation of nonlinear feedback by sharp switches. We compare the Rac-Rho model to an even simpler single-GTPase ('wave-pinning') model and demonstrate that the overall behavior is inherent to GTPase properties, rather than stemming solely from network topology.

  10. Analysis of a minimal Rho-GTPase circuit regulating cell shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, William R.; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2016-08-01

    Networks of Rho-family GTPases regulate eukaryotic cell polarization and motility by controlling assembly and contraction of the cytoskeleton. The mutually inhibitory Rac-Rho circuit is emerging as a central, regulatory hub that can affect the shape and motility phenotype of eukaryotic cells. Recent experimental manipulation of the amounts of Rac and Rho or their regulators (guanine nucleotide-exchange factors, GTPase-activating proteins, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors) have been shown to bias the prevalence of these different states and promote transitions between them. Here we show that part of this data can be understood in terms of inherent Rac-Rho mutually inhibitory dynamics. We analyze a spatio-temporal mathematical model of Rac-Rho dynamics to produce a detailed set of predictions of how parameters such as GTPase rates of activation and total amounts affect cell decisions (such as Rho-dominated contraction, Rac-dominated spreading, and spatially segregated Rac-Rho polarization). We find that in some parameter regimes, a cell can take on any of these three fates depending on its environment or stimuli. We also predict how experimental manipulations (corresponding to parameter variations) can affect cell shapes observed. Our methods are based on local perturbation analysis (a kind of nonlinear stability analysis), and an approximation of nonlinear feedback by sharp switches. We compare the Rac-Rho model to an even simpler single-GTPase (‘wave-pinning’) model and demonstrate that the overall behavior is inherent to GTPase properties, rather than stemming solely from network topology.

  11. ARF functions as a melanoma tumor suppressor by inducing p53-independent senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Linan; Ichikawa, Takeshi; Anver, Miriam; Dickins, Ross; Lowe, Scott; Sharpless, Norman E.; Krimpenfort, Paul; DePinho, Ronald A.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Merlino, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Inactivation of the p53 pathway represents the most common molecular defect of human cancer. But in the setting of melanoma, a highly aggressive and invariably fatal malignancy in its advanced disseminated form, mutation/deletion of p53 is relatively rare, whereas its positive regulator ARF is often lost. Here, we show that genetic deficiency in Arf but not p53 facilitates rapid development of melanoma in a genetically engineered mouse model. This difference is accounted for, at least in part, by the unanticipated observation that, unlike fibroblasts, senescence control in melanocytes is strongly regulated by Arf and not p53. Moreover, oncogenic NRAS collaborates with deficiency in Arf, but not p53, to fully transform melanocytes. Our data demonstrate that ARF and p53, although linked in a common pathway, suppress tumorigenesis through distinct, lineage-dependent mechanisms and suggest that ARF helps restrict melanoma progression by executing the oncogene-induced senescence program in benign nevi. Thus, therapeutics designed to restore wild-type p53 function may be insufficient to counter melanoma and other malignancies in which ARF holds p53-independent tumor suppressor activity. PMID:17576930

  12. p19Arf Inhibits the Invasion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells by Binding to CtBP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Wen; Paliwal, Seema; Draheim, Kyle; Grossman, Steven R.; Lewis, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    The INK4A/ARF tumor suppressor locus is frequently inactivated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), yet the consequences of this remain unknown. We recently described a HCC mouse model in which loss of the Ink4a/Arf locus accelerates the development of metastasis and enhances tumor cell migration and invasion in cell culture assays. We show here that knockdown of p19Arf in a HCC cell line increases invasion in cell culture assays. Further, reintroduction of p19Arf into HCC cell lines lacking Ink4a/Arf inhibits tumor cell invasion, without affecting cell proliferation, or cell transformation as measured by soft agar colony formation. Inhibition of cell invasion by p19Arf was dependent on its C-terminal binding protein (CtBP) interaction domain, but independent of Mdm2 binding and nucleolar localization. Indeed, RNAi-mediated knockdown of CtBP1 or CtBP2 decreased cell invasion, and ectopic expression of CtBP2 enhanced tumor cell migration and invasion. Thus, our data indicate a novel role for the Arf tumor suppressor protein in regulating phenotypes associated with tumor progression and metastasis in HCC cells. PMID:18199542

  13. p14ARF upregulation of p53 and enhanced effects of 5-fluorouracil in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张群华; 倪泉兴; 甘军; 沈兆忠; 罗建民; 金忱; 张妞; 张延龄

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the synergistic antitumor effects of combined use of p14ARF gene and 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) in pancreatic cancer.Methods A human pancreatic cancer cell line PC-3 was transfected with lipofectin-mediated recombinant p14ARF gene, and was then administered with 5-Fu. Cell growth, morphological changes, cell cycle, apoptosis, and molecular changes were measured using the MTT assay, flow cytometry, RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunocytochemical assays.Results After transfection of p14ARF, cell growth was obviously inhibited, resulting in an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase. The proportion of cells in the G1 phase was significantly increased from 58.51% to 75.92 %, and in the S and G2/M phases decreased significantly from 20.05% to 12.60%, and from 21.44% to 11.48 %, respectively, as compared with those of the control groups. PC-3/p14ARF cells that underwent 5-Fu treatment had significantly greater G2/M phase accumulation, from 11.48% to 53.47 %. The apoptopic index was increased in PC-3/p14ARF cells from 3.64% to 19.62%. The MTT assay showed p14ARF-expressing cells were significantly more sensitive to 5-Fu (0.01-10 mg/L) than those devoid of p14ARF expression (P<0.01). Western blotting showed p14ARF upregulates p53 expression. Conclusion Combined use of p14ARF gene and 5-Fu acts synergistically to inhibit pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, suggesting a new anticancer strategy.

  14. Neon reduction program on Cymer ArF light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawade, Dinesh; Roman, Yzzer; Cacouris, Ted; Thornes, Josh; O'Brien, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    In response to significant neon supply constraints, Cymer has responded with a multi-part plan to support its customers. Cymer's primary objective is to ensure that reliable system performance is maintained while minimizing gas consumption. Gas algorithms were optimized to ensure stable performance across all operating conditions. The Cymer neon support plan contains four elements: 1. Gas reduction program to reduce neon by >50% while maintaining existing performance levels and availability; 2. short-term containment solutions for immediate relief. 3. qualification of additional gas suppliers; and 4. long-term recycling/reclaim opportunity. The Cymer neon reduction program has shown excellent results as demonstrated through the comparison on standard gas use versus the new >50% reduced neon performance for ArF immersion light sources. Testing included stressful conditions such as repetition rate, duty cycle and energy target changes. No performance degradation has been observed over typical gas lives.

  15. Lime pretreatment of sugar beet pulp and evaluation of synergy between ArfA, ManA and XynA from Clostridium cellulovorans on the pretreated substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Dredge, Roselyn; Radloff, Sarah E.; Van Dyk, J. Susan; Brett I. Pletschke

    2011-01-01

    Sugar beet pulp (SBP) is a waste product from the sugar beet industry and could be used as a potential biomass feedstock for second generation biofuel technology. Pretreatment of SBP with ‘slake lime’ (calcium hydroxide) was investigated using a 23 factorial design and the factors examined included lime loading, temperature and time. The pretreatment was evaluated for its ability to enhance enzymatic degradation using a combination of three hemicellulases, namely ArfA (an arabinofuranosidase)...

  16. Rho GTPase-formin pairs in cytoskeletal remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Peng, Jun; Wallar, Bradley J; Alberts, Arthur S

    2005-01-01

    Diaphanous-related formins (Drfs) are members of a conserved formin family of actin-nucleating proteins and are thought to act as Rho GTPase effectors in signal transduction pathways that govern gene expression, cytoskeletal remodelling and cell division. In vitro evidence suggests that the three mammalian Drf proteins--mDia1, mDia2 and mDia3-have distinct GTPase-binding specificities. However, much of our current understanding of GTPase-Drf partnerships in mammalian cell signalling is based on expression studies using Drfs missing their unique GTPase-binding domains. We have employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and gene targeting approaches to identify the function of different GTPase-formin pairs in cell signalling. These studies have allowed us to uncover new roles for Drf proteins in cytoskeletal remodelling and novel regulatory mechanisms whereby GTPases influence formin function. Our genetic experiments strongly suggest that Drfs cooperate with other GTPase effector proteins, including the gene product of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome gene, WASP, during the regulation of cell proliferation. Further, the Drf gene knockout experiments indicate that this family of formins has a role in cancer pathophysiology.

  17. Rho GTPase-activating bacterial toxins: from bacterial virulence regulation to eukaryotic cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemonnier, Marc; Landraud, Luce; Lemichez, Emmanuel

    2007-09-01

    Studies on the interactions of bacterial pathogens with their host have provided an invaluable source of information on the major functions of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell biology. In addition, this expanding field of research, known as cellular microbiology, has revealed fascinating examples of trans-kingdom functional interplay. Bacterial factors actually exploit eukaryotic cell machineries using refined molecular strategies to promote invasion and proliferation within their host. Here, we review a family of bacterial toxins that modulate their activity in eukaryotic cells by activating Rho GTPases and exploiting the ubiquitin/proteasome machineries. This family, found in human and animal pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, encompasses the cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs) from Escherichia coli and Yersinia species as well as dermonecrotic toxins from Bordetella species. We survey the genetics, biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology of these bacterial factors from the standpoint of the CNF1 toxin, the paradigm of Rho GTPase-activating toxins produced by urinary tract infections causing pathogenic Escherichia coli. Because it reveals important connections between bacterial invasion and the host inflammatory response, the mode of action of CNF1 and its related Rho GTPase-targetting toxins addresses major issues of basic and medical research and constitutes a privileged experimental model for host-pathogen interaction.

  18. MicroRNA390-directed TAS3 cleavage leads to the production of tasiRNA-ARF3/4 during somatic embryogenesis in Dimocarpus longan Lour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuling eLin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Trans-acting short-interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs originate from TAS3 families through microRNA (miRNA 390-guided cleavage of primary transcripts and target auxin response factors (ARF3/-4, which are involved in the normal development of lateral roots and flowers in plants. However, their roles in embryo development are still unclear. Here, the pathway miR390-TAS3-ARF3/-4 was identified systematically for the first time during somatic embryo development in Dimocarpus longan. We identified the miR390 primary transcript and promoter. The promoter contained cis-acting elements responsive to stimuli such as light, salicylic acid, anaerobic induction, fungal elicitor, circadian control and heat stress. The longan TAS3 transcript, containing two miR390-binding sites, was isolated; the miR390- guided cleavage site located near the 3' end of the TAS3 transcript was verified. Eight TAS3-tasiRNAs with the 21-nucleotide phase were found among longan small RNA data, further confirming that miR390-directed TAS3 cleavage leads to the production of tasiRNA in longan. Among them, TAS3_5'D5+ and 5'D6+ tasiRNAs were highly abundant, and verified to target ARF3 and -4, implying that miR390-guided TAS3 cleavage with 21-nucleotide phase leading to the production of tasiRNA-ARF is conserved in plants. Pri-miR390 was highly expressed in friable-embryogenic callus (EC, and less expressed in incomplete compact pro-embryogenic cultures,while miR390 showed its lowest expression in EC and highest expression in torpedo-shaped embryo. DlTAS3 and DlARF4 both exhibited their lowest expressions in EC, and reached their peaks in the globular embryos stage, which were mainly inversely proportional to the expression of miR390, especially at the GE to CE stages. While DlARF3 showed little variation from the EC to torpedo-shaped embryos stages, and exhibited its lowest expression in the cotyledonary embryos stage. There was a general lack of correlation between the expressions of DlARF3

  19. The rho GTPase Rac1 is required for proliferation and survival of progenitors in the developing forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leone, Dino P; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Brakebusch, Cord;

    2010-01-01

    , although the homeodomain transcription factor Cux2 and Cyclin D2, a core component of the cell cycle machinery, are specifically involved in controlling SVZ cell proliferation. Rho GTPases have been implicated in regulating the proliferation, differentiation, and migration of many cell types, and one...

  20. Aberrant DNA methylation of ESR1 and p14ARF genes could be useful as prognostic indicators in osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonaglio V

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Viviane Sonaglio,1 Ana C de Carvalho,2 Silvia R C Toledo,3,4 Carolina Salinas-Souza,3,4 André L Carvalho,5 Antonio S Petrilli,3 Beatriz de Camargo,6 André L Vettore21Pediatrics Department, A C Camargo Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Biological Science Department, Federal University of São Paulo, Diadema, Brazil; 3Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Oncology Institute, GRAACC/Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 4Department of Morphology and Genetics, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 5Department of Head and Neck Surgery, PIO XII Foundation, Barretos Cancer Hospital, Barretos, São Paulo, Brazil; 6Research Program Pediatric Oncology Program, CPNq, Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilAbstract: Osteosarcoma (OS is the eighth most common form of childhood and adolescence cancer. Approximately 10%–20% of patients present metastatic disease at diagnosis and the 5-year overall survival remains around 70% for nonmetastatic patients and around 30% for metastatic patients. Metastatic disease at diagnosis and the necrosis grade induced by preoperative treatment are the only well-established prognostic factors for osteosarcoma. The DNA aberrant methylation is a frequent epigenetic alteration in humans and has been described as a molecular marker in different tumor types. This study evaluated the DNA aberrant methylation status of 18 genes in 34 OS samples without previous chemotherapy treatment and in four normal bone specimens and compared the methylation profile with clinicopathological characteristics of the patients. We were able to define a three-gene panel (AIM1, p14ARF, and ESR1 in which methylation was correlated with OS cases. The hypermethylation of p14ARF showed a significant association with the absence of metastases at diagnoses, while ESR1 hypermethylation was marginally associated with worse overall survival. This study demonstrated that aberrant promoter methylation is a common event

  1. The small GTPase RhoH is an atypical regulator of haematopoietic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubatzky Katharina F

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rho GTPases are a distinct subfamily of the superfamily of Ras GTPases. The best-characterised members are RhoA, Rac and Cdc42 that regulate many diverse actions such as actin cytoskeleton reorganisation, adhesion, motility as well as cell proliferation, differentiation and gene transcription. Among the 20 members of that family, only Rac2 and RhoH show an expression restricted to the haematopoietic lineage. RhoH was first discovered in 1995 as a fusion transcript with the transcriptional repressor LAZ3/BCL6. It was therefore initially named translation three four (TTF but later on renamed RhoH due to its close relationship to the Ras/Rho family of GTPases. Since then, RhoH has been implicated in human cancer as the gene is subject to somatic hypermutation and by the detection of RHOH as a translocation partner for LAZ3/BCL6 or other genes in human lymphomas. Underexpression of RhoH is found in hairy cell leukaemia and acute myeloid leukaemia. Some of the amino acids that are crucial for GTPase activity are mutated in RhoH so that the protein is a GTPase-deficient, so-called atypical Rho GTPase. Therefore other mechanisms of regulating RhoH activity have been described. These include regulation at the mRNA level and tyrosine phosphorylation of the protein's unique ITAM-like motif. The C-terminal CaaX box of RhoH is mainly a target for farnesyl-transferase but can also be modified by geranylgeranyl-transferase. Isoprenylation of RhoH and changes in subcellular localisation may be an additional factor to fine-tune signalling. Little is currently known about its signalling, regulation or interaction partners. Recent studies have shown that RhoH negatively influences the proliferation and homing of murine haematopoietic progenitor cells, presumably by acting as an antagonist for Rac1. In leukocytes, RhoH is needed to keep the cells in a resting, non-adhesive state, but the exact mechanism has yet to be elucidated. RhoH has also been

  2. Novel Activities of Select NSAID R-Enantiomers against Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor I Oprea

    Full Text Available Rho family GTPases (including Rac, Rho and Cdc42 collectively control cell proliferation, adhesion and migration and are of interest as functional therapeutic targets in numerous epithelial cancers. Based on high throughput screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library® and cheminformatics we identified the R-enantiomers of two approved drugs (naproxen and ketorolac as inhibitors of Rac1 and Cdc42. The corresponding S-enantiomers are considered the active component in racemic drug formulations, acting as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs with selective activity against cyclooxygenases. Here, we show that the S-enantiomers of naproxen and ketorolac are inactive against the GTPases. Additionally, more than twenty other NSAIDs lacked inhibitory action against the GTPases, establishing the selectivity of the two identified NSAIDs. R-naproxen was first identified as a lead compound and tested in parallel with its S-enantiomer and the non-chiral 6-methoxy-naphthalene acetic acid (active metabolite of nabumetone, another NSAID as a structural series. Cheminformatics-based substructure analyses-using the rotationally constrained carboxylate in R-naproxen-led to identification of racemic [R/S] ketorolac as a suitable FDA-approved candidate. Cell based measurement of GTPase activity (in animal and human cell lines demonstrated that the R-enantiomers specifically inhibit epidermal growth factor stimulated Rac1 and Cdc42 activation. The GTPase inhibitory effects of the R-enantiomers in cells largely mimic those of established Rac1 (NSC23766 and Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141 specific inhibitors. Docking predicts that rotational constraints position the carboxylate moieties of the R-enantiomers to preferentially coordinate the magnesium ion, thereby destabilizing nucleotide binding to Rac1 and Cdc42. The S-enantiomers can be docked but are less favorably positioned in proximity to the magnesium. R-naproxen and R-ketorolac have potential for rapid

  3. Novel Activities of Select NSAID R-Enantiomers against Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprea, Tudor I.; Sklar, Larry A.; Agola, Jacob O.; Guo, Yuna; Silberberg, Melina; Roxby, Joshua; Vestling, Anna; Romero, Elsa; Surviladze, Zurab; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Waller, Anna; Ursu, Oleg; Hudson, Laurie G.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rho family GTPases (including Rac, Rho and Cdc42) collectively control cell proliferation, adhesion and migration and are of interest as functional therapeutic targets in numerous epithelial cancers. Based on high throughput screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library® and cheminformatics we identified the R-enantiomers of two approved drugs (naproxen and ketorolac) as inhibitors of Rac1 and Cdc42. The corresponding S-enantiomers are considered the active component in racemic drug formulations, acting as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with selective activity against cyclooxygenases. Here, we show that the S-enantiomers of naproxen and ketorolac are inactive against the GTPases. Additionally, more than twenty other NSAIDs lacked inhibitory action against the GTPases, establishing the selectivity of the two identified NSAIDs. R-naproxen was first identified as a lead compound and tested in parallel with its S-enantiomer and the non-chiral 6-methoxy-naphthalene acetic acid (active metabolite of nabumetone, another NSAID) as a structural series. Cheminformatics-based substructure analyses—using the rotationally constrained carboxylate in R-naproxen—led to identification of racemic [R/S] ketorolac as a suitable FDA-approved candidate. Cell based measurement of GTPase activity (in animal and human cell lines) demonstrated that the R-enantiomers specifically inhibit epidermal growth factor stimulated Rac1 and Cdc42 activation. The GTPase inhibitory effects of the R-enantiomers in cells largely mimic those of established Rac1 (NSC23766) and Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141) specific inhibitors. Docking predicts that rotational constraints position the carboxylate moieties of the R-enantiomers to preferentially coordinate the magnesium ion, thereby destabilizing nucleotide binding to Rac1 and Cdc42. The S-enantiomers can be docked but are less favorably positioned in proximity to the magnesium. R-naproxen and R-ketorolac have potential for rapid translation and

  4. Ink4a/Arf expression is a biomarker of aging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krishnamurthy, Janakiraman; Torrice, Chad; Ramsey, Matthew R; Kovalev, Grigoriy I; Al-Regaiey, Khalid; Su, Lishan; Sharpless, Norman E

    2004-01-01

    .... We show that expression of p16INK4a and Arf markedly increases in almost all rodent tissues with advancing age, while there is little or no change in the expression of other related cell cycle inhibitors...

  5. Increased Arf/p53 activity in stem cells, aging and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Garcia, Estefania; Moreno, Manuel; Moreno-Cugnon, Leire; Matheu, Ander

    2017-04-01

    Arf/p53 pathway protects the cells against DNA damage induced by acute stress. This characteristic is the responsible for its tumor suppressor activity. Moreover, it regulates the chronic type of stress associated with aging. This is the basis of its anti-aging activity. Indeed, increased gene dosage of Arf/p53 displays elongated longevity and delayed aging. At a cellular level, it has been recently shown that increased dosage of Arf/p53 delays age-associated stem cell exhaustion and the subsequent decline in tissue homeostasis and regeneration. However, p53 can also promote aging if constitutively activated. In this context, p53 reduces tissue regeneration, which correlates with premature exhaustion of stem cells. We discuss here the current evidence linking the Arf/p53 pathway to the processes of aging and cancer through stem cell regulation. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Medicago truncatula Rop GTPases expression in young nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Kusu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Small GTPases are monomeric guanine nucleotide binding proteins with molecular weight of 21 to 30 kD. Plants have plantspecific small GTPases, termed Rop (Rho GTPases from plants which serve as signaling proteins in plant signal transduction. To have better understanding on nodulation process in legume, which Rop proteins that play a dominant role in nodule formation would be determined. Therefore, the expression of five Medicago truncatula Rop GTPase genes (MtRops in young nodules were studied in this experiment. RT-PCR method was used to examine the expression of MtRops. The MtRops expression in inoculated M. truncatula plants were compared with those in uninoculated plants. Results of this studies showed that the expression of MtRop5 and MtRop6 were significantly induced in young nodules, it was suggesting that these Rops may have important role during nodule formation.

  7. p19Arf suppresses growth, progression, and metastasis of Hras-driven carcinomas through p53-dependent and -independent pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S Kelly-Spratt

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic expression of oncogenes such as Ras induces expression of p19(Arf, which, in turn, activates p53 and growth arrest. Here, we used a multistage model of squamous cell carcinoma development to investigate the functional interactions between Ras, p19(Arf, and p53 during tumor progression in the mouse. Skin tumors were induced in wild-type, p19(Arf-deficient, and p53-deficient mice using the DMBA/TPA two-step protocol. Activating mutations in Hras were detected in all papillomas and carcinomas examined, regardless of genotype. Relative to wild-type mice, the growth rate of papillomas was greater in p19(Arf-deficient mice, and reduced in p53-deficient mice. Malignant conversion of papillomas to squamous cell carcinomas, as well as metastasis to lymph nodes and lungs, was markedly accelerated in both p19 (Arf- and p53-deficient mice. Thus, p19(Arf inhibits the growth rate of tumors in a p53-independent manner. Through its regulation of p53, p19(Arf also suppresses malignant conversion and metastasis. p53 expression was upregulated in papillomas from wild-type but not p19( Arf-null mice, and p53 mutations were more frequently seen in wild-type than in p19( Arf-null carcinomas. This indicates that selection for p53 mutations is a direct result of signaling from the initiating oncogenic lesion, Hras, acting through p19(Arf.

  8. ARF functions as a melanoma tumor suppressor by inducing p53-independent senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Linan; Ichikawa, Takeshi; Anver, Miriam; Dickins, Ross; Lowe, Scott; Sharpless, Norman E.; Krimpenfort, Paul; DePinho, Ronald A.; Bennett, Dorothy C.; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Merlino, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Inactivation of the p53 pathway represents the most common molecular defect of human cancer. But in the setting of melanoma, a highly aggressive and invariably fatal malignancy in its advanced disseminated form, mutation/deletion of p53 is relatively rare, whereas its positive regulator ARF is often lost. Here, we show that genetic deficiency in Arf but not p53 facilitates rapid development of melanoma in a genetically engineered mouse model. This difference is accounted for, at least in part...

  9. ARF-B2: A Protein Complex that Specifically Binds to Part of the Anaerobic Response Element of Maize Adh 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Crude whole cell extracts from maize (Zea mays L.) suspension cells were examined for DNA binding proteins that specifically interact with a portion of the maize Adh 1 promoter that was previously shown to be in contact with a trans-acting factor in vivo. A 17 base pair, double-stranded oligonucleotide probe was constructed that centered around a strong in vivo dimethylsulfate footprint (B2) that coincides with part of the anaerobic response element (ARE). Gel retardation assays were used to characterize a major, specific DNA binding protein activity found in the crude extracts. The activity is present in both aerobic and hypoxically treated cultures and has been designated ARF-B2 (ARE binding factor). ARF-B2 appears to be a multicomponent complex, with a 54 kilodalton subunit termed ARF-B2α in primary contact with the target DNA. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:16667563

  10. Concurrent disruption of p16INK4a and the ARF-p53 pathway predicts poor prognosis in aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbaek, K; de Nully Brown, P; Møller, Michael Boe

    2000-01-01

    %) cases with aggressive histology. For the aggressive lymphomas, the Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival for cases with disruption of either p16INK4a or the ARF-p53 pathway was not different from cases with retention of both pathways (5 year survival 45% vs 35%; P= 0.85), suggesting that selective...... inactivation of one of the pathways does not significantly influence overall survival. By contrast, the 5-year survival was only 7% for cases with concurrent disruption of p16INK4a and the ARF-p53 pathway vs 38% for cases with retention of one or both pathways (P = 0.005). Similar results were obtained when...... the analysis was confined to diffuse large B cell lymphomas (P= 0.019). On stepwise multivariate regression analysis including factors from the international prognostic index, concurrent disruption of p16INK4a and the ARF-p53 pathway was an independent negative prognostic factor in NHL with aggressive...

  11. INK4/ARF transcript expression is associated with chromosome 9p21 variants linked to atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liu

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have linked common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on chromosome 9p21 near the INK4/ARF (CDKN2A/B tumor suppressor locus with risk of atherosclerotic diseases and type 2 diabetes mellitus. To explore the mechanism of this association, we investigated whether expression of proximate transcripts (p16(INK4a, p15(INK4b, ARF, ANRIL and MTAP correlate with genotype of representative 9p21 SNPs.We analyzed expression of 9p21 transcripts in purified peripheral blood T-cells (PBTL from 170 healthy donors. Samples were genotyped for six selected disease-related SNPs spanning the INK4/ARF locus. Correlations among these variables were determined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Significantly reduced expression of all INK4/ARF transcripts (p15(INK4b, p16(INK4a, ARF and ANRIL was found in PBTL of individuals harboring a common SNP (rs10757278 associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease, stroke and aortic aneurysm. Expression of MTAP was not influenced by rs10757278 genotype. No association of any these transcripts was noted with five other tested 9p21 SNPs.Genotypes of rs10757278 linked to increased risk of atherosclerotic diseases are also associated with decreased expression in PBTL of the INK4/ARF locus, which encodes three related anti-proliferative transcripts of known importance in tumor suppression and aging.

  12. Effect of cell cycle inhibitor p19ARF on senescence of human diploid cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effect of cell cycle inhibitor p19ARF on replicative senescence of human diploid cell, recombinant p19ARF eukaryotic expression vector was constructed and p19ARF gene was transfected into human diploid fibroblasts (WI-38 cells) by liposome-mediated transfection for overexpression. Then, the effects of p19ARF on replicative senescence of WI-38 cells were observed. The results re- vealed that, compared with control cells, the WI-38 cells in which p19ARF gene was introduced showed significant up-regulation of p53 and p21 expression level, decrease of cell generation by 10 12 generations, decline of cell growth rate with cell cycle being arrested at G1 phase, increase of positive rate of senescent marker SA-β-gal staining, and decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential. The morphology of the transfected fibroblasts presented the characteristics changes similar to senescent cells. These results indicated that high expression of p19ARF may promote the senescent process of human diploid cells.

  13. Reverse engineering GTPase programming languages with reconstituted signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Scott M

    2016-07-02

    The Ras superfamily GTPases represent one of the most prolific signaling currencies used in Eukaryotes. With these remarkable molecules, evolution has built GTPase networks that control diverse cellular processes such as growth, morphology, motility and trafficking. (1-4) Our knowledge of the individual players that underlie the function of these networks is deep; decades of biochemical and structural data has provided a mechanistic understanding of the molecules that turn GTPases ON and OFF, as well as how those GTPase states signal by controlling the assembly of downstream effectors. However, we know less about how these different activities work together as a system to specify complex dynamic signaling outcomes. Decoding this molecular "programming language" would help us understand how different species and cell types have used the same GTPase machinery in different ways to accomplish different tasks, and would also provide new insights as to how mutations to these networks can cause disease. We recently developed a bead-based microscopy assay to watch reconstituted H-Ras signaling systems at work under arbitrary configurations of regulators and effectors. (5) Here we highlight key observations and insights from this study and propose extensions to our method to further study this and other GTPase signaling systems.

  14. Multiple sequence elements facilitate Chp Rho GTPase subcellular location, membrane association, and transforming activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenette, Emily J; Mitin, Natalia Y; Der, Channing J

    2006-07-01

    Cdc42 homologous protein (Chp) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases and shares significant sequence and functional similarity with Cdc42. However, unlike classical Rho GTPases, we recently found that Chp depends on palmitoylation, rather than prenylation, for association with cellular membranes. Because palmitoylation alone is typically not sufficient to promote membrane association, we evaluated the possibility that other carboxy-terminal residues facilitate Chp subcellular association with membranes. We found that Chp membrane association and transforming activity was dependent on the integrity of a stretch of basic amino acids in the carboxy terminus of Chp and that the basic amino acids were not simply part of a palmitoyl acyltransferase recognition motif. We also determined that the 11 carboxy-terminal residues alone were sufficient to promote Chp plasma and endomembrane association. Interestingly, stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-alpha activated only endomembrane-associated Chp. Finally, we found that Chp membrane association was not disrupted by Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitory proteins, which are negative regulators of Cdc42 membrane association and biological activity. In summary, the unique carboxy-terminal sequence elements that promote Chp subcellular location and function expand the complexity of mechanisms by which the cellular functions of Rho GTPases are regulated.

  15. Rac1 GTPase silencing counteracts microgravity-induced effects on osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignandon, Alain; Faure, Céline; Neutelings, Thibaut; Rattner, Aline; Mineur, Pierre; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Laroche, Norbert; Lambert, Charles; Deroanne, Christophe; Nusgens, Betty; Demets, René; Colige, Alain; Vico, Laurence

    2014-09-01

    Bone cells exposed to real microgravity display alterations of their cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, two major mechanosensitive structures. These structures are controlled by small GTPases of the Ras homology (Rho) family. We investigated the effects of RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 modulation of osteoblastic cells under microgravity conditions. Human MG-63 osteoblast-like cells silenced for RhoGTPases were cultured in the automated Biobox bioreactor (European Space Agency) aboard the Foton M3 satellite and compared to replicate ground-based controls. The cells were fixed after 69 h of microgravity exposure for postflight analysis of focal contacts, F-actin polymerization, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and matrix targeting. We found that RhoA silencing did not affect sensitivity to microgravity but that Rac1 and, to a lesser extent, Cdc42 abrogation was particularly efficient in counteracting the spaceflight-related reduction of the number of focal contacts [-50% in silenced, scrambled (SiScr) controls vs. -15% for SiRac1], the number of F-actin fibers (-60% in SiScr controls vs. -10% for SiRac1), and the depletion of matrix-bound VEGF (-40% in SiScr controls vs. -8% for SiRac1). Collectively, these data point out the role of the VEGF/Rho GTPase axis in mechanosensing and validate Rac1-mediated signaling pathways as potential targets for counteracting microgravity effects. © FASEB.

  16. Interplay of Polarity Proteins and GTPases in T-Lymphocyte Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Fung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polarity refers to the asymmetric distribution of different cellular components within a cell and is central to many cell functions. In T-cells, polarity regulates the activation, migration, and effector function of cytotoxic T-cells (CTLs during an immune response. The regulation of asymmetric cell division by polarity proteins may also dictate CTL effector and memory differentiation following antigen presentation. Small GTPases, along with their associated polarity and adaptor proteins, are critical for mediating the polarity changes necessary for T-cell activation and function, and in turn, are regulated by guanine exchange factors (GEFS and GTPase activating proteins (GAPS. For example, a novel GEF, dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8 was recently identified as a regulator of immune cell function and mutations in DOCK8 have been detected in patients with severe combined immunodeficiency. Both B and T-cells from DOCK8 mutant mice form defective immunological synapses and have abnormal functions, in addition to impaired immune memory development. This paper will discuss the interplay between polarity proteins and GTPases, and their role in T-cell function.

  17. Ribosome-induced tuning of GTP hydrolysis by a translational GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maracci, Cristina; Peske, Frank; Dannies, Ev; Pohl, Corinna; Rodnina, Marina V

    2014-10-07

    GTP hydrolysis by elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), a translational GTPase that delivers aminoacyl-tRNAs to the ribosome, plays a crucial role in decoding and translational fidelity. The basic reaction mechanism and the way the ribosome contributes to catalysis are a matter of debate. Here we use mutational analysis in combination with measurements of rate/pH profiles, kinetic solvent isotope effects, and ion dependence of GTP hydrolysis by EF-Tu off and on the ribosome to dissect the reaction mechanism. Our data suggest that--contrary to current models--the reaction in free EF-Tu follows a pathway that does not involve the critical residue H84 in the switch II region. Binding to the ribosome without a cognate codon in the A site has little effect on the GTPase mechanism. In contrast, upon cognate codon recognition, the ribosome induces a rearrangement of EF-Tu that renders GTP hydrolysis sensitive to mutations of Asp21 and His84 and insensitive to K(+) ions. We suggest that Asp21 and His84 provide a network of interactions that stabilize the positions of the γ-phosphate and the nucleophilic water, respectively, and thus play an indirect catalytic role in the GTPase mechanism on the ribosome.

  18. Maturation and integration of adult born hippocampal neurons: signal convergence onto small Rho GTPases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna eVadodaria

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis, restricted to specific regions in the mammalian brain, represents one of the most interesting forms of plasticity in the mature nervous system. Adult-born hippocampal neurons play important roles in certain forms of learning and memory, and altered hippocampal neurogenesis has been associated with a number of neuropsychiatric diseases such as major depression and epilepsy. Newborn neurons go through distinct developmental steps from a dividing neurogenic precursor to a synaptically integrated mature neuron. Previous studies have uncovered several molecular signaling pathways involved in distinct steps of this maturational process. In this context, the small Rho GTPases, Cdc42, Rac1 and RhoA have recently been shown to regulate the morphological and synaptic maturation of adult-born dentate granule cells in vivo. Distinct upstream regulators, including several growth factors that modulate maturation and integration of newborn neurons have been shown to also recruit the small Rho GTPases. Here we review recent findings and highlight the possibility that small Rho GTPases may act as central assimilators, downstream of critical input onto adult-born hippocampal neurons contributing to their maturation and integration into the existing dentate gyrus circuitry.

  19. Modification of plant Rac/Rop GTPase signalling using bacterial toxin transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manoj K; Ren, Fugang; Giesemann, Torsten; Dal Bosco, Cristina; Pasternak, Taras P; Blein, Thomas; Ruperti, Benedetto; Schmidt, Gudula; Aktories, Klaus; Molendijk, Arthur J; Palme, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial protein toxins which modify Rho GTPase are useful for the analysis of Rho signalling in animal cells, but these toxins cannot be taken up by plant cells. We demonstrate in vitro deamidation of Arabidopsis Rop4 by Escherichia coli Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1) and glucosylation by Clostridium difficile toxin B. Expression of the catalytic domain of CNF1 caused modification and activation of co-expressed Arabidopsis Rop4 GTPase in tobacco leaves, resulting in hypersensitive-like cell death. By contrast, the catalytic domain of toxin B modified and inactivated co-expressed constitutively active Rop4, blocking the hypersensitive response caused by over-expression of active Rops. In transgenic Arabidopsis, both CNF1 and toxin B inhibited Rop-dependent polar morphogenesis of leaf epidermal cells. Toxin B expression also inhibited Rop-dependent morphogenesis of root hairs and trichome branching, and resulted in root meristem enlargement and dwarf growth. Our results show that CNF1 and toxin B transgenes are effective tools in Rop GTPase signalling studies.

