WorldWideScience

Sample records for facing young people

  1. Emotion Recognition in Faces and the Use of Visual Context in Young People with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Barry; Clarke, Natalie; Jordan, Jo; Young, Andrew W.; Clarke, Paula; Miles, Jeremy; Nation, Kate; Clarke, Leesa; Williams, Christine

    2008-01-01

    We compared young people with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) with age, sex and IQ matched controls on emotion recognition of faces and pictorial context. Each participant completed two tests of emotion recognition. The first used Ekman series faces. The second used facial expressions in visual context. A control task involved…

  2. Emotion Recognition in Faces and the Use of Visual Context in Young People with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Barry; Clarke, Natalie; Jordan, Jo; Young, Andrew W.; Clarke, Paula; Miles, Jeremy; Nation, Kate; Clarke, Leesa; Williams, Christine

    2008-01-01

    We compared young people with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) with age, sex and IQ matched controls on emotion recognition of faces and pictorial context. Each participant completed two tests of emotion recognition. The first used Ekman series faces. The second used facial expressions in visual context. A control task involved…

  3. Gamma activation in young people with autism spectrum disorders and typically-developing controls when viewing emotions on faces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Wright

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Behavioural studies have highlighted irregularities in recognition of facial affect in children and young people with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. Recent findings from studies utilising electroencephalography (EEG and magnetoencephalography (MEG have identified abnormal activation and irregular maintenance of gamma (>30 Hz range oscillations when ASD individuals attempt basic visual and auditory tasks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The pilot study reported here is the first study to use spatial filtering techniques in MEG to explore face processing in children with ASD. We set out to examine theoretical suggestions that gamma activation underlying face processing may be different in a group of children and young people with ASD (n = 13 compared to typically developing (TD age, gender and IQ matched controls. Beamforming and virtual electrode techniques were used to assess spatially localised induced and evoked activity. While lower-band (3-30 Hz responses to faces were similar between groups, the ASD gamma response in occipital areas was observed to be largely absent when viewing emotions on faces. Virtual electrode analysis indicated the presence of intact evoked responses but abnormal induced activity in ASD participants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings lend weight to previous suggestions that specific components of the early visual response to emotional faces is abnormal in ASD. Elucidation of the nature and specificity of these findings is worthy of further research.

  4. The contribution of youth work to address the challenges young people are facing, in particular the transition from education to employment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Louw, Arnt Vestergaard

    The findings of the expert group detail the role of youth work and its specific contribution to addressing the challenges young people face, in particular the transition from education to employment. In this context, youth work is defined as 'actions directed towards young people regarding activi...... activities where they take part voluntarily, designed for supporting their personal and social development through non-formal and informal learning'....

  5. The hidden face of income transfer programs for young people in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Pontes Sposito

    Full Text Available Based on a broader analysis of the nature of recent public policies directed at youths in Brazil and on the conflicting orientations inherent in this field, this paper discusses the presuppositions contained in three public programs currently being implemented in the country: the Young Agent Project, the Voluntary Civil Service Program and the Work-Income Allowance Program. After an overview of each of these programs, including various aspects where they diverge, the analysis focuses on the paradoxes and ambiguities underlining their common format: the transfer of income linked to some kind of return commitment by the youngsters, usually a return to or continuation of schooling and the realization of socioeducational or community-type activities. While acknowledging the beneficial side of access to income, the paper warns of the possibility of disseminating new forms of domination based on the adoption of this model in public policies directed at youngsters.

  6. Recruiting young people with a visible difference to the YP Face IT feasibility trial: a qualitative exploration of primary care staff experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlet, Claire; Williamson, Heidi; Harcourt, Diana

    2017-08-14

    Qualitative research methods embedded within feasibility trials are of significant value as they can provide important information for a definitive trial, often unable to be fulfilled by quantitative methods alone. In addition, such information can aid researchers running other trials or evaluating interventions on a similar topic. Aim This study aimed to explore GP and nurses' experiences of recruiting to a trial exploring the feasibility of evaluating YP Face IT, a novel online psychosocial intervention to support young people with appearance-altering conditions. During the recruitment period, a focus group with participating GPs and nurses explored recruitment challenges. In addition, at the end of the recruitment period, telephone interviews were conducted with eight GPs and nurses involved in recruiting to the study, in order to inform a definitive trial of YP Face IT. Transcripts were subjected to thematic analysis. Findings Despite reporting that the study was valuable and interesting, interviewees struggled to recruit in-consultation. They appeared to lack confidence in raising the sensitive issue of a visible difference and adopted strategies to avoid mentioning the topic. Participants felt the nature of the target population, as well as pressures of the primary care environment presented challenges to recruitment, but welcomed YP Face IT as an intervention that could address unmet support needs. Primary care staff may benefit from training to help them raise the subject of a visible difference with young people in order to identify those that require additional support.

  7. Drugs and Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fully developed. As a result, the brains of young people may be more susceptible to drug abuse and addiction than adult brains. Abused drugs include Amphetamines Anabolic ... better to prevent drug abuse in the first place. NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse

  8. How Young People Communicate-A Czech Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Eddie Fisher; Pavl¨ªna Rupov¨¢; Dominika Bittnerov¨¢

    2014-01-01

    There appears to be a relationship between the latest communications technology and how effectively young people communicate. It is a world-wide phenomenon. This research investigates how young people in the Czech Republic communicate today in an era of increased use of social media and mobile technology. The research was limited to the city of Olomouc. Results suggest that face to face communications by and amongst young people are diminishing fast at the expense of social media such as Face...

  9. Comparing young people's experience of technology-delivered v. face-to-face mindfulness and relaxation: two-armed qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunney, Conall; Cooney, Patricia; Coyle, David; O'Reilly, Gary

    2017-04-01

    BackgroundThe current popularity of mindfulness-based practices has coincided with the increase in access to mobile technology. This has led to many mindfulness apps and programs becoming available, some specifically for children. However, little is known about the experience of engaging with mindfulness through these mediums.AimsTo explore children's experience of mindfulness delivered both face-to-face and through a computer game to highlight any differences or similarities.MethodA two-armed qualitative focus groups design was used to explore children's experiences. The first arm offered mindfulness exercises in a traditional face-to-face setting with guided meditations. The second arm offered mindfulness exercises through a computer game avatar.ResultsThemes of relaxation, engagement, awareness, thinking, practice and directing attention emerged from both arms of focus groups. Subthematic codes highlight key differences as well as similarities in the experience of mindfulness.ConclusionsThese results indicate that mindfulness delivered via technology can offer a rich experience. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  10. Emotion talk in the context of young people self-harming: facing the feelings in family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Alice; Schmidt, Petra

    2016-04-01

    This article describes the use of emotion talk in the context of using a manualised approach to family therapy where the presenting problem is self-harm. Whilst we understand that there is an internal aspect to emotion, we also consider emotions to be socially purposeful, culturally constructed and interactional. We found that within the presenting families, negative emotions were often talked about as located within the young person. Through using 'emotion talk' (Fredman, 2004) in deconstructing and tracking emotions and exploring how emotions connected to family-of-origin and cultural contexts, we developed an interactional understanding of these emotions. This led to better emotional regulation within the family and offered alternative ways of relating. The article discusses the use of relational reflexivity, and using the therapist and team's emotions to enable the therapeutic process, encouraging reflexivity on the self of the therapist in relation to work with emotions.

  11. The Cedar Project: resilience in the face of HIV vulnerability within a cohort study involving young Indigenous people who use drugs in three Canadian cities

    OpenAIRE

    Pearce, Margo E.; Jongbloed, Kate A.; Richardson, Chris G.; Henderson, Earl W.; Pooyak, Sherri D.; Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia; Christian, Wunuxtsin M.; Schechter, Martin T.; Spittal, Patricia M.; ,

    2015-01-01

    Background Indigenous scholars have long argued that it is critical for researchers to identify factors related to cultural connectedness that may protect against HIV and hepatitis C infection and buffer the effects of historical and lifetime trauma among young Indigenous peoples. To our knowledge, no previous epidemiological studies have explored the effect of historical and lifetime traumas, cultural connectedness, and risk factors on resilience among young, urban Indigenous people who use ...

  12. Effective Communication with Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Patrick; Elliott, David

    2009-01-01

    The Australian Government established the Office for Youth (the Office) in September 2008 in an effort to engage with the young people of Australia. The Office will work with other government agencies to help young people reach their full potential; make effective transitions to adulthood as they continue to learn, start work, make decisions that…

  13. Young people and sexual orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisette Kuyper

    2015-01-01

    Original title: Young people and sexual orientation The Netherlands Institute for Social Research ¦ SCP carries out regular research on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals. In this report, the focus is on young people in the Netherlands. The report addresses two issues: attitud

  14. Young Peoples' Ideas of Infinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, John

    2001-01-01

    Considers young peoples' views of infinity prior to instruction in the methods mathematicians use in addressing the subject of infinity. Presents a partially historical account of studies examining young peoples' ideas of infinity. Four sections address potential pitfalls for research in this area and the work of Piaget, issues concerning the…

  15. Young people and sexual orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisette Kuyper

    2015-01-01

    Original title: Young people and sexual orientation The Netherlands Institute for Social Research ¦ SCP carries out regular research on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals. In this report, the focus is on young people in the Netherlands. The report addresses two issues:

  16. Young People and Contemporary Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illeris, Helene

    2005-01-01

    In this article empirical examples are used to connect theories about young people, contemporary art forms and learning. The first part of the article introduces the new forms of consciousness which, according to the youth researchers Birgitte Simonsen and Thomas Ziehe, characterize young people of today. In the second part, the qualities of…

  17. Priorities for children and young people - opportunities and challenges for children and young people's nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Fiona

    2016-05-09

    Across Europe children's nurses today face many challenges, including rising childhood obesity, the soaring incidence of issues with the mental health of children and young people, the effects of social media, child maltreatment and the impact of poverty, war and conflict on children and families. There are opportunities for children's nurses to undertake new roles and to influence both policy and practice to improve the health outcomes of children and young people, and thereby the future health of the population.

  18. Research-based Reflections on How the Educational, Economic and Social Circumstances Faced by Some Children and Young People Can Lead to Significant Disadvantage and Vulnerability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tucker Stanley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides detailed reflections on the educational, economic and social circumstances that impact on the lives of many disadvantaged and vulnerable children and young people. Drawing largely on primary research data collected in Romania, Germany and the United Kingdom, three illustrative case studies are presented for consideration focusing on: life in residential care and youth offending institutions; experiences of educational vulnerability; and human trafficking. The methodological approach adopted across the research projects explored, was shaped by the demands and expectations of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC. All of the reported data reflects the views of children and young people who were interviewed as part of three research projects. It is argued that the difficult and challenging circumstances that many children and young people find themselves in, place them at significant disadvantage and increased vulnerability in terms of their social and educational development and life chances.

  19. Young People with a Twist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bo Wagner; Madsen, Diana Højlund

    The report is based on group interviews with 33 young people with ethnic minority backgrounds. They have been asked about their educational and vocational wishes and also touch on a number of issues such as family, gender equality, discrimination and integration.......The report is based on group interviews with 33 young people with ethnic minority backgrounds. They have been asked about their educational and vocational wishes and also touch on a number of issues such as family, gender equality, discrimination and integration....

  20. Sexual behaviour in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerressu, Makeda; Stephenson, Judith M

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this review was to synthesize major research findings in relation to young people and sexual behaviour from the period 2006-2007. We found several key reviews that advance knowledge in the field of young people and sexual behaviour, including observational studies, both qualitative and quantitative, and intervention studies designed to reduce sexual transmission of HIV in both developed and developing countries. Other reviews focused on same-sex behaviours, victimization within relationships, HIV infection/sexually transmitted infection in travellers, prevention of HIV/sexually transmitted infection and the determinants of sexual behaviour in young people. Powerful and consistent forces sustain gender differences in sexual behaviour. The design of interventions to reduce sexual risk behaviour should take account of these forces that help explain young people's sexual behaviour. Knowledge about the kind of interventions that reduce risk behaviour and should be implemented has improved, although the impact on health outcomes such as pregnancy and HIV/sexually transmitted infection is often uncertain. Effective school sex education needs to be part of much broader strategies to improve sexual health, and there is an urgent need for better evaluation of interventions, especially community interventions. Further longitudinal studies are needed to provide insight into the development of relationships and sexual behaviour as well as the course of acculturation.

  1. Motivating young people for education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cort, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The article explores the issue of motivation in policy and practice. The argument is that the folk high schools and the tradition of liberal education offer a learning environment where a number of psychological needs are satisfied among the young people leading to a motivation for learning whereas...

  2. “We want to show our face, man”: hip hop helping to build identity, awareness and social participation of young people in a socialy vulnerable situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heliana Castro Alves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hip Hop is considered an artistic movement of social protest, which forms a symbolic guiding system of cultural practices and youth attitudes, enabling citizenship and social recognition. This study aimed to describe and analyze the use of hip hop as a strategy for the construction of identity, awareness, participation and social inclusion of young people in the daily life of peripheral communities from the perspective of cultural rights. This is a case study with a qualitative approach. Data collection took place over a year using 10 semi-structured interviews and footage of artistic and cultural workshops in the occupational therapeutic context, working at the interface between the social, the cultural field and the field of non-formal education. The thematic content analysis created three themes: Identity Construction and rescue the life course; Hip Hop as an expression of social reality; Social inclusion and participation. This research suggests that Hip Hop can be a useful resource in socio-educational practices, enabling critical reflection of young people in social vulnerability on their contexts, the rescue of the life course, identity construction and social participation.

  3. Helping Young People Engage with Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, Maggie; Sykes, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    There can be multiple benefits of scientists engaging with young people, including motivation and inspiration for all involved. But there are risks, particularly if scientists do not consider the interests and needs of young people or listen to what they have to say. We argue that "dialogue" between scientists, young people and teachers…

  4. Moving On: Young People and Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Kathryn; Chamberlain, Chris

    2009-01-01

    To help explain why some young people move from recreational drug use to substance abuse, twelve in-depth interviews were conducted with young people who had experienced problematic substance use. The data were supplemented by statistical data on 111 young people. The researchers found a variety of "structural" factors that help explain young…

  5. Empowering young people/ young adults to action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, Birgitte Gade

    2014-01-01

    Research questions: How do the young students relate to their community? How do young students position themselves as agents in their own lives and in the places they live – which discourse is used?......Research questions: How do the young students relate to their community? How do young students position themselves as agents in their own lives and in the places they live – which discourse is used?...

  6. Challenges facing young African scientists in their research careers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Challenges facing young African scientists in their research careers: A qualitative exploratory study. ... This study aimed at identifying the challenges that young African scientists face in their career development. Methods: This ... Article Metrics.

  7. Volunteering among Young People. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mark Hugo; Marcelo, Karlo Barrios

    2007-01-01

    This fact sheet presents information on the frequency of volunteering, trends in volunteering, and the organizations for which young people volunteer, utilizing data from multiple sources. Unlike many surveys, it shows that volunteering rates among young people are generally higher than they are among adults 26 and older. Findings of the Civic and…

  8. Evaluating Youth Work with Vulnerable Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Andy; Cartmel, Fred; Powney, Janet; Hall, Stuart

    This report presents the results of an 18-month research project that studied the effectiveness of youth work with vulnerable young people. The research, representing six distinct geographical areas of Scotland characterized by disadvantage, focused on young people aged 13 to 16. In each neighborhood, the project examined the experiences of young…

  9. Young People's Internet Use: Divided or Diversified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonaert, Tom; Vettenburg, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    This article critically analyses research on young people's internet use. Based on a literature analysis, it examines which young people do what on the internet. These results invite a reflection on the dominant discourse on the digital divide. Within this discourse, there is a strong focus on the use of the internet for information purposes only,…

  10. Homophobia, Transphobia, Young People and the Question of Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Mary Lou; Sanjakdar, Fida; Allen, Louisa; Quinlivan, Kathleen; Bromdal, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Young people may face conflicting and confusing messages about what it means to respond well in relation to homophobia and transphobia. Consequently, we ask--What might it mean to respond well to homophobia and transphobia? This strategy, inspired by Anika Thiem and Judith Butler, is recognition of the ambivalent conditions which structure…

  11. Barriers to Dance Training for Young People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujla, Imogen J.; Redding, Emma

    2013-01-01

    Dance is a viable and enjoyable activity -- and potential career -- for young people with disabilities, yet they face several barriers to participation and training. The aim of this article, by Imogen J. Aujla of the University of Bedfordshire and Emma Redding of Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, is to review the literature on…

  12. Homophobia, Transphobia, Young People and the Question of Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Mary Lou; Sanjakdar, Fida; Allen, Louisa; Quinlivan, Kathleen; Bromdal, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Young people may face conflicting and confusing messages about what it means to respond well in relation to homophobia and transphobia. Consequently, we ask--What might it mean to respond well to homophobia and transphobia? This strategy, inspired by Anika Thiem and Judith Butler, is recognition of the ambivalent conditions which structure…

  13. Barriers to Dance Training for Young People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujla, Imogen J.; Redding, Emma

    2013-01-01

    Dance is a viable and enjoyable activity -- and potential career -- for young people with disabilities, yet they face several barriers to participation and training. The aim of this article, by Imogen J. Aujla of the University of Bedfordshire and Emma Redding of Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, is to review the literature on…

  14. Well-being of young unemployed people

    OpenAIRE

    Takala, Johannes; Woge, Henok

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this Thesis was to find out how to promote health and well-being of young unemployed people. As well as to find out what is the well-being of young unemployed people in Finland based on researches made in Finland and internationally. This Thesis was done for RUORI project which aims to promote the well-being, health and employment of people. Aim: This Thesis was aimed for healthcare professionals and people interested in health and well-being of young unemployed. This ...

  15. Controlling young people through treatment and punishment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Tea Torbenfeldt

    2015-01-01

    This chapter demonstrates how both treatment and punishment is part of controlling young people involved in crime in the Danish welfare state. Lately there has been an increase in the use of confinement in young offenders institutions and thus a turn towards stricter punishments for crime. However......, treatment aiming at rehabilitation is still an integrated part of the system and the organization of the young offenders institutions. For the young people subjected to control both treatment and punishment are regarded as effective means of risk-control but there are also limitations and unintended results...... of exclusion and marginalization. When seeking to control young people involved in crime, the Danish social welfare state is not only social and humane but also exclusionary and at times inhumane....

