WorldWideScience

Sample records for factbook examines statewide

  1. Statewide Factbook: Community and Technical Colleges of Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin. Div. of Community and Technical Colleges.

    Included in this statewide factbook for Texas community and technical colleges are the following eight sections, each with its own summary analysis. Section 1 reports on the annual headcount enrollment, which includes academic year 1994-1995 enrollment charts by type of major, gender, race/ethnicity, and tuition status, and a chart for enrollment…

  2. A Multigrade, Multiyear Statewide Examination of Reading Achievement: Examination of Reading Achievement Examining Variability between Districts, Schools, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelson, Jill L.; Dickinson, Emily R.; Cunningham, Brittany C.

    2016-01-01

    This brief examined the patterns of reading achievement using statewide data from all students (Grades 3-10) in multiple years to examine gaps based on student, school, and district characteristics. Results indicate reading achievement varied most between students within schools and that students' prior achievement was the strongest predictor of…

  3. A Multigrade, Multiyear Statewide Examination of Reading Achievement: Examination of Reading Achievement Examining Variability between Districts, Schools, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelson, Jill L.; Dickinson, Emily R.; Cunningham, Brittany C.

    2016-01-01

    This brief examined the patterns of reading achievement using statewide data from all students (Grades 3-10) in multiple years to examine gaps based on student, school, and district characteristics. Results indicate reading achievement varied most between students within schools and that students' prior achievement was the strongest predictor of…

  4. Curating the CIA World Factbook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Buneman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The CIA World Factbook is a prime example of a curated database – a database that is constructed and maintained with a great deal of human effort in collecting, verifying, and annotating data. Preservation of old versions of the Factbook is important for verification of citations; it is also essential for anyone interested in the history of the data such as demographic change. Although the Factbook has been published, both physically and electronically, only for the past 30 years, we appear in danger of losing this history. This paper investigates the issues involved in capturing the history of an evolving database and its application to the CIA World Factbook. In particular it shows that there is substantial added value to be gained by preserving databases in such a way that questions about the change in data, (longitudinal queries can be readily answered. Within this paper, we describe techniques for recording change in a curated database and we describe novel techniques for querying the change. Using the example of this archived curated database, we discuss the extent to which the accepted practices and terminology of archiving, curation and digital preservation apply to this important class of digital artefacts.

  5. A Statewide Study of Academic Variables Affecting Performance of Baccalaureate Nursing Graduates on Licensure Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Eleanor; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study validated findings from two previous studies investigating the relationships between admission selection variables and achievement in baccalaureate nursing programs and performance on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Results suggest that students' prenursing grade point average and American…

  6. Fifty states of self-control: A U.S. statewide examination of the initiation and inhibition dimensions of self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findley, Matthew; Brown, Ryan

    2017-02-26

    Individual differences in self-control have been shown to reflect two underlying dimensions: initiation and inhibition. We examined the possibility that degrees of self-control might likewise be modeled at a broader social level, similar to other socio-cultural differences that operate at an individual level (e.g., collectivism). To test this notion, we used a variety of mundane behaviors measured at the level of U.S. states to create inhibitory and initiatory indices of self-control at a collective level. We show that statewide levels of initiatory and inhibitory self-control, despite being correlated with one another, exhibit unique patterns of association with a wide range of outcomes, including homicide, suicide, home foreclosures, divorce, and infidelity. This study represents one of the first attempts to model the dimensional structure of self-control at a social level and supports the utility of conceptualizing self-control as an important socio-cultural variable.

  7. A Statewide Writing Assessment Model: Student Proficiency and Future Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dappen, Leon; Isernhagen, Jody; Anderson, Sue

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an examination of statewide district writing achievement gain data from the Nebraska Statewide Writing Assessment system and implications for statewide assessment writing models. The writing assessment program is used to gain compliance with the United States No Child Left Behind Law (NCLB), a federal effort to influence school…

  8. Louisiana's statewide beach cleanup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstedt, Dianne M.; Holmes, Joseph C.

    1989-01-01

    Litter along Lousiana's beaches has become a well-recognized problem. In September 1987, Louisiana's first statewide beach cleanup attracted about 3300 volunteers who filled 16,000 bags with trash collected along 15 beaches. An estimated 800,173 items were gathered. Forty percent of the items were made of plastic and 11% were of polystyrene. Of all the litter collected, 37% was beverage-related. Litter from the oil and gas, commercial fishing, and maritime shipping industries was found, as well as that left by recreational users. Although beach cleanups temporarily rid Louisiana beaches of litter, the real value of the effort is in public participation and education. Civic groups, school children, and individuals have benefited by increasing their awareness of the problems of trash disposal.

  9. Examining alternative scoring rubrics on a statewide test: The impact of different scoring methods on science and social studies performance assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Susan Dabney

    There is no consensus regarding the most reliable and valid scoring methods for the assessment of higher order thinking skills. Most of the research on alternative formats has focused on the scoring of writing ability. This study examined the value of different types of performance assessment scoring guides on state mandated science and social studies tests. A proportional stratified sample of raters were randomly assigned to one of four scoring groups: checklist, analytic rubric, holistic rubric, and generic rubrics. A fifth method, the weighted analytic rubric, was included by applying an algorithmic formula to the scores assigned by raters using the analytic rubric. A comparison of the mean scores for the five scoring groups suggests that there may be a difference in the way raters applied the rubric for each group. Although the literature suggests that it is possible to achieve high levels of inter-rater reliability, across forms of scoring, phi coefficients of moderate strength were obtained for three of the four constructed-response items. Results for each scoring group were compared indicating that item complexity may impact the level of inter-rate, reliability and the selection of the most reliable rubric for each discipline. Analytic rubrics appear to achieve more reliable results with less complex items. A multitrait-multimethod approach was utilized to investigate the external validity of the social studies and science tasks. As expected, there tended to be a stronger association between the PACT science constructed-response scores with scores based on science multiple-choice scores than between the science constructed-response scores and the writing ability subtest scores. A similar pattern was seen with social studies items. These results provide some evidence for the validity of the performance assessments. A post study survey completed by raters provided qualitative information regarding their thought processes and their primary focus during the

  10. Developing Assessment Techniques for Statewide Electronic Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Charles R.; Bertot, John Carlo

    1996-01-01

    Explores several methods through which to evaluate statewide electronic networks, and discusses key issues and preliminary findings that affect the successful evaluation of statewide networked services. (Author/AEF)

  11. Nuclear Proliferation Factbook. Prepared for the Subcommittees on Arms Control, International Security and Science and on International Economic Policy and Trade of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, U.S. House of Representatives and the Subcommittee on Energy, Nuclear Proliferation, and Federal Processes of the Committee on Governmental Affairs, U.S. Senate, 99th Congress, 1st session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC. Congressional Research Service.

    To provide a handy reference for those concerned with ways to avoid the further spread, or proliferation, of nuclear weapons, the House Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs have since 1977 sponsored periodic publication of the Nuclear Proliferation Factbook. This fourth edition of the factbook includes a…

  12. Challenges and Problems for Research in the Field of Statewide Exams. A Stock Taking of Differing Procedures and Standardization Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Esther Dominique; van Ackeren, Isabell

    2011-01-01

    Statewide exit examinations play an important role in discussions on school effectiveness. Referring to educational governance concepts, this paper presumes a relation between varying organizational structures of statewide examinations across states, and heterogeneous effects on school actors. It is assumed that their ability to affect work in…

  13. Challenges and Problems for Research in the Field of Statewide Exams. A Stock Taking of Differing Procedures and Standardization Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Esther Dominique; van Ackeren, Isabell

    2011-01-01

    Statewide exit examinations play an important role in discussions on school effectiveness. Referring to educational governance concepts, this paper presumes a relation between varying organizational structures of statewide examinations across states, and heterogeneous effects on school actors. It is assumed that their ability to affect work in…

  14. Statewide Professional Development Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul V. Bredeson

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available In an environment increasingly skeptical of the effectiveness of large-scale professional development activities, this study examines K-12 educators' reasons for participating and beliefs in the utility in a large-scale professional development conference. Pre- and post-conference surveys revealed that while financial support played a significant role in educators' ability to participate, they were drawn to the conference by the promise to learn substantive issues related to, in this case, performance assessment—what it means, how to implement it, and how to address community concerns. In spite of the conference's utility as a means to increase awareness of critical issues and to facilitate formal and informal learning, well conceived linkages to transfer new knowledge to the school and classroom were lacking.

  15. 42 CFR 440.380 - Statewideness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Benchmark Benefit and Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.380 Statewideness. States have the option to amend their State plan to provide benchmark or benchmark-equivalent coverage to individuals without regard to statewideness....

  16. Nebraska Statewide Wind Integration Study: Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EnerNex Corporation, Knoxville, Tennessee; Ventyx, Atlanta, Georgia; Nebraska Power Association, Lincoln, Nebraska

    2010-03-01

    Wind generation resources in Nebraska will play an increasingly important role in the environmental and energy security solutions for the state and the nation. In this context, the Nebraska Power Association conducted a state-wide wind integration study.

  17. The Statewide Energy Consortium: A California Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, G. Cleve; Giacosie, Robert V.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the formation and organization of a statewide energy consortium consisting of faculty from 19 campuses of the California State University and Colleges system. Also describes three major consortium activities and reasons for its success. (SK)

  18. The Statewide Energy Consortium: A California Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, G. Cleve; Giacosie, Robert V.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the formation and organization of a statewide energy consortium consisting of faculty from 19 campuses of the California State University and Colleges system. Also describes three major consortium activities and reasons for its success. (SK)

  19. The Status of Statewide Subscription Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Karla S.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative content analysis presents subscription databases available to school libraries through statewide purchases. The results may help school librarians evaluate grade and subject-area coverage, make comparisons to recommended databases, and note potential suggestions for their states to include in future contracts or for local…

  20. The Changing Landscape of Principal Preparation: An Analysis of Statewide Longitudinal Program Component Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Jennifer; Watson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This article examines comparative survey results for 16 principal preparation programs located in the Midwestern state of Missouri across a four-year time period from 2008 to 2012. The authors are founding members of a statewide Higher Education Evaluation Committee (HEEC), which has been meeting on a monthly basis since 2005, comprised of faculty…

  1. A Multilevel, Statewide Investigation of School District Anti-Bullying Policy Quality and Student Bullying Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Amy L.; Cousin, Molly; Borowsky, Iris W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although nearly all states in the United States require school districts to adopt anti-bullying policies, little research examines the effect of these policies on student bullying and health. Using a statewide sample, we investigated associations between the quality of school district anti-bullying policies and student bullying…

  2. Do Affirmative Action Bans Lower Minority College Enrollment and Attainment?: Evidence from Statewide Bans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Using institutional data on race-specific college enrollment and completion, I examine whether minority students were less likely to enroll in a four-year public college or receive a degree following a statewide affirmative action ban. As in previous studies, I find that black and Hispanic enrollment dropped at the top institutions; however, there…

  3. A Multilevel, Statewide Investigation of School District Anti-Bullying Policy Quality and Student Bullying Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Amy L.; Cousin, Molly; Borowsky, Iris W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although nearly all states in the United States require school districts to adopt anti-bullying policies, little research examines the effect of these policies on student bullying and health. Using a statewide sample, we investigated associations between the quality of school district anti-bullying policies and student bullying…

  4. 23 CFR 450.214 - Development and content of the long-range statewide transportation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND RESEARCH PLANNING ASSISTANCE AND STANDARDS Statewide Transportation Planning and... long-range statewide transportation plan should include capital, operations and management strategies... transportation system. The long-range statewide transportation plan may consider projects and strategies that...

  5. The World Factbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    petroleum, food, machinery, municipality* ( municipio especial); 1KAX: n- service available at this time chemicals Camaguey, Ciego de Avila...the 1980s. the Michoacan, Morelos. Nayarit, Nuevo Leon. (CONCANACO); National Peasant accumulation of large external debts, falling Oaxaca, Puebla

  6. The World Factbook 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Repubblica Italiana ), local short form (Italia), former(Kingdom of Italy), as well as the abbreviation. Also see the Terminology note. Currency: This...Francisco UNITE *Los Angeles Phoenix San Diego leuana /. El Paso / ,e,,l me I c Ciudad jabrez / 30/ / :.a ; I Monterrey - ------------------- ----J...3,880,531) singular - provincia) and 1 special municipality*territorial sea: 12 NM (municipio especial); Camaguey, Ciego de Avila, Cienfuegos, Ciudad de La

  7. The World Factbook 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    long form (Repubblica Italiana ), local short form (Italia), former (Kingdom of Italy), as well as the abbreviation. Also see the Terminology note...Camaguey, Ciego de Avila, border countries: US Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay Cienfuegos, Ciudad de La Habana, Granma, 29 km P e o p I e Guantanamo...Law of the Sea, Marine Dumping, local long form: Repubblica Italiana Southern Tyrol People’s Party 3, Autonomous List 2, Nuclear Test Ban, Ozone

  8. Water Quality attainment Information from Clean Water Act Statewide Statistical Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Designated uses assessed by statewide statistical surveys and their state and national attainment categories. Statewide statistical surveys are water quality...

  9. Projected Statewide Impact of "Opportunity Culture" School Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly, Christen; Dean, Stephanie; Hassel, Emily Ayscue; Hassel, Bryan C.

    2014-01-01

    This brief estimates the impact of a statewide implementation of Opportunity Culture models, using North Carolina as an example. Impacts estimated include student learning outcomes, gross state product, teacher pay, and other career characteristics, and state income tax revenue. Estimates indicate the potential for a statewide transition to…

  10. 49 CFR 613.200 - Statewide transportation planning and programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Statewide transportation planning and programming. 613.200 Section 613.200 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... Transportation Planning and Programming § 613.200 Statewide transportation planning and programming....

  11. Assessment of statewide annual streamflow in New Mexico, 1985-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affinati, Joseph Anthony; Myers, Nathan C.

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute began a statewide assessment of the water resources of New Mexico. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, addressed the streamflow component of the assessment by examining streamgage data for major river basins and streams in New Mexico for the study period over water years 1985–2013 (all references to years in this report are to water years).

  12. Applying the APA/AERA/NCME "Standards": Evidence for the Validity and Reliability of Three Statewide Teaching Assessment Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Lori; Hessling, Peter A.

    The statewide teaching performance assessment instruments being used in Georgia, North Carolina, and Florida were examined. Forty-one reliability and validity studies regarding the instruments in use in each state were collected from state departments and universities. Georgia uses the Georgia Teacher Performance Assessment Instrument. North…

  13. Nebraska Statewide Wind Integration Study: April 2008 - January 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EnerNex Corporation, Knoxville, Tennessee; Ventyx, Atlanta, Georgia; Nebraska Power Association, Lincoln, Nebraska

    2010-03-01

    Wind generation resources in Nebraska will play an increasingly important role in the environmental and energy security solutions for the state and the nation. In this context, the Nebraska Power Association conducted a state-wide wind integration study.

  14. Benchmarking statewide trauma mortality using Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's patient safety indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Darwin; McKenney, Mark; Norwood, Scott; Kurek, Stanley; Kimbrell, Brian; Liu, Huazhi; Ziglar, Michele; Hurst, James

    2015-09-01

    Improving clinical outcomes of trauma patients is a challenging problem at a statewide level, particularly if data from the state's registry are not publicly available. Promotion of optimal care throughout the state is not possible unless clinical benchmarks are available for comparison. Using publicly available administrative data from the State Department of Health and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) patient safety indicators (PSIs), we sought to create a statewide method for benchmarking trauma mortality and at the same time also identifying a pattern of unique complications that have an independent influence on mortality. Data for this study were obtained from State of Florida Agency for Health Care Administration. Adult trauma patients were identified as having International Classification of Disease ninth edition codes defined by the state. Multivariate logistic regression was used to create a predictive inpatient expected mortality model. The expected value of PSIs was created using the multivariate model and their beta coefficients provided by the AHRQ. Case-mix adjusted mortality results were reported as observed to expected (O/E) ratios to examine mortality, PSIs, failure to prevent complications, and failure to rescue from death. There were 50,596 trauma patients evaluated during the study period. The overall fit of the expected mortality model was very strong at a c-statistic of 0.93. Twelve of 25 trauma centers had O/E ratios <1 or better than expected. Nine statewide PSIs had failure to prevent O/E ratios higher than expected. Five statewide PSIs had failure to rescue O/E ratios higher than expected. The PSI that had the strongest influence on trauma mortality for the state was PSI no. 9 or perioperative hemorrhage or hematoma. Mortality could be further substratified by PSI complications at the hospital level. AHRQ PSIs can have an integral role in an adjusted benchmarking method that screens at risk trauma centers in the state

  15. Effectiveness of open versus endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in population settings: A systematic review of statewide databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christopher R; Brooke, Benjamin S

    2017-10-01

    Patient outcomes after open abdominal aortic aneurysm and endovascular aortic aneurysm repair have been widely reported from several large, randomized, controlled trials. It is not clear whether these trial outcomes are representative of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair procedures performed in real-world hospital settings across the United States. This study was designed to evaluate population-based outcomes after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair versus open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair using statewide inpatient databases and examine how they have helped improve our understanding of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases was performed to identify articles comparing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair using data from statewide inpatient databases. This search was limited to studies published in the English language after 1990, and abstracts were screened and abstracted by 2 authors. Our search yielded 17 studies published between 2004 and 2016 that used data from 29 different statewide inpatient databases to compare endovascular aortic aneurysm repair versus open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. These studies support the randomized, controlled trial results, including a lower mortality associated with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair extended from the perioperative period up to 3 years after operation, as well as a higher complication rate after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. The evidence from statewide inpatient database analyses has also elucidated trends in procedure volume, patient case mix, volume-outcome relationships, and health care disparities associated with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair versus open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Population analyses of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair using statewide inpatient databases have confirmed short- and long-term mortality outcomes obtained from

  16. Private provider participation in statewide immunization registries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowan Anne E

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population-based registries have been promoted as an effective method to improve childhood immunization rates, yet rates of registry participation in the private sector are low. We sought to describe, through a national overview, the perspectives of childhood immunization providers in private practice regarding factors associated with participation or non-participation in immunization registries. Methods Two mailed surveys, one for 264 private practices identified as registry non-participants and the other for 971 identified as registry participants, from 15 of the 31 states with population-based statewide immunization registries. Frequency distributions were calculated separately for non-participants and participants regarding the physician-reported factors that influenced decisions related to registry participation. Pearson chi-square tests of independence were used to assess associations among categorical variables. Results Overall response rate was 62% (N = 756. Among non-participants, easy access to records of vaccines provided at other sites (N = 101, 68% and printable immunization records (N = 82, 55% were most often cited as "very important" potential benefits of a registry, while the most commonly cited barriers to participation were too much cost/staff time (N = 36, 38% and that the practice has its own system for recording and monitoring immunizations (N = 35, 37%. Among registry participants, most reported using the registry to input data on vaccines administered (N = 326, 87% and to review immunization records of individual patients (N = 302, 81%. A minority reported using it to assess their practice's immunization coverage (N = 110, 29% or generate reminder/recall notices (N = 54, 14%. Few participants reported experiencing "significant" problems with the registry; the most often cited was cost/staff time to use the registry (N = 71, 20%. Conclusion Most registry participants report active participation with few

  17. An Analysis of Statewide Adoption Rates of Building Energy Code by Local Jurisdictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Butner, Ryan S.

    2012-12-31

    The purpose of this study is to generally inform the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Energy Codes Program of the local, effective energy code adoption rate for a sample set of 21 states, some which have adopted statewide codes and some that have not. Information related to the residential energy code adoption process and status at the local jurisdiction was examined for each of the states. Energy code status information was gathered for approximately 2,800 jurisdictions, which effectively covered approximately 80 percent of the new residential building construction in the 21 states included in the study.

  18. Staff turnover in statewide implementation of ACT: relationship with ACT fidelity and other team characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Angela L; Salyers, Michelle P; Tsai, Jack; Lydick, Jennifer M

    2010-09-01

    Staff turnover on assertive community treatment (ACT) teams is a poorly understood phenomenon. This study examined annual turnover and fidelity data collected in a statewide implementation of ACT over a 5-year period. Mean annual staff turnover across all observations was 30.0%. Turnover was negatively correlated with overall fidelity at Year 1 and 3. The team approach fidelity item was negatively correlated with staff turnover at Year 3. For 13 teams with 3 years of follow-up data, turnover rates did not change over time. Most ACT staff turnover rates were comparable or better than other turnover rates reported in the mental health and substance abuse literature.

  19. 23 CFR 450.206 - Scope of the statewide transportation planning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scope of the statewide transportation planning process....206 Scope of the statewide transportation planning process. (a) Each State shall carry out a continuing, cooperative, and comprehensive statewide transportation planning process that provides for...

  20. Piloting a Statewide Home Visiting Quality Improvement Learning Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Neera K; Rome, Martha G; Massie, Julie A; Mangeot, Colleen; Ammerman, Robert T; Breckenridge, Jye; Lannon, Carole M

    2017-02-01

    Objective To pilot test a statewide quality improvement (QI) collaborative learning network of home visiting agencies. Methods Project timeline was June 2014-May 2015. Overall objectives of this 8-month initiative were to assess the use of collaborative QI to engage local home visiting agencies and to test the use of statewide home visiting data for QI. Outcome measures were mean time from referral to first home visit, percentage of families with at least three home visits per month, mean duration of participation, and exit rate among infants learning. A statewide data system was used to generate monthly run charts. Results Mean time from referral to first home visit was 16.7 days, and 9.4% of families received ≥3 visits per month. Mean participation was 11.7 months, and the exit rate among infants learning network, agencies tested and measured changes using statewide and internal data. Potential next steps are to develop and test new metrics with current pilot sites and a larger collaborative.

  1. Creating a Minnesota Statewide SNAP-Ed Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Abby; Barno, Trina Adler; Sherman, Shelley; Lovett, Kathleen; Hurtado, G. Ali

    2013-01-01

    Systematic evaluation is an essential tool for understanding program effectiveness. This article describes the pilot test of a statewide evaluation tool for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed). A computer algorithm helped Community Nutrition Educators (CNEs) build surveys specific to their varied educational settings…

  2. Statewide Masterplan for Nevada Libraries, 2000-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevada State Library and Archives, Carson City.

    The "Statewide Masterplan for Nevada Libraries" provides direction and serves as a blueprint for development of library services throughout the state. The plan is based on input from people who attended meetings throughout Nevada, and also reflects the best thinking of public, school, academic, and special librarians. Following the…

  3. Statewide Masterplan for Nevada Libraries: 1993-1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevada State Library and Archives, Carson City.

    This document provides a framework for direction and development of libraries in Nevada. This plan is based on input solicited from hundreds of citizens statewide in preparation for the Governor's Conference on Libraries held in May 1990 and has been developed to reflect the current and best thinking of public, school, and academic librarians. The…

  4. California Statewide Plug-In Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, Marc; Helwig, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The California Statewide Plug-In Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Assessment conveys to interested parties the Energy Commission’s conclusions, recommendations, and intentions with respect to plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) infrastructure development. There are several relatively low-risk and high-priority electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) deployment options that will encourage PEV sales and

  5. Wisconsin EMT Association: A Statewide Injury Prevention Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ralph; Evans, Diane

    This report provides a detailed description of a statewide injury prevention program of the Wisconsin Emergency Medical Technician Association. A project introduction is followed by brief descriptions of the components of the injury prevention program: occupant protection seminars; mock crash seminars; Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Buckle Bear,…

  6. A Statewide Plan to Train Emergency Medical Technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina Hospital Association, Columbia.

    The final report outlines a statewide project which provided basic emergency technicians (EMT) training. The use of videotaped instruction, development of testing materials, and the development of cooperative voluntary structures on the State and community level are discussed. Objectives emphasize: (1) uniform training throughout the State, (2)…

  7. Understanding the Support Needs of People with Intellectual and Related Developmental Disabilities through Cluster Analysis and Factor Analysis of Statewide Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viriyangkura, Yuwadee

    2014-01-01

    Through a secondary analysis of statewide data from Colorado, people with intellectual and related developmental disabilities (ID/DD) were classified into five clusters based on their support needs characteristics using cluster analysis techniques. Prior latent factor models of support needs in the field of ID/DD were examined to investigate the…

  8. Quality in Family Child Care Settings: The Relationship between Provider Educational Experiences and Global Quality Scores in a Statewide Quality Rating and Improvement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, Rena A.; Bargreen, Kaitlin N.; Ridgley, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    This study is a secondary analysis of a statewide sample of licensed family child care providers in the Tennessee Child Care Evaluation and Report Card Program ("N"?=?1,145) that describes the general quality of family child care programs in the state and examines the relationships between provider education and global quality. Study…

  9. Understanding the Support Needs of People with Intellectual and Related Developmental Disabilities through Cluster Analysis and Factor Analysis of Statewide Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viriyangkura, Yuwadee

    2014-01-01

    Through a secondary analysis of statewide data from Colorado, people with intellectual and related developmental disabilities (ID/DD) were classified into five clusters based on their support needs characteristics using cluster analysis techniques. Prior latent factor models of support needs in the field of ID/DD were examined to investigate the…

  10. Generation of Statewide DEMs and Orthoimages – Guidelines and Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giribabu Dandabathula

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cartosat-1 is a global, high resolution stereographic imaging mission to support enhanced applications in several areas of terrain mapping, natural resources management, disaster management, infrastructure and development planning. A collaborative project of generating statewide Digital Elevation Model (DEMs and mosaic of Ortho-image for all the states and union territories in India has completed under the project namely Space based Information Support for Decentralized Planning (SIS-DP using Photogrammetric techniques with Cartosat-1 stereo data.  Approximately 11000 stereo pairs of Cartosat-1 data were used in this process. Photogrammetric blocks for each state were processed using existing reference tiles and accordingly ortho-images were generated. The paper outlines the methodology for generating state-wide Digital Elevation Models (DEMs and ortho-images. The guidelines that govern the quality of the output were discussed. Dissemination mechanism via public accessible web platform was described.

  11. California Statewide PEV Infrastructure Assessment; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, Marc; Eichman, Joshua

    2015-06-10

    This presentation discusses how the California Statewide Plug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Infrastructure Assessment provides a framework for understanding the potential energy (kWh) and demand (MW) impacts of PEV market growth; how PEV travel simulations can inform the role of public infrastructure in future market growth; and how ongoing assessment updates and Alternative Fuels Data Center outreach can help coordinate stakeholder planning and decision making and reduce uncertainties.

  12. Marketing physical activity: lessons learned from a statewide media campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michael; Abraham, Avron; Waterfield, Allan

    2005-10-01

    Steps taken to create, implement, and initially assess a statewide physical activity social marketing campaign targeted to 18-to 30-year-olds are presented. Included is a summary demonstration of the application of the associative group analysis in formative market research and message development. Initial postcampaign questionnaire (n = 363) results indicated that 39.1% of respondents had seen the television ad, of which 31.2% indicated they intended to be more active, and 62.5% of respondents had been exposed to either the television or outdoor media ads. Lessons learned through the social marketing process including media channel effectiveness, message development and assessment, and marketing firm relationships are provided.

  13. 45 CFR 205.38 - Federal financial participation (FFP) for establishing a statewide mechanized system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... financial participation (FFP) for establishing a statewide mechanized system. (a) Effective July 1, 1981... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal financial participation (FFP) for establishing a statewide mechanized system. 205.38 Section 205.38 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to...

  14. An Update on the Alaska Statewide Testing Program. Assessment Reports 8-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau, Office of Education, Assessment and Research.

    The Alaska Statewide Assessment Test (ASAT) in reading and math is administered to fourth and eighth graders every two years. This document contains three separate assessment reports generally titled "An Update on the Alaska Statewide Testing Program." Assessment Report 8, "The Interpretive Panels Look at Results," lists…

  15. Variations in statewide water quality of New Jersey streams, water years 1998-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckathorn, Heather A.; Deetz, Anna C.

    2012-01-01

    Statistical analyses were conducted for six water-quality constituents measured at 371 surface-water-quality stations during water years 1998-2009 to determine changes in concentrations over time. This study examined year-round concentrations of total dissolved solids, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, dissolved phosphorus, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen; concentrations of dissolved chloride were measured only from January to March. All the water-quality data analyzed were collected by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Geological Survey as part of the cooperative Ambient Surface-Water-Quality Monitoring Network. Stations were divided into groups according to the 1-year or 2-year period that the stations were part of the Ambient Surface-Water-Quality Monitoring Network. Data were obtained from the eight groups of Statewide Status stations for water years 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001-02, 2003-04, 2005-06, 2007-08, and 2009. The data from each group were compared to the data from each of the other groups and to baseline data obtained from Background stations unaffected by human activity that were sampled during the same time periods. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine whether median concentrations of a selected water-quality constituent measured in a particular 1-year or 2-year group were different from those measured in other 1-year or 2-year groups. If the median concentrations were found to differ among years or groups of years, then Tukey's multiple comparison test on ranks was used to identify those years with different or equal concentrations of water-quality constituents. A significance level of 0.05 was selected to indicate significant changes in median concentrations of water-quality constituents. More variations in the median concentrations of water-quality constituents were observed at Statewide Status stations (randomly chosen stations scattered throughout the State of New Jersey) than at Background stations

  16. Characteristics and Effects of a Statewide STEM Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D. Weld

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive statewide STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics reform initiative enters its fifth year in the U.S. state of Iowa. A significant proportion of the state’s pre K-12 students and teachers participate in one or more of the twenty programs offered, ranging from classroom curricular innovations to teacher professional development, and from community STEM festivals to career exploration events. An external, inter-university evaluation consortium measures annual progress of the initiative through the Iowa STEM Monitoring Project. Results show citizens to be increasingly aware of and supporting of STEM education; students to be increasingly interested in STEM as well as outperforming nonparticipating peers on state math and science tests; and teachers more confident and knowledgeable in teaching STEM. Iowa’s STEM initiative has garnered national acclaim though challenges remain with regard to expanding the participation of learners of diversity, as well as ensuring the long-term sustainability of the programs and structures that define Iowa’s statewide STEM initiative.

  17. 34 CFR 403.201 - What are the State's responsibilities for developing and implementing a statewide system of core...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and implementing a statewide system of core standards and measures of performance? 403.201 Section 403... a statewide system of core standards and measures of performance? (a)(1) Each State board receiving funds under the Act shall develop and implement a statewide system of core standards and measures...

  18. Statewide tracking of crash victims' medical system utilization and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Nicholas; Garthe, Elizabeth

    2007-02-01

    For the study year, the state of Massachusetts had the lowest fatal motor vehicle crash rate in the nation. The state was interested in exploring new approaches to save additional lives. The study goal was to determine the potential for Massachusetts's medical system to reduce fatalities through alternative utilization of existing transport methods, treatment hospital types, and victim pathways. This was a 1-year retrospective statewide population-based study of all persons involved in a trafficway motor vehicle crash in which at least one person died within 30 days. Database linkage was used to track the pathway and outcome of every involved victim from the crash scene, including air medical and ground ambulance utilization, community or trauma center treatment, and interhospital transfers; air and trauma center (TC) scene triage levels were computed retrospectively. All crash and hospital locations were geomapped and confounding factors were included. Air and ground scene transports to TCs were underutilized by 7:1 and 4.5:1, respectively. No request was the major reason for air underutilization. Underutilization was associated with reduced lived-to-died ratio (L/D) by pathway of up to 10:1. Statewide, air transport to Level I trauma centers had both the highest (1.0, scene) and lowest L/Ds (0.6, interfacility). A 4.5:1 difference in L/D was associated with fulfilled versus unfulfilled air requests. By emergency medical service region, L/D varied by nearly 3:1 and utilization of scene air and TC transports by 5:1 and 4:1. Victim helicopter emergency medical services transport to a TC with an Injury Severity Score > or =19 was identified as critical and was associated with L/D differences of 3.7:1. The paradox of lower L/D for scene air transports to TCs occurring simultaneously with higher overall system L/D was observed and explained. System-based L/D differences of 1.8:1 were observed associated with increases in appropriate triage. Results that explain the

  19. New Mexico statewide geothermal energy program. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icerman, L.; Parker, S.K. (ed.)

    1988-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of geothermal energy resource assessment work conducted by the New Mexico Statewide Geothermal Energy Program during the period September 7, 1984, through February 29, 1988, under the sponsorship of the US Dept. of Energy and the State of New Mexico Research and Development Institute. The research program was administered by the New Mexico Research and Development Institute and was conducted by professional staff members at New Mexico State University and Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. The report is divided into four chapters, which correspond to the principal tasks delineated in the above grant. This work extends the knowledge of the geothermal energy resource base in southern New Mexico with the potential for commercial applications.

  20. A state-wide assessment: marital stability and client outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, D J; Sullivan, W P; Wolk, J L

    1991-12-01

    This paper presents results of Missouri's first statewide evaluation of alcohol and drug treatment programs. The study utilized a 1-year follow-up sample of 242 respondents to explore the nature and patterns of post-treatment functioning. This paper focuses on the impact of client marital stability on post-treatment substance use. The data supported the expected result that marital status was related to post-treatment relapse. Further analysis suggests that transitional periods between marriage and divorce are especially important in understanding the pattern of relapse after treatment. Multivariate analysis indicates that the marital status effect is important both directly and in interaction with program completion. The data suggest that attention to transitional states and interpersonal functioning should be incorporated into client follow-up.

  1. Using the OCLC union listing component for a statewide health sciences union list of serials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, L S; Wolfgram, P A

    1986-04-01

    Union lists of serials are critical to the effective operation of interlibrary loan networks. The Michigan Health Sciences Libraries Association used the OCLC union list component to produce the Michigan Statewide Health Sciences Union List of Serials (MISHULS). MISHULS, which includes the serials holdings of ninety-three hospital health sciences libraries, is a subset of a statewide multi-type union list maintained on OCLC. The rationale for a statewide list and the criteria for choosing vendors are discussed. Typical costs are provided. Funding sources are identified and a unique approach to decentralized input is described. The benefits of resource sharing in a larger, multi-type library network are also explored.

  2. Examining Pre-School Classroom Quality in a Statewide Quality Rating and Improvement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Lieny; Buettner, Cynthia K.; Hur, Eunhye

    2014-01-01

    Background: Research has documented the importance of high-quality early childhood experiences in preparing children for school. Quality rating and improvement systems (QRIS) have recently emerged in many states as a way to build quality of child care and to promote better child outcomes. Objective: The goal of this study was to determine if…

  3. Geodatabase of Wyoming statewide oil and gas drilling activity to 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Wyoming statewide oil and gas wells feature class was developed to provide a historical perspective of drilling activity for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation...

  4. A case study: planning a statewide information resource for health professionals: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinall, Erinn E; Chew, Katherine; Watson, Linda; Parker, Mary

    2009-10-01

    What is the best approach for implementing a statewide electronic health library (eHL) to serve all health professionals in Minnesota? The research took place at the University of Minnesota Health Sciences Libraries. In January 2008, the authors began planning a statewide eHL for health professionals following the five-step process for evidence-based librarianship: formulating the question, finding the best evidence, appraising the evidence, assessing costs and benefits, and evaluating the effectiveness of resulting actions. The authors identified best practices for developing a statewide eHL for health professionals relating to audience or population served, information resources, technology and access, funding model, and implementation and sustainability. They were compared to the mission of the eHL project to drive strategic directions by developing recommendations. EBL can guide the planning process for a statewide eHL, but findings must be tailored to the local environment to address information needs and ensure long-term sustainability.

  5. Statewide Scent Station Survey for South Carolina Furbearers Annual Report 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1984, a statewide scent station survey was initiated in SC to provide an index to the relative abundance of terrestrial furbearing animals. This report is from...

  6. Statewide Watershed Protection and Local Implementation: A Comparison of Washington, Minnesota, and Oregon

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Abstract In 1991 EPA embraced the watershed protection approach for environmental management. EPA defines watershed protection as â a strategy for effectively protecting and restoring aquatic ecosystems and protecting human health.â To encourage statewide watershed protection, EPA developed the â Statewide Watershed Protection Approachâ document, which is designed to aid states in developing their own watershed protection program. The watershed protection approach is n...

  7. The 10 Conditions That Increased Vermont's Readiness to Implement Statewide Health System Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grembowski, David; Marcus-Smith, Miriam

    2017-08-22

    Following an arduous, 6-year policy-making process, Vermont is the first state implementing a unified, statewide all-payer integrated delivery system with value-based payment, along with aligned medical and social service reforms, for almost all residents and providers in a state. Commercial, Medicare, and Medicaid value-based payment for most Vermonters will be administered through a new statewide accountable care organization in 2018-2022. The purpose of this article is to describe the 10 conditions that increased Vermont's readiness to implement statewide system transformation. The authors reviewed documents, conducted internet searches of public information, interviewed key informants annually in 2014-2016, cross-validated factual and narrative interpretation, and performed content analyses to derive conditions that increased readiness and their implications for policy and practice. Four social conditions (leadership champions; a common vision; collaborative culture; social capital and collective efficacy) and 6 support conditions (money; statewide data; legal infrastructure; federal policy promoting payment reform; delivery system transformation aligned with payment reform; personnel skilled in system reform) increased Vermont's readiness for system transformation. Vermont's experience indicates that increasing statewide readiness for reform is slow, incremental, and exhausting to overcome the sheer inertia of large fee-based systems. The new payments may work because statewide, uniform population-based payment will affect the health care of almost all Vermonters, creating statewide, uniform provider incentives to reduce volume and making the current fee-based system less viable. The conditions for readiness and statewide system transformation may be more likely in states with regulated markets, like Vermont, than in states with highly competitive markets.

  8. Predictive validity of the classroom strategies scale-observer form on statewide testing scores: an initial investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Linda A; Fabiano, Gregory A; Dudek, Christopher M; Hsu, Louis

    2013-12-01

    The present study examined the validity of a teacher observation measure, the Classroom Strategies Scale--Observer Form (CSS), as a predictor of student performance on statewide tests of mathematics and English language arts. The CSS is a teacher practice observational measure that assesses evidence-based instructional and behavioral management practices in elementary school. A series of two-level hierarchical generalized linear models were fitted to data of a sample of 662 third- through fifth-grade students to assess whether CSS Part 2 Instructional Strategy and Behavioral Management Strategy scale discrepancy scores (i.e., ∑ |recommended frequency--frequency ratings|) predicted statewide mathematics and English language arts proficiency scores when percentage of minority students in schools was controlled. Results indicated that the Instructional Strategy scale discrepancy scores significantly predicted mathematics and English language arts proficiency scores: Relatively larger discrepancies on observer ratings of what teachers did versus what should have been done were associated with lower proficiency scores. Results offer initial evidence of the predictive validity of the CSS Part 2 Instructional Strategy discrepancy scores on student academic outcomes.

  9. Risk of Negative Outcomes After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Statewide Population-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteneck, Gale G; Cuthbert, Jeffery P; Corrigan, John D; Bogner, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the rates of negative outcomes associated with all severities of traumatic brain injury (TBI), treated in all settings or not treated at all, in comparison to the general population. Coloradoans without injury, with injury but no TBI, with mild TBI but no loss of consciousness (LOC), mild TBI with LOC, moderate TBI, or severe TBI. Statewide population-based survey. Computer-assisted, modified Ohio State University TBI Identification Method; Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and National Health Interview Survey questions; Satisfaction with Life Scale; and postconcussive symptoms. Up to 42.5% of participants reported a lifetime history of at least 1 TBI. Multiple negative outcomes were found to increase in prevalence in a stepwise fashion in association with greater TBI severity, with the clearest patterns observed for disability, poor life satisfaction, and impaired memory. Traumatic brain injury was found to be associated with disability and other negative outcomes in a general population survey. This study does not allow us to examine the proximate causes of disability, but it suggests that TBI may serve to both cause disability directly and exacerbate the influence of other etiologies. These relations should be examined in subsequent studies.

  10. Analyzing the Measurement Equivalence of a Translated Test in a Statewide Assessment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Carvajal-Espinoza

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available When tests are translated into one or more languages, the question of the equivalence of items across language forms arises. This equivalence can be assessed at the scale level by means of a multiple group confirmatory factor analysis (CFA in the context of structural equation modeling. This study examined the measurement equivalence of a Spanish translated version of a statewide Mathematics test originally constructed in English by using a multi-group CFA approach. The study used samples of native speakers of the target language of the translation taking the test in both the source and target language, specifically Hispanics taking the test in English and Spanish. Test items were grouped in twelve facet-representative parcels. The parceling was accomplished by grouping items that corresponded to similar content and computing an average for each parcel. Four models were fitted to examine the equivalence of the test across groups. The multi-group CFA fixed factor loadings across groups and results supported the equivalence of the two language versions (English and Spanish of the test. The statistical techniques implemented in this study can also be used to address the performance on a test based on dichotomous or dichotomized variables such as gender, socioeconomic status, geographic location and other variables of interest.

  11. Maternal language and adverse birth outcomes in a statewide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentell, Tetine; Chang, Ann; Ahn, Hyeong Jun; Miyamura, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Limited English proficiency is associated with disparities across diverse health outcomes. However, evidence regarding adverse birth outcomes across languages is limited, particularly among U.S. Asian and Pacific Islander populations. The study goal was to consider the relationship of maternal language to birth outcomes using statewide hospitalization data. Detailed discharge data from Hawaii childbirth hospitalizations from 2012 (n = 11,419) were compared by maternal language (English language or not) for adverse outcomes using descriptive and multivariable log-binomial regression models, controlling for race/ethnicity, age group, and payer. Ten percent of mothers spoke a language other than English; 93% of these spoke an Asian or Pacific Islander language. In multivariable models, compared to English speakers, non-English speakers had significantly higher risk (adjusted relative risk [ARR]: 2.02; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.34-3.04) of obstetric trauma in vaginal deliveries without instrumentation. Some significant variation was seen by language for other birth outcomes, including an increased rate of primary Caesarean sections and vaginal births after Caesarean, among non-English speakers. Non-English speakers had approximately two times higher risk of having an obstetric trauma during a vaginal birth when other factors, including race/ethnicity, were controlled. Non-English speakers also had higher rates of potentially high-risk deliveries.

  12. Impacts of Child Development Accounts on maternal depressive symptoms: evidence from a randomized statewide policy experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin; Sherraden, Michael; Purnell, Jason Q

    2014-07-01

    This study examines the impact of Child Development Accounts (CDAs)-asset-building accounts created for children at birth-on the depressive symptoms of mothers in a statewide randomized experiment conducted in the United States. The experiment identified the primary caregivers of children born in Oklahoma during 2007, and 2704 of the caregivers completed a baseline interview before random assignment to the treatment (n = 1358) or the control group (n = 1346). To treatment participants, the experiment offered CDAs built on the existing Oklahoma 529 College Savings Plan. The baseline and follow-up surveys measured the participants' depressive symptoms with a shortened version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). In models that control for baseline CES-D scores, the mean follow-up score of treatment mothers is .17 lower than that of control mothers (p psychological well-being. Findings also suggest that CDAs' impacts on maternal depressive symptoms may be partially mediated through children's social-emotional development.

  13. Tobacco Smoke Pollution in Hospitality Venues Before and After Passage of Statewide Smoke-Free Legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner-Schmidt, Kelly; Boursaw, Blake; Lobo, Marie L; Travers, Mark J

    2017-03-01

    In 2012, North Dakota enacted a comprehensive statewide law prohibiting smoking in enclosed public places. Disparities in tobacco control exist in rural areas. This study's objective was to determine the extent to which the passage of a comprehensive, statewide, smoke-free law in a predominantly rural state influenced tobacco smoke pollution in rural and nonrural venues. A longitudinal cohort design study comparing the levels of tobacco smoke pollution before and after passage of the statewide smoke-free law was conducted in 64 restaurants and bars statewide in North Dakota. Particulate matter with a median aerodynamic diameter of pollution) was assessed. A significant 83% reduction in tobacco smoke pollution levels occurred after passage of the law. Significant reductions in tobacco smoke pollution levels occurred in each of the rural categories; however, no difference by rurality was noted in the analysis after passage of the law, in contrast to the study before passage. To our knowledge, this was the largest, single, rural postlaw study globally. A comprehensive statewide smoke-free law implemented in North Dakota dramatically decreased the level of tobacco smoke pollution in bars and restaurants. © 2016 The Authors. Public Health Nursing Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. 76 FR 51054 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC) Conference Call Meetings on the Statewide Travel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... the Statewide Travel and Transportation Management Planning Policy AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... Utah RAC Subgroup on the Statewide Travel and Transportation Management Planning Policy will host a... a variety of planning and management issues associated with public land management in Utah....

  15. Evaluating RITES, a Statewide Math and Science Partnership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, D. P.; Caulkins, J. L.; Burns, A. L.; de Oliveira, G.; Dooley, H.; Brand, S.; Veeger, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Rhode Island Technology-Enhanced Science project (RITES) is a NSF-MSP Program that seeks to improve science education by providing professional development to science teachers at the 5th through 12th grade levels. At it's heart, RITES is a complex, multifaceted project that is challenging to evaluate because of the nature of its goal: the development of a large, statewide partnership between higher education and K12 public school districts during a time when science education strategies and leadership are in flux. As a result, these difficulties often require flexibility and creativity regarding evaluation, study design and data collection. In addition, the research agenda of the project often overlaps with the evaluator's agenda, making collaboration and communication a crucial component of the project's success. In it's 5th year, RITES and it's evaluators have developed a large number of instruments, both qualitative and quantitative, to provide direction and feedback on the effectiveness of the project's activities. RITES personnel work closely with evaluators and researchers to obtain a measure of how RITES' 'theory-of-action' affects both student outcomes and teacher practice. Here we discuss measures of teacher and student content gains, student inquiry gains, and teacher implementation surveys. Using content questions based on AAAS and MOSART databases, teachers in the short courses and students in classrooms showed significant normalized learning gains with averages generally above 0.3. Students of RITES-trained teachers also outperformed their non-RITES peers on the inquiry-section of the NECAP test, and The results show, after controlling for race and economic status, a small but statistically significant increase in test scores for RITES students. Technology use in the classroom significantly increased for teachers who were 'expected implementers' where 'expected implementers' are those teachers who implemented RITES as the project was designed. This

  16. Empowering High School Students in Scientific Careers: Developing Statewide Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, C.; Swartz, D.