  20. Electrostatic free energies in translational GTPases: Classic allostery and the rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Thomas; Aleksandrov, Alexey; Satpati, Priyadarshi

    2015-05-01

    GTPases typically switch between an inactive, OFF conformation and an active, ON conformation when a GDP ligand is replaced by GTP. Their ON/OFF populations and activity thus depend on the stabilities of four protein complexes, two apo-protein forms, and GTP/GDP in solution. A complete characterization is usually not possible experimentally and poses major challenges for simulations. We review the most important methodological challenges and we review thermodynamic data for two GTPases involved in translation of the genetic code: archaeal Initiation Factors 2 and 5B (aIF2, aIF5B). One main challenge is the multiplicity of states and conformations, including those of GTP/GDP in solution. Another is force field accuracy, especially for interactions of GTP/GDP with co-bound divalent Mg(2+) ions. The calculation of electrostatic free energies also poses specific challenges, and requires careful protocols. For aIF2, experiments and earlier simulations showed that it is a "classic" GTPase, with distinct ON/OFF conformations that prefer to bind GTP and GDP, respectively. For aIF5B, we recently proposed a non-classic mechanism, where the ON/OFF states differ only in the protonation state of Glu81 in the nucleotide binding pocket. This model is characterized here using free energy simulations. The methodological analysis should help future studies, while the aIF2, aIF5B examples illustrate the diversity of ATPase/GTPase mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Recent developments of molecular dynamics.

  1. Reversible bleb formation in mast cells stimulated with antigen is Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent and bleb size is regulated by ARF6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanase, Yuhki; Carvou, Nicolas; Frohman, Michael A; Cockcroft, Shamshad

    2009-12-14

    Mast cells stimulated with antigen undergo extensive changes in their cytoskeleton. In the present study, we assess the impact of actin-modifying drugs and report that, in the presence of cytochalasin D, mast cells stop membrane ruffling, but instead bleb. Bleb formation is reversible following washout of cytochalasin D and occurs in an actin-polymerization-dependent manner. Bleb formation is inhibited by expression of constitutively active ezrin-T567D. Blebbing is also inhibited by blebbistatin, a myosin II inhibitor, implying myosin II activation in the process. We used a selection of inhibitors and observed that myosin II activation is dependent mainly on Ca2+-calmodulin, with only a small contribution from Rho kinase. The signalling pathways stimulated by antigen include PLC (phospholipase C) and PLD (phospholipase D). Bleb formation was dependent on activation of PLC, but not PLD. Primary alcohols, used previously as a means to reduce PLD-derived phosphatidic acid, were potent inhibitors of membrane blebbing, but a more selective inhibitor of PLD, FIPI (5-fluoro-2-indolyl des-chlorohalopemide), was without effect. FIPI also did not inhibit membrane ruffling or degranulation of mast cells, indicating that inhibition by primary alcohols works through an unidentified mechanism rather than via diversion of PLD activity as assumed. We also examined the requirement for ARF6 (ADP-ribosylation factor 6) and observed that its expression led to an increase in bleb size and a further increase was observed with the dominant-active mutant, ARF6-Q67L. Since ARF6-T27N had no effect on bleb size, we conclude that ARF6 needs to be active to regulate the size of the blebs.

  2. A population-based study on the association between acute renal failure (ARF) and the duration of polypharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Because of the rapid growth in elderly population, polypharmacy has become a serious public health issue worldwide. Although acute renal failure (ARF) is one negative consequence of polypharmacy, the association between the duration of polypharmacy and ARF remains unclear. We therefore assessed this association using a population-based database. Methods Data were collected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) from 2003 through 2006. The case group included patients hospitalized for ARF during 2006, but not admitted due to trauma, surgery, burn trauma, car accident, transplantation, or infectious diseases; the control group included patients hospitalized without ARF. The cumulative number of days of polypharmacy (defined as more than 5 prescriptions per day) for 1 year prior to admission was determined, with patients further subdivided into 4 categories: less than 30 days, 31–90 days, 91–180 days, and over 181 days. The dependent variable was ARF, and the control variables were age, gender, comorbidities in patients hospitalized for ARF, stay in ICUs during ARF hospitalization and site of operation for prior admissions within one month of ARF hospitalization. Results Of 20,790 patients who were admitted to hospitals for ARF in 2006, 12,314 (59.23 %) were male and more than 60 % were older than 65 years. Of patients with and without ARF, 16.14 % and 10.61 %, respectively, received polypharmacy for 91–180 days and 50.22 % and 24.12 %, respectively, for over 181 days. A statistical model indicated that, relative to patients who received polypharmacy for less than 30 days, those who received polypharmacy for 31–90, 91–180 and over 181 days had odds ratios of developing ARF of 1.33 (ppolypharmacy and the occurrence of ARF. PMID:22935542

  3. The Polycomb group proteins bind throughout the INK4A-ARF locus and are disassociated in senescent cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bracken, Adrian P; Kleine-Kohlbrecher, Daniela; Dietrich, Nikolaj

    2007-01-01

    The p16INK4A and p14ARF proteins, encoded by the INK4A-ARF locus, are key regulators of cellular senescence, yet the mechanisms triggering their up-regulation are not well understood. Here, we show that the ability of the oncogene BMI1 to repress the INK4A-ARF locus requires its direct association....... These results provide a model for how the INK4A-ARF locus is activated and how Polycombs contribute to cancer....

  4. Rac and Rho GTPases in cancer cell motility control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parri Matteo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rho GTPases represent a family of small GTP-binding proteins involved in cell cytoskeleton organization, migration, transcription, and proliferation. A common theme of these processes is a dynamic reorganization of actin cytoskeleton which has now emerged as a major switch control mainly carried out by Rho and Rac GTPase subfamilies, playing an acknowledged role in adaptation of cell motility to the microenvironment. Cells exhibit three distinct modes of migration when invading the 3 D environment. Collective motility leads to movement of cohorts of cells which maintain the adherens junctions and move by photolytic degradation of matrix barriers. Single cell mesenchymal-type movement is characterized by an elongated cellular shape and again requires extracellular proteolysis and integrin engagement. In addition it depends on Rac1-mediated cell polarization and lamellipodia formation. Conversely, in amoeboid movement cells have a rounded morphology, the movement is independent from proteases but requires high Rho GTPase to drive elevated levels of actomyosin contractility. These two modes of cell movement are interconvertible and several moving cells, including tumor cells, show an high degree of plasticity in motility styles shifting ad hoc between mesenchymal or amoeboid movements. This review will focus on the role of Rac and Rho small GTPases in cell motility and in the complex relationship driving the reciprocal control between Rac and Rho granting for the opportunistic motile behaviour of aggressive cancer cells. In addition we analyse the role of these GTPases in cancer progression and metastatic dissemination.

  5. Delocalization and destabilization of the Arf tumor suppressor by the leukemia-associated NPM mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Emanuela; Martinelli, Paola; Zamponi, Raffaella; Shing, Danielle C; Bonetti, Paola; Luzi, Lucilla; Volorio, Sara; Bernard, Loris; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Alcalay, Myriam; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2006-03-15

    One third of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) are characterized by the aberrant cytoplasmic localization of nucleophosmin (NPM) due to mutations within its putative nucleolar localization signal. NPM mutations are mutually exclusive with major AML-associated chromosome rearrangements and are frequently associated with a normal karyotype, suggesting that they are critical during leukemogenesis. The underlying molecular mechanisms are, however, unknown. NPM is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that has been implicated in several cellular processes, including ribosome biogenesis, centrosome duplication, cell cycle progression, and stress response. It has been recently shown that NPM is required for the stabilization and proper nucleolar localization of the tumor suppressor p19(Arf). We report here that the AML-associated NPM mutant localizes mainly in the cytoplasm due to an alteration of its nucleus-cytoplasmic shuttling equilibrium, forms a direct complex with p19(Arf), but is unable to protect it from degradation. Consequently, cells or leukemic blasts expressing the NPM mutant have low levels of cytoplasmic Arf. Furthermore, we show that expression of the NPM mutant reduces the ability of Arf to initiate a p53 response and to induce cell cycle arrest. Inactivation of p19(Arf), a key regulator of the p53-dependent cellular response to oncogene expression, might therefore contribute to leukemogenesis in AMLs with mutated NPM.

  6. CDK5RAP3 is a novel repressor of p14ARF in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Grace Wing-Yan; Lai, Wai-Lung; Zhou, Yuan; Li, Mingtao; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin; Ching, Yick-Pang

    2012-01-01

    CDK5 regulatory subunit associated protein 3 (CDK5RAP3) is a novel activator of PAK4 and processes important pro-metastatic function in hepatocarcinogenesis. However, it remains unclear if there are other mechanisms by which CDK5RAP3 promotes HCC metastasis. Here, we showed that in CDK5RAP3 stable knockdown SMMC-7721 HCC cells, p14(ARF) tumor suppressor was upregulated at protein and mRNA levels, and ectopic expression of CDK5RAP3 was found to repress the transcription of p14(ARF). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrated that CDK5RAP3 bound to p14(ARF) promoter in vivo. Furthermore, knockdown of p14(ARF) in CDK5RAP3 stable knockdown HCC cells reversed the suppression of HCC cell invasiveness mediated by knockdown of CDK5RAP3. Taken together, our findings provide the new evidence that overexpression of CDK5RAP3 promotes HCC metastasis via downregulation of p14(ARF).

  7. CDK5RAP3 is a novel repressor of p14ARF in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Wing-Yan Mak

    Full Text Available CDK5 regulatory subunit associated protein 3 (CDK5RAP3 is a novel activator of PAK4 and processes important pro-metastatic function in hepatocarcinogenesis. However, it remains unclear if there are other mechanisms by which CDK5RAP3 promotes HCC metastasis. Here, we showed that in CDK5RAP3 stable knockdown SMMC-7721 HCC cells, p14(ARF tumor suppressor was upregulated at protein and mRNA levels, and ectopic expression of CDK5RAP3 was found to repress the transcription of p14(ARF. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we demonstrated that CDK5RAP3 bound to p14(ARF promoter in vivo. Furthermore, knockdown of p14(ARF in CDK5RAP3 stable knockdown HCC cells reversed the suppression of HCC cell invasiveness mediated by knockdown of CDK5RAP3. Taken together, our findings provide the new evidence that overexpression of CDK5RAP3 promotes HCC metastasis via downregulation of p14(ARF.

  8. MASSUGU2 encodes Aux/IAA19, an auxin-regulated protein that functions together with the transcriptional activator NPH4/ARF7 to regulate differential growth responses of hypocotyl and formation of lateral roots in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatematsu, Kiyoshi; Kumagai, Satoshi; Muto, Hideki; Sato, Atsuko; Watahiki, Masaaki K; Harper, Reneé M; Liscum, Emmanuel; Yamamoto, Kotaro T

    2004-02-01

    We have isolated a dominant, auxin-insensitive mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, massugu2 (msg2), that displays neither hypocotyl gravitropism nor phototropism, fails to maintain an apical hook as an etiolated seedling, and is defective in lateral root formation. Yet other aspects of growth and development of msg2 plants are almost normal. These characteristics of msg2 are similar to those of another auxin-insensitive mutant, non-phototropic hypocotyl4 (nph4), which is a loss-of-function mutant of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7 (ARF7) (Harper et al., 2000). Map-based cloning of the MSG2 locus reveals that all four mutant alleles result in amino acid substitutions in the conserved domain II of an Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid protein, IAA19. Interestingly, auxin inducibility of MSG2/IAA19 gene expression is reduced by 65% in nph4/arf7. Moreover, MSG2/IAA19 protein binds to the C-terminal domain of NPH4/ARF7 in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) two-hybrid assay and to the whole latter protein in vitro by pull-down assay. These results suggest that MSG2/IAA19 and NPH4/ARF7 may constitute a negative feedback loop to regulate differential growth responses of hypocotyls and lateral root formation.

  9. Gibberellin application at pre-bloom in grapevines down-regulates the expressions of VvIAA9 and VvARF7, negative regulators of fruit set initiation, during parthenocarpic fruit development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Jin Jung

    Full Text Available Fruit set is initiated only after fertilization and is tightly regulated primarily by gibberellins (GAs and auxins. The application of either of these hormones induces parthenocarpy, fruit set without fertilization, but the molecular mechanism underlying this induction is poorly understood. In the present study, we have shown that the parthenocarpic fruits induced by GA application at pre-bloom result from the interaction of GA with auxin signaling. The transcriptional levels of the putative negative regulators of fruit set initiation, including Vitis auxin/indole-3-acetic acid transcription factor 9 (VvIAA9, Vitis auxin response factor 7 (VvARF7, and VvARF8 were monitored during inflorescence development in seeded diploid 'Tamnara' grapevines with or without GA application. Without GA application, VvIAA9, VvARF7, and VvARF8 were expressed at a relatively high level before full bloom, but decreased thereafter following pollination. After GA application at 14 days before full bloom (DBF; however, the expression levels of VvIAA9 and VvARF7 declined at 5 DBF prior to pollination. The effects of GA application on auxin levels or auxin signaling were also analyzed by monitoring the expression patterns of auxin biosynthesis genes and auxin-responsive genes with or without GA application. Transcription levels of the auxin biosynthesis genes Vitis anthranilate synthase β subunit (VvASB1-like, Vitis YUCCA2 (VvYUC2, and VvYUC6 were not significantly changed by GA application. However, the expressions of Vitis Gretchen Hagen3.2 (VvGH3.2 and VvGH3.3, auxin-responsive genes, were up-regulated from 2 DBF to full bloom with GA application. Furthermore, the Vitis GA signaling gene, VvDELLA was up-regulated by GA application during 12 DBF to 7 DBF, prior to down-regulation of VvIAA9 and VvARF7. These results suggest that VvIAA9 and VvARF7 are negative regulators of fruit set initiation in grapevines, and GA signaling is integrated with auxin signaling via Vv

  10. Ral-GTPases: approaching their 15 minutes of fame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Larry A

    2003-08-01

    Andy Warhol, the famous pop artist, once claimed that "in the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes". The same, it seems, can be said of proteins, because at any given time some proteins become more "fashionable" to study than others. But most proteins have been highly conserved throughout millions of years of evolution, which implies that they all have essential roles in cell biology. Thus, each one will no doubt enter the limelight if the right experiment in the right cell type is done. A good example of this is the Ras-like GTPases (Ral-GTPases), which until recently existed in the shadow of their close cousins--the Ras proto-oncogenes. Recent studies have yielded insights into previously unappreciated roles for Ral-GTPases in intensively investigated disciplines such as vesicle trafficking, cell morphology, transcription and possibly even human oncogenesis.

  11. IFN-inducible GTPases in host cell defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Shenoy, Avinash R; Kumar, Pradeep; Bradfield, Clinton J; MacMicking, John D

    2012-10-18

    From plants to humans, the ability to control infection at the level of an individual cell-a process termed cell-autonomous immunity-equates firmly with survival of the species. Recent work has begun to unravel this programmed cell-intrinsic response and the central roles played by IFN-inducible GTPases in defending the mammalian cell's interior against a diverse group of invading pathogens. These immune GTPases regulate vesicular traffic and protein complex assembly to stimulate oxidative, autophagic, membranolytic, and inflammasome-related antimicrobial activities within the cytosol, as well as on pathogen-containing vacuoles. Moreover, human genome-wide association studies and disease-related transcriptional profiling have linked mutations in the Immunity-Related GTPase M (IRGM) locus and altered expression of guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) with tuberculosis susceptibility and Crohn's colitis.

  12. Regulation of bacterial cell polarity by small GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilberg, Daniela; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria are polarized with many proteins localizing dynamically to specific subcellular sites. Two GTPase families have important functions in the regulation of bacterial cell polarity, FlhF homologues and small GTPases of the Ras superfamily. The latter consist of only a G domain and are widespread in bacteria. The rod-shaped Myxococcus xanthus cells have two motility systems, one for gliding and one that depends on type IV pili. The function of both systems hinges on proteins that localize asymmetrically to the cell poles. During cellular reversals, these asymmetrically localized proteins are released from their respective poles and then bind to the opposite pole, resulting in an inversion of cell polarity. Here, we review genetic, cell biological, and biochemical analyses that identified two modules containing small Ras-like GTPases that regulate the dynamic polarity of motility proteins. The GTPase SofG interacts directly with the bactofilin cytoskeletal protein BacP to ensure polar localization of type IV pili proteins. In the second module, the small GTPase MglA, its cognate GTPase activating protein (GAP) MglB, and the response regulator RomR localize asymmetrically to the poles and sort dynamically localized motility proteins to the poles. During reversals, MglA, MglB, and RomR switch poles, in that way inducing the relocation of dynamically localized motility proteins. Structural analyses have demonstrated that MglB has a Roadblock/LC7 fold, the central β2 strand in MglA undergoes an unusual screw-type movement upon GTP binding, MglA contains an intrinsic Arg finger required for GTP hydrolysis, and MglA and MglB form an unusual G protein/GAP complex with a 1:2 stoichiometry.

  13. Comparison of Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS) and Plasma Carotenoid Concentrations: A Validation Study in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Lee; Williams, Rebecca; Rollo, Megan; Pezdirc, Kristine; Collins, Clare

    2017-01-01

    Diet quality indices can predict nutritional adequacy of usual intake, but validity should be determined. The aim was to assess the validity of total and sub-scale score within the Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS), in relation to fasting plasma carotenoid concentrations. Diet quality and fasting plasma carotenoid concentrations were assessed in 99 overweight and obese adults (49.5% female, aged 44.6 ± 9.9 years) at baseline and after three months (198 paired observations). Associations were assessed using Spearman’s correlation coefficients and regression analysis, and agreement using weighted kappa (Kw). Small, significantly positive correlations were found between total ARFS and plasma concentrations of total carotenoids (r = 0.17, p < 0.05), β-cryptoxanthin (r = 0.18, p < 0.05), β-carotene (r = 0.20, p < 0.01), and α-carotene (r = 0.19, p < 0.01). Significant agreement between ARFS categories and plasma carotenoid concentrations was found for total carotenoids (Kw 0.12, p = 0.02), β-carotene (Kw 0.14, p < 0.01), and α-carotene (Kw 0.13, p < 0.01). In fully-adjusted regression models the only signification association with ARFS total score was for α-carotene (β = 0.19, p < 0.01), while ARFS meat and fruit sub-scales demonstrated significant relationships with α-carotene, β-carotene, and total carotenoids (p < 0.05). The weak associations highlight the issues with self-reporting dietary intakes in overweight and obese populations. Further research is required to evaluate the use of the ARFS in more diverse populations. PMID:28817083

  14. Mutual exclusivity analysis of genetic and epigenetic drivers in melanoma identifies a link between p14ARF and retinoic acid receptor β signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christina; Christensen, Claus; Jonsson, Goran

    2013-01-01

    affecting p14ARF (P melanocytes, and that the steady-state levels of p14ARF in these cells...... are regulated via RARβ. Furthermore, we show that the ability of ATRA to induce senescence is reduced in p14ARF-depleted melanocytes, and we provide proof-of-concept that ATRA can induce irreversible growth arrest in melanoma cells with an intact RARβ-p14ARF axis, independent of p16INK4A and p53 status...

  15. CDK5RAP3 is a novel repressor of p14ARF in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Wing-Yan Mak; Wai-Lung Lai; Yuan Zhou; Mingtao Li; Irene Oi-Lin Ng; Yick-Pang Ching

    2012-01-01

    CDK5 regulatory subunit associated protein 3 (CDK5RAP3) is a novel activator of PAK4 and processes important pro-metastatic function in hepatocarcinogenesis. However, it remains unclear if there are other mechanisms by which CDK5RAP3 promotes HCC metastasis. Here, we showed that in CDK5RAP3 stable knockdown SMMC-7721 HCC cells, p14(ARF) tumor suppressor was upregulated at protein and mRNA levels, and ectopic expression of CDK5RAP3 was found to repress the transcription of p14(ARF). Using chro...

  16. Rational design and characterization of a Rac GTPase-specific small molecule inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Dickerson, J Bradley; Guo, Fukun; Zheng, Jie; Zheng, Yi

    2004-05-18

    The signaling pathways mediated by Rho family GTPases have been implicated in many aspects of cell biology. The specificity of the pathways is achieved in part by the selective interaction between Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and their Rho GTPase substrates. Here, we report a first-generation small-molecule inhibitor of Rac GTPase targeting Rac activation by GEF. The chemical compound NSC23766 was identified by a structure-based virtual screening of compounds that fit into a surface groove of Rac1 known to be critical for GEF specification. In vitro it could effectively inhibit Rac1 binding and activation by the Rac-specific GEF Trio or Tiam1 in a dose-dependent manner without interfering with the closely related Cdc42 or RhoA binding or activation by their respective GEFs or with Rac1 interaction with BcrGAP or effector PAK1. In cells, it potently blocked serum or platelet-derived growth factor-induced Rac1 activation and lamellipodia formation without affecting the activity of endogenous Cdc42 or RhoA. Moreover, this compound reduced Trio or Tiam1 but not Vav, Lbc, Intersectin, or a constitutively active Rac1 mutant-stimulated cell growth and suppressed Trio, Tiam1, or Ras-induced cell transformation. When applied to human prostate cancer PC-3 cells, it was able to inhibit the proliferation, anchorage-independent growth and invasion phenotypes that require the endogenous Rac1 activity. Thus, NSC23766 constitutes a Rac-specific small-molecule inhibitor that could be useful to study the role of Rac in various cellular functions and to reverse tumor cell phenotypes associated with Rac deregulation.

  17. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2 Intersects Hormonal Signals in the Regulation of Tomato Fruit Ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitel, Dario A; Chappell-Maor, Louise; Meir, Sagit; Panizel, Irina; Puig, Clara Pons; Hao, Yanwei; Yifhar, Tamar; Yasuor, Hagai; Zouine, Mohamed; Bouzayen, Mondher; Granell Richart, Antonio; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-03-01

    The involvement of ethylene in fruit ripening is well documented, though knowledge regarding the crosstalk between ethylene and other hormones in ripening is lacking. We discovered that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2A (ARF2A), a recognized auxin signaling component, functions in the control of ripening. ARF2A expression is ripening regulated and reduced in the rin, nor and nr ripening mutants. It is also responsive to exogenous application of ethylene, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expressing ARF2A in tomato resulted in blotchy ripening in which certain fruit regions turn red and possess accelerated ripening. ARF2A over-expressing fruit displayed early ethylene emission and ethylene signaling inhibition delayed their ripening phenotype, suggesting ethylene dependency. Both green and red fruit regions showed the induction of ethylene signaling components and master regulators of ripening. Comprehensive hormone profiling revealed that altered ARF2A expression in fruit significantly modified abscisates, cytokinins and salicylic acid while gibberellic acid and auxin metabolites were unaffected. Silencing of ARF2A further validated these observations as reducing ARF2A expression let to retarded fruit ripening, parthenocarpy and a disturbed hormonal profile. Finally, we show that ARF2A both homodimerizes and interacts with the ABA STRESS RIPENING (ASR1) protein, suggesting that ASR1 might be linking ABA and ethylene-dependent ripening. These results revealed that ARF2A interconnects signals of ethylene and additional hormones to co-ordinate the capacity of fruit tissue to initiate the complex ripening process.

  18. HIV signaling through CD4 and CCR5 activates Rho family GTPases that are required for optimal infection of primary CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucera, Mark B; Fleissner, Zach; Tabler, Caroline O; Schlatzer, Daniela M; Troyer, Zach; Tilton, John C

    2017-01-24

    HIV-1 hijacks host cell machinery to ensure successful replication, including cytoskeletal components for intracellular trafficking, nucleoproteins for pre-integration complex import, and the ESCRT pathway for assembly and budding. It is widely appreciated that cellular post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein activity within cells; however, little is known about how PTMs influence HIV replication. Previously, we reported that blocking deacetylation of tubulin using histone deacetylase inhibitors promoted the kinetics and efficiency of early post-entry viral events. To uncover additional PTMs that modulate entry and early post-entry stages in HIV infection, we employed a flow cytometric approach to assess a panel of small molecule inhibitors on viral fusion and LTR promoter-driven gene expression. While viral fusion was not significantly affected, early post-entry viral events were modulated by drugs targeting multiple processes including histone deacetylation, methylation, and bromodomain inhibition. Most notably, we observed that inhibitors of the Rho GTPase family of cytoskeletal regulators-including RhoA, Cdc42, and Rho-associated kinase signaling pathways-significantly reduced viral infection. Using phosphoproteomics and a biochemical GTPase activation assay, we found that virion-induced signaling via CD4 and CCR5 activated Rho family GTPases including Rac1 and Cdc42 and led to widespread modification of GTPase signaling-associated factors. Together, these data demonstrate that HIV signaling activates members of the Rho GTPase family of cytoskeletal regulators that are required for optimal HIV infection of primary CD4+ T cells.

  19. Structural Mechanisms and Drug Discovery Prospects of Rho GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithers, Cameron C; Overduin, Michael

    2016-06-13

    Rho GTPases regulate cellular morphology and dynamics, and some are key drivers of cancer progression. This superfamily offers attractive potential targets for therapeutic intervention, with RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 being prime examples. The challenges in developing agents that act on these signaling enzymes include the lack of obvious druggable pockets and their membrane-bound activities. However, progress in targeting the similar Ras protein is illuminating new strategies for specifically inhibiting oncogenic GTPases. The structures of multiple signaling and regulatory states of Rho proteins have been determined, and the post-translational modifications including acylation and phosphorylation points have been mapped and their functional effects examined. The development of inhibitors to probe the significance of overexpression and mutational hyperactivation of these GTPases underscores their importance in cancer progression. The ability to integrate in silico, in vitro, and in vivo investigations of drug-like molecules indicates the growing tractability of GTPase systems for lead optimization. Although no Rho-targeted drug molecules have yet been clinically approved, this family is clearly showing increasing promise for the development of precision medicine and combination cancer therapies.

  20. Plant GTPases: regulation of morphogenesis by ROPs and ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrig, Joachim F; Hülskamp, Martin

    2006-03-21

    Polarized cell growth in plants is controlled by Rho-like small GTPases (ROPs), not only through the canonical WAVE/Arp2/3 pathway, but also through newly defined plant-specific pathways involving the regulated release of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  1. Roc, a Ras/GTPase domain in complex proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosgraaf, Leonard; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    2003-01-01

    We identified a novel group of the Ras/GTPase superfamily, termed Roc, that is present as domain in complex proteins together with other domains, including leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), ankyrin repeats, WD40 repeats, kinase domains, RasGEF and RhoGAP domains. Roc is always succeeded by a novel 300–40

  2. The cytoskeletal protein Ndel1 regulates dynamin 2 GTPase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Chansard

    Full Text Available Cytoskeleton dynamics, membranes trafficking and positioning are essential for the proper functioning of any mammalian cell. The identification of the molecules and mechanisms that allow these cellular processes to interface is vital for understanding cell behaviors. Ndel1, the mammalian homolog of the Aspergillus nidulans NudE, organizes the cytoskeleton and regulates molecular motors, thereby impacting on the positioning of membranes. Hypothetically, Ndel1 can act in concert with enzymes controlling membrane trafficking (vesicle-mediated transport per se, but this idea has never been investigated. We now report that a pool of Ndel1 associates directly with Dynamin 2 (Dyn2, a large cytosolic GTPase involved in the trafficking of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR1. In vitro, Ndel1 enhances Dyn2 GTPase activity in its unassembled and assembled forms, without promoting oligomerization of the enzyme. In cells, gain and loss of function of Ndel1 recapitulate the effects of overexpression of Dyn2 and Dyn2 dominant negative with reduced GTPase activity on the intracellular localization of GluR1, respectively, without affecting the stability of microtubules. Together, these results indicate that Ndel1 regulates Dyn2 GTPase activity and impacts GluR1-containing membranes distribution in a manner reminiscent of Dyn2.

  3. Rho GTPase inactivation impairs lens growth and integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Vasantha; Wawrousek, Eric; Tamm, Ernst R; Zigler, Samuel

    2002-02-01

    To elucidate the significance of Rho GTPase signaling on lens growth and structural integrity, we have selectively inactivated Rho GTPase in the ocular lens. To achieve this tissue-specific inactivation, a transgene encoding the C3-exoenzyme from Clostridium botulinum has been expressed in mice under transcriptional control of the lens-specific alphaA-crystallin promoter. C3-exoenzyme is known to selectively inactivate all Rho GTPase isoforms by ADP-ribosylating an asparagine residue at position 41. Mice expressing the C3-exoenzyme transgene exhibited selective ocular defects, including cataract and microphthalmia. Extralenticular effects included ocular hemorrhage (blood accumulation in the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye) and abnormalities of the iris including focal attachments to lens and cornea (synechiae). C3-transgene expression was found only in the lens and not in the other ocular tissues as determined by RT-PCR analysis. Histologic examination of the eyes of C3 transgenic mice from two independent lines revealed extensive abnormalities of the lens, including defective fiber cell differentiation and elongation, ruptured posterior lens capsule, and thickened anterior lens capsule. Electron microscopic analysis of hemorrhaged C3 eyes showed abnormalities in the posterior hyaloid vessels. Collectively these data reveal the importance of Rho GTPase signaling in regulating lens growth and maintenance of lens transparency.

  4. Control of T lymphocyte morphology by the GTPase Rho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caudell Eva G

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rho family GTPase regulation of the actin cytoskeleton governs a variety of cell responses. In this report, we have analyzed the role of the GTPase Rho in maintenance of the T lymphocyte actin cytoskeleton. Results Inactivation of the GTPase Rho in the human T lymphocytic cell line HPB-ALL does not inhibit constitutively high adhesion to the integrin β1 substrate fibronectin. It did however result in the aberrant extension of finger-like dendritic processes on the substrates VCAM-1, Fn, and mAb specific to β1 integrins. Time-lapse video microscopy demonstrated that C3 induced extensions were primarily the result of an altered pseudopod elongation rather than retraction. Once the stellate pseudopodia extended, none retracted, and cells became completely immobile. Filipodial structures were absent and the dendritic-like processes in C3 treated cells were rich in filamentous actin. Immunolocalization of RhoA in untreated HPB-ALL cells spreading on fibronectin demonstrated a diffuse staining pattern within the pseudopodia. In C3 treated cells, clusters of RhoA were pronounced and localized within the altered extensions. Conclusions GTPase Rho is actively involved in the regulation of T lymphocyte morphology and motility.

  5. Activation of the Small GTPase Rap1 in Human Neutrophils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M'Rabet, Laura; Coffer, P.J.; Zwartkruis, G.J.T.; Franke, Barbara; Segal, Anthony W.; Koenderman, L.; Bos, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    The small GTPase Rap1 is highly expressed in human neutrophils, but its function is largely unknown. Using the Rap1- binding domain of RalGDS (RalGDS-RBD) as an activationspecific probe for Rap1, we have investigated the regulation of Rap1 activity in primary human neutrophils. We found that a varie

  6. Risk factors of acute renal failure after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezuelo, J B; Ramírez, P; Ríos, A; Acosta, F; Torres, D; Sansano, T; Pons, J A; Bru, M; Montoya, M; Bueno, F S; Robles, R; Parrilla, P

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the risk factors of postoperative acute renal failure (ARF) in orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). We reviewed 184 consecutive OLT. Postoperative ARF was defined as a persistent rise of 50% increase or more of the S-creatinine (S-Cr). The patients were classified as early postoperative ARF (E-ARF) (first week) and late postoperative ARF (L-ARF) (second to fourth week). Preoperative variables were age, sex, comorbidity, indication for OLT, Child-Pugh stage, united network for organ sharing status, analysis of the blood and urine, and donor's data. Intraoperative variables were systolic arterial pressure, mean arterial pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, cardiac index, and systemic vascular resistance index. Surgical technique, number of blood products transfused, need for adrenergic agonist drugs, and intraoperative complications were also important. Postoperative variables were duration of stay in the intensive care unit, time on mechanic ventilation, liver graft dysfunction, need for adrenergic agonist drugs, units of blood products infused, episodes of acute rejection, re-operations, and bacterial infections. Firstly we carried out a univariate statistical analysis, and secondly a logistic regression analysis. The risk factors for E-ARF were: pretransplant ARF (odds ratio (OR)=10.2, P=0.025), S-albumin (OR=0.3, P=0.001), duration of treatment with dopamine (OR=1.6, P=0.001), and grade II-IV dysfunction of the liver graft (OR=5.6, P=0.002). The risk factors for L-ARF were: re-operation (OR=3.1, P=0.013) and bacterial infection (OR=2.9, P=0.017). The development of E-ARF is influenced by preoperative factors such as ARF and hypoalbuminemia, as well as postoperative factors such as liver dysfunction and prolonged treatment with dopamine. The predicting factors of L-ARF differ from E-ARF and correspond to postoperative causes such as bacterial infection and surgical re-operation.

  7. A RHOse by any other name: a comparative analysis of animal and plant Rho GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brembu, Tore; Winge, Per; Bones, Atle Magnar; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2006-05-01

    Rho GTPases are molecular switches that act as key regulators of a many cellular processes, including cell movement, morphogenesis, host defense, cell division and gene expression. Rho GTPases are found in all eukaryotic kingdoms. Plants lack clear homologs to conventional Rho GTPases found in yeast and animals; instead, they have over time developed a unique subfamily, ROPs, also known as RAC. The origin of ROP-like proteins appears to precede the appearance of land plants. This review aims to discuss the evolution of ROP/RAC and to compare plant ROP and animal Rho GTPases, focusing on similarities and differences in regulation of the GTPases and their downstream effectors.

  8. Osteoblast differentiation and migration are regulated by dynamin GTPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Huang, Su; Wayakanon, Kornchanok; Largura, Heather W; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Bone formation is controlled by osteoblasts, but the signaling proteins that control osteoblast differentiation and function are still unclear. We examined if the dynamin GTPase, which is associated with actin remodeling and migration in other cells, plays a role in osteoblast differentiation and migration. Dynamin mRNA was expressed in primary osteoblasts throughout differentiation (0-21 days). However, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a marker of osteoblast differentiation, was decreased in osteoblasts over-expressing dynamin. Conversely, ALP activity was increased following shRNA-mediated knockdown of dynamin and in osteoblasts treated with the dynamin inhibitor, dynasore. Dynasore also reduced c-fos and osterix expression, markers of early osteoblasts, suggesting a role for dynamin in pre-osteoblast to osteoblast differentiation. Since dynamin GTPase activity is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation, we examined the mechanism of dynamin dephosphorylation in osteoblasts. Dynamin formed a protein complex with the tyrosine phosphatase PTP-PEST and inhibition of phosphatase activity increased the level of phosphorylated dynamin. Further, PTP-PEST blocked the Src-mediated increase in the phosphorylation and GTPase activity of wild-type dynamin but not the phosphorylation mutant dynY231F/Y597F. Although ALP activity was increased in osteoblasts expressing GTPase-defective dynK44A, and to a lesser extent dynY231F/Y597F, osteoblast migration was significantly inhibited by dynK44A and dynY231F/Y597F. These studies demonstrate a novel role for dynamin GTPase activity and phosphorylation in osteoblast differentiation and migration, which may be important for bone formation.