  16. Psychosis and epilepsy in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax Pericall, M T; Taylor, E

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of children and young people under 19 with both epilepsy and a psychotic state (schizophrenia-like psychotic episode, organic delusional disorder, or other brief psychotic episode). In total, the clinical case notes for 17 young people with these characteristics were identified retrospectively from three different sources. Compared with a group of young people with psychosis without epilepsy, children with epilepsy and psychosis more frequently had other neuropsychological problems like learning disability and autism. Both groups had a high rate of family histories of mental illness and social disability. Contrary to the findings in adults with psychosis and epilepsy, in this group of young people, psychosis was associated neither with temporal lobe epilepsy nor with mesial temporal sclerosis. The children with psychosis and epilepsy had a variety of seizure types and structural abnormalities.

  17. Parental Influence on Young People's Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Luther B.; Call, Vaughn R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Describes theory and research on parental influence on young people's career development and highlights an important implication of this relationship for career counseling. The authors discuss a seminar that helps parents help their children choose careers. (CT)

  18. Elderly Peoples' Perception of Young People - A Preliminary Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Mateusz Cybulski; Elżbieta Krajewska-Kułak; Paweł Sowa; Magda Orzechowska; Katarzyna Van Damme-Ostapowicz; Emilia Rozwadowska; Andrzej Guzowski

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Aging is becoming a more noticeable phenomenon in Poland and Europe. We analysed the perception of youth by elderly and compared attitudes of students of the University of the Third Age (SU3A) with nursing homes residents (NHR) to young people. Methods Our questionnaire was distributed to 140 people over the age of 50 (70 SU3A and 70 NHR). Results 85.0% of all respondents answered positively to the question “Do you enjoy contact with young people?”, even though their conta...

  19. Elderly Peoples' Perception of Young People - A Preliminary Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Cybulski

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aging is becoming a more noticeable phenomenon in Poland and Europe. We analysed the perception of youth by elderly and compared attitudes of students of the University of the Third Age (SU3A with nursing homes residents (NHR to young people.Our questionnaire was distributed to 140 people over the age of 50 (70 SU3A and 70 NHR.85.0% of all respondents answered positively to the question "Do you enjoy contact with young people?", even though their contacts are usually limited and mostly confined to a few s a year. Vast majority of NHR (62.9% and almost half SU3A (48.6% believe that there is a need to integrate seniors and youth to achieve mutual benefits.Young people would benefit from the life experience of the elderly; the elderly could become more active in many areas of life.

  20. Young People and Migration from Contemporary Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Young Polish migrants to the UK are often portrayed as being highly educated and mobile: willing nomads who are privileged to be able to take advantage of new opportunities for travel and work abroad offered by European Union membership. However, there are also less well-educated young people who adopt migration as a livelihood strategy in…

  1. Young People and Migration from Contemporary Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Young Polish migrants to the UK are often portrayed as being highly educated and mobile: willing nomads who are privileged to be able to take advantage of new opportunities for travel and work abroad offered by European Union membership. However, there are also less well-educated young people who adopt migration as a livelihood strategy in…

  2. Young People Should Have Combatant Spirit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays,quite a few people believe that combatant spirit is essential for one'ssuccess in today's competitive world.However,some young people today think nothing of this spirit which,in their opinion,is only needed in revolutionary age.Even

  3. Service Approaches to Young People with Complex Needs Leaving Out-of-Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvaso, Catia; Delfabbro, Paul; Hackett, Louisa; Mills, Hayley

    2016-01-01

    Although leaving statutory out-of-home care can be a challenging time for many young people, it is recognised that young people who have multiple or complex needs find this transition particularly difficult. This study aims to gain a deeper understanding of the challenges faced by care leavers who have complex needs, as well as to identify some of…

  4. Service Approaches to Young People with Complex Needs Leaving Out-of-Home Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvaso, Catia; Delfabbro, Paul; Hackett, Louisa; Mills, Hayley

    2016-01-01

    Although leaving statutory out-of-home care can be a challenging time for many young people, it is recognised that young people who have multiple or complex needs find this transition particularly difficult. This study aims to gain a deeper understanding of the challenges faced by care leavers who have complex needs, as well as to identify some of…

  5. Young homeless people and service provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Paul; Klee, Hilary

    1999-01-01

    This paper focuses on access to services, and views of service provision amongst young homeless people aged 14-25 years. Two hundred young homeless people were interviewed in locations throughout Greater Manchester, the majority in towns surrounding the city of Manchester. A semistructured interview schedule was used with interviews being taped and transcribed to provide additional qualitative data. The operational definition of homelessness included not only those who were roofless, but also those residing in hostels, bed and breakfast accommodation, or staying temporarily with friends. Topics examined include: access to services such as housing, health, advice and information; appraisal of service provision; confidence in securing help; and the use of both formal and informal support services. Results show that the provision and use of services for young homeless people varies widely across the county, with the majority of services being concentrated in the city of Manchester. Respondents made good use of certain services such as streetwork agencies, but exhibited a lack of confidence in securing help with the most basic needs, such as food. A desire to avoid being labelled as 'homeless' appeared to make some people unwilling to make use of non-statutory agencies specifically for homeless people. Overall, respondents found particular difficulties in accessing help from statutory services, such as housing and health. Findings point to the necessity of providing adequately resourced services which reach out to young homeless people.

  6. Young people's anticipation regarding education and job

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Tilde Mette; Lundby, Astrid Arbjerg

    struggle in the decision making process because they see educational and vocational choices as definitive and therefore are afraid to take a ‘wrong’ turn. They seem to think of their educational pathway as linear with no room for detours. This can appear paradoxical on a labour market described as both...... of the reason why young people choose gymnasium instead of vocational education. In the paper we discuss the foundation we outline of young people’s anticipation regarding education and job....

  7. Social Capital and Stratification of Young People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Behtoui

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the impact of social capital on the status attainment process of young people at the start of their careers and examines how social class, gender and ethnicity affect the accumulation of social capital and thereby labour market stratification of young people. A sample of young Swedes graduating from vocational schools and universities between 2005 and 2006, was surveyed via the telephone about their experiences acquiring jobs. Two research questions are posed: (i Which characteristics (class, gender and ethnicity affect young people's access to more social capital? (ii How is social capital rewarded in the labour market? The results show that being female, coming from the lower social classes and being a member of a stigmatized immigrant groupare associated with a substantial social capital deficit. When socioeconomic and demographic backgrounds as well as the human capital of respondents are controlled, social capital is positively associated with salary level. The results indicate that social capital is a significant factor in the stratification process of young people.

  8. Sudden Death in Young People--Heart Problems Often Blamed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudden death in young people: Heart problems often blamed Sudden death in young people is rare, but those at ... causes and treatments. By Mayo Clinic Staff Sudden death in people younger than 35, often due to ...

  9. Young people, drinking and social class

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolind, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    that in order to fully understand differences in the drinking and partying practices of young people, such practices must be related to the youngsters' general life and values, especially aspects such as rule-setting and school culture. Moreover, such practices including drinking attitudes are used by young...... people to construct social class-related identities: mainstream youngsters continually confirm their taken-for-granted normality, and mainstream breakers resist the mainstream hegemonic (school) culture which usually defies them. In conclusion, bounded consumption, corresponding with contemporary ideals...

  10. Internet Usage among Children and Young People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonca Karayagiz Muslu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Computers have occupied increasingly central roles in children’s world with the advance of technology. They have proved to be an ideal companion for children in developing and developed countries who spend most of their time at school or home with computers. As a measure of development and modernization, technology has made people’s lives easier and contributed positively to social well-being so far while it has also brought about some problems and threats stemming from irresponsible use of Internet. Unmonitored use of Internet may cause damages in children’s and young people’s physical, psychological, social and cognitive development. It seems imperative to assure that children and young people can benefit from computers and Internet resources effectively and productively while measures for appropriate and safe use of Internet are to be taken into serious consideration. Therefore, the government offices and institutions should lay stress upon the issue; education professionals and parents should be well-informed and regularly updated; and finally children and young people should be educated and monitored to achieve a better and efficient use of Internet. In this paper, has been mentioned to negative effect of internet usage on physical, psychosocial and cognitive health of children and young people. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(5.000: 445-450

  11. Heart diseases and strokes in young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Pizova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the relevance of the problem associated with the diagnosis and treatment of stroke in young patients aged 15-45 years. It considers the major causes of acute cerebrovascular accidents in young people, including pregnant women. Diseases, such patent foramen ovale, mitral valve prolapse, infective endocarditis, and postpartum cardiomyopathy, are described in detail. The basic principles of the diagnosis and therapy of ischemic stroke at a young age are given. The mainstay of therapy for acute ischemic stroke is stated to include two procedures: reperfusion and neuronal protection.

  12. Volunteering Among Young People. CIRCLE Fact Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mark Hugo

    2004-01-01

    Volunteering rates among young people are generally higher than they are among adults 26 and older. However, measuring volunteer rates among all adults is a difficult task. In recent years, efforts at measuring volunteering have produced widely different estimates, largely because of the methods employed to measure volunteering. For example, the…

  13. Sexting and Young People: Experts' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Shelley; Sanci, Lena; Temple-Smith, Meredith

    2011-01-01

    Young people's "sexting"--defined by the "Macquarie Dictionary Online" (2010) as the sending and receiving of sexually explicit images via mobile phones--has become a focus of much media reporting; however, research regarding the phenomenon is in its infancy. This paper reports on the first phase of a study to understand this activity more…

  14. The Labor Values of Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlopova, T. V.; Ozernikova, T. G.

    2004-01-01

    This article reports the labor values of young people. The problem of the transformation of labor values occupies a special place in the transition economy of Russia. In this article, the authors look at labor values as an element of the motivation mechanism. Furthermore, the authors examine the the term "motivation" in its content sense…

  15. Missing: Children and Young People with SEBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, John; Daniels, Harry; Macnab, Natasha

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the issue of missing from and missing out on education. It argues that too little is known with regard to the characteristics of children and young people missing from schooling. It postulates that many of these pupils will have social, emotional and behavioural difficulties which are largely unrecognized and thus not…

  16. Young victims of violence, tattooed faces and erasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Cerbino

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This article tries to rethink the diverse modalities of gang violence, and proposes a set of causes that explain them. It explores the spiral of violence, and the opposition between victims and perpetrators. Specifically, the paper looks at the case of the Central American maras and offers an interpretation of the act of tattooing the face, as a practice that shows paradoxically how young people suffer violence in exercising of violence. Furthermore, we analyze the practice of erasing tattoos from the skin as sign of a much more intense institutional violence. The interpretation of these practices emphasizes some of the aspects related to the meanings of positions of subjectivation.

  17. Emotional Expressions of Old Faces Are Perceived as More Positive and Less Negative than Young Faces in Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norah C Hass

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Interpreting the emotions of others through their facial expressions can provide important social information, yet the way in which we judge an emotion is subject to psychosocial factors. We hypothesized that the age of a face would bias how the emotional expressions are judged, with older faces generally more likely to be viewed as having more positive and less negative expressions than younger faces. Using two-alternative forced-choice perceptual decision tasks, participants sorted young and old faces of which emotional expressions were gradually morphed into one of two categories - neutral vs. happy and neutral vs. angry. The results indicated that old faces were more frequently perceived as having a happy expression at the lower emotional intensity levels, and less frequently perceived as having an angry expression at the higher emotional intensity levels than younger faces in young adults. Critically, the perceptual decision threshold at which old faces were judged as happy was lower than for young faces, and higher for angry old faces compared to young faces. These findings suggest that the age of the face influences how its emotional expression is interpreted in social interactions.

  18. Emotional expressions of old faces are perceived as more positive and less negative than young faces in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Norah C; Schneider, Erik J S; Lim, Seung-Lark

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting the emotions of others through their facial expressions can provide important social information, yet the way in which we judge an emotion is subject to psychosocial factors. We hypothesized that the age of a face would bias how the emotional expressions are judged, with older faces generally more likely to be viewed as having more positive and less negative expressions than younger faces. Using two-alternative forced-choice perceptual decision tasks, participants sorted young and old faces of which emotional expressions were gradually morphed into one of two categories-"neutral vs. happy" and "neutral vs. angry." The results indicated that old faces were more frequently perceived as having a happy expression at the lower emotional intensity levels, and less frequently perceived as having an angry expression at the higher emotional intensity levels than younger faces in young adults. Critically, the perceptual decision threshold at which old faces were judged as happy was lower than for young faces, and higher for angry old faces compared to young faces. These findings suggest that the age of the face influences how its emotional expression is interpreted in social interactions.

  19. Motivating young people : A case study on AIESEC Tampere

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Truc

    2012-01-01

    This study was commissioned by AIESEC Tampere, one of the most successful AIESEC committees in Finland. AIESEC is a worldwide non-profit organization run by young people to serve young people. AIESEC comprises an interesting group of young people and operates on their voluntary contributions and performances without providing any extrinsic or monetary benefits. This group of young people is a particularly interesting subject for motivation research. Besides, AIESEC Tampere has paid significa...

  20. Sudanese Young People of Refugee Background in Rural and Regional Australia: Social Capital and Education Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Jae; Wilkinson, Jane; Langat, Kip; Santoro, Ninetta

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses literature pertaining to the settlement of African refugees in regional and rural Australia, particularly focusing on the specific challenges and opportunities faced by Sudanese young people of refugee background in education. Drawing on a pilot study of the out-of-school resources of regionally located young Sudanese…

  1. Parental Attitudes and Young People's Online Sexual Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbring, Emma; Hallberg, Jonas; Bohlin, Margareta; Skoog, Therése

    2015-01-01

    Parental attitudes towards young people's sexuality in traditional (i.e. non-online media) settings have been associated with young people's sexual activities. In this study, we explored the association between key parent and youth characteristics and parental attitudes towards young people's online sexual activities. We also examined the…

  2. Civic-Mindedness, Patriotism, and the Upbringing of Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriliuk, V. V.; Malenkov, V. V.

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of the position of "young people" as a subject of social partnership during the period of the transformation of Russian society can be characterized by the relationship of young people with work, politics, education, and the state. The authors surveys of young people during the 1990s in the Tiumen Region provide evidence of…

  3. Supportive Housing in Foster Care: The Views of Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Kyttälä, Minna

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated Finnish young people's experiences of supportive housing. Supportive housing is an after-care programme that should support the transition from foster care to independent adulthood. It is directed mainly at young people who have been taken into foster care by social workers. The sample consisted of 39 young people (23…

  4. Supportive Housing in Foster Care: The Views of Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Kyttälä, Minna

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated Finnish young people's experiences of supportive housing. Supportive housing is an after-care programme that should support the transition from foster care to independent adulthood. It is directed mainly at young people who have been taken into foster care by social workers. The sample consisted of 39 young people (23…

  5. Sixth Sense: The Disabled Children and Young People's Participation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Rosemary

    2012-01-01

    The Disabled Children and Young Peoples Participation Project (DCYPPP) was established by Barnardos (Northern Ireland) in 2002 to explore ways of involving children and young people with disabilities in decision-making processes within Children's Services Planning of the Health and Social Services Board. Over 200 young people have participated in…

  6. Resisting Participation: Critiquing Participatory Research Methodologies with Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    Participatory methodologies are increasingly employed in research with young people. These practices stem from a desire to reduce problematic distributions of power in research and to construct knowledge with young people rather than for them. This paper examines research conducted with a small group of young people experiencing exclusion from…

  7. Parental Attitudes and Young People's Online Sexual Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbring, Emma; Hallberg, Jonas; Bohlin, Margareta; Skoog, Therése

    2015-01-01

    Parental attitudes towards young people's sexuality in traditional (i.e. non-online media) settings have been associated with young people's sexual activities. In this study, we explored the association between key parent and youth characteristics and parental attitudes towards young people's online sexual activities. We also examined the…

  8. From Ambivalence to Activism: Young People's Environmental Views and Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Do young people really take a particular interest in environmental issues, or are they apathetic? This paper considers what young people really think about the environment by drawing together and reviewing attitudinal polling and other research into young people's views. It seeks to challenge simplistic assumptions, and instead acknowledges the…

  9. Eye gaze during observation of static faces in deaf people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsumi Watanabe

    Full Text Available Knowing where people look when viewing faces provides an objective measure into the part of information entering the visual system as well as into the cognitive strategy involved in facial perception. In the present study, we recorded the eye movements of 20 congenitally deaf (10 male and 10 female and 23 (11 male and 12 female normal-hearing Japanese participants while they evaluated the emotional valence of static face stimuli. While no difference was found in the evaluation scores, the eye movements during facial observations differed among participant groups. The deaf group looked at the eyes more frequently and for longer duration than the nose whereas the hearing group focused on the nose (or the central region of face more than the eyes. These results suggest that the strategy employed to extract visual information when viewing static faces may differ between deaf and hearing people.

  10. Eye Gaze during Observation of Static Faces in Deaf People

    OpenAIRE

    Katsumi Watanabe; Tetsuya Matsuda; Tomoyuki Nishioka; Miki Namatame

    2011-01-01

    Knowing where people look when viewing faces provides an objective measure into the part of information entering the visual system as well as into the cognitive strategy involved in facial perception. In the present study, we recorded the eye movements of 20 congenitally deaf (10 male and 10 female) and 23 (11 male and 12 female) normal-hearing Japanese participants while they evaluated the emotional valence of static face stimuli. While no difference was found in the evaluation scores, the e...

  11. Do people have insight into their face recognition abilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Romina; Rossion, Bruno; Rhodes, Gillian; Laguesse, Renaud; Tez, Tolga; Hall, Bronwyn; Albonico, Andrea; Malaspina, Manuela; Daini, Roberta; Irons, Jessica; Al-Janabi, Shahd; Taylor, Libby C; Rivolta, Davide; McKone, Elinor

    2017-02-01

    Diagnosis of developmental or congenital prosopagnosia (CP) involves self-report of everyday face recognition difficulties, which are corroborated with poor performance on behavioural tests. This approach requires accurate self-evaluation. We examine the extent to which typical adults have insight into their face recognition abilities across four experiments involving nearly 300 participants. The experiments used five tests of face recognition ability: two that tap into the ability to learn and recognize previously unfamiliar faces [the Cambridge Face Memory Test, CFMT; Duchaine, B., & Nakayama, K. (2006). The Cambridge Face Memory Test: Results for neurologically intact individuals and an investigation of its validity using inverted face stimuli and prosopagnosic participants. Neuropsychologia, 44(4), 576-585. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2005.07.001; and a newly devised test based on the CFMT but where the study phases involve watching short movies rather than viewing static faces-the CFMT-Films] and three that tap face matching [Benton Facial Recognition Test, BFRT; Benton, A., Sivan, A., Hamsher, K., Varney, N., & Spreen, O. (1983). Contribution to neuropsychological assessment. New York: Oxford University Press; and two recently devised sequential face matching tests]. Self-reported ability was measured with the 15-item Kennerknecht et al. questionnaire [Kennerknecht, I., Ho, N. Y., & Wong, V. C. (2008). Prevalence of hereditary prosopagnosia (HPA) in Hong Kong Chinese population. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A, 146A(22), 2863-2870. doi:10.1002/ajmg.a.32552]; two single-item questions assessing face recognition ability; and a new 77-item meta-cognition questionnaire. Overall, we find that adults with typical face recognition abilities have only modest insight into their ability to recognize faces on behavioural tests. In a fifth experiment, we assess self-reported face recognition ability in people with CP and find that some people who expect to

  12. Emotional expressions of old faces are perceived as more positive and less negative than young faces in young adults

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting the emotions of others through their facial expressions can provide important social information, yet the way in which we judge an emotion is subject to psychosocial factors. We hypothesized that the age of a face would bias how the emotional expressions are judged, with older faces generally more likely to be viewed as having more positive and less negative expressions than younger faces. Using two-alternative forced-choice perceptual decision tasks, participants sorted young an...