    2008-05-01

    Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP) is a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center focused on improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models. The Center is divided into three sections including Knowledge Transfer, Research, and Education and Diversity. The Science Education and Diversity mission is to educate and train people with diverse backgrounds in Climate and Earth System Science by enhancing teaching and learning and disseminating science results through multiple media. CMMAP is partnering with two local school districts to host an annual global climate conferences for high school students. The 2008 Colorado Global Climate Conference seeks "To educate students on global and local climate issues and empower them to se their knowledge." The conference is sponsored by CMMAP, The Governor's Energy Office, Poudre School District, Thompson School District, Clif Bar, and Ben and Jerry's Scoop Shop of Fort Collins. The conference seeks to inspire students to pursue future education and careers in science fields. Following an opening welcome from the Governor's Energy Office, Keynote Piers Sellers will discuss his experiences as an atmospheric scientist and NASA astronaut. Students will then attend 3 out of 16 breakout sessions including such sessions as "Hot poems, Cool Paintings, and the treasures of Antiquity of Climate Change", "Mitigation vs Adaptation", "Bigfoot Walks(What Size is our carbon footprint?)" "The Wedges: Reduc ing Carbon Emissions", and "We the People: Climate and Culture of Climate Change" to name a few. Using The Governor's High School Conference on the Environment sponsored by the Wisconsin Center for Environmental Education as a model we are developing statewide partnerships to bring high school students together to look at global climate issues that will impact their future and of which they can be part of the solution through their education and career paths. In addition to

  17. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT FOR FORESTRY BIOFUEL STATEWIDE COLLABORATION CENTER (MICHIGAN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaCourt, Donna M.; Miller, Raymond O.; Shonnard, David R.

    2012-04-24

    A team composed of scientists from Michigan State University (MSU) and Michigan Technological University (MTU) assembled to better understand, document, and improve systems for using forest-based biomass feedstocks in the production of energy products within Michigan. Work was funded by a grant (DE-EE-0000280) from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and was administered by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC). The goal of the project was to improve the forest feedstock supply infrastructure to sustainably provide woody biomass for biofuel production in Michigan over the long-term. Work was divided into four broad areas with associated objectives: • TASK A: Develop a Forest-Based Biomass Assessment for Michigan – Define forest-based feedstock inventory, availability, and the potential of forest-based feedstock to support state and federal renewable energy goals while maintaining current uses. • TASK B: Improve Harvesting, Processing and Transportation Systems – Identify and develop cost, energy, and carbon efficient harvesting, processing and transportation systems. • TASK C: Improve Forest Feedstock Productivity and Sustainability – Identify and develop sustainable feedstock production systems through the establishment and monitoring of a statewide network of field trials in forests and energy plantations. • TASK D: Engage Stakeholders – Increase understanding of forest biomass production systems for biofuels by a broad range of stakeholders. The goal and objectives of this research and development project were fulfilled with key model deliverables including: 1) The Forest Biomass Inventory System (Sub-task A1) of feedstock inventory and availability and, 2) The Supply Chain Model (Sub-task B2). Both models are vital to Michigan’s forest biomass industry and support forecasting delivered cost, as well as carbon and energy balance. All of these elements are important to facilitate investor, operational and policy decisions. All

  18. Office-based preventive dental program and statewide trends in dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achembong, Leo N; Kranz, Ashley M; Rozier, R Gary

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of a North Carolina Medicaid preventive dentistry program in primary care medical offices (Into the Mouths of Babes Program [IMBP]) on decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft) of kindergarten students statewide and in schools with a large proportion of students from low-income families. An ecologic study using panel data of 920,505 kindergarten students with 11,694 school-year observations examined the effect of the IMBP on dmft scores from 1998 to 2009. Ordinary least squares regression with fixed effects determined the association between IMBP visits per child 0 to 4 years of age per county and mean dmft scores per kindergarten student per school, controlling for school-level poverty and ethnicity, county-level Medicaid enrollment, and supply of dentists and physicians. Mean dmft per kindergarten student per school increased from 1.53 in 1998 to 1.84 in 2004, then decreased to 1.59 in 2009. The mean number of IMBP visits per child 0 to 4 years of age per county increased from 0.01 in 2000 to 0.22 in 2009. A 1-unit increase in IMBP visits per county was associated with a 0.248 (95% confidence interval, -0.40 to -0.10) decrease in dmft per kindergarten student per school. For schools with more students at high risk for dental disease, a 1-unit increase in IMBP visits was associated with a 0.320 (95% confidence interval, -0.55 to -0.09) decrease in dmft. IMBP reduced dental caries among targeted vulnerable children, which helped reduce oral health disparities among preschool-aged children in North Carolina.

  19. Criminal Justice Profile--Statewide, 1984. Supplement to "Crime and Delinquency in California."

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Justice, Sacramento. Bureau of Criminal Statistics and Special Services.

    This California annual Criminal Justice Statewide Profile presents data which supplements the Bureau of Criminal Statistics' (BCS) annual Crime and Delinquency publication. This monograph summarizes and combines data pertaining to California's justice system. The profile consists of two sections. The first section consists of 12 tables displaying…

  20. A Statewide Train-the-Trainer Model for Effective Entrepreneurship and Workforce Readiness Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Nia Imani; Brown, Mananmi; Piechocinski, Alganesh; Wells, Kendra

    2012-01-01

    A statewide youth and adult train-the-trainer model that integrates workforce readiness and entrepreneurship can have a profound effect on young people's academic performance, interest in college, and overall youth development. Participants in workforce and entrepreneurship programs develop personal resources that have value in school, in the…

  1. The Florida Community College Statewide Collection Assessment Project: Outcomes and Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, Anna H.; Adams, Tina M.; Smith, Rhonda; Dixon, Jeannie

    2002-01-01

    Reports on the outcomes and impact of the Florida Community College Statewide Collection Assessment Project. Highlights include influences on the appropriation of additional funds; collection development decisions; collection weeding based on institution-specific collection assessment reports; and receipt and use of state legislative funding.…

  2. State-Wide Taxation of Commercial and Industrial Property for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Helen F.

    1976-01-01

    Simulates effects on educational expenditures in the Boston metropolitan area of establishing a statewide tax on commercial and industrial property to finance state aid for education. Concludes that removing business property from the local tax base for education would adversely affect the pattern of educational expenditures in the Boston area.…

  3. The Impact of a Universal Class-Size Reduction Policy: Evidence from Florida's Statewide Mandate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chingos, Matthew M.

    2012-01-01

    Class-size reduction (CSR) mandates presuppose that resources provided to reduce class size will have a larger impact on student outcomes than resources that districts can spend as they see fit. I estimate the impact of Florida's statewide CSR policy by comparing the deviations from prior achievement trends in districts that were required to…

  4. 23 CFR 450.216 - Development and content of the statewide transportation improvement program (STIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., right-of-way, design, or construction) the following: (1) Sufficient descriptive material (i.e., type of... TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND RESEARCH PLANNING ASSISTANCE AND STANDARDS Statewide Transportation Planning and... research projects funded under 23 U.S.C. 505 and 49 U.S.C. 5305(e); (4) At the State's discretion, State...

  5. 20 CFR 665.210 - What are allowable Statewide workforce investment activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are allowable Statewide workforce investment activities? 665.210 Section 665.210 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION... assist in skills upgrading; and (2) Programs targeted to Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Communities. (e...

  6. The AIME Statewide Survey of School Library Media Centers: Expenditures & Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Daniel; Knuth, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    This report is based on an Indiana statewide survey of school library media center collections, budgets, and services which was sponsored by the Association for Indiana Media Educators (AIME). Completed and usable surveys were received from 823 public and private school library media programs representing 44% of the total possible school library…

  7. A Cost-Savings Analysis of a Statewide Parenting Education Program in Child Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Erin J.; Corwin, Tyler W.; Hodnett, Rhenda; Faulk, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This article presents a cost-savings analysis of the statewide implementation of an evidence-informed parenting education program. Methods: Between the years 2005 and 2008, the state of Louisiana used the Nurturing Parenting Program (NPP) to impart parenting skills to child welfare-involved families. Following these families' outcomes…

  8. An Empirically-Based Statewide System for Identifying Quality Pre-Kindergarten Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeffrey M.; Landry, Susan H.; Anthony, Jason L.; Swank, Paul R.; Crawford, April D.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents an empirically-based statewide system that links information about pre-kindergarten programs with children's school readiness scores to certify pre-kindergarten classrooms as promoting school readiness. Over 8,000 children from 1,255 pre-kindergarten classrooms were followed longitudinally for one year. Pre-kindergarten quality…

  9. Statewide Physical Fitness Testing: A BIG Waist or a BIG Waste?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, James R., Jr.; Ede, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Statewide physical fitness testing is gaining popularity in the United States because of increased childhood obesity levels, the relations between physical fitness and academic performance, and the hypothesized relations between adult characteristics and childhood physical activity, physical fitness, and health behaviors. Large-scale physical…

  10. From Theory to Practice: Considerations for Implementing a Statewide Voucher System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Denis P.

    This monograph analyzes trends in American educational philosophy and history in its proposal to implement an all-public statewide school voucher system. Following an introduction, section 1, "Alternative Voucher Systems," discusses three concepts: universal unregulated vouchers, favored by Milton Friedman; regulated compensatory vouchers,…

  11. A Massachusetts and Multi-State Approach to Statewide Assessment of Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosson, Pat; Orcutt, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    This article describes efforts in Massachusetts and the Multi-State Collaborative to Advance Learning Outcomes Assessment (MSC) to develop a statewide system for learning outcomes assessment that does not rely on standardized testing and that is designed to transcend the traditional tensions and boundaries between campus-based formative and…

  12. A Statewide System To Track Medical Students' Careers: The Pennsylvania Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Howard K.; Veloski, J. Jon; Aber, Robert C.; Adler, Sheldon; Ferretti, Sylvia M.; Kelliher, Gerald J.; Mochen, Eugene; Morrison, Gail; Rattner, Susan L.; Sterling, Gerald; Robeson, Mary R.; Hojat, Mohammadreza; Xu, Gang

    1999-01-01

    Pennsylvania developed a generalist physician initiative, inspired by that of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, initiating a longitudinal tracking system at six allopathic and two osteopathic medical schools to follow students from matriculation into professional careers. The statewide database includes information on over 18,000 students,…

  13. A Statewide Train-the-Trainer Model for Effective Entrepreneurship and Workforce Readiness Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Nia Imani; Brown, Mananmi; Piechocinski, Alganesh; Wells, Kendra

    2012-01-01

    A statewide youth and adult train-the-trainer model that integrates workforce readiness and entrepreneurship can have a profound effect on young people's academic performance, interest in college, and overall youth development. Participants in workforce and entrepreneurship programs develop personal resources that have value in school, in the…

  14. 2011-2013 Indiana Statewide Imagery and LiDAR Program: Lake Michigan Watershed Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Indiana's Statewide LiDAR data is produced at 1.5-meter average post spacing for all 92 Indiana Counties covering more than 36,420 square miles. New LiDAR data was...

  15. A Statewide University System (16 Campuses) Creates Collaborative Learning Communities in Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Lynn Jones; Guerra, Mario; Corliss, Stephanie; Jarmon, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    For the first time in history, an entire statewide public institution of higher education is extending all of its 16 campuses into the online virtual world of Second Life and is creating one of the largest virtual collaborative learning communities in the world. There are three levels of assessment and research for this initial-entry project: (1)…

  16. Statewide Physical Fitness Testing: A BIG Waist or a BIG Waste?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, James R., Jr.; Ede, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Statewide physical fitness testing is gaining popularity in the United States because of increased childhood obesity levels, the relations between physical fitness and academic performance, and the hypothesized relations between adult characteristics and childhood physical activity, physical fitness, and health behaviors. Large-scale physical…

  17. Promoting Tobacco-Free School Policies through a Statewide Media Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerlin-Long, Shelley K.; Goldstein, Adam O.; Davis, James; Shah, Vandana

    2009-01-01

    Background: Comprehensive, enforced tobacco-free school (TFS) policies lead to significant reductions in youth tobacco use. North Carolina is the first state in the United States to develop a statewide mass media campaign to promote the adoption of and compliance with TFS policies. Methods: In order to guide campaign development, researchers…

  18. Statewide Strategic Forest Resource Planning Programs: Evaluation Based on Context, Process, Outputs, and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Gerald J.; Ellefson, Paul V.

    1991-01-01

    Evaluation of strategic planning programs is illustrated using the examples of statewide forest resource planning programs implemented by state governments in 1986. Client-based perspectives were studied via a survey of 216 officials affected by the forestry planning program. Considering planning's context, process, outputs, and performance helped…

  19. A Statewide Train-the-Trainer Model for Effective Entrepreneurship and Workforce Readiness Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Nia Imani; Brown, Mananmi; Piechocinski, Alganesh; Wells, Kendra

    2012-01-01

    A statewide youth and adult train-the-trainer model that integrates workforce readiness and entrepreneurship can have a profound effect on young people's academic performance, interest in college, and overall youth development. Participants in workforce and entrepreneurship programs develop personal resources that have value in school, in the…

  20. Total fact-book 2000-2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    TOTAL S.A., a French society incorporated in France on March 28, 1924, together with its subsidiaries and affiliates, is the fourth largest publicly-traded integrated oil and gas company in the world. This document provides statistical data and information on the corporate (highlights, statements), upstream (production, costs,main producing fields, drilling), upstream maps, downstream (refining, distillation, retail gasoline outlets) and chemicals (sales, specialities). (A.L.B.)

  1. The Migration and Remittances Factbook 2008

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2008-01-01

    This fact book for 2008 attempts to present numbers and facts behind the stories of international migration and remittances, drawing on authoritative, publicly available data. It provides a snapshot of statistics on immigration, emigration, skilled emigration, and remittance flows for 194 countries and 13 regional and income groups. The top migrant destination countries are the United Stat...

  2. WIC Participation and Pregnancy Outcomes: Massachusetts Statewide Evaluation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelchuck, Milton; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Using 1978 data from the Massachusetts Birth and Death Registry, examined the effects of WIC prenatal participation. Found that increased WIC participation was associated with enhanced pregnancy outcomes, but suggested that other causal factors also should be considered. (GC)

  3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a statewide media campaign to promote adolescent physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michael; Chandlee, Margaret; Abraham, Avron

    2008-10-01

    A cost-effectiveness analysis of a statewide social marketing campaign was performed using a statewide surveillance survey distributed to 6th through 12th graders, media production and placement costs, and 2000 census data. Exposure to all three advertisements had the highest impact on both intent and behavior with 65.6% of the respondents considering becoming more active and 58.3% reporting becoming more active. Average cost of the entire campaign was $4.01 per person to see an ad, $7.35 per person to consider being more active, and $8.87 per person to actually become more active, with billboards yielding the most positive cost-effectiveness. Findings highlight market research as an essential part of social marketing campaigns and the importance of using multiple marketing modalities to enhance cost-effectiveness and impact.

  4. Decrease in Statewide Antipsychotic Prescribing after Implementation of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Consultation Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Rebecca P; Penfold, Robert B; Sullivan, Donna; Boydston, Lauren; Wignall, Julia; Hilt, Robert J

    2017-04-01

    To learn if a quality of care Medicaid child psychiatric consultation service implemented in three different steps was linked to changes in statewide child antipsychotic utilization. Washington State child psychiatry consultation program primary data and Medicaid pharmacy division antipsychotic utilization secondary data from July 1, 2006, through December 31, 2013. Observational study in which consult program data were analyzed with a time series analysis of statewide antipsychotic utilization. All consultation program database information involving antipsychotics was compared to Medicaid pharmacy division database information involving antipsychotic utilization. Washington State's total child Medicaid antipsychotic utilization fell from 0.51 to 0.25 percent. The monthly prevalence of use fell by a mean of 0.022 per thousand per month following the initiation of elective consults (p = .004), by 0.065 following the initiation of age/dose triggered mandatory reviews (p consultation and best-practice education service. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  5. A task force model for statewide change in nursing education: building quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Mary H; Clark, Margherita Procaccini; Klemczak, Jeanette Wrona

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a statewide planning process to transform nursing education in Michigan to improve quality and safety of patient care. A task force model was used to engage diverse partners in issue identification, consensus building, and recommendations. An example of a statewide intervention in nursing education and practice that was executed was the Michigan Quality and Safety in Nursing Education Institute, which was held using an integrated approach to academic-practice partners from all state regions. This paper describes the unique advantage of leadership by the Michigan Chief Nurse Executive, the existence of a nursing strategic plan, and a funding model. An overview of the Task Force on Nursing Education is presented with a focus on the model's 10 process steps and resulting seven recommendations. The Michigan Nurse Education Council was established to implement the recommendations that included quality and safety.

  6. Emotional Distress among Vietnamese Adolescents: A Statewide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Donold W.; Ness, Robert C.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a study designed to provide baseline data for longitudinal research of emotional distress, social adjustment, and academic progress among Vietnamese adolescents in Connecticut. Examined sex differences, relationships with American classmates and with parents, English proficiency, acquisition of American cultural traits, and educational…

  7. Results of Statewide TerraNova Testing, Fall 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Marca, Paul M.

    This summary provides key findings about state, district, and school level performance on the TerraNova examinations (CTB/McGraw Hill) in Nevada in 1998-1999. The TerraNova tests are used to assess students in grades 4, 8, and 10 as stipulated by Nevada law. Within this summary, a description of performance as measured by national percentile…

  8. Third Grade English Language Arts: Underperformance on Statewide Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnarain, Taramattie

    2013-01-01

    The intent of this investigation was to examine the Kaplan K-12 program in an intervention process and identify the determinants that contributed to the void in performance in English language arts in Grade 3. As such, the researcher selected the Kaplan K-12 intervention program to shrink the void in performance in the English language arts within…

  9. Examining Student Digital Artifacts during a Year-Long Technology Integration Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Prisca M.; Frey, Chris; Dawson, Kara; Liu, Feng; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.

    2012-01-01

    This study was situated within a year-long, statewide technology integration initiative designed to support technology integration within science, technology, engineering, and math classrooms. It examined the elements used in student artifacts in an attempt to investigate trends in digital artifact creation. Among several conclusions, this…

  10. Validation of a risk stratification tool for fall-related injury in a state-wide cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Thomas H; Castro, Victor M; Cagan, Andrew; Roberson, Ashlee M; Perlis, Roy H

    2017-01-01

    Objective A major preventable contributor to healthcare costs among older individuals is fall-related injury. We sought to validate a tool to stratify such risk based on readily available clinical data, including projected medication adverse effects, using state-wide medical claims data. Design Sociodemographic and clinical features were drawn from health claims paid in the state of Massachusetts for individuals aged 35–65 with a hospital admission for a period spanning January–December 2012. Previously developed logistic regression models of hospital readmission for fall-related injury were refit in a testing set including a randomly selected 70% of individuals, and examined in a training set comprised of the remaining 30%. Medications at admission were summarised based on reported adverse effect frequencies in published medication labelling. Setting The Massachusetts health system. Participants A total of 68 764 hospitalised individuals aged 35–65 years. Primary Measures Hospital readmission for fall-related injury defined by claims code. Results A total of 2052 individuals (3.0%) were hospitalised for fall-related injury within 90 days of discharge, and 3391 (4.9%) within 180 days. After recalibrating the model in a training data set comprised of 48 136 individuals (70%), model discrimination in the remaining 30% test set yielded an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.74 (95% CI 0.72 to 0.76). AUCs were similar across age decades (0.71 to 0.78) and sex (0.72 male, 0.76 female), and across most common diagnostic categories other than psychiatry. For individuals in the highest risk quartile, 11.4% experienced fall within 180 days versus 1.2% in the lowest risk quartile; 57.6% of falls occurred in the highest risk quartile. Conclusions This analysis of state-wide claims data demonstrates the feasibility of predicting fall-related injury requiring hospitalisation using readily available sociodemographic and clinical

  11. The Soft Underbelly of System Change: The Role of Leadership and Organizational Climate in Turnover during Statewide Behavioral Health Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Sommerfeld, David H; Willging, Cathleen E

    2011-01-01

    This study examined leadership, organizational climate, staff turnover intentions, and voluntary turnover during a large-scale statewide behavioral health system reform. The initial data collection occurred nine months after initiation of the reform with a follow-up round of data collected 18 months later. A self-administered structured assessment was completed by 190 participants (administrators, support staff, providers) employed by 14 agencies. Key variables included leadership, organizational climate, turnover intentions, turnover, and reform-related financial stress ("low" versus "high") experienced by the agencies. Analyses revealed that positive leadership was related to a stronger empowering climate in both high and low stress agencies. However, the association between more positive leadership and lower demoralizing climate was evident only in high stress agencies. For both types of agencies empowering climate was negatively associated with turnover intentions, and demoralizing climate was associated with stronger turnover intentions. Turnover intentions were positively associated with voluntary turnover. Results suggest that strong leadership is particularly important in times of system and organizational change and may reduce poor climate associated with turnover intentions and turnover. Leadership and organizational context should be addressed to retain staff during these periods of systemic change.

  12. Lessons Learned From a Program Evaluation of a Statewide Continuing Education Program for Staff Members Working in Assisted Living and Adult Day Care Centers in Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Tracey L; Pryor, Jennifer M; Welleford, E Ayn

    2016-02-01

    The number of older adults residing in assisted living facilities (ALF) and utilizing adult day care services is expanding with the increasing population of older adults. Currently, there are no standardized requirements for continuing education for assisted living and adult day care service staff at a national level. Given that 62% of states within the United States require continuing education for ALF staff and/or administrators, a more formalized system is needed that provides evidence-based gerontological training to enhance the quality of care and services provided to older adults. This article describes the challenges and lessons learned from conducting a program evaluation of a Statewide Training and Continuing Education Program for Assisted Living Facility and Adult Day Care Service staff in Virginia. Survey evaluation data from a 6-year period was examined and a formative program evaluation was conducted. The findings from the survey evaluation and formative evaluation are discussed as are the lessons learned.

  13. Why Work for Extension? An Examination of Job Satisfaction and Motivation in a Statewide Employee Retention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Amy; Gouldthorpe, Jessica; Goodwin, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Understanding motivation and job satisfaction is important for increasing rates of employee retention within Extension. The purpose of the study reported here was to explore factors positively affecting the motivation of Extension professionals in their careers. An online survey of Extension professionals in Colorado was conducted. Factors such as…

  14. Why Work for Extension? An Examination of Job Satisfaction and Motivation in a Statewide Employee Retention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Amy; Gouldthorpe, Jessica; Goodwin, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Understanding motivation and job satisfaction is important for increasing rates of employee retention within Extension. The purpose of the study reported here was to explore factors positively affecting the motivation of Extension professionals in their careers. An online survey of Extension professionals in Colorado was conducted. Factors such as…

  15. Statewide Evaluation of Local Wellness Policies in Georgia: An Examination of Policy Compliance, Policy Strength, and Associated Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyn, Rodney; O'Meara, Sandra; Hepburn, Valerie A.; Potter, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze relationships between demographic characteristics of Georgia school systems and: (1) compliance with the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act (CNRA); and (2) strength of wellness policy goals in nutrition, physical activity, and other school-based activities. Design: Each local school district submitted their…

  16. Advocating self-advocacy: board membership in a statewide mental health consumer organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Sandra J

    2014-08-01

    Until 2008 Ohio Advocates for Mental Health was a statewide mental health advocacy organization run by mental health consumers and supportive of consumer-run organizations around the state. The author's tenure on the board entailed repeated engagement with questions of identity - self-identity, peer support through personal identification, and negotiation of public identities with provider groups and the state agency. These are fundamental to defining and legitimating the claims of mentally ill people not just for health care resources but for full participation as citizens in the public sphere.

  17. Predictors of Suicidal Ideation in a Statewide Sample of Transgender Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Brian A; Puckett, Julia A; Pantalone, David W; Bradford, Judith B

    2015-09-01

    Transgender individuals experience violence and discrimination, which, in addition to gender transitioning, are established correlates of psychological distress. In a statewide sample of 350 transgender adults, we investigated whether a history of violence and discrimination increased the odds of reporting lifetime suicidal ideation (SI) and whether differences in SI were predicted by gender transition status. Violence, discrimination, and transition status significantly predicted SI. Compared with individuals with no plans to transition, individuals with plans or who were living as their identified gender reported greater odds of lifetime SI. We discuss implications for SI disparities using Meyer's minority stress model.

  18. Leveraging a Statewide Clinical Data Warehouse to Expand Boundaries of the Learning Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Christine B; Obeid, Jihad; Larsen, Rick; Fryar, Katrina M; Lenert, Leslie; Bjorn, Arik; Lyons, Genevieve; Moskowitz, Jay; Sanderson, Iain

    2016-01-01

    Learning Health Systems (LHS) require accessible, usable health data and a culture of collaboration-a challenge for any single system, let alone disparate organizations, with macro- and micro-systems. Recently, the National Science Foundation described this important setting as a cyber-social ecosystem. In 2004, in an effort to create a platform for transforming health in South Carolina, Health Sciences South Carolina (HSSC) was established as a research collaboration of the largest health systems, academic medical centers and research intensive universities in South Carolina. With work beginning in 2010, HSSC unveiled an integrated Clinical Data Warehouse (CDW) in 2013 as a crucial anchor to a statewide LHS. This CDW integrates data from independent health systems in near-real time, and harmonizes the data for aggregation and use in research. With records from over 2.7 million unique patients spanning 9 years, this multi-institutional statewide clinical research repository allows integrated individualized patient-level data to be used for multiple population health and biomedical research purposes. In the first 21 months of operation, more than 2,800 de-identified queries occurred through i2b2, with 116 users. HSSC has developed and implemented solutions to complex issues emphasizing anti-competitiveness and participatory governance, and serves as a recognized model to organizations working to improve healthcare quality by extending the traditional borders of learning health systems.

  19. A focus area maturity model for a statewide master person index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Jeffrey; Xu, Wu; Narus, Scott P; Clyde, Stephen; Nangle, Barry; Thornton, Sid; Facelli, Julio

    2013-01-01

    The sharing of personally identifiable information across organizational boundaries to facilitate patient identification in Utah presents significant policy challenges. Our objective was to create a focus area maturity model to describe and evaluate our progress in developing a policy framework to support a statewide master person index (sMPI) for healthcare and public health operations and research in Utah. We used various artifacts, including minutes from policy guidance committee meetings over a span of 18 months, a report from Utah's Digital Health Services Commission, and a draft technical requirements document to retrospectively analyze our work and create a focus area maturity model describing the domain of policy needed to support the sMPI. We then used our model to assess our progress and future goals. The focus area maturity model provides an orderly path that can guide the complex process of developing a functional statewide master person index among diverse, autonomous partners. While this paper focuses on our experience in Utah, we believe that the arguments for using a focus area maturity model to guide the development of state or regional MPIs is of general interest.

  20. North Carolina Statewide Star Party: 45 Sites Offer Skywatching and Citizen Science the Same Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayle, A. E.; Sorrell, M. J.; Frederick, J.; Young, D. L.

    2014-07-01

    As the kickoff to the 2013 North Carolina Science Festival, 45 sites across the state planned skywatching sessions for the public on April 5, 2013. The Statewide Star Party sites stretched across 500 miles, from the mountains to the Outer Banks, and included large cities as well as rural areas. Hosts included parks, planetariums, museums, nature centers, and universities. Many sites were aided by local amateur astronomers who provided their telescopes and expertise. Because the star party date fell during International Dark Sky Week and a GLOBE at Night citizen-science campaign, each host was encouraged to teach their audiences about light pollution and GLOBE at Night, and was provided with a kit of relevant materials to support them in planning their events and educating the public. Two hosts canceled their events because of poor weather. The 43 star party events that took place attracted 4,926 participants and were held in 31 counties across the state. The North Carolina Statewide Star Party will become an annual event during the North Carolina Science Festival. Other states and regions are encouraged to plan similar star parties to help educate and inspire the public about astronomy and citizen science.

  1. Technical Architecture of ONC-Approved Plans For Statewide Health Information Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Randolph C.; Ezzard, John

    2011-01-01

    ONC-approved state plans for HIE were reviewed for descriptions and depictions of statewide HIE technical architecture. Review was complicated by non-standard organizational elements and technical terminology across state plans. Findings were mapped to industry standard, referenced, and defined HIE architecture descriptions and characteristics. Results are preliminary due to the initial subset of ONC-approved plans available, the rapid pace of new ONC-plan approvals, and continuing advancements in standards and technology of HIE, etc. Review of 28 state plans shows virtually all include a direct messaging component, but for participating entities at state-specific levels of granularity (RHIO, enterprise, organization/provider). About ½ of reviewed plans describe a federated architecture, and ¼ of plans utilize a single-vendor “hybrid-federated” architecture. About 1/3 of states plan to leverage new federal and open exchange technologies (DIRECT, CONNECT, etc.). Only one plan describes a centralized architecture for statewide HIE, but others combine central and federated architectural approaches. PMID:22195059

  2. Statewide hepatitis C model of care for rural and remote regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wendy; Nazareth, Saroj; Flexman, James Patrick

    2015-03-01

    The evolution of management of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has seen a majority of patients treated being regarded as cured. Despite this development, uptake of treatment remains low in Australia, and this is particularly true in rural and remote areas. The largest state in Australia, Western Australia (WA), covers an area of 2500 km(2). As the rural and remote population of WA is scattered in small areas rather than major centers, poor accessibility to remote areas and lack of adequate of medical and nursing resources pose major problems in providing equity of care to patients with chronic HCV. A statewide hepatitis model of care, established in 2009, has led to an increase in identification and treatment of patients living with HCV. Strategies used to facilitate these changes include telehealth, a nurse practitioner model, and general practitioner shared-care model. The statewide program will be modified to meet the changing needs of patients as all-oral treatment regimens become available, with further emphasis being placed on the role of rural and remote health professionals in identifying patients with HCV and initiating and monitoring treatment.

  3. A Focus Area Maturity Model for a Statewide Master Person Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Jeffrey; Xu, Wu; Narus, Scott P.; Clyde, Stephen; Nangle, Barry; Thornton, Sid; Facelli, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The sharing of personally identifiable information across organizational boundaries to facilitate patient identification in Utah presents significant policy challenges. Our objective was to create a focus area maturity model to describe and evaluate our progress in developing a policy framework to support a statewide master person index (sMPI) for healthcare and public health operations and research in Utah. Materials and Methods: We used various artifacts, including minutes from policy guidance committee meetings over a span of 18 months, a report from Utah’s Digital Health Services Commission, and a draft technical requirements document to retrospectively analyze our work and create a focus area maturity model describing the domain of policy needed to support the sMPI. We then used our model to assess our progress and future goals. Conclusions: The focus area maturity model provides an orderly path that can guide the complex process of developing a functional statewide master person index among diverse, autonomous partners. While this paper focuses on our experience in Utah, we believe that the arguments for using a focus area maturity model to guide the development of state or regional MPIs is of general interest. PMID:23923093

  4. Avoiding a knowledge gap in a multiethnic statewide social marketing campaign: is cultural tailoring sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchthal, O Vanessa; Doff, Amy L; Hsu, Laura A; Silbanuz, Alice; Heinrich, Katie M; Maddock, Jay E

    2011-03-01

    In 2007, the State of Hawaii, Healthy Hawaii Initiative conducted a statewide social-marketing campaign promoting increased physical activity and nutrition. The campaign included substantial formative research to develop messages tailored for Hawaii's multiethnic Asian and Pacific Islander populations. The authors conducted a statewide random digital dialing telephone survey to assess the campaign's comparative reach among individuals with different ethnicities and different levels of education and income. This analysis suggests that the intervention was successful in reaching its target ethnic audiences. However, a knowledge gap related to the campaign appeared among individuals with incomes less than 130% of the poverty level and those with less than a high school education. These results varied significantly by message and the communication channel used. Recall of supermarket-based messages was significantly higher among individuals below 130% of the poverty level and those between 18 and 35 years of age, 2 groups that showed consistently lower recall of messages in other channels. Results suggest that cultural tailoring for ethnic audiences, although important, is insufficient for reaching low-income populations, and that broad-based social marketing campaigns should consider addressing socioeconomic status-related channel preferences in formative research and campaign design.

  5. Examining the Satisfaction of Educational Leaders and Their Intent to Pursue Career Advancement in Public School Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Tracey L.; Rosser, Vicki J.

    2007-01-01

    This statewide study examined selected demographic characteristics, worklife experiences, and personal issues that influence the satisfaction of administrators (assistant principals, principals, assistant superintendents) and their intent to leave their positions and careers or pursue career advancement in public school administration. The results…

  6. Up Close and Personal: A Statewide Collaborative's Effort to Get Individual Surgeon Quality Improvement Data to the Practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Brian J; Cecil, William; Cofer, Joseph B; Clarke, P Chris; Guillamondegui, Oscar

    2016-03-01

    Ranking of surgeons and hospitals focuses on procedure volume and hospitality. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program provides vetted outcomes of surgical quality and therefore can direct improvement. Our statewide collaborative's analysis creates personalized surgeon data to drive quality improvement. Statewide National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data generated specific measures from 103,656 general/vascular cases and identified individual surgeon's outcome of occurrences and length of procedure. We assumed a normal distribution and called the top 2.5 per cent as exemplars and the bottom 2.5 per cent as outliers. For length of operation, a standard duration was calculated, and identified outliers as longer than the 95th percentile of the upper confidence interval/procedure. Since 2009, sharing best practice reduced statewide mortality rate by 31.5 per cent and postoperative morbidity by 33.3 per cent. For length of surgery, long outliers have more complications (urinary tract infection, organ space/surgical site infection, sepsis, septic shock, prolonged intubation, pneumonia, deep venous thrombosis, deep incisional infection, and wound disruption). No significant trends in surgeon performance were seen over 24 months. A statewide collaborative has resulted in substantial risk-adjusted reductions in surgical morbidity and mortality. These results of the individual surgeon demonstrate best practices are shared, a proven tool for improvement in our collaborative.

  7. Results of the 2010 Statewide New Mexico School Social Work Survey: Implications for Evaluating the Effectiveness of School Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittlesey-Jerome, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    Today's school social workers are facing unique challenges in the workplace. The results of the 2009 New Mexico School Social Work Survey reinforced the idea that school social workers must be able to prove their effectiveness. Building on the school social work literature on practice outcomes evaluation, a more extensive statewide survey of…

  8. Statewide collaboration to evaluate the effects of blood loss and transfusion on surgical site infection after hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Heather; Berumen, Crystal; Knepper, Bryan; Miller, Amber; Silverman, Morgan; Gilmartin, Heather; Wodrich, Elizabeth; Alexander, Sandy; Price, Connie S

    2012-01-01

    We used mandatory public reporting as an impetus to perform a statewide study to define risk factors for surgical site infection. Among women who underwent abdominal hysterectomy, blood transfusion was a significant risk factor for surgical site infection in patients who experienced blood loss of less than 500 mL.

  9. A Guide to Effective Statewide Laws/Policies: Preventing Discrimination against LGBT Students in K-12 Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund, New York, NY.

    This document presents guidance for stopping discrimination, harassment, and violence against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in schools. Section 1, "Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund on the Legal Considerations for Creating and Changing Statewide Laws and Policies," discusses the various types of statewide…

  10. Changes in Obesity Awareness, Obesity Identification, and Self-Assessment of Health: Results from a Statewide Public Education Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Adam G.; Boyle, Tracy F.; Hill, James O.; Lindley, Corina; Weiss, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to the high prevalence of obesity, individuals may be desensitized to weight as a personal health concern. Purpose: To evaluate changes in obesity awareness associated with a statewide public education campaign in Colorado. Methods: Cross-sectional random digit dial telephone surveys (n = 1,107 pre, n = 1101 post) were conducted…

  11. A statewide consortium of surgical care: a longitudinal investigation of vascular operative procedures at 16 hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Peter K; Kubus, Jim; Englesbe, Michael J; Harbaugh, Calista; Campbell, Darrell A

    2010-10-01

    Regional surgical quality improvement consortiums are becoming more common. Herein we have reported the effectiveness of a statewide consortium focusing on open vascular operative procedures. The statewide Michigan Surgical Quality Consortium was established in 2005 with 16 hospitals that report cases of vascular open operative intervention, in a sampling manner consistent with the private sector National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Data are abstracted by onsite trained nurses using defined and validated pre-, peri-, and postoperative variables with 30-day follow-up. Outpatient and emergent cases were excluded. We compared outcomes over the course of the consortium (era I, April 2005-March 2007; era II, April 2007-March 2008) via univariate and multivariate techniques. Era I (n = 2,453) and era II (n = 3,409) cases were similar in age (mean, 68 years), gender (61% male), relative value units (mean, 21), and distribution of Current Procedural Terminology codes. Duration of stay and operative time decreased by 15% and 11%, respectively, when comparing era I with era II (P cardiac or renal, complications. When evaluating both eras, modifiable variables (able to be altered by the surgeon) for morbidity included increased length of operation (odds ratio [OR], 1.004; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.003-1.005; P < .0001), hypertension (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.03-2.1; P = .03), and blood transfusion (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 2.04-3.88; P < .0001). However, anemic patients (11%; hematocrit <30) who were transfused were less likely to suffer morbidity (OR, 56; 95% CI, 0.47-0.67; P < .0001) than those transfused who were not anemic. The absolute 2% reduction in complications led to a $172 cost savings for the payers per patient in era II compared with era I. A statewide quality-of-care consortium with timely feedback of data was associated with decreased morbidity over a relatively short follow-up period in vascular patients. Focusing on best processes in real-world practice

  12. The Cosmic Ray Observatory Project: A Statewide Outreach and Education Experiment in Nebraska

    CERN Document Server

    Claes, Daniel R

    2007-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Observatory Project (CROP) is a statewide education and research experiment involving Nebraska high school students, teachers and university undergraduates in the study of extensive cosmic-ray air showers. A network of high school teams construct, install, and operate school-based detectors in coordination with University of Nebraska physics professors and graduate students. The detector system at each school is an array of scintillation counters recycled from the Chicago Air Shower Array in weather-proof enclosures on the school roof, with a GPS receiver providing a time stamp for cosmic-ray events. The detectors are connected to triggering electronics and a data-acquisition PC inside the building. Students share data via the Internet to search for time coincidences with other sites. Funded by the National Science Foundation, CROP has enlisted 29 schools with the aim of expanding to the 314 high schools in the state over several years. This report highlights both the scientific and professiona...

  13. Developing and maintaining state-wide adolescent pregnancy prevention coalitions: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezlek, J B; Galano, J

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of state-wide adolescent pregnancy prevention coalitions. Key informants in five states throughout the southern United States were given semi-structured interviews regarding the adolescent pregnancy prevention coalitions in their states. From these interviews and other documents, conclusions were drawn regarding the nature and importance of the environments within which these coalitions operate, the universe of activities in which coalitions engage, and the stages of development of these coalitions. Katz and Kahn's model of social organizations served as the basis for understanding coalitions in terms of these three considerations. Future research should consider the utility of organizational models that can explain more fully the organization--committee hybrid structure that tends to characterize these coalitions.

  14. A model for a statewide critical incident stress (CIS) debriefing program for emergency services personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, K W; Spitzer, W J

    1997-01-01

    Emergency services personnel are highly vulnerable to acute and cumulative critical incident stress (CIS) that can manifest as anger, guilt, depression, and impaired decision-making, and, in certain instances, job loss. Interventions designed to identify such distress and restore psychological functioning becomes imperative. A statewide debriefing team was formed in 1988 through a collaborative effort between an academic department of emergency medicine and a social work department of a teaching hospital, and a metropolitan area fire department and ambulance service. Using an existing CIS debriefing model, 84 prescreened, mental health professionals and emergency services personnel were provided with 16 hours of training and were grouped into regional teams. Debriefing requests are received through a central number answered by a communicator in a 24-hour communications center located within the emergency department. Debriefings are conducted 48-72 hours after the event for specific types of incidents. Follow-up telephone calls are made by the debriefing team leader two to three weeks following a debriefing. The teams rely on donations to pay for travel and meals. One hundred sixty-eight debriefings were conducted during the first four years. Rural agencies accounted for 116 (69%) requests. During this period, 1,514 individuals were debriefed: 744 (49%) firefighters, 460 (30%) EMTs, and 310 (21%) police officers, dispatchers, and other responders. Deaths of children, extraordinary events, and incidents involving victims known to the responders (35%, 14%, and 14% respectively) were the most common reasons for requesting debriefings. Feedback was received from 48 (28%) of the agencies that requested the debriefing. All of those who responded felt that the debriefing had a beneficial effect on its personnel. Specific individuals identified by agency representatives as having the greatest difficulty were observed to be returned to their pre-incident state. CIS

  15. State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch State-wide Water Quality Sampling Dataset 1999-2006 (NODC Accession 0013723)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Monitoring Section of the State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch collects water quality data at over 300 coastal locations state-wide using...

  16. Child Day Care Centers, Statewide Day Cares in the LDSS database., Published in 2006, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Louisiana State University.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Child Day Care Centers dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale as of 2006. It is described as 'Statewide Day Cares in the LDSS database.'. The extent...

  17. State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch State-wide Water Quality Sampling Dataset 1973-1998 (NODC Accession 0013724)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Monitoring Section of the State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Clean Water Branch collects water quality data at over 300 coastal locations state-wide using...

  18. Impact of Online Learning Modules on Medical Student Microbiology Examination Scores

    OpenAIRE

    Mary T. Johnson

    2009-01-01

    Medical students have a limited amount of time in which to acquire working knowledge of an enormous amount of information, and this is especially relevant for microbiology. One large midwestern medical school is unique in having medical microbiology taught at nine regional campuses using a single core curriculum. A committee of statewide course directors writes a licensure board-style final examination that is referenced to the core and used at all campuses. To prepare for the final examinati...

  19. Cytogenetic examination

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic examination on six normal persons, four men and two women, was carried out using a technique proposed by Dutrillaux with slight modification. Five drops of blood were taken from a peripheral vessel and was incubated on a PHA (phytohemarglutinine)-containing medium at 37°C for about 72 hours. Cell division was blocked by adding colchicine solution, an antimitotic agent, into this medium. A mixture of distilled water, magnesium chloride, hyaluronidase, and goat serum was used as hy...

  20. Statewide analysis of the drainage-area ratio method for 34 streamflow percentile ranges in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asquith, William H.; Roussel, Meghan C.; Vrabel, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The drainage-area ratio method commonly is used to estimate streamflow for sites where no streamflow data are available using data from one or more nearby streamflow-gaging stations. The method is intuitive and straightforward to implement and is in widespread use by analysts and managers of surface-water resources. The method equates the ratio of streamflow at two stream locations to the ratio of the respective drainage areas. In practice, unity often is assumed as the exponent on the drainage-area ratio, and unity also is assumed as a multiplicative bias correction. These two assumptions are evaluated in this investigation through statewide analysis of daily mean streamflow in Texas. The investigation was made by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. More than 7.8 million values of daily mean streamflow for 712 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Texas were analyzed. To account for the influence of streamflow probability on the drainage-area ratio method, 34 percentile ranges were considered. The 34 ranges are the 4 quartiles (0-25, 25-50, 50-75, and 75-100 percent), the 5 intervals of the lower tail of the streamflow distribution (0-1, 1-2, 2-3, 3-4, and 4-5 percent), the 20 quintiles of the 4 quartiles (0-5, 5-10, 10-15, 15-20, 20-25, 25-30, 30-35, 35-40, 40-45, 45-50, 50-55, 55-60, 60-65, 65-70, 70-75, 75-80, 80-85, 85-90, 90-95, and 95-100 percent), and the 5 intervals of the upper tail of the streamflow distribution (95-96, 96-97, 97-98, 98-99 and 99-100 percent). For each of the 253,116 (712X711/2) unique pairings of stations and for each of the 34 percentile ranges, the concurrent daily mean streamflow values available for the two stations provided for station-pair application of the drainage-area ratio method. For each station pair, specific statistical summarization (median, mean, and standard deviation) of both the exponent and bias-correction components of the drainage-area ratio

  1. Comparison of Remotely Sensed Precipitation and Evapotranspiration Products for a Statewide Water Assessment of New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Fernald, A.; Peterson, K.; Walker, S.; Hewitt, I. C.; Hendrickx, J. M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Precipitation and evapotranspiration (ET) are the major components of the water balance in New Mexico. Therefore, it is critical to acquire accurate precipitation and ET data as input into a statewide water balance. Since existing meteorological stations in New Mexico don't cover the entire state and leave many areas without accurate information, we propose to evaluate the accuracy of existing nationwide remotely sensed databases for precipitation and ET to quantify the spatial and temporal distributions of those components in a statewide water balance. In this study we compare five precipitation products and three ET products: the CHIRPS (Climate Hazard Group InfraRed Precipitation with Station data) model, the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service product, the PERSIANN-GCCS (Precipitation Estimation from Remote Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Network - Global Cloud Classification System) model, the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Relationships on Independent Slopes) model the TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, the ALExI (Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse) model, the MOD 16 ( MODIS Global Evapotranspiration Product) model of NASA, and the SSEB (Simplified Surface Energy Balance) model produced by the USGS. Early results show a strong relationship between all precipitation products across the state of New Mexico from 2000 to 2013 with an average depth of 315 mm, except for the PERSIANN model which has a rainfall depth approximately 53% higher (673mm) than the average of the other models. Additionally there is a strong relationship between the ALExI and SSEB ET models yet these models exceed the precipitation in the state by approximately 35%. The MOD 16 ET model has an average ET depth approximately 42% less than the average of the precipitation models and about 60% less than the ALExI and SSEB ET models. Future work includes validation of precipitation and ET models using high density rain gauge networks, as well as METRIC

  2. Statewide land cover derived from multiseasonal Landsat TM data: A retrospective of the WISCLAND project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, H.M.; Lillesand, T.M.; Nagel, D.E.; Stewart, J.S.; Goldmann, R.A.; Simmons, T.E.; Chipman, J.W.; Tessar, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data were the basis in production of a statewide land cover data set for Wisconsin, undertaken in partnership with U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Gap Analysis Program (GAP). The data set contained seven classes comparable to Anderson Level I and 24 classes comparable to Anderson Level II/III. Twelve scenes of dual-date TM data were processed with methods that included principal components analysis, stratification into spectrally consistent units, separate classification of upland, wetland, and urban areas, and a hybrid supervised/unsupervised classification called "guided clustering." The final data had overall accuracies of 94% for Anderson Level I upland classes, 77% for Level II/III upland classes, and 84% for Level II/III wetland classes. Classification accuracies for deciduous and coniferous forest were 95% and 93%, respectively, and forest species' overall accuracies ranged from 70% to 84%. Limited availability of acceptable imagery necessitated use of an early May date in a majority of scene pairs, perhaps contributing to lower accuracy for upland deciduous forest species. The mixed deciduous/coniferous forest class had the lowest accuracy, most likely due to distinctly classifying a purely mixed class. Mixed forest signatures containing oak were often confused with pure oak. Guided clustering was seen as an efficient classification method, especially at the tree species level, although its success relied in part on image dates, accurate ground troth, and some analyst intervention. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A statewide nurse training program for a hospital based infant abusive head trauma prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, Maryalice; Shanahan, Meghan; Murphy, Robert A; Sullivan, Kelly M; Barr, Marilyn; Price, Julie; Zolotor, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Successful implementation of universal patient education programs requires training large numbers of nursing staff in new content and procedures and maintaining fidelity to program standards. In preparation for statewide adoption of a hospital based universal education program, nursing staff at 85 hospitals and 1 birthing center in North Carolina received standardized training. This article describes the training program and reports findings from the process, outcome and impact evaluations of this training. Evaluation strategies were designed to query nurse satisfaction with training and course content; determine if training conveyed new information, and assess if nurses applied lessons from the training sessions to deliver the program as designed. Trainings were conducted during April 2008-February 2010. Evaluations were received from 4358 attendees. Information was obtained about training type, participants' perceptions of newness and usefulness of information and how the program compared to other education materials. Program fidelity data were collected using telephone surveys about compliance to delivery of teaching points and teaching behaviors. Results demonstrate high levels of satisfaction and perceptions of program utility as well as adherence to program model. These findings support the feasibility of implementing a universal patient education programs with strong uptake utilizing large scale systematic training programs.