  9. Atlastin GTPases are required for Golgi apparatus and ER morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rismanchi, Neggy; Soderblom, Cynthia; Stadler, Julia; Zhu, Peng-Peng; Blackstone, Craig

    2008-06-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (SPG1-33) comprise a cluster of inherited neurological disorders characterized principally by lower extremity spasticity and weakness due to a length-dependent, retrograde axonopathy of corticospinal motor neurons. Mutations in the gene encoding the large oligomeric GTPase atlastin-1 are responsible for SPG3A, a common autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia. Here we describe a family of human GTPases, atlastin-2 and -3 that are closely related to atlastin-1. Interestingly, while atlastin-1 is predominantly localized to vesicular tubular complexes and cis-Golgi cisternae, mostly in brain, atlastin-2 and -3 are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and are most enriched in other tissues. Knockdown of atlastin-2 and -3 levels in HeLa cells using siRNA (small interfering RNA) causes disruption of Golgi morphology, and these Golgi structures remain sensitive to brefeldin A treatment. Interestingly, expression of SPG3A mutant or dominant-negative atlastin proteins lacking GTPase activity causes prominent inhibition of ER reticularization, suggesting a role for atlastin GTPases in the formation of three-way junctions in the ER. However, secretory pathway trafficking as assessed using vesicular stomatitis virus G protein fused to green fluorescent protein (VSVG-GFP) as a reporter was essentially normal in both knockdown and dominant-negative overexpression conditions for all atlastins. Thus, the atlastin family of GTPases functions prominently in both ER and Golgi morphogenesis, but they do not appear to be required generally for anterograde ER-to-Golgi trafficking. Abnormal morphogenesis of the ER and Golgi resulting from mutations in atlastin-1 may ultimately underlie SPG3A by interfering with proper membrane distribution or polarity of the long corticospinal motor neurons.

  10. Specific contribution of p19(ARF) to nitric oxide-dependent apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeini, Miriam; Través, Paqui G; López-Fontal, Raquel; Pantoja, Cristina; Matheu, Ander; Serrano, Manuel; Boscá, Lisardo; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2006-09-01

    NO is an important bioactive molecule involved in a variety of physio- and pathological processes, including apoptosis induction. The proapoptotic activity of NO involves the rise in the tumor suppressor p53 and the accumulation and targeting of proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, in particular Bax and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. However, the exact mechanism by which NO induces p53 activation has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we describe that NO induces p19(ARF) through a transcriptional mechanism. This up-regulation of p19(ARF) activates p53, leading to apoptosis. The importance of p19(ARF) on NO-dependent apoptosis was revealed by the finding that various cell types from alternate reading frame-knockout mice exhibit a diminished response to NO-mediated apoptosis when compared with normal mice. Moreover, the biological relevance of alternative reading frame to p53 apoptosis was confirmed in in vivo models of apoptosis. Together, these results demonstrate that NO-dependent apoptosis requires, in part, the activation of p19(ARF).

  11. The clathrin adaptor AP-1 complex and Arf1 regulate planar cell polarity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Balmer, Sophie; Mendoza, Meg; Dussert, Aurore; Collu, Giovanna; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Weber, Ursula; Ciruna, Brian; Mlodzik, Marek

    2015-04-07

    A key step in generating planar cell polarity (PCP) is the formation of restricted junctional domains containing Frizzled/Dishevelled/Diego (Fz/Dsh/Dgo) or Van Gogh/Prickle (Vang/Pk) complexes within the same cell, stabilized via Flamingo (Fmi) across cell membranes. Although models have been proposed for how these complexes acquire and maintain their polarized localization, the machinery involved in moving core PCP proteins around cells remains unknown. We describe the AP-1 adaptor complex and Arf1 as major regulators of PCP protein trafficking in vivo. AP-1 and Arf1 disruption affects the accumulation of Fz/Fmi and Vang/Fmi complexes in the proximo-distal axis, producing severe PCP phenotypes. Using novel tools, we demonstrate a direct and specific Arf1 involvement in Fz trafficking in vivo. Moreover, we uncover a conserved Arf1 PCP function in vertebrates. Our data support a model whereby the trafficking machinery plays an important part during PCP establishment, promoting formation of polarized PCP-core complexes in vivo.

  12. Properties of human dentin surface after ArF excimer laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Tomohiro; Tonami, Ken-ichi; Araki, Kouji; Kurosaki, Norimasa

    2008-03-01

    Recently, improvement of the properties of dentin surface using dental lasers to increase bonding strength has been anticipated in the field of adhesive dentistry. The objective of this study was to investigate changes in the surface properties of human dentin after ArF excimer laser irradiation at different irradiation times, pulse repetition rates and energy densities. The SEM images of the irradiated surfaces were observed, and the contact angle and the roughness of the irradiated surface were measured. As a result, SEM demonstrated that the dentin surface became irregular following ArF excimer laser irradiation. When the energy density increased, the irregularity became more minute and dentinal tubules were more easily identified. By contrast, such changes were not observed when the irradiation time and pulse repetition rate were changed. Moreover, as energy densities increased, the contact angle tended to decrease and the surface roughness tended to increase. These results suggested that the area of the irradiated surface and wettability increased after irradiation with the ArF excimer laser. Consequently, irradiation with ArF excimer lasers could improve the surface properties and be potentially useful for adhesive dentistry.

  13. Nucleophosmin is required for DNA integrity and p19Arf protein stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Emanuela; Bonetti, Paola; Lazzerini Denchi, Eros

    2005-01-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is a nucleolar phosphoprotein that binds the tumor suppressors p53 and p19(Arf) and is thought to be indispensable for ribogenesis, cell proliferation, and survival after DNA damage. The NPM gene is the most frequent target of genetic alterations in leukemias and lymphomas, th...

  14. Autophosphorylation-dependent degradation of Pak1, triggered by the Rho-family GTPase, Chp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz Hubsman, Monika; Volinsky, Natalia; Manser, Edward; Yablonski, Deborah; Aronheim, Ami

    2007-06-15

    The Paks (p21-activated kinases) Pak1, Pak2 and Pak3 are among the most studied effectors of the Rho-family GTPases, Rac, Cdc42 (cell division cycle 42) and Chp (Cdc42 homologous protein). Pak kinases influence a variety of cellular functions, but the process of Pak down-regulation, following activation, is poorly understood. In the present study, we describe for the first time a negative-inhibitory loop generated by the small Rho-GTPases Cdc42 and Chp, resulting in Pak1 inhibition. Upon overexpression of Chp, we unexpectedly observed a T-cell migration phenotype consistent with Paks inhibition. In line with this observation, overexpression of either Chp or Cdc42 caused a marked reduction in the level of Pak1 protein in a number of different cell lines. Chp-induced degradation was accompanied by ubiquitination of Pak1, and was dependent on the proteasome. The susceptibility of Pak1 to Chp-induced degradation depended on its p21-binding domain, kinase activity and a number of Pak1 autophosphorylation sites, whereas the PIX- (Pak-interacting exchange factor) and Nck-binding sites were not required. Together, these results implicate Chp-induced kinase autophosphorylation in the degradation of Pak1. The N-terminal domain of Chp was found to be required for Chp-induced degradation, although not for Pak1 activation, suggesting that Chp provides a second function, distinct from kinase activation, to trigger Pak degradation. Collectively, our results demonstrate a novel mechanism of signal termination mediated by the Rho-family GTPases Chp and Cdc42, which results in ubiquitin-mediated degradation of one of their direct effectors, Pak1.

  15. Redox control of GTPases: from molecular mechanisms to functional significance in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jongyun

    2011-02-15

    Small GTPases, including the proto-oncoprotein Ras and Rho GTPases, are involved in various cellular signaling events. Some of these small GTPases are redox sensitive, including Ras, Rho, Ran, Dexras1, and Rhes GTPases. Thus, the redox-mediated regulation of these GTPases often determines the course of their cellular signaling cascades. This article takes into consideration the application of Marcus theory to potential redox-based molecular mechanisms in the regulation of these redox-sensitive GTPases and the relevance of such mechanisms to a specific redox-sensitive motif. The discussion also takes into account various diseases, including cancers, heart, and neuronal disorders, that are often linked with the dysregulation of the redox signaling cascades associated with these redox-sensitive GTPases.

  16. Extracellular signals and receptor-like kinases regulating ROP GTPases in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori N Miyawaki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rho-like GTPase from plants (ROPs function as signaling switches that control a wide variety of cellular functions and behaviors including cell morphogenesis, cell division and cell differentiation. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 11 ROPs that form a distinct single subfamily contrarily to animal or fungal counterparts where multiple subfamilies of Rho GTPases exist. Since Rho proteins bind to their downstream effector proteins only in their GTP-bound active state, the activation of ROPs by upstream factor(s is a critical step in the regulation of ROP signaling. Therefore, it is critical to examine the input signals that lead to the activation of ROPs. Recent findings showed that the plant hormone auxin is an important signal for the activation of ROPs during PC morphogenesis as well as for other developmental processes. In contrast to auxin, another plant hormone, abscisic acid (ABA, negatively regulates ROP signaling. Calcium is another emerging signal in the regulation of ROP signaling. Several lines of evidence indicate that plasma membrane localized-receptor like kinases play a critical role in the transmission of the extracellular signals to intracellular ROP signaling pathways. This review focuses on how these signals impinge upon various direct regulators of ROPs to modulate various plant processes.

  17. Extracellular signals and receptor-like kinases regulating ROP GTPases in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyawaki, Kaori N; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Rho-like GTPase from plants (ROPs) function as signaling switches that control a wide variety of cellular functions and behaviors including cell morphogenesis, cell division and cell differentiation. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 11 ROPs that form a distinct single subfamily contrarily to animal or fungal counterparts where multiple subfamilies of Rho GTPases exist. Since Rho proteins bind to their downstream effector proteins only in their GTP-bound "active" state, the activation of ROPs by upstream factor(s) is a critical step in the regulation of ROP signaling. Therefore, it is critical to examine the input signals that lead to the activation of ROPs. Recent findings showed that the plant hormone auxin is an important signal for the activation of ROPs during pavement cell morphogenesis as well as for other developmental processes. In contrast to auxin, another plant hormone, abscisic acid, negatively regulates ROP signaling. Calcium is another emerging signal in the regulation of ROP signaling. Several lines of evidence indicate that plasma membrane localized-receptor like kinases play a critical role in the transmission of the extracellular signals to intracellular ROP signaling pathways. This review focuses on how these signals impinge upon various direct regulators of ROPs to modulate various plant processes.

  18. A novel proapoptotic gene PANO encodes a post-translational modulator of the tumor suppressor p14ARF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Akihiro; Li, Yang; Higashiyama, Shinji; Yutsudo, Masuo

    2012-02-01

    The protein p14ARF is a known tumor suppressor protein controlling cell proliferation and survival, which mainly localizes in nucleoli. However, the regulatory mechanisms that govern its activity or expression remain unclear. Here, we report that a novel proapoptotic nucleolar protein, PANO, modulates the expression and activity of p14ARF in HeLa cells. Overexpression of PANO enhances the stability of p14ARF protein by protecting it from degradation, resulting in an increase in p14ARF expression levels. Overexpression of PANO also induces apoptosis under low serum conditions. This effect is dependent on the nucleolar localization of PANO and inhibited by knocking-down p14ARF. Alternatively, PANO siRNA treated cells exhibit a reduction in p14ARF protein levels. In addition, ectopic expression of PANO suppresses the tumorigenicity of HeLa cells in nude mice. These results indicate that PANO is a new apoptosis-inducing gene by modulating the tumor suppressor protein, p14ARF, and may itself be a new candidate tumor suppressor gene. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel proapoptotic gene PANO encodes a post-translational modulator of the tumor suppressor p14ARF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watari, Akihiro; Li, Yang; Higashiyama, Shinji; Yutsudo, Masuo, E-mail: yutsudo@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2012-02-01

    The protein p14ARF is a known tumor suppressor protein controlling cell proliferation and survival, which mainly localizes in nucleoli. However, the regulatory mechanisms that govern its activity or expression remain unclear. Here, we report that a novel proapoptotic nucleolar protein, PANO, modulates the expression and activity of p14ARF in HeLa cells. Overexpression of PANO enhances the stability of p14ARF protein by protecting it from degradation, resulting in an increase in p14ARF expression levels. Overexpression of PANO also induces apoptosis under low serum conditions. This effect is dependent on the nucleolar localization of PANO and inhibited by knocking-down p14ARF. Alternatively, PANO siRNA treated cells exhibit a reduction in p14ARF protein levels. In addition, ectopic expression of PANO suppresses the tumorigenicity of HeLa cells in nude mice. These results indicate that PANO is a new apoptosis-inducing gene by modulating the tumor suppressor protein, p14ARF, and may itself be a new candidate tumor suppressor gene.

  20. Activation-Inactivation Cycling of Rab35 and ARF6 Is Required for Phagocytosis of Zymosan in RAW264 Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youhei Egami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phagocytosis of zymosan by phagocytes is a widely used model of microbial recognition by the innate immune system. Live-cell imaging showed that fluorescent protein-fused Rab35 accumulated in the membranes of phagocytic cups and then dissociated from the membranes of newly formed phagosomes. By our novel pull-down assay for Rab35 activity, we found that Rab35 is deactivated immediately after zymosan internalization into the cells. Phagosome formation was inhibited in cells expressing the GDP- or GTP-locked Rab35 mutant. Moreover, the simultaneous expression of ACAP2—a Rab35 effector protein—with GTP-locked Rab35 or the expression of plasma membrane-targeted ACAP2 showed a marked inhibitory effect on phagocytosis through ARF6 inactivation by the GAP activity of ACAP2. ARF6, a substrate for ACAP2, was also localized on the phagocytic cups and dissociated from the membranes of internalized phagosomes. In support of the microscopic observations, ARF6-GTP pull-down experiments showed that ARF6 is transiently activated during phagosome formation. Furthermore, the expression of GDP- or GTP-locked ARF6 mutants also suppresses the uptake of zymosan. These data suggest that the activation-inactivation cycles of Rab35 and ARF6 are required for the uptake of zymosan and that ACAP2 is an important component that links Rab35/ARF6 signaling during phagocytosis of zymosan.

  1. Variation in Efficacy of Isolates of the Fungus ARF Against the Soybean Cyst Nematode Heterodera glycines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timper, P; Riggs, R D

    1998-12-01

    An unnamed fungus, designated ARF, that parasitizes eggs and sedentary stages of cyst nematodes is a potential biological control agent of Heterodera glycines. The objectives of this study were to determine whether ARF isolates differ in their ability to suppress nematode numbers in soil and to compare the efficacy of ARF in heat-treated and native soil. The effectiveness of 11 ARF isolates was compared by introducing homogenized mycelium into heat-treated soil. Soybean seedlings were transplanted into pots containing fungus-infested soil and inoculated with H. glycines. After 30 or 60 days, the number of nematodes and the percentage of parasitized eggs were determined. Three isolates (907, 908, and TN14), which were previously reported to be weak egg parasites in vitro, consistently suppressed nematode numbers by 50% to 100%. Of the isolates previously reported to be aggressive egg parasites, four (903, BG2, MS3, and TN12) reduced nematode numbers by 56% to 69% in at least one experimental trial, but the other four had no effect on nematode numbers. When the efficacy of isolate TN14 was tested in heat-treated and native soil, nematode suppression was greater in the heat-treated soil in only one of two trials. In both soil treatments, nematode numbers were reduced by more than 60%. We conclude that virulence toward nematode eggs in vitro is a poor indicator of effectiveness of an ARF isolate in soil, and that the presence of soil microbes may reduce, but does not completely inhibit, activity of isolate TN14.

  2. Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein B, a novel small GTPase, is involved in the regulation of DNA gyrase and drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jun; Han, Jiao; Wu, Hanyu; Hu, Xinling; Deng, Jiaoyu; Fleming, Joy; Maxwell, Anthony; Bi, Lijun; Mi, Kaixia

    2013-01-01

    DNA gyrase plays a vital role in resolving DNA topological problems and is the target of antibiotics such as fluoroquinolones. Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein A (MfpA) from Mycobacterium smegmatis is a newly identified DNA gyrase inhibitor that is believed to confer intrinsic resistance to fluoroquinolones. However, MfpA does not prevent drug-induced inhibition of DNA gyrase in vitro, implying the involvement of other as yet unknown factors. Here, we have identified a new factor, named Mycobacterium fluoroquinolone resistance protein B (MfpB), which is involved in the protection of DNA gyrase against drugs both in vivo and in vitro. Genetic results suggest that MfpB is necessary for MfpA protection of DNA gyrase against drugs in vivo; an mfpB knockout mutant showed greater susceptibility to ciprofloxacin than the wild-type, whereas a strain overexpressing MfpA and MfpB showed higher loss of susceptibility. Further biochemical characterization indicated that MfpB is a small GTPase and its GTP bound form interacts directly with MfpA and influences its interaction with DNA gyrase. Mutations in MfpB that decrease its GTPase activity disrupt its protective efficacy. Our studies suggest that MfpB, a small GTPase, is required for MfpA-conferred protection of DNA gyrase. PMID:23275532

  3. Ink4a/Arf −/− and HRAS(G12V) transform mouse mammary cells into triple-negative breast cancer containing tumorigenic CD49f− quiescent cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kai, Kazuharu; Iwamoto, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Arima, Yoshimi; Takamoto, Yayoi; Ohnishi, Nobuyuki; Bartholomeusz, Chandra; Horii, Rie; Akiyama, Futoshi; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Pusztai, Lajos; Saya, Hideyuki; Ueno, Naoto T.

    2013-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity within individual breast tumors is a well-known phenomenon that may contribute to drug resistance. This heterogeneity is dependent on several factors, such as types of oncogenic drivers and tumor precursor cells. The purpose of our study was to engineer a mouse mammary tumor model with intratumoral heterogeneity by using defined genetic perturbations. To achieve this, we used mice with knockout (−/−) of Ink4a/Arf, a tumor suppressor locus; these mice are known to be...

  4. A population-based study on the association between acute renal failure (ARF and the duration of polypharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Yi-Ping

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the rapid growth in elderly population, polypharmacy has become a serious public health issue worldwide. Although acute renal failure (ARF is one negative consequence of polypharmacy, the association between the duration of polypharmacy and ARF remains unclear. We therefore assessed this association using a population-based database. Methods Data were collected from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD from 2003 through 2006. The case group included patients hospitalized for ARF during 2006, but not admitted due to trauma, surgery, burn trauma, car accident, transplantation, or infectious diseases; the control group included patients hospitalized without ARF. The cumulative number of days of polypharmacy (defined as more than 5 prescriptions per day for 1 year prior to admission was determined, with patients further subdivided into 4 categories: less than 30 days, 31–90 days, 91–180 days, and over 181 days. The dependent variable was ARF, and the control variables were age, gender, comorbidities in patients hospitalized for ARF, stay in ICUs during ARF hospitalization and site of operation for prior admissions within one month of ARF hospitalization. Results Of 20,790 patients who were admitted to hospitals for ARF in 2006, 12,314 (59.23 % were male and more than 60 % were older than 65 years. Of patients with and without ARF, 16.14 % and 10.61 %, respectively, received polypharmacy for 91–180 days and 50.22 % and 24.12 %, respectively, for over 181 days. A statistical model indicated that, relative to patients who received polypharmacy for less than 30 days, those who received polypharmacy for 31–90, 91–180 and over 181 days had odds ratios of developing ARF of 1.33 (p Conclusions We observed statistically significant associations between the duration of polypharmacy and the occurrence of ARF.

  5. Role of ARF6, Rab11 and external Hsp90 in the trafficking and recycling of recombinant-soluble Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (rNadA in human epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Bozza

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA is a meningococcus surface protein thought to assist in the adhesion of the bacterium to host cells. We have previously shown that NadA also promotes bacterial internalization in a heterologous expression system. Here we have used the soluble recombinant NadA (rNadA lacking the membrane anchor region to characterize its internalization route in Chang epithelial cells. Added to the culture medium, rNadA internalizes through a PI3K-dependent endocytosis process not mediated by the canonical clathrin or caveolin scaffolds, but instead follows an ARF6-regulated recycling pathway previously described for MHC-I. The intracellular pool of rNadA reaches a steady state level within one hour of incubation and colocalizes in endocytic vesicles with MHC-I and with the extracellularly labeled chaperone Hsp90. Treatment with membrane permeated and impermeable Hsp90 inhibitors 17-AAG and FITC-GA respectively, lead to intracellular accumulation of rNadA, strongly suggesting that the extracellular secreted pool of the chaperone is involved in rNadA intracellular trafficking. A significant number of intracellular vesicles containing rNadA recruit Rab11, a small GTPase associated to recycling endosomes, but do not contain transferrin receptor (TfR. Interestingly, cell treatment with Hsp90 inhibitors, including the membrane-impermeable FITC-GA, abolished Rab11-rNadA colocalization but do not interfere with Rab11-TfR colocalization. Collectively, these results are consistent with a model whereby rNadA internalizes into human epithelial cells hijacking the recycling endosome pathway and recycle back to the surface of the cell via an ARF6-dependent, Rab11 associated and Hsp90-regulated mechanism. The present study addresses for the first time a meningoccoccal adhesin mechanism of endocytosis and suggests a possible entry pathway engaged by N. meningitidis in primary infection of human epithelial cells.

  6. High miR156 Expression Is Required for Auxin-Induced Adventitious Root Formation via MxSPL26 Independent of PINs and ARFs in Malus xiaojinensis

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    Xiaozhao Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Adventitious root formation is essential for the vegetative propagation of perennial woody plants. During the juvenile-to-adult phase change mediated by the microRNA156 (miR156, the adventitious rooting ability decreases dramatically in many species, including apple rootstocks. However, the mechanism underlying how miR156 affects adventitious root formation is unclear. In the present study, we showed that in the presence of the synthetic auxin indole-3-butyric acid (IBA, semi-lignified leafy cuttings from juvenile phase (Mx-J and rejuvenated (Mx-R Malus xiaojinensis trees exhibited significantly higher expression of miR156, PIN-FORMED1 (PIN1, PIN10, and rootless concerning crown and seminal roots-like (RTCS-like genes, thus resulting in higher adventitious rooting ability than those from adult phase (Mx-A trees. However, the expression of SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE26 (SPL26 and some auxin response factor (ARF gene family members were substantially higher in Mx-A than in Mx-R cuttings. The expression of NbRTCS-like but not NbPINs and NbARFs varied with miR156 expression in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana plants transformed with 35S:MdMIR156a6 or 35S:MIM156 constructs. Overexpressing the miR156-resistant MxrSPL genes in tobacco confirmed the involvement of MxSPL20, MxSPL21&22, and MxSPL26 in adventitious root formation. Together, high expression of miR156 was necessary for auxin-induced adventitious root formation via MxSPL26, but independent of MxPINs and MxARFs expression in M. xiaojinensis leafy cuttings.

  7. Logistic regression analysis of the risk factors of acute renal failure complicating limb war injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-zhi CHENG

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the risk factors of complication of acute renal failure(ARF in war injuries of limbs.Methods The clinical data of 352 patients with limb injuries admitted to 303 Hospital of PLA from 1968 to 2002 were retrospectively analyzed.The patients were divided into ARF group(n=9 and non-ARF group(n=343 according to the occurrence of ARF,and the case-control study was carried out.Ten factors which might lead to death were analyzed by logistic regression to screen the risk factors for ARF,including causes of trauma,shock after injury,time of admission to hospital after injury,injured sites,combined trauma,number of surgical procedures,presence of foreign matters,features of fractures,amputation,and tourniquet time.Results Fifteen of the 352 patients died(4.3%,among them 7 patients(46.7% died of ARF,3(20.0% of pulmonary embolism,3(20.0% of gas gangrene,and 2(13.3% of multiple organ failure.Univariate analysis revealed that the shock,time before admitted to hospital,amputation and tourniquet time were the risk factors for ARF in the wounded with limb injuries,while the logistic regression analysis showed only amputation was the risk factor for ARF(P < 0.05.Conclusion ARF is the primary cause-of-death in the wounded with limb injury.Prompt and accurate treatment and optimal time for amputation may be beneficial to decreasing the incidence and mortality of ARF in the wounded with severe limb injury and ischemic necrosis.

  8. How to analyze bacterial toxins targeting Rho GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielek, Heike; Schmidt, Gudula

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens developed several strategies to overcome defense systems of eukaryotic hosts. Within the infection process, they need to attach to and cross through epithelial layers, escape from the innate and adaptive immune response, and find a physiological niche to survive. One target to modulate the host-pathogen interaction in order to deceit pathogen resistance is the actin cytoskeleton and its regulators: the family of Rho GTPases. Some bacterial toxins catalyze a covalent modification of Rho GTPases to keep these molecular switches in a constitutive active or inactive state. This leads to rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Toxin-treated cells show typical morphological changes depending on substrate specificity and action of the toxins. In this chapter, we discuss the classes of bacterial toxins based on their mode of action, their recombinant expression (specifically CNF1), intoxication and subsequent morphological changes of the actin cytoskeleton, and cell shape.

  9. Modelling Rho GTPase biochemistry to predict collective cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Brian; Feng, James

    The collective migration of cells, due to individual cell polarization and intercellular contact inhibition of locomotion, features prominently in embryogenesis and metastatic cancers. Existing methods for modelling collectively migrating cells tend to rely either on highly abstracted agent-based models, or on continuum approximations of the group. Both of these frameworks represent intercellular interactions such as contact inhibition of locomotion as hard-coded rules defining model cells. In contrast, we present a vertex-dynamics framework which predicts polarization and contact inhibition of locomotion naturally from an underlying model of Rho GTPase biochemistry and cortical mechanics. We simulate the interaction between many such model cells, and study how modulating Rho GTPases affects migratory characteristics of the group, in the context of long-distance collective migration of neural crest cells during embryogenesis.

  10. A complex distribution of elongation family GTPases EF1A and EFL in basal alveolate lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, Kirill V; Janouškovec, Jan; Tikhonenkov, Denis V; Mirzaeva, Gulnara S; Diakin, Andrei Yu; Simdyanov, Timur G; Mylnikov, Alexander P; Keeling, Patrick J; Aleoshin, Vladimir V

    2014-09-01

    Translation elongation factor-1 alpha (EF1A) and the related GTPase EF-like (EFL) are two proteins with a complex mutually exclusive distribution across the tree of eukaryotes. Recent surveys revealed that the distribution of the two GTPases in even closely related taxa is frequently at odds with their phylogenetic relationships. Here, we investigate the distribution of EF1A and EFL in the alveolate supergroup. Alveolates comprise three major lineages: ciliates and apicomplexans encode EF1A, whereas dinoflagellates encode EFL. We searched transcriptome databases for seven early-diverging alveolate taxa that do not belong to any of these groups: colpodellids, chromerids, and colponemids. Current data suggest all seven are expected to encode EF1A, but we find three genera encode EFL: Colpodella, Voromonas, and the photosynthetic Chromera. Comparing this distribution with the phylogeny of alveolates suggests that EF1A and EFL evolution in alveolates cannot be explained by a simple horizontal gene transfer event or lineage sorting.

  11. Regulation of cargo-selective endocytosis by dynamin 2 GTPase-activating protein girdin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Liang; Enomoto, Atsushi; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kiyofumi; Asai, Naoya; Morone, Nobuhiro; Jiang, Ping; An, Jian; Kato, Takuya; Kuroda, Keisuke; Watanabe, Takashi; Asai, Masato; Ishida-Takagishi, Maki; Murakumo, Yoshiki; Nakashima, Hideki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Takahashi, Masahide

    2014-09-17

    In clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), specificity and selectivity for cargoes are thought to be tightly regulated by cargo-specific adaptors for distinct cellular functions. Here, we show that the actin-binding protein girdin is a regulator of cargo-selective CME. Girdin interacts with dynamin 2, a GTPase that excises endocytic vesicles from the plasma membrane, and functions as its GTPase-activating protein. Interestingly, girdin depletion leads to the defect in clathrin-coated pit formation in the center of cells. Also, we find that girdin differentially interacts with some cargoes, which competitively prevents girdin from interacting with dynamin 2 and confers the cargo selectivity for CME. Therefore, girdin regulates transferrin and E-cadherin endocytosis in the center of cells and their subsequent polarized intracellular localization, but has no effect on integrin and epidermal growth factor receptor endocytosis that occurs at the cell periphery. Our results reveal that girdin regulates selective CME via a mechanism involving dynamin 2, but not by operating as a cargo-specific adaptor.

  12. Protective role of interferon-induced Mx GTPases against influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, O; Staeheli, P; Kochs, G

    2009-04-01

    Mx proteins are interferon-induced large GTPases with antiviral activities. They inhibit a wide range of viruses by blocking early stages of the replication cycles. Importantly, Mx GTPases also suppress the growth of highly pathogenic influenza A viruses, such as currently circulating H5N1 viruses or the pandemic H1N1 virus strain of 1918. In this paper, the authors review the properties of Mx proteins and discuss their role in host defence against highly pathogenic viruses. The authors further suggest that mammalian Mx proteins may normally provide a barrier against zoonotic transmission of avian influenza A viruses and that acquired resistance to the antiviral action of human MxA may be one factor, among many others, that facilitates the spread of pandemic strains in human populations. The presently available evidence suggests that Mx proteins of domestic chickens lack the ability to efficiently combat avian influenza viruses known to cause devastating infections in this species. The deliberate introduction of an antivirally active Mx gene originating from resistant birds or mammals may confer some degree of protection and thus stop commercial birds from serving as amplifying hosts of potentially pandemic influenza virus strains.

  13. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of auxin response factor gene family in Medicago truncatula

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    Chenjia eShen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Auxin response factors (ARFs bind specifically to auxin response elements (AuxREs in the promoters of down-stream target genes and play roles in plant responses to diverse environmental factors. Using the latest updated Medicago truncatula reference genome sequence, a comprehensive characterization and analysis of 24 MtARF genes were performed. To uncover the basic information and functions of MtARF genes during symbiosis, we analyze the expression patterns of MtARF genes during the early phase of Sinorhizobium meliloti infection. The systematic analysis indicated that MtARF gene expressions were involved in the symbiosis processes. Furthermore, the roles of MtARF-mediated auxin signaling in symbiosis were tested in the infection resistant mutant (dmi3. The expression responses of MtARFs to S. meliloti infection were attenuated in the mutant compared to wild-type A17. In summary, our results shed that the MtARF gene expressions was involved in responses to S. meliloti infection, which may play an essential role in the regulation of nodule formation.

  14. A role for the rap GTPase YlRsr1 in cellular morphogenesis and the involvement of YlRsr1 and the ras GTPase YlRas2 in bud site selection in the dimorphic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Qing; Li, Min; Zhao, Xiao-Feng; Gao, Xiang-Dong

    2014-05-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica is a dimorphic yeast species that can grow in the ovoid yeast form or in the elongated pseudohyphal or hyphal form depending on the growth conditions. Here, we show that the Rap GTPase Rsr1 of Y. lipolytica (YlRsr1) plays an important role in cellular morphogenesis in this microorganism. Cells deleted for YlRSR1 exhibited impaired polarized growth during yeast-form growth. Pseudohyphal and hyphal development were also abnormal. YlRsr1 is also important for cell growth, since the deletion of YlRSR1 in cells lacking the Ras GTPase YlRas2 caused lethality. Y. lipolytica cells bud in a bipolar pattern in which the cells produce the new buds at the two poles. YlRsr1 plays a prominent role in this bud site selection process. YlRsr1's function in bud site selection absolutely requires the cycling of YlRsr1 between the GTP- and GDP-bound states but its function in cellular morphogenesis does not, suggesting that the two processes are differentially regulated. Interestingly, the Ras GTPase YlRas2 is also involved in the control of bud site selection, as Ylras2Δ cells were severely impaired in bipolar bud site selection. The GTP/GDP cycling and the plasma membrane localization of YlRas2 are important for YlRas2's function in bud site selection. However, they are not essential for this process, suggesting that the mechanism by which YlRas2 acts is different from that of YlRsr1. Our results suggest that YlRsr1 is regulated by the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) YlBud2 and partially by YlCdc25, the potential guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for YlRas2.

  15. Osteoblast differentiation and migration are regulated by Dynamin GTPase activity

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Bone formation is controlled by osteoblasts but the signaling proteins that control osteoblast differentiation and function are still unclear. We examined if the dynamin GTPase, which is associated with actin remodeling and migration in other cells, plays a role in osteoblast differentiation and migration. Dynamin mRNA was expressed in primary osteoblasts throughout differentiation (0–21 days). However, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a marker of osteoblast differentiation, was decreased...

  16. Endogenous target mimics down-regulate miR160 mediation of ARF10, -16 and -17 cleavage during somatic embryogenesis in Dimocarpus longan Lour.

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    yuling elin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNA160 plays a critical role in plant development by negatively regulating the auxin response factors ARF10, -16 and -17. However, the ways in which miR160 expression is regulated at the transcriptional level, and how miR160 interacts with its targets during plant embryo development, remain unknown. Here, we studied the regulatory relationships among endogenous target mimics (eTMs, and miR160 and its targets, and their involvement in hormone signaling and somatic embryogenesis (SE in Dimocarpus longan. We identified miR160 family members and isolated the miR160 precursor, primary transcript, and promoter. The promoter contained cis-acting elements responsive to stimuli such as light, abscisic acid, salicylic acid and heat stress. The pri-miR160 was down-regulated in response to salicylic acid but up-regulated by gibberellic acid, ethylene, and methyl jasmonate treatment, suggesting that pri-miR160 was associated with hormone transduction. Dlo-miR160a, -a* and -d* reached expression peaks in torpedo-shaped embryos, globular embryos and cotyledonary embryos, respectively, but were barely detectable in embryogenic callus. This suggests that they have expression-related and functional diversity, especially during the middle and later developmental stages of SE. Four potential eTMs for miR160 were identified. Two of them, glucan endo-1,3-beta- glucosidase-like protein 2-like and calpain-type cysteine protease DEK1, were confirmed to control the corresponding dlo-miR160a* expression level. This suggests that they may function to abolish the binding between dlo-miR160a* and its targets. These two eTMs also participated in auxin and ABA signal transduction. DlARF10, -16, and -17 targeting by dlo-miR160a was confirmed; their expression levels were higher in friable-embryogenic callus and incomplete compact pro-embryogenic cultures and responded to 2,4-D, suggesting they may play a major role in the early stages of longan SE dependent on 2,4-D. The e

  17. Interferon-inducible GTPases in cell autonomous and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Etienne; Broz, Petr

    2016-02-01

    Detection and clearance of invading pathogens requires a coordinated response of the adaptive and innate immune system. Host cell, however, also features different mechanisms that restrict pathogen replication in a cell-intrinsic manner, collectively referred to as cell-autonomous immunity. In immune cells, the ability to unleash those mechanisms strongly depends on the activation state of the cell, which is controlled by cytokines or the detection of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by pattern-recognition receptors. The interferon (IFN) class of cytokines is one of the strongest inducers of antimicrobial effector mechanisms and acts against viral, bacterial and parasitic intracellular pathogens. This has been linked to the upregulation of several hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes, among them the so-called IFN-inducible GTPases. Two subfamilies of IFN-inducible GTPases, the immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), have gained attention due to their exceptional ability to specifically target intracellular vacuolar pathogens and restrict their replication by destroying their vacuolar compartment. Their repertoire has recently been expanded to the regulation of inflammasome complexes, which are cytosolic multi-protein complexes that control an inflammatory cell death called pyroptosis and the release of cytokines like interleukin-1β and interleukin-18. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding the function, the targeting and regulation of IRG and GBP proteins during microbial infections.