  13. Emotional Expressions of Old Faces Are Perceived as More Positive and Less Negative than Young Faces in Young Adults

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting the emotions of others through their facial expressions can provide important social information, yet the way in which we judge an emotion is subject to psychosocial factors. We hypothesized that the age of a face would bias how the emotional expressions are judged, with older faces generally more likely to be viewed as having more positive and less negative expressions than younger faces. Using two-alternative forced-choice perceptual decision tasks, participants sorted young an...

  14. Social position and young people's health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian; Morrow, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    to Coleman and Putnam. In this theoretical article, we will unpack Bourdieu's use of social capital, and will suggest that his general sociology has different questions, concepts and perspectives to the questions addressed in the work of Coleman and Putnam. Social capital in the work of Bourdieu needs......, and as such needs to elaborate political constructions of the object. Our starting point for this paper arises from our experiences of empirical social research with young people in Denmark and England that attempted to explore ‘social capital' in relation to health....

  15. Corporeality in the communication of young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornélia Jakubíková

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study describes communication of young people with the emphasis on its content dedicated to corporeality and determines a content-based classification of topics from a normative perspective: what topics are regular, intimate, or tabooed; participants; and gender differences. The study is divided into parts, which thematically describe: starting points, research, sample; communication content and topics; participants in communication; gender differences; factors of communication and the language of communication. The study is elaborated on the basis of information coming from professional literature and field research conducted by semi-structured interviews with university students and university educated people – 15 women and 15 men in age 22–28 (year of birth 1987–1993 coming from an urban environment in Slovakia.

  16. Invest in adolescents and young people: it pays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This year’s Women Deliver conference made a strong call for investing in the health and development of adolescents and young people. It highlighted the unique problems faced by adolescent girls and young women–some of the most vulnerable and neglected individuals in the world–and stressed the importance of addressing their needs and rights, not only for their individual benefit, but also to achieve global goals such as reducing maternal mortality and HIV infection. In response to an invitation from the editors of Reproductive Health, we-the sixteen coauthors of this commentary–put together key themes that reverberated throughout the conference, on the health and development needs of adolescents and young people, and promising solutions to meet them. 1. Investing in adolescents and young people is crucial for ensuring health, creating prosperity and fulfilling human rights. 2. Gender inequality contributes to many health and social problems. Adolescent girls and boys, and their families and communities, should be challenged and supported to change inequitable gender norms. – Child marriage utterly disempowers girls. It is one of the most devastating manifestations of gender discrimination. – Negative social and cultural attitudes towards menstruation constrain the lives of millions of girls. This may well establish the foundation for lifelong discomfort felt by girls about their bodies and reticence in seeking help when problems arise. 3. Adolescents need comprehensive, accurate and developmentally appropriate sexuality education. This will provide the bedrock for attitude formation and decision making. 4. Adolescent-centered health services can prevent sexual and reproductive health problems and detect and treat them if and when they occur. 5. National governments have the authority and the responsibility to address social and cultural barriers to the provision of sexual and reproductive health education and services for adolescents and young people

  17. Anger and globalization among young people in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchday, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the challenges faced by youth in developing countries. Using India as an example of a fast-globalizing country, this article highlights the experience and challenges faced by adolescents and emerging adults as they search for their interpersonal and professional identities. The difficulties of defining identity in the context of rapid globalization where people are exposed to diverse cultural forces that may conflict with each other are particularly salient when dealing with anger. Anger frequently results from thwarted wants and needs. In globalizing developing economies, young people often face inequitable access and opportunities that may be cause for distress-anger and depression. However, the skills to deal with anger are frequently culturally determined and may not be effective in situations where multiple cultural rules are operational. For example, India being a collectivist culture traditionally encourages the suppression of anger. However, situations and rules of conduct in a global economic order require the assertive expression of anger and the confrontation of conflict. Research that is methodologically and culturally appropriate is needed in exploring these issues and ameliorating distress associated with inequity, conflicts, and challenges.

  18. Exploring Young People's Beliefs and Images about Sun Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K. M.; Robinson, N. G.; Young, R. McD.; Anderson, P. J.; Hyde, M. K.; Greenbank, S.; Keane, J.; Rolfe, T.; Vardon, P.; Baskerville, D.

    2008-01-01

    To understand young people's low levels of sun protection behaviour, 145 young people (aged 12 to 20 years) were recruited from Queensland, to participate in a one-hour focus group where they discussed issues related to sun protection and images of tanned and non-tanned people. Responses were content analysed to identify common sun protection…

  19. Project Jump: Young People's Perspectives on a Sexual Health Drama Project for Hard to Reach Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Judy; Salmon, Debra; Mages, Linda

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the qualitative process findings from an evaluation of Project Jump--a sexual health drama project for hard to reach young people. Project Jump aimed to enable young people to consider their sexual behaviour and its impact and consequence on other people and themselves. The research aimed to capture the experiences and…

  20. Children and young people in immigration detention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Michael; Steel, Zachary; Mares, Sarah; Newman, Louise

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews evidence about the impact of immigration detention and other restrictive immigration policies on the mental health of children, young people and the adults who care for them. We review the implications of this for clinicians attempting to assess or work with incarcerated child and adult refugees and asylum seekers. There are increasing numbers of adults and children seeking asylum across the globe and many nations use incarceration and other harsh and interceptive immigration practices. There is mounting evidence of the psychological harm associated with detention of already vulnerable adults and children. Australia is used as a case study. Clinicians are required to consider the intersection of mental health assessment and treatment with human rights violations, and the impact of restrictive immigration policies, not only on asylum seekers and refugees but also on clinicians, clinical practice and professional ethics.

  1. Young people's knowledge of alcohol prices in a retail context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Gadensgaard, Birgitte; Godt, Diana

    Several European governments consider an increase in taxation of alcoholic beverages to confront increased alcohol intake by young people. However, little is known as to young people’s knowledge of alcohol prices and thus whether they will notice such price increases. In the present study, young...... people’s price knowledge of alcoholic beverages is examined by a price recall and a deal spotting test. The results indicate that the vast majority of young people hold fairly accurate reference prices, while a rather large segment of young people appears to actively search for prices of alcohol in store...

  2. AIDS awareness and attitudes among Yemeni young people living in high-risk areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Serouri, A W; Anaam, M; Al-Iryani, B; Al Deram, A; Ramaroson, S

    2010-03-01

    Despite te low rate of infection in Yemen, there are concerns about the possible spread of HIV among high-risk and vulnerable groups. A community-based study was made in 2005 of AIDS awareness and attitudes among 601 young people aged 15-24 years from low-income, high-risk neighbourhoods in Aden. Young people lacked proper information about HIV/AIDS. Although 89% had heard of AIDS, fewer (46%) could name 3 ways of transmission or 3 ways to avoid infection (28%). Misconceptions about modes of transmissions were prevalent and many young people believed that they faced little or no risk. There were intolerant attitudes towards AIDS patients. About half the young people knew that prostitution and homosexuality existed in their area.

  3. Sexual and reproductive health services for young people in Kenya and Zambia : Providers attitudes and young peoples needs and experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Warenius, Linnéa

    2008-01-01

    Background: Unintended pregnancy, abortion and STI, including HIV are common sexual and reproductive health problems among young people in Kenya and Zambia. Yet, the reproductive health services are underutilised. Nurses and midwives are key providers in the promotion young people s sexual and reproductive health in Kenya and Zambia. Aim: The overall aim was to describe and explore young people s sexual and reproductive health needs and experiences and to describe health ...

  4. Young and Older Emotional Faces: Are there Age-Group Differences in Expression Identification and Memory?

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Studies finding that older compared to young adults are less able to identify facial expressions and have worse memory for negative than positive faces have used only young faces. Studies finding that both age groups are more accurate at recognizing faces of their own than other ages have used mostly neutral faces. Thus, age-differences in processing faces may not extend to older faces, and preferential memory for own-age faces may not extend to emotional faces. To investigate these possibili...

  5. Knowledge and attitude of young people regarding HIV prevention and unwanted pregnancy in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Come Yélian Adohinzin, Clétus; Meda, Nicolas; Anicet Ouédraogo, Georges; Gaston Belem, Adrien Marie; Sombié, Issiaka; Berthé, Abdramane; Bakwin Kandala, Ngianga; Damienne Avimadjenon, Georgette; Fond-Harmant, Laurence

    2016-10-19

    Introduction: Despite health education efforts, young people are still faced with major health problems. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitude regarding HIV prevention and unwanted pregnancy among young people in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso. Methods: Based on two-level sampling, representing 94,947 households in the Bobo-Dioulasso municipality, 573 young people between the ages of 15 and 24 years were interviewed. This data collection was conducted from September 2014 to January 2015 in the three districts of the municipality. A questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge and attitudes of young people. Results: The interviewees had a poor knowledge about HIV transmission and prevention and contraception Very few young people (9%) had complete knowledge about the modes of transmission and 5% had no knowledge. Persistent misperceptions about the effectiveness of condoms (25%) and contraception (32%) did not prevent some young people from using them (79% used condoms and 46% used contraceptives). Knowledge and attitudes of young people regarding HIV and contraception varied according to age, sex, education level and type of parental supervision. Conclusion: A significant proportion of young people still has incomplete knowledge about HIV/AIDS and contraception. Actions designed to reinforce the knowledge of young people are of paramount importance. The capacities of parents and healthcare providers also need to be reinforced to improve the quality of relationship with young people.

  6. Attractiveness judgments and discrimination of mommies and grandmas: perceptual tuning for young adult faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Lindsey A; Mondloch, Catherine J; Hackland, Anne T

    2015-01-01

    Adults are more accurate in detecting deviations from normality in young adult faces than in older adult faces despite exhibiting comparable accuracy in discriminating both face ages. This deficit in judging the normality of older faces may be due to reliance on a face space optimized for the dimensions of young adult faces, perhaps because of early and continuous experience with young adult faces. Here we examined the emergence of this young adult face bias by testing 3- and 7-year-old children on a child-friendly version of the task used to test adults. In an attractiveness judgment task, children viewed young and older adult face pairs; each pair consisted of an unaltered face and a distorted face of the same identity. Children pointed to the prettiest face, which served as a measure of their sensitivity to the dimensions on which faces vary relative to a norm. To examine whether biases in the attractiveness task were specific to deficits in referencing a norm or extended to impaired discrimination, we tested children on a simultaneous match-to-sample task with the same stimuli. Both age groups were more accurate in judging the attractiveness of young faces relative to older faces; however, unlike adults, the young adult face bias extended to the match-to-sample task. These results suggest that by 3 years of age, children's perceptual system is more finely tuned for young adult faces than for older adult faces, which may support past findings of superior recognition for young adult faces.

  7. The sexual behaviour of young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, E

    1993-12-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is currently the major sexually transmitted disease (STD) in Sweden. In the early 1980s 20% of young clinic attenders were infected. Treatment policies, including partner tracing, instituted in 1988 reduced the prevalence to less than 5%. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) has also declined with the decrease of gonorrhea and chlamydia. The improvements can be associated with policy: the introduction of compulsory sex education at school in 1956 and the establishment of youth clinics in the 1970s with contraceptive counselling, screening, and treatment for STDs. a 1992 study of more than 9000 sexually active Swedish teenagers revealed that 99% considered the condom the most effective means against STDs, and 84% recognized chlamydia, HIV/AIDS, gonorrhea, and genital warts as STDs. 75% of the subjects had engaged in coitus at first intercourse and 82% at the most recent encounter. 17% had had an STD, and 9% had been or had made somebody pregnant, mostly ending in abortion. In 1975, when the new abortion law was adopted, the teenage abortion rate was high at 30/1000 teenagers aged 15-19. Counseling and free contraceptives reduced the rate by 30% in the next 10 years. However, news about the possible risks of oral contraceptives in the 1980s again boosted the rate from 18 to 25/1000. Recent concerted efforts cut the rate anew. Preventive policies need to convey a positive attitude about sexuality and deal with the basic teenage problems of multiple partners and stress the importance of condom use. Condoms are effective only in stable relationships, and those with less education or those unemployed take more risks, using condoms and contraceptives less frequently. Girls from emotionally poor environments often engage in sex for emotional satisfaction. Openness and further knowledge is needed to ensure the safe sexual behavior of young people.

  8. Young People's Involvement in a Substance Misuse Communications Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mathew; Salmon, Debra; Orme, Judy

    2004-01-01

    There is growing emphasis in public policy on involving young people in the development of health promotion campaigns and information resources on substance misuse. To date there has been little literature that explores the level and nature young people's involvement in such initiatives. This paper reports on an evaluation of a substance misuse…

  9. Young People's Uses of Celebrity: Class, Gender and "Improper" Celebrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kim; Mendick, Heather

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we explore the question of how celebrity operates in young people's everyday lives, thus contributing to the urgent need to address celebrity's social function. Drawing on data from three studies in England on young people's perspectives on their educational and work futures, we show how celebrity operates as a classed and…

  10. Awareness of Stratification among Fifth Generation Young People: A Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Liu

    2011-01-01

    China's reform and opening up have been implemented for more than thirty years now. The "fifth generation" of young people, born between 1978 and 1988, has gradually grown up to become a backbone force for the advancement of social development. This article takes young people living or working in the Xuhui district as a sample and uses statistical…

  11. Young People's and Parent's Perceptions of Managed Moves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Christopher; Hallam, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The current research aimed to increase understanding of the experiences of young people and their parents of managed moves, what contributed to success and the nature of the challenges experienced. The study was conducted in one English Local Authority, where five young people and their parents were interviewed. Five superordinate themes emerged…

  12. Young People's Perspectives on Health: Empowerment, or Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Research to date has identified young people's perspectives on a number of health-related topics such as smoking, alcohol, sexual health, physical activity and healthy eating. Whilst this body of research draws important attention towards young people's views on topical health concerns, it arguably remains located within a pre-defined…

  13. Creating a different international HIV response for young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Caitlin L

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that certain notions of young people in the HIV and AIDS response reveal an overly generalised understanding of 'youth' that does not reflect a realistic view of young people's identity and lives. Faulty stereotypes of 'youth'--such as the perceptions that young people are necessarily victims or risk-takers--result in many HIV programmes based on generalisations about young people, rather than their actual needs and realities. These stereotypes and generalisations dominate million dollar prevention programmes that have little effect on HIV incidence rates amongst young people. To create a different future for young people and achieve real and lasting change, this paper recommends three discrete but interrelated actions for the international HIV community to undertake now; to base programmes on definitions of young people that emerge from the setting in which the programme will be implemented; to ensure HIV prevention programming is targeted at specific groups of young people, rather than a 'one-size-fits-all' package; and to incorporate structural approaches into AIDS programming to address the underlying factors that make younger age groups more vulnerable to HIV--including age-related stigma, discrimination and human rights abuses.

  14. Sexual Assemblages: Mobile Phones/Young People/School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    This paper asks, what more can we think in relation to debates around young people's use of mobile phones at school? Rather than attempting to answer the question of whether mobile phones are "good" or "bad" for young people, this paper recasts the debate's ontological underpinnings. To do this feminist appropriations of the…

  15. A Study of Young Lesbian and Gay People's School Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    This retrospective study used Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) to explore young lesbian and gay (LG) people's experiences of school in relation to their sexuality and their perceptions of how schools could be inclusive for young LG people. Participants were in the age range of 16 to 21 and provided insights into coping strategies,…

  16. Getting into Higher Education: Young People's Views of Fairness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minty, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Free tuition in Scotland is frequently linked to principles of equal access and fairness. But just how "fair" do young people think access to higher education is? And what concepts of fairness are their views based on? This article reports the findings of semi-structured interviews with 121 young people aged 15-18 in Scotland. The paper…

  17. Picturing the city: young people's representations of urban environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beneker, T.; Sanders, R.; Tani, S.; Taylor, L.

    2010-01-01

    Urban environments form the setting of everyday life for most Western young people. This article explores visual representations of cities made by young people in a range of environments within four countries. The findings inform a larger study on urban geographies within geography education. We ana

  18. Youth Work with Vulnerable Young People. Interchange No. 51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powney, Janet; Furlong, Andy; Cartmel, Fred; Hall, Stuart

    Research was conducted in Scotland to evaluate the effectiveness of youth work with vulnerable young people, primarily between the ages of 13 and 16. Four complementary methods were adopted: (1) a survey of secondary school students; (2) a series of focus group interviews with young people with experience of youth work; (3) interviews with…

  19. Young People's Perspectives on Health: Empowerment, or Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Research to date has identified young people's perspectives on a number of health-related topics such as smoking, alcohol, sexual health, physical activity and healthy eating. Whilst this body of research draws important attention towards young people's views on topical health concerns, it arguably remains located within a pre-defined…

  20. Young People and Alcohol in Italy: An Evolving Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccaria, Franca; Prina, Franco

    2010-01-01

    In Italy, commonly held opinions and interpretations about the relationship between young people and alcohol are often expressed as generalizations and approximations. In order to further understanding of the relationship between young people and alcohol in contemporary Italy, we have gathered, compared and discussed all the available data, both…

  1. E-Cigarettes and Young People: A Public Health Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit Button Past Emails E-Cigarettes and Young People: A Public Health Concern Language: English Español (Spanish) ... justify efforts to prevent e-cigarette use by young people. We know that the vapor from e-cigarettes ...