  4. PASS-THROUGH FREIGHT MODELING AT THE STATEWIDE AND METROPOLITAN LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Anderson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to determine the volumes of freight (specifically trucks passing through a state or metropolitan area is difficult to determine/forecast because transportation professionals have no direct survey mechanism to collect this data. This paper documents various procedures developed to utilize the Freight Analysis Framework Version 2 Database to determine the number of trucks passing through the entire state and an urban area in Alabama. The procedures developed in this research focus on national level pass through data, trips from one state to another that pass through a state only because of that state’s location; pass through from a port of entry to the country where an urbanized area is located on a major corridor; and statewide level through trip data, trips from one part of a state to another that pass through an urbanized area because of its geographic location. The need for, and application of, the pass through freight forecasting is evident in the transportation planning models each metropolitan area and state are expected to develop and maintain for evaluating transportation projects. The ability to accurately forecast the pass through freight movements will benefit transportation planners by identifying freight volumes that must be accommodated by existing and proposed infrastructure, but for which the state or metropolitan area has no direct method to survey.

  5. A statewide Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) initiative: evolution of the Georgia CIT program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Janet R; Compton, Michael T

    2008-01-01

    In late 2004, Georgia began implementation of a statewide Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) program to train a portion of its law enforcement officers to respond safely and effectively to individuals with mental illnesses who are in crisis. This overview provides a description of the evolution of the Georgia CIT, including discussions of the historical context in which the program developed; the program's vision, mission, and objectives; the importance of the multidisciplinary Georgia CIT Advisory Board; the training curriculum; the role played by state and local coordinators; the value of stakeholders' meetings; practical operations of the program; the importance of considering the adequacy of community-based and hospital-based psychiatric services; costs and funding; the program's expansion plan; and evaluation, research, and academic collaborations. These detailed descriptions of the Georgia CIT program may be useful for professionals involved in local, regional, or state CIT program planning and may provide a practical synopsis of one example of this collaborative model that is being rapidly disseminated across the U.S.

  6. Comparison of molecular detection methods for pertussis in children during a state-wide outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, X; Zerr, D M; Kronman, M P; Adler, A L; Berry, J E; Rich, S; Buccat, A M; Xu, M; Englund, J A

    2016-04-27

    A state-wide pertussis outbreak occurred in Washington during the winter-spring months of 2012, concurrent with respiratory viral season. We compared performance characteristics of a laboratory-developed pertussis PCR (LD-PCR for Bordetella pertussis, Bordetella parapertussis, and Bordetella holmesii) and rapid multiplex PCR (RM-PCR) for respiratory viruses (FilmArray™, BioFire, B. pertussis data unblinded following FDA approval post outbreak). We analyzed three cohorts of patients using physician testing orders as a proxy for clinical suspicion for pertussis or respiratory viruses: Cohort 1, tested by LD-PCR for pertussis pathogens only by nasopharyngeal swab; Cohort 2, by RM-PCR for respiratory viruses only by mid-nasal turbinate swab; and Cohort 3, by both methods. B. pertussis was detected in a total of 25 of the 490 patients in Cohort 3 in which LD-PCR detected 20/25 (80 %) cases and the RM-PCR detected 24/25 (96 %; p = 0.2). Pertussis pathogens were detected in 21/584 (3.6 %) of samples from Cohort 1 where clinicians had a relatively strong suspicion for pertussis. In contrast, B. pertussis was detected in only 4/3071 (0.1 %) specimens from Cohort 2 where suspicion for pertussis was lower (p < 0.001 for comparison with Cohort 1). In summary, the two laboratory methods were comparable for the detection of B. pertussis.

  7. A Statewide Nested Case–Control Study of Preterm Birth and Air Pollution by Source and Composition: California, 2001–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Olivier; Hu, Jianlin; Li, Lianfa; Kleeman, Michael J.; Bartell, Scott M.; Cockburn, Myles; Escobedo, Loraine; Wu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Preterm birth (PTB) has been associated with exposure to air pollution, but it is unclear whether effects might vary among air pollution sources and components. Objectives: We studied the relationships between PTB and exposure to different components of air pollution, including gases and particulate matter (PM) by size fraction, chemical composition, and sources. Methods: Fine and ultrafine PM (respectively, PM2.5 and PM0.1) by source and composition were modeled across California over 2000–2008. Measured PM2.5, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone concentrations were spatially interpolated using empirical Bayesian kriging. Primary traffic emissions at fine scale were modeled using CALINE4 and traffic indices. Data on maternal characteristics, pregnancies, and birth outcomes were obtained from birth certificates. Associations between PTB (n = 442,314) and air pollution exposures defined according to the maternal residence at birth were examined using a nested matched case–control approach. Analyses were adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, education and neighborhood income. Results: Adjusted odds ratios for PTB in association with interquartile range (IQR) increases in average exposure during pregnancy were 1.133 (95% CI: 1.118, 1.148) for total PM2.5, 1.096 (95% CI: 1.085, 1.108) for ozone, and 1.079 (95% CI: 1.065, 1.093) for nitrogen dioxide. For primary PM, the strongest associations per IQR by source were estimated for onroad gasoline (9–11% increase), followed by onroad diesel (6–8%) and commercial meat cooking (4–7%). For PM2.5 composition, the strongest positive associations per IQR were estimated for nitrate, ammonium, and secondary organic aerosols (11–14%), followed by elemental and organic carbon (2–4%). Associations with local traffic emissions were positive only when analyses were restricted to births with residences geocoded at the tax parcel level. Conclusions: In our statewide nested case–control study population, exposures

  8. The New Hampshire Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding Collaborative: A Statewide QI Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Bonny L; Kelly, Joyce; Holmes, Alison Volpe

    2015-06-01

    Despite national recognition for their breastfeeding-friendly practices, many New Hampshire hospitals are still not achieving the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. To increase achievement of the Ten Steps in New Hampshire's birthing hospitals, facilitate Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) designation for interested hospitals, and improve rates of in-hospital any and exclusive breastfeeding. After a 2010 needs assessment, we conducted 2 statewide workshops targeting 6 of the Ten Steps found to be most deficient among New Hampshire birthing hospitals. Eighteen of 20 hospitals attended at least 1 workshop, and 6 participated in an intensive collaborative. In 2013, we analyzed interval Ten Step achievement and in-hospital breastfeeding trends. Staff education showed the greatest improvement, increasing step 2 achievement from 1 to 6 hospitals (P=.05). Although the number of hospitals implementing step 6 (breast milk only) and step 9 (no artificial nipples) increased, differences were not statistically significant. Intensive collaborative hospitals achieved an average of 1.5 new steps, whereas non-Baby Friendly hospitals lost 0.7 steps (P=.05). In-hospital breastfeeding rates increased in intensive collaborative hospitals and were significantly higher than those in non-Baby Friendly hospitals by the end of the study (any breastfeeding, 89% vs 73%, P=.03; exclusive breastfeeding, 84% vs 61%, Pbreastfeeding for hospitals participating in an intensive collaborative. Active work in Ten Step implementation, including staff education, appears to be more effective in increasing in-hospital breastfeeding than does BFHI designation alone. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Impact of Maine's statewide nutrition policy on high school food environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley Blum, Janet E; Beaudoin, Christina M; O'Brien, Liam M; Polacsek, Michele; Harris, David E; O'Rourke, Karen A

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the effect on the food environments of public high schools of Maine's statewide nutrition policy (Chapter 51), which banned "foods of minimal nutritional value" (FMNV) in public high schools that participated in federally funded meal programs. We documented allowable exceptions to the policy and describe the school food environments. We mailed surveys to 89 high school food-service directors to assess availability pre-Chapter 51 and post-Chapter 51 of soda, other sugar-sweetened beverages, and junk food. Frequency data were tabulated pre-Chapter 51 and post-Chapter 51, and Fisher exact test was used to assess significance in changes. We conducted food and beverage inventories at 11 high schools. The survey return rate was 61% (N = 54). Availability of soda in student vending significantly decreased pre-Chapter 51 versus post-Chapter 51 (P = .04). No significant changes were found for other sugar-sweetened beverages and junk food. Exceptions to Chapter 51 were permitted to staff (67%), to the public (86%), and in career and technical education programs (31%). Inventories in a subset of schools found no availability of soda for students, whereas other sugar-sweetened beverages and junk food were widely available in à la carte, vending machines, and school stores. Candy, considered a FMNV, was freely available. Soda advertisement on school grounds was common. Student vending choices improved after the implementation of Chapter 51; however, use of FMNV as the policy standard may be limiting, as availability of other sugar-sweetened beverages and junk food was pervasive. School environments were not necessarily supportive of the policy, as advertisement of soda was common and some FMNV were available. Furthermore, local exceptions to Chapter 51 likely reduced the overall effect of the policy.

  10. Evaluation of a statewide medical home program on children and young adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburger, Robert; Berhane, Zekarias; Gatto, Molly; Yunghans, Suzanne; Davis, Renee K; Turchi, Renee M

    2015-01-01

    Asthma, the most common chronic condition among children, accounts for significant healthcare utilization and impact on quality of life. Care coordination in a medical home is considered standard practice, but has not been rigorously evaluated. We initiated this pilot study of children/young adults with asthma (n = 967), ages: birth to 24 years, receiving care from a subset of pediatric practices (n = 20) participating in the Pennsylvania Medical Home Initiative, Educating Practices in Community-Integrated Care (92 practices statewide). We hypothesized children and youth with asthma receiving care coordination in the context of a formal medical home program would experience favorable associations with healthcare utilization and quality of life measures. A total of 9240 care coordination encounters for this cohort of children/youth occurred over 100 days. The average length of care coordination encounter was 20.7 minutes. The most common care coordination activity was referral management (21%) and the care coordinator in the practice most often contacted parent/family and specialists (75%). Children with more severe asthma had more hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits than children with less severe asthma. There was a significant decrease in school absences, ED visits and acute care visits for children/youth with asthma with increasing length of time in a medical home program (p children/youth with asthma is feasible and may yield improvements in healthcare utilization, expenditures and quality of life. Larger-scale implementation of care coordination and medical home models for children/youth with asthma and other diagnoses are warranted.

  11. Neuroanatomical correlates of performance in a state-wide test of math achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkey, Eric D; Cutting, Laurie E; Price, Gavin R

    2017-03-03

    The development of math skills is a critical component of early education and a strong indicator of later school and economic success. Recent research utilizing population-normed, standardized measures of math achievement suggest that structural and functional integrity of parietal regions, especially the intraparietal sulcus, are closely related to the development of math skills. However, it is unknown how these findings relate to in-school math learning. The present study is the first to address this issue by investigating the relationship between regional differences in grey matter (GM) volume and performance in grade-level mathematics as measured by a state-wide, school-based test of math achievement (TCAP math) in children from 3rd to 8th grade. Results show that increased GM volume in the bilateral hippocampal formation and the right inferior frontal gyrus, regions associated with learning and memory, is associated with higher TCAP math scores. Secondary analyses revealed that GM volume in the left angular gyrus had a stronger relationship to TCAP math in grades 3-4 than in grades 5-8 while the relationship between GM volume in the left inferior frontal gyrus and TCAP math was stronger for grades 5-8. These results suggest that the neuroanatomical architecture related to in-school math achievement differs from that related to math achievement measured by standardized tests, and that the most related neural structures differ as a function of grade level. We suggest, therefore, that the use of school-relevant outcome measures is critical if neuroscience is to bridge the gap to education.

  12. Reducing preterm birth by a statewide multifaceted program: an implementation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, John P; White, Scott W; Meharry, Suzanne; Lee, Han-Shin; Pedretti, Michelle K; Arrese, Catherine A; Keelan, Jeffrey A; Kemp, Matthew W; Dickinson, Jan E; Doherty, Dorota A

    2017-05-01

    A comprehensive preterm birth prevention program was introduced in the state of Western Australia encompassing new clinical guidelines, an outreach program for health care practitioners, a public health program for women and their families based on print and social media, and a new clinic at the state's sole tertiary level perinatal center for referral of those pregnant women at highest risk. The initiative had the single aim of safely lowering the rate of preterm birth. The objective of the study was to evaluate the outcomes of the initiative on the rates of preterm birth both statewide and in the single tertiary level perinatal referral center. This was a prospective population-based cohort study of perinatal outcomes before and after 1 full year of implementation of the preterm birth prevention program. In the state overall, the rate of singleton preterm birth was reduced by 7.6% and was lower than in any of the preceding 6 years. This reduction amounted to 196 cases relative to the year before the introduction of the initiative and the effect extended from the 28-31 week gestational age group onward. Within the tertiary level center, the rate of preterm birth in 2015 was also significantly lower than in the preceding years. A comprehensive and multifaceted preterm birth prevention program aimed at both health care practitioners and the general public, operating within the environment of a government-funded universal health care system can significantly lower the rate of early birth. Further research is now required to increase the effect and to determine the relative contributions of each of the interventions. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Saarland, Germany: a statewide admission prevalence screening study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Herrmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The screening of hospital admission patients for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is of undisputed value in controlling and reducing the overall MRSA burden; yet, a concerted parallel universal screening intervention throughout all hospitals of an entire German Federal State has not yet been performed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During a four-week period, all 24 acute care hospitals of the State of Saarland participated in admission prevalence screening. Overall, 436/20,027 screened patients revealed MRSA carrier status (prevalence, 2.2/100 patients with geriatrics and intensive care departments associated with highest prevalence (7.6/100 and 6.3/100, respectively. Risk factor analysis among 17,975 admission patients yielded MRSA history (OR, 4.3; CI₉₅ 2.7-6.8, a skin condition (OR, 3.2; CI₉₅ 2.1-5.0, and/or an indwelling catheter (OR, 2.2; CI₉₅ 1.4-3.5 among the leading risks. Hierarchical risk factor ascertainment of the six risk factors associated with highest odd's ratios would require 31% of patients to be laboratory screened to allow for detection of 67% of all MRSA positive admission patients in the State. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: State-wide admission prevalence screening in conjunction with risk factor ascertainment yields important information on the distribution of the MRSA burden for hospitals, and allows for data-based decisions on local or institutional MRSA screening policies considering risk factor prevalence and expected MRSA identification rates.

  14. WiFi RFID demonstration for resource tracking in a statewide disaster drill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Stacey L; Siddiqui, Javeed; Harry, David J; Sandrock, Christian E

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the capabilities of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking of patients and medical equipment during a simulated disaster response scenario. RFID infrastructure was deployed at two small rural hospitals, in one large academic medical center and in two vehicles. Several item types from the mutual aid equipment list were selected for tracking during the demonstration. A central database server was installed at the UC Davis Medical Center (UCDMC) that collected RFID information from all constituent sites. The system was tested during a statewide disaster drill. During the drill, volunteers at UCDMC were selected to locate assets using the traditional method of locating resources and then using the RFID system. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of RFID infrastructure in real-time resource identification and tracking. Volunteers at UCDMC were able to locate assets substantially faster using RFID, demonstrating that real-time geolocation can be substantially more efficient and accurate than traditional manual methods. A mobile, Global Positioning System (GPS)-enabled RFID system was installed in a pediatric ambulance and connected to the central RFID database via secure cellular communication. This system is unique in that it provides for seamless region-wide tracking that adaptively uses and seamlessly integrates both outdoor cellular-based mobile tracking and indoor WiFi-based tracking. RFID tracking can provide a real-time picture of the medical situation across medical facilities and other critical locations, leading to a more coordinated deployment of resources. The RFID system deployed during this study demonstrated the potential to improve the ability to locate and track victims, healthcare professionals, and medical equipment during a region-wide disaster.

  15. Impact of online learning modules on medical student microbiology examination scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mary T

    2008-01-01

    Medical students have a limited amount of time in which to acquire working knowledge of an enormous amount of information, and this is especially relevant for microbiology. One large midwestern medical school is unique in having medical microbiology taught at nine regional campuses using a single core curriculum. A committee of statewide course directors writes a licensure board-style final examination that is referenced to the core and used at all campuses. To prepare for the final examination, students traditionally utilize print-based board examination review books. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether students who train using web-based quizzes score differently as a group on this statewide examination than students who do not utilize the materials online for exam preparation. The study included 71 learners from two different campuses who were taught by the same instructor and were admitted to medical school with similar exemplary credentials. Results were aggregated for three consecutive years. A standard medical microbiology textbook was used to assign the same suggested readings for all students and similar laboratory sessions were provided for all learners. The independent variable was use of the web-based quizzes to prepare before examinations, as indicated by student web usage logs. The dependent variable was score on the statewide final examination. Results support the hypothesis that students who use preparation modules online score higher on the final examination than students who do not. Moreover, students who prepared online scored higher on questions designed to test synthesis of knowledge and analysis of data. The significant difference in final examination outcome (P medical microbiology.

  16. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport lecture. Statewide physical fitness testing: a big waist or a big waste?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, James R; Ede, Alison

    2009-12-01

    Statewide physical fitness testing is gaining popularity in the United States because of increased childhood obesity levels, the relations between physical fitness and academic performance, and the hypothesized relations between adult characteristics and childhood physical activity, physical fitness, and health behaviors. Large-scale physical fitness testing can be fraught with problems unless properly planned and conducted. Legislators, administrators, teachers, and parents should consider the following 10 essential issues when conducting large-scale physical fitness testing purpose of testing, proper planning, training, quality of the data, reporting support, costs, interpretation, programmatic matters, and policies and politics.

  17. Integrating a framework for conducting public health systems research into statewide operations-based exercises to improve emergency preparedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Jennifer C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the uncommon nature of large-scale disasters and emergencies, public health practitioners often turn to simulated emergencies, known as “exercises”, for preparedness assessment and improvement. Under the right conditions, exercises can also be used to conduct original public health systems research. This paper describes the integration of a research framework into a statewide operations-based exercise program in California as a systems-based approach for studying public health emergency preparedness and response. Methods We developed a research framework based on the premise that operations-based exercises conducted by medical and public health agencies can be described using epidemiologic concepts. Using this framework, we conducted a survey of key local and regional medical and health agencies throughout California following the 2010 Statewide Medical and Health Exercise. The survey evaluated: (1 the emergency preparedness capabilities activated and functions performed in response to the emergency scenario, and (2 the major challenges to inter-organizational communications and information management. Results Thirty-five local health departments (LHDs, 24 local emergency medical services (EMS agencies, 121 hospitals, and 5 Regional Disaster Medical and Health Coordinators/Specialists (RDMHC responded to our survey, representing 57%, 77%, 26% and 83%, respectively, of target agencies in California. We found two sets of response capabilities were activated during the 2010 Statewide Exercise: a set of core capabilities that were common across all agencies, and a set of agency-specific capabilities that were more common among certain agency types. With respect to one response capability in particular, inter-organizational information sharing, we found that the majority of respondents’ comments were related to the complete or partial failure of communications equipment or systems. Conclusions Using the 2010 Statewide

  18. Commercial baby food consumption and dietary variety in a statewide sample of infants receiving benefits from the special supplemental nutrition program for women, infants, and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Kristen M; Black, Maureen M

    2010-10-01

    Dietary variety and exposure to fruits and vegetables in infancy have been associated with nutritional benefits and later acceptance of these foods. The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of fruit and vegetable commercial baby food consumption and its relation to dietary variety during infancy. A cross-sectional statewide telephone survey of 733 Maryland mothers and infants receiving benefits from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) was conducted between July 2004 and July 2005. A 24-hour dietary recall was examined to assess infant dietary variety. Among infants from birth to age 5 months, 54% had consumed complementary foods in the past 24 hours; 60% received commercial baby foods. Among infants aged 6 to 12 months, 98% had consumed complementary foods in the past 24 hours; 81% received commercial baby foods. In the latter age range, the average daily number of different types of fruits and vegetables consumed was 1.5±1.2, range 0 to 6). In a multivariate model, infants aged 6 to 12 months who received commercial baby foods consumed a greater variety of fruits and vegetables (β=.54, 95% confidence interval 0.26-0.84; Pbaby food is consumed by a majority of WIC infants, although many mothers introduce it before the recommended age of 6 months. Among infants aged 6 to 12 months, commercial baby food is associated with dietary variety in fruits and vegetables. By encouraging consumption of fruits and vegetables after 6 months of age, either through the provision of commercial baby foods and/or education and resources related to the preparation of fruits and vegetables for infants, WIC can increase dietary variety and appropriate introduction of complementary foods among infants. Copyright © 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Can a clinical senate enhance state-wide clinician engagement? A survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlivan, Julie A; Miller, Mary; Hutton, Marani

    2016-12-16

    Objective Clinician engagement correlates with quality, safety and efficacy outcomes. The aim of the present study was to explore whether a clinical senate model achieves clinical input into system manager and operational health service boards.Methods A mixed-methods survey was undertaken. Participants were current or immediate past members of the Clinical Senate of Western Australia (CS). For the 124 surveys sent out, the response rate was 60%.Results Respondents stated the CS played a role in clinician engagement (95%), contributed to healthcare reform (82%), knowledge of contemporary health issues (92%), feedback to decision makers (82%), clinician networking (94%), debate on important issues (93%), enabled clinicians to work on recommendations to improve health at a state level (87%), contributed to clinician thinking on health reform (88%) and enabled clinicians to share their knowledge (91%). Four major themes emerged in the qualitative analysis: (1) the need for a strong independent clinician forum and voice at a state level; (2) the need to strengthen clinician interactions with operational healthcare boards; (3) a strong belief that clinician engagement strengthened quality and safety outcomes at a state level; and (4) that membership was important and needed to be diverse, multidisciplinary and independent, but structurally representative of clinicians in the state.Conclusion A clinical senate model can facilitate state-wide clinician engagement.What is known about the topic? High levels of clinical engagement foster a culture within healthcare organisations that is associated with the delivery of sustained high-quality, safe and efficient services. This has led to a focus on strategies to optimise clinical engagement in healthcare planning and reform. However, there is limited data exploring how to achieve clinical engagement at a state, rather than local, level within the healthcare system.What does this paper add? This survey study evaluates the

  20. Concomitant Tricuspid Valve Surgery Affects Outcomes Following Mitral Operations: A multi-institutional, statewide analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPar, Damien J.; Mulloy, Daniel P.; Stone, Matthew L.; Crosby, Ivan K.; Lau, Christine L; Kron, Irving L.; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitral valve disease is often accompanied by concomitant tricuspid valve disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of performing tricuspid procedures in the setting of mitral valve surgery within a multi-institutional patient population. Methods From 2001–2008, 5,495 mitral valve operations were performed at 17 different statewide centers. Patients underwent either mitral valve alone (MV alone, n=5,062, age=63.4±13.0 years) or mitral + tricuspid valve operations (MV+TV, n=433, age=64.0±14.2 years). Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the influence of concomitant tricuspid procedures on operative mortality and the composite incidence of major complications. Results Patients undergoing MV+TV were more commonly female (62.7% vs. 45.5%, p<0.001), had higher rates of heart failure (73.7% vs. 50.9%, p<0.001), and more frequently underwent reoperations (17.1% vs. 7.4%, p<0.001) compared to MV alone patients. Other patient characteristics, including preoperative endocarditis (8.5% vs. 8.2%, p=0.78), were similar between groups. Mitral replacement (63.5%) was more common than repair (36.5%, p<0.001) in MV+TV operations, and MV+TV operations incurred longer median cardiopulmonary bypass (181 min. vs. 149 min, p<0.001) times. Unadjusted operative mortality (6.0% vs. 10.4%, p=0.001) and postoperative complications were higher following MV+TV compared to MV alone. Importantly, after risk adjustment, performance of concomitant tricuspid valve procedures proved an independent predictor of operative mortality (OR=1.50, p=0.03) and major complications (OR=1.39, p=0.004). Conclusions Concomitant tricuspid surgery is a proxy for more advanced valve disease. Compared to mitral operations alone, simultaneous mitral-tricuspid valve operations are associated with elevated morbidity and mortality even after risk adjustment. This elevated risk should be considered during preoperative patient risk stratification. PMID:22607786

  1. Amputation Risk in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus and Peripheral Artery Disease Using Statewide Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Misty D; Brunson, Ann; Hedayati, Nasim; Romano, Patrick; Melnkow, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Conflicting data exist regarding changes in amputation rates in patients with ulcers because of diabetes mellitus (DM) and peripheral artery disease (PAD). This study focuses on how population-based amputation rates are changing in the current treatment era. Using the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development Patient Discharge database, all patients who underwent major nontraumatic lower extremity (LE) amputation in 2005 through 2011 were identified. Age-adjusted population-based amputation risk was determined by year. Gender and age trends in amputation risk were estimated separately for diabetes-related amputations and PAD-related amputations, treating all California residents as the population at risk. From 2005 to 2011, 32,025 qualifying amputations were performed in California. Of these, 11,896 were DM-associated (n = 1,095), PAD-associated (n = 4,335), or associated with both conditions (n = 6,466). PAD-associated amputation rates and combined PAD/DM-associated amputation rates have changed little since 2009 after decreasing substantially over the prior 5 years, but DM-associated amputation rates have continuously increased since 2005. California residents older than the age of 80 years had the most dramatic decrease in PAD-associated amputation rates from 2005 to 2011 (i.e., from 317 to 175 per million Californians). Men with PAD/DM had amputation rate 1.5 times higher than those of patients with PAD alone and 5 times higher than rates of DM patients. In women the difference between patient with PAD and PAD/DM was not seen; however, these rates were 2.5 times higher than patients with DM alone. Preventable amputations associated with high-risk diseases are no longer decreasing despite continuing advances in care and education. Octogenarians with PAD represent the highest risk group for amputation, but DM-associated amputations have increased since 2005. Further research to understand treatment pathways for patient with LE wounds may shed

  2. A statewide review of postnatal care in private hospitals in Victoria, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forster Della A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concerns have been raised in Australia and internationally regarding the quality and effectiveness of hospital postnatal care, although Australian women receiving postnatal care in the private maternity sector rate their satisfaction with care more highly than women receiving public maternity care. In Victoria, Australia, two-thirds of women receive their maternity care in the public sector and the remainder in private health care sector. A statewide review of public hospital postnatal care in Victoria from the perspective of care providers found many barriers to care provision including the busyness of postnatal wards, inadequate staffing and priority being given to other episodes of care; however the study did not include private hospitals. The aim of this study was replicate the review in the private sector, to explore the structure and organisation of postnatal care in private hospitals and identify those aspects of care potentially impacting on women's experiences and maternal and infant care. This provides a more complete overview of the organisational structures and processes in postnatal care in all Victorian hospitals from the perspective of care providers. Methods A mixed method design was used. A structured postal survey was sent to all Victorian private hospitals (n = 19 and key informant interviews were undertaken with selected clinical midwives, maternity unit managers and obstetricians (n = 11. Survey data were analysed using descriptive statistics and interview data analysed thematically. Results Private hospital care providers report that postnatal care is provided in very busy environments, and that meeting the aims of postnatal care (breastfeeding support, education of parents and facilitating rest and recovery for women following birth was difficult in the context of increased acuity of postnatal care; prioritising of other areas over postnatal care; high midwife-to-woman ratios; and the number and

  3. A Statewide Private Microwave Wide Area Network for Real-time Natural Hazard Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M. C.; Kent, G.; Smith, K. D.; Plank, G.; Slater, D.; Torrisi, J.; Presser, R.; Straley, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Nevada Seismological Laboratory (NSL) at the University of Nevada, Reno, operates the Nevada Seismic Network, a collection of ground motion instruments installed throughout Nevada and California, for the purposes of detecting, locating, and notifying the public of earthquakes in the state. To perform these tasks effectively, NSL has designed and built a statewide wireless microwave wide-area network (WAN) in order to receive ground motion data in near real-time. This network consists of radio access points, backhauls, and backbone communication sites transmitting time-series, images, and datalogger diagnostics to our data center servers in Reno. This privately managed communication network greatly reduces the dependence on third-party infrastructure (e.g. commercial cellular networks), and is vital for emergency management response and system uptime. Any individual seismograph or data collection device is networked through a wireless point-to-multipoint connection to a remote access point (AP) using a low-cost radio/routerboard combination. Additional point-to-point connections from AP's to radio backhauls and/or mountaintop backbone sites allow the Data Center in Reno to communicate with and receive data directly from each datalogger. Dataloggers, radios, and routers can be configured using tablets on-site, or via desktop computers at the Data Center. Redundant mountaintop links can be added to the network and facilitate the re-routing of data (similar to a meshed network) in the event of a faulty, failing, or noisy communication site. All routers, radios, and servers, including those at the Data Center, have redundant power and can operate independently in the event of a grid power or public Internet outage. A managed server room at the Data Center processes earthquake data for notifications and acts as a data source for remote users. Consisting of about 500 hosts, and spanning hundreds of miles, this WAN provides network operators access to each router and

  4. Pseudacteon spp. (Diptera: Phoridae) biological control agents of Solenopsis spp. (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Louisiana: statewide distribution and Kneallhazia solenopsae (Microsporidia: Thelohaniidae) prevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phorid flies, Pseudacteon spp. (Diptera: Phoridae), have been released in the United States since 1996 as biological control agents for imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, Solenopsis richteri Forel, and their hybrid (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), management. A statewide survey was conducted in ...

  5. The Land Is Our Mother. A Summary, Statewide Indian Land Use and Policy Meeting (Crow Agency, Montana, November 14-15, 1974).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montana State Univ., Bozeman. Cooperative Extension Service.

    Summarized in this brief report are proceedings of the Statewide Indian Land Use Policy Meeting, a meeting planned by American Indians in response to their perceptions of constraints on effective management of Indian lands and one which drew 135 people, including representatives from every reservation in Montana and Wyoming. This booklet outlines:…

  6. Predicting Student Performance in Statewide High-Stakes Tests for Middle School Mathematics Using the Results from Third Party Testing Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylani, Rusen; Bitter, Gary G.; Castaneda, Rene

    2014-01-01

    In this study regression and neural networks based methods are used to predict statewide high-stakes test results for middle school mathematics using the scores obtained from third party tests throughout the school year. Such prediction is of utmost significance for school districts to live up to the state's educational standards mandated by the…

  7. Using Logistic Regression for Validating or Invalidating Initial Statewide Cut-Off Scores on Basic Skills Placement Tests at the Community College Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secolsky, Charles; Krishnan, Sathasivam; Judd, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    The community colleges in the state of New Jersey went through a process of establishing statewide cut-off scores for English and mathematics placement tests. The colleges wanted to communicate to secondary schools a consistent preparation that would be necessary for enrolling in Freshman Composition and College Algebra at the community college…

  8. Screening Cases within a Statewide Autism Registry: A Comparison of Parental Reports Using "DSM-IV-TR" Criteria versus the "SCQ"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goin-Kochel, Robin P.; Cohen, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Parents and caregivers of 70 children enrolled in a university-based, statewide autism registry (M age = 9.5 years) completed two questionnaires, one generated from criteria outlined in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition-Text Revision" (DSM-IV-TR) and the other the "Social Communication…

  9. Screening Cases within a Statewide Autism Registry: A Comparison of Parental Reports Using "DSM-IV-TR" Criteria versus the "SCQ"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goin-Kochel, Robin P.; Cohen, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Parents and caregivers of 70 children enrolled in a university-based, statewide autism registry (M age = 9.5 years) completed two questionnaires, one generated from criteria outlined in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition-Text Revision" (DSM-IV-TR) and the other the "Social Communication Questionnaire"…

  10. A Statewide Scale up of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports: A Description of the Development of Systems of Support and Analysis of Adoption and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Pas, Elise T.

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the process by which a statewide support system was developed in Maryland to promote high-quality implementation of a school-wide prevention model called Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS). PBIS (Sugai & Horner, 2006) aims to prevent disruptive behavior problems and promote a positive school climate…

  11. Environmental Service-Learning Programs in Florida High Schools and Colleges: Nature, Status, and Effects as Determined by a Statewide Program Census

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Yuliya A.; Marcinkowski, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe environmental service-learning (SL) programs in Florida high schools and colleges through a statewide program census that explored (a) academic, service, and reflection program features; (b) effects of Furco's SL outcome domains on student outcomes; and (c) program partnerships. The results of the study reveal that secondary…

  12. Statewide Writing Assessment Follow-Up; Federal Reporting Requirements; Preparing the School District Assessment Portfolio. Update # 5. STARS: School-Based Teacher-Led Assessment and Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebraska State Dept. of Education, Lincoln.

    This update provides information about the Nebraska Statewide Writing Assessment follow-up, the federal reporting of assessment information, and preparing the school District Assessment Portfolio. The information is intended to assist local educators in the reporting of local assessment information in June 2001. The update on the writing…

  13. Under Pressure: Financial Impact of the Hospital-Acquired Conditions Initiative. A Statewide Analysis of Pressure Ulcer Development and Payment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddings, Jennifer A.; Reichert, Heidi; Rogers, Mary A. M.; Hofer, Timothy P.; McMahon, Laurence F.; Grazier, Kyle L.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the financial impact of the 2008 Hospital-Acquired Conditions Initiative’s pressure ulcer payment changes on Medicare and other payors. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective before-and-after study of all-payor statewide administrative data for >2.4 million annual adult discharges from 311 nonfederal acute-care California hospitals in 2007 and 2009, using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Datasets. We assessed how often and by how much the 2008 payment changes for pressure ulcers affected hospital payment. MEASUREMENTS Pressure ulcer rates and hospital payment changes RESULTS Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates were very low (0.28%) in 2007 and 2009; present-on-admission pressure ulcer rates increased from 2.35% in 2007 to 3.00% in 2009. By clinical stage of pressure ulcer (available in 2009), hospital-acquired stage III–IV ulcers occurred in 603 discharges (0.02%); 60,244 discharges (2.42%) contained other pressure ulcer diagnoses. Payment removal for stage III–IV hospital-acquired ulcers reduced payment in 75 (0.003%) discharges for a statewide payment decrease of $310,444 (0.001%) for all payors and $199,238 (0.001%) for Medicare. For all other pressure ulcers, the Hospital-Acquired Conditions Initiative reduced hospital payment in 20,246 (0.81%) cases (including 18,953 cases with present-on-admission ulcers) reducing statewide payment by $62,538,586 (0.21%) for all payors and $47,237,984 (0.32%) for Medicare. CONCLUSION The total financial impact of the 2008 payment changes for pressure ulcers was negligible. Most payment decreases occurred by removal of comorbidity payments for present-on-admission pressure ulcers other than stages III–IV. The removal of payment for hospital-acquired stage III–IV ulcers was more than 200 times less than the removal of payment for other types of pressure ulcers that occurred in implementation of the Hospital-Acquired Conditions Initiative. PMID:26140454

  14. The smoking ban next door: do hospitality businesses in border areas have reduced sales after a statewide smoke-free policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Elizabeth G; Hood, Nancy E

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies demonstrating no significant economic effects on hospitality businesses following a statewide smoke-free (SF) policy, regional concerns suggest that areas near states without SF policies may experience a loss of hospitality sales across the border. The present study evaluated the impact of Ohio's statewide SF policy on taxable restaurant and bar sales in border and non-border areas. Spline regression analysis was used to assess changes in monthly taxable sales at the county level in full-service restaurants and bars in Ohio. Data were analyzed from four years prior to policy implementation to three years post-policy. Change in the differences in the slope of taxable sales for border (n = 21) and non-border (n = 67) counties were evaluated for changes following the statewide SF policy enforcement, adjusted for unemployment rates, general trends in the hospitality sector, and seasonality. After adjusting for covariates, there was no statistically significant change in the difference in slope for taxable sales for either restaurants (β = 0.9, p = 0.09) or bars (β = 0.2, p = 0.07) following the SF policy for border areas compared to non-border areas of Ohio. Border regions in Ohio did not experience a significant change in bar and restaurant sales compared to non-border areas following a statewide SF policy. Results support that Ohio's statewide SF policy did not impact these two areas differently, and provide additional evidence for the continued use of SF policies to provide protection from exposure to secondhand smoke for both workers and the general public. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The case for human agency, well-being, and community reintegration for people aging in prison: a statewide case analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschi, Tina; Morrisey, Mary Beth; Leigey, Margaret

    2013-07-01

    This study profiled 2,913 adults aged 50 and older sentenced to a statewide correctional system and their parole eligibility status with implications for community reintegration, resettlement, and recovery needs. The research team developed the Correctional Tracking Data Extraction Tool to gather official data and personal and legal characteristics from a state department of corrections website. The majority of older prisoners were men from racial/ethnic minorities between the ages of 50 and 59 with a range of minor to serious offenses. Time served in prison ranged from 1 month to 45 years; more than 40% were eligible for parole within 5 years. These findings underscore the need for an intervention that can address the differing typologies and individual-level and systemic issues that gave rise to the aging prisoner population. Promising practices that address elements of a conceptual model in prison and community reintegration and recovery for older adult prisoners are reviewed.

  16. An Ecological Examination of North Carolina's Amendment One Vote to Ban Same Sex Marriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L. Davison

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available On May 8th, 2012, North Carolina voters passed a constitutional amendment that officially banned same sex marriage. Whereas statewide the amendment was supported by 61% of North Carolina voters, there was a 67% range in variance of support for the amendment among North Carolina counties. This paper examines the large variance regarding the state amendment vote, among North Carolina's 100 counties. Controlling for percent of county residents with a bachelor’s or greater degree had an enormous effect in diminished support for the amendment while age, race and urban demographics were weaker and capricious measures in understanding the county variance of the Amendment One vote.

  17. Perceived Factors Influencing High School Student Participation in an Integrated Statewide Dual Credit Program: An Examination of Program Success and Student Higher Education Selection Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchstone, Allison J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Dual credit programs have become increasingly popular with 71% U.S. public high schools offering dual credit courses in 2002-2003. As this popularity has grown, so have concerns regarding academic rigor, course quality, parity with college courses, and effects on higher education. Determining actual dual credit course equivalent in higher…

  18. Perceived Factors Influencing High School Student Participation in an Integrated Statewide Dual Credit Program: An Examination of Program Success and Student Higher Education Selection Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchstone, Allison J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Dual credit programs have become increasingly popular with 71% U.S. public high schools offering dual credit courses in 2002-2003. As this popularity has grown, so have concerns regarding academic rigor, course quality, parity with college courses, and effects on higher education. Determining actual dual credit course equivalent in higher…

  19. Trails, Bike, Where statewide bike routes run through 9 county region in South Georgia, Published in 2002, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Southern Georgia Regional Commission.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Trails, Bike dataset, published at 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Other information as of 2002. It is described as 'Where statewide...

  20. Traffic Analysis Zones - TRAFFIC_COUNTS_INDOTMODEL_IN: Traffic Counts on Roadways (from INDOT Statewide Travel Demand MODEL version 4, ISTDM4) in Indiana (Indiana Department of Transportation, Line Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — TRAFFIC_COUNTS_INDOTMODEL_IN is a line shapefile that shows traffic counts (factored to year 2000) for the roadways in the Indiana Statewide Travel Demand Model,...

  1. Outcome of the ‘Drip-and-Ship’ Paradigm among Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke: Results of a Statewide Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan I. Qureshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ‘drip-and-ship’ paradigm denotes a treatment regimen in patients in whom intravenous (IV recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA is initiated at the emergency department (ED of a community hospital, followed by transfer within 24 h to a comprehensive stroke center. Although the drip-and-ship paradigm has the potential to increase the number of patients who receive IV rt-PA, comparative outcomes have not been assessed at a population-based level. Methods: Statewide estimates of thrombolysis, associated in-hospital outcomes, and hospitalization charges were obtained from 2008–2009 Minnesota Hospital Association data for all patients hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of ischemic stroke. Patients who were assigned the drip-and-ship code [International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM V45.88] were classified under the drip-and-ship paradigm. Patients who underwent thrombolysis (ICD-9-CM code 99.10 without drip-and-ship code were classified as primary ED arrival. Patient outcomes were analyzed after stratification into patients treated with IV rt-PA through primary ED arrival or drip-and-ship paradigm. Results: Of the 21,024 admissions, 602 (2.86% received IV rt-PA either through primary ED arrival (n = 473 or the drip-and-ship paradigm (n = 129. IV rt-PA was administered in 30 hospitals, of which 13 hospitals used the drip-and-ship paradigm; the number of patients treated with the drip-and-ship paradigm varied from 1 to 40 between the 13 hospitals. The rates of secondary intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage were higher in patients treated with IV rt-PA through primary ED arrival compared with those treated with the drip-and-ship paradigm (8.5 vs. 3.1%, respectively; p = 0.038. The in-hospital mortality rate was similar among ischemic stroke patients receiving IV rt-PA through primary ED arrival or the drip-and-ship paradigm (5.9 vs. 7.0%, respectively. The mean hospital

  2. Genome Structural Diversity among 31 Bordetella pertussis Isolates from Two Recent U.S. Whooping Cough Statewide Epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Katherine E; Weigand, Michael R; Peng, Yanhui; Cassiday, Pamela K; Sammons, Scott; Knipe, Kristen; Rowe, Lori A; Loparev, Vladimir; Sheth, Mili; Weening, Keeley; Tondella, M Lucia; Williams, Margaret M

    2016-01-01

    During 2010 and 2012, California and Vermont, respectively, experienced statewide epidemics of pertussis with differences seen in the demographic affected, case clinical presentation, and molecular epidemiology of the circulating strains. To overcome limitations of the current molecular typing methods for pertussis, we utilized whole-genome sequencing to gain a broader understanding of how current circulating strains are causing large epidemics. Through the use of combined next-generation sequencing technologies, this study compared de novo, single-contig genome assemblies from 31 out of 33 Bordetella pertussis isolates collected during two separate pertussis statewide epidemics and 2 resequenced vaccine strains. Final genome architecture assemblies were verified with whole-genome optical mapping. Sixteen distinct genome rearrangement profiles were observed in epidemic isolate genomes, all of which were distinct from the genome structures of the two resequenced vaccine strains. These rearrangements appear to be mediated by repetitive sequence elements, such as high-copy-number mobile genetic elements and rRNA operons. Additionally, novel and previously identified single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected in 10 virulence-related genes in the epidemic isolates. Whole-genome variation analysis identified state-specific variants, and coding regions bearing nonsynonymous mutations were classified into functional annotated orthologous groups. Comprehensive studies on whole genomes are needed to understand the resurgence of pertussis and develop novel tools to better characterize the molecular epidemiology of evolving B. pertussis populations. IMPORTANCE Pertussis, or whooping cough, is the most poorly controlled vaccine-preventable bacterial disease in the United States, which has experienced a resurgence for more than a decade. Once viewed as a monomorphic pathogen, B. pertussis strains circulating during epidemics exhibit diversity visible on a genome structural

  3. Economic Intervention and Parenting: A Randomized Experiment of Statewide Child Development Accounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Yunju; Wikoff, Nora; Sherraden, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We examine the effects of Child Development Accounts (CDAs) on parenting stress and practices. Methods: We use data from the SEED for Oklahoma Kids (SEED OK) experiment. SEED OK selected caregivers of infants from Oklahoma birth certificates using a probability sampling method, randomly assigned caregivers to the treatment (n = 1,132)…

  4. Hispanic Student Enrollment and Attainment in Texas Two-Year Colleges: A Multiyear, Statewide Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jack; Slate, John R.; Joyner, Sheila A.

    2015-01-01

    In this investigation, we examined the numbers and percentages of Hispanic college students enrolled in Texas two-year colleges and the numbers and percentages of Hispanic students who obtained associate degrees from Texas two-year colleges for the 2000 through the 2011 academic years. Hispanic student enrollment and educational attainment…

  5. Teacher Trust in Leadership, Professional Learniing Community, and Student Achievement: An Analysis of Statewide Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Troy S.