  18. Structural determinants allowing endolysosomal sorting and degradation of endosomal GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Ruth A; Oeste, Clara L; Stamatakis, Konstantinos; Ramos, Irene; Herrera, Mónica; Boya, Patricia; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2010-09-01

    Rapid control of protein degradation is usually achieved through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. We recently found that the short-lived GTPase RhoB is degraded in lysosomes. Moreover, the fusion of the RhoB C-terminal sequence CINCCKVL, containing the isoprenylation and palmitoylation sites, to other proteins directs their sorting into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and rapid lysosomal degradation. Here, we show that this process is highly specific for RhoB. Alteration of late endosome lipid dynamics produced the accumulation of RhoB, but not of other endosomal GTPases, including Rab5, Rab7, Rab9 or Rab11, into enlarged MVB. Other isoprenylated and bipalmitoylated GTPases, such as H-Ras, Rap2A, Rap2B and TC10, were not accumulated into MVB and were stable. Remarkably, although TC10, which is highly homologous to RhoB, was stable, a sequence derived from its C-terminus (CINCCLIT) elicited MVB sorting and degradation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-chimeric protein. This led us to identify a cluster of basic amino acids (KKH) in the TC10 hypervariable region, constituting a secondary signal potentially involved in electrostatic interactions with membrane lipids. Mutation of this cluster allowed TC10 MVB sorting and degradation, whereas inserting it into RhoB hypervariable region rescued this protein from its lysosomal degradation pathway. These findings define a highly specific structural module for entering the MVB pathway and rapid lysosomal degradation.

  19. Small GTPases and Brucella entry into the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bolle, Xavier; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-12-01

    A key determinant for intracellular pathogenic bacteria to ensure their virulence within host cells is their ability to bypass the endocytic pathway and to reach a safe niche of replication. In the case of Brucella, the bacterium targets the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) to create a replicating niche called the BCV (Brucella-containing vacuole). The ER is a suitable strategic place for pathogenic Brucella. Indeed, bacteria can be hidden from host cell defences to persist within the host, and they can take advantage of the membrane reservoir delivered by the ER to replicate. Interaction with the ER leads to the presence on the BCV of the GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and the small GTPase Rab2 known to be located on secretory vesicles that traffic between the ER and the Golgi apparatus. GAPDH and the small GTPase Rab2 controls Brucella replication at late times post-infection. A specific interaction between the human small GTPase Rab2 and a Brucella spp. protein named RicA was identified. Altered kinetics of intracellular trafficking and faster proliferation of the Brucella abortus ΔricA mutant was observed compared with the wild-type strain. RicA is the first reported effector with a proposed function for B. abortus.

  20. Rho GTPase signaling promotes constitutive expression and release of TGF-β2 by human trabecular meshwork cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervan, Cynthia L; Lautz, Jonathan D; Blitzer, Andrea L; Langert, Kelly A; Stubbs, Evan B

    2016-05-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is causally implicated in the pathophysiology of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). The molecular mechanisms responsible for elevated IOP remain elusive, but may involve aberrant expression and signaling of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 within the trabecular meshwork (TM). Consistent with previously published studies, we show here that exogenous addition of TGF-β2 to cultured porcine anterior segments significantly attenuates outflow facility in a time-dependent manner. By comparison, perfusing segments with a TGFβRI/ALK-5 antagonist (SB-431542) unexpectedly elicited a significant and sustained increase in outflow facility, implicating a role for TM-localized constitutive expression and release of TGF-β2. Consistent with this thesis, cultured primary or transformed (GTM3) quiescent human TM cells were found to constitutively express and secrete measurable amounts of biologically-active TGF-β2. Disrupting monomeric GTPase post-translational prenylation and activation with lovastatin or GGTI-298 markedly reduced constitutive TGF-β2 expression and release. Specifically, inhibiting the Rho subfamily of GTPases with C3 exoenzyme similarly reduced constitutive expression and secretion of TGF-β2. These findings suggest that Rho GTPase signaling, in part, regulates constitutive expression and release of biologically-active TGF-β2 from human TM cells. Localized constitutive expression and release of TGF-β2 by TM cells may promote or exacerbate elevation of IOP in POAG.

  1. RNAi screens for Rho GTPase regulators of cell shape and YAP/TAZ localisation in triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Vargas, Patricia; Cooper, Samuel; Sero, Julia; Bousgouni, Vicky; Arias-Garcia, Mar; Bakal, Chris

    2017-03-01

    In order to metastasise, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) must make dynamic changes in cell shape. The shape of all eukaryotic cells is regulated by Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RhoGEFs), which activate Rho-family GTPases in response to mechanical and informational cues. In contrast, Rho GTPase-activating proteins (RhoGAPs) inhibit Rho GTPases. However, which RhoGEFs and RhoGAPS couple TNBC cell shape to changes in their environment is very poorly understood. Moreover, whether the activity of particular RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs become dysregulated as cells evolve the ability to metastasise is not clear. Towards the ultimate goal of identifying RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that are essential for TNBC metastasis, we performed an RNAi screen to isolate RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that contribute to the morphogenesis of the highly metastatic TNBC cell line LM2, and its less-metastatic parental cell line MDA-MB-231. For ~6 million cells from each cell line, we measured 127 different features following the depletion of 142 genes. Using a linear classifier scheme we also describe the morphological heterogeneity of each gene-depleted population.

  2. RNAi screens for Rho GTPase regulators of cell shape and YAP/TAZ localisation in triple negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Vargas, Patricia; Cooper, Samuel; Sero, Julia; Bousgouni, Vicky; Arias-Garcia, Mar; Bakal, Chris

    2017-01-01

    In order to metastasise, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) must make dynamic changes in cell shape. The shape of all eukaryotic cells is regulated by Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RhoGEFs), which activate Rho-family GTPases in response to mechanical and informational cues. In contrast, Rho GTPase-activating proteins (RhoGAPs) inhibit Rho GTPases. However, which RhoGEFs and RhoGAPS couple TNBC cell shape to changes in their environment is very poorly understood. Moreover, whether the activity of particular RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs become dysregulated as cells evolve the ability to metastasise is not clear. Towards the ultimate goal of identifying RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that are essential for TNBC metastasis, we performed an RNAi screen to isolate RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that contribute to the morphogenesis of the highly metastatic TNBC cell line LM2, and its less-metastatic parental cell line MDA-MB-231. For ~6 million cells from each cell line, we measured 127 different features following the depletion of 142 genes. Using a linear classifier scheme we also describe the morphological heterogeneity of each gene-depleted population. PMID:28248929

  3. Cahit Arf: Exploring his scientific influence using social network analysis, author co-citation maps and single publication h index1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasar Tonta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cahit Arf (1910-1997, a famous Turkish scientist whose picture is depicted in one of the Turkish banknotes, is a well-known figure in mathematics with his discoveries named after him (e.g., Arf invariant, Arf rings, the Hasse-Arf theorem. Although Arf may not be considered as a prolific scientist in terms of number of papers (he authored a total of 23 papers, his influence on mathematics and related disciplines was profound. As he was active before, during, and after World War II, Arf′s contributions are not properly listed in citation indexes, and thus did not generate many citations even though several papers with "Arf" in their titles appeared in literature. This paper traces influence of Arf in scientific world using citation analysis techniques first. It reviews scientific impact of Arf by analyzing both; the papers authored by Arf and papers whose titles or keywords containing various combinations of "Arf invariant," "Arf rings," and so on. The paper then goes on to study Arf′s contributions using social network analysis (SNA and author co-citation analysis (ACA techniques. CiteSpace and pennant diagrams are used to explore scientific impact of Arf by mapping his cited references derived from Thomson Reuters′ Web of Science (WoS database. The direct and indirect influences of Arf′s highly cited paper on Arf invariant are assessed through ACA and single publication h index, respectively. The paper ends with a discussion of whether data analysis techniques used in this study can be useful to study scientific impact of researchers retrospectively.

  4. Beyond Rab GTPases Legionella activates the small GTPase Ran to promote microtubule polymerization, pathogen vacuole motility, and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbi, Hubert; Rothmeier, Eva; Hoffmann, Christine; Harrison, Christopher F

    2014-01-01

    Legionella spp. are amoebae-resistant environmental bacteria that replicate in free-living protozoa in a distinct compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Upon transmission of Legionella pneumophila to the lung, the pathogens employ an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to grow in LCVs within alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. LCV formation is a complex and robust process, which requires the bacterial Icm/Dot type IV secretion system and involves the amazing number of 300 different translocated effector proteins. LCVs interact with the host cell's endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking pathway. Accordingly, in a proteomics approach as many as 12 small Rab GTPases implicated in endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking were identified and validated as LCV components. Moreover, the small GTPase Ran and its effector protein RanBP1 have been found to decorate the pathogen vacuole. Ran regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, spindle assembly, and cytokinesis, as well as the organization of non-centrosomal microtubules. In L. pneumophila-infected amoebae or macrophages, Ran and RanBP1 localize to LCVs, and the small GTPase is activated by the Icm/Dot substrate LegG1. Ran activation by LegG1 leads to microtubule stabilization and promotes intracellular pathogen vacuole motility and bacterial growth, as well as chemotaxis and migration of Legionella-infected cells.

  5. Functional interactions between Lmo2, the Arf tumor suppressor, and Notch1 in murine T-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treanor, Louise M; Volanakis, Emmanuel J; Zhou, Sheng; Lu, Taihe; Sherr, Charles J; Sorrentino, Brian P

    2011-05-19

    LMO2 is a target of chromosomal translocations in T-cell tumors and was activated by retroviral vector insertions in T-cell tumors from X-SCID patients in gene therapy trials. To better understand the cooperating genetic events in LMO2-associated T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), we investigated the roles of Arf tumor suppressor loss and Notch activation in murine models of transplantation. Lmo2 overexpression enhanced the expansion of primitive DN2 thymocytes, eventually facilitating the stochastic induction of clonal CD4(+)/CD8(+) malignancies. Inactivation of the Arf tumor suppressor further increased the self-renewal capacity of the primitive, preleukemic thymocyte pool and accelerated the development of aggressive, Lmo2-induced T-cell lympholeukemias. Notch mutations were frequently detected in these Lmo2-induced tumors. The Arf promoter was not directly engaged by Lmo2 or mutant Notch, and use of a mouse model in which activation of a mutant Notch allele depends on previous engagement of the Arf promoter revealed that Notch activation could occur as a subsequent event in T-cell tumorigenesis. Therefore, Lmo2 cooperates with Arf loss to enhance self-renewal in primitive thymocytes. Notch mutation and Arf inactivation appear to independently cooperate in no requisite order with Lmo2 overexpression in inducing T-ALL, and all 3 events remained insufficient to guarantee immediate tumor development.

  6. Computational model explains high activity and rapid cycling of Rho GTPases within protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B Goryachev

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Formation of multiprotein complexes on cellular membranes is critically dependent on the cyclic activation of small GTPases. FRAP-based analyses demonstrate that within protein complexes, some small GTPases cycle nearly three orders of magnitude faster than they would spontaneously cycle in vitro. At the same time, experiments report concomitant excess of the activated, GTP-bound form of GTPases over their inactive form. Intuitively, high activity and rapid turnover are contradictory requirements. How the cells manage to maximize both remains poorly understood. Here, using GTPases of the Rab and Rho families as a prototype, we introduce a computational model of the GTPase cycle. We quantitatively investigate several plausible layouts of the cycling control module that consist of GEFs, GAPs, and GTPase effectors. We explain the existing experimental data and predict how the cycling of GTPases is controlled by the regulatory proteins in vivo. Our model explains distinct and separable roles that the activating GEFs and deactivating GAPs play in the GTPase cycling control. While the activity of GTPase is mainly defined by GEF, the turnover rate is a sole function of GAP. Maximization of the GTPase activity and turnover rate places conflicting requirements on the concentration of GAP. Therefore, to achieve a high activity and turnover rate at once, cells must carefully maintain concentrations of GEFs and GAPs within the optimal range. The values of these optimal concentrations indicate that efficient cycling can be achieved only within dense protein complexes typically assembled on the membrane surfaces. We show that the concentration requirement for GEF can be dramatically reduced by a GEF-activating GTPase effector that can also significantly boost the cycling efficiency. Interestingly, we find that the cycling regimes are only weakly dependent on the concentration of GTPase itself.

  7. Rapid parallel flow cytometry assays of active GTPases using effector beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranda, Tione; BasuRay, Soumik; Swanson, Scarlett; Agola, Jacob; Bondu, Virginie; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2013-11-15

    We describe a rapid assay for measuring the cellular activity of small guanine triphosphatases (GTPases) in response to a specific stimulus. Effector-functionalized beads are used to quantify in parallel multiple GTP-bound GTPases in the same cell lysate by flow cytometry. In a biologically relevant example, five different Ras family GTPases are shown for the first time to be involved in a concerted signaling cascade downstream of receptor ligation by Sin Nombre hantavirus.

  8. Continuous veno-venous hemofiltration for ARF in critically Ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadia F

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The mortality of critically ill patients who develop ARF in an ICU setting is extremely high (50-80%. Any mode of renal replacement therapy chosen should be able to achieve solute and water clearance while maintaining hemodynamic stability, have a positive effect on nutrition, and have low complication rates. AIM: To determine the efficacy and feasibility of Continuous Venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH in critically ill patients with ARF. Inclusion criteria: Patients with ARF requiring 2 or more inotropes to maintain systolic blood pressure >100 mm of Hg. Failed or technically impossible hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. Time Period: July 2002 - June 2003. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Polysulfone hemofilter 0.7m2, [Aquamax (Edwards or Multimat BL680 (Bellco.] Blood flow of 150-200 ml/minute (Travenol. Volumetrically controlled Ultrafiltration of > 2000 ml per hour (Watson Marlowe and replacement fluid infusion [(Infusomat-P post filter]. Anticoagulation: Heparin infusion or regional heparinisation. RESULTS: 22 patients included, 6 with recent abdominal surgery. 11 underwent hemodiafiltration and hemofiltration each. Severe sepsis was present in 21, and DIC in18. 5 patients were on immunosuppressive therapy. The time from ICU admission to the start of CVVH was 114 + 88.08 hours. The duration of CVVH was 35.93 + 20.91 hours, (range 11 to 84 hours. The mean hourly ultrafiltration of 93.72 + 65.57 ml and total ultrafiltration of 3955.55 + 4132 ml was tolerated by all patients without limiting hypotension. The APACHE II scores had significantly worsened between admission (22.5 + 6.71 to starting CVVH (36.05 + 4.08, [P<0.001]. The daily costs of CVVH were Rs. 5000 compared to Rs. 2150 for PD and Rs. 1500 for extended daily dialysis CONCLUSIONS: CVVH was effective in providing metabolic correction in ARF, in the setting of multi-organ failure. It is technically feasible even when conventional hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis cannot be performed.

  9. Illuga saga Gríðarfóstra in Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavender, Philip Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at the intellectual history behind and scholarly preparation towards the first edition of Illuga saga Gríðarfóstra in Sweden in 1695. One of the main questions which the article tries to answer is why an edition of a saga about Danish kings and heroes would end up being produced...... in the middle of the Sweden and Denmark's fiercely competitive nation-building furore....

  10. Establishing epithelial glandular polarity: interlinked roles for ARF6, Rac1, and the matrix microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleon, Christine L; Sedgwick, Alanna; Hartsell, Alyssa; Dai, Michael; Whittington, Catherine; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2012-12-01

    Epithelial cysts comprise the structural units of the glandular epithelium. Although glandular inversion in epithelial tumors is thought to be a potential mechanism for the establishment of metastatic disease, little is known about the morphogenic cues and signaling pathways that govern glandular polarity and organization. Using organotypic cultures of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells in reconstituted basement membrane, we show that cellular depletion of the small GTP-binding protein ARF6 promotes the formation of inverted cysts, wherein the apical cell membrane faces the cyst exterior, and the basal domain faces the central lumen, while individual cell polarity is maintained. These cysts are also defective in interactions with laminin at the cyst-matrix interface. This inversion of glandular orientation is accompanied by Rac1 inactivation during early cystogenesis, and temporal activation of Rac1 is sufficient to recover the normal cyst phenotype. In an unnatural collagen I microenvironment, ARF6-depleted, inverted epithelial cysts exhibit some loss of cell polarity, a marked increase in Rho activation and Rac1 inactivation, and striking rearrangement of the surrounding collagen I matrix. These studies demonstrate the importance of ARF6 as a critical determinant of glandular orientation and the matrix environment in dictating structural organization of epithelial cysts.

  11. Structural and functional insights into the mode of action of a universally conserved Obg GTPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boya Feng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Obg proteins are a family of P-loop GTPases, conserved from bacteria to human. The Obg protein in Escherichia coli (ObgE has been implicated in many diverse cellular functions, with proposed molecular roles in two global processes, ribosome assembly and stringent response. Here, using pre-steady state fast kinetics we demonstrate that ObgE is an anti-association factor, which prevents ribosomal subunit association and downstream steps in translation by binding to the 50S subunit. ObgE is a ribosome dependent GTPase; however, upon binding to guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp, the global regulator of stringent response, ObgE exhibits an enhanced interaction with the 50S subunit, resulting in increased equilibrium dissociation of the 70S ribosome into subunits. Furthermore, our cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM structure of the 50S·ObgE·GMPPNP complex indicates that the evolutionarily conserved N-terminal domain (NTD of ObgE is a tRNA structural mimic, with specific interactions with peptidyl-transferase center, displaying a marked resemblance to Class I release factors. These structural data might define ObgE as a specialized translation factor related to stress responses, and provide a framework towards future elucidation of functional interplay between ObgE and ribosome-associated (pppGpp regulators. Together with published data, our results suggest that ObgE might act as a checkpoint in final stages of the 50S subunit assembly under normal growth conditions. And more importantly, ObgE, as a (pppGpp effector, might also have a regulatory role in the production of the 50S subunit and its participation in translation under certain stressed conditions. Thus, our findings might have uncovered an under-recognized mechanism of translation control by environmental cues.

  12. The 'invisible hand': regulation of RHO GTPases by RHOGDIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Boulter, Etienne; Burridge, Keith

    2011-07-22

    The 'invisible hand' is a term originally coined by Adam Smith in The Theory of Moral Sentiments to describe the forces of self-interest, competition and supply and demand that regulate the resources in society. This metaphor continues to be used by economists to describe the self-regulating nature of a market economy. The same metaphor can be used to describe the RHO-specific guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (RHOGDI) family, which operates in the background, as an invisible hand, using similar forces to regulate the RHO GTPase cycle.

  13. Comparative genomic analysis of eutherian interferon-γ-inducible GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premzl, Marko

    2012-11-01

    The interferon-γ-inducible GTPases, IFGGs, are intracellular proteins involved in immune response against pathogens. A comprehensive comparative genomic review and analysis of eutherian IFGGs was carried out using public genomic sequences. The 64 eutherian IFGG genes were examined in detail and annotated. The eutherian IFGG promoter types were first catalogued followed by a phylogenetic analysis of eutherian IFGGs, which described five major IFGG clusters. The patterns of differential gene expansions and protein regions that may regulate IFGG catalytic features suggested a new classification of eutherian IFGGs. This mini-review has also provided new tests of reliability of public genomic sequences as well as tests of protein molecular evolution.

  14. Growth factors and acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, R; Ding, H

    1998-03-01

    During acute renal injury, there are alterations in the expression of several growth factors and their receptors in the kidney. The increased expression of several growth factors and/or their receptors at sites of nephron injury suggests important contributions to repair. Exogenous administration of some growth factors, such as IGF-I, EGF and HGF, accelerates recovery of renal function in experimental acute renal failure (ARF). In ARF growth factors act through several mechanisms, which may include altered cell cycle regulation and mitogenesis, differentiation of recovered cells, regulation of apoptosis, improved renal hemodynamics, and others. There is evidence for interactions of growth factors with other growth factors as well as with other genes resulting in complex orchestration of biologic events contributing to recovery from ARF.

  15. Acute Renal Failure Following Coronary Artery By-Pass Surgery: Perioperative Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Baltalarlı

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Morbidity and mortality rates due to acute renal failure (ARF developed in the postoperative period in patients undergoing coronary artery by-pass surgery (CABG, are increasing. After the determination of risk factors for the development of ARF in the perioperative period, treatment strategies to prevent the development of ARF can be implemented. Methods: Three hundred and nine patients who had undergone isolated CABG between May 2005 and December 2006 were included in the study. Patients’ data registered in the preoperative, intra-operative, and postoperative periods were collected in the electronic media. Factors possibly affecting the development of ARF in the postoperative period were determined by univariate analysis. Later, the independent risk factors affecting the development of ARF were determined by multivariate analysis.Results: Univariate analysis showed that there was a relation between old age, low ejection fraction (EF in the preoperative period, presence of COPD, high preoperative serum creatinine levels, long CPB duration, the requirement of intra-operative inotropic support, the amount of postoperative mediastinal drainage, peak creatinine levels, the amount of blood transfusions and postoperative ARF development.At the end of the evaluation of these factors with multivariate analysis; old age, high creatinine levels in the preoperative period, the requirement of inotropic support during the operation and increased amounts of postoperative mediastinal drainage were found to be independent risk factors for the development of ARF.Conclusions: ARF development is found to be higher in patients with old age, low EF, impaired preoperative renal functions. We suggest that implementing a close follow up with appropriate measures forthese patients can decrease the risk of ARF development postoperatively.

  16. Ras GTPases modulate morphogenesis, sporulation and cellulase gene expression in the cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwei Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The model cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei (teleomorph Hypocrea jecorina is capable of responding to environmental cues to compete for nutrients in its natural saprophytic habitat despite its genome encodes fewer degradative enzymes. Efficient signalling pathways in perception and interpretation of environmental signals are indispensable in this process. Ras GTPases represent a kind of critical signal proteins involved in signal transduction and regulation of gene expression. In T. reesei the genome contains two Ras subfamily small GTPases TrRas1 and TrRas2 homologous to Ras1 and Ras2 from S. cerevisiae, but their functions remain unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we have investigated the roles of GTPases TrRas1 and TrRas2 during fungal morphogenesis and cellulase gene expression. We show that both TrRas1 and TrRas2 play important roles in some cellular processes such as polarized apical growth, hyphal branch formation, sporulation and cAMP level adjustment, while TrRas1 is more dominant in these processes. Strikingly, we find that TrRas2 is involved in modulation of cellulase gene expression. Deletion of TrRas2 results in considerably decreased transcription of cellulolytic genes upon growth on cellulose. Although the strain carrying a constitutively activated TrRas2(G16V allele exhibits increased cellulase gene transcription, the cbh1 and cbh2 expression in this mutant still strictly depends on cellulose, indicating TrRas2 does not directly mediate the transmission of the cellulose signal. In addition, our data suggest that the effect of TrRas2 on cellulase gene is exerted through regulation of transcript abundance of cellulase transcription factors such as Xyr1, but the influence is independent of cAMP signalling pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these findings elucidate the functions for Ras signalling of T. reesei in cellular morphogenesis, especially in cellulase gene expression, which contribute

  17. Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Transformation by Rho GTPase Through a Novel Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    87: 635-44. 18. Burbelo P, Wellstein A, Pestell RG. Altered Rho GTPase signaling pathways in breast cancer cells. Breast Cancer Res Treat 2004; 84...Burbelo P, Wellstein A, Pestell RG. Altered Rho GTPase signaling pathways in breast cancer cells. Breast Cancer Res Treat 2004;84:43–8. 19. Band V

  18. Review: Ras GTPases and myosin: Qualitative conservation and quantitative diversification in signal and energy transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Matthias P; Goody, Roger S

    2016-08-01

    Most GTPases and many ATPases belong to the P-loop class of proteins with significant structural and mechanistic similarities. Here we compare and contrast the basic properties of the Ras family GTPases and myosin, and conclude that there are fundamental similarities but also distinct differences related to their specific roles. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 422-430, 2016.

  19. Identification of the GTPase superfamily in Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Luiz Borges

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasmas are the smallest known prokaryotes with self-replication ability. They are obligate parasites, taking up many molecules of their hosts and acting as pathogens in men, animals, birds and plants. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the infective agent of swine mycoplasmosis and Mycoplasma synoviae is responsible for subclinical upper respiratory infections that may result in airsacculitis and synovitis in chickens and turkeys. These highly infectious organisms present a worldwide distribution and are responsible for major economic problems. Proteins of the GTPase superfamily occur in all domains of life, regulating functions such as protein synthesis, cell cycle and differentiation. Despite their functional diversity, all GTPases are believed to have evolved from a single common ancestor. In this work we have identified mycoplasma GTPases by searching the complete genome databases of Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, J (non-pathogenic and 7448 (pathogenic strains. Fifteen ORFs encoding predicted GTPases were found in M. synoviae and in the two strains of M. hyopneumoniae. Searches for conserved G domains in GTPases were performed and the sequences were classified into families. The GTPase phylogenetic analysis showed that the subfamilies were well resolved into clades. The presence of GTPases in the three strains suggests the importance of GTPases in 'minimalist' genomes.

  20. Phosphorylation of mouse immunity-related GTPase (IRG resistance proteins is an evasion strategy for virulent Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Steinfeldt

    Full Text Available Virulence of complex pathogens in mammals is generally determined by multiple components of the pathogen interacting with the functional complexity and multiple layering of the mammalian immune system. It is most unusual for the resistance of a mammalian host to be overcome by the defeat of a single defence mechanism. In this study we uncover and analyse just such a case at the molecular level, involving the widespread intracellular protozoan pathogen Toxoplasma gondii and one of its most important natural hosts, the house mouse (Mus musculus. Natural polymorphism in virulence of Eurasian T. gondii strains for mice has been correlated in genetic screens with the expression of polymorphic rhoptry kinases (ROP kinases secreted into the host cell during infection. We show that the molecular targets of the virulent allelic form of ROP18 kinase are members of a family of cellular GTPases, the interferon-inducible IRG (immunity-related GTPase proteins, known from earlier work to be essential resistance factors in mice against avirulent strains of T. gondii. Virulent T. gondii strain ROP18 kinase phosphorylates several mouse IRG proteins. We show that the parasite kinase phosphorylates host Irga6 at two threonines in the nucleotide-binding domain, biochemically inactivating the GTPase and inhibiting its accumulation and action at the T. gondii parasitophorous vacuole membrane. Our analysis identifies the conformationally active switch I region of the GTP-binding site as an Achilles' heel of the IRG protein pathogen-resistance mechanism. The polymorphism of ROP18 in natural T. gondii populations indicates the existence of a dynamic, rapidly evolving ecological relationship between parasite virulence factors and host resistance factors. This system should be unusually fruitful for analysis at both ecological and molecular levels since both T. gondii and the mouse are widespread and abundant in the wild and are well-established model species with

  1. Controlling the switches: Rho GTPase regulation during animal cell mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yan; Oh, Wonkyung; Frost, Jeffrey A

    2014-12-01

    Animal cell division is a fundamental process that requires complex changes in cytoskeletal organization and function. Aberrant cell division often has disastrous consequences for the cell and can lead to cell senescence, neoplastic transformation or death. As important regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, Rho GTPases play major roles in regulating many aspects of mitosis and cytokinesis. These include centrosome duplication and separation, generation of cortical rigidity, microtubule-kinetochore stabilization, cleavage furrow formation, contractile ring formation and constriction, and abscission. The ability of Rho proteins to function as regulators of cell division depends on their ability to cycle between their active, GTP-bound and inactive, GDP-bound states. However, Rho proteins are inherently inefficient at fulfilling this cycle and require the actions of regulatory proteins that enhance GTP binding (RhoGEFs), stimulate GTPase activity (RhoGAPs), and sequester inactive Rho proteins in the cytosol (RhoGDIs). The roles of these regulatory proteins in controlling cell division are an area of active investigation. In this review we will delineate the current state of knowledge of how specific RhoGEFs, RhoGAPs and RhoGDIs control mitosis and cytokinesis, and highlight the mechanisms by which their functions are controlled.

  2. The Role of Rho GTPase Proteins in CNS Neuronal Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govek, Eve-Ellen; Hatten, Mary E.; Van Aelst, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The architectonics of the mammalian brain arise from a remarkable range of directed cell migrations, which orchestrate the emergence of cortical neuronal layers and pattern brain circuitry. At different stages of cortical histogenesis, specific modes of cell motility are essential to the stepwise formation of cortical architecture. These movements range from interkinetic nuclear movements at the ventricular zone (VZ), to migrations of early-born, postmitotic polymorphic cells into the preplate, to the radial migration of precursors of cortical output neurons across the thickening cortical wall, and the vast, tangential migrations of interneurons from the basal forebrain into the emerging cortical layers. In all cases, acto-myosin motors act in concert with cell adhesion receptor systems to provide the force and traction needed for forward movement. As key regulators of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, cell polarity, and adhesion, the Rho GTPases play a critical role in CNS neuronal migration. This review will focus on the different types of migration in the developing neocortex and cerebellar cortex, and the role of the Rho GTPases, their regulators and effectors in these CNS migrations, with particular emphasis on their involvement in radial migration. PMID:21557504

  3. GTP-specific fab fragment-based GTPase activity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopra, Kari; Rozwandowicz-Jansen, Anita; Syrjänpää, Markku; Blaževitš, Olga; Ligabue, Alessio; Veltel, Stefan; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Abankwa, Daniel; Härmä, Harri

    2015-03-17

    GTPases are central cellular signaling proteins, which cycle between a GDP-bound inactive and a GTP-bound active conformation in a controlled manner. Ras GTPases are frequently mutated in cancer and so far only few experimental inhibitors exist. The most common methods for monitoring GTP hydrolysis rely on luminescent GDP- or GTP-analogs. In this study, the first GTP-specific Fab fragment and its application are described. We selected Fab fragments using the phage display technology. Six Fab fragments were found against 2'/3'-GTP-biotin and 8-GTP-biotin. Selected antibody fragments allowed specific detection of endogenous, free GTP. The most potent Fab fragment (2A4(GTP)) showed over 100-fold GTP-specificity over GDP, ATP, or CTP and was used to develop a heterogeneous time-resolved luminescence based assay for the monitoring of GTP concentration. The method allows studying the GEF dependent H-Ras activation (GTP binding) and GAP-catalyzed H-Ras deactivation (GTP hydrolysis) at nanomolar protein concentrations.

  4. Rabifier2: an improved bioinformatic classifier of Rab GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surkont, Jaroslaw; Diekmann, Yoan; Pereira-Leal, José B

    2017-02-15

    The Rab family of small GTPases regulates and provides specificity to the endomembrane trafficking system; each Rab subfamily is associated with specific pathways. Thus, characterization of Rab repertoires provides functional information about organisms and evolution of the eukaryotic cell. Yet, the complex structure of the Rab family limits the application of existing methods for protein classification. Here, we present a major redesign of the Rabifier, a bioinformatic pipeline for detection and classification of Rab GTPases. It is more accurate, significantly faster than the original version and is now open source, both the code and the data, allowing for community participation. Rabifier and RabDB are freely available through the web at http://rabdb.org . The Rabifier package can be downloaded from the Python Package Index at https://pypi.python.org/pypi/rabifier , the source code is available at Github https://github.com/evocell/rabifier . jsurkont@igc.gulbenkian.pt or jleal@igc.gulbenkian.pt. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. Evolution and diversity of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuichet, Kristin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2014-12-04

    The Ras superfamily of small GTPases are single domain nucleotide-dependent molecular switches that act as highly tuned regulators of complex signal transduction pathways. Originally identified in eukaryotes for their roles in fundamental cellular processes including proliferation, motility, polarity, nuclear transport, and vesicle transport, recent studies have revealed that single domain GTPases also control complex functions such as cell polarity, motility, predation, development and antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Here, we used a computational genomics approach to understand the abundance, diversity, and evolution of small GTPases in prokaryotes. We collected 520 small GTPase sequences present in 17% of 1,611 prokaryotic genomes analyzed that cover diverse lineages. We identified two discrete families of small GTPases in prokaryotes that show evidence of three distinct catalytic mechanisms. The MglA family includes MglA homologs, which are typically associated with the MglB GTPase activating protein, whereas members of the Rup (Ras superfamily GTPase of unknown function in prokaryotes) family are not predicted to interact with MglB homologs. System classification and genome context analyses support the involvement of small GTPases in diverse prokaryotic signal transduction pathways including two component systems, laying the foundation for future experimental characterization of these proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic GTPases supports that the last universal common ancestor contained ancestral MglA and Rup family members. We propose that the MglA family was lost from the ancestral eukaryote and that the Ras superfamily members in extant eukaryotes are the result of vertical and horizontal gene transfer events of ancestral Rup GTPases. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. A competitive nucleotide binding inhibitor: in vitro characterization of Rab7 GTPase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agola, Jacob O; Hong, Lin; Surviladze, Zurab; Ursu, Oleg; Waller, Anna; Strouse, J Jacob; Simpson, Denise S; Schroeder, Chad E; Oprea, Tudor I; Golden, Jennifer E; Aubé, Jeffrey; Buranda, Tione; Sklar, Larry A; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2012-06-15

    Mapping the functionality of GTPases through small molecule inhibitors represents an underexplored area in large part due to the lack of suitable compounds. Here we report on the small chemical molecule 2-(benzoylcarbamothioylamino)-5,5-dimethyl-4,7-dihydrothieno[2,3-c]pyran-3-carboxylic acid (PubChem CID 1067700) as an inhibitor of nucleotide binding by Ras-related GTPases. The mechanism of action of this pan-GTPase inhibitor was characterized in the context of the Rab7 GTPase as there are no known inhibitors of Rab GTPases. Bead-based flow cytometry established that CID 1067700 has significant inhibitory potency on Rab7 nucleotide binding with nanomolar inhibitor (K(i)) values and an inhibitory response of ≥97% for BODIPY-GTP and BODIPY-GDP binding. Other tested GTPases exhibited significantly lower responses. The compound behaves as a competitive inhibitor of Rab7 nucleotide binding based on both equilibrium binding and dissociation assays. Molecular docking analyses are compatible with CID 1067700 fitting into the nucleotide binding pocket of the GTP-conformer of Rab7. On the GDP-conformer, the molecule has greater solvent exposure and significantly less protein interaction relative to GDP, offering a molecular rationale for the experimental results. Structural features pertinent to CID 1067700 inhibitory activity have been identified through initial structure-activity analyses and identified a molecular scaffold that may serve in the generation of more selective probes for Rab7 and other GTPases. Taken together, our study has identified the first competitive GTPase inhibitor and demonstrated the potential utility of the compound for dissecting the enzymology of the Rab7 GTPase, as well as serving as a model for other small molecular weight GTPase inhibitors.