  2. Young People's Perceptions of Advice about Sexual Risk Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Christopher; Bonillas, Consuelo; Moreno, Jeniffer; Cardoza, Omara; Cheung, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Sexual and reproductive health indicators for young people in the USA have improved in recent decades, but teenage pregnancies remain high, and large differences between Whites and non-Whites persist in teenage births, abortions, and the acquisition of sexually transmitted infections. Prior research shows that young people are receptive to…

  3. Young People's Perceptions of Advice about Sexual Risk Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Christopher; Bonillas, Consuelo; Moreno, Jeniffer; Cardoza, Omara; Cheung, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Sexual and reproductive health indicators for young people in the USA have improved in recent decades, but teenage pregnancies remain high, and large differences between Whites and non-Whites persist in teenage births, abortions, and the acquisition of sexually transmitted infections. Prior research shows that young people are receptive to…

  4. Young People, Pornography, and Sexuality: Sources and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmyr, Gudrun; Welin, Catharina

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of and attitudes among young people toward pornography and their sources of information about sexuality. Eight hundred and seventy-six young people ages 15-25 years (555 females and 321 males) who visited a youth center in Sweden for a period of 1 year answered a questionnaire about their use of…

  5. Young People, Pornography, and Sexuality: Sources and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmyr, Gudrun; Welin, Catharina

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of and attitudes among young people toward pornography and their sources of information about sexuality. Eight hundred and seventy-six young people ages 15-25 years (555 females and 321 males) who visited a youth center in Sweden for a period of 1 year answered a questionnaire about their use of…

  6. Rural Young People and Society: A Crisis of Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur'ianova, M. P.

    2013-01-01

    Research on rural youth in Russia shows that keeping qualified and ambitious young people in the rural economy will require creating conditions for young people to exercise initiative in the rural economy and diminishing the gap in quality of life between rural and urban environments. Only in this way can the pessimism of rural youth be overcome.

  7. Spaces of Trauma: Young People, Homelessness and Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Lucinda

    2012-01-01

    Little contemporary research has examined young people's experiences of violence and homelessness in detail within the Australian context. This article draws upon qualitative research with 33 homeless youth in Melbourne and seeks to enhance understanding of the impact of violence on young people. It argues that everyday experiences of violence…

  8. Effect Of Telerehabilitation, Face To Face Therapy And Attention Control Intervention For People With Aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhondeh Jamshidi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:Telerehabilitation enables patients to access remote rehabilitation services in their own homes, typically by using internet video conferencing technologies. A number of studies have explored the use of telerehabilitation across a range of stroke services with promising findings. However, the strength of evidence is low, with much of the data drawn from case series or feasibility studies. Applications of telerehabilitation in the domain of aphasia are even more preliminary. A number of studies have shown that remote language assessment is reliable and acceptable to participants. There is also some evidence that remote administration of treatment can improve targeted skills, and achieve good levels of patient satisfaction. Two studies compared face to face with remote delivery of aphasia therapy, Also, One study additionally included an attention control condition, comprising remote supported conversation. As, word retrieval deficits are widespread in aphasia and respond well to intervention,therefore, The purpose of this review, effect of Telerehabilitation, face to face therapy and attention control intervention in word retrieval deficits for people with aphasia. Method: ISI databases and browsers using Google Scholar, pubmed, Science direct and Medline to Article 30 in the period from 2007 to 2015 in this area was accessed. Among the found articles, articles that met the inclusion criteria were selected and used for writing this article Result: no result Conclusion: The findings of this study have shown that Telerehabilitation administration of word retrieval therapy for people with aphasia was feasible and acceptable to participants. Telerehabilitation and face to face therapy improved word retrieval more than an attention control intervention.

  9. Holistic face processing of own- and other-age faces in young and older adults: ERP evidence from the composite face task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Holger; Kachel, Ulrike; Schweinberger, Stefan R

    2013-07-01

    Participants more accurately remember own-age relative to other-age faces (own-age bias, OAB). The present study tested whether this effect is related to more efficient holistic processing of own-age faces. Young adult and older participants performed a composite face task with young and old faces, in which they indicated whether the upper half of two subsequent composite faces was identical or not. The lower half of the second face was always different, and face halves were horizontally misaligned in 50% of the trials. Both participant groups were more efficient to correctly identify same upper halves in the misaligned relative to the aligned condition, and this composite face effect (CFE), a marker of holistic face processing, was stronger for young faces. Analysis of event-related potentials revealed strong misalignment effects in the N170, which were more pronounced for young faces in both groups. Critically, in the subsequent N250r a stronger misalignment effect for young faces was detected in young participants only. Since N250r may reflect the facilitated access of a perceptual representation of a previously presented face, this finding is interpreted to reflect young participants' more efficient representation of own-age faces as a whole, which may contribute to their OAB in memory.

  10. Accessing Flexible Learning Opportunities: Children's and Young People's Use of Laptops in a Paediatric Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisselle, Amy; Hanns, Shaun; Green, Julie; Jones, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Hospitalised children and young people not only face challenges to their health but also to their continued education and social connections. These challenges can impact on future life trajectories, so it is crucial to maintain learning and socialising. Educational technologies, such as laptops and iPads, are used in the multidisciplinary…

  11. Children and Young People in Hospitals: Doing Youth Work in Medical Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Scott; Payne, Malcolm; Dyson, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Young people in hospitals face a range of challenging issues. Many have chronic conditions and experience stigmatisation, anxiety and family conflict. They may also experience social isolation in hospitals, separation from local peer groups and sources of support, and separation from trusted carers during transition to adult care. These issues can…

  12. Effects of the School-to-Work Group Method among Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Petri; Vuori, Jukka; Nykyri, Elina

    2007-01-01

    This study examines effects of the School-to-Work Group Method among 17-25-year-old young people facing the transition from vocational college to work. After baseline measurement (N=416) participants were randomized into experimental and control groups. The results of ten month follow-up (N=334) showed notable beneficial impacts of the group…

  13. Accessing Flexible Learning Opportunities: Children's and Young People's Use of Laptops in a Paediatric Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisselle, Amy; Hanns, Shaun; Green, Julie; Jones, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Hospitalised children and young people not only face challenges to their health but also to their continued education and social connections. These challenges can impact on future life trajectories, so it is crucial to maintain learning and socialising. Educational technologies, such as laptops and iPads, are used in the multidisciplinary…

  14. Young people's leisure time: Gender differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Videnović

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last three decades, topics relating to young peoples leisure time have become increasingly more present in academic literature. Among the numerous studies that delve into this subject, results point towards a relationship between the way teenagers spend their leisure time and their gender. In this study we wanted to answer the question if gender differences were evident in the way secondary school students in Serbia spent their leisure time. This problem was not looked into in more detail among secondary school students in Serbia. We conducted a survey on a sample of 922 secondary school teenagers from the 1st to 4th grade(ages 15–19 from nine Serbian towns. Research in this field commonly uses the rating scale. In this paper we have constructed an instrument that represents a methodological innovation in approaching a particular set of problems. It was a questionnaire. The task was to name all the activities they participated in, and the time frame in which the activities took place, over the course of one weekday and the Saturday of the previous week. The activities which best differentiate these two groups of surveyed teenagers are: sports, studying, computer use, spending time at friends’ homes and grooming. We did not discover differences in participating in creative activities while foreign studies show that such activities are more typical for girls.

  15. Dancing beyond exercise: young people's experiences in dance classes

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, SM; Komesaroff, P; Fensham, R.

    2008-01-01

    Dance classes in urban settings may have a role in health-promotion programmes seeking to increase physical activity amongst young people. However, little is so far known about the motivations, experiences or health outcomes of those participating in dance classes. This qualitative study of young people attending recreational dance classes addressed motivations, the nature of the class experience, and implications for health and well-being. Data show that young dance participants' experiences...

  16. Exploring the experiences of young people nursed on adult wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Linda; Black, Sharon

    This paper reports on a study of experiences of young people aged 14 to 18 years who were nursed on acute adult hospital wards in NHS hospitals in England. In spite of British government guidelines, young people from 14 years of age continue to be admitted to adult wards in the UK. Although much has been written about the transition of the young person to adult services, there is little research about the experiences of young people who are nursed on adult wards. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used to explore the lived experiences of eight young people who had been nursed on adult wards between 2004 and 2010. Data were collected in 2010. In-depth interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using Colaizzi's framework ( Colaizzi, 1978 ). Themes explored included expectations of what the experience may be like, young people's first impressions of the ward environment, the feelings of the young person while in hospital, the attitudes of people towards them including, both staff and other patients, and future admissions and how they would cope with readmissions. Better provision needs to be made for young people including appropriately trained staff, adolescent-friendly environments and areas in adult wards that are dedicated to adolescents.

  17. Food, risk and place: agency and negotiations of young people with food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stjerna, Marie-Louise

    2015-02-01

    Potentially life-threatening food allergies are increasing among children in the Western world. Informed by childhood studies, this article explores young people's management of food allergy risk and highlights their agency in relation to food, eating and place. Drawing on individual interviews with 10 young people who took part in a larger multi-method study of young people's experiences of food allergies, the findings demonstrate that the management of health risks means, to some extent, trying to control the uncontrollable. A reaction can occur at any time and to experience a severe reaction entails a temporarily loss of control. The strategies the young people develop to avoid allergic reactions can be understood both as responses to this uncertainty and as manifestations of their agency. Their risk experiences vary with place; at school and in other public places they face social as well as health risks. What we see is not agency as a voluntary choice but that young people with food allergies experience tensions between their own competence to manage different types of risks and their dependence on others to adjust to their needs. Thus, the relational aspects of young people's agency come to the fore. © 2015 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Judging Normality and Attractiveness in Faces: Direct Evidence of a More Refined Representation for Own-Race, Young Adult Faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaomei; Short, Lindsey A; Chan, Harmonie S J; Mondloch, Catherine J

    2016-09-01

    Young and older adults are more sensitive to deviations from normality in young than older adult faces, suggesting that the dimensions of face space are optimized for young adult faces. Here, we extend these findings to own-race faces and provide converging evidence using an attractiveness rating task. In Experiment 1, Caucasian and Chinese adults were shown own- and other-race face pairs; one member was undistorted and the other had compressed or expanded features. Participants indicated which member of each pair was more normal (a task that requires referencing a norm) and which was more expanded (a task that simply requires discrimination). Participants showed an own-race advantage in the normality task but not the discrimination task. In Experiment 2, participants rated the facial attractiveness of own- and other-race faces (Experiment 2a) or young and older adult faces (Experiment 2b). Between-rater variability in ratings of individual faces was higher for other-race and older adult faces; reduced consensus in attractiveness judgments reflects a less refined face space. Collectively, these results provide direct evidence that the dimensions of face space are optimized for own-race and young adult faces, which may underlie face race- and age-based deficits in recognition.

  19. Leadership and Innovation-Listening to and Learning From Young People in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nininahazwe, Cédric; Alesi, Jacquelyne; Caswell, Georgina; Lumumba, Musah; Mellin, Julie; Ndayizeye, Nicholas-Monalisa; Orza, Luisa; Rahimi, Michaela; Westerhof, Nienke

    2017-02-01

    This commentary describes young people's leadership from the perspective of a youth-led organization in the Link Up project in Burundi, Réseau National des Jeunes vivant avec le VIH. It describes processes that enable young people to guide, influence, deliver, and improve health service provision; the challenges faced by Réseau National des Jeunes vivant avec le VIH and how they are addressing these challenges. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Rethinking passive transport: bus fare exemptions and young people's wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alasdair; Steinbach, Rebecca; Roberts, Helen; Goodman, Anna; Green, Judith

    2012-05-01

    Much recent public health research has emphasised the health impacts for young people of 'active travel' modes, typically defined as walking and cycling. Less research has focused on public transport modes. Drawing on qualitative data, we examine the links between bus travel and wellbeing in London, where young people currently have free bus travel. Our findings indicate that bus travel can be both a physically and socially active experience for young people. We suggest a more nuanced understanding of 'active travel' is now needed, alongside greater attention to urban public transport networks as key sites that impact on important determinants of wellbeing such as independent mobility and social inclusion.

  1. Prioritizing young people's emotional health support needs via participatory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendal, S E; Milnes, L; Welsby, H; Pryjmachuk, S

    2017-06-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THIS SUBJECT?: Young people's mental health is a concern to people around the world. Good emotional health promotes mental health and protects against mental illness, but we need to know more about how to help young people look after their emotional health. We are learning that research is better if the public are involved in it, including children and young people. Therefore, we need to listen carefully to what young people have to say. In this paper, we describe some research that involved young people from start to finish. We were asking what kind of emotional health support would be useful to them. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: We developed a useful way to involve young people in research so their voice can be heard. Young people like to use the Internet to find emotional health support and information, but need to know which web sites they can trust. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Our method of bringing young people together to tell us their views was successful. It is important to explore ways to help young people judge the quality of emotional health web sites. Introduction Youth mental health is a global concern. Emotional health promotes mental health and protects against mental illness. Youth value self-care for emotional health, but we need better understanding of how to help them look after their emotional health. Participatory research is relevant, since meaningful engagement with youth via participatory research enhances the validity and relevance of research findings and supports young people's rights to involvement in decisions that concern them. Aim We aimed to develop a participatory approach for involving youth in research about their emotional health support preferences. Method Our team included a young expert-by-experience. We developed a qualitative, participatory research design. Eleven youth (16-18 years) participated in focus groups, followed immediately by a nominal group exercise in which they

  2. Judging trustworthiness from faces: Emotion cues modulate trustworthiness judgments in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Frances; Ewing, Louise; Bank, Samantha; Rhodes, Gillian

    2016-08-01

    By adulthood, people judge trustworthiness from appearances rapidly and reliably. However, we know little about these judgments in children. This novel study investigates the developmental trajectory of explicit trust judgments from faces, and the contribution made by emotion cues across age groups. Five-, 7-, 10-year-olds, and adults rated the trustworthiness of trustworthy and untrustworthy faces with neutral expressions. The same participants also rated faces displaying overt happy and angry expressions, allowing us to investigate whether emotion cues modulate trustworthiness judgments similarly in children and adults. Results revealed that the ability to evaluate the trustworthiness of faces emerges in childhood, but may not be adult like until 10 years of age. Moreover, we show that emotion cues modulate trust judgments in young children, as well as adults. Anger cues diminished the appearance of trustworthiness for participants from 5 years of age and happy cues increased it, although this effect did not consistently emerge until later in childhood, that is, 10 years of age. These associations also extended to more subtle emotion cues present in neutral faces. Our results indicate that young children are sensitive to facial trustworthiness, and suggest that similar expression cues modulate these judgments in children and adults. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  3. Psychiatric Assessment and Follow-up of Young People after ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    often are suspicious of services and as a result do not open up to talk about their .... the young people following discharge and liaise with the local. CAMHS team .... dynamics, coping vulnerabilities, life-time psychopathology, cognitions, and ...

  4. Rwandan young people's perceptions on sexuality and relationships ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kristien Michielsen

    2014-06-20

    Jun 20, 2014 ... Mailboxes were installed in five secondary schools in the ... desire among young people of the same age, and transactional sex, occurring after negotiation .... or status in the interaction; and finally, the social context influ-.

  5. PREMARITAL GROUNDS AND LIFE PLANS OF YOUNG PEOPLE: SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elena Nikolaevna Kasarkina; Dinara Asymovna Bistyaykina; Tatyana Vladimirovna Solovyova

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with life plans of young people in the modern society, in particular, the issues of marriage, childbearing and family formation are analyzed basing on sociological surveys conducted...

  6. The Reproductive Behavior of Young People in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalachikova, O. N.

    2013-01-01

    Research on reproductive preferences of young people in Russia shows that their attitudes regarding the number of children they may have differs by gender and by urban-rural origins. (Contains 4 tables, 1 figure, and 1 note.)

  7. Hepatitis B among young people in Lere health department (Chad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B among young people in Lere health department (Chad) ... South Sudan Medical Journal ... Agespecific prevalence varies by geographical region with highest endemicity levels in sub-Saharan Africa and prevalence below 2% in ...

  8. Young people's uses of celebrity: Class, gender and 'improper' celebrity

    OpenAIRE

    Mendick, H.

    2013-01-01

    This is an Author's Accepted Manuscript of an article published in Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 34(1), 2013, copyright Taylor & Francis, available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/01596306.2012.698865. In this article, we explore the question of how celebrity operates in young people's everyday lives, thus contributing to the urgent need to address celebrity's social function. Drawing on data from three studies in England on young people's pe...

  9. WORKING WITH YOUNG PEOPLE: A MODEL OF SOCIAL INTERVENTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dovilė Lisauskienė

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Social workers, working with young people ought to be aware of the values, needs and problems of contemporary young people. Therefore, it is necessary to develop study programmes of Social Work that would reflect the current situation of modern youth and be oriented towards effective techniques for working with young people. The most common methods described in the literature are counseling, supervision, case management, self-reflection. The article highlights the method of social intervention, which objectively and fully assesses the problem situation and establishes the connections and relationships between the young man and his relatives, friends or authorities. This method helps to enable young people to solve their own problems. The aim of the research is to analyze the application features of the social intervention model when working with young people. The objectives are to discuss the activities of youth organizations in the field of social 99SOCIALINIO TINKLO INTERVENCIJOS MODELIO TAIKYMAS DIRBANT SU JAUNIMU work; to highlight the methods of social workers‘ practice; to investigate the application of social intervention model, enabling young people to solve their own problems. The methods applied include comparative analysis of scientific literature, monitoring, social intervention model. The survey revealed that when social workers enable young people to solve their own problems, a model of social intervention allows to evaluate not only the relationships of close people or family members, but also highlights the roles of youth organizations or social workers and their positive effect on the customer‘s actions. Thus, when applying the method of social intervention, social workers play an important role, as well as their professional knowledge and skills to establish the connection with the client are extremely important in order to promote the client‘s reflection.

  10. PREMARITAL GROUNDS AND LIFE PLANS OF YOUNG PEOPLE: SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Nikolaevna Kasarkina; Dinara Asymovna Bistyaykina; Tatyana Vladimirovna Solovyova

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with life plans of young people in the modern society, in particular, the issues of marriage, childbearing and family formation are analyzed basing on sociological surveys conducted in Saransk, as well as on a comparative analysis of other Russian and foreign studies. It is noted that nowadays young people eager to realize their own professional interests, to achieve material well-being, independence, personal improvement and only then to realize their aspirations in family...

  11. Face likeability mediates the memory-enhancing effect of face attractiveness in young but not older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tian; Lendry, Reesa; Ebner, Natalie C

    2016-11-01

    Evidence of effects of face attractiveness on memory is mixed and little is known about the underlying mechanisms of this relationship. Previous work suggests a possible mediating role of affective responding to faces (i.e., face likeability) on the relationship between face attractiveness and memory. Age-related change in social motivation may reduce the relevance of face attractiveness in older adults, with downstream effects on memory. In the present study, 50 young and 51 older participants were presented with face-trait pairs. Faces varied in attractiveness. Participants then completed a face-trait associative recognition memory task and provided likeability ratings for each face. There was a memory-enhancing effect of face attractiveness in young (but not older) participants, which was partially mediated by face likeability. In addition, more attractive and less attractive (compared to moderately attractive) faces were more likely remembered by both young and older participants. This quadratic effect of face attractiveness on memory was not mediated by face likeability. Findings are discussed in the context of motivational influences on memory that vary with age.