    2013-01-01

    The foundation of positive interpersonal relationships is trust and such relationships are needed for professional collaboration and learning to take place. Building trust, then, must be important in order to meet organizational goals and impact student success. The purpose of this survey research was to examine the relationship among teachers'…

  6. Technological Change in the Workplace: A Statewide Survey of Community College Library and Learning Resources Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Carolyn E.; Denny, Emmett

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the effects of technostress on library personnel focuses on an investigation that examined how employees in Florida community college libraries and learning resources centers are dealing with technological change in their work environment. Considers implications for planning and implementing technological change and includes…

  7. Arts Teachers' Perceptions and Attitudes on Arts Integration While Participating in a Statewide Arts Integration Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Brittany Nixon; Robinson, Nicole R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions and attitudes of the Beverley Taylor Sorenson Arts Learning Program (BTSALP) arts specialists on arts integration. BTSALP arts specialists (N = 50) throughout the state of Utah responded to a 20-item survey. Results indicated that a majority of BTSALP arts specialists believe that arts…

  8. Math Readiness of Texas Community College Developmental Education Students: A Multiyear Statewide Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Reni A.; Slate, John R.; Saxon, D. Patrick; Barnes, Wally

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, we examined the college readiness in math of Texas community college students using archival data from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Data analyzed were the rate of all first-time in college (FTIC) developmental education students who scored below the Texas college readiness standards in math and the rates of…

  9. Leadership, Innovation Climate, and Attitudes toward Evidence-Based Practice during a Statewide Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Sommerfeld, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Leadership is important in practice change, yet there are few studies addressing this issue in mental health and social services. This study examined the differential roles of transformational (i.e., charismatic) leadership and leader-member exchange (i.e., the relationship between a supervisor and their direct service providers) on…

  10. Arts Teachers' Perceptions and Attitudes on Arts Integration While Participating in a Statewide Arts Integration Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Brittany Nixon; Robinson, Nicole R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions and attitudes of the Beverley Taylor Sorenson Arts Learning Program (BTSALP) arts specialists on arts integration. BTSALP arts specialists (N = 50) throughout the state of Utah responded to a 20-item survey. Results indicated that a majority of BTSALP arts specialists believe that arts…

  11. Economic Intervention and Parenting: A Randomized Experiment of Statewide Child Development Accounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Yunju; Wikoff, Nora; Sherraden, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We examine the effects of Child Development Accounts (CDAs) on parenting stress and practices. Methods: We use data from the SEED for Oklahoma Kids (SEED OK) experiment. SEED OK selected caregivers of infants from Oklahoma birth certificates using a probability sampling method, randomly assigned caregivers to the treatment (n = 1,132)…

  12. Examination Management and Examination Malpractice: The Nexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunji, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Examination malpractice or cheating has become a global phenomenon. In different countries of the world today, developed and developing, academic dishonesty especially cheating in examinations has heightened and taken frightening dimension. In many countries of the world this phenomenon has become a serious matter of concern that has left many…

  13. Development of a model web-based system to support a statewide quality consortium in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Jean M; Feng, Mary; Benedetti, Lisa A; Marsh, Robin; Griffith, Kent A; Matuszak, Martha M; Hess, Michael; McMullen, Matthew; Fisher, Jennifer H; Nurushev, Teamour; Grubb, Margaret; Gardner, Stephen; Nielsen, Daniel; Jagsi, Reshma; Hayman, James A; Pierce, Lori J

    A database in which patient data are compiled allows analytic opportunities for continuous improvements in treatment quality and comparative effectiveness research. We describe the development of a novel, web-based system that supports the collection of complex radiation treatment planning information from centers that use diverse techniques, software, and hardware for radiation oncology care in a statewide quality collaborative, the Michigan Radiation Oncology Quality Consortium (MROQC). The MROQC database seeks to enable assessment of physician- and patient-reported outcomes and quality improvement as a function of treatment planning and delivery techniques for breast and lung cancer patients. We created tools to collect anonymized data based on all plans. The MROQC system representing 24 institutions has been successfully deployed in the state of Michigan. Since 2012, dose-volume histogram and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine-radiation therapy plan data and information on simulation, planning, and delivery techniques have been collected. Audits indicated >90% accurate data submission and spurred refinements to data collection methodology. This model web-based system captures detailed, high-quality radiation therapy dosimetry data along with patient- and physician-reported outcomes and clinical data for a radiation therapy collaborative quality initiative. The collaborative nature of the project has been integral to its success. Our methodology can be applied to setting up analogous consortiums and databases. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Factors associated with seclusion in a statewide forensic psychiatric service in Australia over a 2-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Stuart D M; Daffern, Michael; Martin, Trish; Ogloff, James R P; Thomson, Lindsay D G; Ferguson, Murray

    2009-02-01

    Despite seclusion being described as one of the most ethically- and legally-controversial management options available, it remains a widely-used clinical strategy for managing disruptive, aggressive, and violent behaviour. This study sought to determine how frequently seclusion was used, the common characteristics of those secluded and not secluded, and the degree to which the Level of Service Inventory - Revised: Screening Version (LSI-R: SV) could predict seclusion. The study was retrospective, covering the first 2 years of operation of a statewide forensic psychiatry hospital in Victoria, Australia. Data were collected from individual case files, electronic databases, and paper copies of records pertaining to violent incidents and episodes of seclusion. Eighty five (44%) of the 193 patients admitted during this period were secluded. Those secluded were significantly younger and had a more established psychiatric history. LSI-R: SV scores were significantly and positively associated with being secluded. A statistical model containing three LSI-R: SV items, along with age on admission and psychiatric history, achieved an area under the curve of 0.74. Seclusion is used on a regular basis in response to a range of different forms of aggressive behaviour of different severity. The LSI-R: SV demonstrated moderate-to-good accuracy in predicting seclusion and warrants further research using detailed prospective methodologies.

  15. Growth and gaps in mathematics achievement of students with and without disabilities on a statewide achievement test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Joseph J; Schulte, Ann C; Elliott, Stephen N; Nese, Joseph F T; Tindal, Gerald

    2015-02-01

    This study estimated mathematics achievement growth trajectories in a statewide sample of 92,045 students with and without disabilities over Grades 3 to 7. Students with disabilities (SWDs) were identified in seven exceptionality categories. Students without disabilities (SWoDs) were categorized as General Education (GE) or Academically/Intellectually Gifted (AIG). Students in all groups showed significant growth that decelerated over grades as well as significant variability in achievement by student group, both at the initial assessment in Grade 3 and in rates of growth over time. Race/ethnicity, gender, parental education, free/reduced lunch status, and English language proficiency were also significant predictors of achievement. Effect size estimates showed substantial year-to-year growth that decreased over grades. Sizeable achievement gaps that were relatively stable over grades were observed between SWoDs and students in specific exceptionality categories. Our study also demonstrated the importance of statistically controlling for variation related to student demographic characteristics. Additional research is needed that expands on these results with the same and additional exceptionality groups. Copyright © 2014 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Family-friendliness in Medical Studies in Baden-Württemberg. Results of a state-wide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehues, Johanna; Prospero, Katrin; Fegert, Jörg M; Liebhardt, Hubert

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the study on "Family-friendliness of the Medical Studies in Baden-Württemberg" carried out in 2009-2011 by the working group "Family, Time policy and E-Learning" of the University Hospital of Ulm, supported by the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts of Baden-Württemberg. This state-wide survey of the studying conditions and personal circumstances of medical students with children at the five medical schools in Baden-Württemberg aims to describe existing and necessary factors of family-friendliness. A total of 238 students with children participated in the quantitative online survey conducted during the summer semester 2010 which was based on topics from previous qualitative interviews with student parents.The data shows that even though founding a family while at university is usually planned, student parents are faced with significant compatibility issues, demonstrating the need for additional measures to individualise course organisation and to make the curriculum more flexible. At the same time, the need to significantly increase information and advisory services alongside the establishment of additional support services for student parents is discernable. The study contributes to the debate on the family-friendliness of universities and university hospitals and adds practice-oriented approaches to solutions.

  17. Using a representative sample of elementary school students to determine the statewide prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity in Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellist, Karen; Coats, Karen; Friedrichs, Mike

    2009-10-01

    Utah's Height and Weight Measurement Project was conducted with elementary school students periodically from 2002 to 2008. The 2002 pilot project was performed to establish variability rates between schools and within schools. It allowed us to accurately determine both the sample size and the number of schools that were required to calculate a reliable statewide estimate based on a random sample of schools and to establish sentinel grades. The sentinel grades identified were grades 1, 3, and 5. Use of randomly selected classes in the sentinel grades resulted in decreased sample size and less school disruption while maintaining sufficient precision. Standardized, calibrated equipment was purchased and given to school nurses for safekeeping. Lessons learned included establishing strong relationships with partners, especially school nurses, and obtaining support from upper management at the schools, school districts, and the Utah Department of Health. A significant difference in participation rates and obesity rates at the individual school level was observed depending on parental consent type; active consent was associated with lower student participation rates and lower observed obesity rates. Data were presented to both participating and nonparticipating schools, school nurses, district superintendents, and principals. For surveillance purposes, sampling is an efficient, cost-effective way to estimate childhood overweight and obesity rates.

  18. How Statewide LGB Policies Go From “Under Our Skin” to “Into Our Hearts”: Fatherhood Aspirations and Psychological Well-Being Among Emerging Adult Sexual Minority Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have noted increasingly the public health importance of addressing discriminatory policies towards lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) populations. At present, however, we know little about the mechanisms through which policies affect LGB populations’ psychological well-being; in other words, how do policies get under our skin? Using data from a study of sexual minority young men (N = 1,487; M = 20.80 (SD = 1.93); 65 % White; 92 % gay), we examined whether statewide bans (e.g., same-sex marriage, adoption) moderated the relationship between fatherhood aspirations and psychological well-being. Fatherhood aspirations were associated with lower depressive symptoms and higher self-esteem scores among participants living in states without discriminatory policies. In states with marriage equality bans, fatherhood aspirations were associated with higher depressive symptoms and lower self-esteem scores, respectively. Fatherhood aspirations were associated negatively with self-esteem in states banning same-sex and second parent adoptions, respectively. Our findings underscore the importance of recognizing how anti-equality LGB policies may influence the psychosocial development of sexual minority men. PMID:24233971

  19. How statewide LGB policies go from ‘‘under our skin’’ to ‘‘into our hearts’’: fatherhood aspirations and psychological well-being among emerging adult sexual minority men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermeister, José A

    2014-08-01

    Researchers have noted increasingly the public health importance of addressing discriminatory policies towards lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) populations. At present, however, we know little about the mechanisms through which policies affect LGB populations’ psychological well-being; in other words, how do policies get under our skin? Using data from a study of sexual minority young men (N = 1,487; M = 20.80 (SD = 1.93); 65% White; 92% gay), we examined whether statewide bans (e.g., same-sex marriage, adoption) moderated the relationship between fatherhood aspirations and psychological well-being. Fatherhood aspirations were associated with lower depressive symptoms and higher self-esteem scores among participants living in states without discriminatory policies. In states with marriage equality bans, fatherhood aspirations were associated with higher depressive symptoms and lower self-esteem scores, respectively. Fatherhood aspirations were associated negatively with self-esteem in states banning same-sex and second parent adoptions, respectively. Our findings underscore the importance of recognizing how anti-equality LGB policies may influence the psychosocial development of sexual minority men.

  20. Statewide and national impact of California's Staffing Law on pediatric cardiac surgery outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Patricia A; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Jenkins, Kathy; Fawcett, Jacqueline; Hayman, Laura

    2011-05-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the impact of staffing ratios on risk-adjusted outcomes for pediatric cardiac surgery programs in California and relative to other states combined. California performs 20% of the nation's pediatric cardiac surgery and is the only state with a nurse ratio law. Understanding the imposition of mandated ratios on pediatric outcomes is necessary to inform the debate about nurse staffing. Patient variables were extracted from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database. The American Hospital Association database was used for institutional variables. Descriptive analyses were used to identify and describe patient, nursing, and hospital characteristics. Changes in nursing ratios and full-time equivalents (FTEs) between 2003 and 2006 were examined. Associations between nursing characteristics and each outcome variable were examined using general estimating equation models. The RACHS-1 (Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery) risk adjustment method was used for mortality. Hospitals in California significantly increased RN FTEs (P = .025) and RN ratios (P = .036) after enactment of AB 394 in 2006. Neither RN FTEs nor RN ratios were associated with mortality, complications, or resource utilization after risk adjustment. After the law, California's standardized mortality ratio (SMR) decreased more (33%) than in all other states combined (29%). Standardized complication ratio (SCR) increased by 5% but decreased by 5% for all other states combined, and the increase in charge differential ($53,443) was more than twice the increase ($23,119) for other states combined. Hospitals in California made upward adjustments in nursing FTEs and ratios after enactment of AB 394. There was a substantial increase in California's charge differential, a decrease in SMR, and an increase in SCR after enactment of the legislation.

  1. Detecting Changes in Newspaper Reporting of Suicide after a Statewide Social Marketing Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Michele; Ramchand, Rajeev; Chamberlin, Margaret; Marcellino, William

    2017-03-29

    A social marketing campaign was introduced in California in 2012, promoting media adherence to consensus-based guidelines on reporting about suicide. We examine adherence to these guidelines by applying quantitative scores to articles in California and a national control group in two six-month intervals prior to and following campaign implementation. Utilizing a difference-in-difference approach, we found no significant effect of the campaign, though the type of article content was a significant indicator of the overall score. Findings also demonstrated a nation-wide downward trend in the quality of reporting. Qualitative results suggest a need for more flexible guidelines in light of a technologically driven news culture.

  2. Scaling-up from an implementation trial to state-wide coverage: results from the preliminary Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janus Edward D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The successful Greater Green Triangle Diabetes Prevention Program (GGT DPP, a small implementation trial, has been scaled-up to the Victorian state-wide ‘Life!’ programme with over 10,000 individuals enrolled. The Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study (MDPS is an evaluation of the translation from the GGT DPP to the Life! programme. We report results from the preliminary phase (pMDPS of this evaluation. Methods The pMDPS is a randomised controlled trial with 92 individuals aged 50 to 75 at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes randomised to Life! or usual care. Intervention consisted of six structured 90-minute group sessions: five fortnightly sessions and the final session at 8 months. Participants underwent anthropometric and laboratory tests at baseline and 12 months, and provided self-reported psychosocial, dietary, and physical activity measures. Intervention group participants additionally underwent these tests at 3 months. Paired t tests were used to analyse within-group changes over time. Chi-square tests were used to analyse differences between groups in goals met at 12 months. Differences between groups for changes over time were tested with generalised estimating equations and analysis of covariance. Results Intervention participants significantly improved at 12 months in mean body mass index (−0.98 kg/m2, standard error (SE = 0.26, weight (−2.65 kg, SE = 0.72, waist circumference (−7.45 cm, SE = 1.15, and systolic blood pressure (−3.18 mmHg, SE = 1.26, increased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (0.07 mmol/l, SE = 0.03, reduced energy from total (−2.00%, SE = 0.78 and saturated fat (−1.54%, SE = 0.41, and increased fibre intake (1.98 g/1,000 kcal energy, SE = 0.47. In controls, oral glucose at 2 hours deteriorated (0.59 mmol/l, SE = 0.27. Only waist circumference reduced significantly (−4.02 cm, SE = 0.95. Intervention participants significantly

  3. Genetic variants for long QT syndrome among infants and children from a statewide newborn hearing screening program cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ruey-Kang R; Lan, Yueh-Tze; Silka, Michael J; Morrow, Hallie; Kwong, Alan; Smith-Lang, Janna; Wallerstein, Robert; Lin, Henry J

    2014-03-01

    Autosomal recessive long QT syndrome (LQTS), or Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS), can be associated with sensorineural hearing loss. We aimed to explore newborn hearing screening combined with electrocardiograms (ECGs) for early JLNS detection. In California, we conducted statewide, prospective ECG screening of children ≤ 6 years of age with unilateral or bilateral, severe or profound, sensorineural or mixed hearing loss. Families were identified through newborn hearing screening and interviewed about medical and family histories. Twelve-lead ECGs were obtained. Those with positive histories or heart rate corrected QT (QTc) intervals ≥ 450 ms had repeat ECGs. DNA sequencing of 12 LQTS genes was performed for repeat QTc intervals ≥ 450 ms. We screened 707 subjects by ECGs (number screened/number of responses = 91%; number of responses/number of families who were mailed invitations = 54%). Of these, 73 had repeat ECGs, and 19 underwent gene testing. No subject had homozygous or compound heterozygous LQTS mutations, as in JLNS. However, 3 individuals (with QTc intervals of 472, 457, and 456 ms, respectively) were heterozygous for variants that cause truncation or missplicing: 2 in KCNQ1 (c.1343dupC or p.Glu449Argfs*14; c.1590+1G>A or p.Glu530sp) and 1 in SCN5A (c.5872C>T or p.Arg1958*). In contrast to reports of JLNS in up to 4% of children with sensorineural hearing loss, we found no examples of JLNS. Because the 3 variants identified were unrelated to hearing, they likely represent the prevalence of potential LQTS mutations in the general population. Further studies are needed to define consequences of such mutations and assess the overall prevalence. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  4. Review of Experience of a Statewide Poison Control Center With Pediatric Exposures to Oral Antineoplastic Drugs in the Nonmedical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Stephen L; Liu, Jehnan; Soleymani, Kamyar; Romasco, Rebecca L; Farid, Hanieh; Clark, Richard F; Cantrell, F Lee

    2016-01-01

    The use of oral antineoplastic agents in nonmedical settings continues to increase. There are limited data available on pediatric exposures to these agents. We sought to identify characteristics of such exposures. We performed a retrospective review of database of a statewide poison system from 2000 to 2009 for all cases of pediatric exposures to oral antineoplastic agents, which took place in a nonmedical setting. Data collected include gender, age, agent of exposure, dose, drug concentration, reason for exposure, symptoms, outcomes, interventions, and length of hospital stay. There were a total of 328 patients. The mean average age was 4.1 years. Eighty-nine percentage (n = 293) was unintentional. Exposures to 21 different antineoplastic agents were identified. Methotrexate (n = 91) and 6-mercaptopurine (n = 47) were the most common agents encountered. Two hundred ninety-nine (91%) cases had no symptoms reported. When reported, gastrointestinal symptoms (n = 17) and central nervous system sedation (n = 6) were most common. One case of pancytopenia was reported. No deaths were reported in this series. Sixty-seven percent (n = 220) were managed at home, whereas 19 (6%) were admitted to a health care facility. Cases were followed by the poison control center for 0.34 days (SD = 1.40). In this study, exposures to oral antineoplastics were primarily unintentional, asymptomatic, and managed at home. Study limitations include possible reporting bias, inability to objectively confirm exposures, and limited duration of monitoring by the poison control center. In this retrospective review, no significant morbidity or mortality was reported from pediatric exposures to oral antineoplastic drugs in the nonmedical setting.

  5. Insecticide - treated bednet ownership and utilization in Rivers State, Nigeria before a state-wide net distribution campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin-West, C I; Alex-Hart, B A

    2011-09-01

    Malaria presents a huge health and economic burden to families living in malaria endemic areas. The use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) is one of the global strategies in decreasing the malaria burden on vulnerable populations. The use of ITNs reduces clinical malaria by over 50% and all cause mortality in children by 15-30% when the overall population coverage is >70%. This study was aimed at establishing the level of household insecticide -treated bednet ownership and utilization in Rivers State, Nigeria before a statewide scale -up distribution campaign. A descriptive, cross - sectional study was carried out in the Rivers State in November 2008 among household heads or their proxies to serve as a pre -intervention baseline for the scale -up distribution of insecticide treated bednets in the state. The households were selected by a multi -staged sampling technique: first stage being the selection of Local Government Areas (LGAs) from Senatorial districts, second stage the selection of communities from LGAs and final stage the selection of households. Data were collected using a questionnaire adapted from the WHO/FMoH and analyzed using the Epi -Info version 6.04d statistical software package. Hypothesis tests were conducted to compare summary statistics at 95% significance level. A total of 811 household heads or their proxies were interviewed. Their age ranged between 20 and 70 yr, with a mean of 47.96 ± 4.39 yr. The study showed that although 552 (68.1%) of the households owned bednets, only 245 (30.2%, 95% CI=27.1-33.5) of them owned long -lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs). Similarly, only 37.2% of those who owned ITNs slept under them the night preceding the survey. Household ITN ownership and utilization were low in the state. Incorporating behavour change communication package as part of the ITN distribution intervention is advocated to increase ITNs utilization in the state.

  6. The impact of a statewide training to increase child care providers' knowledge of nutrition and physical activity rules in Delaware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stan, Stefanie; Lessard, Laura; Dupont Phillips, Kate

    2013-02-01

    Childhood obesity has been recognized as a national problem of epidemic proportions. Child care represents an ideal venue in which to address this problem, as many young children spend a significant amount of time and consume the majority of their meals in this setting. Recognizing this opportunity, Delaware recently enacted reforms to statewide licensing regulations designed to improve the quality of the nutrition-, physical activity-, and screen viewing-related environments in child care settings. To facilitate the translation of these regulations into practices, a series of broad-scale trainings was held throughout the state. Attendance was required for all Child & Adult Care Food Program (CACFP)-participating facilities, although child care providers from non-CACFP facilities also attended. Pre- and posttraining surveys were used to assess changes in providers' knowledge of the regulations and satisfaction with the training. In total 1094 presurveys and 1076 postsurveys were received. Participants were highly satisfied with the training format and content, including the instructors, materials, and schedule. Data analysis demonstrates improved knowledge of all 26 regulation components from presurvey to postsurvey. Family child care providers, providers with more years of experience, CACFP-participating facilities, and facilities with food service personnel scored significantly higher than their center staff, less experienced and non-CACFP counterparts, as well as those without food service personnel. Broad-scale, in-person training can effectively increase child care providers' knowledge of the regulations and is well received by this audience. Other states and jurisdictions seeking to improve nutrition, physical activity, and screen-viewing practices in child care settings should consider this model of quality improvement.

  7. Risk Stratification using Human Papillomavirus Testing among Women with Equivocally Abnormal Cytology: Results from a State-wide Surveillance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Julia C; Hunt, William C; Schiffman, Mark; Katki, Hormuzd A; Cheung, Li C; Cuzick, Jack; Myers, Orrin; Castle, Philip E; Wheeler, Cosette M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines for cervical cancer screening have incorporated comparative risks of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or cancer (CIN3+) for various screening outcomes to determine management. Few cohorts are large enough to distinguish CIN3+ risks among women with minor abnormalities vs. negative cytology because of low incidence. The New Mexico HPV Pap Registry offers a unique opportunity to evaluate cervical cancer screening in a diverse population across a broad-spectrum of health service delivery. Methods Kaplan-Meier and logistic-Weibull survival models were used to estimate cumulative risks of CIN3+ among women aged 21–64 who were screened in New Mexico between 2007–2011 with negative, equivocal or mildly abnormal cytology, i.e., atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US; with or without HPV triage), or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions. Results We identified 452,045 women meeting the selection criteria. The 3-year CIN3+ risks for women with negative, ASC-US and LSIL cytology were: 0.30%, 2.6%, and 5.2%, respectively. HPV triage of ASC-US stratified 3-year CIN3+ risks were 0.72% for HPV-negative and 7.7% for HPV-positive. Risks tended to decline after age 30 for all screening results. Conclusions In this state-wide population-based cohort, cytology and HPV triage of ASC-US stratified women’s CIN3+ risk into similar patterns observed previously, suggesting the validity of screening guidelines for diverse populations in the United States (U.S.). Absolute risk estimates should be compared across other large populations. Impact Strategies for HPV triage of ASC-US derived from clinical trials are upheld in large clinical practice settings and across diverse screening populations in the U.S.. PMID:26518316

  8. Does the Institution of a Statewide Trauma System Reduce Preventable Mortality and Yield a Positive Return on Investment for Taxpayers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxson, Todd; Mabry, Charles D; Sutherland, Michael J; Robertson, Ronald D; Booker, James O; Collins, Terry; Spencer, Horace J; Rinker, Charles F; Sanddal, Teri L; Sanddal, Nels D

    2017-04-01

    In July 2009, Arkansas began to annually fund $20 million for a statewide trauma system (TS). We studied injury deaths both pre-TS (2009) and post-TS (2013 to 2014), with attention to causes of preventive mortality, societal cost of those preventable mortality deaths, and benefit to tax payers of the lives saved. A multi-specialty trauma-expert panel met and reviewed records of 672 decedents (290 pre-TS and 382 post-TS) who met standardized inclusion criteria, were judged potentially salvageable, and were selected by a proportional sampling of the roughly 2,500 annual trauma deaths. Deaths were adjudicated into sub-categories of nonpreventable and preventable causes. The value of lives lost was calculated for those lives potentially saved in the post-TS period. Total preventable mortality was reduced from 30% of cases pre-TS to 16% of cases studied post-TS, a reduction of 14%. Extrapolating a 14% reduction of preventable mortality to the post-TS study period, using the same inclusion criteria of the post-TS, we calculate that 79 lives were saved in 2013 to 2014 due to the institution of a TS. Using a minimal standard estimate of $100,000 value for a life-year, a lifetime value of $2,365,000 per person was saved. This equates to an economic impact of the lives saved of almost $186 million annually, representing a 9-fold return on investment from the $20 million of annual state funding invested in the TS. The implementation of a TS in Arkansas during a 5-year period resulted in a reduction of the preventable death rate to 16% post-TS, and a 9-fold return on investment by the tax payer. Additional life-saving gains can be expected with ongoing financial support and additional system performance-improvement efforts. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhancing Extension Program Effectiveness by Examining Regional Differences in High Water Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-wen Huang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Competition for water sources in urban areas of Florida has increased due to increased population and human activities. High water users have been identified as a specific group on which Extension should focus water conservation education due to their low awareness of water issues and active landscape water use. In order to ensure the effectiveness of Extension programs targeting high water users statewide, this study sought to explore regional differences in water conservation behavior engagement within Florida high water users. An online survey was conducted to capture responses of high water users (N = 932 in three distinct regions for this comparative study. Respondents were asked to indicate their current engagement in water use behavior, application of water conservation strategies, and likelihood of engaging in water conservation and related societal behaviors. Regional differences were found in all four examined constructs. The findings imply Extension educators should tailor educational programs to regional audiences’ behavior patterns instead of designing statewide programs to ensure program effectiveness

  10. Quality Assessment of Colonoscopy Reporting: Results from a Statewide Cancer Screening Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to assess quality of colonoscopy reports and determine if physicians in practice were already documenting recommended quality indicators, prior to the publication of a standardized Colonoscopy Reporting and Data System (CO-RADS in 2007. We examined 110 colonoscopy reports from 2005-2006 through Maryland Colorectal Cancer Screening Program. We evaluated 25 key data elements recommended by CO-RADS, including procedure indications, risk/comorbidity assessments, procedure technical descriptions, colonoscopy findings, specimen retrieval/pathology. Among 110 reports, 73% documented the bowel preparation quality and 82% documented specific cecal landmarks. For the 177 individual polyps identified, information on size and morphology was documented for 87% and 53%, respectively. Colonoscopy reporting varied considerately in the pre-CO-RADS period. The absence of key data elements may impact the ability to make recommendations for recall intervals. This paper provides baseline data to assess if CO-RADS has an impact on reporting and how best to improve the quality of reporting.

  11. The experiences of Massachusetts hospitals as statewide health insurance reform was implemented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzoli, Gloria J; Clement, Jan P

    2014-02-01

    Hospitals treat many uninsured patients and shoulder substantial amounts of uncompensated care. Health reform as implemented in Massachusetts, then, would be expected to bode well for hospitals as many people obtain coverage from private and public programs. We examined changes in Massachusetts hospital payer mix, unreimbursed costs of care for the uninsured and those in means-tested public programs, and overall financial condition for the period 2004 to 2010. Despite increases in coverage, unreimbursed costs for the uninsured and those in means-tested government programs did not decrease appreciably for Massachusetts hospitals over the study period. Major safety-net hospitals, which play a substantial role in serving the uninsured and Medicaid, had some initial easing of this burden but their financial situation weakened through 2010. The U.S. economic recession and Massachusetts budget pressures, which in part resulted from reform implementation, likely offset advantages hospitals experienced from reductions in the uninsured. Our analysis suggests that state actions in Massachusetts to change payment programs that the two major safety net hospitals relied on to support indigent care contributed to their financial difficulties.

  12. Examine Your Skin

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    Full Text Available ... Items Awareness Store In Memory Melanoma Info Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly ... use this video. UPDATED: November 23, 2016 Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly ...

  13. Examine Your Skin

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    Full Text Available ... Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video below and in only two minutes, you can learn to examine your skin. A special thanks to Dr. Martin Weinstock, MD, ...

  14. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Support Donate Share Facebook Twitter Newsletter Examine Your Skin Watch the video below and in only two minutes, you can learn to examine your skin. A special thanks to Dr. Martin Weinstock, MD, ...

  15. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Store In Memory Melanoma Info Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ... video. UPDATED: November 23, 2016 Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ...

  16. Examine Your Skin

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Store In Memory Melanoma Info Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ... video. UPDATED: November 23, 2016 Melanoma Facts Melanoma Prevention Sunscreen Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding ...

  17. Critical incident stress: the role of hospital-based social work in developing a statewide intervention system for first-responders delivering emergency services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, W J; Neely, K

    1992-01-01

    Emotional, cognitive and behavioral stress can negatively affect the performance of fire, rescue and law enforcement personnel responding to emergency situations. Impaired professional performance in these crises not only endangers the incident victims, all involved responders and their families, but potentially the lives and property of entire communities. This article describes the major administrative and clinical leadership of a hospital-based Social Work department in implementing one of the few statewide critical incident stress debriefing teams for emergency service personnel in the United States. It represents a model for program development by other organizations.

  18. Variation of Blunt Traumatic Injury with Age in Older Adults: Statewide Analysis 2011-14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Earl-Royal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic injury is a leading cause of death and disability in adults ≥ 65 years old, but there are few epidemiological studies addressing this issue. The aim of this study was to assess how characteristics of blunt traumatic injuries in adults ≥ 65 vary by age. Methods: Using data from the a single-state trauma registry, this retrospective cohort study examined injured patients ≥ 65 admitted to all Level I and Level II trauma centers in Pennsylvania between 2011 and 2014 (n=38,562. Patients were stratified by age into three subgroups (age 65-74; 75-84; ≥85. We compared demographics, injury, and system-level across groups. Results: We found significant increases in the proportion of female gender, (48.6% vs. 58.7% vs. 67.7%, white race (89.1% vs. 92.6% vs. 94.6%, and non-Hispanic ethnicity (97.5% vs. 98.6% vs. 99.4% across advancing age across age groups, respectively. As age increased, the proportion of falls (69.9% vs. 82.1% vs. 90.3%, in-hospital mortality (4.6% vs. 6.2% vs. 6.8%, and proportion of patients arriving to the hospital via ambulance also increased (73.6% vs. 75.8% vs. 81.1%, while median injury severity plateaued (9.0% all groups and the proportion of Level I trauma alerts (10.6% vs. 8.2% vs. 6.7% decreased. We found no trend between age and patient transfer status. The five most common diagnoses were vertebral fracture, rib fracture, head contusion, open head wound, and intracranial hemorrhage, with vertebral fracture and head contusion increasing with age, and rib fracture decreasing with age. Conclusion: In a large cohort of older adults with trauma (n= 38,000, we found, with advancing age, a decrease in trauma alert level, despite an increase in mortality and a decrease in demographic diversity. This descriptive study provides a framework for future research on the relationship between age and blunt traumatic injury in older adults.

  19. The relation between media promotions and service volume for a statewide tobacco quitline and a web-based cessation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schillo Barbara A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This observational study assessed the relation between mass media campaigns and service volume for a statewide tobacco cessation quitline and stand-alone web-based cessation program. Methods Multivariate regression analysis was used to identify how weekly calls to a cessation quitline and weekly registrations to a web-based cessation program are related to levels of broadcast media, media campaigns, and media types, controlling for the impact of external and earned media events. Results There was a positive relation between weekly broadcast targeted rating points and the number of weekly calls to a cessation quitline and the number of weekly registrations to a web-based cessation program. Additionally, print secondhand smoke ads and online cessation ads were positively related to weekly quitline calls. Television and radio cessation ads and radio smoke-free law ads were positively related to web program registration levels. There was a positive relation between the number of web registrations and the number of calls to the cessation quitline, with increases in registrations to the web in 1 week corresponding to increases in calls to the quitline in the subsequent week. Web program registration levels were more highly influenced by earned media and other external events than were quitline call volumes. Conclusion Overall, broadcast advertising had a greater impact on registrations for the web program than calls to the quitline. Furthermore, registrations for the web program influenced calls to the quitline. These two findings suggest the evolving roles of web-based cessation programs and Internet-use practices should be considered when creating cessation programs and media campaigns to promote them. Additionally, because different types of media and campaigns were positively associated with calls to the quitline and web registrations, developing mass media campaigns that offer a variety of messages and communicate through

  20. The trauma ecosystem: The impact and economics of new trauma centers on a mature statewide trauma system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesla, David J; Pracht, Etienne E; Leitz, Pablo T; Spain, David A; Staudenmayer, Kristan L; Tepas, Joseph J

    2017-06-01

    Florida serves as a model for the study of trauma system performance. Between 2010 and 2104, 5 new trauma centers were opened alongside 20 existing centers. The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of trauma system expansion on system triage performance and trauma center patients' profiles. A statewide data set was queried for all injury-related discharges from adult acute care hospitals using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for 2010 and 2014. The data set, inclusion criteria, and definitions of high-risk injury were chosen to match those used by the Florida Department of Health in its trauma registry. Hospitals were classified as existing Level I (E1) or Level II (E2) trauma centers and new E2 (N2) centers. Five N2 centers were established 11.6 to 85.3 miles from existing centers. Field and overall trauma system triage of high-risk patients was less accurate with increased overtriage and no change in undertriage. Annual volume at N2 centers increased but did not change at E1 and E2 centers. In 2014, Patients at E1 and E2 centers were slightly older and less severely injured, while those at N2 centers were substantially younger and more severely injured than in 2010. The injured patient-payer mix changed with a decrease in self-pay and commercial patients and an increase in government-sponsored patients at E1 and E2 centers and an increase in self-pay and commercial patients with a decrease in government-sponsored patients at N2 centers. Designation of new trauma centers in a mature system was associated with a change in established trauma center demographics and economics without an improvement in trauma system triage performance. These findings suggest that the health of an entire trauma system network must be considered in the design and implementation of a regional trauma system. Therapeutic/care management study, level IV; epidemiological, level IV.

  1. Amputation trends for patients with lower extremity ulcers due to diabetes and peripheral artery disease using statewide data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Misty D; Brunson, Ann; Li, Chin-Shang; Melnikow, Joy; Romano, Patrick S

    2016-12-01

    This study reports all-payer amputation rates using state-based administrative claims data for high-risk patients with lower extremity (LE) ulcers and concomitant peripheral artery disease (PAD), diabetes mellitus (DM), or combination PAD/DM. In addition, we characterize patient factors that affect amputation-free survival. We also attempted to create a measure of a patient's ability to manage chronic diseases or to access appropriate outpatient care for ulcer management by accounting for hospital and emergency department (ED) visits in the preceding 60 days to determine how this also affects amputation-free survival. Patients admitted to nonfederal hospitals, seen in an ED, or treated in an eligible ambulatory surgery center within California from 2005 through 2013 with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis code for a disease-specific LE ulcer were identified in the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development database. All subsequent hospital, ED, and ambulatory surgery center visits and procedures are captured to identify whether a patient underwent major amputation. Yearly amputation rates were determined to analyze trends. Amputation-free survival for the PAD, DM, and PAD/DM groups was determined. Cox modeling was used to evaluate the effect of patient characteristics. There were 219,547 patients identified with an incident LE ulcer throughout the state. Of these, 131,731 were DM associated, 36,193 were PAD associated, and 51,623 were associated with both PAD and DM. From 2005 to 2013, the number of patients with LE ulcers who required inpatient admission, presented to the ED, or had outpatient procedures was stable. However, there was a statistically significant increase in overall disease-associated amputation rates from 5.1 in 2005 to 13.5 in 2013 (P amputation rates from 10 per 100 patients with LE ulcers in 2005 to 28 per 100 patients in 2013 (P amputation-free survival. Within

  2. CFPC's Certification Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handfield-Jones, Richard; Hollingworth, Gary R.

    1990-01-01

    The certification examination of the College of Family Physicians of Canada is designed to assess the extent to which the College's educational objectives have been achieved. Since the first examination in 1969, more than 7000 physicians have received their certification. The authors describe the basic elements of this test and the process through which the Committee on Examinations designs and sets the examination. The authors comment on the role of the certification process in the education of family physicians in Canada. Imagesp2073-a PMID:21233952

  3. Examination Syllabus Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallatratt, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A study was conducted based on an analysis of computer study courses leading to CSE and 0-level examinations. Several findings are discussed and questions about future developments are raised. Syllabus content (including history, hardware, basic computer science, programming, applications, and implications), format, and examinations are among the…

  4. Examination Syllabus Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallatratt, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A study was conducted based on an analysis of computer study courses leading to CSE and 0-level examinations. Several findings are discussed and questions about future developments are raised. Syllabus content (including history, hardware, basic computer science, programming, applications, and implications), format, and examinations are among the…

  5. Essentials of musculoskeletal examination

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-08-01

    Aug 1, 2011 ... The history, physical examination and special investigations combine in the evaluation of the above ... further in that, for example, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) .... therapeutic and prognostic implications for the patient.

  6. The paediatric ophthalmic examination

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    management. .... In a child who has the eyes shut, topical anaesthesia and sedation may help, but a ... Photographs are valuable – current or previous. ey may allow additional information to the examination and can be forwarded for com-.

  7. Terror of Examinations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔园玲

    2013-01-01

    Parents send their sons and daughters to schools and col eges to get education. Teachers work year in and year out to fulfil the task which society entrusts to them. Many ways of reforming the examination system have been suggested.

  8. Breast Self- Examination Contradiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayla Akkas Gursoy

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is very important health problem among women in the World and Turkey. Although treatment chance is very rising and survival is getting longer thanks to early diagnosis in breast cancer. Some discussion is making related to breast self examination which is one of the early detection methods in recent years. This article consider the discussions about breast self examination under the historical development light. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(3.000: 257-260

  9. Under Pressure: Financial Effect of the Hospital-Acquired Conditions Initiative-A Statewide Analysis of Pressure Ulcer Development and Payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddings, Jennifer; Reichert, Heidi; Rogers, Mary A M; Hofer, Timothy P; McMahon, Laurence F; Grazier, Kyle L

    2015-07-01

    To assess the financial effect of the 2008 Hospital-Acquired Conditions Initiative (HACI) pressure ulcer payment changes on Medicare, other payers, and hospitals. Retrospective before-and-after study of all-payer statewide administrative data for more than 2.4 million annual adult discharges in 2007 and 2009 using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Datasets for California. How often and by how much the 2008 payment changes for pressure ulcers affected hospital payment was assessed. Nonfederal acute care California hospitals (N = 311). Adults discharged from acute-care hospitals. Pressure ulcer rates and hospital payment changes. Hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates were low in 2007 (0.28%) and 2009 (0.27%); present-on-admission pressure ulcer rates increased from 2.3% in 2007 to 3.0% in 2009. According to clinical stage of pressure ulcer (available in 2009), hospital-acquired Stage III and IV ulcers occurred in 603 discharges (0.02%); 60,244 discharges (2.42%) contained other pressure ulcer diagnoses. Payment removal for Stage III and IV hospital-acquired ulcers reduced payment in 75 (0.003%) discharges, for a statewide payment decrease of $310,444 (0.001%) for all payers and $199,238 (0.001%) for Medicare. For all other pressure ulcers, the Hospital-Acquired Conditions Initiative reduced hospital payment in 20,246 (0.81%) cases (including 18,953 cases with present-on-admission ulcers), reducing statewide payment by $62,538,586 (0.21%) for all payers and $47,237,984 (0.32%) for Medicare. The total financial effect of the 2008 payment changes for pressure ulcers was negligible. Most payment decreases occurred by removal of comorbidity payments for present-on-admission pressure ulcers other than Stages III and IV. The removal of payment for hospital-acquired Stage III and IV ulcers by implementation of the HACI policy was 1/200th that of the removal of payment for other types of pressure ulcers that occurred in implementation of the

  10. The sexual assault examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargot, L A

    1985-04-01

    The sexual assault examination poses many problems for physicians. They must deal not only with the patient's physical and emotional trauma, but also collect forensic evidence, and provide proper treatment and follow-up. Patient management has been simplified and improved in Ontario by a standardized sexual assault examination kit. It has been used at McMaster University's Regional Sexual Assault Centre since its establishment in 1979. The first step in managing victims is ensuring their wellbeing, and treating them sympathetically. The kit provides information on consent, taking the sexual assault history, recording the patient's emotional status, and treatment guidelines. It also contains equipment and instructions on collecting clothing and body evidence, and on the genital and anal examination. The collection of good forensic evidence can decrease the need for doctors and nurses to testify in court.

  11. Partly Tailored Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, R.

    1974-01-01

    A type of examination in which additional questions are provided was used for Grade 12 Algebra and College 1 Introductory Calculus. An hypothesis was formulated that this procedure should reveal additional knowledge which whould be reflected in superior average scores for the class group. (Editor)

  12. Partly Tailored Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, R.

    1974-01-01

    A type of examination in which additional questions are provided was used for Grade 12 Algebra and College 1 Introductory Calculus. An hypothesis was formulated that this procedure should reveal additional knowledge which whould be reflected in superior average scores for the class group. (Editor)

  13. Mini mental state examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kørner, Ejnar Alex; Lauritzen, Lise; Wang, August;

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) is widely used in Denmark, but often in non-validated versions. In 2000 a cross-sectional workgroup decided on a new common version of the MMSE with a corresponding manual, which is validated for the first time in the present study. MATERIALS...

  14. Students friendly medical examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Chandra Chaurasia

    2014-04-01

    always a burden. The professional exams of universities are the matter of their norms and regulation, but we have day-to-day assessment through-out duration; this is enough to moralize them and prepare before final professional examination. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 412-412

  15. Examining College Writing Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncheon, Julia C.; Tierney, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing postsecondary access depends in large part on enhancing underrepresented students' writing ability, or college writing readiness. However, what exactly constitutes college-level writing is not clear-cut, complicating efforts to improve secondary preparation. This article examines recent efforts to define postsecondary writing,…

  16. Using First-Grade Teacher Ratings to Predict Third-Grade English Language Arts and Mathematics Achievement on a High-Stakes Statewide Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorinda J. GALLANT

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Early childhood professional organizations support teachers as the best assessors of students’ academic, social, emotional, and physical development. This study investigates the predictive nature of teacher ratings of first-grade students’ performance on a standards-based curriculum-embedded performance assessment within the context of a state accountability system. The sample includes 4292 elementary school students cross-classified by 131 first-grade and 137 third-grade schools attended. This study uses extant statewide assessment data for students located in a state in the southeastern part of the United States. Controlling for student and school demographic variables in cross-classified random effects multilevel models, first-grade teacher ratings—as reflected by domain scores on a performance assessment—are found to positively and significantly correlate with students’ third-grade academic achievement.

  17. Use of a Novel Accounting and Grouping Method for Major Trunk Injury-Analysis of Data from a Statewide Trauma Financial Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Kyla D; Mabry, Charles D; Kalkwarf, Kyle J; Betzold, Richard D; Spencer, Horace J; Spinks, Kara M; Porter, Austin; Karim, Saleema; Robertson, Ronald D; Sutherland, Michael J; Maxson, Robert T

    2016-09-01

    Major trunk trauma is common and costly, but comparisons of costs between trauma centers (TCs) are rare. Understanding cost is essential to improve quality, manage trauma service lines, and to facilitate institutional commitment for trauma. We have used results of a statewide trauma financial survey of Levels I to IV TC to develop a useful grouping method for costs and clinical characteristics of major trunk trauma. The trauma financial survey collected billing and clinical data on 75 per cent of the state trauma registry patients for fiscal year 2012. Cost was calculated by separately accounting for embedded costs of trauma response and verification, and then adjusting reasonable costs from the Medicare cost report for each TC. The cost-to-charge ratios were then recalculated and used to determine uniform cost estimates for each patient. From the 13,215 patients submitted for the survey, we selected 1,094 patients with major trunk trauma: lengths of stay ≥ 48 hours and a maximum injury of AIS ≥3 for either thorax or abdominal trauma. These patients were then divided into three Injury Severity Score (ISS) groups of 9 to 15, 16 to 24, or 25+ to stratify patients into similar injury groups for analysis of cost and cost drivers. For abdominal injury, average total cost for patients with ISS 9 to 15 was $17,429. Total cost and cost per day increased with severity of injury, with $51,585 being the total cost for those with ISS 25. Similar trends existed for thoracic injury. Use of the Medicare cost report and cost-to-charge ratios to compute uniform costs with an innovative grouping method applied to data collected across a statewide trauma system provides unique information regarding cost and outcomes, which affects quality improvement, trauma service line management, and decisions on TC participation.

  18. Effects of a Statewide Protocol for the Management of Peritoneal Dialysis-Related Peritonitis on Microbial Profiles and Antimicrobial Susceptibilities: A Retrospective Five-Year Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Amanda L; Carson, Christine F; Inglis, Timothy J J; Chakera, Aron

    2015-12-01

    ♦ Peritonitis is a major complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Early empirical antibiotic therapy is recommended, with the choice of agents guided by local resistance patterns. As routine use of specific antimicrobial agents can drive resistance, regular assessment of causative organisms and their susceptibility to empirical therapy is essential. ♦ We conducted a retrospective review of all PD peritonitis cases and positive PD fluid cultures obtained over a 5-year period in Western Australia following the introduction of a statewide protocol for the initial management of PD peritonitis with intraperitoneal vancomycin and gentamicin. ♦ The incidence of PD peritonitis decreased from 1 in 16 patient months (0.75/year at risk) to 1 in 29 patient months (0.41/year at risk) over the 5 years. There were 1,319 culture-positive samples and 1,069 unique isolates identified. Gram-positive bacteria accounted for 69.9% of positive cultures, with vancomycin resistance averaging 2% over the study period. Gram-negative bacteria accounted for 25.4% of positive cultures, with gentamicin resistance identified in an average of 8% of organisms. No increase in antimicrobial resistance to vancomycin or gentamicin occurred over the 5 years and there was no change in the proportion of gram-positive (69.9%), gram-negative (25.4%) or fungal (4.4%) organisms causing PD peritonitis. ♦ Over time, the peritonitis rates have dramatically improved although the profile of causative organisms remains similar. Empirical treatment of PD peritonitis with intraperitoneal vancomycin and gentamicin remains efficacious, with high levels of susceptibility and no evidence that the introduction of this statewide empirical PD peritonitis treatment protocol is driving resistance to these agents. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  19. Hispanic Student Enrollment and Educational Attainment in Texas 2-Year Colleges: A Multi-Year Statewide Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to examine the numbers and percentages of Hispanic college students enrolled in Texas 2-year colleges from the 2000 through the 2011 academic years and to examine the numbers and percentages of Hispanic students obtaining associate degrees from Texas 2-year colleges for the 2000 through the 2011 academic…

  20. More than Access: The Role of Support Services in the Transitional Experiences of Underrepresented Students in a Statewide Access Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Juan Gabriel; Zerquera, Desiree D.; Smith, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    While a number of studies have examined outcomes associated with early intervention programs that have a financial aid component, few have examined the experiences of student beneficiaries of those programs and the administrators charged with carrying out state mandates associated with the implementation of the programs. This gap in the literature…

  1. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  2. Cheeting in Mathematics Examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Mejía Pérez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The exam is the most widely used assessment instrument in the history of education, primarily in mathematics. One of the main problems that happens in this resource, and make it an unreliable source to gather information, is plagiarism, copying or cheating. This issue occurs for many reasons, but has several consistencies in behavior of students when attending a test, as we could find in the experimental ethnographic exercises we did. We also noticed that although there is a direct relationship between the teacher's role as a supervisor of an examination and the level of plagiarism that occurs in it, the problem definitely has a greater connotation. Inside the classroom it can clearly see a culture of plagiarism which obstructs the educational process regarding ethical and educational justice is concerned.