  7. Rho GTPase RhoJ is Associated with Gastric Cancer Progression and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan; Yang, Hannah; Park, Intae; Chon, Hong Jae; Kim, Joo Hoon; Kwon, Woo Sun; Lee, Won Suk; Kim, Tae Soo; Rha, Sun Young

    2016-01-01

    Rho GTPases play a pivotal role in tumor progression by regulating tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rho GTPases in gastric cancer (GC) remains unexplored. This study aimed to investigate the clinical implications of RhoJ, which is an uncharted member of Rho family. RhoJ expression in human GC cell lines and surgical specimens from GC patients were analyzed. Moreover, in vitro gain-of-function analysis was performed to evaluate the malignant phenotypes of RhoJ-overexpressing GC cells. The extent of RhoJ expression varied among GC cell lines and GC patients. YCC-9 cell line displayed the strongest expression, while YCC-10, -11, and -16 showed scant expressions. Of the 70 GC patients, 34 (48.6%) had RhoJ expression in their GC tissue, and patients with high RhoJ expression had more diffuse type GC (73.5% vs. 41.7%), were at more advanced stages (stage III, IV: 85.3% vs. 58.4%), and had more frequent metastasis (47.1% vs. 11.1%), denoting that RhoJ has a potential role in GC progression and metastasis. High RhoJ expression significantly correlated with poor overall survival and recurrence-free survival after surgical resection of gastric cancer. Finally, In vitro gain-of-function experiments showed 41.3% enhanced motility and 60.4% enhanced invasiveness in RhoJ-overexpressing GC cells compared to control, with negligible difference in cell proliferation. Collectively, high RhoJ expression is an independent negative prognostic factor for the survival outcome of GC and correlated with the increased cell motility and invasiveness. PMID:27471571

  8. Yersinia outer protein YopE affects the actin cytoskeleton in Dictyostelium discoideum through targeting of multiple Rho family GTPases

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vlahou, Georgia

    2009-07-14

    Abstract Background All human pathogenic Yersinia species share a virulence-associated type III secretion system that translocates Yersinia effector proteins into host cells to counteract infection-induced signaling responses and prevent phagocytosis. Dictyostelium discoideum has been recently used to study the effects of bacterial virulence factors produced by internalized pathogens. In this study we explored the potential of Dictyostelium as model organism for analyzing the effects of ectopically expressed Yersinia outer proteins (Yops). Results The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis virulence factors YopE, YopH, YopM and YopJ were expressed de novo within Dictyostelium and their effects on growth in axenic medium and on bacterial lawns were analyzed. No severe effect was observed for YopH, YopJ and YopM, but expression of YopE, which is a GTPase activating protein for Rho GTPases, was found to be highly detrimental. GFP-tagged YopE expressing cells had less conspicuous cortical actin accumulation and decreased amounts of F-actin. The actin polymerization response upon cAMP stimulation was impaired, although chemotaxis was unaffected. YopE also caused reduced uptake of yeast particles. These alterations are probably due to impaired Rac1 activation. We also found that YopE predominantly associates with intracellular membranes including the Golgi apparatus and inhibits the function of moderately overexpressed RacH. Conclusion The phenotype elicited by YopE in Dictyostelium can be explained, at least in part, by inactivation of one or more Rho family GTPases. It further demonstrates that the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can be used as an efficient and easy-to-handle model organism in order to analyze the function of a translocated GAP protein of a human pathogen.

  9. Efficacy of the Nematophagous Fungus ARF18 in Alginate-clay Pellet Formulations Against Heterodera glycines

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, D. G.; Riggs, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    Dry alginate-clay pellets containing mycelium of ARF18 were added to sandy soil in greenhouse tests to determine the formulation's efficacy in the suppression of Heterodera glycines. Pellet formulation variables included quantity of mycelium per pellet (0.0-3.9%), pellet size (2.3 or 8.3 mg), pellet application rate per unit soil (0.4 or 1.0% based on dry soil weight), and pellet storage (0 or 90 days). All of these variables affected efficacy. Nematode suppression was greatest (95%) with 8.3...

  10. Whatever Happened to Illuga saga Gríðarfóstra?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavender, Philip Thomas

    Never heard of Illuga saga Gríðarfóstra? You’re not alone. Alongside the canon of world literary treasures there lies a shady world of forgotten and abandoned texts. The focus of my doctoral research has been the revindication of one such work, not simply because humanities research revels....... It is found in 37 manuscript witnesses, but also in a number of other literary and textual formats. The relationships between these various formats - a passage from Saxo Grammaticus’ Gesta Danorum, Faroese ballads, Swedish ‘Stormaktstiden’ academic interventions and post-medieval Icelandic rímur...

  11. Collateral damage-free debridement using 193nm ArF laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James J.; Felsenstein, Jerome M.; Trzcinski, Robert; Zupanski-Nielsen, Donna; Connors, Daniel P.

    2011-03-01

    Burn eschar and other necrotic areas of the skin and soft tissue are anhydrous compared to the underlying viable tissue. A 193 nm ArF excimer laser, emitting electromagnetic radiation at 6.4 eV at fluence exceeding the ablation threshold, will debride such necrotic areas. Because such radiation is strongly absorbed by aqueous chloride ions through the nonthermal process of electron photodetachment, debridement will cease when hydrated (with chloride ions) viable tissue is exposed, avoiding collateral damage to this tissue. Such tissue will be sterile and ready for further treatment, such as a wound dressing and/or a skin graft.

  12. Radiative processes in air excited by an ArF laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.; Huo, Winifred M.

    1988-01-01

    The emission spectrum of air that is excited by an ArF laser has been investigated experimentally and theoretically to determine the conditions under which fluorescence from O2 can be used for the measurement of temperature in aerodynamic flows. In addition to the expected fluorescence from O2, the spectrum from excitation with an intense laser beam is shown to contain significant contributions from the near-resonant Raman fundamental and overtone bands, the four-photon fluorescence excitation of C produced from ambient CO2, and possibly the three-photon excitation of O(2+). The nature of the radiative interactions contributing to these additional features is described.

  13. Evidence for Lateral gene Transfer (LGT in the evolution of eubacteria-derived small GTPases in plant organelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nengah Suwastika

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The genomes of free-living bacteria frequently exchange genes via lateral gene transfer (LGT, which has played a major role in bacterial evolution. LGT also played a significant role in the acquisition of genes from non-cyanobacterial bacteria to the lineage of ‘primary’ algae and land plants. Small GTPases are widely distributed among prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In this study, we inferred the evolutionary history of organelle-targeted small GTPases in plants. Arabidopsis thaliana contains at least one ortholog in seven subfamilies of OBG-HflX-like and TrmE-Era-EngA-YihA-Septin-like GTPase superfamilies (together referred to as Era-like GTPases. Subcellular localization analysis of all Era-like GTPases in Arabidopsis revealed that all thirteen eubacteria-related GTPases are localized to chloroplasts and/or mitochondria, whereas archaea-related DRG and NOG1 are localized to the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively, suggesting that chloroplast- and mitochondrion-localized GTPases are derived from the ancestral cyanobacterium and α-proteobacterium, respectively, through endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT. However, phylogenetic analyses revealed that plant organelle GTPase evolution is rather complex. Among the eubacterium-related GTPases, only four localized to chloroplasts (including one dual targeting GTPase and two localized to mitochondria were derived from cyanobacteria and α-proteobacteria, respectively. Three other chloroplast-targeted GTPases were related to α-proteobacterial proteins, rather than to cyanobacterial GTPases. Furthermore, we found that four other GTPases showed neither cyanobacterial nor α-proteobacterial affiliation. Instead, these GTPases were closely related to clades from other eubacteria, such as Bacteroides (Era1, EngB-1, and EngB-2 and green non-sulfur bacteria (HflX. This study thus provides novel evidence that LGT significantly contributed to the evolution of organelle-targeted Era-like GTPases in plants.

  14. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) enhances recovery from HgCl2-induced acute renal failure: the effects on renal IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor, and IGF-binding protein-1 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlaender, M; Popovtzer, M M; Weiss, O; Nefesh, I; Kopolovic, J; Raz, I

    1995-04-01

    Several growth factors have been found to play an important role in the recovery from acute renal failure (ARF). The effect of the continuous subcutaneous infusion of human recombinant insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 (125 micrograms daily by osmotic minipumps) in a rat model of mercuric chloride (HgCl2)-induced ARF was examined. HgCl2 (4 mg/kg) induced ARF with a mortality that was unaffected by IGF-1. However, IGF-1 significantly enhanced functional and histologic recovery in the survivors, as measured by serum creatinine and creatinine clearance and by histologic scoring. Solution hybridization RNAase protection assays showed that renal IGF-1 mRNA, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) mRNA, and IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) mRNA were unaffected by exogenous IGF-1, but this treatment significantly increased renal IGF-1 in ARF rats compared with normal rats and ARF rats not receiving IGF-1. After ARF renal mRNA for IGF-1 was decreased, IGF-1R was unchanged and IGFBP-1 was increased. Similar changes occurred in IGF-1-infused ARF rats. Thus, (1) IGF-1 enhances recovery from nephrotoxic ARF both functionally and histologically; (2) in nephrotoxic ARF, there is (a) a reduction in IGF-1 mRNA expression that is not prevented by IGF-1 infusion, and (b) an increase in renal IGFBP-1 mRNA. This may allow a significant increase in renal IGF-1 levels in IGF-1-infused ARF rats, despite the decrease in renal IGF-1 mRNA. A local increase in renal IGFBP-1 and IGF-1 may explain the accelerated recovery from ATN in this model. It was concluded that HgCl2-induced ARF is amenable to improvement by IGF-1 infusion and that the increase in renal IGFBP-1 mRNA may be an important modulator in the recovery of the kidney.

  15. The role of NPM, p14arf and MDM2 in precursors of bronchial squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascaux, C; Bex, F; Martin, B; Burny, A; Haller, A; Paesmans, M; Willard-Gallo, K; Ninane, V; Sculier, J-P

    2008-09-01

    Murine double minute clone 2 (MDM2), p14 alternate reading frame (p14arf), and nucleophosmin (NPM) regulate p53 activity. A total of 200 biopsies, including normal bronchial, pre-invasive and invasive tissues, were examined for changes in NPM, p14arf, MDM2 and p53 expression patterns by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence with confocal microscopy. NPM and p14arf displayed a diffuse nuclear staining in most normal bronchial tissue. The fraction of biopsies displaying an increased MDM2 staining or a nucleolar relocalisation of NPM increased at mild and moderate dysplasia, respectively. Two different modifications occurred in p14arf expression, i.e. its loss or its nucleolar relocalisation, both increasing at severe dysplasia and both being associated with high MDM2 expression. In addition, the nucleolar relocalisation of p14arf was associated with that of NPM. Immunofluorescence staining indicated that NPM and p14arf either co-localised in the nucleoplasm or in the nucleoli, before and as a result of severe dysplasia, respectively. MDM2 was not detected in the nucleoli. Thus, changes occur in murine double minute clone 2, p14 alternate reading frame and nucleophosmin level of expression and/or cellular distribution during early steps of lung carcinogenesis. Their relative localisation as determined by immunofluorescence, supports the hypothesis that p14 alternate reading frame nucleolar relocalisation impairs p14 alternate reading frame-murine double minute clone 2 complex formation and that nucleophosmin might sequester p14 alternate reading frame. The demonstration of this hypothesis requires further functional studies.

  16. Functional mapping of human dynamin-1-like GTPase domain based on x-ray structure analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Wenger

    Full Text Available Human dynamin-1-like protein (DNM1L is a GTP-driven molecular machine that segregates mitochondria and peroxisomes. To obtain insights into its catalytic mechanism, we determined crystal structures of a construct comprising the GTPase domain and the bundle signaling element (BSE in the nucleotide-free and GTP-analogue-bound states. The GTPase domain of DNM1L is structurally related to that of dynamin and binds the nucleotide 5'-Guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (GMP-PNP via five highly conserved motifs, whereas the BSE folds into a pocket at the opposite side. Based on these structures, the GTPase center was systematically mapped by alanine mutagenesis and kinetic measurements. Thus, residues essential for the GTPase reaction were characterized, among them Lys38, Ser39 and Ser40 in the phosphate binding loop, Thr59 from switch I, Asp146 and Gly149 from switch II, Lys216 and Asp218 in the G4 element, as well as Asn246 in the G5 element. Also, mutated Glu81 and Glu82 in the unique 16-residue insertion of DNM1L influence the activity significantly. Mutations of Gln34, Ser35, and Asp190 in the predicted assembly interface interfered with dimerization of the GTPase domain induced by a transition state analogue and led to a loss of the lipid-stimulated GTPase activity. Our data point to related catalytic mechanisms of DNM1L and dynamin involving dimerization of their GTPase domains.

  17. Bypass of senescence by the polycomb group protein CBX8 through direct binding to the INK4A-ARF locus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Nikolaj; Bracken, Adrian P; Trinh, Emmanuelle

    2007-01-01

    , we demonstrate that the chromodomain-containing protein, CBX8, which is part of one of the PRC1 complexes, regulates proliferation of diploid human and mouse fibroblasts through direct binding to the INK4A-ARF locus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CBX8 is limiting for the regulation of INK4A......-ARF, and that ectopic expression of CBX8 leads to repression of the Ink4a-Arf locus and bypass of senescence, leading to cellular immortalization. Gene expression and location analysis demonstrate that besides the INK4A-ARF locus, CBX8 also regulates a number of other genes important for cell growth and survival....... On the basis of these results, we conclude that CBX8 is an essential component of one of the PRC1 complexes, which directly regulate the expression of numerous target genes, including the INK4A-ARF locus, involved in cell-fate decisions....

  18. Transfer of p14ARF gene in drug-resistant human breast cancer MCF-7/Adr cells inhibits proliferation and reduces doxorubicin resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the effect of p14ARF gene on multidrug-resistant tumor cells. Methods: We transferred a p14ARF cDNA into p53-mutated MCF-7/Adr human breast cancer cells. Results: In this report we demonstrated for the first time that p14ARF expression was able to greatly inhibit the MCF-7/Adr cell proliferation. Furthermore, p14ARF expression resulted in decreases in MDR1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein production, which linked with the reducing resistance of MCF-7/Adr cells to doxorubicin. Conclusion: These results imply that drug resistance might be effectively reversed with the wild-type p14ARF expression in human breast cancer cells.

  19. Role of Ran GTPase in cell cycle regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Qing; LU Zhigang; ZHANG Chuanmao

    2004-01-01

    Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase superfamily,is a multifunctional protein and abundant in the nucleus.Many evidences suggest that Ran and its interacting proteins are involved in multiple aspects of the cell cycle regulation.So far it has been conformed that Ran and its interacting proteins control the nucleocytoplasmic transport, the nuclear envelope (NE) assembly, the DNA replication and the spindle assembly, although many details of the mechanisms are waiting for elucidation. It has also been implicated that Ran and its interacting proteins are involved in regulating the integrity of the nuclear structure, the mRNA transcription and splicing, and the RNA transport from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In this review we mainly discuss the mechanisms by which Ran and its interacting proteins regulate NE assembly, DNA replication and spindle assembly.

  20. Leonardo da Vinci’s anatomical drawings and Juan de Arfe y Villafañe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röhrl, Boris

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The four volumes of the Varia commensuración para la escultura y architectura (1585–87 of the Spanish silversmith and sculptor Juan de Arfe y Villafañe represent an extensive compilation of Italian art techniques of the Renaissance. The sources for the Libro segundo, which includes systematic explanations on the theory of proportions, the skeleton and musculature have yet to be discovered. Its didactic and illustrative structure is unique in the context of sixteenth-century literature. The general layout and some details of the illustrations of the first three chapters seem to be derived from the Windsor convolute of anatomical drawings by Leonardo da Vinci.Los cuatros libros de Varia commensuración para la escultura y architectura (1585-1587 del platero y escultor Juan de Arfe y Villafañe representan un extenso compendio de las teorías y técnicas del Renacimiento italiano. Las fuentes del Libro segundo, que contiene explicaciones sistemáticas sobre la proporción de la figura humana, el esqueleto y la musculatura, aún no han sido descubiertas. La estructura didáctica y las ilustraciones son únicas en el contexto de la literatura del siglo XVI. El formato general y algunos detalles de las ilustraciones de los primeros tres capítulos parecen tener su origen en los dibujos anatómicos de Leonardo da Vinci conservados en el castillo de Windsor.

  1. Efficacy of the Nematophagous Fungus ARF18 in Alginate-clay Pellet Formulations Against Heterodera glycines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D G; Riggs, R D

    1995-12-01

    Dry alginate-clay pellets containing mycelium of ARF18 were added to sandy soil in greenhouse tests to determine the formulation's efficacy in the suppression of Heterodera glycines. Pellet formulation variables included quantity of mycelium per pellet (0.0-3.9%), pellet size (2.3 or 8.3 mg), pellet application rate per unit soil (0.4 or 1.0% based on dry soil weight), and pellet storage (0 or 90 days). All of these variables affected efficacy. Nematode suppression was greatest (95%) with 8.3 mg pellets containing 3.9% mycelium that were not stored and applied at the rate of 1.0% of dry soil weight. Storage for 90 days reduced the efficacy of the pellets. The soybean cultivars tested were not equally good hosts of H. glycines, but reproduction of the nematode was reduced equally on all. The average suppression was 96% (range 86-99%). Similar suppression of reproduction occurred in tests with six races of H. glycines. ARF18 appeared to be nonspecific with regard to soybean cultivar and H. glycines race.

  2. RhoGDI: multiple functions in the regulation of Rho family GTPase activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dovas, Athanassios; Couchman, John R

    2005-01-01

    insight as to how RhoGDI exerts its effects on nucleotide binding, the membrane association-dissociation cycling of the GTPase and how these activities are controlled. Despite the initial negative roles attributed to RhoGDI, recent evidence has come to suggest that it may also act as a positive regulator...... and the importance of the particular membrane microenvironment that represents the site of action for GTPases. All these results point to a wider role for RhoGDI than initially perceived, making it a binding partner that can tightly control Rho GTPases, but which also allows them to reach their full spectrum...

  3. The immunity-related GTPases in mammals: a fast-evolving cell-autonomous resistance system against intracellular pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunn, Julia P; Feng, Carl G; Sher, Alan; Howard, Jonathan C

    2011-02-01

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) belong to the family of large, interferon-inducible GTPases and constitute a cell-autonomous resistance system essential for the control of vacuolar pathogens like Toxoplasma gondii in mice. Recent results demonstrated that numerous IRG members accumulate collaboratively at the parasitophorous vacuole of invading T. gondii leading to the destruction of the vacuole and the parasite and subsequent necrotic host cell death. Complex regulatory interactions between different IRG proteins are necessary for these processes. Disturbance of this finely balanced system, e.g., by single genetic deficiency for the important negative regulator Irgm1 or the autophagic regulator Atg5, leads to spontaneous activation of the effector IRG proteins when induced by IFNγ. This activation has cytotoxic consequences resulting in a severe lymphopenia, macrophage defects, and failure of the adaptive immune system in Irgm1-deficient mice. However, alternative functions in phagosome maturation and induction of autophagy have been proposed for Irgm1. The IRG system has been studied primarily in mice, but IRG genes are present throughout the mammalian lineage. Interestingly, the number, type, and diversity of genes present differ greatly even between closely related species, probably reflecting intimate host-pathogen coevolution driven by an armed race between the IRG resistance proteins and pathogen virulence factors. IRG proteins are targets for polymorphic T. gondii virulence factors, and genetic variation in the IRG system between different mouse strains correlates with resistance and susceptibility to virulent T. gondii strains.

  4. Solanum lycopersicum AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 9 regulates cell division activity during early tomato fruit development

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Maaike; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Schimmel, Bernardus C. J.; Stultiens, Catharina L. M.; de Groot, Peter F. M.; Powers, Stephen J.; Tikunov, Yury M.; Bovy, Arnoud G.; Mariani, Celestina; Vriezen, Wim H.; Rieu, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    The transformation of the ovary into a fruit after successful completion of pollination and fertilization has been associated with many changes at transcriptomic level. These changes are part of a dynamic and complex regulatory network that is controlled by phytohormones, with a major role for auxin. One of the auxin-related genes differentially expressed upon fruit set and early fruit development in tomato is Solanum lycopersicum AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 9 (SlARF9). Here, the functional analysis of this ARF is described. SlARF9 expression was found to be auxin-responsive and SlARF9 mRNA levels were high in the ovules, placenta, and pericarp of pollinated ovaries, but also in other plant tissues with high cell division activity, such as the axillary meristems and root meristems. Transgenic plants with increased SlARF9 mRNA levels formed fruits that were smaller than wild-type fruits because of reduced cell division activity, whereas transgenic lines in which SlARF9 mRNA levels were reduced showed the opposite phenotype. The expression analysis, together with the phenotype of the transgenic lines, suggests that, in tomato, ARF9 negatively controls cell division during early fruit development. PMID:25883382

  5. Solanum lycopersicum AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 9 regulates cell division activity during early tomato fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Maaike; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Schimmel, Bernardus C J; Stultiens, Catharina L M; de Groot, Peter F M; Powers, Stephen J; Tikunov, Yury M; Bovy, Arnoud G; Mariani, Celestina; Vriezen, Wim H; Rieu, Ivo

    2015-06-01

    The transformation of the ovary into a fruit after successful completion of pollination and fertilization has been associated with many changes at transcriptomic level. These changes are part of a dynamic and complex regulatory network that is controlled by phytohormones, with a major role for auxin. One of the auxin-related genes differentially expressed upon fruit set and early fruit development in tomato is Solanum lycopersicum AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 9 (SlARF9). Here, the functional analysis of this ARF is described. SlARF9 expression was found to be auxin-responsive and SlARF9 mRNA levels were high in the ovules, placenta, and pericarp of pollinated ovaries, but also in other plant tissues with high cell division activity, such as the axillary meristems and root meristems. Transgenic plants with increased SlARF9 mRNA levels formed fruits that were smaller than wild-type fruits because of reduced cell division activity, whereas transgenic lines in which SlARF9 mRNA levels were reduced showed the opposite phenotype. The expression analysis, together with the phenotype of the transgenic lines, suggests that, in tomato, ARF9 negatively controls cell division during early fruit development. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  6. Dysregulation of Rho GTPases in the alphaPix/Arhgef6 mouse model of X-linked intellectual disability is paralleled by impaired structural and synaptic plasticity and cognitive deficits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramakers, G.J.A.; Wolfer, D.; Rosenberger, G.; Kuchenbecker, K.; Kreienkamp, H. J.; Prange-Kiel, J.; Rune, G.; Richter, K.; Langnaese, K.; Masneuf, S.; Bösl, M.R.; Fischer, K.D.; Krugers, H.J.; Lipp, H. P.; van Galen, E.; Kutsche, K.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the ARHGEF6 gene, encoding the guanine nucleotide exchange factor αPIX/Cool-2 for the Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42, cause X-linked intellectual disability (ID) in humans. We show here that αPix/Arhgef6 is primarily expressed in neuropil regions of the hippocampus. To study the role of αPi

  7. Effect of Regulating Pokemon-p14ARF-p53 Pathway on Proliferation and Apoptosis of Human Colon Cancer Cells%调控Pokemon-p14ARF-p53通路对人结肠癌细胞增殖和凋亡的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱迎春; 徐凌; 王锋; 郭传勇; 柏乃运; 陈岳祥

    2013-01-01

    背景:研究发现转录抑制因子Pokemon是一种关键性致癌因子,在多种人类恶性肿瘤中表达异常上调,在体内、外实验中均能促进细胞的肿瘤性转化.Pokemon对抑癌基因ARF具有特异性转录抑制作用.目的:应用RNA干扰技术抑制人结肠癌细胞株HT-29的Pokemon表达,观察其表达抑制对肿瘤细胞增殖和凋亡的影响并探讨其可能的分子机制.方法:根据Pokemon cDNA序列设计干扰序列,构建重组干扰质粒,经脂质体介导转染入HT-29细胞.以real time RT-PCR和蛋白质印迹法检测Pokemon、p14ARF、p53表达,流式细胞术检测细胞周期和细胞凋亡.结果:Pokemon siRNA能有效抑制HT-29细胞中的Pokemon mRNA和蛋白表达,mRNA相对表达量为0.29 ±0.04,同时p14ARF、p53 mRNA和蛋白表达明显上调,mRNA相对表达量分别为3.03 ±0.49和2.80±0.25.与转染无效序列siRNA的HT-29细胞相比,Pokemon表达抑制的HT-29细胞G0/G1期细胞比例增加(43.6%±2.3%对34.7%±1.9%,P <0.05),细胞凋亡增多(10.7%±1.9%对2.7%±0.4%,P<0.05).结论:人结肠癌细胞中的Pokemon表达与p14ARF、p53表达之间存在负相关关系,抑制Pokemon可通过上调p14ARF-p53信号通路阻滞肿瘤细胞的细胞周期进程,并诱导细胞凋亡.调控Pokemon-p14ARF-p53信号通路有望作为结肠癌的治疗靶点.%Transcriptional repressor Pokemon was identified as a critical factor in oncogenesis. It is aberrantly overexpressed in many human cancers, and leads to overt oncogenic transformation in both in vitro and in vivo models. Pokemon can specifically repress the transcription of tumor suppressor gene ARF. Aims: To investigate the effect of inhibiting Pokemon by RNA interfering technique on proliferation and apoptosis of human colon cancer cell line HT-29 and its possible molecular mechanism. Methods: Interference sequence was designed according to the cDNA sequence of Pokemon for constructing the recombinant interference plasmid. HT

  8. Role of Rab GTPases and their interacting proteins in mediating metabolic signalling and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Christelle En Lin; Tang, Bor Luen

    2015-06-01

    The vesicular transport pathways, which shuttle materials to and from the cell surface and within the cell, and the metabolic (growth factor and nutrient) signalling pathways, which integrate a variety of extracellular and intracellular signals to mediate growth, proliferation or survival, are both important for cellular physiology. There is evidence to suggest that the transport and metabolic signalling pathways intersect-vesicular transport can affect the regulation of metabolic signals and vice versa. The Rab family GTPases regulate the specificity of vesicular transport steps in the cell. Together with their interacting proteins, Rabs would likely constitute the points of intersection between vesicular transport and metabolic signalling pathways. Examples of these points would include growth factor signalling, glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as autophagy. Many of these processes involve mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) in downstream cascades, or are regulated by TORC signalling. A general functionality of the vesicular transport processes controlled by the Rabs is also important for spatial and temporal regulation of the transmission of metabolic signals between the cell surface and the nucleus. In other cases, specific Rabs and their interacting proteins are known to function in recruiting metabolism-related proteins to target membranes, or may compete with other factors in the TORC signalling pathway as a means of metabolic regulation. We review and discuss herein examples of how Rabs and their interacting proteins can mediate metabolic signalling and regulation in cells.

  9. Ink4a/Arf(-/-) and HRAS(G12V) transform mouse mammary cells into triple-negative breast cancer containing tumorigenic CD49f(-) quiescent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, K; Iwamoto, T; Kobayashi, T; Arima, Y; Takamoto, Y; Ohnishi, N; Bartholomeusz, C; Horii, R; Akiyama, F; Hortobagyi, G N; Pusztai, L; Saya, H; Ueno, N T

    2014-01-23

    Intratumoral heterogeneity within individual breast tumors is a well-known phenomenon that may contribute to drug resistance. This heterogeneity is dependent on several factors, such as types of oncogenic drivers and tumor precursor cells. The purpose of our study was to engineer a mouse mammary tumor model with intratumoral heterogeneity by using defined genetic perturbations. To achieve this, we used mice with knockout (-/-) of Ink4a/Arf, a tumor suppressor locus; these mice are known to be susceptible to non-mammary tumors such as fibrosarcoma. To induce mammary tumors, we retrovirally introduced an oncogene, HRAS(G12V), into Ink4a/Arf(-/-) mammary cells in vitro, and those cells were inoculated into syngeneic mice mammary fat pads. We observed 100% tumorigenesis. The tumors formed were negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2. Further, they had pathological features similar to those of human triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (for example, pushing borders, central necrosis). The tumors were found to be heterogeneous and included two subpopulations: CD49f(-) quiescent cells and CD49f(+)cells. Contrary to our expectation, CD49f(-) quiescent cells had high tumor-initiating potential and CD49f(+)cells had relatively low tumor-initiating potential. Gene expression analysis revealed that CD49f(-) quiescent cells overexpressed epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-driving genes, reminiscent of tumor-initiating cells and claudin-low breast cancer. Our animal model with intratumoral heterogeneity, derived from defined genetic perturbations, allows us to test novel molecular targeted drugs in a setting that mimics the intratumoral heterogeneity of human TNBC.

  10. EFL GTPase in cryptomonads and the distribution of EFL and EF-1alpha in chromalveolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gile, Gillian H; Patron, Nicola J; Keeling, Patrick J

    2006-10-01

    EFL (EF-like protein) is a member of the GTPase superfamily that includes several translation factors. Because it has only been found in a few eukaryotic lineages and its presence correlates with the absence of the related core translation factor EF-1alpha, its distribution is hypothesized to be the result of lateral gene transfer and replacement of EF-1alpha. In one supergroup of eukaryotes, the chromalveolates, two major lineages were found to contain EFL (dinoflagellates and haptophytes), while the others encode EF-1alpha (apicomplexans, ciliates, heterokonts and cryptomonads). For each of these groups, this distribution was deduced from whole genome sequence or expressed sequence tag (EST) data from several species, with the exception of cryptomonads from which only a single EF-1alpha PCR product from one species was known. By sequencing ESTs from two cryptomonads, Guillardia theta and Rhodomonas salina, and searching for all GTPase translation factors, we revealed that EFL is present in both species, but, contrary to expectations, we found EF-1alpha in neither. On balance, we suggest the previously reported EF-1alpha from Rhodomonas salina is likely an artefact of contamination. We also identified EFL in EST data from two members of the dinoflagellate lineage, Karlodinium micrum and Oxyrrhis marina, and from an ongoing genomic sequence project from a third, Perkinsus marinus. Karlodinium micrum is a symbiotic pairing of two lineages that would have both had EFL (a dinoflagellate and a haptophyte), but only the dinoflagellate gene remains. Oxyrrhis marina and Perkinsus marinus are early diverging sister-groups to dinoflagellates, and together show that EFL originated early in this lineage. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that these genes are all EFL homologues, and showed that cryptomonad genes are not detectably related to EFL from other chromalveolates, which collectively form several distinct groups. The known distribution of EFL now includes a third group

  11. SWI/SNF mediates polycomb eviction and epigenetic reprogramming of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.K. Kia; M.M. Gorski (Marcin); S. Giannakopoulos (Stavros); C.P. Verrijzer (Peter)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractStable silencing of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a tumor suppressor locus occurs in a variety of human cancers, including malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRTs). MRTs are extremely aggressive cancers caused by the loss of the hSNF5 subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. We found previously

  12. To finish things well: cysteine methylation ensures selective GTPase membrane localization and signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansado, José

    2017-09-19

    Isoprenylcysteine-O-Carboxyl Methyltransferase (ICMT) catalyzes the final step in the prenylation process of different proteins including members of the Ras superfamily of GTPases. While cysteine methylation is essential in mammalian cells for growth, membrane association, and signalling by Ras and Rho GTPases, its role during signal transduction events in simple eukaryotes like yeasts appears irrelevant. By using a multidisciplinary approach our group has recently shown that, contrary to this initial assumption, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe ICMT activity encoded by the Mam4 gene is not only important to promote selective plasma membrane targeting of Ras and specific Rho GTPases, but also to allow precise downstream signalling to the mitogen-activated protein kinase and target of rapamycin pathways in response to diverse environmental cues. Thus, the dynamic regulation of in vivo methylation as a modulator of GTPase localization and function is an evolutionary conserved mechanism, making fission yeast an appealing model organism to study the regulation of this process.

  13. Role of Rab family GTPases and their effectors in melanosomal logistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2012-04-01

    Rab GTPases constitute a family of small GTPases that regulate a variety of membrane trafficking events in all eukaryotic cells by recruiting their specific effector molecules. Recent accumulating evidence indicates that members of the mammalian Rab small GTPase family are involved in certain physiological and pathological processes. In particular, functional impairments of specific Rab proteins, e.g. Rab38 and Rab27A, their regulators or their effectors cause pigmentation disorders in humans and coat colour variations in mice because such impairments cause defects in melanosomal logistics, i.e. defects in melanosome biogenesis and transport. Genetic and biochemical analyses of the gene products responsible for mammalian pigmentation disorders in the past decade have revealed that Rab-mediated endosomal transport systems and melanosome transport systems play crucial roles in the efficient darkening of mammalian hair and skin. In this article, we review current knowledge regarding melanosomal logistics, with particular focus on the roles of Rab small GTPases and their effectors.

  14. LRRK2 GTPase Dysfunction in the Pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yulan; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are the most frequent genetic cause of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and these mutations play important roles in sporadic PD. The LRRK2 protein contains GTPase and kinase domains and several protein-protein interaction domains. The kinase and GTPase activity of LRRK2 seem to be important in regulating LRRK2-dependent cellular signaling pathways. LRRK2’s GTPase and kinase domains may reciprocally regulate each other to direct LRRK2’s ultimate function. While most LRRK2 investigations are centered on LRRK2’s kinase activity, this review focuses on the function of LRRK2’s GTPase in LRRK2 physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:22988868

  15. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2 Intersects Hormonal Signals in the Regulation of Tomato Fruit Ripening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario A Breitel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of ethylene in fruit ripening is well documented, though knowledge regarding the crosstalk between ethylene and other hormones in ripening is lacking. We discovered that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2A (ARF2A, a recognized auxin signaling component, functions in the control of ripening. ARF2A expression is ripening regulated and reduced in the rin, nor and nr ripening mutants. It is also responsive to exogenous application of ethylene, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA. Over-expressing ARF2A in tomato resulted in blotchy ripening in which certain fruit regions turn red and possess accelerated ripening. ARF2A over-expressing fruit displayed early ethylene emission and ethylene signaling inhibition delayed their ripening phenotype, suggesting ethylene dependency. Both green and red fruit regions showed the induction of ethylene signaling components and master regulators of ripening. Comprehensive hormone profiling revealed that altered ARF2A expression in fruit significantly modified abscisates, cytokinins and salicylic acid while gibberellic acid and auxin metabolites were unaffected. Silencing of ARF2A further validated these observations as reducing ARF2A expression let to retarded fruit ripening, parthenocarpy and a disturbed hormonal profile. Finally, we show that ARF2A both homodimerizes and interacts with the ABA STRESS RIPENING (ASR1 protein, suggesting that ASR1 might be linking ABA and ethylene-dependent ripening. These results revealed that ARF2A interconnects signals of ethylene and additional hormones to co-ordinate the capacity of fruit tissue to initiate the complex ripening process.