  12. WHY DO YOUNG PEOPLE PREFER FAST- FOOD RESTAURANTS? AN EXPLORATORY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nicoleta UNTARU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to identify the reasons which determine young people to choose fast-food restaurants, as well as the criteria they bear in mind, when they choose such places to eat. There are relatively a few studies in Romania, on this field, which deal with young people’s perceptions about fast-food and the products they offer. This study intends to add new information to the specific literature in this field, where we face a growing number of fast - food restaurants and a huge interest young people shown them. The sample included 13 students from Transilvania University in Brasov. Although the research method is a qualitative one, using the focus- group, the results can be taken into consideration by the public decisional factors in the fast- food field in order to elaborate the proper strategies to attract and keep the young consumers.

  13. EDUCATION AND YOUNG FACE OF DEMANDING JOB MARKET BRAZILIAN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Raza

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses an analysis of public policies applied to education and their influence on economic development and social rise of workers in the Brazilian labor market, which requires efficient, economically productive people in constant training. It aims at examining the overall efficiency of the management model of educational public policies, as well as the teaching process and preparation of young people to the labor market. From the results of this study, we can conclude that there is a huge gap between institutions of secondary education and the labor market; we discussed questions such as how school refusal is caused by disinterest and lack of relationship between theory and practice, required for the insertion of the young in the labor market, as well as the lack of integration among schools, businesses and society. Thus, it is proved necessary to adopt more efficient policies to decrease the distance or lack of preparation of the young to develop the country's economic and bring social development.

  14. Developing public health provision for vulnerable young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewings, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Engaging vulnerable children and young people can be a challenge. This article reports on the development of a specialist school nurse service, known as Support Services Health Team, aimed at the most vulnerable children and young people in Hull. The aim was to provide public health support and coordinate healthcare to children and young people in the looked after system, those in pupil referrals units, home educated and those outside of the educational system (missing from education). This innovative approach to addressing the health needs of this population helped to establish firm networks across the city of Hull, reduce duplication of support being offered and avoid young people slipping through the systems. The team has a sound knowledge around health trends for young people, social groups and hotspots where they are at risk across the city. They have created a presence in the city where professionals and young people are aware of them and the service offered. Clear pathways have been established on intervention starting with the completion of a comprehensive health needs assessment and care plan. A creative approach to supervision has been established to ensure staff do not feel overwhelmed and that they are evidence-based in their approach to intervention and advice offered.

  15. Socio-Demographic Vulnerability: The Condition of Italian Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busetta, A.; Milito, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    For a kind of inertia effect, today the Italian welfare state protects the older too much and, on the contrary, it does not counter sufficiently the new risks associated with other phases of life. Not much seems to be implemented in favour of Italian young people who, as a matter of fact, seem to suffer a lot from the present changes: young people…

  16. Evaluation of a Smoking Cessation Club for Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinks, Annette; Linnell, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to undertake a formative evaluation of a young person's Smokebuster club and to examine how young people's experience of being a club member can be used to inform the club's future development. Design/methodology/approach: After seeking and being granted Local Research Ethics Committee approval to undertake the…

  17. Young People Smokers’ Reactions on Peer Influence Not to Smoke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harakeh, Z.; van Nijnatten, C.H.C.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peers exert influence not to smoke but little is yet known on how this affects young people's behavior and cognitions. Objectives: This experimental study investigates the impact of two types of peer influence not to smoke on the verbalized attitudes and responses of daily-smoking young

  18. Young People Smokers’ Reactions on Peer Influence Not to Smoke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harakeh, Z.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/297964283; van Nijnatten, C.H.C.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071920129

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peers exert influence not to smoke but little is yet known on how this affects young people's behavior and cognitions. Objectives: This experimental study investigates the impact of two types of peer influence not to smoke on the verbalized attitudes and responses of daily-smoking young

  19. Attitudes of Young People toward Diversity. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olander, Michael; Kirby, Emily Hoban; Schmitt, Krista

    2005-01-01

    This fact sheet summarizes young people's attitudes toward three groups that are sometimes targets of intolerance: gays, immigrants, and racial minorities. In general, the data show that young Americans are the most tolerant age group and are growing more tolerant over time. However, their social circles and voluntary associations (such as…

  20. Enhancing early engagement with mental health services by young people

    OpenAIRE

    Burns J; Birrell E

    2014-01-01

    Jane Burns, Emma Birrell Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre, Abbotsford, VIC, Australia Abstract: International studies have shown that the prevalence of mental illness, and the fundamental contribution it make to the overall disease burden, is greatest in children and young people. Despite this high burden, adolescents and young adults are the least likely population group to seek help or to access professional care for mental health problems. This issue is particularly problematic ...

  1. Young and older emotional faces: are there age group differences in expression identification and memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Natalie C; Johnson, Marcia K

    2009-06-01

    Studies have found that older compared with young adults are less able to identify facial expressions and have worse memory for negative than for positive faces, but those studies have used only young faces. Studies finding that both age groups are more accurate at recognizing faces of their own than other ages have used mostly neutral faces. Thus, age differences in processing faces may not extend to older faces, and preferential memory for own age faces may not extend to emotional faces. To investigate these possibilities, young and older participants viewed young and older faces presented either with happy, angry, or neutral expressions; participants identified the expressions displayed and then completed a surprise face recognition task. Older compared with young participants were less able to identify expressions of angry young and older faces and (based on participants' categorizations) remembered angry faces less well than happy faces. There was no evidence of an own age bias in memory, but self-reported frequency of contact with young and older adults and awareness of own emotions played a role in expression identification of and memory for young and older faces.

  2. Self-Blame and Commodification of Unemployed Young People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pultz, Sabina

    people experience their situation and position themselves in regards to this normative encouragement to blame themselves. Personal branding and networking are identified as strategies enforced by the employment system and can be viewed as technologies of the self encouraging young people to commodify...

  3. Young People's Writing: Attitudes, Behaviour and the Role of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christina; Dugdale, George

    2009-01-01

    Writing is an important issue in the UK today. While children's and young people's writing standards steadily improved until 2006, levels have not increased in recent years. Writing is much more than just an educational issue--it is an essential skill that allows people to participate fully in today's society and to contribute to the economy.…

  4. PREMARITAL GROUNDS AND LIFE PLANS OF YOUNG PEOPLE: SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nikolaevna Kasarkina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with life plans of young people in the modern society, in particular, the issues of marriage, childbearing and family formation are analyzed basing on sociological surveys conducted in Saransk, as well as on a comparative analysis of other Russian and foreign studies. It is noted that nowadays young people eager to realize their own professional interests, to achieve material well-being, independence, personal improvement and only then to realize their aspirations in family life. Many attributes of marriage and family are implemented in matrimonial behavior of young peoplein a distorted form. For example, the preservation of pre-marital chastity is questioned. A special role is given to premarital cohabitation, which is represented as a certain step before marriage, allowing young people to check the mutual feelings, attitudes and willingness of the partners to have a full marriage. Emotional contacts and sexual satisfaction per se are valuable for young people, and do not always correspond with the question of marriage and family. Nevertheless, the questionnaire shows that in their life plans, though giving priority to career and financial independence, young people seek to build a strong family based on wedlock. Despite the emergence of new views on marriage, the  society still has strong enough thousand-year experience of family traditions. 

  5. Forging ties between young People from CERN and ESA

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    The CERN Student Club (CSC) is the official club for the community of young people at CERN. In addition to organizing regular activities for its members, the club serves as a platform for young people to come together and meet people from other backgrounds. On 11 and 12 April, the network for young people from the European Space Agency (YoungESA) organized an excursion to CERN, in which more than 30 young researchers participated. The CERN Student Club was happy to host several activities for the members of the two communities.   Some of the participants in the first meeting of the ESA-CERN student clubs. “One of the most amazing things about being a young researcher is the boundless opportunities for meeting people from all around the world, whether for the exchange of research ideas or for social purposes”, says Yi Ling Hwong, a member of the CMS experiment and Vice-president of the CERN Student Club. “In a place like CERN such occasions are abundant but t...

  6. Physical Health Risk Behaviours in Young People with Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloughen, Andrea; Foster, Kim; Marabong, Nikka; Miu, David; Fethney, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Comorbid physical health conditions, commonly associated with mental illness, contribute to increased morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The trajectory to poorer health begins with the onset of mental illness. For young people with mental illness, health risk behaviours and poor physical health can progress to adulthood with long-term detrimental impacts. Using a cross-sectional survey design, self-reported health risk behaviours were gathered from 56 young (16-25 years) Australians who had been hospitalised for mental illness and taking psychotropic medication. Smoking, alcohol use, minimal physical activity, and lack of primary health care were evident. While these behaviours are typical of many young people, those with mental illness have substantially increased vulnerability to poor health and reduced life expectancy. Priority needs to be given to targeted health promotion strategies for young people with mental illness to modify their risky long-term health behaviours and improve morbidity and mortality outcomes. Nurses in mental health settings play a vital role in promoting young peoples' well-being and preventing poorer physical health outcomes. Implementation of a cardiometabolic health nurse role in inpatient settings for young people with mental illness could facilitate prevention and early intervention for health risk behaviours.

  7. A young people's perspective on computer game addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brus, Anne Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    these concerns about young people ‘at risk’, there is a gap between the phenomenon as a suggested psychiatric diagnosis and young people’s reflections on the matter. Following the work of Goffman and Becker, computer game addiction is not necessarily something negative in the eyes of the player and other young...... people. It is shown that the classification can be a positive element in young people’s identity work. On the other hand, a high consumption of computer games is also considered as ‘culturally unacceptable’. From this perspective, computer game addiction becomes a question of how to construct...... the boundaries between normality and deviance and how prejudices are governing and controlling young people’s lives. All this suggests more caution in classifying frequent and problematic computer game play as a disorder in itself. We need a more complex understanding of computer game addiction than research so...

  8. Why Young People Don't Vote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Curtis; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses several reasons for decreasing voter participation in the United States, specifically focusing on lack of voter participation by youth. Highlights recommendations for increasing young voter turnout. Presents three voting activity lesson plans for middle school students and three activities entitled "Increasing Participation in…

  9. Decision aids for people facing health treatment or screening decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, A M; Stacey, D; Entwistle, V; Llewellyn-Thomas, H; Rovner, D; Holmes-Rovner, M; Tait, V; Tetroe, J; Fiset, V; Barry, M; Jones, J

    2003-01-01

    Decision aids prepare people to participate in preference-sensitive decisions. 1. Create a comprehensive inventory of patient decision aids focused on healthcare options. 2. Review randomized controlled trials (RCT) of decision aids, for people facing healthcare decisions. Studies were identified through databases and contact with researchers active in the field. Two independent reviewers screened abstracts for interventions designed to aid patients' decision making by providing information about treatment or screening options and their associated outcomes. Information about the decision aids was compiled in an inventory; those that had been evaluated in a RCT were reviewed in detail. Two reviewers independently extracted data using standardized forms. Results of RCTs were pooled using weighted mean differences (WMD) and relative risks (RR) using a random effects model. Over 200 decision aids were identified. Of the 131 available decision aids, most are intended for use before counselling. Using the CREDIBLE criteria to evaluate the quality of the decision aids: a) most included potential harms and benefits, credentials of the developers, description of their development process, update policy, and were free of perceived conflict of interest; b) many included reference to relevant literature; c) few included a description of the level of uncertainty regarding the evidence; and d) few were evaluated. Thirty of these decision aids were evaluated in 34 RCTs and another trial evaluated a suite of eight decision aids. An additional 30 trials are yet to be published. Among the trials comparing decision aids to usual care, decision aids performed better in terms of: a) greater knowledge (WMD 19 out of 100, 95% CI: 13 to 24; b) more realistic expectations (RR 1.4, 95%CI: 1.1 to 1.9); c) lower decisional conflict related to feeling informed (WMD -9.1 of 100, 95%CI: -12 to -6); d) increased proportion of people active in decision making (RR 1.4, 95% CI: 1.0 to 2.3); and e

  10. Reverse correlating trustworthy faces in young and older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Éthier-Majcher, Catherine; Joubert, Sven; Gosselin, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how older persons determine if someone deserves their trust or not based on their facial appearance, a process referred to as “facial trustworthiness.”In the past few years, Todorov and colleagues have argued that, in young adults, trustworthiness judgments are an extension of emotional judgments, and therefore, that trust judgments are made based on a continuum between anger and happiness (Todorov, 2008; Engell et al., 2010). Evidence from the literature on emotion processing suggest that older adults tend to be less efficient than younger adults in the recognition of negative facial expressions (Calder et al., 2003; Firestone et al., 2007; Ruffman et al., 2008; Chaby and Narme, 2009). Based on Todorov';s theory and the fact that older adults seem to be less efficient than younger adults in identifying emotional expressions, one could expect that older individuals would have different representations of trustworthy faces and that they would use different cues than younger adults in order to make such judgments. We verified this hypothesis using a variation of Mangini and Biederman's (2004) reverse correlation method in order to test and compare classification images resulting from trustworthiness (in the context of money investment), from happiness, and from anger judgments in two groups of participants: young adults and older healthy adults. Our results show that for elderly participants, both happy and angry representations are correlated with trustworthiness judgments. However, in young adults, trustworthiness judgments are mainly correlated with happiness representations. These results suggest that young and older adults differ in their way of judging trustworthiness. PMID:24046755

  11. Reverse correlating trustworthy faces in young and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eÉthier-Majcher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about how older persons determine if someone deserves their trust or not based on their facial appearance, a process referred to as facial trustworthiness. In the past few years, Todorov and colleagues have argued that, in young adults, trustworthiness judgments are an extension of emotional judgments, and therefore, that trust judgments are made based on a continuum between anger and happiness (Engell, Todorov & Haxby, 2010; Todorov, 2008. Evidence from the literature on emotion processing suggest that older adults tend to be less efficient than younger adults in the recognition of negative facial expressions (Chaby & Narme, 2009; Ruffman, Henry, Livingstone et al., 2008; Firestone, Turk-Browne & Ryan, 2007; Calder, Keane, Manly et al., 2003. Based on Todorov’s theory and the fact that older adults seem to be less efficient than younger adults in identifying emotional expressions, one could expect that older individuals would have different representations of trustworthy faces and that they would use different cues than younger adults in order to make such judgments. We verified this hypothesis using a variation of Mangini and Biederman's (2004 reverse correlation method in order to test and compare classification images resulting from trustworthiness (in the context of money investment, from happiness, and from anger judgments in two groups of participants: young adults and older healthy adults. Our results show that for elderly participants, both happy and angry representations are correlated with trustworthiness judgments. However, in young adults, trustworthiness judgments are mainly correlated with happiness representations. These results suggest that young and older adults differ in their way of judging trustworthiness.

  12. Reverse correlating trustworthy faces in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier-Majcher, Catherine; Joubert, Sven; Gosselin, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how older persons determine if someone deserves their trust or not based on their facial appearance, a process referred to as "facial trustworthiness."In the past few years, Todorov and colleagues have argued that, in young adults, trustworthiness judgments are an extension of emotional judgments, and therefore, that trust judgments are made based on a continuum between anger and happiness (Todorov, 2008; Engell et al., 2010). Evidence from the literature on emotion processing suggest that older adults tend to be less efficient than younger adults in the recognition of negative facial expressions (Calder et al., 2003; Firestone et al., 2007; Ruffman et al., 2008; Chaby and Narme, 2009). Based on Todorov';s theory and the fact that older adults seem to be less efficient than younger adults in identifying emotional expressions, one could expect that older individuals would have different representations of trustworthy faces and that they would use different cues than younger adults in order to make such judgments. We verified this hypothesis using a variation of Mangini and Biederman's (2004) reverse correlation method in order to test and compare classification images resulting from trustworthiness (in the context of money investment), from happiness, and from anger judgments in two groups of participants: young adults and older healthy adults. Our results show that for elderly participants, both happy and angry representations are correlated with trustworthiness judgments. However, in young adults, trustworthiness judgments are mainly correlated with happiness representations. These results suggest that young and older adults differ in their way of judging trustworthiness.

  13. Mindfulness-Based Approaches for Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Their Caregivers: Do These Approaches Hold Benefits for Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan-Mount, Rebekah; Albrecht, Nicole Jacqueline; Waters, Lea

    2016-01-01

    Parents and teachers who care for and educate young people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) face unique challenges associated with their roles. In this review we investigated the efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions in reducing stress and increasing positive behaviours in young people with ASD and their caregivers: parents and teachers.…

  14. A Year's Turning: Young People Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, I. V., Ed.

    This book is an anthology of unedited verse and prose written by 14- and 15-year-old students. The book is intended for teachers in training, for their tutors, and for all teachers of English. The verses are classified as undirected and directed poems about nature, places, war, the Egyptian Tomb, up and back again, and people. The prose is…

  15. Confidentiality in Family Planning Services for Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittain, Anna W.; Williams, Jessica R.; Zapata, Lauren B.; Moskosky, Susan B.; Weik, Tasmeen S.