  3. Examining fatigue in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Shair, Khaled; Muellerova, Hana; Yorke, Janelle

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Fatigue is a disruptive symptom that inhibits normal functional performance of COPD patients in daily activities. The availability of a short, simple, reliable and valid scale would improve assessment of the characteristics and influence of fatigue in COPD. METHODS......: At baseline, 2107 COPD patients from the ECLIPSE cohort completed the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Fatigue (FACIT-F) scale. We used well-structured classic method, the principal components analysis (PCA) and Rasch analysis for structurally examining the 13-item FACIT-F. RESULTS: Four items...... were less able to capture fatigue characteristics in COPD and were deleted. PCA was applied to the remaining 9 items of the modified FACIT-F and resulted in three interpretable dimensions: i) general (5 items); ii) functional ability (2 items); and iii) psychosocial fatigue (2 items). The modified...

  4. Maternal symptoms of stress, depression, and anxiety are related to nonresponsive feeding styles in a statewide sample of WIC participants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hurley, Kristen M; Black, Maureen M; Papas, Mia A; Caulfield, Laura E; Caufield, Laura E

    2008-01-01

    .... The relationship between maternal mental health and feeding styles has not been examined. We hypothesized that mothers who report more symptoms of stress, depression, or anxiety report less responsive (e.g...

  5. Examining maintenance responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, K C

    2001-06-01

    This paper has examined the important responsibilities of the two organisations involved in the provision of maintenance service for the vital building services in many of our highly serviced buildings. The issues raised could be put to beneficial use in both clients and maintenance providers. All in all, the clients should work closely with their maintenance providers. Engineering services in buildings will not perform satisfactorily and efficiently if both parties do not work together and understand the maintenance tasks based on a business partnering mode. Put forward is the view that the management of the activities involved in the operation and maintenance process is a "shared commitment/involvement" between the client and the maintenance provider. It is obvious that many factors can influence the continued effectiveness of a quality maintenance scheme set up by client and provider. Some of these factors are: Change in key personnel Updates in technology Amendments to engineering practice Implementation of legislative requirements Changes in operation by client or provider Change of use of building Passage of time These factors must be fully reviewed by both parties from time to time, and necessary actions taken. A cooperative team working relationship and improved communication should be fostered by the client and his provider for the best management of services maintenance. This arrangement will contribute to better building services systems with continuous improvement; improved value for clients and higher return for the maintenance provider.

  6. Temporomandibular joint examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guarda Nardini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ it’s a joint closely related to the skull base, the spine, and the jaws; all these anatomical structures must be taken in consideration when evaluating pain involving the tmj. In order to detect patients affected by pathology or dysfunctions of the tmj, physical examination is of great value in orienting the diagnosis. Inspection must consider the symmetry of the body, the dental status and the type of occlusion. Palpation is a way to assess contractiont involving the muscles of the masticatory system and of the neck. Auscultation, based on articular noise provides means to determine whether we are dealing with degeneration of the joint or a dislocation of the intrarticular disc. In order to confirm the diagnosis obtained with the clinical evaluation, it’s useful to perform imaging techniques as opt, tomography and TC of the tmj and electromyokineosiography – index of the mandibular functionality and of the muscles status. MRI and dynamic MRI are among the non invasive exams which give the greatest amount of information, regarding the disc position and the joint degeneration. Arthroscopy is an invasive technique that allows early diagnosis of degeneration and is helpful to reveal early inflammatory processes of the joint.

  7. Examining Archean methanotrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotznick, Sarah P.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2016-05-01

    The carbon isotope ratios preserved in sedimentary rocks can be used to fingerprint ancient metabolisms. Organic carbon in Late Archean samples stands out from that of other intervals with unusually low δ13C values (∼-45 to -60‰). It was hypothesized that these light compositions record ecosystem-wide methane cycling and methanotrophy, either of the aerobic or anaerobic variety. To test this idea, we studied the petrography and carbon and oxygen isotope systematics of well-known and spectacular occurrences of shallow water stromatolites from the 2.72 Ga Tumbiana Formation of Western Australia. We examined the carbonate cements and kerogen produced within the stromatolites, because methanotrophy is expected to leave an isotopic fingerprint in these carbon reservoirs. Mathematical modeling of Archean carbonate chemistry further reveals that methanotrophy should still have a discernible signature preserved in the isotopic record, somewhat diminished from those observed in Phanerozoic sedimentary basins due to higher dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations. These stromatolites contain kerogen with δ13Corg values of ∼ - 50 ‰. By microsampling different regions and textures within the stromatolites, we determined that the isotopic compositions of the authigenic calcite cements show a low degree of variation and are nearly identical to values estimated for seawater at this time; the lack of low and variable δ13Ccarb values implies that methanotrophy does not explain the low δ13Corg seen in the coeval kerogen. These observations do not support a methanotrophy hypothesis, but instead hint that the Late Archean may constitute an interval wherein autotrophs employed markedly different biochemical processes of energy conservation and carbon fixation.

  8. A Framework for Statewide Analysis of Site Suitability, Energy Estimation, Life Cycle Costs, Financial Feasibility and Environmental Assessment of Wind Farms: A Case Study of Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Indraneel

    In the last decade, Midwestern states including Indiana have experienced an unprecedented growth in utility scale wind energy farms. For example, by end of 2013, Indiana had 1.5 GW of wind turbines installed, which could provide electrical energy for as many as half-a-million homes. However, there is no statewide systematic framework available for the evaluation of wind farm impacts on endangered species, required necessary setbacks and proximity standards to infrastructure, and life cycle costs. This research is guided to fill that gap and it addresses the following questions. How much land is suitable for wind farm siting in Indiana given the constraints of environmental, ecological, cultural, settlement, physical infrastructure and wind resource parameters? How much wind energy can be obtained? What are the life cycle costs and economic and financial feasibility? Is wind energy production and development in a state an emission free undertaking? The framework developed in the study is applied to a case study of Indiana. A fuzzy logic based AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) spatial site suitability analysis for wind energy is formulated. The magnitude of wind energy that could be sited and installed comprises input for economic and financial feasibility analysis for 20-25 years life cycle of wind turbines in Indiana. Monte Carlo simulation is used to account for uncertainty and nonlinearity in various costs and price parameters. Impacts of incentives and cost variables such as production tax credits, costs of capital, and economies of scale are assessed. Further, an economic input-output (IO) based environmental assessment model is developed for wind energy, where costs from financial feasibility analysis constitute the final demand vectors. This customized model for Indiana is used to assess emissions for criteria air pollutants, hazardous air pollutants and greenhouse gases (GHG) across life cycle events of wind turbines. The findings of the case study include

  9. Examining High Quality Online Teacher Professional Development: Teachers' Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Linda J.; Liang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Funded by Race to the Top, a federal education initiative, the Department of Education of a Midwestern state in the U.S. launched statewide implementation of online teacher professional development (OTPD) to apply formative instructional practices (FIP) to enhance classroom instruction. Central to the design and implementation of OTPD was the need…

  10. A Statewide Study Designed to Determine Methods of Reducing Injury in Interscholastic Football Competition by Equipment Modification. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, William T.; And Others

    Through an examination of data on injuries to the lower extremities of varsity high school players, this study sought to ascertain 1) whether modified cleats brought about a reduction in the number and/or severity of such injuries; and 2) whether there existed an optimum combination of equipment for reduction in the number and/or severity of such…

  11. Achievement Gaps for Students with Disabilities: Stable, Widening, or Narrowing on a State-Wide Reading Comprehension Test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Ann C.; Stevens, Joseph J.; Elliott, Stephen N.; Tindal, Gerald; Nese, Joseph F. T.

    2016-01-01

    Reading comprehension growth trajectories from 3rd to 7th grade were estimated for 99,919 students on a state reading comprehension assessment. We examined whether differences between students in general education (GE) and groups of students identified as exceptional learners were best characterized as stable, widening, or narrowing. The groups…

  12. Evidence-Based Services in a Statewide Public Mental Health System: Do the Services Fit the Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Jason; Becker, Kimberly D.; Daleiden, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which a literature review of evidence-based services identified services appropriate for the actual problems of youth involved in intensive public mental health services. The diagnostic profiles and specific intervention targets reported by treatment providers were coded to determine whether a relevant empirically…

  13. Assessing the Special Education Faculty Shortage: The Crisis in California--A Statewide Study of the Professoriate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Susan; Eliot, Michael; Hood, Jolene; Driggs, Max; Mori, Ayako; Johnson, Theresa

    2005-01-01

    This article examines several questions related to the faculty shortage in special education. Using California as a case, the authors address these questions: (1) What were the personal and professional characteristics of current special education faculty preparing special education credential and doctoral candidates?; (2) What were the…

  14. Achievement Gaps for Students with Disabilities: Stable, Widening, or Narrowing on a State-Wide Reading Comprehension Test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Ann C.; Stevens, Joseph J.; Elliott, Stephen N.; Tindal, Gerald; Nese, Joseph F. T.

    2016-01-01

    Reading comprehension growth trajectories from 3rd to 7th grade were estimated for 99,919 students on a state reading comprehension assessment. We examined whether differences between students in general education (GE) and groups of students identified as exceptional learners were best characterized as stable, widening, or narrowing. The groups…

  15. Mapping one strong 'Ohana: using network analysis and GIS to enhance the effectiveness of a statewide coalition to prevent child abuse and neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardazone, Gina; U Sy, Angela; Chik, Ivan; Corlew, Laura Kate

    2014-06-01

    Network analysis and GIS enable the presentation of meaningful data about organizational relationships and community characteristics, respectively. Together, these tools can provide a concrete representation of the ecological context in which coalitions operate, and may help coalitions identify opportunities for growth and enhanced effectiveness. This study uses network analysis and GIS mapping as part of an evaluation of the One Strong 'Ohana (OSO) campaign. The OSO campaign was launched in 2012 via a partnership between the Hawai'i Children's Trust Fund (HCTF) and the Joyful Heart Foundation. The OSO campaign uses a collaborative approach aimed at increasing public awareness of child maltreatment and protective factors that can prevent maltreatment, as well as enhancing the effectiveness of the HCTF Coalition. This study focuses on three elements of the OSO campaign evaluation: (1) Network analysis exploring the relationships between 24 active Coalition member organizations, (2) GIS mapping of responses to a randomized statewide phone survey (n = 1,450) assessing awareness of factors contributing to child maltreatment, and (3) Combined GIS maps and network data, illustrating opportunities for geographically-targeted coalition building and public awareness activities.

  16. Role of Surgical Services in Profitability of Hospitals in California: An Analysis of Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development Annual Financial Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzez, Ashkan; de Virgilio, Christian

    2016-10-01

    With constant changes in health-care laws and payment methods, profitability, and financial sustainability of hospitals are of utmost importance. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between surgical services and hospital profitability. The Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development annual financial databases for the years 2009 to 2011 were used for this study. The hospitals' characteristics and income statement elements were extracted for statistical analysis using bivariate and multivariate linear regression. A total of 989 financial records of 339 hospitals were included. On bivariate analysis, the number of inpatient and ambulatory operating rooms (ORs), the number of cases done both as inpatient and outpatient in each OR, and the average minutes used in inpatient ORs were significantly related with the net income of the hospital. On multivariate regression analysis, when controlling for hospitals' payer mix and the study year, only the number of inpatient cases done in the inpatient ORs (β = 832, P = 0.037), and the number of ambulatory ORs (β = 1,485, 466, P = 0.001) were significantly related with the net income of the hospital. These findings suggest that hospitals can maximize their profitability by diverting and allocating outpatient surgeries to ambulatory ORs, to allow for more inpatient surgeries.

  17. Sensory modulation and trauma-informed-care knowledge transfer and translation in mental health services in Victoria: Evaluation of a statewide train-the-trainer intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvedy, Samantha; Maguire, Tessa; Furness, Trentham; McKenna, Brian

    2017-07-01

    Sensory modulation (SM) and trauma-informed-care (TIC) are therapeutic strategies which can help avoid incidents of aggression and thus reduce the use of restrictive interventions in mental health settings. In order to educate mental health nurses and allied health professionals in these strategies, a train-the-trainer intervention was developed and delivered to 19 area mental health services as a statewide, government funded program. This descriptive qualitative study evaluated the effectiveness of the intervention to: a) transfer knowledge; and, b) translate knowledge into practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with senior staff (n = 21); focus group discussions with trainees (n = 10); and, a paired in-depth interview with master trainers (n = 2). In total, 170 trainees attended two day train-the-trainer sessions. Many trainees were not in education roles. Most services facilitated further knowledge transfer to end-user clinicians, though training materials were often adapted. End-users' responses to SM/TIC training were generally positive to the training, but some were resistant to the change in practice. Limited anecdotal evidence of translation of SM/TIC into practice was provided. Ongoing support is required to maintain a focus on SM and TIC, sustain and encourage further knowledge transfer and translation, and assess the impact on consumer and staff health outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Youth Arrested for Trading Sex Have the Highest Rates of Childhood Adversity: A Statewide Study of Juvenile Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naramore, Rachel; Bright, Melissa A; Epps, Nathan; Hardt, Nancy S

    2017-06-01

    A history of childhood adversity is associated with high-risk behaviors and criminal activity in both adolescents and adults. Furthermore, individuals with histories of child maltreatment are at higher risk for engaging in risky sexual behavior, experiencing re-victimization, and in some cases, becoming sexual offenders. The purpose of the current study was to examine the prevalence of individual and cumulative adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) reported by 102 offending youth who were arrested for trading sex and 64,227 offending youth who were arrested for various other crimes, using Florida's Positive Achievement Change Tool. Youth with violations related to sex trafficking had higher rates for each ACE as well as number of ACEs, particularly sexual abuse and physical neglect. These findings have implications for identifying adverse experiences in both maltreated and offending youth as well as tailoring services to prevent re-victimization.

  19. Alcohol policy enforcement and changes in student drinking rates in a statewide public college system: a follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Sion K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heavy alcohol use among U.S. college students is a major contributor to young adult morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to examine whether college alcohol policy enforcement levels predict changes in student drinking and related behaviors in a state system of public colleges and universities, following a system-wide change to a stricter policy. Methods Students and administrators at 11 Massachusetts public colleges/universities completed surveys in 1999 (N of students = 1252, one year after the policy change, and again in 2001 (N = 1074. We calculated policy enforcement scores for each school based on the reports of deans of students, campus security chiefs, and students, and examined the correlations between perceived enforcement levels and the change in student drinking rates over the subsequent two year period, after weighting the 2001 data to adjust for demographic changes in the student body. Results Overall rates of any past-30-days drinking, heavy episodic drinking, and usual heavy drinking among past-30-days drinkers were all lower in 2001 compared to 1999. School-level analyses (N = 11 found deans' baseline reports of stricter enforcement were strongly correlated with subsequent declines in heavy episodic drinking (Pearson's r = -0.73, p = 0.011. Moreover, consistently high enforcement levels across time, as reported by deans, were associated with greater declines in heavy episodic drinking. Such relationships were not found for students' and security chiefs' reports of enforcement. Marijuana use did not rise during this period of decline in heavy drinking. Conclusions Study findings suggest that stronger enforcement of a stricter alcohol policy may be associated with reductions in student heavy drinking rates over time. An aggressive enforcement stance by deans may be an important element of an effective college alcohol policy.

  20. Establishment of a Web-based System for Collection of Patient-reported Outcomes After Radical Prostatectomy in a Statewide Quality Improvement Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Steven M; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Ghani, Khurshid R; Miller, David C; Linsell, Susan; Starr, Jay; Peabody, James O; Hurley, Patrick; Montie, James; Cher, Michael L

    2017-09-01

    To report on the establishment of a unified, electronic patient-reported outcome (PRO) infrastructure and pilot results from the first 5 practices enrolled in the web-based collection system developed by the Michigan Urological Surgery Improvement Collaborative. Eligible patients were those undergoing radical prostatectomy of 5 academic and community practices. PRO was obtained using a validated 21-item web-based questionnaire, regarding urinary function, erection function, and sexual interest and satisfaction. Data were collected preoperatively, at 3 months, and 6 months postoperatively. Patients were provided a link via email to complete the surveys. Perioperative and PRO data were analyzed as reports for individual patients and summary performance reports for individual surgeons. Among 773 eligible patients, 688 (89%) were enrolled preoperatively. Survey completion rate was 88%, 84%, and 90% preoperatively, at 3 months, and 6 months. Electronic completion rates preoperatively, at 3 months, and 6 months were 70%, 70%, and 68%, respectively. Mean urinary function scores were 18.3, 14.3, and 16.6 (good function ≥ 17), whereas mean erection scores were 18.7, 7.3, and 9.1 (good erection score ≥ 22) before surgery, at 3 months, and 6 months. Variation was noted for erectile function among the practices. Collection of electronic PRO via this unified, web-based format was successful and provided results that reflect expected recovery and identify opportunities for improvement. This will be extended to more practices statewide to improve outcomes after radical prostatectomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Interview with a quality leader: Carol Wagner on Washington State Hospital Association (WSHA) and their statewide improvement. Interview by Susan V. White.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Carol Wagner, RN, MBA is the Vice President for Patient Safety at the Washington State Hospital Association (WSHA). She is recognized nationally as an innovative patient safety leader. She led the development of WSHA's Patient Safety Program and Rural Healthcare Quality Network. Under Carol's leadership, the WSHA received the 2010 John Eisenberg Patient Safety and Quality Award for national innovation given by The Joint Commission and the National Quality Forum. The association also received the 2011 Dick Davidson Award for Allied Association Leadership. These national awards are two of the highest honors an organization can receive for patient safety and quality. Through close working relationships with national and state regulatory bodies and professional organizations, Carol designs programs to improve quality and safety in every hospital in Washington State. Under Carol's leadership, all hospitals in Washington participated in the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's (IHI) 5 Million Lives Campaign. The effort led to implementation of the largest number of rapid response teams in a geographic area. Carol also created the first statewide learning collaborative to reduce hospital-acquired infections. Carol is a registered nurse with an MBA focusing on finance and operations. She worked clinically in a variety of settings, provided leadership as a nursing administrator, and transitioned to lead hospital strategic planning, budgeting, and cost accounting. She studied management and system change at The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Her quality training was with Dr. W. Edwards Deming and at Intermountain Health Care with Dr. Brent James. Her experience includes work in for-profit and not-for-profit environments and supporting community, tertiary, and academic medical centers. This includes Huntington Hospital in Pasadena, California and a national for-profit hospital system with more than 100 hospitals. © 2011 National Association for

  2. Incidence and Risk Factors for Deliberate Self-harm, Mental Illness, and Suicide Following Bariatric Surgery: A State-wide Population-based Linked-data Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, David J R; Ho, Kwok M

    2017-02-01

    Assess the incidence and determinants of hospitalization for deliberate self-harm and mental health disorders, and suicide after bariatric surgery. Limited recent literature suggests an increase in deliberate self-harm following bariatric surgery. A state-wide, population-based, self-matched, longitudinal cohort study over a 5-year period between 2007 and 2011. Utilizing the Western Australian Department of Health Data Linkage Unit records, all patients undergoing bariatric surgery (n = 12062) in Western Australia were followed for an average 30.4 months preoperatively and 40.6 months postoperatively. There were 110 patients (0.9%) hospitalized for deliberate self-harm, which was higher than the general population [incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-1.94, P = 0.005]. Compared with before surgery, there was no significant increase in deliberate self-harm hospitalizations (IRR 0.79, 95% CI 0.54-1.16; P = 0.206) and a reduction in overall mental illness related hospitalizations (IRR 0.76, 95% CI 0.63-0.91; P = 0.002) after surgery. Younger age, no private-health insurance cover, a history of hospitalizations due to depression before surgery, and gastrointestinal complications after surgery were predictors for deliberate self-harm hospitalizations after bariatric surgery. Three suicides occurred during the follow-up period, a rate comparable to the general population during the same time period (IRR 0.61, 95% CI 0.11-2.27, P = 0.444). Hospitalization for deliberate self-harm in bariatric patients was more common than the general population, but an increased incidence of deliberate self-harm after bariatric surgery was not observed. Hospitalization for depression before surgery and major postoperative gastrointestinal complications after bariatric surgery are potentially modifiable risk factors for deliberate self-harm after bariatric surgery.

  3. Prevalence of Internet gaming disorder in German adolescents: diagnostic contribution of the nine DSM-5 criteria in a state-wide representative sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehbein, Florian; Kliem, Sören; Baier, Dirk; Mößle, Thomas; Petry, Nancy M

    2015-05-01

    Internet gaming disorder (IGD) is included as a condition for further study in Section 3 of the DSM-5. Nine criteria were proposed with a threshold of five or more criteria recommended for diagnosis. The aims of this study were to assess how the specific criteria contribute to diagnosis and to estimate prevalence rates of IGD based on DSM-5 recommendations. Large-scale, state-representative school survey using a standardized questionnaire. Germany (Lower Saxony). A total of 11 003 ninth-graders aged 13-18 years (mean = 14.88, 51.09% male). IGD was assessed with a DSM-5 adapted version of the Video Game Dependency Scale that covered all nine criteria of IGD. In total, 1.16% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.96, 1.36] of respondents were classified with IGD according to DSM-5 recommendations. IGD students played games for longer periods, skipped school more often, had lower grades in school, reported more sleep problems and more often endorsed feeling 'addicted to gaming' than their non-IGD counterparts. The most frequently reported DSM-5 criteria overall were 'escape adverse moods' (5.30%) and 'preoccupation' (3.91%), but endorsement of these criteria rarely related to IGD diagnosis. Conditional inference trees showed that the criteria 'give up other activities', 'tolerance' and 'withdrawal' were of key importance for identifying IGD as defined by DSM-5. Based on a state-wide representative school survey in Germany, endorsement of five or more criteria of DSM-5 internet gaming disorder (IGD) occurred in 1.16% of the students, and these students evidence greater impairment compared with non-IGD students. Symptoms related to 'give up other activities', 'tolerance' and 'withdrawal' are most relevant for IGD diagnosis in this age group. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. The Smoking Cessation and Reduction in Pregnancy Treatment (SCRIPT) Adoption Scale: evaluating the diffusion of a tobacco treatment innovation to a statewide prenatal care program and providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Richard; Cleary, Sean; Ramiah, Kalpana; Clark, Jeannie; Abroms, Lorien; Davis, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    When a new patient education program is being considered for adoption by a public health agency, it is essential to determine provider perceptions of its acceptability for routine use. In 2007, the West Virginia Bureau of Public Health Perinatal Program, Right From The Start (RFTS), decided to adopt the Smoking Cessation and Reduction in Pregnancy Treatment (SCRIPT) Program. RFTS is a statewide perinatal home visitation initiative delivered by designated care coordinators (DCCs). The authors developed the SCRIPT Adoption Scale (SAS) in the absence of a valid instrument to assess the perceived attributes of a tobacco treatment innovation among the RFTS DCC population. They evaluated the validity of the five constructs of the Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations model in an organization (relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, observability, and trialability) to predict SCRIPT use. After reviewing the literature and developing draft SAS forms, 2 expert panel reviews established the face and content validity of a 43-item SAS. It was administered to 90% (85/90) of the RFTS DCC population. Psychometric analyses confirmed the validity and reliability of a 28-item scale. All 28 items had factor loadings greater than 0.40 (range = 0.43-0.81). All SAS subscales were strongly correlated, r = 0.51 to 0.97, supporting the convergent validity of a 5-factor SAS. There was a significant association between the DCC SAS score and DCC SCRIPT Program Implementation Index supporting the SAS convergent (construct) validity (r = 0.38). The SAS internal consistencyr = 0.93 and stabilityr = 0.76. Although 2 specific subscales need to be improved, the SAS can be adapted by prenatal care programs to measure the attributes of adoption of new, evidence-based patient education and counseling methods.

  5. CFPC's Certification Examination: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Handfield-Jones, Richard; Hollingworth, Gary R

    1990-01-01

    The certification examination of the College of Family Physicians of Canada is designed to assess the extent to which the College's educational objectives have been achieved. Since the first examination in 1969, more than 7000 physicians have received their certification. The authors describe the basic elements of this test and the process through which the Committee on Examinations designs and sets the examination. The authors comment on the role of the certification process in the education...

  6. Evaluation of Practical Clinical Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrong, Joseph M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The effectiveness of practical examinations in assessing the clinical competence of dental students is discussed. A grading system that derives a significant portion of the senior student's grade from this type of examination is described. The impact of practical clinical examinations on two consecutive graduating classes was analyzed. (Author/MLW)

  7. Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, S.

    2005-08-01

    With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power, and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

  8. Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, S.

    2006-05-01

    With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

  9. Narrowing the achievement gap on a state-wide scale: Student success in North Carolina early colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaniuka, Theodore S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2002, the first early college high schools opened in North Carolina in an attempt to improve the performance of traditionally underserved students. Students of color, economic disadvantage, or having family histories of little or no post secondary attainment were targeted by this school reform initiative. Students attending these schools are exposed to rigorous high school curricula, experience a small school environment, and have access to post secondary education at the community college or university level. This study examined the academic performance of early college students compared to traditional high school students in North Carolina using non-parametric methods to determine whether the early college students have different passing rates on select North Carolina high school exams. The results indicate that for the selected end-of-course exams, many of the early college students have significantly greater rates of passing and in several instances that the gap between white and traditionally under represented students is narrower than traditional schools. These results suggest the North Carolina early college model may be a viable school reform initiative in assisting students to graduate high school and prepare students for life beyond high school.

  10. Survey-related experiential and attitudinal correlates of future health survey participation: results of a statewide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Timothy J; Jenkins, Sarah M; Anderson, Kari J; Davern, Michael E

    2008-12-01

    To determine the survey-related experiential and attitudinal correlates of future health-related survey participation. From July 21, 2005, through October 25, 2005, we conducted a mixed-mode mail and telephone survey of 1636 noninstitutionalized Minnesota residents aged 18 years or older. The overall response rate was 49%. We examined the unadjusted effect of each independent variable on the likelihood of future participation in health-related surveys using univariate logistic regression and discerned the relative contribution of the different variables with multivariate logistic regression analysis. Respondents were asked to complete an average of 4.5 different surveys in the year before the current survey; approximately a quarter of the respondents perceived these surveys to be burdensome. The likelihood of future participation in health-related surveys was negatively related to good health status, a busy schedule, and perceptions that the surveys were too long. Respondents were more than twice as likely to indicate that they would participate in a future health-related survey if they knew the organization doing the survey. For health-related surveys, investigators should remain mindful of people's busy schedules and keep their surveys as short as possible. Further research is needed to clarify whether the decision to participate in a survey hinges more on knowing the organization paying to have a survey performed (the sponsor) or the survey vendor collecting the data.

  11. Benefits of adding small financial incentives or optional group meetings to a web-based statewide obesity initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahey, Tricia M; Subak, Leslee L; Fava, Joseph; Schembri, Michael; Thomas, Graham; Xu, Xiaomeng; Krupel, Katie; Kent, Kimberly; Boguszewski, Katherine; Kumar, Rajiv; Weinberg, Brad; Wing, Rena

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether adding either small, variable financial incentives or optional group sessions improves weight losses in a community-based, Internet behavioral program. Participants (N = 268) from Shape Up Rhode Island 2012, a 3-month Web-based community wellness initiative, were randomized to: Shape Up+Internet behavioral program (SI), Shape Up+Internet program+incentives (SII), or Shape Up+Internet program+group sessions (SIG). At the end of the 3-month program, SII achieved significantly greater weight losses than SI (SII: 6.4% [5.1-7.7]; SI: 4.2% [3.0-5.6]; P = 0.03); weight losses in SIG were not significantly different from the other two conditions (SIG: 5.8% [4.5-7.1], P's ≥ 0.10). However, at the 12-month no-treatment follow-up visit, both SII and SIG had greater weight losses than SI (SII: 3.1% [1.8-4.4]; SIG: 4.5% [3.2-5.8]; SI: 1.2% [-0.1-2.6]; P's ≤ 0.05). SII was the most cost-effective approach at both 3 (SII: $34/kg; SI: $34/kg; SIG: $87/kg) and 12 months (SII: $64/kg; SI: $140/kg; SIG: $113/kg). Modest financial incentives enhance weight losses during a community campaign, and both incentives and optional group meetings improved overall weight loss outcomes during the follow-up period. However, the use of the financial incentives is the most cost-effective approach. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  12. Differences in mathematics and science performance by economic status, gender, and ethnicity/race: A multiyear Texas statewide study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Pamela Bennett

    Purpose. The purpose of the first study was to ascertain the extent to which differences were present in the STAAR Mathematics and Science test scores by Grade 5 and Grade 8 student economic status. The purpose of the second study was to examine differences in Grade 5 STAAR Mathematics and Science test performance by gender and by ethnicity/race (i.e., Asian, Black, Hispanic, and White). Finally, with respect to the third study in this journal-ready dissertation, the purpose was to investigate the STAAR Mathematics and Science test scores of Grade 8 students by gender and by ethnicity/race (i.e., Asian, Black, Hispanic, and White). Method. For this journal-ready dissertation, a non-experimental, causal-comparative research design (Creswell, 2009) was used in all three studies. Grade 5 and Grade 8 STAAR Mathematics and Science test data were analyzed for the 2011-2012 through the 2014-2015 school years. The dependent variables were the STAAR Mathematics and Science test scores for Grade 5 and Grade 8. The independent variables analyzed in these studies were student economic status, gender, and ethnicity/race. Findings. Regarding the first study, statistically significant differences were present in Grade 5 and Grade 8 STAAR Mathematics and Science test scores by student economic status for each year. Moderate effect sizes (Cohen's d) were present for each year of the study for the Grade 5 STAAR Mathematics and Science exams, Grade 8 Science exams, and the 2014-2015 Grade 8 STAAR Mathematics exam. However, a small effect size was present for the 2011-2012 through 2013-2014 Grade 8 STAAR Mathematics exam. Regarding the second and third study, statistically significant differences were revealed for Grade 5 and Grade 8 STAAR Mathematics and Science test scores based on gender, with trivial effect sizes. Furthermore, statistically significant differences were present in these test scores by ethnicity/race, with moderate effects for each year of the study. With regard to

  13. EXAMINATION OF THE PATELLOFEMORAL JOINT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, Robert C; Davies, George J

    2016-12-01

    Patellofemoral pain is one of the leading causes of knee pain in athletes. The many causes of patellofemoral pain make diagnosis unpredictable and examination and treatment difficult. This clinical commentary discusses a detailed physical examination routine for the patient with patellofemoral pain. Critically listening and obtaining a detailed medical history followed by a clearly structured physical examination will allow the physical therapist to diagnose most forms of patellofemoral pain. This clinical commentary goes one step further by suggesting an examination scheme and order in which it should be performed during the examination process. This step-by-step guide will be helpful for the student or novice therapist and serve as review for those that are already well versed in patellofemoral examination.

  14. Digital Elevation Model (DEM), Countywide DEMs were created from the 2004 Maryland Statewide Lidar data.A map service has been created to host this data but local copies are recommended for complex processing and analysis as this data is very large.Contact the ESRGC to obtain a copy, Published in 2004, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Eastern Shore Regional GIS Cooperative.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Regional | GIS Inventory — Digital Elevation Model (DEM) dataset current as of 2004. Countywide DEMs were created from the 2004 Maryland Statewide Lidar data.A map service has been created to...

  15. Examining the Association Between Temperature and Mental Health in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, R.; Gavin, L.; Pearson, D.; Malig, B. J.; Ebisu, K.

    2016-12-01

    Background: The association between temperature and morbidity from some specific causes has been well established. However, the association between temperature and mental health effects has not been examined closely, although those with mental illnesses may be susceptible to temperature. Methods: We obtained daily counts of emergency room visits and hospitalizations (ICD-9 codes) from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development from 16 California climate zones from 2005 - 2013. Mean apparent temperature was determined by combining monitored temperature and humidity data from the US EPA, California Irrigation Management Information System, and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration and weighting monitor values by distance to zip code tabulation areas (ZCTA) and ZCTA populations in the same climate zone as each monitor. We used a two-stage hierarchical model to analyze this data, adjusted by the following independent variables: mean daily apparent temperature, holiday, day of the week, and a natural spline smoothing function of time. The regression was performed for both warm (5/1 - 10/31) and cold (11/1 - 4/30) seasons. Results were stratified by race/ethnicity and age group. Results: We observed an association between same-day mean apparent temperature and mental health outcomes during the warm and cold seasons. We also observed associations between temperature and suicide/self-injury and homicide/assault injury. A 10°F increase in mean apparent temperature was associated with a 4.98% [95% confidence interval, 3.73-6.23], 5.82% [4.34-7.30], and 7.43% [6.75-8.12], increase in mental health events, suicide, and homicide events during the warm season, respectively. Similar results were observed during the cold season. Effect modification by race/ethnic and age groups was observed for some outcomes for both seasons. Conclusions: Increase in mean apparent temperature was found to have same-day associations with several mental health

  16. Examination Regimes and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino de Cohen, Clemencia

    2010-01-01

    Examination regimes at the end of secondary school vary greatly intra- and cross-nationally, and in recent years have undergone important reforms often geared towards increasing student achievement. This research presents a comparative analysis of the relationship between examination regimes and student achievement in the OECD. Using a micro…

  17. History of neurologic examination books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors).

  18. The neuro-ophthalmological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Janet C; Kennard, Christopher; Leigh, R John

    2011-01-01

    The neuro-ophthalmological examination constitutes one of the most refined and exact components of the clinical examination, often allowing precise diagnosis and formulation of a treatment plan even within the compass of the first visit. This chapter briefly highlights important features in the neuro-ophthalmological history and then presents detailed information on the important components of a comprehensive neuro-ophthalmological examination. Covered examination topics include visual acuity, visual field testing, color vision, external eye exam, pupils, ophthalmoscopy, and eye movements. The final section discusses ancillary tests that supplement the bedside neuro-ophthalmological examination, including formal visual field analysis, electroretinography, fluorescein angiography, ocular coherence tomography, visual-evoked potentials, neuroimaging, and quantitative eye movement recordings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Staffing in postnatal units: is it adequate for the provision of quality care? Staff perspectives from a state-wide review of postnatal care in Victoria, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumley Judith

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background State-wide surveys of recent mothers conducted over the past decade in Victoria, one state of Australia, have identified that women are consistently less satisfied with the care they received in hospital following birth compared with other aspects of maternity care. Little is known of caregivers' perspectives on the provision ofhospital postnatal care: how care is organised and provided in different hospitals; what constrains the provision of postnatal care (apart from funding and what initiatives are being undertaken to improve service delivery. A state-widereview of organisational structures and processes in relation to the provision of hospital postnatal care in Victoria was undertaken. This paper focuses on the impact of staffing issues on the provision of quality postnatal care from the perspective of care providers. Methods A study of care providers from Victorian public hospitals that provide maternity services was undertaken. Datawere collected in two stages. Stage one: a structured questionnaire was sent to all public hospitals in Victoria that provided postnatal care (n = 73, exploring the structure and organisation of care (e.g. staffing, routine observations, policy framework and discharge planning. Stage two: 14 maternity units were selected and invited to participate in a more in-depth exploration of postnatal care. Thirty-eight key informant interviews were undertaken with midwives (including unit managers, associate unit managers and clinical midwives and a medical practitioner from eachselected hospital. Results Staffing was highlighted as a major factor impacting on the provision of quality postnatal care. There were significant issues associated with inadequate staff/patient ratios; staffing mix; patient mix; prioritisation of birth suites over postnatal units; and the use of non-permanent staff. Forty-three percent of hospitals reported having only midwives (i.e. no non-midwives providing postnatal care

  20. [Operational availability of ground-based emergency medical services in Rheinland-Palatinate: state-wide web-based system for collation, display and analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiz, T; van Lengen, R H; Wickenkamp, A; Kranz, T; Madler, C

    2011-05-01

    A growing number of reports have been published in Germany related to problems with the operational readiness of mobile emergency physician services, although no systematic analyses have yet been presented. However, such investigations form the prerequisite for the deployment of countermeasures. Rhineland-Palatinate (4,060,000 inhabitants, 7,753 mi(2)) is a typical territorial state in the southwest of Germany with extensive wooded areas covering 42% of the state and only few metropolitan areas. These basic conditions represent a challenge to the provision of state-wide emergency medical services (EMS). On behalf of the Ministry of the Interior a web-based platform for the collation, display and analysis of the operational readiness of all 68 ground-based physician-staffed emergency units within the state was developed. Of these units 61 are affiliated to hospitals and 7 units to medical practices and 89,000 emergency missions are carried out annually. Within the study period (April 2009-March 2010) 56 of the 68 units (82.4%) reported 1 or more periods of unavailability of operational readiness. In total 2,613 periods of temporary unavailability were documented with a mean duration of 8.9 h. The mean unavailability of operational readiness was 3.9% for the whole state, 6.2% for the northern and 1.6% for the southern EMS districts. In 7 of the units (10.3%) the degree of unavailability exceeded 5% and in 8 units (11.7%) it exceeded 10%. Two thirds of all suspended services were the result of shortages of emergency physicians, with considerably higher deficits at bases affiliated with hospitals of lower levels of care or in rural regions. This tool enables the large-scale collation and analysis of the operational readiness of physician-based ambulance services. Currently the state does not suffer from a general lack of emergency physicians. However, rural areas as well as bases affiliated with small hospitals show a considerable deficit in operational readiness

  1. Strengthening Knowledge Co-Production Capacity: Examining Interest in Community-University Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen P. Bell

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Building successful, enduring research partnerships is essential for improving links between knowledge and action to address sustainability challenges. Communication research can play a critical role in fostering more effective research partnerships, especially those concerned with knowledge co-production processes. This article focuses on community-university research partnerships and factors that influence participation in the co-production process. We identify specific pathways for improving partnership development through a prospective analytical approach that examines community officials’ interest in partnering with university researchers. Using survey responses from a statewide sample of Maine municipal officials, we conduct a statistical analysis of community-university partnership potential to test a conceptual model of partnership interest grounded in natural resource management theory and environmental communication. Our findings both support and advance prior research on collaborations. Results reveal that belief in the helpfulness of the collaborator to solve problems, institutional proximity, familiarity, perceived problem severity and problem type and trust influence interest in developing community-university partnerships. These findings underscore the benefits of proactively assessing partnership potential prior to forming partnerships and the important roles for communication research within sustainability science, especially with regard to strengthening partnership formation and knowledge co-production processes.

  2. Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) is one of the largest hot cells dedicated to radioactive materials research at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The nation's...

  3. MANAGEMENT OF EXAMINATIONS: ETHICAL ISSUES.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elizabeth

    examinations, creating in the students, sense of responsibility and good study habit. ... of a great number of soldiers for the purpose of assigning them to different military tasks. .... Classroom tests are achievement tests prepared by the teacher.

  4. Neurological examination in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Paluš

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This clinical review about the neurological examination in small animals describes the basics about the first steps of investigation when dealing with neurological patients. The knowledge of how to perform the neurological examination is important however more important is how to correctly interpret these performed tests. A step-by-step approach is mandatory and examiners should master the order and the style of performing these tests. Neurological conditions can be sometimes very distressing for owners and for pets that might not be the most cooperating. The role of a veterinary surgeon, as a professional, is therefore to collect the most relevant history, to examine a patient in a professional manner and to give to owners an educated opinion about the further treatment and prognosis. However neurological examinations might look challenging for many. But it is only the clinical application of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to an every-day situation for practicing veterinarians and it does not require any specific in-to-depth knowledge. This clinical review is aimed not only to provide the information on how to perform the neurological examination but it is also aimed to appeal on veterinarians to challenge their daily routine and to start practicing on neurologically normal patients. This is the best and only way to differentiate between the normal and abnormal in a real situation.

  5. Endocrine responses and examination anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, J; Moore, G F; de la Riva, C; Watts, F N

    1986-06-01

    Endocrine and psychological function (measuring both affect and attitudes to study) were studied in 38 male medical students 4 weeks and 1-2 h before a major examination. Anxiety (or tension) and emotionality increased just before the examination, as did the 'denial' subscale of a 'coping' questionnaire. Serum cortisol and prolactin increased; serum testosterone and LH were unchanged. Both urinary noradrenaline and adrenaline were elevated. Increased cortisol correlated with increased prolactin across subjects; so, too, did levels of urinary noradrenaline and adrenaline, but the two sets of endocrine responses were not correlated with each other. Several of the trait scales predicted the endocrine response to the examination. The 'lie' scale of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire correlated negatively with changes in both cortisol and prolactin, as did 'debilitating' anxiety, as defined by the Alpert-Haber scale. However, although there were no significant correlations between changes in hormone levels and those in any of the state scales, there was some relation between absolute hormone levels on the day of the examination. Measures of academic strategies or psychological responses to examinations do not predict the nature of the considerable hormonal response which occurs in this homogeneous set of high-achieving students.

  6. Examining Place Branding with Aarhus

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the phenomenon place branding in relations to a specific case, the Danish city Aarhus, whom recently changed the city brand and image to “Aarhus – Danish for Progress”. The goal of the study is to examine which community of values is present in the branding of Aarhus, and what implications this type of branding has in a democratic society. The study includes a functional-pragmatic discourse analysis of the publications “Positioning Aarhus for the Future” and “Do Busines...

  7. Open Book Professional Accountancy Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, J. E.; Forsyth, D.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the structure and rationale for an open-book approach in professional accountancy examinations. The concept of knowledge management and the recognition that some knowledge ought to be embedded in the minds of professional accountants while other knowledge ought to be readily accessible and capable of application forms the…

  8. Ballistics examination of air rifle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiel, G

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the velocity, energy, maximum range and distance at which pellets fired from an air rifle of kinetic energy below 17 J can pose a threat to unprotected human skin. Doppler radar equipment and exterior ballistics software were used in this examination.

  9. Ballistics examination of air rifle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Bogiel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to determine the velocity, energy, maximum range and distance at which pellets fired from an air rifle of kinetic energy below 17 J can pose a threat to unprotected human skin. Doppler radar equipment and exterior ballistics software were used in this examination.

  10. Ballistics examination of air rifle

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the velocity, energy, maximum range and distance at which pellets fired from an air rifle of kinetic energy below 17 J can pose a threat to unprotected human skin. Doppler radar equipment and exterior ballistics software were used in this examination.

  11. Understanding Comparability of Examination Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Much of the argument about comparability of examination standards is at cross-purposes; contradictory positions are in fact often both defensible, but they are using the same words to mean different things. To clarify this, two broad conceptualisations of standards can be identified. One sees the standard in the observed phenomena of performance…

  12. Open Book Professional Accountancy Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, J. E.; Forsyth, D.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the structure and rationale for an open-book approach in professional accountancy examinations. The concept of knowledge management and the recognition that some knowledge ought to be embedded in the minds of professional accountants while other knowledge ought to be readily accessible and capable of application forms the…

  13. Examination of the rape victim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheimer, A J

    1982-03-01

    Knowledge of the procedure of rape examination can benefit not only obstetrician-gynecologists but also family practitioners, emergency department physicians, and surgeons who may find themselves called upon to examine a victim of sexual assault. In this situation, the physician has a responsibility to the judicial system as well as to the patient. He or she must deliver the best medical and psychologic support possible and collect the appropriate evidence in such a fashion as to give the victim the greatest chance of success if she decides to prosecute. Alternatively, information may be obtained which may help release the accused from suspicion. Having gained an understanding of these steps, the physician can discharge his or her responsibility with confidence and precision.

  14. [Diagnosis. History and physical examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Martín, Álvaro

    2014-01-01

    Family physicians play a key role in the diagnosis and management of patients with osteoarthritis. Diagnosis is mainly clinical and radiological. A complete history should be taken with meticulous physical examination of the joints. The history-taking should aim to detect risk factors and compatible clinical symptoms. Pain characteristics should be identified, distinguishing between mechanical and inflammatory pain, and an exhaustive examination of the joints should be performed, with evaluation of the presence of pain, deformity, mobility restrictions (both active and passive), crepitus, joint effusion, and inflammation. A differential diagnosis should be made with all diseases that affect the joints and/or produce joint stiffness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Scintigraphic examinations in skeletal diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noeh, E.; Akalin, M.

    1981-06-01

    Scintigraphy has been carried out for many years in adequate hospitals with special equipments. Isotopic examinations have been considered to be more and more important; they are applied in cases of pathologic changes of bones and joints or in cases of changes in the surrounding areas. Besides all medical findings, for instance X-ray, laboratory and histological ones, scintigraphic examinations have been applied as a supporting method especially in cases of loosened endoprosthesis or a suspected loosening of the endoprosthesis, para- and periarticular calcifications, rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatoid diseases of the joints, inflammatory processes, tumourous processes, delayed healing of the bones, pseudoarthrosis and osteoporosis. Of course the scintigraphy is a not specific method but it is extremely important for a complete diagnosis.

  16. Histopathological examination of Acanthamoeba sclerokeratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kato K

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kumiko Kato,1 Koji Hirano,2 Tetsuro Nagasaka,3 Koichi Matsunaga,1 Yuko Takashima,1 Mineo Kondo1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Mie University School of Medicine, Tsu, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Fujita Health University, Nagoya, Japan; 3Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan Purpose: To report the histopathological findings in a case of severe Acanthamoeba sclerokeratitis (ASK. Patient and methods: A 46-year-old patient was referred to the Department of Ophthalmology of Mie University Hospital because of a severe corneal ulcer of the right eye of 6 months' duration. Our initial examination showed a ring-shaped corneal opacity with extensive epithelial defects and nodular scleritis. Cysts of Acanthamoeba were identified in cultures from corneal scrapings, and he was diagnosed with ASK. He was started on antiamoebic treatment, including topical micafungin and chlorhexidine. The corneal ulcer was debrided several times. One month later, he developed necrotizing scleritis, and the cornea suddenly perforated. The eye was enucleated because of severe pain and prepared for histopathological examination. Results: The histopathological examination showed an infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes throughout the corneal stroma and also in the limbal area of the sclera, forming an abscess. Granulation tissue was observed in the anterior sclera close to the ciliary body, but the posterior regions of the eye were not affected by inflammation or tissue destruction. The cysts of Acanthamoeba were observed only in the cornea. Conclusion: Histopathological examination of an eye with severe ASK showed that the inflammation and tissue granulation were present only in the anterior part of eye, and the posterior segment was not affected. Because the inflammation and tissue destruction were confined to the anterior segment, enucleation might not have been necessary if the severe pain was

  17. Ultrasound examination of the thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaenepoel, L.; Demeester-Mirkine, N.; Sacre, R.; Jockheer, M.H.; van Geertruyden, J.