  16. The interaction properties of the human Rab GTPase family--comparative analysis reveals determinants of molecular binding selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Stein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rab GTPases constitute the largest subfamily of the Ras protein superfamily. Rab proteins regulate organelle biogenesis and transport, and display distinct binding preferences for effector and activator proteins, many of which have not been elucidated yet. The underlying molecular recognition motifs, binding partner preferences and selectivities are not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Comparative analysis of the amino acid sequences and the three-dimensional electrostatic and hydrophobic molecular interaction fields of 62 human Rab proteins revealed a wide range of binding properties with large differences between some Rab proteins. This analysis assists the functional annotation of Rab proteins 12, 14, 26, 37 and 41 and provided an explanation for the shared function of Rab3 and 27. Rab7a and 7b have very different electrostatic potentials, indicating that they may bind to different effector proteins and thus, exert different functions. The subfamily V Rab GTPases which are associated with endosome differ subtly in the interaction properties of their switch regions, and this may explain exchange factor specificity and exchange kinetics. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have analysed conservation of sequence and of molecular interaction fields to cluster and annotate the human Rab proteins. The analysis of three dimensional molecular interaction fields provides detailed insight that is not available from a sequence-based approach alone. Based on our results, we predict novel functions for some Rab proteins and provide insights into their divergent functions and the determinants of their binding partner selectivity.

  17. Potential involvement of drought-induced Ran GTPase CLRan1 in root growth enhancement in a xerophyte wild watermelon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Kinya; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Kajikawa, Masataka; Hanada, Kouhei; Kosaka, Rina; Kato, Atsushi; Katoh, Akira; Nanasato, Yoshihiko; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Yokota, Akiho

    2016-10-01

    Enhanced root growth is known as the survival strategy of plants under drought. Previous proteome analysis in drought-resistant wild watermelon has shown that Ran GTPase, an essential regulator of cell division and proliferation, was induced in the roots under drought. In this study, two cDNAs were isolated from wild watermelon, CLRan1 and CLRan2, which showed a high degree of structural similarity with those of other plant Ran GTPases. Quantitative RT-PCR and promoter-GUS assays suggested that CLRan1 was expressed mainly in the root apex and lateral root primordia, whereas CLRan2 was more broadly expressed in other part of the roots. Immunoblotting analysis confirmed that the abundance of CLRan proteins was elevated in the root apex region under drought stress. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing CLRan1 showed enhanced primary root growth, and the growth was maintained under osmotic stress, indicating that CLRan1 functions as a positive factor for maintaining root growth under stress conditions.

  18. Disassembly of the Staphylococcus aureus hibernating 100S ribosome by an evolutionarily conserved GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Arnab; Yap, Mee-Ngan F

    2017-09-11

    The bacterial hibernating 100S ribosome is a poorly understood form of the dimeric 70S particle that has been linked to pathogenesis, translational repression, starvation responses, and ribosome turnover. In the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and most other bacteria, hibernation-promoting factor (HPF) homodimerizes the 70S ribosomes to form a translationally silent 100S complex. Conversely, the 100S ribosomes dissociate into subunits and are presumably recycled for new rounds of translation. The regulation and disassembly of the 100S ribosome are largely unknown because the temporal abundance of the 100S ribosome varies considerably among different bacterial phyla. Here, we identify a universally conserved GTPase (HflX) as a bona fide dissociation factor of the S. aureus 100S ribosome. The expression levels hpf and hflX are coregulated by general stress and stringent responses in a temperature-dependent manner. While all tested guanosine analogs stimulate the splitting activity of HflX on the 70S ribosome, only GTP can completely dissociate the 100S ribosome. Our results reveal the antagonistic relationship of HPF and HflX and uncover the key regulators of 70S and 100S ribosome homeostasis that are intimately associated with bacterial survival.

  19. Implications of Rho GTPase signaling in glioma cell invasion and tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Patricia Fortin Ensign

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GB is the most malignant of primary adult brain tumors, characterized by a highly locally-invasive cell population, as well as abundant proliferative cells, neoangiogenesis, and necrosis. Clinical intervention with chemotherapy or radiation may either promote or establish an environment for manifestation of invasive behavior. Understanding the molecular drivers of invasion in the context of glioma progression may be insightful in directing new treatments for patients with GB. Here, we review current knowledge on Rho family GTPases, their aberrant regulation in GB, and their effect on GB cell invasion and tumor progression. Rho GTPases are modulators of cell migration through effects on actin cytoskeleton rearrangement; in non-neoplastic tissue, expression and activation of Rho GTPases are normally under tight regulation. In GB, Rho GTPases are deregulated, often via hyperactivity or overexpression of their activators, Rho GEFs. Downstream effectors of Rho GTPases have been shown to promote invasiveness and, importantly, glioma cell survival. The study of aberrant Rho GTPase signaling in GB is thus an important investigation of cell invasion as well as treatment resistance and disease progression.

  20. Whatever Happened to Illuga saga Gríðarfóstra?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavender, Philip Thomas

    . It is found in 37 manuscript witnesses, but also in a number of other literary and textual formats. The relationships between these various formats - a passage from Saxo Grammaticus’ Gesta Danorum, Faroese ballads, Swedish ‘Stormaktstiden’ academic interventions and post-medieval Icelandic rímur......Never heard of Illuga saga Gríðarfóstra? You’re not alone. Alongside the canon of world literary treasures there lies a shady world of forgotten and abandoned texts. The focus of my doctoral research has been the revindication of one such work, not simply because humanities research revels...... – will be adumbrated and their production contexts analyzed in an attempt to account for how past audiences interacted with this quirky saga. The result hopefully provides a partial blueprint for the salvaging of similar literary flotsam and jetsam....

  1. Theoretical study of potential energy surface and vibrational spectra of ArF2 system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨明晖; 谢代前; 鄢国森

    2000-01-01

    An ab initio potential energy surface (PES) of ArF2 system has been obtained by using MP4 calculation with a large basis set including bond functions. There are two local minimums on the PES: one is T-shaped and the other is L-shaped. The L-shaped minimum is the global minimum with a well depth of -119.62 cm- 1 at R = 0.3883nm. The T-shaped minimum has a well depth of -85.93cm -1 at R = 0.3486 nm. A saddle point is found at R = 0.3486 and θ = 61° with the well depth of -61.53 cm-1. The vibrational energy levels have been calculated by using VSCF-CI method. The results show that this PES supports 27 vibrational bound states, and the ground states are two degenerate states assigned to the L-type vibration.

  2. Theoretical study of potential energy surface and vibrational spectra of ArF2 system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An ab initio potential energy surface (PES) of ArF2 system has been obtained by using MP4 calculation with a large basis set including bond functions. There are two local minimums on the PES: one is T-shaped and the other is L-shaped. The L-shaped minimum is the global minimum with a well depth of -119.62 cm-1 at R = 0.3883nm. The T-shaped minimum has a well depth of -85.93cm-1 at R = 0.3486 nm. A saddle point is found at R = 0.3486 and q = 61° with the well depth of -61.53 cm-1. The vibrational energy levels have been calculated by using VSCF-CI method. The results show that this PES supports 27 vibrational bound states, and the ground states are two degenerate states assigned to the L-type vibration.

  3. Aberrant splicing of the DMP1-ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A

    2016-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) of mRNA precursors is a ubiquitous mechanism for generating numerous transcripts with different activities from one genomic locus in mammalian cells. The gene products from a single locus can thus have similar, dominant-negative or even opposing functions. Aberrant AS has been found in cancer to express proteins that promote cell growth, local invasion and metastasis. This review will focus on the aberrant splicing of tumor suppressor/oncogenes that belong to the DMP1-ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway. Our recent study shows that the DMP1 locus generates both tumor-suppressive DMP1α (p53-dependent) and oncogenic DMP1β (p53-independent) splice variants, and the DMP1β/α ratio increases with neoplastic transformation of breast epithelial cells. This process is associated with high DMP1β protein expression and shorter survival of breast cancer (BC) patients. Accumulating pieces of evidence show that ARF is frequently inactivated by aberrant splicing in human cancers, demonstrating its involvement in human malignancies. Splice variants from the MDM2 locus promote cell growth in culture and accelerate tumorigenesis in vivo. Human cancers expressing these splice variants are associated with advanced stage/metastasis, and thus have negative clinical impacts. Although they lack most of the p53-binding domain, their activities are mostly dependent on p53 since they bind to wild-type MDM2. The p53 locus produces splice isoforms that have either favorable (β/γ at the C-terminus) or negative impact (Δ40, Δ133 at the N-terminus) on patients' survival. As the oncogenic AS products from these loci are expressed only in cancer cells, they may eventually become targets for molecular therapies.

  4. p14ARF post-transcriptional regulation of nuclear cyclin D1 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells: discrimination between a good and bad prognosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen M McGowan

    Full Text Available As part of a cell's inherent protection against carcinogenesis, p14ARF is upregulated in response to hyperproliferative signalling to induce cell cycle arrest. This property makes p14ARF a leading candidate for cancer therapy. This study explores the consequences of reactivating p14ARF in breast cancer and the potential of targeting p14ARF in breast cancer treatment. Our results show that activation of the p14ARF-p53-p21-Rb pathway in the estrogen sensitive MCF-7 breast cancer cells induces many hallmarks of senescence including a large flat cell morphology, multinucleation, senescence-associated-β-gal staining, and rapid G1 and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. P14ARF also induces the expression of the proto-oncogene cyclin D1, which is most often associated with a transition from G1-S phase and is highly expressed in breast cancers with poor clinical prognosis. In this study, siRNA knockdown of cyclin D1, p21 and p53 show p21 plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of high cyclin D1 expression, cell cycle and growth arrest post-p14ARF induction. High p53 and p14ARF expression and low p21/cyclin D1 did not cause cell-cycle arrest. Knockdown of cyclin D1 stops proliferation but does not reverse senescence-associated cell growth. Furthermore, cyclin D1 accumulation in the nucleus post-p14ARF activation correlated with a rapid loss of nucleolar Ki-67 protein and inhibition of DNA synthesis. Latent effects of the p14ARF-induced cellular processes resulting from high nuclear cyclin D1 accumulation included a redistribution of Ki-67 into the nucleoli, aberrant nuclear growth (multinucleation, and cell proliferation. Lastly, downregulation of cyclin D1 through inhibition of ER abrogated latent recurrence. The mediation of these latent effects by continuous expression of p14ARF further suggests a novel mechanism whereby dysregulation of cyclin D1 could have a double-edged effect. Our results suggest that p14ARF induced-senescence is related to late

  5. 医院获得性急性肾功能衰竭相关因素研究%Research on related factors of hospital-acquired acute renal failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚俞函; 张正荣; 杨红; 张翠; 白江伟

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨医院获得性急性肾功能衰竭(HA-ARF)的相关因素.方法 回顾分析该院2003~2009年164例ARF患者的临床资料,将其分为2组,HA-ARF组(n=65)与社区获得性ARF(CA-ARF)组(n=99).结果 HA-ARF组平均年龄、合并多器官功能衰竭(MOF)比例明显高于CA-ARF组(P<0.01),HA-ARF多源于ICU,病因以感染因素最多(30.8%),肾毒性药物(23.1%)、手术因素(21.5%)、肾脏低灌注(15.8%)及合并MOF死亡率(35.38%)均高于CA-ARF组.结论 HA-ARF病因复杂,感染、药物、手术、肾脏低灌注是引起HA-ARF主要原因.%Objective To discuss the etiology of hospital acquired acute renal failure(HA ARF)and its related factors. Methods To retrospectively analyze 164 cases of ARF in the past 6 years,patients were divided into two group: HA-ARF group (n=65) and community acquired ARF (CA-ARF)(n=99). Results Compared with CA-ARF group, the ratio of average age and merge with multiple organ failure(MOF)was significantly higher in the HA-ARF group(P<0.01). The main cases of HA-ARF derives from intensive care unit(ICU) ,infection was the most important factors(30.8%) ,then nephrotoxicity drug(23. 1%) ,operation(21.5%)and kidney hypoperfusion (15.8 %) ;The mortality incorporating with MOF was 35.38 %, higher than CA-ARF. Conclusion The etiology of HA-ARF is complicated, the major causes of hospital-acquired ARF are infections, drugs, operations and low renal perfusion.

  6. RAC/ROP GTPases and Auxin Signaling[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hen-ming; Hazak, Ora; Cheung, Alice Y.; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2011-01-01

    Auxin functions as a key morphogen in regulating plant growth and development. Studies on auxin-regulated gene expression and on the mechanism of polar auxin transport and its asymmetric distribution within tissues have provided the basis for realizing the molecular mechanisms underlying auxin function. In eukaryotes, members of the Ras and Rho subfamilies of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases function as molecular switches in many signaling cascades that regulate growth and development. Plants do not have Ras proteins, but they contain Rho-like small G proteins called RACs or ROPs that, like fungal and metazoan Rhos, are regulators of cell polarity and may also undertake some Ras functions. Here, we discuss the advances made over the last decade that implicate RAC/ROPs as mediators for auxin-regulated gene expression, rapid cell surface-located auxin signaling, and directional auxin transport. We also describe experimental data indicating that auxin–RAC/ROP crosstalk may form regulatory feedback loops and theoretical modeling that attempts to connect local auxin gradients with RAC/ROP regulation of cell polarity. We hope that by discussing these experimental and modeling studies, this perspective will stimulate efforts to further refine our understanding of auxin signaling via the RAC/ROP molecular switch. PMID:21478442

  7. Rho GTPase-independent regulation of mitotic progression by the RhoGEF Net1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Sarita; Oh, Wonkyung; Carr, Heather S; Frost, Jeffrey A

    2013-09-01

    Neuroepithelial transforming gene 1 (Net1) is a RhoA-subfamily-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor that is overexpressed in multiple human cancers and is required for proliferation. Molecular mechanisms underlying its role in cell proliferation are unknown. Here we show that overexpression or knockdown of Net1 causes mitotic defects. Net1 is required for chromosome congression during metaphase and generation of stable kinetochore microtubule attachments. Accordingly, inhibition of Net1 expression results in spindle assembly checkpoint activation. The ability of Net1 to control mitosis is independent of RhoA or RhoB activation, as knockdown of either GTPase does not phenocopy effects of Net1 knockdown on nuclear morphology, and effects of Net1 knockdown are effectively rescued by expression of catalytically inactive Net1. We also observe that Net1 expression is required for centrosomal activation of p21-activated kinase and its downstream kinase Aurora A, which are critical regulators of centrosome maturation and spindle assembly. These results identify Net1 as a novel regulator of mitosis and indicate that altered expression of Net1, as occurs in human cancers, may adversely affect genomic stability.

  8. Rotenone-induced toxicity is mediated by Rho-GTPases in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Monica; Gastaldi, Laura; Remedi, Monica; Cáceres, Alfredo; Landa, Carlos

    2008-08-01

    In this study, we have examined the effects of rotenone in primary cultures of hippocampal and dopaminergic neurons in order to obtain insights into the possible mechanisms underlying the neurotoxic effects of this pesticide. The results obtained indicate that a 48-h exposure to rotenone (0.1 microM) produces a complete and selective suppression of axon formation. This effect was dose dependent, not accompanied by changes in microtubule organization, and reversible after washout of the agrochemical from the tissue culture medium. Interestingly, pull-down assays revealed that rotenone decreases Cdc42 and Rac activities, whereas increasing that of Rho. In accordance with this, treatment of neuronal cultures with cytochalasin D, an actin-depolymerizing drug, or with the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632, or overexpression of Tiam1, a guanosine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac, reverts the inhibitory effect of rotenone on axon formation. Taken together, our data suggest that at least some of the neurotoxic effects of rotenone are associated with an inhibition of actin dynamics through modifications of Rho-GTPase activity.

  9. RIT1 GTPase Regulates Sox2 Transcriptional Activity and Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Sajad; Cai, Weikang; Andres, Douglas A

    2017-02-10

    Adult neurogenesis, the process of generating mature neurons from neuronal progenitor cells, makes critical contributions to neural circuitry and brain function in both healthy and disease states. Neurogenesis is a highly regulated process in which diverse environmental and physiological stimuli are relayed to resident neural stem cell populations to control the transcription of genes involved in self-renewal and differentiation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing neurogenesis is necessary for the development of translational strategies to harness this process for neuronal repair. Here we report that the Ras-related GTPase RIT1 serves to control the sequential proliferation and differentiation of adult hippocampal neural progenitor cells, with in vivo expression of active RIT1 driving robust adult neurogenesis. Gene expression profiling analysis demonstrates increased expression of a specific set of transcription factors known to govern adult neurogenesis in response to active RIT1 expression in the hippocampus, including sex-determining region Y-related HMG box 2 (Sox2), a well established regulator of stem cell self-renewal and neurogenesis. In adult hippocampal neuronal precursor cells, RIT1 controls an Akt-dependent signaling cascade, resulting in the stabilization and transcriptional activation of phosphorylated Sox2. This study supports a role for RIT1 in relaying niche-derived signals to neural/stem progenitor cells to control transcription of genes involved in self-renewal and differentiation.

  10. A Small GTPase Activator Protein Interacts with Cytoplasmic Phytochromes in Regulating Root Development*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Ho; Cho, Man-Ho; Kim, Tae-Lim; Yoo, Jihye; Kim, Jeong-Il; Han, Yun-Jeong; Song, Pill-Soon; Jeon, Jong-Seong; Bhoo, Seong Hee; Hahn, Tae-Ryong

    2010-01-01

    Phytochromes enable plants to sense light information and regulate developmental responses. Phytochromes interact with partner proteins to transmit light signals to downstream components for plant development. PIRF1 (phytochrome-interacting ROP guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (RopGEF 1)) functions as a light-signaling switch regulating root development through the activation of ROPs (Rho-like GTPase of plant) in the cytoplasm. In vitro pulldown and yeast two-hybrid assays confirmed the interaction between PIRF1 and phytochromes. PIRF1 interacted with the N-terminal domain of phytochromes through its conserved PRONE (plant-specific ROP nucleotide exchanger) region. PIRF1 also interacted with ROPs and activated them in a phytochrome-dependent manner. The Pr form of phytochrome A enhanced the RopGEF activity of PIRF1, whereas the Pfr form inhibited it. A bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis demonstrated that PIRF1 was localized in the cytoplasm and bound to the phytochromes in darkness but not in light. PIRF1 loss of function mutants (pirf1) of Arabidopsis thaliana showed a longer root phenotype in the dark. In addition, both PIRF1 overexpression mutants (PIRF1-OX) and phytochrome-null mutants (phyA-211 and phyB-9) showed retarded root elongation and irregular root hair formation, suggesting that PIRF1 is a negative regulator of phytochrome-mediated primary root development. We propose that phytochrome and ROP signaling are interconnected through PIRF1 in regulating the root growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:20551316

  11. An overexpression screen of Toxoplasma gondii Rab-GTPases reveals distinct transport routes to the micronemes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Kremer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The basic organisation of the endomembrane system is conserved in all eukaryotes and comparative genome analyses provides compelling evidence that the endomembrane system of the last common eukaryotic ancestor (LCEA is complex with many genes required for regulated traffic being present. Although apicomplexan parasites, causative agents of severe human and animal diseases, appear to have only a basic set of trafficking factors such as Rab-GTPases, they evolved unique secretory organelles (micronemes, rhoptries and dense granules that are sequentially secreted during invasion of the host cell. In order to define the secretory pathway of apicomplexans, we performed an overexpression screen of Rabs in Toxoplasma gondii and identified Rab5A and Rab5C as important regulators of traffic to micronemes and rhoptries. Intriguingly, we found that not all microneme proteins traffic depends on functional Rab5A and Rab5C, indicating the existence of redundant microneme targeting pathways. Using two-colour super-resolution stimulated emission depletion (STED we verified distinct localisations of independent microneme proteins and demonstrate that micronemal organelles are organised in distinct subsets or subcompartments. Our results suggest that apicomplexan parasites modify classical regulators of the endocytic system to carryout essential parasite-specific roles in the biogenesis of their unique secretory organelles.

  12. Encephalomyocarditis virus Leader protein hinge domain is responsible for interactions with Ran GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacot-Davis, Valjean R; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2013-08-15

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), a Cardiovirus, initiates its polyprotein with a short 67 amino acid Leader (L) sequence. The protein acts as a unique pathogenicity factor, with anti-host activities which include the triggering of nuclear pore complex hyperphosphorylation and direct binding inhibition of the active cellular transport protein, Ran GTPase. Chemical modifications and protein mutagenesis now map the Ran binding domain to the L hinge-linker region, and in particular, to amino acids 35-40. Large deletions affecting this region were shown previously to diminish Ran binding. New point mutations, especially K35Q, D37A and W40A, preserve the intact L structure, abolish Ran binding and are deficient for nucleoporin (Nup) hyperphosphorylation. Ran itself morphs through multiple configurations, but reacts most effectively with L when in the GDP format, preferably with an empty nucleotide binding pocket. Therefore, L:Ran binding, mediated by the linker-hinge, is a required step in L-induced nuclear transport inhibition.

  13. Mechanistic Insights from Structural Analyses of Ran-GTPase-Driven Nuclear Export of Proteins and RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-22

    Understanding how macromolecules are rapidly exchanged between the nucleus and the cytoplasm through nuclear pore complexes is a fundamental problem in biology. Exportins are Ran-GTPase-dependent nuclear transport factors that belong to the karyopherin-β family and mediate nuclear export of a plethora of proteins and RNAs, except for bulk mRNA nuclear export. Exportins bind cargo macromolecules in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner in the nucleus, forming exportin-cargo-Ran-GTP complexes (nuclear export complexes). Transient weak interactions between exportins and nucleoporins containing characteristic FG (phenylalanine-glycine) repeat motifs facilitate nuclear pore complex passage of nuclear export complexes. In the cytoplasm, nuclear export complexes are disassembled, thereby releasing the cargo. GTP hydrolysis by Ran promoted in the cytoplasm makes the disassembly reaction virtually irreversible and provides thermodynamic driving force for the overall export reaction. In the past decade, X-ray crystallography of some of the exportins in various functional states coupled with functional analyses, single-particle electron microscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and small-angle solution X-ray scattering has provided rich insights into the mechanism of cargo binding and release and also begins to elucidate how exportins interact with the FG repeat motifs. The knowledge gained from structural analyses of nuclear export is being translated into development of clinically useful inhibitors of nuclear export to treat human diseases such as cancer and influenza.

  14. Rho GTPases: Novel Players in the Regulation of the DNA Damage Response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Fritz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1 belongs to the family of Ras-homologous small GTPases. It is well characterized as a membrane-bound signal transducing molecule that is involved in the regulation of cell motility and adhesion as well as cell cycle progression, mitosis, cell death and gene expression. Rac1 also adjusts cellular responses to genotoxic stress by regulating the activity of stress kinases, including c-Jun-N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK and p38 kinases as well as related transcription factors. Apart from being found on the inner side of the outer cell membrane and in the cytosol, Rac1 has also been detected inside the nucleus. Different lines of evidence indicate that genotoxin-induced DNA damage is able to activate nuclear Rac1. The exact mechanisms involved and the biological consequences, however, are unclear. The data available so far indicate that Rac1 might integrate DNA damage independent and DNA damage dependent cellular stress responses following genotoxin treatment, thereby coordinating mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR that are related to DNA repair, survival and cell death.

  15. Unique Structural and Nucleotide Exchange Features of the Rho1 GTPase of Entamoeba histolytica*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Dustin E.; Wittchen, Erika S.; Qiu, Connie; Burridge, Keith; Siderovski, David P.

    2011-01-01

    The single-celled human parasite Entamoeba histolytica possesses a dynamic actin cytoskeleton vital for its intestinal and systemic pathogenicity. The E. histolytica genome encodes several Rho family GTPases known to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. EhRho1, the first family member identified, was reported to be insensitive to the Rho GTPase-specific Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, raising the possibility that it may be a misclassified Ras family member. Here, we report the crystal structures of EhRho1 in both active and inactive states. EhRho1 is activated by a conserved switch mechanism, but diverges from mammalian Rho GTPases in lacking a signature Rho insert helix. EhRho1 engages a homolog of mDia, EhFormin1, suggesting a role in mediating serum-stimulated actin reorganization and microtubule formation during mitosis. EhRho1, but not a constitutively active mutant, interacts with a newly identified EhRhoGDI in a prenylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, constitutively active EhRho1 induces actin stress fiber formation in mammalian fibroblasts, thereby identifying it as a functional Rho family GTPase. EhRho1 exhibits a fast rate of nucleotide exchange relative to mammalian Rho GTPases due to a distinctive switch one isoleucine residue reminiscent of the constitutively active F28L mutation in human Cdc42, which for the latter protein, is sufficient for cellular transformation. Nonconserved, nucleotide-interacting residues within EhRho1, revealed by the crystal structure models, were observed to contribute a moderating influence on fast spontaneous nucleotide exchange. Collectively, these observations indicate that EhRho1 is a bona fide member of the Rho GTPase family, albeit with unique structural and functional aspects compared with mammalian Rho GTPases. PMID:21930699

  16. Unique structural and nucleotide exchange features of the Rho1 GTPase of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Dustin E; Wittchen, Erika S; Qiu, Connie; Burridge, Keith; Siderovski, David P

    2011-11-11

    The single-celled human parasite Entamoeba histolytica possesses a dynamic actin cytoskeleton vital for its intestinal and systemic pathogenicity. The E. histolytica genome encodes several Rho family GTPases known to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. EhRho1, the first family member identified, was reported to be insensitive to the Rho GTPase-specific Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, raising the possibility that it may be a misclassified Ras family member. Here, we report the crystal structures of EhRho1 in both active and inactive states. EhRho1 is activated by a conserved switch mechanism, but diverges from mammalian Rho GTPases in lacking a signature Rho insert helix. EhRho1 engages a homolog of mDia, EhFormin1, suggesting a role in mediating serum-stimulated actin reorganization and microtubule formation during mitosis. EhRho1, but not a constitutively active mutant, interacts with a newly identified EhRhoGDI in a prenylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, constitutively active EhRho1 induces actin stress fiber formation in mammalian fibroblasts, thereby identifying it as a functional Rho family GTPase. EhRho1 exhibits a fast rate of nucleotide exchange relative to mammalian Rho GTPases due to a distinctive switch one isoleucine residue reminiscent of the constitutively active F28L mutation in human Cdc42, which for the latter protein, is sufficient for cellular transformation. Nonconserved, nucleotide-interacting residues within EhRho1, revealed by the crystal structure models, were observed to contribute a moderating influence on fast spontaneous nucleotide exchange. Collectively, these observations indicate that EhRho1 is a bona fide member of the Rho GTPase family, albeit with unique structural and functional aspects compared with mammalian Rho GTPases.

  17. Unique Structural and Nucleotide Exchange Features of the Rho1 GTPase of Entamoeba histolytica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, Dustin E.; Wittchen, Erika S.; Qiu, Connie; Burridge, Keith; Siderovski, David P. (UNC)

    2012-08-10

    The single-celled human parasite Entamoeba histolytica possesses a dynamic actin cytoskeleton vital for its intestinal and systemic pathogenicity. The E. histolytica genome encodes several Rho family GTPases known to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. EhRho1, the first family member identified, was reported to be insensitive to the Rho GTPase-specific Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme, raising the possibility that it may be a misclassified Ras family member. Here, we report the crystal structures of EhRho1 in both active and inactive states. EhRho1 is activated by a conserved switch mechanism, but diverges from mammalian Rho GTPases in lacking a signature Rho insert helix. EhRho1 engages a homolog of mDia, EhFormin1, suggesting a role in mediating serum-stimulated actin reorganization and microtubule formation during mitosis. EhRho1, but not a constitutively active mutant, interacts with a newly identified EhRhoGDI in a prenylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, constitutively active EhRho1 induces actin stress fiber formation in mammalian fibroblasts, thereby identifying it as a functional Rho family GTPase. EhRho1 exhibits a fast rate of nucleotide exchange relative to mammalian Rho GTPases due to a distinctive switch one isoleucine residue reminiscent of the constitutively active F28L mutation in human Cdc42, which for the latter protein, is sufficient for cellular transformation. Nonconserved, nucleotide-interacting residues within EhRho1, revealed by the crystal structure models, were observed to contribute a moderating influence on fast spontaneous nucleotide exchange. Collectively, these observations indicate that EhRho1 is a bona fide member of the Rho GTPase family, albeit with unique structural and functional aspects compared with mammalian Rho GTPases.

  18. LASERS: Influence of excitation parameters and active medium on the efficiency of an electric-discharge excimer ArF laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razhev, A. M.; Shchedrin, A. I.; Kalyuzhnaya, Anna G.; Zhupikov, A. A.

    2005-09-01

    The kinetic model of processes occurring in the plasma of an electric-discharge 193-nm excimer ArF laser operating on mixtures of He and Ne buffer gases is developed. The influence of excitation and active medium parameters on the lasing energy and total efficiency of the electric-discharge excimer ArF laser is studied theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that a specific pump power of ~4.5-5.0 MW cm-3 is required for attaining the maximum lasing energy for the highest efficiency of an ArF laser operating on a He—Ar—F2 mixture. For the first time, the pulse energy of 1.3 J at an efficiency of 2.0% is attained for an ArF laser with a specific pump power of 5.0 MW cm-3 using mixtures with helium as a buffer gas.

  19. The exocyst and regulatory GTPases in urinary exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Heszele, Maria F; Choi, Soo Young; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Baek, Jeong-In; Ward, Chris; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2014-08-01

    Cilia, organelles that function as cellular antennae, are central to the pathogenesis of "ciliopathies", including various forms of polycystic kidney disease (PKD). To date, however, the molecular mechanisms controlling ciliogenesis and ciliary function remain incompletely understood. A recently proposed model of cell-cell communication, called "urocrine signaling", hypothesizes that a subset of membrane bound vesicles that are secreted into the urinary stream (termed exosome-like vesicles, or ELVs), carry cilia-specific proteins as cargo, interact with primary cilia, and affect downstream cellular functions. This study was undertaken to determine the role of the exocyst, a highly conserved eight-protein trafficking complex, in the secretion and/or retrieval of ELVs. We used Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells expressing either Sec10-myc (a central component of the exocyst complex) or Smoothened-YFP (a ciliary protein found in ELVs) in experiments utilizing electron gold microscopy and live fluorescent microscopy, respectively. Additionally, human urinary exosomes were isolated via ultracentrifugation and subjected to mass-spectrometry-based proteomics analysis to determine the composition of ELVs. We found, as determined by EM, that the exocyst localizes to primary cilia, and is present in vesicles attached to the cilium. Furthermore, the entire exocyst complex, as well as most of its known regulatory GTPases, are present in human urinary ELVs. Finally, in living MDCK cells, ELVs appear to interact with primary cilia using spinning disc confocal microscopy. These data suggest that the exocyst complex, in addition to its role in ciliogenesis, is centrally involved in the secretion and/or retrieval of urinary ELVs.

  20. Thousands of rab GTPases for the cell biologist.

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    Yoan Diekmann

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Rab proteins are small GTPases that act as essential regulators of vesicular trafficking. 44 subfamilies are known in humans, performing specific sets of functions at distinct subcellular localisations and tissues. Rab function is conserved even amongst distant orthologs. Hence, the annotation of Rabs yields functional predictions about the cell biology of trafficking. So far, annotating Rabs has been a laborious manual task not feasible for current and future genomic output of deep sequencing technologies. We developed, validated and benchmarked the Rabifier, an automated bioinformatic pipeline for the identification and classification of Rabs, which achieves up to 90% classification accuracy. We cataloged roughly 8.000 Rabs from 247 genomes covering the entire eukaryotic tree. The full Rab database and a web tool implementing the pipeline are publicly available at www.RabDB.org. For the first time, we describe and analyse the evolution of Rabs in a dataset covering the whole eukaryotic phylogeny. We found a highly dynamic family undergoing frequent taxon-specific expansions and losses. We dated the origin of human subfamilies using phylogenetic profiling, which enlarged the Rab repertoire of the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor with Rab14, 32 and RabL4. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the Choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis Rab family pinpointed the changes that accompanied the emergence of Metazoan multicellularity, mainly an important expansion and specialisation of the secretory pathway. Lastly, we experimentally establish tissue specificity in expression of mouse Rabs and show that neo-functionalisation best explains the emergence of new human Rab subfamilies. With the Rabifier and RabDB, we provide tools that easily allows non-bioinformaticians to integrate thousands of Rabs in their analyses. RabDB is designed to enable the cell biology community to keep pace with the increasing number of fully-sequenced genomes and change the scale

  1. Thousands of rab GTPases for the cell biologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, Yoan; Seixas, Elsa; Gouw, Marc; Tavares-Cadete, Filipe; Seabra, Miguel C; Pereira-Leal, José B

    2011-10-01

    Rab proteins are small GTPases that act as essential regulators of vesicular trafficking. 44 subfamilies are known in humans, performing specific sets of functions at distinct subcellular localisations and tissues. Rab function is conserved even amongst distant orthologs. Hence, the annotation of Rabs yields functional predictions about the cell biology of trafficking. So far, annotating Rabs has been a laborious manual task not feasible for current and future genomic output of deep sequencing technologies. We developed, validated and benchmarked the Rabifier, an automated bioinformatic pipeline for the identification and classification of Rabs, which achieves up to 90% classification accuracy. We cataloged roughly 8.000 Rabs from 247 genomes covering the entire eukaryotic tree. The full Rab database and a web tool implementing the pipeline are publicly available at www.RabDB.org. For the first time, we describe and analyse the evolution of Rabs in a dataset covering the whole eukaryotic phylogeny. We found a highly dynamic family undergoing frequent taxon-specific expansions and losses. We dated the origin of human subfamilies using phylogenetic profiling, which enlarged the Rab repertoire of the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor with Rab14, 32 and RabL4. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the Choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis Rab family pinpointed the changes that accompanied the emergence of Metazoan multicellularity, mainly an important expansion and specialisation of the secretory pathway. Lastly, we experimentally establish tissue specificity in expression of mouse Rabs and show that neo-functionalisation best explains the emergence of new human Rab subfamilies. With the Rabifier and RabDB, we provide tools that easily allows non-bioinformaticians to integrate thousands of Rabs in their analyses. RabDB is designed to enable the cell biology community to keep pace with the increasing number of fully-sequenced genomes and change the scale at which we perform

  2. Chimeric negative regulation of p14ARF and TBX1 by a t(9;22) translocation associated with melanoma, deafness, and DNA repair deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaohui; Anzick, Sarah L; Khan, Sikandar G; Ueda, Takahiro; Stone, Gary; Digiovanna, John J; Tamura, Deborah; Wattendorf, Daniel; Busch, David; Brewer, Carmen C; Zalewski, Christopher; Butman, John A; Griffith, Andrew J; Meltzer, Paul S; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2013-09-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer and DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is the most frequent interstitial deletion syndrome. We characterized a novel balanced t(9;22)(p21;q11.2) translocation in a patient with melanoma, DNA repair deficiency, and features of DGS including deafness and malformed inner ears. Using chromosome sorting, we located the 9p21 breakpoint in CDKN2A intron 1. This resulted in underexpression of the tumor suppressor p14 alternate reading frame (p14ARF); the reduced DNA repair was corrected by transfection with p14ARF. Ultraviolet radiation-type p14ARF mutations in his melanoma implicated p14ARF in its pathogenesis. The 22q11.2 breakpoint was located in a palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR22). We identified a new gene, FAM230A, that contains PATRR22 within an intron. The 22q11.2 breakpoint was located 800 kb centromeric to TBX1, which is required for inner ear development. TBX1 expression was greatly reduced. The translocation resulted in a chimeric transcript encoding portions of p14ARF and FAM230A. Inhibition of chimeric p14ARF-FAM230A expression increased p14ARF and TBX1 expression and improved DNA repair. Expression of the chimera in normal cells produced dominant negative inhibition of p14ARF. Similar chimeric mRNAs may mediate haploinsufficiency in DGS or dominant negative inhibition of other genes such as those involved in melanoma.