    2015-01-01

    Context Family planning services are essential for reducing high rates of unintended pregnancies among young people, yet a perception that providers will not preserve confidentiality may deter youth from accessing these services. This systematic review, conducted in 2011, summarizes the evidence on the effect of assuring confidentiality in family planning services to young people on reproductive health outcomes. The review was used to inform national recommendations on providing quality family planning services. Evidence acquisition Multiple databases were searched to identify articles addressing confidentiality in family planning services to youth aged 10–24 years. Included studies were published from January 1985 through February 2011. Studies conducted outside the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, or New Zealand, and those that focused exclusively on HIV or sexually transmitted diseases, were excluded. Evidence synthesis The search strategy identified 19,332 articles, nine of which met the inclusion criteria. Four studies examined outcomes. Examined outcomes included use of clinical services and intention to use services. Of the four outcome studies, three found a positive association between assurance of confidentiality and at least one outcome of interest. Five studies provided information on youth perspectives and underscored the idea that young people greatly value confidentiality when receiving family planning services. Conclusions This review demonstrates that there is limited research examining whether confidentiality in family planning services to young people affects reproductive health outcomes. A robust research agenda is needed, given the importance young people place on confidentiality. PMID:26190851

  16. Enhancing early engagement with mental health services by young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burns J

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Jane Burns, Emma Birrell Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre, Abbotsford, VIC, Australia Abstract: International studies have shown that the prevalence of mental illness, and the fundamental contribution it make to the overall disease burden, is greatest in children and young people. Despite this high burden, adolescents and young adults are the least likely population group to seek help or to access professional care for mental health problems. This issue is particularly problematic given that untreated, or poorly treated, mental disorders are associated with both short- and long-term functional impairment, including poorer education and employment opportunities, potential comorbidity, including drug and alcohol problems, and a greater risk for antisocial behavior, including violence and aggression. This cycle of poor mental health creates a significant burden for the young person, their family and friends, and society as a whole. Australia is enviably positioned to substantially enhance the well-being of young people, to improve their engagement with mental health services, and – ultimately – to improve mental health. High prevalence but potentially debilitating disorders, such as depression and anxiety, are targeted by the specialized youth mental health service, headspace: the National Youth Mental Health Foundation and a series of Early Psychosis Prevention and Intervention Centres, will provide early intervention specialist services for low prevalence, complex illnesses. Online services, such as ReachOut.com by Inspire Foundation, Youthbeyondblue, Kids Helpline, and Lifeline Australia, and evidence-based online interventions, such as MoodGYM, are also freely available, yet a major challenge still exists in ensuring that young people receive effective evidence-based care at the right time. This article describes Australian innovation in shaping a comprehensive youth mental health system, which is informed by an evidence

  17. The Relationship between Maternal Attitudes and Young People's Attitudes toward Children's Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, David M.; Peterson-Badali, Michele; Ruck, Martin D.

    2006-01-01

    Relations between maternal socio-political attitudes and parenting style and young people's and mothers' attitudes toward young people's nurturance and self-determination rights were examined. Both young people (n=121) and mothers (n=67) were more supportive of nurturance than self-determination rights, although young people were more supportive…

  18. Decision aids for people facing health treatment or screening decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Dawn; Légaré, France; Col, Nananda F; Bennett, Carol L; Barry, Michael J; Eden, Karen B; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary; Lyddiatt, Anne; Thomson, Richard; Trevena, Lyndal; Wu, Julie H C

    2014-01-28

    Decision aids are intended to help people participate in decisions that involve weighing the benefits and harms of treatment options often with scientific uncertainty. To assess the effects of decision aids for people facing treatment or screening decisions. For this update, we searched from 2009 to June 2012 in MEDLINE; CENTRAL; EMBASE; PsycINFO; and grey literature. Cumulatively, we have searched each database since its start date including CINAHL (to September 2008). We included published randomized controlled trials of decision aids, which are interventions designed to support patients' decision making by making explicit the decision, providing information about treatment or screening options and their associated outcomes, compared to usual care and/or alternative interventions. We excluded studies of participants making hypothetical decisions. Two review authors independently screened citations for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. The primary outcomes, based on the International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS), were:A) 'choice made' attributes;B) 'decision-making process' attributes.Secondary outcomes were behavioral, health, and health-system effects. We pooled results using mean differences (MD) and relative risks (RR), applying a random-effects model. This update includes 33 new studies for a total of 115 studies involving 34,444 participants. For risk of bias, selective outcome reporting and blinding of participants and personnel were mostly rated as unclear due to inadequate reporting. Based on 7 items, 8 of 115 studies had high risk of bias for 1 or 2 items each.Of 115 included studies, 88 (76.5%) used at least one of the IPDAS effectiveness criteria: A) 'choice made' attributes criteria: knowledge scores (76 studies); accurate risk perceptions (25 studies); and informed value-based choice (20 studies); and B) 'decision-making process' attributes criteria: feeling informed (34 studies) and feeling clear about values (29

  19. Facing the times: A young onset dementia support group: Facebook™ style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Denise; Strivens, Edward

    2016-03-01

    Young onset dementia accounts for up to 1 in 10 dementia diagnoses. Those diagnosed face premature transition into the realm of aged care services and adjustment to an illness of ageing prior to age 65. To help elicit communication of the perceived psychosocial needs of this group, provide a platform to gain peer support and advocate for increased awareness, the Young Onset Dementia Support Group was established on the social networking site, Facebook™ . Followers post comments, read educational or otherwise interesting news feeds, share inspirational quotes and access others living with dementia worldwide. Facebook provides a means of rapid global reach in a way that allows people with dementia to increase their communications and potentially reduce isolation. This paper was authored by the page administrators. We aim to highlight the promising utility of a social network platform just entering its stride amongst health communication initiatives.

  20. Face Shape Variation Among Sundanese People from Western Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WOLLY CANDRAMILA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The face is an important visual stimulus in daily life and each face identifies a particular person. The bone structure of the skull along with various soft tissues and coloration influence perception of the face. Facial averageness, and bilateral symmetry are the two most commonly used criterion of facial attractiveness, yet, both may be perceived differently based on hormonal status of the person observed. Facial perceptions may also differ according to cultural norms. In this research, we examined variations in face-shape among Sundanese male and female adults aged 18 to 40. We applied geometric-morphometric methods to analyze the landmark-based morphological variations in the frontal and lateral views of subjects’ faces. We identified five types of female frontal face views and four of male. We also identified five types each of female and male lateral face views. The trichion, gonion and gnathion were three most variable landmarks among the face views in our study, and highly determined the shape of the individuals’ faces. Multiple face type variation may refer to many categories of attractive faces since there is no exactly perfect category in the assessment of facial attractiveness by the viewers. Therefore, we believe that the configuration of facial features cannot constitute the sole visual criterion of facial attractiveness.

  1. Empowering our young people out of gangs

    OpenAIRE

    Nasir, Sudirman

    2013-01-01

    We have recently witnessed violent acts by numerous members of motorcycle gangs in several big cities in Indonesia such as Bandung, Pekanbaru and Makassar. They have been involved in aggressive behavior, including vandalism, rape and assaults. Frequently, they display this violence publicly and inevitably cause fear and panic among ordinary people. The media widely report these destructive acts and this inevitably triggers public debate and raises important questions as to who these youn...

  2. Long-Term Exposure to American and European Movies and Television Series Facilitates Caucasian Face Perception in Young Chinese Watchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yamin; Zhou, Lu

    2016-10-01

    Most young Chinese people now learn about Caucasian individuals via media, especially American and European movies and television series (AEMT). The current study aimed to explore whether long-term exposure to AEMT facilitates Caucasian face perception in young Chinese watchers. Before the experiment, we created Chinese, Caucasian, and generic average faces (generic average face was created from both Chinese and Caucasian faces) and tested participants' ability to identify them. In the experiment, we asked AEMT watchers and Chinese movie and television series (CMT) watchers to complete a facial norm detection task. This task was developed recently to detect norms used in facial perception. The results indicated that AEMT watchers coded Caucasian faces relative to a Caucasian face norm better than they did to a generic face norm, whereas no such difference was found among CMT watchers. All watchers coded Chinese faces by referencing a Chinese norm better than they did relative to a generic norm. The results suggested that long-term exposure to AEMT has the same effect as daily other-race face contact in shaping facial perception.

  3. A social semiotic interpretation of suicidal behaviour in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Martin; Standen, P J; Noon, Joe P

    2005-05-01

    This article presents a study of nurses' and doctors' perceptions of young people who engage in suicidal behaviour. A contemporary view of grounded theory is used to guide the collection and analysis of qualitative data from nurses and doctors working with young people in an accident and emergency department, paediatric medicine and child and adolescent mental health services (adolescent inpatient unit). The analysis of 45 semi-structured interviews generated the category: Processes of communication and associated meanings: Another voice, Complex messages and Seeing and using the social environment. A social semiotic framework is used to explore the way in which nurses and doctors perceive young people who engage in suicidal behaviour. The article concludes by considering the implications for policy and practice.

  4. SSRIs and risk of suicide attempts in young people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Erik; Agerbo, Esben; Bilenberg, Niels;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: SSRIs are widely used in the treatment of mental illness for both children and adults. Studies have found a slightly increased risk of suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts in young people using SSRIs but SSRIs' impact on risk for suicides in youth is not well-established. AIM......: Is there indication that SSRIs might raise risk for suicide attempts in young people? METHODS: We used an observational register-based historical cohort design, a large cohort of all Danish individuals born in 1983-1989 (n = 392,458) and a propensity score approach to analyse the impact from SSRIs on risk for suicide...... prescription. The hazard ratio for suicide attempts after redeeming a prescription was estimated to 5.23, 95% CI 4.82-5.68. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the risk of suicide attempt is higher for young people in the first months after redeeming their first prescription for SSRIs, compared to non-users. For SSRI...

  5. Decision aids for people facing health treatment or screening decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Dawn; Légaré, France; Lewis, Krystina; Barry, Michael J; Bennett, Carol L; Eden, Karen B; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Llewellyn-Thomas, Hilary; Lyddiatt, Anne; Thomson, Richard; Trevena, Lyndal

    2017-04-12

    Decision aids are interventions that support patients by making their decisions explicit, providing information about options and associated benefits/harms, and helping clarify congruence between decisions and personal values. To assess the effects of decision aids in people facing treatment or screening decisions. Updated search (2012 to April 2015) in CENTRAL; MEDLINE; Embase; PsycINFO; and grey literature; includes CINAHL to September 2008. We included published randomized controlled trials comparing decision aids to usual care and/or alternative interventions. For this update, we excluded studies comparing detailed versus simple decision aids. Two reviewers independently screened citations for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Primary outcomes, based on the International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS), were attributes related to the choice made and the decision-making process.Secondary outcomes were behavioural, health, and health system effects.We pooled results using mean differences (MDs) and risk ratios (RRs), applying a random-effects model. We conducted a subgroup analysis of studies that used the patient decision aid to prepare for the consultation and of those that used it in the consultation. We used GRADE to assess the strength of the evidence. We included 105 studies involving 31,043 participants. This update added 18 studies and removed 28 previously included studies comparing detailed versus simple decision aids. During the 'Risk of bias' assessment, we rated two items (selective reporting and blinding of participants/personnel) as mostly unclear due to inadequate reporting. Twelve of 105 studies were at high risk of bias.With regard to the attributes of the choice made, decision aids increased participants' knowledge (MD 13.27/100; 95% confidence interval (CI) 11.32 to 15.23; 52 studies; N = 13,316; high-quality evidence), accuracy of risk perceptions (RR 2.10; 95% CI 1.66 to 2.66; 17 studies; N = 5096; moderate

  6. [Tobacco industry strategies: marketing cigarettes to young people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damphousse, François

    2005-01-01

    "Tobacco industry strategies: marketing cigarettes to young people" describres how tobacco manufacturers through their internal documents and litigation have been forced to admit or found to deliberately target young people in their marketing strategies to recruit new smokers, despite having denied it publicly for years. Given that most smokers start and get hooked on tobacco in their ealy years and that the link between advertising, promotion and tobacco initiation is well documented, countries should adopt a complete ban on advertising and promotion. The FCTC is the best avenue for a global ban.

  7. Managing young people with self-harming or suicidal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Gemma

    2016-02-01

    This literature review aimed to determine the risk factors being used to identify children and young people who are at increased risk of engaging in self-harm and suicidal behaviour, so that optimal care can be provided for this patient group in children's medical ward settings. The two main themes that emerged were mental and neurodevelopmental disorders, and external factors. Management strategies to aid healthcare professionals in caring for this patient group were also identified. The review concludes by highlighting the need to provide healthcare professionals with continuing education about the mental health problems of children and young people, including risk factors and management strategies.

  8. Young people's knowledge of alcohol prices in a retail context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Gadensgaard, Birgitte; Godt, Diana

    people’s price knowledge of alcoholic beverages is examined by a price recall and a deal spotting test. The results indicate that the vast majority of young people hold fairly accurate reference prices, while a rather large segment of young people appears to actively search for prices of alcohol in store....... Results from logistic regressions are reported. The authors find a significant effect of ‘purchasing a special’ and ‘recognisable prices’ on price recall. However, no significant effect of purchase frequency, recency or demographical variables is found. Implications for public policy and managers...

  9. Developing gender: The medical treatment of transgender young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Claudia

    2015-10-01

    Situating the contemporary medical treatment of transgender young people--children and adolescents--in the longer history of engagement between transgender activists and the medical community, this article analyzes the World Professional Association for Transgender Health's (WPATH) Standards of Care (SOC) concerning the medical treatment of transgender young people. It traces how the SOC both achieves medical treatment for children and adolescents and reinforces a normative gender system by cleaving to a developmental approach. Without rejecting the value of developmentally-based medical treatment for now, it offers some preliminary thoughts on queer theory's valuation of developmental failure as a potential future alternative to an emergent medico-technological transgender normativity.

  10. Young people and the formation of attitudes towards the police

    OpenAIRE

    Sindall, K; McCarthy, D J; Brunton-Smith, I.

    2016-01-01

    Much is now known about public trust and confidence in the police, especially regarding the important role of procedural justice in police–citizen engagements. However, less is known about perceptions of the police amongst young people and how their views are formed. We use survey data from more than 1500 young people aged 10–15 years whose parents were also interviewed in the Crime Survey for England and Wales (2010–12) to explore the extent that children’s views of the police correspond wit...

  11. A visual processing advantage for young-adolescent deaf observers: Evidence from face and object matching tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megreya, Ahmed M.; Bindemann, Markus

    2017-01-01

    It is unresolved whether the permanent auditory deprivation that deaf people experience leads to the enhanced visual processing of faces. The current study explored this question with a matching task in which observers searched for a target face among a concurrent lineup of ten faces. This was compared with a control task in which the same stimuli were presented upside down, to disrupt typical face processing, and an object matching task. A sample of young-adolescent deaf observers performed with higher accuracy than hearing controls across all of these tasks. These results clarify previous findings and provide evidence for a general visual processing advantage in deaf observers rather than a face-specific effect. PMID:28117407

  12. A visual processing advantage for young-adolescent deaf observers: Evidence from face and object matching tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megreya, Ahmed M; Bindemann, Markus

    2017-01-24

    It is unresolved whether the permanent auditory deprivation that deaf people experience leads to the enhanced visual processing of faces. The current study explored this question with a matching task in which observers searched for a target face among a concurrent lineup of ten faces. This was compared with a control task in which the same stimuli were presented upside down, to disrupt typical face processing, and an object matching task. A sample of young-adolescent deaf observers performed with higher accuracy than hearing controls across all of these tasks. These results clarify previous findings and provide evidence for a general visual processing advantage in deaf observers rather than a face-specific effect.

  13. Stereotypes in media and media literacy among young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đerić Ivana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Young people, the most common consumers of media content, bear out the view that media shapes people’s lives. Therefore we must not underestimate the effect media exerts on young people’s values and behavioral patterns. Television is the medium which draws children and young people for the greatest part of their free time. Regardless whether television programs are described as positive or negative, whether they abound with stereotypes or not, it is important that young people develop a critical attitude towards them so that they may resist different forms of media manipulation. The paper discusses how stereotypes are generated and used by media and the manners in which stereotypical concepts affect young people’s attitudes. It highlights the importance of the development of media literacy which implies a critical attitude towards media images and discourses, the development of criteria for the selection and evaluation of information broadcast by media, the development of skills in interpreting and understanding stereotypical concepts and familiarity with alternative forms of media culture. The paper draws special attention to the issue of media education. The conclusion is that schools should offer media literacy as part of their curriculum and in it possible solutions to the problems discussed. .

  14. Raising Educational Attainment: How Young People's Experiences Speak Back to the "Compact with Young Australians"

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Riele, Kitty

    2011-01-01

    In the context of international consensus that the knowledge economy requires more highly educated people, the Australian federal, state and territory governments agreed on a set of policies and targets for lifting the minimum level of educational attainment of young people, which are analysed in Part 1 of this paper. This "Compact with young…

  15. Literature for Young People: Nonfiction Books about Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Joanne E.

    1979-01-01

    Literature for young people that allows issues related to death and suicide to be addressed openly included nonfiction material from various vantage points: anthropology, biology, ecology, theology, thanatology, and more. Exploration of grief and mourning are accomplished in a manner that is scholarly and compassionate. (Author)

  16. Mediating Gendered Performances: Young People Negotiating Embodiment in Research Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, Ann; Pattman, Rob; Croghan, Rosaleen; Griffin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Gender inequalities in schools have implications for life chances, emotional well-being and educational policies and practices, but are apparently resistant to change. This paper employs Judith Butler's conceptualisation of performativity in a study of young people and consumption to provide insights into gendered inequities. It argues that how…

  17. Young People and Prostitution: An End to the Beginning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayre, Patrick; Barrett, David

    2000-01-01

    Examines some reasons for the failure to protect young people in England and Wales from sexual abuse inherent in prostitution. Identifies characteristics of the child protection system which fit poorly for work with these youth. Argues that lasting improvement of these children's well-being depends on the creation of "joined-up,"…

  18. Best Science and Technology Reference Books for Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowsky, H. Robert

    This book is a guide to 669 science and technology reference books for children and young people (third grade through high school). It includes some older well-established titles that may be out of print, newer editions, and newer books that have not been completely tested by time. The entries for the books contained in this guide are arranged by…

  19. Counseling Interventions for Adolescents and Young People in Penal Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriakidis, Stavros

    2008-01-01

    The present study focuses on the counseling interventions for adolescents and young people held in custody. The study analyses the social effects of imprisonment, the incapacitation effects of custody, the need for delivering counseling in custody. In addition it reviews evidence regarding the effects of delivering counseling interventions in…

  20. Identifying Young People's Guidance Needs through Telephone Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Bettylu Rasmussen; San Martin, Alfredo Hidalgo; Gutierrez, Bertha Lidia Nuno; Farias, Martha Villasenor; Mora, Iliana Sahagun

    2001-01-01

    Examined needs expressed by young people in Guadalajara in Jalisco, Mexico, during phone calls to the Mexican Social Security Institute. Differences were significant by gender and age. Findings point to the need for more programs that reinforce good health practices, including avoiding risky behaviors. (BF)

  1. Why Young People Fail To Get and Hold Jobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Dept. of Labor, Albany.

    This booklet provides advice to young people seeking their first jobs on how to avoid the pitfalls that have caused others to lose jobs or fail to be hired. Topics discussed in short, one-page sections include appearance, attitude and behavior, ignorance of labor market facts, misrepresentation, sensitivity about a physical defect, unrealistic…

  2. Conflict Experience: A Phenomenological Study among Young People in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szklarski, Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate how young people in Sweden experience conflicts. The study is phenomenological, which means that the focus is on the essence of the investigated experience. Data have been collected by self-reports and analyzed with the help of an empirical phenomenological method. The research process has resulted in…