    1982-07-01

    Ultrasound examination of the thyroid offers an accurate morphological picture and the possibility of comparing objectively the size of lobes and lesions over long periods. Cysts and calcifications, mostly benign, are readily recognized. Neoplastic lesions in our series were all less reflective than normal thyroid tissue. But so were the majority of benign nodules. In hyperthyroidism, subacute thyroiditis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, the thyroid tissue is much less echogenic than in the normal gland.

  18. Warrant Officer Examinations. PR-4018

    Science.gov (United States)

    1944-10-10

    ccouunting, Administrative - Clcorica1, Judge, Advo Ge~nc. De~ptsAdxiiniistrati~ve 1 icl Adi isrtv - Supp:ly, generaile8 ~ Administrativo ’ - Supply, Air...in Manual for Ciurts-LMartial. Examines w-okly roports of Trail Judge Advucatb and informs Staff Judge Advccate of the status of pnding cases... manuals , field manuals , and other publications pertinent to motor transport. F’i~e he may be called upon to parry out any one’phase of motor transport

  19. [DNA examination for criminal investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masanori

    2008-11-30

    The main purpose of DNA examination in a criminal investigation is identification from biological specimen material (sample). Occasionally, DNA genotyping of the sample in which decomposition, pollution, mixture, degeneration, etc., have progressed is requested for identification. In addition, in cases of a small amount of sample, it is not possible to conduct checks many times. The Police Agency in Japan introduced the multiplex PCR system that can detect 15 kinds of STR genotyping and perform sex determination simultaneously using only a small amount of DNA.

  20. Nursing ultrasound examination in catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Romei

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US examination of the bladder can precisely determine the bladder volume and is a useful tool in estimating the residual urine volume. Its application is consequently recommended as an alternative to catheterization for the determination of residual urine. Moreover it represents a simple, noninvasive method to predict the outcome of a voiding trial following acute urine retention based on intravesical prostatic protrusion and on the US pattern of the bladder content. In this article, the Authors review the implementation and results of a bladder US program developed for non-medical caregivers at one Emergency Department.

  1. Postirradiation examination of beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Postirradiation examinations of COBRA-1A beryllium pebbles irradiated in the EBR-II fast reactor at neutron fluences which generated 2700--3700 appm helium have been performed. Measurements included density change, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The major change in microstructure is development of unusually shaped helium bubbles forming as highly non-equiaxed thin platelet-like cavities on the basal plane. Measurement of the swelling due to cavity formation was in good agreement with density change measurements.

  2. OCT for Examination of Artwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targowski, Piotr; Iwanicka, Magdalena; Rouba, Bogumiła J.; Frosinini, Cecilia

    In this chapter the application of OCT to examination of objects of cultural heritage is given. The knowledge about the structure of the object of art is necessary both for inventory purposes and planning/monitoring of conservation-restoration treatments. Due to its noninvasiveness OCT is well suited for such applications. The major limitation is in the lack of transparency of certain structures. Specific requirements, advantages and limitations of use of the OCT technique in this area are discussed first. Then the overview of applications to easel paintings, historic glass, and craftsmanship is given, followed by two examples of monitoring the laser ablation with OCT: very local in case of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), and more general in case of laser ablation of the varnish layer. Then the examples of application of OCT to examination of paintings are given: investigation of deterioration of the varnish layer in the "Adoration of the Magi" by Leonardo da Vinci (Uffizi, Italy), imaging of overpaintings on two 17th and 18th c. oil paintings on canvas, and visualization of specific case of retouching located between two layers of varnish in the "Madonna with Yarnwinder" (attributed to L. da Vinci, private property).

  3. Stokes examines NASA program management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leath, Audrey T.

    As NASA gears up for another attempt at redesigning Space Station Freedom, some in Congress are wondering whether the space agency has learned any lessons from a number of costly past mistakes. Louis Stokes (D-Ohio), the new chairman of the House Appropriations Veterans Affairs, Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Subcommittee, held a hearing on March 17 to examine unanticipated cost growth in a variety of projects, including the space toilet, the advanced turbo pump for the shuttle, and the Mars Observer, as well as the space station. Stokes seemed well-suited to this oversight role, asking well-informed and probing questions rather than accusatory ones. The witnesses, NASA head Daniel Goldin and many of his top managers (most of whom were not in their present positions when the projects were initiated), analyzed past errors and offered useful measures for avoiding similar problems in the future.

  4. [Ultrasound examination of hidradenitis suppurativa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorell, A; Segura Palacios, J M

    2015-11-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa is a debilitating chronic, recurrent, inflammatory cutaneous disease of the hair follicle that usually presents with painful, deep and inflamed lesions in the areas of the body with apocrine glands, most frequently the axillary, groin and anogenital regions. This entity is difficult to manage since it can be difficult to determine the true nature and extension of the lesions. Cutaneous ultrasound allows real-time visualization of the cutaneous structures under examination, defining the type of lesion, its anatomical extension, and the degree of inflammatory activity, which affects adequate patient management. The present review analyses the importance of ultrasound in the assessment of patients with hidradenitis suppurativa. Copyright © 2015 Academia Española de Dermatología y Venereología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. CUDA Enabled Graph Subset Examiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-12-22

    Finding Godsil-McKay switching sets in graphs is one way to demonstrate that a specific graph is not determined by its spectrum--the eigenvalues of its adjacency matrix. An important area of active research in pure mathematics is determining which graphs are determined by their spectra, i.e. when the spectrum of the adjacency matrix uniquely determines the underlying graph. We are interested in exploring the spectra of graphs in the Johnson scheme and specifically seek to determine which of these graphs are determined by their spectra. Given a graph G, a Godsil-McKay switching set is an induced subgraph H on 2k vertices with the following properties: I) H is regular, ii) every vertex in G/H is adjacent to either 0, k, or 2k vertices of H, and iii) at least one vertex in G/H is adjacent to k vertices in H. The software package examines each subset of a user specified size to determine whether or not it satisfies those 3 conditions. The software makes use of the massive parallel processing power of CUDA enabled GPUs. It also exploits the vertex transitivity of graphs in the Johnson scheme by reasoning that if G has a Godsil-McKay switching set, then it has a switching set which includes vertex 1. While the code (in its current state) is tuned to this specific problem, the method of examining each induced subgraph of G can be easily re-written to check for any user specified conditions on the subgraphs and can therefore be used much more broadly.

  6. National Postirradiation Examination Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulthess, Jason L

    2011-06-01

    A National Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) Workshop was held March 29-30, 2011, in Washington D.C., stimulated by the DOE Acting Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy approval on January 31, 2011 of the “Mission Need Statement for Advanced Post-Irradiation Examination Capability”. As stated in the Mission Need, “A better understanding of nuclear fuels and material performance in the nuclear environment, at the nanoscale and lower, is critical to the development of innovative fuels and materials required for tomorrow’s nuclear energy systems.” (2011) Developing an advanced post-irradiation capability is the most important thing we can do to advance nuclear energy as an option to meeting national energy goals. Understanding the behavior of fuels and materials in a nuclear reactor irradiation environment is the limiting factor in nuclear plant safety, longevity, efficiency, and economics. The National PIE Workshop is part of fulfilling or addressing Department of Energy (DOE) missions in safe and publically acceptable nuclear energy. Several presentations were given during the opening of the workshop. Generally speaking, these presentations established that we cannot continue to rely on others in the world to provide the capabilities we need to move forward with nuclear energy technology. These presentations also generally identified the need for increased microstructural understanding of fuels and materials to be coupled with modeling and simulation, and increased accessibility and infrastructure to facilitate the interaction between national laboratories and participating organizations. The overall results of the work of the presenters and panels was distilled into four primary needs 1. Understanding material changes in the extreme nuclear environment at the nanoscale. Nanoscale studies have significant importance due to the mechanisms that cause materials to degrade, which actually occur on the nanoscale. 2. Enabling additional proficiency in

  7. Examining the tsetse teneral phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L R eHaines

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies are the most important vectors of African trypanosomiasis but, surprisingly, are highly refractory to trypanosome parasite infection. In populations of wild caught flies, it is rare to find mature salivarian and mouthpart parasite infection rates exceeding 1% and 15%, respectively. This inherent refractoriness persists throughout the lifespan of the fly, although extreme starvation and suboptimal environmental conditions can cause a reversion to the susceptible phenotype. The teneral phenomenon is a phenotype unique to newly emerged, previously unfed tsetse, and is evidenced by a profound susceptibility to trypanosome infection. This susceptibility persists for only a few days post emergence and decreases with fly age and bloodmeal acquisition. Researchers investigating trypanosome-tsetse interactions routinely exploit this phenomenon by using young, unfed (teneral flies to naturally boost trypanosome establishment and maturation rates. A suite of factors may contribute, at least in part, to this unusual parasite permissive phenotype. These include the physical maturity of midgut barriers, the activation of immunoresponsive tissues and their effector molecules, and the role of the microflora within the midgut of the newly emerged fly. However, at present, the molecular mechanisms that underpin the teneral phenomenon still remain unknown. This review will provide a historical overview of the teneral phenomenon and will examine immune-related factors that influence, and may help us better understand, this unusual phenotype.

  8. An examination of ambiguity aversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Robin Keller

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Ambiguity aversion has been widely observed in individuals' judgments. Using scenarios that are typical in decision analysis, we investigate ambiguity aversion for pairs of individuals. We examine risky and cautious shifts from individuals' original judgments to their judgments when they are paired up in dyads. In our experiment the participants were first asked to specify individually their willingness-to-pay for six monetary gambles. They were then paired at random into dyads, and were asked to specify their willingness-to-pay amount for the same gambles. The dyad's willingness-to-pay amount was to be shared equally by the two individuals. Of the six gambles in our experiment, one involved no ambiguity and the remaining five involved different degrees of ambiguity. We found that dyads exhibited risk aversion as well as ambiguity aversion. The majority of the dyads exhibited a cautious shift in the face of ambiguity, stating a smaller willingness-to-pay than the two individuals' average. Our study thus confirms the persistence of ambiguity aversion in a group setting and demonstrates the predominance of cautious shifts for dyads.

  9. Examining the Synergy of Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Phelan BNS, MSc, PhD

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Public health nurses in Ireland are charged with conducting a home visit to every postnatal mother within 48 hours of hospital discharge. This represents the beginning of a long-term relationship, not only with the mother and newborn child but also with the family. This article fundamentally demonstrates the essential work of the public health nurse in promoting the health of the baby within a family. In this article, the expertise the public health nurse uses in the first visit is examined in the context of 3 competencies: communication, partnerships with the family, and partnerships with individual family members. This expertise provides the foundation for a long-term therapeutic relationship with the family to the essential benefit of the baby’s early childhood growth and developmental milestones. Consequently, the first postnatal visit by public health nursing in Ireland represents a synergy of practice, which provides the foundation for enduring family relationships focused on potentializing both individual family members’ health and the family as a dynamic unit.

  10. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Basset, R.; Bastien, R.; Bechtel, H.; Bleuet, P.; Borg, J.; Brenker F.; Bridges, J.

    2009-01-01

    In January 2006 the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, C omet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return o f contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approximately 0.1m(exp 2) in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the co llecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Col lector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 m(exp 2-) day during two periods before the co metary encounter. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination ( ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the collection using no ndestructive techniques. The ISPE consists of six interdependent proj ects: (1) Candidate identification through automated digital microsco py and a massively distributed, calibrated search (2) Candidate extr action and photodocumentation (3) Characterization of candidates thro ugh synchrotronbased FourierTranform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), S canning XRay Fluoresence Microscopy (SXRF), and Scanning Transmission Xray Microscopy (STXM) (4) Search for and analysis of craters in f oils through FESEM scanning, Auger Spectroscopy and synchrotronbased Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) (5) Modeling of interstell ar dust transport in the solar system (6) Laboratory simulations of h ypervelocity dust impacts into the collecting media

  11. Anterior chest wall examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chest wall involvement is not infrequently observed within inflammatory arthropaties, particularly if one considers seronegative spondiloarthritides and SAPHO syndrome. Physical examination is unreliable and conventional X-rays analysis is an unsatisfactory tool during diagnostic work-up of this region. Scintigraphic techniques yield informations both on the activity and on the anatomical extent of the disease while computerized tomography visualize the elementary lesions, such as erosions, which characterize the process. Moreover, when available, magnetic resonance imaging couple the ability to finely visualize such lesions with the possibility to show early alterations and to characterize the “activity” of the disease, presenting itself as a powerful tool both for diagnosis and follow-up. This review briefly shows the applications of imaging techniques for the evaluation of the anterior chest wall focusing on what has been done in the SAPHO syndrome which can be considered prototypical for this regional involvement since it is the osteo-articular target mainly affected by the disease.

  12. STEM Pathways: Examining Persistence in Rigorous Math and Science Course Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashford, Shetay N.; Lanehart, Rheta E.; Kersaint, Gladis K.; Lee, Reginald S.; Kromrey, Jeffrey D.

    2016-12-01

    From 2006 to 2012, Florida Statute §1003.4156 required middle school students to complete electronic personal education planners (ePEPs) before promotion to ninth grade. The ePEP helped them identify programs of study and required high school coursework to accomplish their postsecondary education and career goals. During the same period Florida required completion of the ePEP, Florida's Career and Professional Education Act stimulated a rapid increase in the number of statewide high school career academies. Students with interests in STEM careers created STEM-focused ePEPs and may have enrolled in STEM career academies, which offered a unique opportunity to improve their preparedness for the STEM workforce through the integration of rigorous academic and career and technical education courses. This study examined persistence of STEM-interested (i.e., those with expressed interest in STEM careers) and STEM-capable (i.e., those who completed at least Algebra 1 in eighth grade) students ( n = 11,248), including those enrolled in STEM career academies, in rigorous mathematics and science course taking in Florida public high schools in comparison with the national cohort of STEM-interested students to measure the influence of K-12 STEM education efforts in Florida. With the exception of multi-race students, we found that Florida's STEM-capable students had lower persistence in rigorous mathematics and science course taking than students in the national cohort from ninth to eleventh grade. We also found that participation in STEM career academies did not support persistence in rigorous mathematics and science courses, a prerequisite for success in postsecondary STEM education and careers.

  13. [Postural examination in daily occlusodontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serviere, F

    1989-03-01

    According to the osteopathic and chiropractic concepts, facing a TMJ problem, the practitioner has to determine if the trouble observed in the stomatognatic apparatus is the cause or the effect of the structural problems present anywhere else in the body. The postural examination allows to answer this question. Tow techniques can be used. First a static and dynamic posture test proposed by Bricot. The level of the cranium, the eyes, the shoulders, the wrists, the pelvis and the ankles is analysed, from a front view; from the side, the gravity line is inspected: vertex, auditory meatus, shoulder, hip joint, anterior side of the tibia, ankle joint. The vertical posture can be studied from the front: the arms are held straight and the antero-posterior length between the fingers is measured. From the back, one notes the recoil of the buttocks on one side. An ocular convergence test is performed. Then one uses a Romberg test (oscillation of the body when the eyes are closed), and a Fukuda stepping test. The patient is then asked to bite on a compress, and the same exams are redone. If no change occurs, we are dealing with an ascending problem: the origin of the problem is not the stomatognathic system. The second technique is the Meerssemann test that needs the practice of Applied Kinesiology muscle testing. The patient is lying supine and one tests: the dental occlusion, the two TMJs, the temporal muscles, masseters, pterygoids, sterno-cleido-mastoids, upper tapezius, left and right sacro-iliac joints, psoas muscles bilaterally.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Bacteriological examination of gallbladder contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petaković Goran

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Acute calculous (obstructive cholecystitis develops as a consequence of cystic obstruction and obstruction of bile flow into choledochus. Most often it is a result of impacted gallstones in Hartman's pouch or the cystic duct. Their direct pressure on gallbladder mucosa causes ischemia, necrosis and ulceration with consequential wall edema and obstructed venous flow. This mechanism is further increasing and spreading the inflammatory process. Ulcerations may be that extensive, that mucosa is highly recognizable on the microscopic preparation. Leukocyte infiltration of all segments occurs. Results of necrosis are as follows: perforation with pericholecystic abscess formation, fistulization or biliary peritonitis. Aim The aim of this investigation was to use microbial sensitivity tests in order to establish possibilities of antibiotic therapy in patients with acute cholecystitis. Material and methods Using random sampling a total of 240 patients with acute cholecystitis were included in the investigation. They were all treated at the Clinic of Abdominal and Endocrine Surgery of the Clinical Center Novi Sad in the period 1997-1999. All patients underwent bacteriological examination and were coherent in regard to sex and age. Microbial sensitivity tests analyzed two groups of bacteria: Group I Escherichia coli, Klebsiella and Staphylococcus and Group II: other isolated bacteria (Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Proteus, Pseudomonas Serratia and Streptococcus. Results In our material Escherichia coli was isolated in most patients - 32 (55.17%, Klebsiella and Staphylococcus in 6 (10.34% patients and Streptococcus in 4 (6.90%, whereas other bacteria were infrequent (Citrobacter and Serratia in 3.45%, Enterobacter, Proteus and Pseudomonas in 1.75%. Thus, E. coli, Klebsiella and Staphylococcus were established in 75.85% of bacteriologic findings, and all the rest in 24.15%. Assessment regarding premedication with antibiotics started

  15. Health reform: examining the alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, W

    1994-03-01

    This Issue Brief examines the major issues of the health reform debate. The issues that must be resolved before reform can be enacted include: allocation of health care resources, universal coverage versus universal access, composition of risk pools, employer and individual mandates, and distribution of health care services' costs. This report also contains short descriptions and analyses of the following proposals: McDermott-Wellstone, Clinton administration, Cooper-Breaux, Chafee-Thomas, Michel-Lott, Nickles-Stearns, and Gramm. Proposals without an individual mandate will not achieve universal coverage. An individual mandate raises significant enforcement issues. An employer mandate will not achieve universal coverage by itself. Depending on the number of hours an employee must work to be included in a mandate, an employer mandate could potentially extend health insurance coverage to as many as 85 percent of the currently uninsured. Each individual has a risk of needing health care services. Restructuring the health insurance market is accomplished by changing the way individuals and their risks are pooled. The composition of these risk pools will determine the costs of health insurance and the distribution of these costs. The theory behind medical saving accounts is that the market for health insurance currently leads to health care cost inflation because many events covered under most health insurance plans are not truly insurable. There are two issues involved in medical savings accounts--the impact on low-income individuals and individuals' ability to evaluate the quality of care they receive. The present market does not provide individuals with adequate information for assessing the quality or effectiveness of medical care. Among the critical issues in health reform is how to reduce the rate of health care cost inflation. The effect of proposals that impose explicit budget caps or price controls on health care cost inflation can be more easily estimated than

  16. Different perspectives: a comparison of newspaper articles to medical examiner data in the reporting of violent deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovesi, Andrea L; Donaldson, Amy E; Morrison, Brynna L; Olson, Lenora M

    2010-03-01

    This study compared violent death information reported in state-wide newspaper articles to the medical examiner reports collected for a state public health surveillance system-the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS). While suicides accounted for 83% of deaths in the NVDRS database, more than three-quarters (79%) of violent deaths reported in newspaper articles were homicides. The majority of the suicide incidents were reported in 1-2 newspaper articles whereas the majority of homicide incidents were reported in 11-34 articles. For suicide incidents, the NVDRS reported more circumstances related to mental health problems while newspaper articles reported recent crisis more often. Results show that there is a mismatch in both frequency and type of information reported between a public health surveillance system (NVDRS) and newspaper reporting of violent deaths. As a result of these findings, scientists and other public health professionals may want to engage in media advocacy to provide newspaper reporters with timely and important health information related to the prevention and intervention of violent deaths in their community. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Religiosity, Homogamy, and Marital Adjustment: An Examination of Newlyweds in First Marriages and Remarriages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, David G.; Marshall, James P.; Harris, Victor W.; Lee, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between religiosity, denominational homogamy, religiosity homogamy, and marital adjustment. Using a statewide sample of spouses in first marriages (N = 1,394) and remarriages (N = 601), the authors find that within-group differences in religiosity, denominational homogamy, and religiosity homogamy are not as…

  18. Teachers' Perceptions on the Changes in the Curriculum and Exit Examinations for Biology and Human Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Mirko; Won, Mihye; Treagust, David F.

    2013-01-01

    In the age of educational accountability, national and statewide measures are assumed to secure and improve the educational quality. However, educators often wonder how much a new accountability measure may improve the actual teaching and learning practices when the agents of change (teachers) are not active participants of such educational…

  19. The implementation and evaluation of an evidence-based statewide prehospital pain management protocol developed using the national prehospital evidence-based guideline model process for emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathleen M; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Alcorta, Richard; Weik, Tasmeen S; Lawner, Ben; Ho, Shiu; Wright, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration funded the development of a model process for the development and implementation of evidence-based guidelines (EBGs) for emergency medical services (EMS). We report on the implementation and evaluation of an evidence-based prehospital pain management protocol developed using this model process. An evidence-based protocol for prehospital management of pain resulting from injuries and burns was reviewed by the Protocol Review Committee (PRC) of the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS). The PRC recommended revisions to the Maryland protocol that reflected recommendations in the EBG: weight-based dosing and repeat dosing of morphine. A training curriculum was developed and implemented using Maryland's online Learning Management System and successfully accessed by 3,941 paramedics and 15,969 BLS providers. Field providers submitted electronic patient care reports to the MIEMSS statewide prehospital database. Inclusion criteria were injured or burned patients transported by Maryland ambulances to Maryland hospitals whose electronic patient care records included data for level of EMS provider training during a 12-month preimplementation period and a 12-month postimplementation period from September 2010 through March 2012. We compared the percentage of patients receiving pain scale assessments and morphine, as well as the dose of morphine administered and the use of naloxone as a rescue medication for opiate use, before and after the protocol change. No differences were seen in the percentage of patients who had a pain score documented or the percent of patients receiving morphine before and after the protocol change, but there was a significant increase in the total dose and dose in mg/kg administered per patient. During the postintervention phase, patients received an 18% higher total morphine dose and a 14.9% greater mg/kg dose. We demonstrated that the implementation of a revised

  20. Costs and effects of a state-wide health promotion program in primary schools in Germany – the Baden-Württemberg Study: A cluster-randomized, controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesztyüs, Tibor; Kilian, Reinhold; Steinacker, Jürgen M

    2017-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the state-wide implementation of the health promotion program “Join the Healthy Boat” in primary schools in Germany. Methods Cluster-randomized intervention trial with wait-list control group. Anthropometric data of 1733 participating children (7.1 ± 0.6 years) were taken by trained staff before and after a one year intervention period in the academic year 2010/11. Parents provided information about the health status, and the health behaviour of their children and themselves, parental anthropometrics, and socio-economic background variables. Incidence of abdominal obesity, defined as waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) ≥ 0.5, was determined. Generalized linear models were applied to account for the clustering of data within schools, and to adjust for baseline-values. Losses to follow-up and missing data were analysed. From a societal perspective, the overall costs, costs per pupil, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) to identify the costs per case of averted abdominal obesity were calculated. Results The final regression model for the incidence of abdominal obesity shows lower odds for the intervention group after an adjustment for grade, gender, baseline WHtR, and breakfast habits (odds ratio = 0.48, 95% CI [0.25; 0.94]). The intervention costs per child/year were €25.04. The costs per incidental case of averted abdominal obesity varied between €1515 and €1993, depending on the different dimensions of the target group. Conclusion This study demonstrates the positive effects of state-wide, school-based health promotion on incidental abdominal obesity, at affordable costs and with proven cost-effectiveness. These results should support allocative decisions of policymakers. An early start to the prevention of abdominal obesity is of particular importance because of its close relationship to non-communicable diseases. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS), Freiburg University, Germany

  1. Model of International Student Persistence: Factors Influencing Retention of International Undergraduate Students at Two Public Statewide Four-Year University Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwai, Chee Khei

    2010-01-01

    The current global economy has created a new middle class around the world, making higher education more accessible to a wider population. The increasing diversity in U.S. higher education is not only the result of minority American students, but also due to the increasing enrollment of international students. This study examined the factors…

  2. A Study to Determine the Academic Progression between Economically Disadvantaged Students and Their Economically Advantaged Peers on Georgia's Statewide Criteria Referenced Competency Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Tonya

    2009-01-01

    This quantitative study implemented a non-experimental design that was descriptive, ex-post facto, and longitudinal. This study is examining economically disadvantaged students (EDS) with comparison to non-economically disadvantaged students (non-EDS) and their academic performance on Georgia's Criterion-Referenced Competency Tests (CRCT).…

  3. predisposing factors towards examination malpractice among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emeka Egbochuku

    Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences, ... One research ... examination malpractice; also, gender and age are no indices for examination ... schools and it is expected that they instil a positive approach to .... interaction in.

  4. The Israeli bagrut examination in biology revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Pinchas

    The Israeli paper-and-pencil matriculation examination in biology has been one of the most powerful means for implementing an inquiry oriented high school biology program based on the U.S. BSCS. The first version of this examination was described and analyzed in JRST in 1972. This article describes the changes and effects of this examination during the years and compares the examination of the year 1982 with that of 1969. Implications for upgrading science education are discussed.

  5. Perceptions of Trust in Public Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lucy; Baird, Jo-Anne

    2013-01-01

    Over recent years, the credibility of public examinations in England has increasingly come to the fore. Government agencies have invested time and money into researching public perceptions of the reliability and validity of examinations. Whilst such research overlaps into the conceptual domain of trust, trust in examinations remains an elusive…

  6. 47 CFR 13.209 - Examination procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL RADIO OPERATORS Examination System § 13.209 Examination procedures. (a) Each examination for a commercial radio operator license must be administered at a... eligible to apply for any commercial radio operator license shall, by reason of any physical handicap,...

  7. 13 CFR 108.690 - Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....690 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Recordkeeping, Reporting, and Examination Requirements for NMVC Companies Examinations of Nmvc Companies by Sba for Regulatory Compliance § 108.690 Examinations. All NMVC companies must submit to...

  8. Assessing the process of designing and implementing electronic health records in a statewide public health system: the case of Colima, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ávila, Juan Eugenio; Palacio-Mejía, Lina Sofia; Lara-Esqueda, Agustín; Silvestre, Eva; Agudelo-Botero, Marcela; Diana, Mark L; Hotchkiss, David R; Plaza, Beatriz; Sanchez Parbul, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The findings of a case study assessing the design and implementation of an electronic health record (EHR) in the public health system of Colima, Mexico, its perceived benefits and limitations, and recommendations for improving the implementation process are presented. In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were used to examine the experience of the actors and stakeholders participating in the design and implementation of EHRs. Results indicate that the main driving force behind the use of EHRs was to improve reporting to the two of the main government health and social development programs. Significant challenges to the success of the EHR include resistance by physicians to use the ICD-10 to code diagnoses, insufficient attention to recurrent resources needed to maintain the system, and pressure from federal programs to establish parallel information systems. Operating funds and more importantly political commitment are required to ensure sustainability of the EHRs in Colimaima.

  9. Demographic, clinical and pathological features of sudden deaths due to myocarditis: Results from a state-wide population-based autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liliang; Zhang, Yang; Burke, Allen; Xue, Aimin; Zhao, Ziqin; Fowler, David; Shen, Yiwen; Li, Ling

    2017-03-01

    Causes of sudden cardiac deaths have been widely reported with limited data focused specifically on myocarditis. A retrospective review of cases from the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (OCME), State of Maryland yielded a total of 103 sudden unexpected deaths (SUDs) due to myocarditis (0.17% of all SUDs and 0.70% of autopsied SUDs) from 2005 through 2014. Most deaths occurred in patients <30 years of age with a male:female ratio 1.3:1. Of the 103 cases, 45 (43.7%) patients were witnessed collapsed. Four deaths occurred during exertion, such as exercising at the gym or performing heavy physical work, and 2 deaths were associated with emotional stress. The common cardiac macroscopic findings included ventricular dilatation (39.8%), mild coronary stenosis (17.5%), mottled myocardial appearance (15.5%), and myocardial fibrosis (10.7%). The histological classification of myocarditis was based on the predominant type of inflammatory cell infiltration. In our study group, lymphocytic myocarditis was most common, accounting for 56 cases (54.4%), followed by neutrophilic (32 cases, 31.7%), eosinophilic (13 cases, 12.6%) and giant cell type (2 cases, 1.9%). Microscopic examination revealed myocyte necrosis in 69 cases (67.0%) and interstitial or perivascular fibrosis in 48 cases (46.6%). The percentage of myocyte necrosis was 75.0% (42/58 cases) in lymphocytic, 65.6% (21/31 cases) in neutrophilic, 30.8% (4/13 cases) in eosinophilic, and 100% (2/2 cases) in giant cell myocarditis. Determination of myocarditis as cause of death continues to present a major challenge to forensic pathologists, because histopathologic findings can be subtle and the diagnosis of myocarditis remains difficult.

  10. 10 CFR 709.31 - DOE standards for polygraph examiners and polygraph examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Polygraph Examination and Examiner Standards § 709.31 DOE standards for polygraph examiners and polygraph examinations. (a) DOE adheres to the procedures and standards established by the Department of Defense... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false DOE standards for polygraph examiners and...

  11. Hypothesis-driven physical examination curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Sharon; Olson, Andrew; Menk, Jeremiah; Nixon, James

    2016-12-09

    Medical students traditionally learn physical examination skills as a rote list of manoeuvres. Alternatives like hypothesis-driven physical examination (HDPE) may promote students' understanding of the contribution of physical examination to diagnostic reasoning. We sought to determine whether first-year medical students can effectively learn to perform a physical examination using an HDPE approach, and then tailor the examination to specific clinical scenarios. Medical students traditionally learn physical examination skills as a rote list of manoeuvres CONTEXT: First-year medical students at the University of Minnesota were taught both traditional and HDPE approaches during a required 17-week clinical skills course in their first semester. The end-of-course evaluation assessed HDPE skills: students were assigned one of two cardiopulmonary cases. Each case included two diagnostic hypotheses. During an interaction with a standardised patient, students were asked to select physical examination manoeuvres in order to make a final diagnosis. Items were weighted and selection order was recorded. First-year students with minimal pathophysiology performed well. All students selected the correct diagnosis. Importantly, students varied the order when selecting examination manoeuvres depending on the diagnoses under consideration, demonstrating early clinical decision-making skills. An early introduction to HDPE may reinforce physical examination skills for hypothesis generation and testing, and can foster early clinical decision-making skills. This has important implications for further research in physical examination instruction. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  12. Associations between statewide prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) requirement and physician patterns of prescribing opioid analgesics for patients with non-cancer chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsien-Chang; Wang, Zhi; Boyd, Carol; Simoni-Wastila, Linda; Buu, Anne

    2018-01-01

    State-level prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) have been implemented in most states. PDMPs enable registered prescribers to obtain real-time information on patients' prescription history to reduce non-medical use of controlled drugs. This study examined whether PDMP implementation and different levels of PDMP requirements were associated with physicians' patterns of prescribing opioid analgesics for patients with non-cancer chronic pain. This is a secondary analysis study using cross-sectional national data. Patients with non-cancer chronic pain from the 2012 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were included (weighted N=81,018,131; unweighted N=3295). Heckman two-step selection procedure employing two logistic regressions was used to explore the associations between PDMP requirements and physicians' prescribing behaviors, controlling for physician characteristics, patient characteristics, physician-healthcare system interaction, and physician-patient relationship, guided by the Eisenberg's model of physician decision making. State PDMP implementation status and requirement levels were not associated with physician opioid prescribing for non-cancer chronic pain treatment (p's ranged 0.30-0.32). Patients with Medicare coverage were more likely to be prescribed opioid analgesics than those with private health insurance (OR=1.55, prequirements and enforcement for prescribers and related stakeholders. Future studies also are needed to identify characteristics contributing to PDMP effectiveness in reducing non-medical use of prescription opioids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Examination of weld defects by computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jovanović

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Defects in metal arc gas (MAG welds made in S235JR low carbon steel of 6 mm thickness were examined. A sample containing lack of fusion (LOF and pores was examined by computed tomography – CT. The computed tomography examination was performed in order to define LOF size and position as well as dimensions and distribution of accompanying pores in the weld metal.

  14. Intelligent Multi-Agent Online Examination System

    OpenAIRE

    Anaekwe, Jane Chioma

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Examinations are essential tools in an education system and are used to test the knowledge, learning capabilities, and progress of a student in a specific domain. Due to its importance in an academic system, it is therefore vital to have an examination system that is fair and efficient. The traditional paper-based examinations are known to have various constraints such as, their time consuming nature, delays in declaration of results, human errors and tedious evaluation/management o...

  15. Radiographic examination for successful dental implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    Recently implant has become an important field in dental clinic. Radiographic examination of pre- and post-operation is essential for successful treatment. Clinicians should have knowledge about the purpose of the radiographic examination, suitable imaging modality for the cases, anatomic landmarks of tooth and jaw bone, advantage and limitation of panoramic radiographic examination for implant, principle and interpretation of cross-sectional imaging, bone mineral density, post-operative radiographic examination. This paper will be helpful to get above information for dentists who want to do dental implant successfully.

  16. A disjointed effort: paediatric musculoskeletal examination.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Irwin

    2012-07-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) symptoms are a frequent cause of emergency department attendance for children, and while most often indicative of benign or self-limiting disease, such symptoms can occasionally be the first presentation of serious illness such as leukaemia or juvenile idiopathic arthritis. MSK examination, however, is often not included as part of the routine paediatric examination. The authors aimed to evaluate how often and how thoroughly MSK examination was performed during admissions to the paediatric ward and to compare it with the examination of other symptoms in relation to the presenting complaint and eventual diagnosis.

  17. Parameters of phoniatric examinations for solo singers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Slobodan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A phoniatrist analyzes the professional's voice at the beginning of his vocal studies or career but also later, in cases of voice disorder. Phoniatric examination of professional singers must be done according to "all inclusive" protocols of examination. Such protocols must establish the status of basic elements of phonatory system: activator generator and resonator of voice and articulatory space. Anamnesis All patients requiring phoniatric examination no matter if they are candidates for professional singers, need to provide anamnestic data about their previous problems regarding voice or singing. Clinical examination This examination is necessary and it must include: examination of nose, cavum oris, pharynx, ears and larynx. Subjective acoustic analysis This analysis is based on evaluation of physiological and pathophysiological manifestations of voice. Musical voice range Determination of musical voice range during phoniatric examination does not intend to make any classification of voice, nor to suggest to vocal teacher what he should count upon from future singers. Musical range can be determined only by a phoniatrist skilled in music or with musical training, but first of all vocal teacher. Objective acoustic analysis These methods are used for examination of phonatory function, or laryngeal pathology. They are not invasive and give objective and quantitative information. They include laryngostroboscopy, spectral analysis of voice (sonography and fundamental parameters of voice signal (computer program. Speech examination Articulation is very important for solo singers, because good articulation contributes to qualitative emission of sound and expression of emotions. Hearing tests Tonal-threshold audiometry is performed as a hearing test. Additional tests They include rhinomanometry, vital capacity measurements maximal phonation time and phonation quotient. Conclusion Phoniatric examination is a necessary proceeding which

  18. Examining Gender Bias in Studies of Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Crowden, N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the presence of a gender bias in studies of innovation. Using the Innovation Systems Research Network (ISRN) and its interview guide as a case study, this research project examines how accurately and completely such innovation studies present gender differences in the innovation process.

  19. Verification and Examination Management of Complex Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stian Ruud

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As ship systems become more complex, with an increasing number of safety-critical functions, many interconnected subsystems, tight integration to other systems, and a large amount of potential failure modes, several industry parties have identified the need for improved methods for managing the verification and examination efforts of such complex systems. Such needs are even more prominent now that the marine and offshore industries are targeting more activities and operations in the Arctic environment. In this paper, a set of requirements and a method for verification and examination management are proposed for allocating examination efforts to selected subsystems. The method is based on a definition of a verification risk function for a given system topology and given requirements. The marginal verification risks for the subsystems may then be evaluated, so that examination efforts for the subsystem can be allocated. Two cases of requirements and systems are used to demonstrate the proposed method. The method establishes a systematic relationship between the verification loss, the logic system topology, verification method performance, examination stop criterion, the required examination effort, and a proposed sequence of examinations to reach the examination stop criterion.

  20. USMLE Step 1 Examination: Legal Vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Bryce

    1996-01-01

    In 1994 the Federation of State Medical Boards and the National Board of Medical Examiners instituted a three-step U.S. Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE). Step one of the USMLE may be vulnerable to legal challenge on the basis of minority group bias and lack of construct validity. (SLD)

  1. 5 CFR 4501.102 - Examination information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Examination information. 4501.102 Section 4501.102 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT SUPPLEMENTAL STANDARDS OF ETHICAL... access to such material, or is involved in the examination rating process, shall notify his...

  2. Evaluation: Is an Open Book Examination Easier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightwell, Richard; Daniel, Janine-Helen; Stewart, Angus

    2004-01-01

    In terms of the assessment of students, it is generally accepted that open book examinations create an enriched environment, offering the student an opportunity to better understand and respond to a particular question. The present study provided the opportunity to examine this assumption and test it in a controlled manner. During the study of an…

  3. A Case for Open-Book Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, John

    1982-01-01

    Research into the effectiveness of open-book examinations has shown that they reduce test anxiety and the need to memorize factual information. An investigation into the effect of using open books in an English literature examination showed that students acquired higher levels of attainment than those who took a traditional test. (SK)

  4. Examiners' Reports on Theses: Feedback or Assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijay; Stracke, Elke

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, examiners' reports on theses at the doctoral and Master's level consist of two components: firstly, summative assessment where a judgement is made about whether the thesis has met the standards established by the discipline for the award of the degree, and, secondly, the developmental and formative component, where examiners provide…

  5. University Entrance Examinations: The Controversy Intensifies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Peter

    1978-01-01

    This review ponders the lack of Canadian university entrance examinations. As there are no province-wide standards it is difficult to give fair and equitable treatment for college admission. Some such method of entrance examination may be soon introduced in Ontario. (MFD)

  6. Standardized CT examination of the multitraumatized patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leidner, B. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oskarshamn Hospital (Sweden)]|[Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Huddinge University Hospital (Sweden); Adiels, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oskarshamn Hospital (Sweden); Aspelin, P. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Huddinge University Hospital (Sweden); Gullstrand, P.; Wallen, S. [Department of Surgery, Oskarshamn Hospital (Sweden)

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a standardized non-helical-CT protocol including head, body and proximal extremities in order to achieve a good time efficiency and diagnostic accuracy in the initial radiological evaluation of the multitraumatized patient. A total of 111 circulatory stable blunt trauma patients, brought in to a trauma level II-III hospital, were examined according to a standardized CT protocol. After examining the head with contiguous 10-mm slices without IV contrast medium injection, the trunk was examined with 10-mm slices every 30 mm through thorax-abdomen-pelvis with IV contrast medium enhancement (occasionally modified). All data in the medical reports were collected and used as ``end-point``, and the outcome of the CT examination was compared with this final diagnosis. Mean examination time was 20 min (range 12-32 min). In total, 55 head injuries, 89 thoracic injuries, 27 abdominal/pelvic injuries and 62 fractures were found. Computed tomography correctly identified the injuries, except one brain stem injury, one contusion/rupture of the heart, one hepatic injury, two intestinal injuries, eight vertebral injuries and one joint dislocation. A standardized non-helical-CT examination of the head and body may be achieved in 20 min. Its diagnostic accuracy was high, except for vertebral column injuries, which is why we recommend it as the method of choice for initial radiological examination of multitraumatized patients. When available, helical scanning would improve both examination speed and accuracy. (orig.) With 6 figs., 40 refs.

  7. Clinical Evaluation: Issues of Examination Format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Phyllis

    1981-01-01

    The utility of general or select response formats for evaluating certain types of clinical competence is studied. Consideration of the suitability of an examination format to fulfill its intended purpose and the appropriateness of the questions included is recommended when designing an examination. (Author/AL)

  8. Video exams and the external examiners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Palle

    to the Master’s programme. The programme offers streamed videos in combination with other learning resources. Oral exams have been mediated with the help of Skype and later with Adobe Connect Professional. It has for all participants - students, examiners and external examiners – been both a challenge...

  9. Instructor Quality and EMT Certification Examination Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ-Eft, Darlene; Dickison, Phil; Levine, Roger

    2007-01-01

    The Longitudinal Emergency Medical Technician Attributes and Demographics Study (LEADS) provides a representative sampling of EMTs throughout the United States. This study examines the relationship between instructor quality and National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians certification examination outcomes. Results show significant…

  10. Rethinking the Australian Doctoral Examination Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiley, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    This paper suggests rethinking the doctoral examination process in Australia to enable a closer alignment with the aims of the learning programme. The doctoral examination processes generally aim to assess the candidate's research capability, the quality and originality of the candidate's contribution to knowledge, and to authenticate that the…

  11. Physical examination of the patellofemoral joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Jonathan D; Watson, Jonathan N; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2014-07-01

    Examination of the patellofemoral joint can prove to be challenging. Although certain acute injuries such as patella fracture or tendon rupture can be diagnosed quickly, more chronic injuries such as patellar subluxation and patellofemoral pain syndrome are more difficult to diagnose because of the subtlety of the examination findings. The source of the problem can also vary, and must be identified to direct treatment. Adding to the complexity is that other structures around the knee may present with anterior knee pain and can be mistaken for patellofemoral disorder, which is why the patellofemoral examination should be performed in the context of a complete knee examination. For all of these reasons, performing a thorough and systematic examination of the patellofemoral joint can lead to optimal outcomes for patients.

  12. The summary mental examination in criminal proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Chusuke

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the inception (in 1955) and history of the inclusion of the summary mental examination in criminal proceedings. It then reviews the procedures for diagnosing easily diagnosed cases such as frank psychosis or obvious mental normality. An overview is then provided of the manner in which the reliability of the summary examination can be maintained by deeming those cases where diagnosis can be made without the use of suggestive questions as easily "diagnosed cases" and by avoiding positively diagnosing obvious mental normality. The importance of ensuring that test proceedings in summary examinations do not interfere with formal forensic psychiatric examinations that may be conducted later is then reviewed. These proceedings, through the summary examination, provide material for an expert to state an opinion in court as to the criminal responsibility of the accused suspect.

  13. Prepurchase examination in ambulatory equine practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Harry W

    2012-04-01

    Prepurchase examination provides a significant opportunity for veterinarians to offer an important professional service to the equine industry. When the service is performed competently and ethically, prospective buyers and sellers will recommend the examining veterinarian to fellow horse owners and professionals. To become comfortable with and skilled at performing prepurchase examinations, a veterinarian must understand the operational challenges associated with this service-and master them. Veterinarians performing prepurchase examinations should address the needs and manage the expectations of the prospective buyer, treat the seller and all parties with professional courtesy, be familiar with the intended use of the horse, competently perform a thorough physical examination, and pay close attention to the medical record and report. Communicate clearly with all parties before, during, and after the examination. Feedback from staff and colleagues is critical to improving and refining the services offered. The veterinarian should work with staff to evaluate the processes used to deliver the prepurchase examination experience to clients and consult with mentors who are skilled in performing these services. Sharing your ideas for improving prepurchase examination with equine colleagues is a service to the veterinary profession and to the horse. Performing a prepurchase examination in the way described may sound like a "tall order," but once patient care and service goals have been established, staff has been trained, and the process has been defined-the challenges become opportunities. The rewards include satisfied clients, reduced liability risk, increased profitability, and the satisfaction of having performed an interesting, valuable task to the best of one’s abilities.

  14. Practice-related examinations are feasible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrauth, Markus

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The 9th Revision of the German Federal Medical Training Regulations demands a practice-related assessment of medical students. On the way to these new regulations German faculties face as well problems related to a lack of experience of lecturers, tutors, examiners, and students with the required examination procedures as strains of a financial and logistic kind. How to succeed in introducing suitable examinations at short notice and which positive effects can be achieved is shown by the Faculty of Medicine of the university of Tübingen.

  15. Do general medical practitioners examine injured runners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Solvej Videbæk; Jensen, A V; Rasmussen, Sten

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General Medical Practitioners (GMP) in Denmark perform clinical examinations of patients with musculoskeletal pain. However, the prevalence proportion of examinations caused by running-related injuries remains unknown. PURPOSE: The primary purpose of the present study was to estimate...... the prevalence proportion of consultations in general medical practice caused by running-related injuries. The secondary purpose was to estimate the prevalence proportion of injured runners, who consult their GMP, that are referred to additional examinations or treatments. STUDY DESIGN: A survey-based study...

  16. The nature of expertise in fingerprint examiners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busey, Thomas A; Parada, Francisco J

    2010-04-01

    Latent print examinations involve a complex set of psychological and cognitive processes. This article summarizes existing work that has addressed how training and experience creates changes in latent print examiners. Experience appears to improve overall accuracy, increase visual working memory, and lead to configural processing of upright fingerprints. Experts also demonstrate a narrower visual filter and, as a group, tend to show greater consistency when viewing ink prints. These findings address recent criticisms of latent print evidence, but many open questions still exist. Cognitive scientists are well positioned to conduct studies that will improve the training and practices of latent print examiners, and suggestions for becoming involved in fingerprint research are provided.

  17. The history of examination of reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    In the late 1800s, Wilhelm Erb, Joseph Babinski, William Gowers, and others helped develop the neurologic examination as we know it today. Erb was one of the first to emphasize a detailed and systematic neurologic exam and was co-discoverer of the muscle stretch reflex, Gowers began studying the knee jerk shortly after it was described, and Babinski focused on finding reliable signs that could differentiate organic from hysterical paralysis. These physicians and others emphasized the bedside examination of reflexes, which have been an important part of the neurologic examination ever since. This review will focus on the history of the examination of the following muscle stretch and superficial/cutaneous reflexes: knee jerk, jaw jerk, deep abdominal reflexes, superficial abdominal reflexes, plantar reflex/Babinski sign, and palmomental reflex. The history of reflex grading will also be discussed.

  18. Academic Dishonesty Behaviours in National Examinations: Motives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    candidates who sat for Form Four National Examination and Qualifying Test in ... and 70 teachers in secondary schools where behavioral analysis of teachers and ... NECTA's report on how cheating had been done was analyzed and it was ...