  3. The Interplay between ROS and Ras GTPases: Physiological and Pathological Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Ferro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The members of the RasGTPase superfamily are involved in various signaling networks responsible for fundamental cellular processes. Their activity is determined by their guanine nucleotide-bound state. Recent evidence indicates that some of these proteins may be regulated by redox agents. Reactive oxygen species (ROSs and reactive nitrogen species (RNSs have been historically considered pathological agents which can react with and damage many biological macromolecules including DNA, proteins, and lipids. However, a growing number of reports have suggested that the intracellular production of ROS is tightly regulated and that these redox agents serve as signaling molecules being involved in a variety of cell signaling pathways. Numerous observations have suggested that some Ras GTPases appear to regulate ROS production and that oxidants function as effector molecules for the small GTPases, thus contributing to their overall biological function. Thus, redox agents may act both as upstream regulators and as downstream effectors of Ras GTPases. Here we discuss current understanding concerning mechanisms and physiopathological implications of the interplay between GTPases and redox agents.

  4. Human Lsg1 defines a family of essential GTPases that correlates with the evolution of compartmentalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheffzek Klaus

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compartmentalization is a key feature of eukaryotic cells, but its evolution remains poorly understood. GTPases are the oldest enzymes that use nucleotides as substrates and they participate in a wide range of cellular processes. Therefore, they are ideal tools for comparative genomic studies aimed at understanding how aspects of biological complexity such as cellular compartmentalization evolved. Results We describe the identification and characterization of a unique family of circularly permuted GTPases represented by the human orthologue of yeast Lsg1p. We placed the members of this family in the phylogenetic context of the YlqF Related GTPase (YRG family, which are present in Eukarya, Bacteria and Archea and include the stem cell regulator Nucleostemin. To extend the computational analysis, we showed that hLsg1 is an essential GTPase predominantly located in the endoplasmic reticulum and, in some cells, in Cajal bodies in the nucleus. Comparison of localization and siRNA datasets suggests that all members of the family are essential GTPases that have increased in number as the compartmentalization of the eukaryotic cell and the ribosome biogenesis pathway have evolved. Conclusion We propose a scenario, consistent with our data, for the evolution of this family: cytoplasmic components were first acquired, followed by nuclear components, and finally the mitochondrial and chloroplast elements were derived from different bacterial species, in parallel with the formation of the nucleolus and the specialization of nuclear components.

  5. Characterizing Plexin GTPase Interactions Using Gel Filtration, Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectrometry, and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Greven, Jeannine; Kim, SoonJeung; Hota, Prasanta K; Tong, Yufeng; Borthakur, Susmita; Buck, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Plexins are unique, as they are the first example of a transmembrane receptor that interacts directly with small GTPases, a family of proteins that are essential for cell motility and proliferation/survival. We and other laboratories have determined the structure of the Rho GTPase-binding domain (RBD) of several plexins and also of the entire intracellular region of plexin-B1. Structures of plexin complexes with Rho GTPases, Rac1 and Rnd1, and a structure with a Ras GTPase, Rap1b, have also been solved. The relationship between plexin-Rho and plexin-Ras interactions is still unclear and in vitro biophysical experiments that characterize the protein interactions of purified components play an important role in advancing our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the function of plexin. This chapter describes the use of gel filtration (also known as size-exclusion chromatography or SEC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in studies of plexin-small GTPase interactions with plexin-B1:Rac1 as an example. Together with other assays and manipulations (e.g., by mutagenesis or protein domain truncation/deletion), these in vitro measurements provide an important reference for the role and extent of the interactions.

  6. Enucleation of cultured mouse fetal erythroblasts requires Rac GTPases and mDia2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Peng; Jayapal, Senthil Raja; Lodish, Harvey F

    2008-03-01

    Mammalian erythroid cells undergo enucleation, an asymmetric cell division involving extrusion of a pycnotic nucleus enveloped by the plasma membrane. The mechanisms that power and regulate the enucleation process have remained obscure. Here, we show that deregulation of Rac GTPase during a late stage of erythropoiesis completely blocks enucleation of cultured mouse fetal erythroblasts without affecting their proliferation or differentiation. Formation of the contractile actin ring (CAR) on the plasma membrane of enucleating erythroblasts was disrupted by inhibition of Rac GTPases. Furthermore, we demonstrate that mDia2, a downstream effector of Rho GTPases and a formin protein required for nucleation of unbranched actin filaments, is also required for enucleation of mouse fetal erythroblasts. We show that Rac1 and Rac2 bind to mDia2 in a GTP-dependent manner and that downregulation of mDia2, but not mDia1, by small interfering RNA (siRNA) during the late stages of erythropoiesis blocked both CAR formation and erythroblast enucleation. Additionally, overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of mDia2 rescued the enucleation defects induced by the inhibition of Rac GTPases. These results reveal important roles for Rac GTPases and their effector mDia2 in enucleation of mammalian erythroblasts.

  7. Dynamin GTPase Regulation is Altered by PH Domain Mutations Found in Centronuclear Myopathy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenniston, J.; Lemmon, M

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin has an important membrane scission function in receptor-mediated endocytosis and other cellular processes. Self-assembly on phosphoinositide-containing membranes stimulates dynamin GTPase activity, which is crucial for its function. Although the pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain is known to mediate phosphoinositide binding by dynamin, it remains unclear how this promotes activation. Here, we describe studies of dynamin PH domain mutations found in centronuclear myopathy (CNM) that increase dynamin's GTPase activity without altering phosphoinositide binding. CNM mutations in the PH domain C-terminal {alpha}-helix appear to cause conformational changes in dynamin that alter control of the GTP hydrolysis cycle. These mutations either 'sensitize' dynamin to lipid stimulation or elevate basal GTPase rates by promoting self-assembly and thus rendering dynamin no longer lipid responsive. We also describe a low-resolution structure of dimeric dynamin from small-angle X-ray scattering that reveals conformational changes induced by CNM mutations, and defines requirements for domain rearrangement upon dynamin self-assembly at membrane surfaces. Our data suggest that changes in the PH domain may couple lipid binding to dynamin GTPase activation at sites of vesicle invagination.

  8. Interferon-inducible GTPase: a novel viral response protein involved in rabies virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Cao, Zengguo; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Guoxing; Yan, Feihu; Wang, Lina; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Tu, Changchun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rabies virus infection is a major public health concern because of its wide host-interference spectrum and nearly 100 % lethality. However, the interactions between host and virus remain unclear. To decipher the authentic response in the central nervous system after rabies virus infection, a dynamic analysis of brain proteome alteration was performed. In this study, 104 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified, and intermediate filament, interferon-inducible GTPases, and leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 16C were the three outstanding groups among these proteins. Interferon-inducible GTPases were prominent because of their strong upregulation. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR showed distinct upregulation of interferon-inducible GTPases at the level of transcription. Several studies have shown that interferon-inducible GTPases are involved in many biological processes, such as viral infection, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and autophagy. These findings indicate that interferon-inducible GTPases are likely to be a potential target involved in rabies pathogenesis or the antiviral process.

  9. Prenylated Rab acceptor protein is a receptor for prenylated small GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, C; Taylor, J; Vojtek, A B

    2001-07-27

    Localization of Ras and Ras-like proteins to the correct subcellular compartment is essential for these proteins to mediate their biological effects. Many members of the Ras superfamily (Ha-Ras, N-Ras, TC21, and RhoA) are prenylated in the cytoplasm and then transit through the endomembrane system on their way to the plasma membrane. The proteins that aid in the trafficking of the small GTPases have not been well characterized. We report here that prenylated Rab acceptor protein (PRA1), which others previously identified as a prenylation-dependent receptor for Rab proteins, also interacts with Ha-Ras, RhoA, TC21, and Rap1a. The interaction of these small GTPases with PRA1 requires their post-translational modification by prenylation. The prenylation-dependent association of PRA1 with multiple GTPases is conserved in evolution; the yeast PRA1 protein associates with both Ha-Ras and RhoA. Earlier studies reported the presence of PRA1 in the Golgi, and we show here that PRA1 co-localizes with Ha-Ras and RhoA in the Golgi compartment. We suggest that PRA1 acts as an escort protein for small GTPases by binding to the hydrophobic isoprenoid moieties of the small GTPases and facilitates their trafficking through the endomembrane system.

  10. Interaction of ARF-1.1 and neuronal calcium sensor-1 in the control of the temperature-dependency of locomotion in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Paul A. C.; McCue, Hannah V.; Haynes, Lee P.; Barclay, Jeff W.; Burgoyne, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) mediates changes in cellular function by regulating various target proteins. Many potential targets have been identified but the physiological significance of only a few has been established. Upon temperature elevation, Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits reversible paralysis. In the absence of NCS-1, worms show delayed onset and a shorter duration of paralysis. This phenotype can be rescued by re-expression of ncs-1 in AIY neurons. Mutants with defects in four potential NCS-1 targets (arf-1.1, pifk-1, trp-1 and trp-2) showed qualitatively similar phenotypes to ncs-1 null worms, although the effect of pifk-1 mutation on time to paralysis was considerably delayed. Inhibition of pifk-1 also resulted in a locomotion phenotype. Analysis of double mutants showed no additive effects between mutations in ncs-1 and trp-1 or trp-2. In contrast, double mutants of arf-1.1 and ncs-1 had an intermediate phenotype, consistent with NCS-1 and ARF-1.1 acting in the same pathway. Over-expression of arf-1.1 in the AIY neurons was sufficient to rescue partially the phenotype of both the arf-1.1 and the ncs-1 null worms. These findings suggest that ARF-1.1 interacts with NCS-1 in AIY neurons and potentially pifk-1 in the Ca2+ signaling pathway that leads to inhibited locomotion at an elevated temperature. PMID:27435667

  11. P19ARF and RasV¹² offer opposing regulation of DHX33 translation to dictate tumor cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yandong; Saporita, Anthony J; Weber, Jason D

    2013-04-01

    DHX33 is a pivotal DEAH-box RNA helicase in the multistep process of RNA polymerase I-directed transcription of the ribosomal DNA locus. We explored the regulation of DHX33 expression by Ras(V12) and ARF to determine DHX33's role in sensing these opposing signals to regulate ribosome biogenesis. In wild-type primary fibroblasts, Ras(V12) infection induced a transient increase in DHX33 protein level, as well as an rRNA transcriptional rate that was eventually suppressed by a delayed activation of the ARF/p53 pathway. DHX33 expression was exclusively controlled at the level of translation. ARF caused a dramatic reduction in polysome-associated DHX33 mRNAs, while Ras(V12) led to a complete shift of existing DHX33 mRNAs to actively translating polysomes. The translation of DHX33 by Ras(V12) was sensitive to inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, mTOR, and mitogen-activated protein and was pivotal for enhanced rRNA transcription and enhanced overall cellular protein translation. In addition, DHX33 knockdown abolished Ras(V12)-induced rRNA transcription and protein translation and prevented both the in vitro and in vivo transforming properties of oncogenic Ras(V12). Our results directly implicate DHX33 as a crucial player in establishing rRNA synthesis rates in the face of Ras(V12) or ARF signals, adjusting ribosome biogenesis to match the appropriate growth or antigrowth signals.

  12. Intratumoral Immunization by p19Arf and Interferon-β Gene Transfer in a Heterotopic Mouse Model of Lung Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Portela Catani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic strategies that act by eliciting and enhancing antitumor immunity have been clinically validated as an effective treatment modality but may benefit from the induction of both cell death and immune activation as primary stimuli. Using our AdRGD-PG adenovector platform, we show here for the first time that in situ gene transfer of p19Arf and interferon-β (IFNβ in the LLC1 mouse model of lung carcinoma acts as an immunotherapy. Although p19Arf is sufficient to induce cell death, only its pairing with IFNβ significantly induced markers of immunogenic cell death. In situ gene therapy with IFNβ, either alone or in combination with p19Arf, could retard tumor progression, but only the combined treatment was associated with a protective immune response. Specifically in the case of combined intratumoral gene transfer, we identified 167 differentially expressed genes when using microarray to evaluate tumors that were treated in vivo and confirmed the activation of CCL3, CXCL3, IL1α, IL1β, CD274, and OSM, involved in immune response and chemotaxis. Histologic evaluation revealed significant tumor infiltration by neutrophils, whereas functional depletion of granulocytes ablated the antitumor effect of our approach. The association of in situ gene therapy with cisplatin resulted in synergistic elimination of tumor progression. In all, in situ gene transfer with p19Arf and IFNβ acts as an immunotherapy involving recruitment of neutrophils, a desirable but previously untested outcome, and this approach may be allied with chemotherapy, thus providing significant antitumor activity and warranting further development for the treatment of lung carcinoma.

  13. Generation of intense 10-ps, 193-nm pulses using simple distributed feedback dye lasers and an ArF(*) amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatten, D L; Cui, Y; Iii, W T; Mikes, T; Goldhar, J

    1992-11-20

    A pair of holographic distributed feedback dye lasers is used to generate 10-ps pulses at two selected wavelengths that are mixed in a BBO crystal to produce a pulse ~ 10 ps in duration at 193 nm. This seed pulse is subsequently amplified in an ArF(*) excimer laser to an energy of 10-15 mJ with <40 microJ in amplified spontaneous emission. The pulses are nearly transform limited and diffraction limited.

  14. The ArfGAP2/3 Glo3 and ergosterol collaborate in transport of a subset of cargoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro F. Estrada

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Proteins reach the plasma membrane through the secretory pathway in which the trans Golgi network (TGN acts as a sorting station. Transport from the TGN to the plasma membrane is maintained by a number of different pathways that act either directly or via the endosomal system. Here we show that a subset of cargoes depends on the ArfGAP2/3 Glo3 and ergosterol to maintain their proper localization at the plasma membrane. While interfering with neither ArfGAP2/3 activity nor ergosterol biosynthesis individually significantly altered plasma membrane localization of the tryptophan transporter Tat2, the general amino acid permease Gap1 and the v-SNARE Snc1, in a Δglo3 Δerg3 strain those proteins accumulated in internal endosomal structures. Export from the TGN to the plasma membrane and recycling from early endosomes appeared unaffected as the chitin synthase Chs3 that travels along these routes was localized normally. Our data indicate that a subset of proteins can reach the plasma membrane efficiently but after endocytosis becomes trapped in endosomal structures. Our study supports a role for ArfGAP2/3 in recycling from endosomes and in transport to the vacuole/lysosome.

  15. LARG links histamine-H1-receptor-activated Gq to Rho-GTPase-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreimer, Mariana; Vatter, Petra; Langer, Torben; Wieland, Thomas; Gierschik, Peter; Moepps, Barbara

    2012-03-01

    Activation of heterotrimeric G proteins, such as G(12/13) and G(q), by cell surface receptors is coupled to the regulation of numerous cellular functions controlled by activated Rho GTPases. Previous studies have implicated the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RhoGEF) leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG) as a regulatory protein receiving stimulatory inputs from activated Gα(12/13) and Gα(q). However, the molecular mechanisms of the Gα(q)-mediated LARG activation are not fully understood and the structural elements of LARG involved in this process have remained unclear. In the present work, the specific coupling of the histamine H1 receptor (HRH1) exogenously expressed in COS-7 cells to G(q), but not to G(12/13), was used to conduct a detailed analysis of receptor- and Gα(q)-mediated LARG activation and to define its structural requirements. The results show that HRH1-mediated activation of the strictly Rho-dependent transcriptional activity of serum response factor requires the PDZ domain of LARG and can be mimicked by activated Gα(q)(Q209L). The functional interaction between activated Gα(q) and LARG requires no more than the catalytic DH-PH tandem of LARG, and is independent of PLCβ activation and distinct from the mechanisms of Gα(q)-mediated p63RhoGEF and PLCβ(3) activation. Activated Gα(q) physically interacts with the relevant portions of LARG in COS-7 cells and histamine causes activation of LARG in native HeLa cells endogenously expressing HRH1, G(q), and LARG. This work is the first positive demonstration of a stimulatory effect of LARG on the ability of a strictly G(q)-coupled receptor to cause activation of a Rho-GTPase-dependent signaling pathway.

  16. Rho GTPases and Nox dependent ROS production in skin. Is there a connection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanley, Alanna; Hynes, Ailish; Brakebusch, Cord Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Rho GTPases are a family of small GTP binding proteins most commonly known for the regulation of many cellular processes, including actin cytoskeleton re-organisation, cell proliferation, signal transduction and regulation of apoptosis. Additionally, a link between Rho GTPases and reactive oxygen...... species (ROS) has been shown. In line with the growing interest in the role of ROS in cell biology, the relevance of this connection is becoming increasingly clearer. ROS production is classically associated with oxidative metabolic pathways (e.g. respiratory chain, arachidonic acid). During...... cell biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis, aimed at maintaining tissue homeostasis. Data suggests that skin cells are capable of a regulated ROS production via Nox complexes. Members of the Rho GTPase family have been found to play a central regulatory...

  17. Functional interaction of Parkinson's disease-associated LRRK2 with members of the dynamin GTPase superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafa, Klodjan; Tsika, Elpida; Moser, Roger; Musso, Alessandra; Glauser, Liliane; Jones, Amy; Biskup, Saskia; Xiong, Yulan; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Moore, Darren J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in LRRK2 cause autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 encodes a multi-domain protein containing GTPase and kinase domains, and putative protein–protein interaction domains. Familial PD mutations alter the GTPase and kinase activity of LRRK2 in vitro. LRRK2 is suggested to regulate a number of cellular pathways although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. To explore such mechanisms, it has proved informative to identify LRRK2-interacting proteins, some of which serve as LRRK2 kinase substrates. Here, we identify common interactions of LRRK2 with members of the dynamin GTPase superfamily. LRRK2 interacts with dynamin 1–3 that mediate membrane scission in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and with dynamin-related proteins that mediate mitochondrial fission (Drp1) and fusion (mitofusins and OPA1). LRRK2 partially co-localizes with endosomal dynamin-1 or with mitofusins and OPA1 at mitochondrial membranes. The subcellular distribution and oligomeric complexes of dynamin GTPases are not altered by modulating LRRK2 in mouse brain, whereas mature OPA1 levels are reduced in G2019S PD brains. LRRK2 enhances mitofusin-1 GTP binding, whereas dynamin-1 and OPA1 serve as modest substrates of LRRK2-mediated phosphorylation in vitro. While dynamin GTPase orthologs are not required for LRRK2-induced toxicity in yeast, LRRK2 functionally interacts with dynamin-1 and mitofusin-1 in cultured neurons. LRRK2 attenuates neurite shortening induced by dynamin-1 by reducing its levels, whereas LRRK2 rescues impaired neurite outgrowth induced by mitofusin-1 potentially by reversing excessive mitochondrial fusion. Our study elucidates novel functional interactions of LRRK2 with dynamin-superfamily GTPases that implicate LRRK2 in the regulation of membrane dynamics important for endocytosis and mitochondrial morphology. PMID:24282027

  18. Macrophages, Inflammation, and Tumor Suppressors: ARF, a New Player in the Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paqui G. Través

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between tumor progression and innate immune system has been well established in the last years. Indeed, several lines of clinical evidence indicate that immune cells such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs interact with tumor cells, favoring growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of a variety of cancers. In most tumors, TAMs show properties of an alternative polarization phenotype (M2 characterized by the expression of a series of chemokines, cytokines, and proteases that promote immunosuppression, tumor proliferation, and spreading of the cancer cells. Tumor suppressor genes have been traditionally linked to the regulation of cancer progression; however, a growing body of evidence indicates that these genes also play essential roles in the regulation of innate immunity pathways through molecular mechanisms that are still poorly understood. In this paper, we provide an overview of the immunobiology of TAMs as well as what is known about tumor suppressors in the context of immune responses. Recent advances regarding the role of the tumor suppressor ARF as a regulator of inflammation and macrophage polarization are also reviewed.

  19. Macrophages, inflammation, and tumor suppressors: ARF, a new player in the game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Través, Paqui G; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between tumor progression and innate immune system has been well established in the last years. Indeed, several lines of clinical evidence indicate that immune cells such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) interact with tumor cells, favoring growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of a variety of cancers. In most tumors, TAMs show properties of an alternative polarization phenotype (M2) characterized by the expression of a series of chemokines, cytokines, and proteases that promote immunosuppression, tumor proliferation, and spreading of the cancer cells. Tumor suppressor genes have been traditionally linked to the regulation of cancer progression; however, a growing body of evidence indicates that these genes also play essential roles in the regulation of innate immunity pathways through molecular mechanisms that are still poorly understood. In this paper, we provide an overview of the immunobiology of TAMs as well as what is known about tumor suppressors in the context of immune responses. Recent advances regarding the role of the tumor suppressor ARF as a regulator of inflammation and macrophage polarization are also reviewed.

  20. Photo-triggering and secondary electron produced ionization in electric discharge ArF* excimer lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2011-10-01

    Electric discharge excimer lasers are sustained in multi-atmosphere attaching gas mixtures that are typically preionized to enable a reproducible, uniform glow, which maximizes optical quality and gain. This preionization is often accomplished using UV light produced by a corona discharge within the plasma cavity. To quantify the relationship between corona discharge properties and those of the laser discharge, the triggering of electron avalanche by preionizing UV light in an electric discharge-pumped ArF* excimer laser was numerically investigated using a two-dimensional model. The preionizing UV fluxes were generated by a corona-bar discharge driven by the same voltage pulse as the main discharge sustained in a multi-atmospheric Ne/Ar/Xe/F2 gas mixture. The resulting peak photo-electron density in the inter-electrode spacing is around 108 cm-3, and its distribution is biased toward the UV source. The preionization density increases with increasing dielectric constant and capacitance of the corona bar. The symmetry and uniformity of the discharge are, however, improved significantly once the main avalanche develops. In addition to bulk electron impact ionization, the ionization generated by sheath accelerated secondary electrons was found to be important in sustaining the discharge current at experimentally observed values. At peak current, the magnitude of the ionization by sheath accelerated electrons is comparable to that from bulk electron impact in the vicinity of the cathode.

  1. IKKβ-Mediated Resistance to Skin Cancer Development Is Ink4a/Arf-Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Angustias; Bravo, Ana; Suarez-Cabrera, Cristian; Alameda, Josefa P; Casanova, M Llanos; Lorz, Corina; Segrelles, Carmen; Segovia, José C; Paramio, Jesús M; Navarro, Manuel; Ramirez, Angel

    2017-09-01

    IKKβ (encoded by IKBKB) is a protein kinase that regulates the activity of numerous proteins important in several signaling pathways, such as the NF-κB pathway. IKKβ exerts a protumorigenic role in several animal models of lung, hepatic, intestinal, and oral cancer. In addition, genomic and proteomic studies of human tumors also indicate that IKBKB gene is amplified or overexpressed in multiple tumor types. Here, the relevance of IKKβ in skin cancer was determined by performing carcinogenesis studies in animal models overexpressing IKKβ in the basal skin layer. IKKβ overexpression resulted in a striking resistance to skin cancer development and an increased expression of several tumor suppressor proteins, such as p53, p16, and p19. Mechanistically, this skin tumor-protective role of IKKβ is independent of p53, but dependent on the activity of the Ink4a/Arf locus. Interestingly, in the absence of p16 and p19, IKKβ-increased expression favors the appearance of cutaneous spindle cell-like squamous cell carcinomas, which are highly aggressive tumors. These results reveal that IKKβ activity prevents skin tumor development, and shed light on the complex nature of IKKβ effects on cancer progression, as IKKβ can both promote and prevent carcinogenesis depending on the cell type or molecular context.Implications: The ability of IKKβ to promote or prevent carcinogenesis suggests the need for further evaluation when targeting this protein. Mol Cancer Res; 15(9); 1255-64. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Evaluation of IDEALSmile for 90-nm FLASH memory contact holes imaging with ArF scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Pietro; Capetti, Gianfranco; Loi, Sara; Lupo, Marco; Pepe, Annalisa; Saitoh, Kenji; Yamazoe, Kenji; Hasegawa, Yasuo; Iwasa, Junji; Toublan, Olivier R.

    2004-05-01

    According to sizes dictated by ITRS road map, contact holes are one of the most challenging features to be printed in the semiconductor manufacturing process. The development of 90[nm] technology FLASH memories requires a robust solution for printing contact holes down to 100[nm] on 200[nm] pitch. The delay of NGL development as well as open issues related to 157[nm] scanner introduction pushes the industry to find a solution for printing such tight features using existing ArF scanner. IDEALSmile technology from Canon was proven to be a good candidate for achieving such high resolution with sufficiently large through pitch process window using a binary mask, relatively simple to be manufactured, with a modified illumination and single exposure, with no impact on throughput and without any increase of cost of ownership. This paper analyses main issues related to the introduction of this new resolution enhancement technology on a real FLASH memory device, highlighting advantages as well as known problems still under investigation.

  3. Influence of resin properties to resist performance at ArF lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangwoong; Kim, Myungsun; Lee, Hong; Kim, Do Y.; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Boo Deuk; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Kyung-Mee; Lee, Shi Yong; Kim, Young Ho; Chon, Sang-Mun

    2004-05-01

    The ArF resist has been evaluated focusing on resin character such as molecular weight, monomer composition and polydispersity (Pd). The resin properties were investigated to elucidate that which parameter was affected to the line edge roughness (LER). The Pd was correlated with LER. As the Pd was large, the LER was small. The resin molecular weight and monomer composition were affected to their vertical profile. Low molecular weight portion rich resin resulted in round and t-top profile, whilst high molecular weight rich resin resulted in square profile. The amount of lower molecular weight fraction was changed by purification method. The lower molecular weight resin caused severe tapered profile. It was concluded that 1) shift of Mw to smaller and 2) higher content of low molecular size fraction lead to rounded and tapered pattern profile. Lot-to-lot stable good pattern profile has achieved by controlling polymer molecular weight and content of low molecular size fraction in small variation range.

  4. Interaction of ArF laser with dental hard tissue (AEM Study

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    Abbas Majdabadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Nowadays lasers are used as alternatives to the tooth preparation because of reducing pain and bloodshed. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of ArF laser on the dental hard tissues. Materials and Methods: For this research human molar teeth with no caries or dental restoration and enamel cracks were used. Irradiation laser energies were taken 95, 70 and 50 mJ for enamel and 80, 70 and 50 mJ for dentine. Then, for each of energy values pulse numbers (repetition rate were adjusted at 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000 and 1500. Ablation was carried out without water spray on both enamel and dentine. Finally, the dimensions of ablated areas were measured by using a camera connected to the computer and results were applied in graphs. Results: For each energy value, the ablation dimension increased by increasing pulse numbers. Ablation depth in dentine was more than that of for enamel. Trends of graphs for dentine and enamel were the same. SEM images of ablations by 95 mJ energy on enamel and 80 mJ energy on dentine showed sharp edges. Conclusion: Ablation depths increased by increasing pulse numbers, for each energy level. However, this increase was not that as expected, because the lack of water spray while irradiating.

  5. Evaluating the effect of climate change on areal reduction factors using regional climate model projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingwan; Sharma, Ashish; Johnson, Fiona; Evans, Jason

    2015-09-01

    Areal reduction factors (ARFs) are commonly used to transform point design rainfall to represent the average design rainfall for a catchment area. While there has been considerable attention paid in the research and engineering communities to the likely changes in rainfall intensity in future climates, the issue of changes to design areal rainfall has been largely ignored. This paper investigates the impact of climate change on ARFs. A new methodology for estimating changes in ARFs is presented. This method is used to assess changes in ARFs in the greater Sydney region using a high-resolution regional climate model (RCM). ARFs under present (1990-2009) and future (2040-2059) climate conditions were derived and compared for annual exceedance probabilities (AEPs) from 50% to 5% for durations ranging from 1 h to 120 h. The analysis shows two main trends in the future changes in ARFs. For the shortest duration events (1-h) the ARFs are found to increase which implies that these events will tend to have a larger spatial structure in the future than the current climate. In contrast, storms with durations between 6 and 72 h are likely to have decreased ARFs in the future, suggesting a more restricted spatial coverage of storms under a warming climate. The extent of the decrease varies with event frequency and catchment size. The largest decreases are found for large catchments and rare events. Although the results here are based on a single RCM and need to be confirmed in future work with multiple models, the framework that is proposed will be useful for future studies considering changes in the areal extent of rainfall extremes.

  6. Critical roles for Rac1 and Rac2 GTPases in B cell development and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Marita J; Ooi, Steen K T; Reynolds, Lucinda F; Smith, Susan Harless; Ruf, Sandra; Mathiot, Anne; Vanes, Lesley; Williams, David A; Cancro, Michael P; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2003-10-17

    The Rac1 guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) has been implicated in multiple cellular functions, including actin dynamics, proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and migration resulting from signaling by multiple receptors, including the B cell antigen receptor (BCR). We used conditional gene targeting to generate mice with specific Rac1 deficiency in the B cell lineage. In the absence of both Rac1 and the highly related Rac2, B cell development was almost completely blocked. Both GTPases were required to transduce BCR signals leading to proliferation, survival and up-regulation of BAFF-R, a receptor for BAFF, a key survival molecule required for B cell development and maintenance.

  7. The large GTPase Mx1 is involved in apical transport in MDCK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Florian; Greb, Christoph; Hollmann, Christina; Hönig, Ellena; Jacob, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    In epithelial cells apical proteins are transported by specific transport carriers to the correct membrane domain. The composition of these carriers is heterogeneous and comprises components such as motor proteins, annexins, lectins, Rab GTPases and cargo molecules. Here, we provide biochemical and fluorescence microscopic data to show that the dynamin-related large GTPase Mx1 is a component of post-Golgi vesicles carrying the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR) . Moreover, siRNA-mediated depletion of Mx1 significantly decreased the transport efficiency of apical proteins in MDCK cells. In conclusion, Mx1 plays a crucial role in the delivery of cargo molecules to the apical membrane of epithelial cells.

  8. Evolution of Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC) Rab GTPase-activating proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Gabernet-Castello, Carme; O'Reilly, Amanda J.; Dacks, Joel B.; Field, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Rab GTPases serve as major control elements in the coordination and definition of specific trafficking steps and intracellular compartments. Rab activity is modulated in part by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), and many RabGAPs share a Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC)–domain architecture, although the majority of TBC proteins are poorly characterized. We reconstruct the evolutionary history of the TBC family using ScrollSaw, a method for the phylogenetic analysis of pan-eukaryotic data sets, and find...

  9. Rem, a member of the RGK GTPases, inhibits recombinant CaV1.2 channels using multiple mechanisms that require distinct conformations of the GTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingting; Xu, Xianghua; Kernan, Timothy; Wu, Vincent; Colecraft, Henry M

    2010-05-15

    Rad/Rem/Gem/Kir (RGK) GTPases potently inhibit Ca(V)1 and Ca(V)2 (Ca(V)1-2) channels, a paradigm of ion channel regulation by monomeric G-proteins with significant physiological ramifications and potential biotechnology applications. The mechanism(s) underlying how RGK proteins inhibit I(Ca) is unknown, and it is unclear how key structural and regulatory properties of these GTPases (such as the role of GTP binding to the nucleotide binding domain (NBD), and the C-terminus which contains a membrane-targeting motif) feature in this effect. Here, we show that Rem inhibits Ca(V)1.2 channels by three independent mechanisms that rely on distinct configurations of the GTPase: (1) a reduction in surface density of channels is accomplished by enhancing dynamin-dependent endocytosis, (2) a diminution of channel open probability (P(o)) that occurs without impacting on voltage sensor movement, and (3) an immobilization of Ca(V) channel voltage sensors. The presence of both the Rem NBD and C-terminus (whether membrane-targeted or not) in one molecule is sufficient to reconstitute all three mechanisms. However, membrane localization of the NBD by a generic membrane-targeting module reconstitutes only the decreased P(o) function (mechanism 2). A point mutation that prevents GTP binding to the NBD selectively eliminates the capacity to immobilize voltage sensors (mechanism 3). The results reveal an uncommon multiplicity in the mechanisms Rem uses to inhibit I(Ca), predict new physiological dimensions of the RGK GTPase-Ca(V) channel crosstalk, and suggest original approaches for developing novel Ca(V) channel blockers.

  10. Candida albicans AGE3, the ortholog of the S. cerevisiae ARF-GAP-encoding gene GCS1, is required for hyphal growth and drug resistance.

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    Thomas Lettner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyphal growth and multidrug resistance of C. albicans are important features for virulence and antifungal therapy of this pathogenic fungus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show by phenotypic complementation analysis that the C. albicans gene AGE3 is the functional ortholog of the yeast ARF-GAP-encoding gene GCS1. The finding that the gene is required for efficient endocytosis points to an important functional role of Age3p in endosomal compartments. Most C. albicans age3Delta mutant cells which grew as cell clusters under yeast growth conditions showed defects in filamentation under different hyphal growth conditions and were almost completely disabled for invasive filamentous growth. Under hyphal growth conditions only a fraction of age3Delta cells shows a wild-type-like polarization pattern of the actin cytoskeleton and lipid rafts. Moreover, age3Delta cells were highly susceptible to several unrelated toxic compounds including antifungal azole drugs. Irrespective of the AGE3 genotype, C-terminal fusions of GFP to the drug efflux pumps Cdr1p and Mdr1p were predominantly localized in the plasma membrane. Moreover, the plasma membranes of wild-type and age3Delta mutant cells contained similar amounts of Cdr1p, Cdr2p and Mdr1p. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate that the defect in sustaining filament elongation is probably caused by the failure of age3Delta cells to polarize the actin cytoskeleton and possibly of inefficient endocytosis. The high susceptibility of age3Delta cells to azoles is not caused by inefficient transport of efflux pumps to the cell membrane. A possible role of a vacuolar defect of age3Delta cells in drug susceptibility is proposed and discussed. In conclusion, our study shows that the ARF-GAP Age3p is required for hyphal growth which is an important virulence factor of C. albicans and essential for detoxification of azole drugs which are routinely used for antifungal therapy. Thus, it

  11. Expression of linear and novel circular forms of an INK4/ARF-associated non-coding RNA correlates with atherosclerosis risk.

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    Christin E Burd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Human genome-wide association studies have linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on chromosome 9p21.3 near the INK4/ARF (CDKN2a/b locus with susceptibility to atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD. Although this locus encodes three well-characterized tumor suppressors, p16(INK4a, p15(INK4b, and ARF, the SNPs most strongly associated with ASVD are ∼120 kb from the nearest coding gene within a long non-coding RNA (ncRNA known as ANRIL (CDKN2BAS. While individuals homozygous for the atherosclerotic risk allele show decreased expression of ANRIL and the coding INK4/ARF transcripts, the mechanism by which such distant genetic variants influence INK4/ARF expression is unknown. Here, using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and analysis of next-generation RNA sequencing datasets, we determined the structure and abundance of multiple ANRIL species. Each of these species was present at very low copy numbers in primary and cultured cells; however, only the expression of ANRIL isoforms containing exons proximal to the INK4/ARF locus correlated with the ASVD risk alleles. Surprisingly, RACE also identified transcripts containing non-colinear ANRIL exonic sequences, whose expression also correlated with genotype and INK4/ARF expression. These non-polyadenylated RNAs resisted RNAse R digestion and could be PCR amplified using outward-facing primers, suggesting they represent circular RNA structures that could arise from by-products of mRNA splicing. Next-generation DNA sequencing and splice prediction algorithms identified polymorphisms within the ASVD risk interval that may regulate ANRIL splicing and circular ANRIL (cANRIL production. These results identify novel circular RNA products emanating from the ANRIL locus and suggest causal variants at 9p21.3 regulate INK4/ARF expression and ASVD risk by modulating ANRIL expression and/or structure.