  3. Alternative Education Engaging Indigenous Young People: Flexi Schooling in Queensland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, Marnee; Heck, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This article will discuss some of the findings from a qualitative research project that explored the connections between alternative education and Indigenous learners. This study investigated how flexi school leaders reported they were supporting Indigenous young people to remain engaged in education. The results of the survey provide demographic…

  4. Work and Work Alternatives for Disabled Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuh, D.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The study compared the past and current work and work alternatives experienced by 383 disabled young people (aged 16-25 years) and 152 able-bodied controls in East Devon, United Kingdom. Also compared were the aspirations and expectations of the disabled with those of their families and service providers. (Author/DB)

  5. Young People with Health Conditions and the Inclusive Education Problematic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Lyn

    2014-01-01

    This article revisits debates about inclusive education from the perspective of the "Keeping Connected" project, a qualitative longitudinal research project focusing on young people with health-related disrupted experiences of schooling. Drawing on findings from this project, three main arguments are advanced and illustrated in relation…

  6. Deconstructing Digital Natives: Young People, Technology, and the New Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    There have been many attempts to define the generation of students who emerged with the Web and new digital technologies in the early 1990s. The term "digital native" refers to the generation born after 1980, which has grown up in a world where digital technologies and the internet are a normal part of everyday life. Young people belonging to this…

  7. Government, Schools, Young People and Communities in Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Robyn; Papadopoulos, Theo

    2010-01-01

    Advance is a flexible, school-based program that provides young people with the opportunity to volunteer or implement a project of benefit to their communities. An evaluation of this partnership between a state government office for youth, government secondary schools and community organisations found that a universal program such as Advance could…

  8. Mediating Gendered Performances: Young People Negotiating Embodiment in Research Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, Ann; Pattman, Rob; Croghan, Rosaleen; Griffin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Gender inequalities in schools have implications for life chances, emotional well-being and educational policies and practices, but are apparently resistant to change. This paper employs Judith Butler's conceptualisation of performativity in a study of young people and consumption to provide insights into gendered inequities. It argues that…

  9. Long-term outcomes of young people who attempted suicide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grisham, Jessica R; Williams, Alishia D

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Suicidal behavior has increased since the onset of the global recession, a trend that may have long-term health and social implications. OBJECTIVE To test whether suicide attempts among young people signal increased risk for later poor health and social functioning above and beyond a pree

  10. Young People on the Margins: Australian Studies of Social Exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelsberg, Harry Joseph; Martin-Giles, Bonnie Mercedes

    2008-01-01

    Drawing upon empirical data from four research projects undertaken in Adelaide, South Australia, we examine the cumulative effects of deprivation on the lives of young people. Utilising a social exclusion framework for analysis we demonstrate the dynamic interplay between the various dimensions of social exclusion. We present the experiences and…

  11. Social Capital and the Educational Expectations of Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behtoui, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the determinants of the educational expectations of young people in disadvantaged urban areas in three large cities in Sweden. In addition to the conventional predictors such as parental resources (economic and cultural capital) and demographic characteristics (such as age, gender, immigration background), this…

  12. Developing Environmental Agency and Engagement through Young People's Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigger, Stephen; Webb, Jean

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the extent to which stories for young people encourage environmental engagement and a sense of agency. Our discussion is informed by the work of Paul Ricoeur (on hermeneutics and narrative), John Dewey (on primacy of experience) and John Macmurray (on personal agency in society). We understand fiction reading about place as…

  13. Young People and Prostitution: An End to the Beginning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayre, Patrick; Barrett, David

    2000-01-01

    Examines some reasons for the failure to protect young people in England and Wales from sexual abuse inherent in prostitution. Identifies characteristics of the child protection system which fit poorly for work with these youth. Argues that lasting improvement of these children's well-being depends on the creation of "joined-up,"…

  14. Plague and Paideia: Sabotage in Devising Theatre with Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Anne

    2012-01-01

    This ethnography, completed by the classroom teacher in a publicly funded secondary school in Mississauga, Canada, explores issues of conflict and sabotage that affected a devising project with suburban young people. The processes of devising generated ethnographic data that included a play script and videotaped rehearsals and performances. As…

  15. Parental Influences on Young People's Sexual Behaviour: A Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, Daniel; Williamson, Lisa; Henderson, Marion

    2006-01-01

    Both family structure and processes have been associated with young people's sexual behaviour, but most studies are cross-sectional and focus on only one outcome: age at first intercourse. This paper uses longitudinal data from a survey of Scottish teenagers (N=5041) to show how low parental monitoring predicts early sexual activity for both sexes…

  16. Life Strategies of Young People: Sociological Research Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubov’ Borisovna Osipova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern reality is the world of formation of various life prospects of a young person. The relevance of the topic depends, firstly, on insufficient sociological research into the mechanism of formation and realization of life strategies of modern youth; and, secondly, on the need to substantiate the sociological concept of youth life strategies in terms of professional self-determination with regard to its social and group characteristics. In this context, young people as the most active social group are of great interest to the authors who consider them a research target. Due to the transitivity of a social status and the incomplete processes of social maturity formation young people need a targeted design of their future. The sociological analysis of the issue involves a clarification of the concept of “life strategy” at the conceptual level (A.A. Volokitin, S.N. Ikonnikova, E.I. Golovakha, Yu.A. Zubok, V.T. Lisovsky, M.N. Rutkevich, G.V. Leonidova, K.A. Ustinova, etc.. The article presents the author’s definition of “life strategies”, which is a dynamic system of perspective individual orientation aimed at designing one’s life in the future. At the same time the results of the author’s sociological research are presented, including a standardized interview, questionnaires, which provide an opportunity to form an idea about the living choices of young people living in Yugra. The declining influence of social institutions and the emerging opportunities for developing their life prospects on their own challenges young people to select their life targets and ways of their implementation independently. The article justifies the necessity of intensified activation of new forms of young students’ management when planning their life trajectory. Life strategies disclose its content in specific life situations associated with choice. The key choice is the career choice of young people which directly depends on the socio

  17. How do young people from so called “rough area” perceive the society where they are evolving?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Belgacem

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available What young people see from the society they are evolving in gives us a clue about and an understanding of the reasons why they sometimes become violent. Young people are revolted because they feel like a lot of things are unfair; they miss “moral values” and “points of reference”, as if nothing made “sense” anymore. Then, consumer society leads some young people into confusing reality with fictional fact and ultimately creates envy and jealousy. With the evolution of society and the fact that traditional rites “disappear”, young people are faced with the only rite that still exists to “jump” from childhood to grow-up world: school. But those who are not going to school will have to find and search for other “ rites of passage ” and we think that this is a major risk for young people, because this is where they could be “separated” from the society. Having to deal with this evolution, young people have some problems finding people they can identify themselves with.

  18. How do young people from so called “rough area” perceive the society where they are evolving?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Belgacem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available What young people see from the society they are evolving in gives us a clue about and an understanding of the reasons why they sometimes become violent. Young people are revolted because they feel like a lot of things are unfair; they miss “moral values” and “points of reference”, as if nothing made “sense” anymore. Then, consumersociety leads some young people into confusing reality with fictional fact and ultimately creates envy and jealousy. With the evolution of society and the fact that traditional rites “disappear”, young people are faced with the only rite that still exists to “jump” from childhood to grow-up world: school. But those who are not going to school will have to find and search for other “ rites of passage ” and we think that this is a major risk for young people, because this is where they could be “separated” from the society. Having to deal with this evolution, young people have some problems finding people they can identify themselves with.

  19. Social Capital and Youth Transitions: Do Young People's Networks Improve Their Participation in Education and Training? Occasional Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semo, Ronnie; Karmel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    In recent times social capital has received considerable attention because it is seen as having the potential to address many of the problems facing modern society, including the poor educational outcomes of considerable numbers of young people. This paper uses data from the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) to explore the…

  20. Improving Patient-Centered Care for Young People in General Practice With a Codesigned Screening App: Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Marianne Julie; Wadley, Greg; Sanci, Lena Amanda

    2017-08-11

    , with use moderated by honesty, motivation, app content and functionality, and app administration. Integrating a health and lifestyle-screening app into face-to-face care can enrich young people's experience of seeing their GP, create scope to identify and address unmet health needs, and increase patient-centered care. Further research is needed to investigate the effect of using a health and lifestyle-screening app in a diverse range of clinic types and settings, and with a diverse range of GPs and youth.

  1. [Essential hypertension in young people--ambulatory versus hospital care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitu, F; Leon, Maria-Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in our country. The number of young people with hypertension grow up quickly, so a good control of dyslipidemia and blood pressure (BP) is essential in prevention of cardiovascular disease. To investigate the prevalence of HTA at young people and established the corelation with another risk factors like smoke, colesterol, obesity and heredity, few data are available on the blood pressure characteristics of young patients. It has been investigate 366 young people between 19-25 years old, in ambulatory system and 350 younger with the same age, in hospital. Blood pressure was measured according to standard procedures, and was considered well-controlled if it was colesterol and 2.1 at men with big colesterol. The relation between HTA--obesity is proven in our study, the incidence of HTA is 2.6 bigger at the obeses patients. These arguments should also promote further research in primary care on the control and the therapeutic behavior of the physicians.

  2. Nursing care provided to young people in two health centers compared with Watson Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Alejandra Pichardo Meza

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This article has as objective to present the analysis of the care given by the nursing personnel to the young adult population in the Clinic of Pain Control and Palliative Care and in the Onco-hematology Service of the Max Peralta Hospital, related to Jean Watson’s theoretical proposal. The study corresponds to a joint research of parallel type with concurrent triangulation. The study populations were made up by twenty-six young adult people (who face morbid process health or chronic pain condition and four nursing professionals who worked in the Clinic of Pain Control and Palliative Care and in the Onco-hematology Service of the Max Peralta Hospital. A self-executed questionnaire and a semi-structured interview were used to collect the information, which was analyzed using the “SPSS” program and the qualitative categories, respectively. Results: The ten elements of the “Human Care Theory” can be included in the care given by the nursing personnel to the young adult population who faces morbid process health or chronic pain condition. The nursing care mainly focuses on the young adult population quality of life throughout education and pain management. The young adult population perceives a warm, pleasant and human nursing care. Conclusion: Nursing personnel put into practice elements of the Jean Watson’s theoretical proposal even when they do not know it.

  3. Promoting and protecting the health of children and young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licence, K

    2004-11-01

    The health-related behaviours adopted by children and young people can have both immediate and long-term health effects. Health promotion interventions that target children and young people can lay the foundations of a healthy lifestyle that may be sustained into adulthood. This paper is based on a selective review of evidence relating to health promotion in childhood, carried out to support the external working group on the 'Healthy Child' module of the Children's National Service Framework. This is a selective review of mainly secondary research. It focuses on injury prevention, support for parenting and the promotion of good mental health, and promoting a healthy diet and physical activity amongst children and young people. In many areas, the quality of primary research into health promotion interventions aimed at children and young people is poor. Interventions are heterogeneous and not described in sufficient detail. Sample sizes tend to be small, and there are commonly problems of bias. Despite these difficulties, there is good evidence for a range of interventions, including (1) area road safety schemes; (2) combining a variety of approaches to the promotion of the use of safety equipment, including legislation and enforcement, loan/assisted purchase/giveaway schemes, education, fitting and maintenance of safety equipment; (3) school-based mental health promotion; (4) parenting support; (5) interventions that promote and facilitate 'lifestyle' activity for children, such as walking and cycling to school, and those that aim to reduce sedentary behaviours such as parent education to reduce the time children spend watching TV and using computers; and (6) controlling advertising of unhealthy food that is aimed at children. There are effective interventions to promote and protect the health of children and young people that require action across the five areas described in the Ottawa Charter. Health, social care and education services have a direct role in the

  4. Report seeks new prevention strategies for young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-16

    The AIDS Research Institute and Center for AIDS Prevention at the University of California, San Francisco collaborated with the Harvard AIDS Institute on a report that considers HIV/AIDS among young people in the United States. The report indicates that AIDS is becoming a disease of the young, and prevention policies are not addressing the realities of youth beliefs or behaviors. The report calls for expanding age-appropriate sex education and condoms in schools, increasing government prevention funding, urging prevention educators to use private-sector marketing tools, and encouraging the private sector to market HIV prevention.

  5. Money attitude of Ukrainian young people: socio-demographic aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIANNA SIMKIV

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research on social and demographic factors of Ukr health literacy, health culture, young adults, concepts of health and healthy lifestyle, motivations, forms of communication, learning methods ainian youth money attitudes. The aim of the research is to identify dependency between money attitudes of the young people and such social and demographic characteristics as sex, age, education, place of residence, place of employment, employment position and level of income. The research required application of survey and questionnaire methods as well as statistical methods of results processing.

  6. Cultures for mental health care of young people: an Australian blueprint for reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGorry, Patrick D; Goldstone, Sherilyn D; Parker, Alexandra G; Rickwood, Debra J; Hickie, Ian B

    2014-12-01

    Mental ill health is now the most important health issue facing young people worldwide. It is the leading cause of disability in people aged 10-24 years, contributing 45% of the overall burden of disease in this age group. Despite their manifest need, young people have the lowest rates of access to mental health care, largely as a result of poor awareness and help-seeking, structural and cultural flaws within the existing care systems, and the failure of society to recognise the importance of this issue and invest in youth mental health. We outline the case for a specific youth mental health stream and describe the innovative service reforms in youth mental health in Australia, using them as an example of the processes that can guide the development and implementation of such a service stream. Early intervention with focus on the developmental period of greatest need and capacity to benefit, emerging adulthood, has the potential to greatly improve the mental health, wellbeing, productivity, and fulfilment of young people, and our wider society.

  7. Direct Gaze Modulates Face Recognition in Young Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farroni, Teresa; Massaccesi, Stefano; Menon, Enrica; Johnson, Mark H.

    2007-01-01

    From birth, infants prefer to look at faces that engage them in direct eye contact. In adults, direct gaze is known to modulate the processing of faces, including the recognition of individuals. In the present study, we investigate whether direction of gaze has any effect on face recognition in four-month-old infants. Four-month infants were shown…

  8. Young people, parents and radical right voting. The case of the Swiss People's Party

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffé, H.R.; Voorpostel, M.B.J.

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly found that young people tend to adopt the political party choice of their parents. However, far less is known about the applicability of this theory when investigating radical right support. Using the Swiss Household panel data (1999e2007), this study empirically identifies the

  9. Being a Deaf Role Model: Deaf People's Experiences of Working with Families and Deaf Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Katherine D.; Young, Alys M.

    2011-01-01

    The experiences of being a deaf role model have been little explored in the literature. This paper explores the role of the deaf role model as perceived by d/Deaf adults who carried out this role, when working with deaf young people, parents of deaf children, and professionals who work with them. The data were collected from part of the evaluation…

  10. Young people, parents and radical right voting. The case of the Swiss People's Party

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffé, H.R.; Voorpostel, M.B.J.

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly found that young people tend to adopt the political party choice of their parents. However, far less is known about the applicability of this theory when investigating radical right support. Using the Swiss Household panel data (1999e2007), this study empirically identifies the relati

  11. Attempted suicide and completed suicide among young people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mogens

    The study explore risk factors associated with the onset of suicidal behavior in young people aged 15 to 24. The study survey possible risk factors and protective factors in order to evaluate if altering the conditions of children’s upbringing, structural factors, geographical segregation......, or individual resource deficits could reduce their suicidal behavior (first time suicide attempts and completed suicides). These issues are being examined using data gathered during a 10-year longitudinal study of two births cohorts of more than 145,000 young people born in 1966 or 1980. In the Nordic welfare...... model it is an ambition to level-out inequalities and give children the same opportunities despite parental income or educational resources. The paper focuses on suicidal behavior as an extreme indicator of individual disadvantage and social disintegration in order to disentangle groups of risk factors...

  12. CAN WE CONFIDENTLY STUDY VO2 KINETICS IN YOUNG PEOPLE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha G. Fawkner

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of VO2 kinetics offers the potential to non-invasively examine the cardiorespiratory and metabolic response to dynamic exercise and limitations to every day physical activity. Its non-invasive nature makes it hugely attractive for use with young people, both healthy and those with disease, and yet the literature, whilst growing with respect to adults, remains confined to a cluster of studies with these special populations. It is most likely that this is partly due to the methodological difficulties involved in studying VO2 kinetics in young people which are not present, or present to a lesser degree, with adults. This article reviews these methodological issues, and explains the main procedures that might be used to overcome them

  13. Attempted suicide and completed suicide among young people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mogens

    The study explore risk factors associated with the onset of suicidal behavior in young people aged 15 to 24. The study survey possible risk factors and protective factors in order to evaluate if altering the conditions of children’s upbringing, structural factors, geographical segregation......, or individual resource deficits could reduce their suicidal behavior (first time suicide attempts and completed suicides). These issues are being examined using data gathered during a 10-year longitudinal study of two births cohorts of more than 145,000 young people born in 1966 or 1980. In the Nordic welfare...... model it is an ambition to level-out inequalities and give children the same opportunities despite parental income or educational resources. The paper focuses on suicidal behavior as an extreme indicator of individual disadvantage and social disintegration in order to disentangle groups of risk factors...

  14. Young people, pornography, and sexuality: sources and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallmyr, Gudrun; Welin, Catharina

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of and attitudes among young people toward pornography and their sources of information about sexuality. Eight hundred and seventy-six young people ages 15-25 years (555 females and 321 males) who visited a youth center in Sweden for a period of 1 year answered a questionnaire about their use of pornography, their attitudes toward pornography, and sources of information about sexuality. Although most had seen pornographic movies, the youngest boys reported viewing the most pornography. The male participants reported that the most common reason they viewed pornography was to get aroused and to masturbate, whereas the female participants stated that they viewed pornography out of curiosity. The most frequent source of information about sexuality was peers. These results illustrate the importance of sex education to give factual information about sexuality and to counteract the messages about sexuality presented in pornography.

  15. How race and age experiences shape young children's face processing abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi Cassia, Viola; Luo, Lizhu; Pisacane, Antonella; Li, Hong; Lee, Kang

    2014-04-01

    Despite recent advances in research on race and age biases, the question of how race and age experiences combine to affect young children's face perception remains unexplored. To fill this gap, the current study tested two ethnicities of 3-year-old children using a combined cross-race/cross-age design. Caucasian children with and without older siblings and Mainland Chinese children without older siblings were tested for their ability to discriminate adult and child Caucasian faces as well as adult and child Asian faces in both upright and inverted orientations. Children of both ethnicities manifested an own-race bias, which was confined to adult faces, and an adult face bias, which was confined to own-race faces. Likewise, sibling experience affected Caucasian children's processing of own-race child faces, but this effect did not generalize to other-race faces. Results suggest that race and age information are represented at the same hierarchical level in young children's memory.