  19. Structural Factors Affecting Health Examination Behavioral Intention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Hui-Ting; Kuo, Yu-Ming; Wang, Shiang-Ru; Wang, Chia-Fen; Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2016-01-01

    .... Here, we used the health belief model as a foundation and integrated social psychological factors and investigated the factors influencing health examination behavioral intention among the public in Taiwan...

  20. Examination of catchment areas for public transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex; Hansen, Stephen; Andersen, Jonas Lohmann Elkjær

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a method to examine the catchment areas for stops in high quality public transport systems based on the street network in the examined area. This is achieved by implementing the Service Area functions from the ArcGIS extension Network Analyst. The method is compared to a more...... simple method using only the Euclidean distance from the examined stop and the paper describes the differences in detail-level of the results. Furthermore, the paper describes how the Service Area method can be used to examine increments in the catchment areas by adding extra entrances to stations...... or by making changes in the street network around the station. The paper also discusses the degree of realism in the used GIS networks and how it can affect the size of the catchment areas. It is concluded that the Service Area method improves the detail-level and accuracy in catchment area analyses...

  1. Bolt Cutter Blade's Imprint in Toolmarks Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Nikolai; Finkelstein, Nir; Novoselsky, Yehuda; Tsach, Tsadok

    2015-11-01

    Bolt cutters are known as cutting tools which are used for cutting hard objects and materials, such as padlocks and bars. Bolt cutter blades leave their imprint on the cut objects. When receiving a cut object from a crime scene, forensic toolmarks examiners can determine whether the suspected cutting tool was used in a specific crime or not based on class characteristic marks and individual marks that the bolt cutter blades leave on the cut object. The paper presents preliminary results of a study on ten bolt cutters and suggests a quick preliminary examination-the comparison between the blade thickness and the width of the imprint left by the tool on the cut object. Based on the comparison result, if there is not a match, the examiner can eliminate the feasibility of the use of the suspected cutting tool in a specific crime. This examination simplifies and accelerates the comparison procedure.

  2. EXAMINATION OF SHIPPING PACKAGE 9975-05050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W.

    2014-11-06

    Shipping package 9975-05050 was examined in K-Area following its identification as a high wattage package. Elevated temperature and fiberboard moisture content are key parameters that impact the degradation rate of fiberboard within 9975 packages in a storage environment. The high wattage of this package contributes significantly to component temperatures. After examination in K-Area, the package was provided to SRNL for further examination of the fiberboard assembly. The moisture content of the fiberboard was relatively low (compared to packages examined previously), but the moisture gradient (between fiberboard ID and OD surfaces) was relatively high, as would be expected for the high heat load. The cane fiberboard appeared intact and displayed no apparent change in integrity relative to a new package.

  3. AN EXAMINATION OF THE CHARACTERISTICS OF ESAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mitch

    an in depth examination of Esan music, of Nigeria by highlighting what he ... very functional because no event passed by in African societies without profuse music ... interwoven with drama, dance, poetry, history and oral literature with oral ...

  4. Compensation of Disadvantages in University Examination Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Quapp

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Active social participation of disabled people is one of the major tasks of modern society. That also includes access to the academic community by higher education. Universities all over the world work hard to give handicapped students a chance to graduate. In this context, compensation of disadvantages in examination procedures is an important matter. But, also chronic illness may impair the student's examination performance. To ensure equal examination opportunities for all students, responsible university officials must be creative to find individual compensation solutions. The paper analyzes examination regulations at universities in different countries and offers solutions to compensate disabled and chronic ill students' disadvantages. It discusses the necessity of compensation for different types of disability and chronic illness. Finally, an overview of current German case law and solutions for compensation problems are provided.

  5. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1999-2000 forward. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of...

  6. Examination of the elbow: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausman, Michael R; Lang, Penelope

    2014-12-01

    The elbow's complex anatomy and synergism of bony and ligamentous stabilizers make physical examination challenging. Adequate elbow assessment is essential for accurate diagnosis and initiating proper treatment. Isolated elbow injuries are rare; fractures should be interpreted as proxies for associated, often unappreciated, soft tissue injuries. A careful elbow examination informs the need for and interpretation of radiological studies, including fluoroscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography scanning.

  7. Double balloon enteroscopy examinations in general anesthesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laszlo; Zubek; Lena; Szabo; Peter; Laszlo; Lakatos; Janos; Papp; Janos; Gal; Gabor; Elo

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To demonstrate that the double balloon enteroscopy(DBE) can be safely performed in general anesthesia with intubation.METHODS:We performed a retrospective examination between August 2005 and November 2008 amongpatients receiving intubation narcosis due to DBE examination.The patients were grouped based on sex,age and physical status.Anesthesia records includedduration of anesthesia,quantity of medication usedand anesthesia-related complications.We determinedthe frequency of complications in the differen...

  8. Visual examinations of K west fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitner, A.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-03

    Over 250 fuel assemblies stored in sealed canisters in the K West Basin were extracted and visually examined for damage. Substantial damage was expected based on high cesium levels previously measured in water samples taken from these canisters. About 11% of the inner elements and 45% of the outer elements were found to be failed in these examinations. Canisters that had cesium levels of I curie or more generally had multiple instances of major fuel damage.

  9. Pracital examination in biochemistry: topics and procedures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vocke, Nils-Daniel

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Under the new revision of the German licensing regulations for physicians ("Approbationsordnung" the rules for the first national examinations (i.e. "Physikum", equivalent to medical school entrance exams have been changed. In addition to the written exam a novel "oral-practical" part is required. Here we describe the implications of this oral-practical exam on the examination procedures in the field of biochemistry/molecular biology. A strategy for its realization is proposed.

  10. Structural Factors Affecting Health Examination Behavioral Intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Ting; Kuo, Yu-Ming; Wang, Shiang-Ru; Wang, Chia-Fen; Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Disease screening instruments used for secondary prevention can facilitate early determination and treatment of pathogenic factors, effectively reducing disease incidence, mortality rates, and health complications. Therefore, people should be encouraged to receive health examinations for discovering potential pathogenic factors before symptoms occur. Here, we used the health belief model as a foundation and integrated social psychological factors and investigated the factors influencing health examination behavioral intention among the public in Taiwan. In total, 388 effective questionnaires were analyzed through structural model analysis. Consequently, this study yielded four crucial findings: (1) The established extended health belief model could effectively predict health examination behavioral intention; (2) Self-efficacy was the factor that most strongly influenced health examination behavioral intention, followed by health knowledge; (3) Self-efficacy substantially influenced perceived benefits and perceived barriers; (4) Health knowledge and social support indirectly influenced health examination behavioral intention. The preceding results can effectively increase the acceptance and use of health examination services among the public, thereby facilitating early diagnosis and treatment and ultimately reducing disease and mortality rates.

  11. Factors of Students Participating in Online Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugilar Sugilar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to discover determinant factors of students' participation in online examination based on expectancy-value theory. The method used was group comparison between the groups of participating and nonparticipating students. The results showed that the following factors differentiated the two groups, i.e.: (1 self efficacy in using computers (t=12.81, p<0.01, (2 perceived of easiness in operating an online examination (t=9.51, p<0.01, (3 perceived of the importance of online examination (t=5.58, t<0.01, (4 intrinsic value of online examination (t=10.58, p<001, and (5 cost of online examination (t=-2.05, p=0.029. In addition, the following students' personal factors were also compared and the results were (1 age (t=-2.01, p=0.46, (2 grade point average (t=-5.546, 0<0.01, (3 sex (x2=28.51, p<0.01, and (4 marital status (x2=6.50, p=0.011. The results concluded that the expectancy and value theory was useful for explaining and predicting students' participation in online examinations.

  12. NATIONAL EXAMINATION IN PERSPECTIVE OF CRITICAL PEDAGOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Made Kerta Adhi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at identifying the factors contributing to why the policy on national examination is given priority, how the policy on national examination is presented in the system of educational management, its implication andrepresentation in the system of educational management applied in Senior High School in Tabanan. The critical theories such as the theory of hegemony, the theory of social practice and the theory of management in the perspective of critical pedagogy were eclectically used in the present study. Qualitative method using the approach of cultural studies was employed. The data were collected using participatory observation, in-depth interview and documentation study. The data were validated using triangulation method and descriptive-qualitative technique. The result of the study showed that the factors contributing to why the policy on national examination was given priority were educational politics and state policy, socio-cultural and global influence. The policy on national examination was represented in the school and class management by the agents within and outside school. The implication was that there was such a coalition among the agents that all the students would pass the national examination. The process of how the national examination was undertaken and the result which appeared to be good (all the students passed turned out to be hyperreality. Therefore, it was necessary to reconstruct the national education.

  13. Web-based pathology practice examination usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C Klatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: General and subject specific practice examinations for students in health sciences studying pathology were placed onto a free public internet web site entitled web path and were accessed four clicks from the home web site menu. Subjects and Methods: Multiple choice questions were coded into. html files with JavaScript functions for web browser viewing in a timed format. A Perl programming language script with common gateway interface for web page forms scored examinations and placed results into a log file on an internet computer server. The four general review examinations of 30 questions each could be completed in up to 30 min. The 17 subject specific examinations of 10 questions each with accompanying images could be completed in up to 15 min each. The results of scores and user educational field of study from log files were compiled from June 2006 to January 2014. Results: The four general review examinations had 31,639 accesses with completion of all questions, for a completion rate of 54% and average score of 75%. A score of 100% was achieved by 7% of users, ≥90% by 21%, and ≥50% score by 95% of users. In top to bottom web page menu order, review examination usage was 44%, 24%, 17%, and 15% of all accessions. The 17 subject specific examinations had 103,028 completions, with completion rate 73% and average score 74%. Scoring at 100% was 20% overall, ≥90% by 37%, and ≥50% score by 90% of users. The first three menu items on the web page accounted for 12.6%, 10.0%, and 8.2% of all completions, and the bottom three accounted for no more than 2.2% each. Conclusions: Completion rates were higher for shorter 10 questions subject examinations. Users identifying themselves as MD/DO scored higher than other users, averaging 75%. Usage was higher for examinations at the top of the web page menu. Scores achieved suggest that a cohort of serious users fully completing the examinations had sufficient preparation to use them to support

  14. Post irradiation examination of thermal reactor fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, D. N.; Viswanathan, U. K.; Ramadasan, E.; Unnikrishnan, K.; Anantharaman, S.

    2008-12-01

    The post irradiation examination (PIE) facility at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has been in operation for more than three decades. Over these years this facility has been utilized for examination of experimental fuel pins and fuels from commercial power reactors operating in India. In a program to assess the performance of (U,Pu)O 2 MOX fuel prior to its introduction in commercial reactors, three experimental MOX fuel clusters irradiated in the pressurized water loop (PWL) of CIRUS up to burnup of 16 000 MWd/tU were examined. Fission gas release from these pins was measured by puncture test. Some of these fuel pins in the cluster contained controlled porosity pellets, low temperature sintered (LTS) pellets, large grain size pellets and annular pellets. PIE has also been carried out on natural UO 2 fuel bundles from Indian PHWRs, which included two high burnup (˜15 000 MWd/tU) bundles. Salient investigations carried out consisted of visual examination, leak testing, axial gamma scanning, fission gas analysis, microstructural examination of fuel and cladding, β, γ autoradiography of the fuel cross-section and fuel central temperature estimation from restructuring. A ThO 2 fuel bundle irradiated in Kakrapar Atomic Power Station (KAPS) up to a nominal fuel burnup of ˜11 000 MWd/tTh was also examined to evaluate its in-pile performance. The performance of the BWR fuel pins of Tarapur Atomic Power Stations (TAPS) was earlier assessed by carrying out PIE on 18 fuel elements selected from eight fuel assemblies irradiated in the two reactors. The burnup of these fuel elements varied from 5000 to 29 000 MWd/tU. This paper provides a brief review of some of the fuels examined and the results obtained on the performance of natural UO 2, enriched UO 2, MOX, and ThO 2 fuels.

  15. Objective structured clinical examination in radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Anurag

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing need for introducing objective structured clinical examination (OSCE as a part of radiology practical examinations in India. OSCE is an established, reliable, and effective multistation test for the assessment of practical professional skills in an objective and a transparent manner. In India, it has been successfully initiated and implemented in specialties like pediatrics, ophthalmology, and otolaryngology. Each OSCE station needs to have a pre-agreed "key-list" that contains a list of objective steps prepared for uniformly assessing the tasks given to students. Broadly, OSCE stations are classified as "manned" or "unmanned" stations. These stations may include procedure or pictorial or theory stations with clinical oriented contents. This article is one of a series of measures to initiate OSCE in radiology; it analyzes the attributes of OSCE stations and outlines the steps for implementing OSCE. Furthermore, important issues like the advantages of OSCE, its limitations, a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT analysis, and the timing of introduction of OSCE in radiology are also covered. The OSCE format in radiology and its stations needs to be validated, certified, and finalized before its use in examinations. This will need active participation and contribution from the academic radiology fraternity and inputs from faculty members of leading teaching institutions. Many workshops/meetings need to be conducted. Indeed, these collaborative measures will effectively sensitize universities, examiners, organizers, faculty, and students across India to OSCE and help successfully usher in this new format in radiology practical examinations.

  16. Objective structured clinical examination in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anurag; Batra, Bipin; Sood, Ak; Ramakantan, Ravi; Bhargava, Satish K; Chidambaranathan, N; Indrajit, Ik

    2010-05-01

    There is a growing need for introducing objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) as a part of radiology practical examinations in India. OSCE is an established, reliable, and effective multistation test for the assessment of practical professional skills in an objective and a transparent manner. In India, it has been successfully initiated and implemented in specialties like pediatrics, ophthalmology, and otolaryngology. Each OSCE station needs to have a pre-agreed "key-list" that contains a list of objective steps prepared for uniformly assessing the tasks given to students. Broadly, OSCE stations are classified as "manned" or "unmanned" stations. These stations may include procedure or pictorial or theory stations with clinical oriented contents. This article is one of a series of measures to initiate OSCE in radiology; it analyzes the attributes of OSCE stations and outlines the steps for implementing OSCE. Furthermore, important issues like the advantages of OSCE, its limitations, a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis, and the timing of introduction of OSCE in radiology are also covered. The OSCE format in radiology and its stations needs to be validated, certified, and finalized before its use in examinations. This will need active participation and contribution from the academic radiology fraternity and inputs from faculty members of leading teaching institutions. Many workshops/meetings need to be conducted. Indeed, these collaborative measures will effectively sensitize universities, examiners, organizers, faculty, and students across India to OSCE and help successfully usher in this new format in radiology practical examinations.

  17. Virginity Testing Beyond a Medical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robatjazi, Mehri; Simbar, Masoumeh; Nahidi, Fatemeh; Gharehdaghi, Jaber; Emamhadi, Mohammadali; Vedadhir, Abou-Ali; Alavimajd, Hamid

    2015-11-18

    Apart from religious values, virginity is important in different communities because of its prominent role in reducing sexually transmitted diseases and teen pregnancies. Even though virginity testing has been proclaimed an example of violence against women by the World Health Organization, it is still conducted in many countries, including Iran. 16 in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants aged 32 to 60 years to elucidate the perceptions and experiences of Iranian examiners of virginity testing.The perception and experience of examiners were reflected in five main themes. The result of this study indicated that virginity testing is more than a medical examination, considering the cultural factors involved and its overt and covert consequences. In Iran, testing is performed for both formal and informal reasons, and examiners view such testing with ambiguity about the accuracy and certainty of the diagnosis and uncertainty about ethics and reproductive rights. Examiners are affected by the overt and covert consequences of virginity testing, beliefs and cultural values underlying virginity testing, and informal and formal reasons for virginity testing.

  18. Objective structured clinical examination in radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anurag; Batra, Bipin; Sood, AK; Ramakantan, Ravi; Bhargava, Satish K; Chidambaranathan, N; Indrajit, IK

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing need for introducing objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) as a part of radiology practical examinations in India. OSCE is an established, reliable, and effective multistation test for the assessment of practical professional skills in an objective and a transparent manner. In India, it has been successfully initiated and implemented in specialties like pediatrics, ophthalmology, and otolaryngology. Each OSCE station needs to have a pre-agreed “key-list” that contains a list of objective steps prepared for uniformly assessing the tasks given to students. Broadly, OSCE stations are classified as “manned” or “unmanned” stations. These stations may include procedure or pictorial or theory stations with clinical oriented contents. This article is one of a series of measures to initiate OSCE in radiology; it analyzes the attributes of OSCE stations and outlines the steps for implementing OSCE. Furthermore, important issues like the advantages of OSCE, its limitations, a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis, and the timing of introduction of OSCE in radiology are also covered. The OSCE format in radiology and its stations needs to be validated, certified, and finalized before its use in examinations. This will need active participation and contribution from the academic radiology fraternity and inputs from faculty members of leading teaching institutions. Many workshops/meetings need to be conducted. Indeed, these collaborative measures will effectively sensitize universities, examiners, organizers, faculty, and students across India to OSCE and help successfully usher in this new format in radiology practical examinations. PMID:20607015

  19. School Dropouts: Examining the Space of Reasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun N. R Kishore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dropping out of school is a worldwide phenomenon with drastic mental health consequences for children, families and society. Aim and Materials & Methods: This study examines school dropouts in one district in Kerala with an emphasis on looking at multiple reasons for the problem. Results: The most common "reason" was various Physical disorders (80, 21.8% followed by Mental Retardation (77, 20.9%. Child labour (Employment came last (30, 8.1% as a "reason" while financial issues constituted 50 (13.6%. Family issues accounted for 63 (17.1% and School-related issues 68 (18.5%. Conclusion: This study highlights the need to examine a space of reasons for this phenomenon with active involvement and coordination of multiple agencies to examine and support getting children back to school and prevent dropouts.

  20. Clinical Orofacial Examination in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Peter; Twilt, Marinka; Spiegel, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    review. The level of evidence for the 5 recommendations was derived primarily from descriptive studies, such as cross-sectional and case-control studies. CONCLUSION: Five recommendations are proposed for the orofacial examination of patients with JIA to improve the clinical practice and aid standardized......OBJECTIVE: To develop international consensus-based recommendations for the orofacial examination of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), for use in clinical practice and research. METHODS: Using a sequential phased approach, a multidisciplinary task force developed and evaluated...... a set of recommendations for the orofacial examination of patients with JIA. Phase 1: A Delphi survey was conducted among 40 expert physicians and dentists with the aim of identifying and ranking the importance of items for inclusion. Phase 2: The task force developed consensus about the domains...

  1. Organ doses from computerized tomography examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janeczek, J.

    1995-12-31

    Estimates of mean organs doses from five typical computerized tomography (CT) examinations were obtained. Measurements were done using Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD). Radiation dose distributions within a phantom has been measured for each examination and results were used for organ dose calculation. Doses to organs specified by ICPR 60 Recommendations were measured for five CT scanners (CT/T8800, CT 9800, CT MAX - made by General Electric; CT 1200 SX - made by Picker; SOMATOM 2 - made by Siemens). Dose distributions from scattered radiation were measured and indicate that scattered radiation dose to thyroid and eye lens can be reduced by proper examination limits setting. The lowest mean organ doses were obtained from CT/T8800 scanner. More advanced scanners using high intensity continuous radiation were giving higher organ doses. (author). 23 refs, 6 figs, 13 tabs.

  2. [Sexual abuse assessed by forensic examinations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worm, A M; Johansen, M S; Nielsen, N H

    1997-12-29

    Within a period of three years, 175 women and three men, with a median age of 25 years, underwent a medico-legal examination after sexual assault. Penal penetration (vaginal, anal and/or oral) was the case in 78% of the victims, more often if the victim had been under the influence of alcohol, and if the assailant was known to the victim. Only 52% of the raped victims were recommended follow up with an examination for and counselling about sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Among those referred to an STD clinic 48% attended. Denmark is the only Nordic country without public services for rape victims. A police report is therefore a prerequisite for a medico-legal examination.

  3. Hernia sacs: is histological examination necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Vajpeyi, Rajkumar

    2013-12-01

    The hernia sac is a common surgical pathology specimen which can occasionally yield unexpected diagnoses. The College of American Pathologists recommends microscopic examination of abdominal hernias, but leaves submission of inguinal hernias for histology to the discretion of the pathologist. To validate this approach at a tertiary care centre, we retrospectively reviewed 1426 hernia sacs derived from inguinal, femoral and abdominal wall hernias. The majority of pathologies noted were known to the clinician, including herniated bowel, lipomas and omentum. A malignancy was noted in three of 800 inguinal hernias and seven of 576 abdominal wall hernias; five of these lesions were not seen on gross examination. Other interesting findings in hernia sacs included appendices, endometriosis, a perivascular epithelioid cell tumour, and pseudomyxoma peritoneii. All hernia sacs should be examined grossly as most pathologies are grossly visible. The decision to submit inguinal hernias for histology may be left to the discretion of the pathologist, but abdominal and femoral hernias should be submitted for histology.

  4. Nervous system examination on YouTube

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Web 2.0 sites such as YouTube have become a useful resource for knowledge and are used by medical students as a learning resource. This study aimed at assessing videos covering the nervous system examination on YouTube. Methods A research of YouTube was conducted from 2 November to 2 December 2011 using the following key words “nervous system examination”, “nervous system clinical examination”, “cranial nerves examination”, “CNS examination”, “examination of cerebellum”, “...

  5. Guidelines for reducing bias in nursing examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klisch, M L

    1994-01-01

    As our nation becomes more diversified, many schools of nursing strive to improve the recruitment and retention of English as a Second Language (ESL) and minority nursing students. An important aspect of this commitment to diversity is the reduction of biased items in nursing examinations, with the goal of making the evaluation process fair for all students. The author defines test and item bias, provides examples of biased items, and presents specific guidelines for decreasing item bias in teacher-made nursing examinations. A discussion of the related topic of whether ESL students should be given extended testing time is included.

  6. Visual examinations of K east fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitner, A.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-03

    Selected fuel elements stored in both ``good fuel`` and ``bad fuel`` canisters in K East Basin were extracted and visually examined full length for damage. Lower end damage in the ``bad fuel`` canisters was found to be more severe than expected based on top end appearances. Lower end damage for the ``good fuel`` canisters, however, was less than expected based on top end observations. Since about half of the fuel in K East Basin is contained in ``good fuel`` canisters based on top end assessments, the fraction of fuel projected to be intact with respect to IPS processing considerations remains at 50% based on these examination results.

  7. Methods of Echocardiographic Examination of Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr S. Sharykin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion of echocardiography in in-depth medical examinations helps conduct screening for inborn or acquired heart anomalies, which, however, can oftentimes be not enough for assessing their significance. In athletes who train 5-6 times per week 2-3 times or more per day, the heart gets under physical stress more often than in non-athletes – therefore, examining them at rest cannot provide a full-scale picture of the heart’s operation. The article describes a methodology of echocardiography with graduated training load, which helps explore the condition of hemodynamics in athletes when they are engaged in doing habitual work.

  8. Statewide Datasets for Idaho StreamStats

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of a workspace (folder) containing four gridded datasets and a personal geodatabase. The gridded datasets are a grid of mean annual...

  9. VT USGS NED DEM (10 meter) - statewide

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This dataset is derived from the multi-resolution National Elevation Dataset (NED), at resolutions of both 1/3 arc-second (approx. 10 meters) and...

  10. 2003 - Color - Statewide NAIP (1m)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The NAIP_1M_CLR_2003 dataset is a 1:40000 scale (1 meter) truecolor (3 band) NAIP imagery product acquired during the summer of 2003. This data...

  11. Statewide datasets for Hawaii StreamStats

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of a workspace (folder) containing 41 gridded datasets and a personal geodatabase. The gridded datasets consist of 28 precipitation-frequency...

  12. Law-Focused Education: A Statewide Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Watt L.

    1977-01-01

    Law Focused Education, Inc., a Texas nonprofit educational organization, has developed innovative programs designed (1) to promote law-related education among inservice social studies teachers and (2) to promote the incorporation of law-focused concepts into the graduate and undergraduate curriculum of those institutions with teacher education…

  13. Neighborhood Stabilization Program Data NSP1 (Statewide)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD's Neighborhood Stabilization Program (www.HUD.gov/nsp) provides emergency assistance to state and local governments to acquire and redevelop foreclosed...

  14. Student Success: Statewide P-16 Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Cheryl; Crowe, Ed; Lingenfelter, Paul E.; Longanecker, David A.; L'Orange, Hans P.; Rainwater, Terese; Somerville, Janis; Venezia, Andrea; Voorhees, Richard A.; Yi, Yun

    The P-16 initiative of the State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO), which produced the essays in this collection, began in 2000. This initiative has included case studies of P-16 activities in five states and full-day discussions of P-16 issues involving educators and policymakers. These essays articulate what state educational systems…

  15. Education in Spotlight on Statewide Ballots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Katie

    2008-01-01

    Education issues are poised to break through the din of presidential politics and economic anxiety in more than a dozen states next month, as voters confront ballot questions and constitutional amendments involving K-12 policy and school finance. High on the list are gambling referendums in six states--Arkansas, Colorado, Maine, Maryland,…

  16. Education in Spotlight on Statewide Ballots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Katie

    2008-01-01

    Education issues are poised to break through the din of presidential politics and economic anxiety in more than a dozen states next month, as voters confront ballot questions and constitutional amendments involving K-12 policy and school finance. High on the list are gambling referendums in six states--Arkansas, Colorado, Maine, Maryland,…

  17. 2005 NCFMP Lidar: NC Statewide Phase 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne LIDAR terrain mapping data acquired March through April 2005. These data sets may represent a single geographic tile of a larger, county/sub-county data...

  18. VT USGS NED DEM (30 meter) - statewide

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a National Elevation Database (NED). VCGI has extracted a portion of the NED for Vermont and re-projected...

  19. Statewide Transition Database: Update. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Jeanne B.; And Others

    Project RETAIN (Retention in Education Technical Assistance and Information Network) is a Florida project that assists school districts through identification and dissemination of effective practices that keep students with mild disabilities in school. One part of the project was the development of a database of school district efforts in the area…

  20. 2003 NCFMP Lidar: NC Statewide Phase 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne LIDAR terrain mapping data acquired January through March 2003. Point data (XYZ) in ASCII format. Horizontal datum NAD83(1995) North Carolina State Plane...

  1. Spontaneous Biliteracy: Examining Latino Students' Untapped Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Luz Reyes, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Cultural deficit theories have long been debunked, yet Spanish continues to be treated as an impediment to Latinos' school success. With over 5 million emerging bilinguals, of which approximately 75% are Spanish speakers, Latinos' biliteracy potential should be examined as a means to support their learning. This article focuses on the spontaneous…

  2. Examining Peer Collaboration in Online Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castek, Jill; Coiro, Julie; Guzniczak, Lizbeth; Bradshaw, Carlton

    2012-01-01

    This study examines peer collaboration among four pairs of seventh graders who read online to determine what caused the downfall of the Mayan civilization. More and less productive collaborative interactions are presented through snippets of dialogue in which pairs negotiated complex texts. Few examples of how teachers can skillfully facilitate…

  3. 36 CFR 21.7 - Health examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 21.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.7 Health examinations. No employee who comes in direct... Reference: For a list of communicable diseases included in the regulations of the United States...

  4. An Examination of the Monitor Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimatani, Hiroshi

    A discussion of Stephen Krashen's Monitor Theory (1982) of second language acquisition examines five main hypotheses: the acquisition-learning distinction, the natural order hypothesis, the monitor hypothesis, the input hypothesis, and the affective filter hypothesis. Several problematic elements of the theory are pointed out. The discussion…

  5. Planning of high school examinations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui; Hansen, Michael Pilegaard

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a computer based support system used to plan high school examinations in Denmark. We will discuss the methods and techniques used to solve such a complex and large scale combinatorial problem. Decomposition and other heuristic principles have been used extensively to develop...

  6. Rehabilitation of the imperial examination system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Haifeng

    2006-01-01

    Since the abolishment of the imperial examination system (the IES) in 1905,the system has been the target of severe criticism by most Chinese people.This paper is intended to clear up the misunderstanding of the IES in seven respects based on some ideas of rehabilitation of the IES over the past 100 years.In the author's opinion,the IES is actually not so contemptible as most people think,at least it is not a bad system.The examination system was an attempt to recruit men on the basis of merit rather than because of social position or political connections,which is a great invention of China.Although it was abolished,the method to select talents by means of examination has not yet been and cannot be exterminated,and it is still proper to be used in the present society.The IES with a 1,300-year history has rich experiences and valuable lessons,which have implications to various examination reforms.

  7. 19 CFR 19.10 - Examination packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Examination packages. 19.10 Section 19.10 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... be returned by the port director to the warehouse for delivery unless the warehouse...

  8. 77 FR 67644 - Examination Rating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... examining Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac (Enterprises), the Federal Home Loan Banks (Banks) (collectively, regulated entities), and the Banks' Office of Finance. The new rating system is based on a ``CAMELSO..., Management, Earnings, Liquidity, Sensitivity to market risk, and Operational risk. The new system...

  9. An Empirical Examination of Validity in Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Laura R.; Kim, Yushim; Lucio, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses validity issues in evaluation that stem from Ernest R. House's book, "Evaluating With Validity". The authors examine "American Journal of Evaluation" articles from 1980 to 2010 that report the results of policy and program evaluations. The authors classify these evaluations according to House's "major approaches" typology…

  10. Examining Competition in Ontario's Higher Education Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Bayan Yousef

    2017-01-01

    Financial challenges have forced many publicly funded academic institutions in Ontario to adopt a corporate model and to use market tools to compete in the higher education market and maintain their enrolment and revenue levels. This study has analyzed how competition affects publicly funded universities in Ontario. Competition was examined by…

  11. Examining School Engagement of African American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirin, Selcuk; Jackson, Lisa R.

    This study investigated the impact of behavioral and affective factors on 688 African American high school students' academic performance, examining the relationship between school engagement, educational expectations, self-esteem, and school achievement; noting differences between males and females; and discussing whether behavioral and affective…

  12. Examining Practice in Secondary Visual Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Donna Mathewson

    2015-01-01

    Teaching in secondary visual arts classrooms is complex and challenging work. While it is implicated in much research, the complexity of the lived experience of secondary visual arts teaching has rarely been the subject of sustained and synthesized research. In this paper, the potential of practice as a concept to examine and represent secondary…

  13. Scaling an Introduction to Clinical Medicine Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William P.; Suttkus, Ramona; DiCarlo, Richard

    This paper shows that a substantial degree of invariance can be attained with an examination not explicitly designed to do so, provides an example of how invariance can be demonstrated through plots, and dispels misconceptions concerning the rigidity of the definition of invariance. Responses of 177 examinees to 94 items of a final examination…

  14. Examining the Personal Resources of Layoff Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Elizabeth W.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the process of burnout and engagement in layoff survivors. Job demands (job insecurity and work overload) and resources (social support, optimism, career adaptability, and career management self-efficacy) were examined as predictors of burnout and engagement. The sample consisted of 203 adults currently working at…

  15. Examination of a failed fifth wheel coupling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fernandes, PJL

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Examination of a fifth wheel coupling which had failed in service showed that it had been modified and that the operating handle had been moved from its original design position. This modification completely eliminated the safety device designed...

  16. The Gesell Screening Examination: Psychometric Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Richard N.

    In an assessment of the adequacy of the Gesell screening examination as a test instrument, a Gesell Screening Evaluation was given to 400 children semi-annually from their 4th to 6th year. The sample, which was stratified by parent occupation, included 40 girls and 40 boys at 5 age levels. The test battery corresponded with the Gesell Preschool…

  17. An Examination of Conceptualization of Sport Metaphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervent, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the metaphors that were used by athletes, coaches, faculty members, and sport managers to describe the concept of "sport". Participants (N = 473) were asked to reveal the single metaphor they had in minds in the sense of the concept of sport by the prompt "Sport is like … because …" 22 valid metaphors were…

  18. Supercalculators and University Entrance Calculus Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ye Yoon; Thomas, Mike; Kiernan, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Investigates whether the use of computer algebra systems could provide a significant advantage to students taking standard university entrance calculus examinations. Indicates that supercalculators would probably provide a significant advantage, particularly for lower-achieving students. Demonstrates that it is possible to write questions in which…

  19. Examining the Halo Effect in Lotto Games

    OpenAIRE

    Victor Matheson; Kent Grote

    2005-01-01

    The "Halo Effect" occurs when lotto ticket sales are unexpectedly high following a large jackpot. An examination of the Powerball lottery finds evidence that the halo effect exists and that it is the result of bettors exchanging prize winnings for new tickets.

  20. Examining Codependency in a College Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretser, Gary; Lombardo, William K.

    1999-01-01

    Examined the occurrence of codependency in 165 college students. Most respondents were categorized at the "high middle" level of codependency. There was no significant difference in level of codependency between age and ethnic groups. More males than females were classified in the two highest categories of codependency. Implications for…

  1. Examining Codependency in a College Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretser, Gary; Lombardo, William K.

    1999-01-01

    Examined the occurrence of codependency in 165 college students. Most respondents were categorized at the "high middle" level of codependency. There was no significant difference in level of codependency between age and ethnic groups. More males than females were classified in the two highest categories of codependency. Implications for…

  2. An Examination of PRC Business Negotiating Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Ming

    The current rapid economic development in mainland China strongly demands that the world understand the People's Republic of China's (PRC) negotiating behaviors to ensure a successful business transaction. This study examined the PRC business negotiating behaviors by interviewing 16 Hong Kong businesspersons who have experiences in doing business…

  3. Help Students Prepare for High School Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagares, Christopher; Connor, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety! Stress! Fear! Everyone lives in a time of escalating accountability in terms of state, district, and city-wide examinations that measure student growth in the acquisition of skills and content area knowledge. All students feel increased pressure to constantly demonstrate improved levels of academic performance. For students with cognitive…

  4. Telephone interventions for adherence to colpocytological examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Marques Lima

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to test the effects of behavioral and educational intervention by telephone on adherence of women with inappropriate periodicity to colpocytological examination. Method: quasi-experimental study with a sample of 524 women, selected with the following inclusion criteria: be aged between 25 and 64 years, have initiated sexual activity, have inappropriate periodicity of examination and have mobile or landline phone. The women were divided into two groups for application of behavioral and educational intervention by telephone. It was used an intervention script according to the principles of Motivational Interviewing. Results: on comparing the results before and after the behavioral and educational interventions, it was found that there was a statistically significant change (p = 0.0283 with increase of knowledge of women who participated in the educational intervention. There was no change in the attitude of women of any of the groups and there was an increase of adherence to colpocytological examination in both groups (p < 0.0001, with greater adherence of women participating in the behavioral group (66.8%. Conclusion: the behavioral and educational interventions by phone were effective in the adherence of women to colpocytological examination, representing important strategies for permanent health education and promotion of care for the prevention of cervical cancer.

  5. Examining Factors Predicting Students' Digital Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatlevik, Ove Edvard; Guðmundsdóttir, Gréta Björk; Loi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors predicting lower secondary school students' digital competence and to explore differences between students when it comes to digital competence. Results from a digital competence test and survey in lower secondary school will be presented. It is important to learn more about and investigate what…

  6. Therapeutic Value of the Periodic Health Examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lincoln, T. A.; Hurt, H. B.

    1965-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been conducting periodic health examinations on all of its employees for over 10 years. The original purpose of this program was the early detection of disease to be followed by referral or appropriate counseling. Because of the relatively young age of this group, we expected that this service would be of greatest benefit to only the small percentage who had significant findings. However, over this 10 year period we have been increasingly impressed that those who had no significant findings have expressed almost as much enthusiasm and gratitude as those in whom we found early but potentially serious disease. This response caused us to look more critically at the reasons for this favorable reaction. As a result, we have become convinced that these examinations have an important therapeutic value to the healthy, as well as the sick, and that this fact should be considered in their justification. A health examination can quite properly be considered therapeutic, even though no disease is found or treated, providing it "serves" or meets some of the needs of the person being examined. After all, the literal definition of the word therapeutic is service, since it is derived from the Greek word therapeutikos, which means an attendant or servant.

  7. Spontaneous Biliteracy: Examining Latino Students' Untapped Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Luz Reyes, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Cultural deficit theories have long been debunked, yet Spanish continues to be treated as an impediment to Latinos' school success. With over 5 million emerging bilinguals, of which approximately 75% are Spanish speakers, Latinos' biliteracy potential should be examined as a means to support their learning. This article focuses on the spontaneous…

  8. EXAMINATION OF BOTTLED WATER FOR NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to examine bottled water for the presence of nontuberculous mycobacteria as a potential source of infection in AIDS patients. Twenty brands of bottled water commonly used in the Los Angeles area were tested for the presence of nontuberculous mycoba...

  9. Test Anxiety in Written and Oral Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparfeldt, Jorn R.; Rost, Detlef H.; Baumeister, Ulrike M.; Christ, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The distinction of different test anxiety reactions (e.g., worry, emotionality) is well established. Recently, additional relevance has been given to school-subject-specific test anxiety factors. The present study explored a further aspect concerning the structure of test anxiety experiences, specifically oral versus written examination modes. A…

  10. Examining Expertise Using Interviews and Verbal Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wiel, Margje W. J.

    2017-01-01

    To understand expertise and expertise development, interactions between knowledge, cognitive processing and task characteristics must be examined in people at different levels of training, experience, and performance. Interviewing is widely used in the initial exploration of domain expertise. Work and cognitive task analysis chart the knowledge,…

  11. Re-Examining the Overjustification Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin-Little, K. Angeleque; Little, Steven G.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to extend the research related to the possible negative side effects of extrinsic reinforcement on children's compliant behavior, particularly the overjustification effect. Specifically, this study examined the effects of a token reinforcement procedure in a naturalistic environment (third grade…

  12. Vygotsky's Philosophy: Constructivism and Its Criticisms Examined

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Charlotte Hua; Matthews, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Criticisms have recently been voiced of constructivism, the leading metaphor of human learning since the 1970s. Inspired by inconsistencies in interpretations of constructivism in current literature, we examine the underlying epistemological beliefs of popular constructivist theories and their criticisms. We find that popular constructivist claims…

  13. (Re-)Examination of Multimodal Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosa, N.E.; Werkhoven, P.J.; Hürst, W.O.

    The majority of augmented reality (AR) research has been concerned with visual perception, however the move towards multimodality is imminent. At the same time, there is no clear vision of what multimodal AR is. The purpose of this position paper is to consider possible ways of examining AR other

  14. Clinical neurological examination of infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Robert H A

    2013-01-01

    A thorough but focused history and neurological examination remain the most important initial elements of neurological diagnosis at all ages. Advances over the past two decades in clinical neurophysiology, neuroimaging, genetics, and neuropathological examination of tissue have at times appeared to predominate over traditional history and physical exam, but no laboratory studies can provide the focus and clues to diagnosis that clinical findings offer. History taking and the techniques of neurological examination are skills to be learned by the student, refined by the resident, and practiced and perfected throughout the career of a pediatric neurologist. Examination must be specifically modified to correspond to age and with the expectation of developmental skills achieved at various ages, in addition to the localizing value of particular signs that may apply at all ages. Hypotonia, extensor plantar responses, and lack of visual fixation may be normal in a preterm infant but abnormal at several months of age. "Primitive" reflexes disappear at a certain age, but really are only suppressed or inhibited and may become re-expressed with disinhibition many decades later. Finally, the pediatric neurologist needs to have a firm foundation in normal development, neuroembryology, and changes in the expression of diseases at various stages of maturation of the nervous system.

  15. Examining Language of Information Books for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Hatice Zeynep

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, inclusion of information books in early childhood centers is well-advised since children show fast developing knowledge of information book language and enjoy reading those books. The aim of the current study is to discuss features of information books' language by examining the illustrations and texts of randomly selected 15…

  16. Examining First Grade Teachers' Handwriting Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Derya

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the first grade teachers' practices of handwriting instructions in terms of teaching, evaluation and handwriting difficulties. From qualitative research patterns, phenomenology was used. The study was applied to the 54 First grade teachers who work at central Burdur and Burdur county centre primary education…

  17. Speak up! Oral Examinations and Political Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Melissa J.; Schneider, Laura U.

    2009-01-01

    Testing assessments of undergraduate political science students is predictable and stagnant. A missing, yet valuable, testing assessment tool that can contribute to the repertoire of political science is the oral examination. Borrowing this testing tool largely from foreign language departments, oral exams require students to "think on their…

  18. 47 CFR 13.203 - Examination elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL RADIO OPERATORS Examination System § 13.203... commercial radio operator license. For each Element, the Commission shall establish through public notices or... operation of pertinent GMDSS sub-systems and equipment; ability to send and receive correctly by...

  19. 22 CFR 92.60 - Examination procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Examination procedures. 92.60 Section 92.60... memory by reference to written records. A witness may be permitted to refresh his memory by referring to... notes, papers or other documents to refresh his memory or for the sake of testifying to matters not...

  20. Delivering Online Examinations: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John MESSING

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Delivering Online Examinations: A Case Study Jason HOWARTH John MESSING Irfan ALTAS Charles Sturt University Wagga Wagga-AUSTRALIA ABSTRACT This paper represents a brief case study of delivering online examinations to a worldwide audience. These examinations are delivered in partnership with a commercial online testing company as part of the Industry Master’s degree at Charles Sturt University (CSU. The Industry Master’s degree is an academic program for students currently employed in the IT industry. Using Internet Based Testing (IBT, these students are examined in test centres throughout the world. This offers many benefits. For example, students have the freedom of sitting exams at any time during a designated interval. Computer-based testing also provides instructors with valuable feedback through test statistics and student comments. In this paper, we document CSU’s use of the IBT system, including how tests are built and delivered, and how both human and statistical feedback is used to evaluate and enhance the testing process.

  1. An Empirical Examination of Lotka's Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, Miranda Lee

    1986-01-01

    Findings of empirical examination of author productivity data to determine conformity to Lotka's law indicate that: most data didn't fit inverse square function; two constants in Lotka's formulation (slope n, constant c) must be derived from observed distribution; inverse square law was special case of inverse exponential relationship. (37…

  2. EXAMINATION OF URINARY IODINE STATUS FROM A

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development Vol. 3 No. 1 March 2003 ... representative sample of adolescent girls aged 10 to. 15 years from the ... to examine dietary behaviors. ... can iodine deficiency affect the individual health of .... possibly her emotional health and social standing. Several studies ...

  3. Higher Education Literature Revisited: Citation Patterns Examined

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, John M.; Magnuson, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    The discourse of the field of higher education is complex, as is its analysis. Citation analysis is means of examining communicative processes. This study investigates citations in the papers of three core journals in higher education, "Research in Higher Education, Review of Higher Education," and "Journal of Higher Education." The results…

  4. Health Instruction Packages: Consumer--Self-Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Carolyn; And Others

    These three learning modules present text, illustrations, and exercises to teach lay persons to take and interpret a temperature, collect a urine specimen, and perform a breast examination. The first module, by Carolyn Maas, defines "temperature," describes the three body areas for temperature taking, distinguishes between normal and…

  5. Examination of a Failed Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Rachel L.; Penny, G. Richard

    2015-01-01

    Schools are using various forms of professional learning communities (PLCs) in order to increase student achievement and improve educational practices through enhanced communication and collaboration among teachers. This study examined a PLC that had too narrow a focus and failed therefore to affect student achievement. A critical shortcoming of…

  6. A Method to Examine Content Domain Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Jerome; Karpinski, Aryn; Welsh, Megan

    2011-01-01

    After a test is developed, most content validation analyses shift from ascertaining domain definition to studying domain representation and relevance because the domain is assumed to be set once a test exists. We present an approach that allows for the examination of alternative domain structures based on extant test items. In our example based on…

  7. Nervous system examination on YouTube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azer Samy A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Web 2.0 sites such as YouTube have become a useful resource for knowledge and are used by medical students as a learning resource. This study aimed at assessing videos covering the nervous system examination on YouTube. Methods A research of YouTube was conducted from 2 November to 2 December 2011 using the following key words “nervous system examination”, “nervous system clinical examination”, “cranial nerves examination”, “CNS examination”, “examination of cerebellum”, “balance and coordination examination”. Only relevant videos in the English language were identified and related URL recorded. For each video, the following information was collected: title, author/s, duration, number of viewers, number of posted comments, and total number of days on YouTube. Using criteria comprising content, technical authority and pedagogy parameters, videos were rated independently by three assessors and grouped into educationally useful and non-educationally useful. Results A total of 2240 videos were screened; 129 were found to have relevant information to nervous system examination. Analysis revealed that 61 (47% of the videos provided useful information on the nervous system examination. These videos scored (mean ± SD, 14.9 ± 0.2 and mainly covered examination of the whole nervous system (8 videos, 13%, cranial nerves (42 videos, 69%, upper limbs (6 videos, 10%, lower limbs (3 videos, 5%, balance and co-ordination (2 videos, 3%. The other 68 (53% videos were not useful educationally; scoring (mean ± SD, 11.1 ± 3.0. The total viewers of all videos was 2,189,434. Useful videos were viewed by 1,050,445 viewers (48% of total viewers. The total viewership per day for useful videos was 1,794.5 and for non-useful videos 1,132.0. The differences between the three assessors were insignificant (less than 0.5 for the mean and 0.3 for the SD. Conclusions Currently, YouTube provides an adequate resource

  8. Mistakes in ultrasound examination of salivary glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography is the first imaging method applied in the case of diseases of the salivary glands. The article discusses basic mistakes that can be made during an ultrasound examination of these structures. The reasons for these mistakes may be examiner-dependent or may be beyond their control. The latter may include, inter alia, difficult conditions during examination (technical or patient-related), similarity of ultrasound images in different diseases, the lack of clinical and laboratory data as well as the lack of results of other examinations, their insufficient number or incorrectness. Doctor-related mistakes include: the lack of knowledge of normal anatomy, characteristics of ultrasound images in various salivary gland diseases and statistical incidence of diseases, but also attaching excessive importance to such statistical data. The complex anatomical structures of the floor of the oral cavity may be mistaken for benign or malignant tumors. Fragments of correct anatomical structures (bones, arterial wall fibrosis, air bubbles in the mouth) can be wrongly interpreted as deposits in the salivary gland or in its excretory duct. Correct lymph nodes in the parotid glands may be treated as pathologic structures. Lesions not being a simple cyst, e.g. lymphoma, benign or malignant tumors of the salivary glands or metastatic lymph nodes, can be mistaken for one. The image of disseminated focal changes, both anechoic and solid, is not pathognomonic for specific diseases in the salivary glands. However, in part, it occurs typically and requires an extended differential diagnosis. Small focal changes and infiltrative lesions pose a diagnostic problem because their etiology cannot be safely suggested on the basis of an ultrasound examination itself. The safest approach is to refer patients with abnormal focal changes for an ultrasoundguided fine-needle aspiration biopsy. PMID:27446603

  9. Mistakes in ultrasound examination of salivary glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa J. Białek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonography is the first imaging method applied in the case of diseases of the salivary glands. The article discusses basic mistakes that can be made during an ultrasound examination of these structures. The reasons for these mistakes may be examiner-dependent or may be beyond their control. The latter may include, inter alia, difficult conditions during examination (technical or patient-related, similarity of ultrasound images in different diseases, the lack of clinical and laboratory data as well as the lack of results of other examinations, their insufficient number or incorrectness. Doctor-related mistakes include: the lack of knowledge of normal anatomy, characteristics of ultrasound images in various salivary gland diseases and statistical incidence of diseases, but also attaching excessive importance to such statistical data. The complex anatomical structures of the floor of the oral cavity may be mistaken for benign or malignant tumors. Fragments of correct anatomical structures (bones, arterial wall fibrosis, air bubbles in the mouth can be wrongly interpreted as deposits in the salivary gland or in its excretory duct. Correct lymph nodes in the parotid glands may be treated as pathologic structures. Lesions not being a simple cyst, e.g. lymphoma, benign or malignant tumors of the salivary glands or metastatic lymph nodes, can be mistaken for one. The image of disseminated focal changes, both anechoic and solid, is not pathognomonic for specific diseases in the salivary glands. However, in part, it occurs typically and requires an extended differential diagnosis. Small focal changes and infiltrative lesions pose a diagnostic problem because their etiology cannot be safely suggested on the basis of an ultrasound examination itself. The safest approach is to refer patients with abnormal focal changes for an ultrasoundguided fine-needle aspiration biopsy.