  12. The ARF, AUX/IAA and GH3 gene families in citrus: genome-wide identification and expression analysis during fruitlet drop from abscission zone A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Rangjin; Pang, Shaoping; Ma, Yanyan; Deng, Lie; He, Shaolan; Yi, Shilai; Lv, Qiang; Zheng, Yongqiang

    2015-12-01

    Completion of the whole genome sequencing of citrus enabled us to perform genome-wide identification and functional analysis of the gene families involved in agronomic traits and morphological diversity of citrus. In this study, 22 CitARF, 11 CitGH3 and 26 CitAUX/IAA genes were identified in citrus, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the genes of each gene family could be subdivided into three groups and showed strong evolutionary conservation. The GH3 and AUX/IAA gene families shrank and ARF gene family was highly conserved in the citrus genome after speciation from Arabidopsis thaliana. Tissue-specific expression profiles revealed that 54 genes were expressed in at least one tissue while just 5 genes including CitARF07, CitARF20, CitGH3.04, CitAUX/IAA25 and CitAUX/IAA26 with very low expression level in all tissues tested, suggesting that the CitARF, CitGH3 and CitAUX/IAA gene families played important roles in the development of citrus organs. In addition, our data found that the expression of 2 CitARF, 4 CitGH3 and 4 AUX/IAA genes was affected by IAA treatment, and 7 genes including, CitGH3.04, CitGH3.07, CitAUX/IAA03, CitAUX/IAA04, CitAUX/IAA18, CitAUX/IAA19 and CitAUX/IAA23 were related to fruitlet abscission. This study provides a foundation for future studies on elucidating the precise role of citrus ARF, GH3 and AUX/IAA genes in early steps of auxin signal transduction and open up a new opportunity to uncover the molecular mechanism underlying citrus fruitlet abscission.

  13. Modulation of Plant RAB GTPase-Mediated Membrane Trafficking Pathway at the Interface Between Plants and Obligate Biotrophic Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Noriko; Betsuyaku, Shigeyuki; Shimada, Takashi L; Ebine, Kazuo; Ito, Emi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Takano, Yoshitaka; Fukuda, Hiroo; Nakano, Akihiko; Ueda, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    RAB5 is a small GTPase that acts in endosomal trafficking. In addition to canonical RAB5 members that are homologous to animal RAB5, land plants harbor a plant-specific RAB5, the ARA6 group, which regulates trafficking events distinct from canonical RAB5 GTPases. Here, we report that plant RAB5, both canonical and plant-specific members, accumulate at the interface between host plants and biotrophic fungal and oomycete pathogens. Biotrophic fungi and oomycetes colonize living plant tissues by establishing specialized infection hyphae, the haustorium, within host plant cells. We found that Arabidopsis thaliana ARA6/RABF1, a plant-specific RAB5, is localized to the specialized membrane that surrounds the haustorium, the extrahaustorial membrane (EHM), formed by the A. thaliana-adapted powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces orontii Whereas the conventional RAB5 ARA7/RABF2b was also localized to the EHM, endosomal SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) and RAB5-activating proteins were not, which suggests that the EHM has modified endosomal characteristic. The recruitment of host RAB5 to the EHM was a property shared by the barley-adapted powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei and the oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, but the extrahyphal membrane surrounding the hypha of the hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum higginsianum at the biotrophic stage was devoid of RAB5. The localization of RAB5 to the EHM appears to correlate with the functionality of the haustorium. Our discovery sheds light on a novel relationship between plant RAB5 and obligate biotrophic pathogens.

  14. The small GTPase Cdc42 modulates the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Mai [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Kitaguchi, Tetsuya [Cell Signaling Group, Waseda Bioscience Research Institute in Singapore (WABOIS), Waseda University, 11 Biopolis Way, 05-01/02 Helios, Singapore 138667 (Singapore); Numano, Rika [The Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS), Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tennpaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Ikematsu, Kazuya [Forensic Pathology and Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kakeyama, Masaki [Laboratory of Environmental Health Sciences, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Murata, Masayuki; Sato, Ken [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Tsuboi, Takashi, E-mail: takatsuboi@bio.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regulation of exocytosis by Rho GTPase Cdc42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of fusion events from newly recruited vesicles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles. -- Abstract: Although the small GTPase Rho family Cdc42 has been shown to facilitate exocytosis through increasing the amount of hormones released, the precise mechanisms regulating the quantity of hormones released on exocytosis are not well understood. Here we show by live cell imaging analysis under TIRF microscope and immunocytochemical analysis under confocal microscope that Cdc42 modulated the number of fusion events and the number of dense-core vesicles produced in the cells. Overexpression of a wild-type or constitutively-active form of Cdc42 strongly facilitated high-KCl-induced exocytosis from the newly recruited plasma membrane vesicles in PC12 cells. By contrast, a dominant-negative form of Cdc42 inhibited exocytosis from both the newly recruited and previously docked plasma membrane vesicles. The number of intracellular dense-core vesicles was increased by the overexpression of both a wild-type and constitutively-active form of Cdc42. Consistently, activation of Cdc42 by overexpression of Tuba, a Golgi-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42 increased the number of intracellular dense-core vesicles, whereas inhibition of Cdc42 by overexpression of the Cdc42/Rac interactive binding domain of neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein decreased the number of them. These findings suggest that Cdc42 facilitates exocytosis by modulating both the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles and the production of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells.

  15. Neuronal chemorepellent Slit2 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell migration by suppressing small GTPase Rac1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Hou, Jie; Hu, Xing; Wang, Xuerong; Xiao, Yan; Mou, Yongshan; De Leon, Hector

    2006-03-01

    The Slits are secreted proteins with roles in axonal guidance and leukocyte migration. On binding to Robo receptors, Slit2 repels developing axons and inhibits leukocyte chemotaxis. Slit2 is cleaved into Slit2-N, a protein tightly binding to cell membranes, and Slit2-C, a diffusible fragment. In the present study, we characterized the functional role of Slit2-N in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the cell association properties of 2 truncated versions of Slit2-N. Here, we document for the first time that Slit2-N is a chemorepellent of VSMCs. Intact blood vessels expressed Slit2 and Robo receptors as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time PCR. Recombinant Slit2-N prevented the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated migration of VSMCs. Slit2-N also abrogated PDGF-mediated activation of small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rac1, a member of the Rho GTPase superfamily of proteins involved in regulating the actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, Slit2-N inhibited the PDGF-induced formation of lamellipodia, a crucial cytoskeletal reorganization event for cell motility. Slit2-N had no effect on the PDGF-mediated increase in DNA synthesis determined by [3H]thymidine uptake, suggesting that VSMC growth is unaffected by Slit2. Analysis of 2 engineered Slit2-N fragments (Slit2-N/1118 and Slit2-N/1121) indicated that 3 amino acids upstream of the putative cleavage site (Arg1121, Thr1122) are involved in the association of Slit2-N to the cell membrane. Our data assign a novel functional role to Slit2 in vascular function and show that cell guidance mechanisms that operate in the developing central nervous system are conserved in VSMCs.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleoside diphosphate kinase inactivates small GTPases leading to evasion of innate immunity.

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    Jim Sun

    Full Text Available Defining the mechanisms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb persistence in the host macrophage and identifying mycobacterial factors responsible for it are keys to better understand tuberculosis pathogenesis. The emerging picture from ongoing studies of macrophage deactivation by Mtb suggests that ingested bacilli secrete various virulence determinants that alter phagosome biogenesis, leading to arrest of Mtb vacuole interaction with late endosomes and lysosomes. While most studies focused on Mtb interference with various regulators of the endosomal compartment, little attention was paid to mechanisms by which Mtb neutralizes early macrophage responses such as the NADPH oxidase (NOX2 dependent oxidative burst. Here we applied an antisense strategy to knock down Mtb nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk and obtained a stable mutant (Mtb Ndk-AS that displayed attenuated intracellular survival along with reduced persistence in the lungs of infected mice. At the molecular level, pull-down experiments showed that Ndk binds to and inactivates the small GTPase Rac1 in the macrophage. This resulted in the exclusion of the Rac1 binding partner p67(phox from phagosomes containing Mtb or Ndk-coated latex beads. Exclusion of p67(phox was associated with a defect of both NOX2 assembly and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in response to wild type Mtb. In contrast, Mtb Ndk-AS, which lost the capacity to disrupt Rac1-p67(phox interaction, induced a strong ROS production. Given the established link between NOX2 activation and apoptosis, the proportion of Annexin V positive cells and levels of intracellular active caspase 3 were significantly higher in cells infected with Mtb Ndk-AS compared to wild type Mtb. Thus, knock down of Ndk converted Mtb into a pro-apoptotic mutant strain that has a phenotype of increased susceptibility to intracellular killing and reduced virulence in vivo. Taken together, our in vitro and in vivo data revealed that Ndk

  17. GIMAP GTPase family genes: potential modifiers in autoimmune diabetes, asthma, and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Mirkka T; Laine, Antti-Pekka; Söderhäll, Cilla; Gruzieva, Olena; Rautio, Sini; Melén, Erik; Pershagen, Göran; Lähdesmäki, Harri J; Knip, Mikael; Ilonen, Jorma; Henttinen, Tiina A; Kere, Juha; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2015-06-15

    GTPase of the immunity-associated protein (GIMAP) family members are differentially regulated during human Th cell differentiation and have been previously connected to immune-mediated disorders in animal studies. GIMAP4 is believed to contribute to the Th cell subtype-driven immunological balance via its role in T cell survival. GIMAP5 has a key role in BB-DR rat and NOD mouse lymphopenia. To elucidate GIMAP4 and GIMAP5 function and role in human immunity, we conducted a study combining genetic association in different immunological diseases and complementing functional analyses. Single nucleotide polymorphisms tagging the GIMAP haplotype variation were genotyped in Finnish type 1 diabetes (T1D) families and in a prospective Swedish asthma and allergic sensitization birth cohort. Initially, GIMAP5 rs6965571 was associated with risk for asthma and allergic sensitization (odds ratio [OR] 3.74, p = 0.00072, and OR 2.70, p = 0.0063, respectively) and protection from T1D (OR 0.64, p = 0.0058); GIMAP4 rs13222905 was associated with asthma (OR 1.28, p = 0.035) and allergic sensitization (OR 1.27, p = 0.0068). However, after false discovery rate correction for multiple testing, only the associations of GIMAP4 with allergic sensitization and GIMAP5 with asthma remained significant. In addition, transcription factor binding sites surrounding the associated loci were predicted. A gene-gene interaction in the T1D data were observed between the IL2RA rs2104286 and GIMAP4 rs9640279 (OR 1.52, p = 0.0064) and indicated between INS rs689 and GIMAP5 rs2286899. The follow-up functional analyses revealed lower IL-2RA expression upon GIMAP4 knockdown and an effect of GIMAP5 rs2286899 genotype on protein expression. Thus, the potential role of GIMAP4 and GIMAP5 as modifiers of immune-mediated diseases cannot be discarded.

  18. The small GTPase RhoB regulates TNFα signaling in endothelial cells.

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    Jeffrey Kroon

    Full Text Available The inflammatory response of endothelial cells triggered by cytokines such as TNFα and IL1β plays a pivotal role in innate immunity. Upon pro-inflammatory cytokine stimulation, endothelial cells produce chemokines and cytokines that attract and activate leukocytes, and express high levels of leukocyte adhesion molecules. This process is mediated by intracellular signaling cascades triggered by activation of e.g. the TNFα receptor (TNFR that lead to the activation of the NFκB transcription factor and of MAP kinases, which in turn activate inflammatory gene transcription. We found that the small GTPase RhoB was strongly and rapidly upregulated in primary human endothelial cells by TNFα, IL1β and LPS. We subsequently investigated the role of RhoB in the regulation of TNFR signaling in endothelial cells by silencing RhoB expression with siRNA. We provide evidence that the TNFα-induced activation of p38 MAP kinase is strongly dependent on RhoB, but not on RhoA, while JNK activation is regulated by both RhoB and RhoA. Consistent with the important role of p38 MAP kinase in inflammation, we demonstrate that loss of RhoB impairs TNFα-induced ICAM-1 expression and reduces cell production of IL6 and IL8. In addition, we show that RhoB silencing alters the intracellular traffic of TNFα after endocytosis. Since RhoB is a known regulator of the intracellular traffic of membrane receptors, our data suggest that RhoB controls TNFα signaling through the regulation of the TNFR traffic.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis nucleoside diphosphate kinase inactivates small GTPases leading to evasion of innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Sun

    Full Text Available Defining the mechanisms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb persistence in the host macrophage and identifying mycobacterial factors responsible for it are keys to better understand tuberculosis pathogenesis. The emerging picture from ongoing studies of macrophage deactivation by Mtb suggests that ingested bacilli secrete various virulence determinants that alter phagosome biogenesis, leading to arrest of Mtb vacuole interaction with late endosomes and lysosomes. While most studies focused on Mtb interference with various regulators of the endosomal compartment, little attention was paid to mechanisms by which Mtb neutralizes early macrophage responses such as the NADPH oxidase (NOX2 dependent oxidative burst. Here we applied an antisense strategy to knock down Mtb nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk and obtained a stable mutant (Mtb Ndk-AS that displayed attenuated intracellular survival along with reduced persistence in the lungs of infected mice. At the molecular level, pull-down experiments showed that Ndk binds to and inactivates the small GTPase Rac1 in the macrophage. This resulted in the exclusion of the Rac1 binding partner p67(phox from phagosomes containing Mtb or Ndk-coated latex beads. Exclusion of p67(phox was associated with a defect of both NOX2 assembly and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in response to wild type Mtb. In contrast, Mtb Ndk-AS, which lost the capacity to disrupt Rac1-p67(phox interaction, induced a strong ROS production. Given the established link between NOX2 activation and apoptosis, the proportion of Annexin V positive cells and levels of intracellular active caspase 3 were significantly higher in cells infected with Mtb Ndk-AS compared to wild type Mtb. Thus, knock down of Ndk converted Mtb into a pro-apoptotic mutant strain that has a phenotype of increased susceptibility to intracellular killing and reduced virulence in vivo. Taken together, our in vitro and in vivo data revealed that Ndk

  20. The small GTPase Cdc42 is necessary for primary ciliogenesis in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xiaofeng; Fogelgren, Ben; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2011-06-24

    Primary cilia are found on many epithelial cell types, including renal tubular epithelial cells, where they participate in flow sensing. Disruption of cilia function has been linked to the pathogenesis of polycystic kidney disease. We demonstrated previously that the exocyst, a highly conserved eight-protein membrane trafficking complex, localizes to primary cilia of renal tubular epithelial cells, is required for ciliogenesis, biochemically and genetically interacts with polycystin-2 (the protein product of the polycystic kidney disease 2 gene), and, when disrupted, results in MAPK pathway activation both in vitro and in vivo. The small GTPase Cdc42 is a candidate for regulation of the exocyst at the primary cilium. Here, we demonstrate that Cdc42 biochemically interacts with Sec10, a crucial component of the exocyst complex, and that Cdc42 colocalizes with Sec10 at the primary cilium. Expression of dominant negative Cdc42 and shRNA-mediated knockdown of both Cdc42 and Tuba, a Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, inhibit ciliogenesis in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Furthermore, exocyst Sec8 and polycystin-2 no longer localize to primary cilia or the ciliary region following Cdc42 and Tuba knockdown. We also show that Sec10 directly interacts with Par6, a member of the Par complex that itself directly interacts with Cdc42. Finally, we show that Cdc42 knockdown results in activation of the MAPK pathway, something observed in cells with dysfunctional primary cilia. These data support a model in which Cdc42 localizes the exocyst to the primary cilium, whereupon the exocyst then targets and docks vesicles carrying proteins necessary for ciliogenesis.

  1. The Small GTPase Cdc42 Is Necessary for Primary Ciliogenesis in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xiaofeng; Fogelgren, Ben; Lipschutz, Joshua H.

    2011-01-01

    Primary cilia are found on many epithelial cell types, including renal tubular epithelial cells, where they participate in flow sensing. Disruption of cilia function has been linked to the pathogenesis of polycystic kidney disease. We demonstrated previously that the exocyst, a highly conserved eight-protein membrane trafficking complex, localizes to primary cilia of renal tubular epithelial cells, is required for ciliogenesis, biochemically and genetically interacts with polycystin-2 (the protein product of the polycystic kidney disease 2 gene), and, when disrupted, results in MAPK pathway activation both in vitro and in vivo. The small GTPase Cdc42 is a candidate for regulation of the exocyst at the primary cilium. Here, we demonstrate that Cdc42 biochemically interacts with Sec10, a crucial component of the exocyst complex, and that Cdc42 colocalizes with Sec10 at the primary cilium. Expression of dominant negative Cdc42 and shRNA-mediated knockdown of both Cdc42 and Tuba, a Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, inhibit ciliogenesis in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Furthermore, exocyst Sec8 and polycystin-2 no longer localize to primary cilia or the ciliary region following Cdc42 and Tuba knockdown. We also show that Sec10 directly interacts with Par6, a member of the Par complex that itself directly interacts with Cdc42. Finally, we show that Cdc42 knockdown results in activation of the MAPK pathway, something observed in cells with dysfunctional primary cilia. These data support a model in which Cdc42 localizes the exocyst to the primary cilium, whereupon the exocyst then targets and docks vesicles carrying proteins necessary for ciliogenesis. PMID:21543338

  2. 香蕉ARF3基因全长克隆及其对枯萎病菌的响应特性分析%Cloning the Full-length cDNA of ARF3 Gene from Banana (Musa acuminata) and Characterizing Its Response to Banana Fusarium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨浩; 杜中军; 徐立; 唐志鹏; 李志英

    2013-01-01

    ARF3 gene is one of member of the ARF gene family. The functions of ARF3 gene are considered to involve in cell signal transduction, membrane transportation and vesicle transporting. This study has designed four specific primers according to the core sequence fragment, which was obtained from banana transcriptome. The full cDNA of the ARF3 was cloned from banana (Musa acuminata) by using the approaches of RACE and PCR, the cloned gene was named MuARF3. The gene sequence of 1 427 bp contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1 166 bp in length that encodes 338 amino acid residuals. BLAST analysis showed that the full-length nucleotide sequence of the ARF3 has a range from 69% to 74% similarities to the reported ARF3 gene of the other plants as well as from 81% to 93% similarities in amino acid sequence. Through infecting banana roots inoculated with banana Fusarium race 4, the expression level of MuARF3 was dramatically elevated to the highest point at 12 h after inoculation and then gradually declined with time elapse. Therefore, the cloned MuARF3 gene has active response to infection of Fusarium physiological race No.4, which might provide a reference for the further use of the gene.%  ARF3基因属于ARF基因家族的成员,主要功能是参与细胞信号转导、跨膜运输及囊泡转运.本研究根据已获得的基因片段设计4条特异性引物,采用RACE技术克隆获得了香蕉ARF3基因cDNA全长序列,命名为MuARF3.该基因序列全长共1427 bp,开放阅读框长度为1166 bp,共编码338个氨基酸.BLAST结果显示,香蕉ARF3基因全长核苷酸序列与已报道的其它植物ARF3具有69%~74%的相似性,氨基酸序列有81%~93%的相似性.用香蕉枯萎病菌4号生理小种侵染香蕉根系后,分析得出的结果表明,侵染根系后香蕉ARF3基因的表达量在侵染后12 h达到最高,并且随着时间推移逐渐降低.由此说明本研究获得的MuARF3基因对香蕉枯萎病菌4号生理小种侵染具有应急

  3. ULAKBİM Cahit Arf Bilgi Merkezinde Belge Sağlamanın Maliyet Analizi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurdagül Ünal

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to review the document delivery requests submitted to the Cahit Arf Information Center, Document Delivery Services Unit of the National Academic Network and Information Center (ULAKBIM. It aims to determine which one is more economic and dispatch in terms of the length of time (in days it takes to fill a request and the unit cost of supplying requests from printed journals and electronic ones. We tracked the data with regards to document delivery requests that were submitted to the Unit for the year 2000 on October and November. Information (labour cost, corrective maintenance, cleaning, communication, etc. was obtained from the Center to calculate the unit cost. In order to calculate the unit cost, the cost types such as labour cost, raw product and general cost were identified and the total cost was divided to the total number of document delivery request. The unit cost of supplying an article in the year 2000 was found as about 3 million Turkish Liras (According to the Consumer Price Index of September 2004, the unit cost of a supplied document was 8.690.541 Turkish Liras. From submission to the mailing of the document, it took a total of 15 days to fill a document delivery request. Since the procedure of supplying the electronic or printed documents was not different in the Unit, the length of time and unit cost were almost the same for supplying the documents from printed journals and electronic ones. Bu araştırmada amaç, Ulusal Akademik Ağ ve Bilgi Merkezi (ULAKBİM Cahit Arf Bilgi Merkezi (CABİM Belge Sağlama Hizmetleri Biriminde basılı dergilerden sağlanan isteklerle elektronik dergilerden sağlanan istekleri süre ve birim maliyet açısından karşılaştırarak hangisinin daha hızlı ve ekonomik olduğunu belirlemektir. Çalışmada, 2000 yılının Ekim ve Kasım aylarında Birime yapılan 9213 belge sağlama isteği izlenmiş ve bu isteklerin birim maliyetim bulmak için gerekli veriler (işçilik, bak

  4. Rho family GTPase Chp/RhoV induces PC12 apoptotic cell death via JNK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepelev, Mikhail V; Chernoff, Jonathan; Korobko, Igor V

    2011-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate numerous cellular processes including apoptosis. Chp/RhoV is an atypical Rho GTPase which functions are poorly understood. Here we investigated the role of Chp in regulation of cell viability using PC12 cells with inducible expression of Chp as a model. We found that expression of Chp results in apoptosis in PC12 cells. Chp-induced apoptosis was accompanied by activation of JNK signaling and both death receptor-mediated and mitochondrial apoptotic pathways as justified by caspase-8 and caspase-9 activation, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of JNK by SP600125 rescued PC12 cells from Chp-triggered cell death and attenuated activation of caspases-9 and -3/7 suggesting that activation of JNK mediates pro-apoptotic effect of Chp. Expression of Chp resulted in increased phosphorylation of c-Jun in PC12 cells, and Chp expression in HE K293 cells upregulated AP-1-dependent transcription in a JNK-dependent manner. Together results of our study reveal the role of Chp GTPase as a putative regulator of JNK-dependent apoptotic death in PC12 cells, similarly to previously described pro-apoptotic activity of the related Cdc42 and Rac1 GTPases.

  5. The Rho-GTPase cdc42 regulates neural progenitor fate at the apical surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappello, Silvia; Attardo, Alessio; Wu, Xunwei

    2006-01-01

    the fundamental difference between these progenitors. Here we show that the conditional deletion of the small Rho-GTPase cdc42 at different stages of neurogenesis in mouse telencephalon results in an immediate increase in basal mitoses. Whereas cdc42-deficient progenitors have normal cell cycle length...

  6. The immunity-related GTPase Irga6 dimerizes in a parallel head-to-head fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Kathrin; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Faelber, Katja; Fröhlich, Chris; Howard, Jonathan; Daumke, Oliver

    2016-03-02

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) constitute a powerful cell-autonomous resistance system against several intracellular pathogens. Irga6 is a dynamin-like protein that oligomerizes at the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (PVM) of Toxoplasma gondii leading to its vesiculation. Based on a previous biochemical analysis, it has been proposed that the GTPase domains of Irga6 dimerize in an antiparallel fashion during oligomerization. We determined the crystal structure of an oligomerization-impaired Irga6 mutant bound to a non-hydrolyzable GTP analog. Contrary to the previous model, the structure shows that the GTPase domains dimerize in a parallel fashion. The nucleotides in the center of the interface participate in dimerization by forming symmetric contacts with each other and with the switch I region of the opposing Irga6 molecule. The latter contact appears to activate GTP hydrolysis by stabilizing the position of the catalytic glutamate 106 in switch I close to the active site. Further dimerization contacts involve switch II, the G4 helix and the trans stabilizing loop. The Irga6 structure features a parallel GTPase domain dimer, which appears to be a unifying feature of all dynamin and septin superfamily members. This study contributes important insights into the assembly and catalytic mechanisms of IRG proteins as prerequisite to understand their anti-microbial action.

  7. Divergent functions of the Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 in podocyte injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blattner, Simone M; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Nishio, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    Podocytes are highly specialized epithelial cells with complex actin cytoskeletal architecture crucial for maintenance of the glomerular filtration barrier. The mammalian Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 are molecular switches that control many cellular processes, but are best known for their roles in ...

  8. G domain dimerization controls dynamin's assembly-stimulated GTPase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappie, Joshua S.; Acharya, Sharmistha; Leonard, Marilyn; Schmid, Sandra L.; Dyda, Fred (NIH); (Scripps)

    2010-06-14

    Dynamin is an atypical GTPase that catalyses membrane fission during clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The mechanisms of dynamin's basal and assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis are unknown, though both are indirectly influenced by the GTPase effector domain (GED). Here we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a human dynamin 1-derived minimal GTPase-GED fusion protein, which was dimeric in the presence of the transition state mimic GDP.AlF{sub 4}{sup -}. The structure reveals dynamin's catalytic machinery and explains how assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis is achieved through G domain dimerization. A sodium ion present in the active site suggests that dynamin uses a cation to compensate for the developing negative charge in the transition state in the absence of an arginine finger. Structural comparison to the rat dynamin G domain reveals key conformational changes that promote G domain dimerization and stimulated hydrolysis. The structure of the GTPase-GED fusion protein dimer provides insight into the mechanisms underlying dynamin-catalysed membrane fission.

  9. Human GTPases associate with RNA polymerase II to mediate its nuclear import.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carré, Clément; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2011-10-01

    Small GTPases share a biochemical mechanism and act as binary molecular switches. One important function of small GTPases in the cell is nucleocytoplasmic transport of both proteins and RNA. Here, we show the stable association of human GPN1 and GPN3, small GTPases related to Ran, with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) isolated from either the cytoplasmic or nuclear fraction. GPN1 and GPN3 directly interact with RNAPII subunit 7 (RPB7)/RPB4 and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII. Depletion of GPN1 or GPN3 using small interfering RNAs led to decreased RNAPII levels in the nucleus and an accumulation of this enzyme in the cytoplasm of human cells. Furthermore, isolation of a GPN1/GPN3/RNAPII complex from stable cell lines expressing a dominant negative GPN1 harboring mutations in the GTP-binding pocket demonstrated a role for these proteins in nuclear import of RNAPII. Thus, GPN1/GPN3 define a new family of small GTPases that are specialized for the transport of RNA polymerase II into the nucleus.

  10. Distinct actions of Rab3 and Rab27 GTPases on late stages of exocytosis of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazares, Victor A; Subramani, Arasakumar; Saldate, Johnny J; Hoerauf, Widmann; Stuenkel, Edward L

    2014-09-01

    Rab GTPases associated with insulin-containing secretory granules (SGs) are key in targeting, docking and assembly of molecular complexes governing pancreatic β-cell exocytosis. Four Rab3 isoforms along with Rab27A are associated with insulin granules, yet elucidation of the distinct roles of these Rab families on exocytosis remains unclear. To define specific actions of these Rab families we employ Rab3GAP and/or EPI64A GTPase-activating protein overexpression in β-cells from wild-type or Ashen mice to selectively transit the entire Rab3 family or Rab27A to a GDP-bound state. Ashen mice carry a spontaneous mutation that eliminates Rab27A expression. Using membrane capacitance measurements we find that GTP/GDP nucleotide cycling of Rab27A is essential for generation of the functionally defined immediately releasable pool (IRP) and central to regulating the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP). By comparison, nucleotide cycling of Rab3 GTPases, but not of Rab27A, is essential for a kinetically rapid filling of the RRP with SGs. Aside from these distinct functions, Rab3 and Rab27A GTPases demonstrate considerable functional overlap in building the readily releasable granule pool. Hence, while Rab3 and Rab27A cooperate to generate release-ready SGs in β-cells, they also direct unique kinetic and functional properties of the exocytotic pathway.

  11. Rho-family GTPase Cdc42 controls migration of Langerhans cells in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luckashenak, Nancy; Wähe, Anna; Breit, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    and contributions of this cell type. To target the migratory properties of DCs, we generated mice lacking the Rho-family GTPase Cdc42 specifically in DCs. In these animals, the initial seeding of the epidermis with LCs is functional, resulting in slightly reduced Langerhans cell numbers. However, Cdc42-deficient...

  12. A novel zinc finger protein Zfp277 mediates transcriptional repression of the Ink4a/arf locus through polycomb repressive complex 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Negishi, Masamitsu; Saraya, Atsunori; Mochizuki, Shinobu

    2010-01-01

    . METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the function of Zinc finger domain-containing protein 277 (Zfp277), a novel zinc finger protein that interacts with the PcG protein Bmi1. Zfp277 binds to the Ink4a/Arf locus in a Bmi1-independent manner and interacts with polycomb repressor complex (PRC) 1 through......BACKGROUND: Polycomb group (PcG) proteins play a crucial role in cellular senescence as key transcriptional regulators of the Ink4a/Arf tumor suppressor gene locus. However, how PcG complexes target and contribute to stable gene silencing of the Ink4a/Arf locus remains little understood...... direct interaction with Bmi1. Loss of Zfp277 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) caused dissociation of PcG proteins from the Ink4a/Arf locus, resulting in premature senescence associated with derepressed p16(Ink4a) and p19(Arf) expression. Levels of both Zfp277 and PcG proteins inversely correlated...

  13. Expression of Rho GTPases family in melanoma cells and its influence on cytoskeleton and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Si-Jian; Zhang, Wei; Ni, Na-Na; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Xiao-Po; Lin, You-Kun; Sun, Jian-Fang

    2017-05-02

    Rho GTPases family members influenced the filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque of melanoma cells through regulating cytoskeleton recombination. The role of Rho GTPases family in the migration and invasion of melanoma and its molecular mechanism were explored. The morphological difference between three types of melanoma cells (M14, A375 and MV3) and human melanocyte (MC) was observed by the Hoffman microscope. Cells were stained by phalloidin labeled by rhodamine. The differences between 4 types of cells in filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque (microfilament is the main constituent) were observed under the super-high resolution microscope. The migration ability of 4 types of cells was detected by Transwell migration assay. QPCR was used to detect the mRNA transcription level of Rho GTPases family. WB was adopted to detect the expression of RhoD and DIAPH2 proteins. There were significant differences in filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque between MC and 3 types of melanoma cells (M14, A375 and MV3). MC did not have stress fiber or adhesion plaque, while M14, A375 and MV3 had stress fiber and adhesion plaque. All 4 types of cells had thin and short filopodia. MV3 had fewer but thicker stress fibers than the latter two. Transwell migration test indicated the followings: M14 and A375 had a similar high migration rate; the migration rate of MV3 was slightly low; MC did not have the ability of transmembrane migration. QPCR results of Rho GTPases family in 4 types of cells showed the change corresponding to immunofluorescence. WB results showed that RhoD was barely expressed in M14, A375 or MV3. DIAPH2, the downstream effector molecule of RhoD, had the corresponding change. Rho GTPases influences the migration and invasion of melanoma cells through regulating filopodia, lamellipodia, stress fiber and adhesion plaque (microfilament is the main constituent).

  14. GTPase activity plays a key role in the pathobiology of LRRK2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulan Xiong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene are associated with late-onset, autosomal-dominant, familial Parkinson's disease (PD and also contribute to sporadic disease. The LRRK2 gene encodes a large protein with multiple domains, including functional Roc GTPase and protein kinase domains. Mutations in LRRK2 most likely cause disease through a toxic gain-of-function mechanism. The expression of human LRRK2 variants in cultured primary neurons induces toxicity that is dependent on intact GTP binding or kinase activities. However, the mechanism(s underlying LRRK2-induced neuronal toxicity is poorly understood, and the contribution of GTPase and/or kinase activity to LRRK2 pathobiology is not well defined. To explore the pathobiology of LRRK2, we have developed a model of LRRK2 cytotoxicity in the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Protein domain analysis in this model reveals that expression of GTPase domain-containing fragments of human LRRK2 are toxic. LRRK2 toxicity in yeast can be modulated by altering GTPase activity and is closely associated with defects in endocytic vesicular trafficking and autophagy. These truncated LRRK2 variants induce similar toxicity in both yeast and primary neuronal models and cause similar vesicular defects in yeast as full-length LRRK2 causes in primary neurons. The toxicity induced by truncated LRRK2 variants in yeast acts through a mechanism distinct from toxicity induced by human alpha-synuclein. A genome-wide genetic screen identified modifiers of LRRK2-induced toxicity in yeast including components of vesicular trafficking pathways, which can also modulate the trafficking defects caused by expression of truncated LRRK2 variants. Our results provide insight into the basic pathobiology of LRRK2 and suggest that the GTPase domain may contribute to the toxicity of LRRK2. These findings may guide future therapeutic strategies aimed at attenuating LRRK2-mediated neurodegeneration.

  15. Miro's N-Terminal GTPase Domain Is Required for Transport of Mitochondria into Axons and Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babic, Milos; Russo, Gary J.; Wellington, Andrea J.; Sangston, Ryan M.; Gonzalez, Migdalia

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamically transported in and out of neuronal processes to maintain neuronal excitability and synaptic function. In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GTPase Miro binds Milton/TRAK adaptor proteins linking microtubule motors to mitochondria. Here we show that Drosophila Miro (dMiro), which has previously been shown to be required for kinesin-driven axonal transport, is also critically required for the dynein-driven distribution of mitochondria into dendrites. In addition, we used the loss-of-function mutations dMiroT25N and dMiroT460N to determine the significance of dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains, respectively. Expression of dMiroT25N in the absence of endogenous dMiro caused premature lethality and arrested development at a pupal stage. dMiroT25N accumulated mitochondria in the soma of larval motor and sensory neurons, and prevented their kinesin-dependent and dynein-dependent distribution into axons and dendrites, respectively. dMiroT25N mutant mitochondria also were severely fragmented and exhibited reduced kinesin and dynein motility in axons. In contrast, dMiroT460N did not impair viability, mitochondrial size, or the distribution of mitochondria. However, dMiroT460N reduced dynein motility during retrograde mitochondrial transport in axons. Finally, we show that substitutions analogous to the constitutively active Ras-G12V mutation in dMiro's N-terminal and C-terminal GTPase domains cause neomorphic phenotypic effects that are likely unrelated to the normal function of each GTPase domain. Overall, our analysis indicates that dMiro's N-terminal GTPase domain is critically required for viability, mitochondrial size, and the distribution of mitochondria out of the neuronal soma regardless of the employed motor, likely by promoting the transition from a stationary to a motile state. PMID:25855186