  10. Origins of the sensory examination in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Cassiopeia; Okun, Michael S

    2002-12-01

    Formal testing of sensation as part of the neurological examination followed the improvements in examination techniques as well as advances in neuroscience. By the 1890s, the observation that temperature sense was frequently impaired at the same time that pain was appreciated led to the supposition that the two paths traveled closely. Through the works of Brown-Séquard and Edinger the existence of a crossed afferent tract was verified. The distinction between two sensory pathways was clear by 1898, when van Gehuchten reported a case of syringomyelia and suggested that the pain and temperature fibers were carried anterolaterally and the position sense fibers carried posteriorly in the spinal cord. Many authors describing patients with tabes dorsalis suspected the posterior columns of the spinal cord played a key role in position sense. It is difficult to determine in the 19th century who first employed the use of movements of joints as a test for proprioceptive function; however, Bell in 1826 recognized what he termed a sixth sense, which later was characterized as proprioceptive function. Goldscheider went on to report the degrees of movement that were considered normal for each joint. Although vibratory sense had been described by Cardano and Ingrassia in the 16th century and tests had been developed by Rinne and Rumpf by the 19th century, it was not until 1903 that Rydel and Seiffer found that vibratory sense and proprioceptive sense were closely related and that both senses were carried in the posterior columns of the spinal cord. By 1955, the sensory examination included tests for light-touch, superficial pain, temperature, position sense, vibration, muscle (deep pain), and two-point discrimination. Tests for these sensibilities still remain in use. We will review the origins of the understanding of sensation, which ultimately led to the development of the sensory examination. We will highlight individuals who made important discoveries and observations, as

  11. Examination of shipping package 9975-02403

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    SRNL examined shipping package 9975-02403 following storage of nuclear material in K-Area Complex (KAC). As a result of field surveillance activities in KAC, this package was identified to contain several non-conforming and other conditions. Further examination of this package in SRNL confirmed significant moisture and mold in the bottom layers of the lower fiberboard assembly, and identified additional corrosion along the seam weld and on the bottom of the drum. It was recently recommended that checking for corrosion along the bottom edge of the drum be implemented for packages that are removed from storage, as well as high wattage packages remaining in storage. The appearance of such corrosion on 9975-02403 further indicates that such corrosion may provide an indication of significant moisture concentration and related degradation within the package. This condition is more likely to develop in packages with higher internal heat loads.

  12. TRUPACT-II 157 Examination Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry H. O& #39; Brien; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Kip E. Archibald

    2003-12-01

    This report presents the results of examination and recovery activities performed on the TRUPACT-II 157 shipping container. The container was part of a contact-handled transuranic waste shipment being transported on a truck to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico when an accident occurred. Although the transport vehicle sustained only minor damage, airborne transuranic contamination was detected in air samples extracted from inside TRUPACT-II 157 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Consequently, the shipping container was rejected, resealed, and returned to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory where the payload was disassembled, examined, and recovered for subsequent reshipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This report documents the results of those activities.

  13. RADIOGRAPHIC EXAMINATION OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heru Suryonegoro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The temporomandibular joint has a very important role in the stomatognathic system. Its main function is for the opening and closing movement, mastication, and speech. It is located anterior to the ear. The temporomandibular joint connects maxilla and mandible through the articular fossa, hence the slightest change that happens would cause serious matters such as pain, exiting, speech disorder, difficulty in opening and closing movement, headache, and even trismus. In a child or an adolescent, the symptoms are often vague; everything is interpreted as “pain”. This is probably why temporomandibular disorder are often undetected by dentists. Therefore, patience and accuracy is needed to determine the actual disorder through means of clinical and radiographic examination. The radiographic examination suitable for child is the transcranial projection. This projection is believed to be more accurate amongst other projection for child patients.

  14. Examining properties of arc sprayed nanostructured coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Czupryński

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of examining properties of arc sprayed coating obtained with nano-alloy on the iron matrix with a high amount of fine carbide precipitates sprayed on non-alloyed steel plates intended for high temperature operation. Powder metal cored wire EnDOtec DO*390N 1,6 mm diameter, was used to produce, dense, very high abrasion and erosion resistant coatings approx. 1,0 mm thick. Nano-material coatings characterization was done to determine abrasion resistance, erosion resistance, adhesion strength, hardness as well as metallographic examinations. Results have proved high properties of arc sprayed nano-material coatings and have shown promising industrial applications.

  15. Interdisciplinarity and the Prior Knowledge Profile Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Oñate Gómez

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an activity that has been for years a common assignment for professors and students at the beginning of the school year at the Technical University of Madrid (UPM, for its acronym in Spanish Universidad Politécnica de Madrid: the Knowledge Profile Examination. Among the many variables this examination has, interdisciplinarity is one of the most significant ones. This remarkable meta-cognitive variable, which urgently needs to be studied, researched, solved and qualified, undoubtedly provides the best contributions to the quantity-quality intricacy of knowledge. The solution of the most important pedagogical issues in the coming years depends on it, when the development of a more humane, useful and responsible knowledge at universities is aimed.

  16. Examining the surfaces in used platinum catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trumić B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of finding more advanced platinum catalyst manufacturing technologies and achieving a higher degree of ammonia oxidation, metallographic characterization has been done on the surface of catalyst gauzes and catalyst gripper gauzes made from platinum and palladium alloys. For the examined samples of gauzes as well as the cross section of the wires, a chemical analysis was provided. The purpose of this paper is the metallographic characterization of examined alloys carried out by way of electronic microscopic scanning, X-rays as well as chemical assays which contributed greatly to a better understanding of the surface deactivation, in other words a better consideration of structural changes occurring on the wire surface.

  17. Examining the Relationship Between Ostracism and ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    Bastien, Myla

    2013-01-01

    Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a behavioral disorder characterized by inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity (Cincinnati Children’s, 2013). Much of ADHD research focuses on the potential social consequences of ADHD such as ostracism. More detailed research goes on to examine the impact of ostracism on affect, such as increased depression and anxiety among ostracized individuals. However, recent ostracism research indicates that feelingsof social exclusion may cause a ...

  18. Planning of high school examinations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui; Hansen, Michael Pilegaard

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a computer based support system used to plan high school examinations in Denmark. We will discuss the methods and techniques used to solve such a complex and large scale combinatorial problem. Decomposition and other heuristic principles have been used extensively to develop...... a clear user-friendly and robust approach. The system has been implemented by the Danish Ministry of Education and has been used successfully for the last three years. We will also present some practical experiences....

  19. Accuracy of anemia diagnosis by physical examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Martins Benseñor

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES: Quantification of clinical signs such as the presence or absence of pallor at clinical examination is a key step for making diagnoses. The aim was, firstly, to evaluate two methods for anemia diagnosis by physical examination: four-level evaluation (crosses method: +/++/+++/++++ and estimated hemoglobin values, both performed by medical students and staff physicians; and secondly, to investigate whether there was any improvement in assessment accuracy according to the number of years in clinical practice. DESIGN AND SETTING: Forty-four randomly selected physicians and medical students in a tertiary care teaching hospital completed a physical examination on five patients with mild to severe anemia. METHODS: The observers used four-level evaluation and also predicted the hemoglobin level. Both methods were compared with the real hemoglobin value as the gold standard. RESULTS: The mean estimated hemoglobin value correlated better with the real hemoglobin values than did the four-level evaluation method, for attending physicians, residents and students (Spearman's correlation coefficients, respectively: 1.0, 1.0 and 0.9 for guessed hemoglobin and -0.8, -0.8 and -0.7 for the four-level evaluation method. There were no differences in the mean "guessed" hemoglobin values from attending physicians, residents and students. However, the correlation between guessed hemoglobin value and the four-level method was positive for attending physicians, thus suggesting some kind of improvement with time (p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that estimated hemoglobin was more accurate than evaluation by the four-level method. The number of years in clinical practice did not improve the accuracy of clinical examination for anemia.

  20. Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald I. Templer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP taken by professional (Vail Model graduates had a failure rate of 30.82% in contrast to 7.60% for EPPP licensing exams taken by traditional (Boulder Model graduates of clinical psychology programs. Thus, exams taken by professional graduates were 4.06 more likely to result in failure. It was acknowledged that it is not known whether EPPP performance is related to psychotherapy outcome.

  1. Publishing translated works: Examining the process

    OpenAIRE

    Garby, Taisha Mary

    2015-01-01

    Greystone Books Ltd., based in Vancouver, publishes many translated works. This report is intended to examine the benefits of publishing translated works and compare that to publishing original English language works. This report will analyze two translated works: Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body’s Most Underrated Organ by Giulia Enders, which was translated from German to English, and 1000 Lashes: Because I Say What I Think by Raif Badawi, which was translated from Arabic to English. Greyst...

  2. Examining Computational Assumptions For Godiva IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkland, Alexander Matthew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jaegers, Peter James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-11

    Over the course of summer 2016, the effects of several computational modeling assumptions with respect to the Godiva IV reactor were examined. The majority of these assumptions pertained to modeling errors existing in the control rods and burst rod. The Monte Carlo neutron transport code, MCNP, was used to investigate these modeling changes, primarily by comparing them to that of the original input deck specifications.

  3. Examination of reproducibility in microbiological degredation experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Spliid, Henrik; Holst, Helle

    1998-01-01

    Experimental data indicate that certain microbiological degradation experiments have a limited reproducibility. Nine identical batch experiments were carried out on 3 different days to examine reproducibility. A pure culture, isolated from soil, grew with toluene as the only carbon and energy sou....... The limited reproducibility may be caused by variability in the preculture, or more precisely, variations in the physiological state of the bacteria in the precultures just before used as inoculum....

  4. [Dynamic examination technique in meniscus sonography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füsting, M; Casser, H R

    1991-03-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce an improved dynamic examination technique for sonographic assessment of the menisci, a technique that takes into account the special anatomy and function of the knee joint. The dynamic examination technique was used together with a 7.5 mhz sector transducer fitted with a water or PVC pad attachment when the area around the anterior horn and the pars intermedia was being scanned. Misinterpretation as a result of confusing reflections from a tear with the Hoffa fatty pad, popliteal tendon or popliteal groove can be largely avoided owing to the better sonoanatomic imaging and orientation. Diagnosing lesions of the meniscus from echogenic torn surfaces has also become easier thanks to dynamic examination. 60 patients with, for the most part, chronic knee-joint complaints were selected. A comparison of sonographic and arthroscopic findings demonstrated that large percentages of tears in the meniscus can be detected (76.7%) or ruled out (90.0%), and that recent longitudinal tears, flap and non-luxated bucket-handle tears can be considered to be "ideal" tear shapes. Because of its high specificity, sonography of the meniscus presents itself as a suitable method when lesions have to be ruled out, especially in recent knee injuries where clinical findings are unclear. On the other hand, if there are sure indications of a tear, sonography of the meniscus makes it possible to introduce therapeutic measures immediately and thereby to avoid any possible secondary damage.

  5. Check-up examination: recommendations in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgini, Vanessa; Meindl-Fridez, Claudine; Battegay, Edouard; Zimmerli, Lukas U

    2015-01-01

    Check-up examinations, or periodic health examinations (PHEs), have gained in importance during the last decades and are nowadays among the most common reasons for consultations in primary care settings. The aim of PHEs is to identify risk factors and early signs of disease, but also to prevent future illness by early intervention. Therefore, each PHE should include counselling, immunisation and physical examination according to the patient's age and gender. However, deciding whether to screen a patient and choosing the most appropriate screening method can be challenging for general practitioners. The U.S. Preventive Service Task Force (USPSTF) provides updated recommendations on different existing preventive care measures based on relevant literature review. The aim of this review is to provide an updated statement of recommendations regarding preventive care measures based mostly on the guidelines derived from the USPSTF and the Swiss Medical Board. Among the major updates, there is no recommendation anymore to routinely screen for breast cancer and prostate cancer in asymptomatic adults. Since 2013, however, the USPSTF recommends annual screening for lung cancer with low-dose CT in patients aged 55 to 80 years with a smoking history of ≥30 pack years. During PHEs, the physician should be alert to the patients' hidden agendas, which are the reason for one third of all consultations in primary care.

  6. AGC-1 Post Irradiation Examination Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank

    2011-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Graphite R&D program is currently measuring irradiated material property changes in several grades of nuclear graphite for predicting their behavior and operating performance within the core of new Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment consisting of six irradiation capsules will generate this irradiated graphite performance data for NGNP reactor operating conditions. All six AGC capsules in the experiment will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), disassembled in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF), and examined at the INL Research Center (IRC) or Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This is the first in a series of status reports on the progress of the AGC experiment. As the first capsule, AGC1 was irradiated from September 2009 to January 2011 to a maximum dose level of 6-7 dpa. The capsule was removed from ATR and transferred to the HFEF in April 2011 where the capsule was disassembled and test specimens extracted from the capsules. The first irradiated samples from AGC1 were shipped to the IRC in July 2011and initial post irradiation examination (PIE) activities were begun on the first 37 samples received. PIE activities continue for the remainder of the AGC1 specimen as they are received at the IRC.

  7. Calorimetric examinations of austempered ductile iron ADI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Binczyk

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the results of calorimetric examinations during heating and cooling of austempered ductile iron ADI after austempering at temperatures of 280, 330 and 380oC. The samples for examinations were taken from cast rods of 20 and 60 mm diameter. Examinations were carried out on a differential scanning calorimeter, type Multi HTC S60. During heating, on a DSC curve one strong exothermic effect has been noted to occur (it does not occur in the case of common-grade cast iron, accompanied by two endothermic effects. The exothermic effect occurs within the range of about 20oC. Depending on the temperature of austempering treatment, its beginning falls to the temperatures from 469 to 490oC. The heat of this effect is proportional to the austenite content in ADI matrix after austempering. The endothermic effects are related with decomposition of pearlite (or bainite and with phase transformation α → γ (ferrite as a constituent of ausferritic matrix.

  8. Solving the Examination Timetabling Problem in GPUs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Kolonias

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The examination timetabling problem belongs to the class of combinatorial optimization problems and is of great importance for every University. In this paper, a hybrid evolutionary algorithm running on a GPU is employed to solve the examination timetabling problem. The hybrid evolutionary algorithm proposed has a genetic algorithm component and a greedy steepest descent component. The GPU computational capabilities allow the use of very large population sizes, leading to a more thorough exploration of the problem solution space. The GPU implementation, depending on the size of the problem, is up to twenty six times faster than the identical single-threaded CPU implementation of the algorithm. The algorithm is evaluated with the well known Toronto datasets and compares well with the best results found in the bibliography. Moreover, the selection of the encoding of the chromosomes and the tournament selection size as the population grows are examined and optimized. The compressed sparse row format is used for the conflict matrix and was proven essential to the process, since most of the datasets have a small conflict density, which translates into an extremely sparse matrix.

  9. [The physical examination - a vanishing art?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tönnesmann, Ernst; Goltz, Diane; Lewalter, Thorsten; Welz, Armin

    2016-10-01

    This report describes the case of a 63-year-old female patient who presented with progressive dyspnea to a specialized internal medicine practice. Prior consultations with her primary care physician and a cardiologist followed by hospitalizations in an acute care hospital and in a specialist clinic for cardiology had not yielded a conclusive diagnosis. During the physical examination, significant bilateral lower extremity edema, as well as pronounced jugular venous distention was noted while in a seated position. This prompted further targeted diagnostic examination and testing and resulted in the final diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis of tuberculous origin.The establishment of the diagnosis is discussed in the context of increasingly technologized medical practice, where clinical skills and the significance of the patient history and physical examination are declining. In addition, we discuss the problem of less common diseases of the myo- and pericardium with primarily diastolic (constrictive or restrictive) dysfunction being overlooked in routine cardiological diagnostic procedures, with a focus on coronary heart disease, valve disorders and the impairment of systolic ventricular function ("ejection fraction"). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Substitute fluid examinations for liquid manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Kevin; Riedel, Marco; Eichert, Helmut

    2016-11-01

    For the farming industry it is essential to use liquid manure as natural fertilizer. Through new agricultural regulation 2015 in Germany the industry must develop new liquid manure spreader systems because the ammonia and methane emission are limited. In a research project the University of Applied Sciences Zwickau and some other industry partners will develop such a new innovative liquid manure spreader. The new liquid manure spreader should use pulsating air to distribute the liquid manure exactly. The pulsating air, which flows through the pipelines, should be analysed at a test station. For examinations at this test station it is important to find another substitute fluid because liquid manure smells strong, is not transparent and is also not homogeneous enough for scientific investigations. Furthermore it is important to ensure that the substitute fluid is, like liquid manure, a non-Newtonian fluid. The substitute fluid must be a shear-thinning substance - this means the viscosity decrease at higher shear rate. Many different samples like soap-water-farragoes, jelly-water-farragoes, agar-water-farragoes, soap-ethanol-farragoes and more are, for the project, examined in regard of their physical properties to find the best substitute fluid. The samples are examined at the rotational viscometer for viscosity at various shear rates and then compared with the viscosity values of liquid manure.

  11. Triple jump examinations for dental student assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navazesh, Mahvash; Rich, Sandra K; Chopiuk, Nasrin Bahari; Keim, Robert G

    2013-10-01

    The triple jump examination (TJE) attempts to assess a higher level of learning with demand for analysis, critical thinking, and resolution of problems presented by written scenarios based on patient care situations. The purpose of this study was to examine the internal consistency, scale reliability, and interrater reliability of the TJE used at the Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California. On the sample of 2,227 examinations administered by seventy-seven raters across a three-year time period, the Cronbach's coefficient alpha for internal consistency of the overall TJE was found to be good (a=0.869). The internal consistency of the three subscales was found to be acceptable (a=0.731), good (a=0.820), and good (a=0.820). Average and single measures intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) for scale reliability were significant at p<0.001, indicating strong interrater reliability. There were no statistically significant differences (p≤0.05) in the mean scores assigned on the TJE between rater groups defined by rater experience level with the TJE. A very high level of agreement among rater pairs was also observed. Across the entire three-year study period, with over 19,152 ratings, the seventy-seven raters were in general agreement 99.5 percent of the time and in exact agreement 77.2 percent of the time.

  12. Familienfreundlichkeit im Medizinstudium in Baden-Württemberg. Ergebnisse einer landesweiten Studie [Family-friendliness in Medical Studies in Baden-Württemberg. Results of a State-wide Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niehues, Johanna

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] This paper describes the results of the study on “Family-friendliness of the Medical Studies in Baden-Württemberg” carried out in 2009-2011 by the working group “Family, Time policy and E-Learning” of the University Hospital of Ulm, supported by the Ministry of Science, Research and the Arts of Baden-Württemberg. This state-wide survey of the studying conditions and personal circumstances of medical students with children at the five medical schools in Baden-Württemberg aims to describe existing and necessary factors of family-friendliness. A total of 238 students with children participated in the quantitative online survey conducted during the summer semester 2010 which was based on topics from previous qualitative interviews with student parents.The data shows that even though founding a family while at university is usually planned, student parents are faced with significant compatibility issues, demonstrating the need for additional measures to individualise course organisation and to make the curriculum more flexible. At the same time, the need to significantly increase information and advisory services alongside the establishment of additional support services for student parents is discernable.The study contributes to the debate on the family-friendliness of universities and university hospitals and adds practice-oriented approaches to solutions.[german] Die vorliegende Arbeit beschreibt die Ergebnisse der im Zeitraum 2009-2011 durch die Arbeitsgruppe ‚Familie, Zeitpolitik und E-Learning’ des Universitätsklinikums Ulm durchgeführten, durch das Ministerium für Wissenschaft, Forschung und Kunst Baden-Württemberg geförderten Studie zum ‚Familienfreundlichen Studium in der Medizin in Baden-Württemberg’. Die landesweite Erhebung der Studien- und Lebensbedingungen Studierender mit Kind in der Humanmedizin an den fünf Medizinischen Fakultäten in Baden-Württemberg hat zum Ziel, bestehende und notwendige

  13. Making the Aural Presentation of Examination Papers Student Friendly: An Alternative to a Reader in Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeham, Sheila; Lee, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Where a student can benefit from having an examination paper presented aurally, the traditional method is to provide a reader. This can be socially uncomfortable for students, and offers of readers are frequently declined. A trial is reported in which examinations were presented on an Apple iPod. This is a medium with which many students are…

  14. Correlation of United States Medical Licensing Examination and Internal Medicine In-Training Examination Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jose A., Jr.; Greer, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (ITE) is administered during residency training in the United States as a self-assessment and program assessment tool. Performance on this exam correlates with outcome on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying examination. Internal Medicine Program Directors use the United States Medical…

  15. Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Piyush; Dewan, Pooja; Singh, Tejinder

    2010-11-01

    Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) was introduced in 1975 as a standardized tool for objectively assessing clinical competencies - including history-taking, physical examination, communication skills, data interpretation etc. It consists of a circuit of stations connected in series, with each station devoted to assessment of a particular competency using pre-determined guidelines or checklists. OSCE has been used as a tool for both formative and summative evaluation of medical graduate and postgraduate students across the globe. The use of OSCE for formative assessment has great potential as the learners can gain insights into the elements making up clinical competencies as well as feedback on personal strengths and weaknesses. However, the success of OSCE is dependent on adequacy of resources, including the number of stations, construction of stations, method of scoring (checklists and or global scoring), the number of students assessed, and adequate time and money. Lately, OSCE has drawn some criticism for its lack of validity, feasibility, practicality, and objectivity. There is evidence to show that many OSCEs may be too short to achieve reliable results. There are also currently no clear cut standards set for passing an OSCE. It is perceived that OSCEs test the students knowledge and skills in a compartmentalized fashion, rather than looking at the patient as a whole. This article focuses on the issues of validity, objectivity, reliability, and standard setting of OSCE. Presently, the Indian experiences with OSCE are limited and there is a need to sensitise the Indian faculty and students. A cautious approach is desired before it is considered as a supplementary tool to other methods of assessment for the summative examinations in Indian settings.

  16. A brief examination of optical tagging technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Cahill, Paul A. (Aspecular Optics, Dayton, OH); Drummond, Timothy J.; Wilcoxon, Jess Patrick

    2003-07-01

    Presented within this report are the results of a brief examination of optical tagging technologies funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was performed during the summer months of 2002 with total funding of $65k. The intent of the project was to briefly examine a broad range of approaches to optical tagging concentrating on the wavelength range between ultraviolet (UV) and the short wavelength infrared (SWIR, {lambda} < 2{micro}m). Tagging approaches considered include such things as simple combinations of reflective and absorptive materials closely spaced in wavelength to give a high contrast over a short range of wavelengths, rare-earth oxides in transparent binders to produce a narrow absorption line hyperspectral tag, and fluorescing materials such as phosphors, dies and chemically precipitated particles. One technical approach examined in slightly greater detail was the use of fluorescing nano particles of metals and semiconductor materials. The idea was to embed such nano particles in an oily film or transparent paint binder. When pumped with a SWIR laser such as that produced by laser diodes at {lambda}=1.54{micro}m, the particles would fluoresce at slightly longer wavelengths, thereby giving a unique signal. While it is believed that optical tags are important for military, intelligence and even law enforcement applications, as a business area, tags do not appear to represent a high on return investment. Other government agencies frequently shop for existing or mature tag technologies but rarely are interested enough to pay for development of an untried technical approach. It was hoped that through a relatively small investment of laboratory R&D funds, enough technologies could be identified that a potential customers requirements could be met with a minimum of additional development work. Only time will tell if this proves to be correct.

  17. Microstructural examination of irradiated vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Chung, H.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Microstructural examination results are reported for a V-5Cr-5Ti unirradiated control specimens of heat BL-63 following annealing at 1050{degrees}C, and V-4Cr-4Ti heat BL-47 irradiated in three conditions from the DHCE experiment: at 425{degrees}C to 31 dpa and 0.39 appm He/dpa, at 600{degrees}C to 18 dpa and 0.54 appm He/dpa and at 600{degrees}C to 18 dpa and 4.17 appm He/dpa.

  18. Neurological examination: pioneering authors and their books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péricles Maranhão-Filho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to highlight some of the most important pioneering books specifically focused on the neurological examination and their authors. During the XIX Century, Alexander Hammond, William Gowers and Charles Mills pioneered the neurological literature, followed in the XX Century by Aloysio de Castro, Monrad-Krohn, Derek Denny-Brown, Robert Wartenberg, Gordon Holmes, and Russel DeJong. With determination and a marked sense of observation and research, they competently developed and spread the technique and art of the neurological exam.

  19. EXAMINATION RESULTS OF CHILDREN WITH CERVICAL SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Bakhteeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available By the example of examination of 80 children aged from 4 to 18 with cervical syndrome it is indicated, that the diagnosed abnormalities of hemodynamics in vertebrobasilar basin in patients of all age groups are connected both with bone and vascular pathology of the cervical part of the spine. The pathology has functional or congenital character. Early detection of discicirculatory vascular injuries in the cervical part of the spine in children with cervical syndrome will allow to define the therapeutic management of patients and to prolong juvenile osteochondrosis clinical behaviour.

  20. An Examination of "The Martian" Trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This analysis was performed to support a request to examine the trajectory of the Hermes vehicle in the novel "The Martian" by Andy Weir. Weir developed his own tool to perform the analysis necessary to provide proper trajectory information for the novel. The Hermes vehicle is the interplanetary spacecraft that shuttles the crew to and from Mars. It is notionally a Nuclear powered vehicle utilizing VASIMR engines for propulsion. The intent of this analysis was the determine whether the trajectory as it was outlined in the novel is consistent with the rules of orbital mechanics.

  1. Hot Fuel Examination Facility/South

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-05-01

    This document describes the potential environmental impacts associated with proposed modifications to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility/South (HFEF/S). The proposed action, to modify the existing HFEF/S at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho, would allow important aspects of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept, offering potential advantages in nuclear safety and economics, to be demonstrated. It would support fuel cycle experiments and would supply fresh fuel to the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at the INEL. 35 refs., 12 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. Examining the Reuse of Open Textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Hilton III

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available An important element of open educational resources (OER is the permission to use the materials in new ways, including revising and remixing them. Prior research has shown that the revision and remix rates for OER are relatively low. In this study we examined the extent to which the openly licensed Flat World Knowledge textbooks were being revised and remixed. We found that the levels of revision and remix were similar to those of other OER collections. We discuss the possible significance and implication of these findings.

  3. Magnetic scanner for forensic examination of audiotapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Michael E.; Schwarz, Willi G.; Malsawma, Lex; Wallace, Robert B.; Ryan, James J.

    1999-02-01

    The use of a new Magnetic Media Imaging Instrument (MMII) as applied to the forensic investigation of audio tapes is reported. The MMII is an instrument that produces a 2D image of the magnetic fields on a segment of tape up to 5 cm long, with a resolution of about 3 microns. The dynamic range exceeds 40 dB. This allows the visualization of important characteristics such as stop marks with much greater detail than is possible with conventional means such as ferrofluids. Results of tests representing typical forensic examinations are presented.

  4. Examination of SR101 shipping packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daugherty, W. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-03-01

    Four SR101 shipping packages were removed from service and provided for disassembly and examination of the internal fiberboard assemblies. These packages were 20 years old, and had experienced varying levels of degradation. Two of the packages were successfully disassembled and fiberboard samples were removed from these packages and tested. Mechanical and thermal property values are generally comparable to or higher than baseline values measured on fiberboard from 9975 packages, which differs primarily in the specified density range. While baseline data for the SR101 material is not available, this comparison with 9975 material suggests that the material properties of the SR101 fiberboard have not significantly degraded.

  5. Examining How Manufacturing Corporations Win Orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Bing Tsai

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study adopted 14 criteria for order-winners and qualifiers as the attributes for evaluation. The first stage used a simultaneous importance-performance analysis to analyse the competitive market situations of a corporation and its competitors. The second stage used the decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory method to analyse the attributes causal relationships and levels of influence; then two methods of analysis were integrated to analyse and re-formulate the competitive strategies for the winning orders. As well as serving as a novel theory-based method to examine how manufacturers win orders, the proposals in this study can be applied to practical industry experiences.

  6. Learning Pelvic Examination with Professional Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Shrestha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Performing pelvic examination is a vital skill to learn during gynecological and obstetrical training. It's a difficult maneuver to master as there is very little to see and more to feel and interpret. In addition, learning PE in usual clinical set-up has been found to induce lot of stress and anxiety among both the patients and the students. Students fear of hurting the patients and being judged inept, whereas patients feel embarrassed having to expose their most intimate body parts for learning purpose. This hampers effective learning. Learning PE on sedated women before surgery or on mannequins has been practiced as alternative learning models. But, they have been found to miss out on teaching the communication skills, which are as important as the palpation skills. However, there exists another model of learning PE--the professional patients, who are specially trained to act as patients and also guide the students on how to make a proper PE. They provide stress-free environment for the students to learn PE and at the same time, provide immediate feedback on each of their maneuvers. They form a complete learning model and help students to see patients as partner and not just a person seeking help. Keywords: learning model, pelvic examination, stress, students.

  7. Examinations for MRA imaging of maxillary artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatani, Atsutoshi [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Dentistry

    2000-09-01

    The optimal conditions for the magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) imaging of the maxillary artery were examined without the contrast medium. Imaging was done with 1.5 T Signa Horizon MR scanner (GE) with QD coil for the head and neck, and data were processed on line by Advantage Workstation (GE). Parameters examined were the flip angle (FA) and repetition time (TR). Subjects were healthy normal volunteers whose number and imaging conditions were, respectively, 20 and 2D TOF method with TR=17 ms/FA=15 deg -90 deg, 20 and 3D TOF with FA=20 deg/TR=20-60 ms, 5 and 2D PC with varied FA/TR, and 20 and 3D PC with TR=30 ms/FA=5 deg -45 deg. Images were assessed by S/N (signal/noise) ratio objectively and by subjective visual scoring and compared with each other for those methods above. It was found that for the non-invasive method, MRA imaging of the maxillary artery can be optimally conducted by 2D TOF method at FA=75 deg, which can be a standard method of pre-operative diagnosis in oral surgery. (K.H.)

  8. ABR Examinations: The Why, What, and How

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Gary J.; Bosma, Jennifer L., E-mail: jbosma@theabr.org; Guiberteau, Milton J.; Gerdeman, Anthony M.; Frush, Donald P.; Borgstede, James P.

    2013-10-01

    The American Board of Radiology (ABR) has provided certification for diagnostic radiologists and other specialists and subspecialists for more than 75 years. The Board certification process is a tangible expression of the social contract between the profession and the public by which the profession enjoys the privilege of self-regulation and the public is assured that it can expect medical professionals to put patients' interests first, guarantees the competence of practitioners, and guards the public health. A primary tool used by the ABR in fulfilling this responsibility is the secure proctored examination. This article sets forth seven standards based on authoritative sources in the field of psychometrics (the science of mental measurements), and explains in each case how the ABR implements that standard. Readers are encouraged to understand that, despite the multiple opinions that may be held, these standards developed over decades by experts using the scientific method should be the central feature in any discussion or critique of examinations given for the privilege of professional practice and for safeguarding the public well-being.

  9. [Diagnosis and Clinical Examination of Autoinflammatory Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Hiroaki

    2015-05-01

    Autoinflammatory syndrome is characterized by: 1) episodes of seemingly unprovoked inflammation, 2) the absence of a high titer of autoantibodies or auto-reactive T cells, and 3) an inborn error of innate immunity. In this decade, many autoinflammatory syndromes have been reported in Japan, and so many Japanese physicians have become aware of this syndrome. Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes present with excessive systemic inflammation including fever, rashes, arthritis, and organ-specific inflammation and are caused by defects in single genes encoding proteins that regulate innate inflammatory pathways. The main monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes are familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), Blau syndrome, and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome. We diagnosed these syndromes as clinical manifestations and performed genetic screening. Many serum cytokines are elevated in patients with autoinflammatory syndrome, but this is not disease-specific. The pathogeneses of many autoinflammatory syndromes are known to be related to inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that serve as a platform for caspase 1 activation and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 muturation. Especially, NLRP3 inflammasomes may play a crucial role in the intiation and progression of FMF and CAPS. In the future, we hope to discover new clinical examinations which can provide evidence of inflammasome activation independent of genetic screening. In this issue, I introduce autoinflammatory syndromes and discuss the diagnosis and clinical examination of these syndromes.

  10. Examining different factors in effectiveness of advertisement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Gholamreza Jalali Naini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the effects of different factors on advertising by examining the simultaneous effects of exposure to the advertisement, type of the media, creativity in advertisements and being informative. Using data collected from one of the chain supermarkets of Tehran called “Shahrvand”; the analysis focuses on the effectiveness of four independent variables and impact of customers’ needs on encouraging consumers to purchase. The results elucidate a relationship among these four variables with encouraging people to purchase. Using creativity in advertisements, however dominate the effects on this issue. The marketing and advertisement environment are dynamic and the paper concentrates only on some of the more effective factors. Producers might be more successful in choosing the best way to promote their goods and services by following the proposed model. This paper puts four effective factors together and investigates their impact on advertisement, which was not done by any other previous papers. Unlike other studies, this paper examines the role of customer needs together with four other elements on advertisement effectiveness.

  11. Sixty years of dynamic examination of drawings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hárdi, István

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic examination of drawing is a serial-comparative follow-up of drawings asking the patients to draw a person and an animal, - before, during the course and after - the treatment. We follow and compare clinical, psychopathological changes with the graphic ones based on dynamic psychopathologic processes. The material collected over 60 years consists of 85714 drawings, with 4710 series, including extended time observation of more than 10 years with 454 patients. Contrary to projective-associative methods, the emphasis here is placed on the changes of formal, dynamic elements and afterwards on the content. Some aspects of our evaluation are the following: alterations of line, impoverishment-enrichment, disproportion-proportion, deformation-harmony, deficiency-completeness, regression progression, and reintegration. Personality levels of drawings is one of the most important category, various types of adult drawings similar but not identical to children developmental phases of drawings. By the aid of personality levels of drawings comparison of the members of series regression could be more precisely stated, just as the grade of recovery. Dynamic examination of drawing has been practiced in outpatient and inpatient circumstances, differing from the atelier situation. It does not need special expensive technical equipments, or conditions and you can use it for evaluating pathologic and therapeutic processes, states and progression.

  12. Multimodal MR examination in acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezzapesa, D.M.; Petruzzellis, M.; Lucivero, V.; Prontera, M.; Tinelli, A.; Sancilio, M.; Carella, A.; Federico, F. [University of Bari, Department of Neurological and Psychiatric Sciences, Bari (Italy)

    2006-04-15

    In recent years, combined diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with perfusion imaging (PI) has become an important investigational tool in the acute phase of ischemic stroke, as it may differentiate reversible from irreversible brain tissue damage. We consecutively examined 20 subjects within 12 h of stroke onset using a multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) examination consisting of DWI, mean transit time (MTT) as PI parameter, and MR angiography (MRA). T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) on day 7 were also acquired in order to obtain final infarct volume. The following MR parameters were considered: volumetric measures of lesion growth and MTT abnormalities, quantification of regional apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and visual inspection of MRA findings. Our results showed: (1) an acute DWI lesion was not predictive of lesion growth and the DWI abnormality did not represent the irreversibly infarcted tissue; (2) ADC values in the ischemic penumbra could not predict tissue at risk; (3) the DWI-PI mismatch did not predict lesion growth, and the PI abnormality overestimated the amount of tissue at risk; and (4) patients with proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion had greater initial and final infarct volumes. This study did not demonstrate the prognostic value of a multimodal MR approach in early ischemic stroke; MRA alone provided predictive information about the volumetric evolution of the lesion. (orig.)

  13. Examining Citizens’ Contact to Local Public Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina Bente

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective - This study aims to explore the communication process within local public administration as a determinant of citizens` satisfaction. Prior work - Several authors had examined if having contact with certain service providers will affect people’s attitudes toward the service quality, but the researchers have not focused yet on the effect of citizens` contact to local authorities on satisfaction. Approach - This research seeks to address this field using an exploratory approach. Following a quantitative methodological approach, a survey was applied to a sample of 380 citizens within Western Romanian. Findings - By analyzing data it was possible to determine citizen satisfaction and to assess its relationship with costumer contact. In addition it was revealed that in Crisana Region city hall is the most frequented local public institution. Implications – The results showed a negative effect of frequency of access to local authorities on overall customer satisfaction. The effect of citizens` contact to local authorities received less attention from the academic researchers, as a need in the literature is to expand this field. Value - This research is the first to specifically examine the contact to local authorities and the effect of frequency of addressing on citizen satisfaction within Crisana Region.

  14. ADAPTING ON DEMAND EXAMINATION SYSTEM IN NATIONAL OPEN UNIVERSITY OF NIGERIA END OF SEMESTER EXAMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okonkwo, Charity AKUADI

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Teaching–learning process is incomplete without effective and meaningful assessment of students learning outcomes. This applies to both conventional modes of education as well as to open and distance learning modes. So far, conduct of examinations at the National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN, has been cumbersome and be-decked with ‘hydra headed’ problems, such as: dearth of skilled academics, finances, prompt marking of scripts and collation/processing of acceptable results leading to release of incomplete or meaningless results. Hence the need for re-engineering the examination process at the NOUN. This paper discusses the On Demand Examination System (ODES, an Information Communication and Technology (ICT based innovation which enables the assessment of students, as at and on their own readiness and demand. But, opined that NOUN can make better use of ODES by convenient adaptation and use of the ODES software functionalities and processes. The ODES can be used to handle the challenging examination processes such as generating items that could be administered to students as a group at the End of Semester Examination. The results of the examination can then be timely processedd and released following the laid down procedures already entrenched by the use of the software to overcome most of the burden experienced so far. Since, the institution, the students and even the staff are not technologically ready for On Demand Examination for now.

  15. AGR-1 Post Irradiation Examination Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkowicz, Paul Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-1 experiment was a multi-year, collaborative effort between Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the performance of UCO (uranium carbide, uranium oxide) tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel fabricated in the U.S. and irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor at INL to a peak burnup of 19.6% fissions per initial metal atom. This work involved a broad array of experiments and analyses to evaluate the level of fission product retention by the fuel particles and compacts (both during irradiation and during post-irradiation heating tests to simulate reactor accident conditions), investigate the kernel and coating layer morphology evolution and the causes of coating failure, and explore the migration of fission products through the coating layers. The results have generally confirmed the excellent performance of the AGR-1 fuel, first indicated during the irradiation by the observation of zero TRISO coated particle failures out of 298,000 particles in the experiment. Overall release of fission products was determined by PIE to have been relatively low during the irradiation. A significant finding was the extremely low levels of cesium released through intact coatings. This was true both during the irradiation and during post-irradiation heating tests to temperatures as high as 1800°C. Post-irradiation safety test fuel performance was generally excellent. Silver release from the particles and compacts during irradiation was often very high. Extensive microanalysis of fuel particles was performed after irradiation and after high-temperature safety testing. The results of particle microanalysis indicate that the UCO fuel is effective at controlling the oxygen partial pressure within the particle and limiting kernel migration. Post-irradiation examination has provided the final body of data that speaks to the quality of the AGR-1 fuel, building

  16. Correlation of the National Emergency Medicine M4 Clerkship Examination with USMLE Examination Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luan E. Lawson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Assessment of medical students’ knowledge in clinical settings is complex yet essential to the learning process. Clinical clerkships use various types of written examinations to objectively test medical knowledge within a given discipline. Within emergency medicine (EM, a new national standardized exam was developed to test medical knowledge in this specialty. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of a new examination is an important issue to address during test development and use. Studies have shown that student performance on selected standardized exams will reveal students’ strengths and/or weaknesses, so that effective remedial efforts can be implemented. Our study sought to address these issues by examining the association of scores on the new EM national exam with other standardized exam scores. Methods: From August 2011 to April 2013, average National EM M4 examination scores of fourthyear medical students taken at the end of a required EM clerkship were compiled. We examined the correlation of the National EM M4 examination with the scores of initial attempts of the United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK examinations. Correlation coefficients and 95% confidence intervals of correlation coefficients are reported. We also examined the association between the national EM M4 examination score, final grades for the EM rotation, and USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 CK scores. Results: 133 students were included in the study and achieved a mean score of 79.5 SD 8.0 on the National EM M4 exam compared to a national mean of 79.7 SD 3.89. The mean USMLE Step 1 score was 226.8 SD 19.3. The mean USMLE Step 2 CK score was 238.5 SD 18.9. National EM M4 examination scores showed moderate correlation with both USMLE Step 1 (mean score=226.8; correlation coefficient=0.50; 95% CI [0.28-0.67] and USMLE Step 2 CK (mean score=238.5; correlation coefficient=0.47; 95% CI [0.25-0.65]. Students scoring

  17. Determination of attitudes with gynecologic examination and anxiety of Turkish women before gynecologic examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nülüfer Erbil

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was planned with the purpose determination of attitudes with gynecologic examination and anxiety of Turkish women before gynecologic examination.Material & Methods: The sample of this descriptive and cross-sectional constituted by 240 women, applying for gynecologic examination in Gynecologic Policlinic of Ordu Maternity-Gynecologic and Child Hospital of who accepted to participate in the research. The data were collected with of a questionnarie form and State Anxiety Inventory. This study was made between the dates of 4 April- 30 May 2006. In the analysis of data, frequency, percentage, standart deviation, arithmetic mean, Kruskal wallis test, t test, ANOVA varience analysis, Mann –Whitney U test and Chi square test were used.Results: In the research, it was determined that the state axiety average point of women is 43.85±5,41. It was been that level anxiety of women before gynecologic examination was “middle level anxiety”. It was found that there is a significant between state anxiety inventory points according to the job and gynecologic examination experience of women order in the family with state anxiety (P=,000. Doctor’s knowledge and capability (63,8%, doctor’s knowledge giving (44,6% and doctor’s complaisant (41,7% were important in women’ doctor preferring for gynecologic examination. It was found that 37,5% of the women desired only doctor and 37,1% of the women desired their husband during gynecologic examination. It was determined that women felt uncomfortable because of nakedness genital organs of them (67,1% and negatif communication between doctor and women (39,6% in previously gynecologic examination. Women perceived feelings as embarrassment (62,5%, distress (38,8%, fear (37,9%, pain (21,7% during gynecologic examination. Expectations of women from health professionals during gynecologic examination were complaisant (45,0%, interest (28,3%, perceptiveness (24,2%.Conclusion: This study

  18. Accredited clinical coder examination 1996 results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J; Holmes, L

    In September 1996, 148 candidates sat for the first Australian Clinical Coder (ACC) accreditation examination at 19 sites across Australia and New Zealand. This event was an important milestone for clinical coders in Australia. Around one third of the candidates who sat for the exam gained accreditation. The results show that the candidates who were most likely to be successful in gaining accreditation: worked in public hospitals (of any size) or private hospitals with more than 150 beds spent 25 hours or more each week on coding or coding-related activities had been coding for three or more years. The greatest percentage of successful candidates had been coding for 10 or more years.

  19. Teamwork in AAC: examining clinical perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batorowicz, Beata; Shepherd, Tracy A

    2011-03-01

    This study examines Prescription Review (PR), a model of teamwork practiced in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) centres in Ontario, Canada. PR is a process in which teams make decisions about AAC system recommendations. For this study, 92 out of 141 professionals working on AAC teams completed questionnaires measuring the benefits of PR. Findings suggest that PR is beneficial in the areas of learning, providing quality services, team support, and decision making. Participants reported satisfaction with the quality of treatment plan, the PR results, and process. Perceptions of PR were related to size of the teams, participants' years of experience, and the range of experience on teams. This study supports PR and highlights the importance of healthy working relationships.

  20. VIDE: The Void IDentification and Examination toolkit

    CERN Document Server

    Sutter, P M; Hamaus, Nico; Pisani, Alice; Wandelt, Benjamin D; Warren, Michael S; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Zivick, Paul; Mao, Qingqing; Thompson, Benjamin B

    2014-01-01

    We present VIDE, the Void IDentification and Examination toolkit, an open-source Python/C++ code for finding cosmic voids in galaxy redshift surveys and N-body simulations, characterizing their properties, and providing a platform for more detailed analysis. At its core, VIDE uses a greatly enhanced version of ZOBOV (Neyinck 2008) to calculate a Voronoi tessellation for estimating the density field and a watershed transform to construct voids. The watershed levels are used to place voids in a hierarchical tree. VIDE provides significant additional functionality for both pre- and post-processing: for example, VIDE can work with volume- or magnitude-limited galaxy samples with arbitrary survey geometries, or dark matter particles or halo catalogs in a variety of common formats. It can also randomly subsample inputs and includes a Halo Occupation Distribution model for constructing mock galaxy populations. VIDE outputs a summary of void properties in plain ASCII, and provides a Python API to perform many analysi...