  16. Health status of marginalised young people in unstable accommodation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klineberg, Emily; Vatiliotis, Veronica; Kang, Melissa; Medlow, Sharon; Sullivan, Lucinda; Cummings, Michael; Pringle, Graeme; Steinbeck, Katharine

    2017-06-10

    More than 26 000 Australians aged 12-24 years experience homelessness, yet data on the health status of homeless youth remain limited. The aim of this study was to describe the health of young people attending a youth health service in Western Sydney who were experiencing homelessness. Retrospective case note review for clients aged 12-25 years attending Youth Health Services in Western Sydney. Extracted data included: homelessness status; demographics; physical health issues; mental health issues; involvement with juvenile justice; and disengagement from education or employment. Just under half of the 180 clients attending a Youth Health Service in Western Sydney were homeless, and an additional 15 young people who were not currently homeless nominated homelessness as a presenting issue. In comparison with currently domiciled young people, homeless youth were less likely to have a regular general practitioner and more likely to nominate a physical health concern as a presenting issue, although there was no difference between groups in terms of diagnosed mental or physical health conditions. Considered as a whole, the sample showed high rates of acute physical symptoms, physical trauma, psychological distress and self-harm. Youth homelessness is associated with risk of both poor physical and mental health. As much of youth homelessness is hidden, health-care providers need to ensure that they inquire about homelessness status, and have an awareness of potentially complex multi-morbidities in the physical and mental health of young marginalised people presenting to health services. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  17. Characteristics of the Socialization of Young People Going to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloskov, I. V.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to the absence of clear-cut moral and ethical guidelines and ideas about what type of individual is in demand in present-day Russian society, to a large extent the value orientations of young people are being developed in a haphazard way. They are under the contradictory influence of on the one hand, the traditions of the folk culture, and,…

  18. Determinants of school attendance of young people in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Paz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the socioeconomic determinants of school attendance and time allocation of young people between 15 and 18 years old in Argentina. We are particularly interested in knowing the importance of each of them. The empirical analysis is based on a multinomial logit model for the period 1997-2009 with data coming from the Permanent Household Survey, Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Censos (INDEC, covering the urban population in the country.

  19. Priorities of Smartphone Online Shopping Applications for Young People

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Takashi; Yatsuhashi, Jiro; Mizutani, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    With widespread use of smartphones, many people use smartphone online shopping applications to enjoy online purchasing. However, Japanese young people’s behavior and perceptions with regard to smartphone online shopping applications are unclear. To reveal these perceptions and priorities, this study examined Japanese respondents’ adoption of online shopping applications on smartphones by applying a choice-based conjoint analysis. This study revealed that our respondents place the highest prio...

  20. Decision making in young people at familial risk of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannie, Z N; Williams, C; Browning, M; Cowen, P J

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is associated with abnormalities in reward processing at neural and behavioural levels. Neural abnormalities in reward have been described in young people at familial risk of depression but behavioural changes in reward-based decision making have been less studied in this group. We studied 63 young people (mean age 18.9 years) with a parent with a diagnosis of major depression but who had never been depressed themselves, that is with a positive family history of depression (the FH+ group). Participants performed the Cambridge Gambling Task (CGT), which provides several measures of decision making including deliberation time, quality of decision making, risk taking, risk adjustment and delay aversion. A control group of 49 age- and gender-matched young people with no history of mood disorder in a first-degree relative undertook the same task. Both FH+ participants and controls had low and equivalent scores on anxiety and depression self-rating scales. Compared to controls, the FH+ participants showed overall lower risk taking, although like controls they made more risky choices as the odds of a favourable outcome increased. No other measures of decision making differed between the two groups. Young people at increased familial risk of depression have altered risk taking that is not accounted for by current affective symptomatology. Lowered risk taking might represent an impairment in reward seeking, which is one of several changes in reward-based behaviours seen in acutely depressed patients; however, our findings suggest that decreased reward seeking could be part of a risk endophenotype for depression.

  1. Smartphone use and smartphone addiction among young people in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Haug, Severin; Castro, Raquel Paz; Kwon, Min; Filler, Andreas; Kowatsch, Tobias; Schaub, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Smartphone addiction, its association with smartphone use, and its predictors have not yet been studied in a European sample. This study investigated indicators of smartphone use, smartphone addiction, and their associations with demographic and health behaviour-related variables in young people. Methods A convenience sample of 1,519 students from 127 Swiss vocational school classes participated in a survey assessing demographic and health-related characteristics as well a...

  2. The attitudes of young people towards sustainable transport

    OpenAIRE

    Line, T.; Chatterjee, K.(Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata, India); Lyons, G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers that a fuller understanding of the public’s attitudes towards and perceptions of transport is essential in the development of successful campaigns and policies aiming to encourage more sustainable transport behaviour. The paper seeks to clarify: the importance of understanding the attitudes and perceptions of young people (the future users and decision makers in regard to transport); what is currently understood in this area through a review of the current literature; whe...

  3. Democratic values and political attitudes in the Macedonian young people

    OpenAIRE

    Cvetanova, Ganka; Naumovska, Bojana

    2016-01-01

    The paper gives an insight into attitudes towards democracy of young people in the Republic of Macedonia, in particular their interest in politics and their engagement in civic and political activities. The findings in the paper rely on the data from following research projects: Virtual and Real Identities in the Republic of Macedonia, Youth Trends in the Republic of Macedonia и Youth Study Macedonia 2013. Throughout the paper, the pursuit of these issues is interlaced with a comparative anal...

  4. Innovative methods for evaluating the science capital of young people

    OpenAIRE

    Padwick, Annie; Dele-Ajayi, Opeyemi; Davenport, Carol; Strachan, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Considerable effort has been spent on interventions to increase the numbers/diversity of young people studying Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and/or entering STEM related careers with little evidence of their effectiveness. In the UK, less than 10% of professional engineers are female. Science capital is a recent concept for capturing those elements that influence children’s choice of a science-related career. Children with higher science capital are more likely to ch...

  5. Prioritising young people's emotional health support needs through participatory research

    OpenAIRE

    Kendal, Sarah; Pryjmachuk, Steven; Welsby, Hannah; Milnes, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Introduction\\ud \\ud Youth mental health is a global concern. Emotional health promotes mental health and protects against mental illness. Youth value self-care for emotional health, but we need better understanding of how to help them look after their emotional health. Participatory research is relevant, since meaningful engagement with youth via participatory research enhances the validity and relevance of research findings and supports young people's rights to involvement in decisions that ...

  6. Access 3 project protocol: young people and health system navigation in the digital age: a multifaceted, mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Melissa; Robards, Fiona; Sanci, Lena; Steinbeck, Katharine; Jan, Stephen; Hawke, Catherine; Kong, Marlene; Usherwood, Tim

    2017-08-07

    The integration of digital technology into everyday lives of young people has become widespread. It is not known whether and how technology influences barriers and facilitators to healthcare, and whether and how young people navigate between face-to-face and virtual healthcare. To provide new knowledge essential to policy and practice, we designed a study that would explore health system access and navigation in the digital age. The study objectives are to: (1) describe experiences of young people accessing and navigating the health system in New South Wales (NSW), Australia; (2) identify barriers and facilitators to healthcare for young people and how these vary between groups; (3) describe health system inefficiencies, particularly for young people who are marginalised; (4) provide policy-relevant knowledge translation of the research data. This mixed methods study has four parts, including: (1) a cross-sectional survey of young people (12-24 years) residing in NSW, Australia; (2) a longitudinal, qualitative study of a subsample of marginalised young people (defined as young people who: identify as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander; are experiencing homelessness; identify as sexuality and/or gender diverse; are of refugee or vulnerable migrant background; and/or live in rural or remote NSW); (3) interviews with professionals; (4) a knowledge translation forum. Ethics approvals were sought and granted. Data collection commenced in March 2016 and will continue until June 2017. This study will gather practice and policy-relevant intelligence about contemporary experiences of young people and health services, with a unique focus on five different groups of marginalised young people, documenting their experiences over time. Access 3 will explore navigation around all levels of the health system, determine whether digital technology is integrated into this, and if so how, and will translate findings into policy-relevant recommendations. © Article author(s) (or

  7. Psychological Neuromodulatory Treatments for Young People with Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Miró

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of young people with chronic pain is a complex endeavor. Many of these youth do not obtain adequate relief from available interventions. Psychological neuromodulatory treatments have been shown to have potential benefit for adults with chronic pain. Here, we review and summarize the available information about the efficacy of three promising psychological neuromodulatory treatments—neurofeedback, meditation and hypnosis—when provided to young people with chronic pain. A total of 16 articles were identified and reviewed. The findings from these studies show that hypnotic treatments are effective in reducing pain intensity for a variety of pediatric chronic pain problems, although research suggests variability in outcomes as a function of the specific pain problem treated. There are too few studies evaluating the efficacy of neurofeedback or meditation training in young people with chronic pain to draw firm conclusions regarding their efficacy. However, preliminary data indicate that these treatments could potentially have positive effects on a variety of outcomes (e.g., pain intensity, frequency of pain episodes, physical and psychological function, at least in the short term. Clinical trials are needed to evaluate the effects of neurofeedback and meditation training, and research is needed to identify the moderators of treatment benefits as well as better understand the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of all three of these treatments. The findings from such research could enhance overall treatment efficacy by: (1 providing an empirical basis for better patient-treatment matching; and (2 identifying specific mechanisms that could be targeted with treatment.

  8. Young people, smoking and gender--a qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Amanda; Bostock, Yvonne

    2007-12-01

    Smoking among young people has become increasingly gendered. In several countries, smoking among adolescent girls is now higher than among adolescent boys. However, we have only a limited understanding of the reasons behind these gender patterns. This paper reports the findings from a qualitative study which used single-sex focus groups to explore the gendered nature of the meaning and function of smoking among Scottish 15- to 16-year old smokers. The study found that young people were ambivalent about their smoking but that this was somewhat different for boys and girls. These differences related to their social worlds, pattern of social relationships, interests, activities and concerns, the meanings they attached to smoking and the role smoking played in dealing with the everyday experience of being a boy or girl in their mid-teens. For example, boys were concerned about the impact of smoking on their fitness and sport, whereas girls were more concerned about the negative aesthetic effects such as their clothes and bodies smelling of smoke. Of particular importance was how smoking related in different ways to the gendered 'identity work' that adolescents had to undertake to achieve a socially and culturally acceptable image. The implications for programmes aimed at reducing smoking among young people, particularly the need for more gender-sensitive approaches, are discussed.

  9. Managing uncertainty of young people's transitions to adulthood in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacheva Siyka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the strategies of young people in Bulgaria for responding to and dealing with uncertainty in the passage to autonomy. It focuses on the active engagement of the young in the processes of identity formation and gaining independence, thus initiating a change in the common patterns of growing up. The biographical choices that the young make are analysed as embedded in a multilayered social context involving the interplay of macro societal changes, shifts in organisational policies and practices and restructuring of gender and generational relations in the family. Theoretically this paper builds upon the concept of uncertainty in understanding the dilemma of structure and agency in youth transitions. The analysis is based upon official statistical information about economic and demographic trends in 21st century Bulgaria and the findings of an organisational case study of a social service agency and biographical interviews with young working parents, which were conducted within the framework of the international Transitions project. Two case studies of individual strategies of young women - one from a working class family and the other from an ethnic minority - are presented in more detail in order to examine the agency they apply in coping with uncertainty and the resources they mobilize in devising (everyday and short-term life projects. The combination of quantitative and qualitative data allows a reflection on the process of managing uncertainty with regards to the past experiences, present meanings and future aspirations of young people as influenced by the contracting state support and contradictory company policies in Bulgaria.

  10. Automated facial coding software outperforms people in recognizing neutral faces as neutral from standardized datasets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewinski, P.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about people’s accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective j

  11. Emotion awareness and cognitive behavioural therapy in young people with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Collins, Cara; Mahoney-Davies, Gerwyn; Russell, Ailsa; Booth, Anne; Loades, Maria

    2017-07-01

    Young people with autism spectrum disorder experience high levels of emotional problems, including anxiety and depression. Adapted cognitive behavioural therapy is recommended for such difficulties. However, no evidence suggests whether emotion awareness is important in treatment outcome for young people on the autism spectrum. This study aimed to investigate the potential differences in emotion awareness between (1) young people on the autism spectrum and typically developing youth and (2) young people on the autism spectrum with and without experience of cognitive behavioural therapy. Three groups (aged 11-20 years) participated: (1) typically developing young people ( n = 56); (2) young people on the autism spectrum with no experience of cognitive behavioural therapy ( n = 23); and (3) young people on the autism spectrum who had attended cognitive behavioural therapy ( n = 33). All participants completed the Emotion Awareness Questionnaire-30 item version. Young people on the autism spectrum differed significantly from typically developing young people on the emotional awareness measure. Young people on the autism spectrum who had attended cognitive behavioural therapy scored significantly lower on the Differentiating Emotions subscale, and significantly higher on the Attending to Others' Emotions subscale, compared to young people on the autism spectrum who had not attended cognitive behavioural therapy. This study highlights the importance of psycho-educational components of cognitive behavioural therapy when adapting for young people on the autism spectrum.

  12. Brief Report: Young People at Risk for Eating Disorders in Southeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Tatiana; Fleitlich-Bilyk, Bacy; Goodman, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A representative sample of 7-14-year-old young people in southeast Brazil (N=1251) was assessed using standardized parent and youth interviews, thereby identifying an "at-risk" group of young people who met one or more DSM-IV criteria for anorexia and/or bulimia nervosa. These young people were compared with an age and gender matched…

  13. Brief Report: Young People at Risk for Eating Disorders in Southeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Tatiana; Fleitlich-Bilyk, Bacy; Goodman, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A representative sample of 7-14-year-old young people in southeast Brazil (N=1251) was assessed using standardized parent and youth interviews, thereby identifying an "at-risk" group of young people who met one or more DSM-IV criteria for anorexia and/or bulimia nervosa. These young people were compared with an age and gender matched…

  14. "Different Journeys at Different Speeds": Young People, Risk and the Challenge of Creative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Young people's experience of education in a "risk society" is characterised by a terrain of "initiative overload" which appears to make the routes through which young people are seeking to plot a path evermore perilous. This article is concerned with the impact of creative learning on young people, as represented by the UK…

  15. Setting the Baseline: The National Literacy Trust's First Annual Survey into Young People's Reading--2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christina

    2011-01-01

    18,141 young people aged 8 to 17 participated in this online survey in November/December 2010. While the survey focuses on young people's attitudes towards reading, writing, communication skills as well as technology use, this report focuses exclusively on the reading aspect of the survey. More specifically, it explores how much young people enjoy…

  16. YOUNG PEOPLE'S PREFERENCES FOR ROMANIAN AGRO ALIMENTARY GOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Catalina Timiras

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of a research undertaken among young people (18-30 years, students of the Faculty of Economic Sciences of the Vasile Alecsandri University of Bacau, this paper reveals their preference for local or foreign brands (on the Romanian market for various categories of food products. It is also highlighted their views on certain essential evaluation criteria for food products (sanogenetic potential, value for money, appearance, taste, availability within commercial network, promotions, image, comparing Romanian and foreign products. The survey shows that the preference for Romanian brands applies particularly to: eggs, bakery products, grain mill, milk and dairy products, fruits and vegetables, meat and meat products (over 50% of the investigated people. A large proportion of young people believes that Romanian products are tastier and healthier than foreign ones, the better image enjoyed by foreign brands being a result of the promotion and packaging of products and not the quality of product; they also believe that Romanian brands are insufficiently promoted nationally, perceiving offer of imported products as being broader than the local one. The research was conducted on a sample of 100 students selected by the group sampling scheme and has an exploratory role for the community of 18-30 years people in Romania, offering, for it, only an indicative perspective on the raised issues.

  17. Children and Young People in Russia: Global Challenges of Modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Anatol’evna Shabunova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present-day world’s development is becoming more and more uneven and new global challenges are emerging. Russia should respond to them by enhancing its economic competitiveness, preserving and increasing its population and human potential, first of all, that of children and young people. The paper points out that for the Russian Federation with its vast territory and substantial reserves of natural resources the most important geopolitical challenges consist in the preservation and increase of population and human potential. The authors prove that the formation of the population of Russia is under double “pressure” of high mortality and low fertility; therefore, natural movement (decline is not completed by mechanical movement. In addition, the article determines that the share of young people in the total population is decreasing. For the first time in the history of Russia the share of children has become lower than the proportion of the elderly. In 2013 in 56 Russian regions, the proportion of children and adolescents accounted for less than 20% of the population (in the early 2000s, there were 41 such regions, and in 1990 – three. In addition to the reduction in the number of the population, child health potential is also deteriorating: about 35% of children in Russia are born ill or become ill in the near future (the figure is 30% in the Vologda Oblast. The number of adolescents aged 15–17 who are accounted for severe mental disorders is continuously increasing. The greatest socio-economic damage to the society comes from suicides that are widely spread among young people (the younger generation (persons up to 24 years old accounts for one third of all the potential years of life lost from suicides. At the same time, young people consider health more valuable than does the population as a whole (4.5 points vs 4.4 points on a five-point scale. But young people underestimate the importance of self-preservation behavior. World

  18. Brain potentials show rapid activation of implicit attitudes towards young and old people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lugt, Arie H; Banfield, Jane F; Osinsky, Roman; Münte, Thomas F

    2012-01-06

    While previous behavioural research suggests that attitudes, for example towards elderly people, may be activated automatically, this type of research does not provide information about the detailed time-course of such processing in the brain. We investigated the impact of age related attitude information in a Go/NoGo association task that paired photographs of elderly or young faces with positive or negative words. Event related brain potentials showed an N200 (NoGo) component, which appeared earlier in runs which required similar responses for congruent stimulus pairings (e.g. respond to pictures of elderly faces or negative words) than for incongruent pairings (e.g. respond to elderly faces or positive words). As information processing leading to a certain attitude must precede differential brain activity according to the congruence of the paired words and faces, we show that this type of information is activated almost immediately following the structural encoding of the face, between 170 and 230 ms after onset of the face.

  19. Face Recognition and Description Abilities in People with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawrylowicz, Julie; Gabbert, Fiona; Carson, Derek; Lindsay, William R.; Hancock, Peter J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities (ID) are as likely as the general population to find themselves in the situation of having to identify and/or describe a perpetrator's face to the police. However, limited verbal and memory abilities in people with ID might prevent them to engage in standard police procedures. Method: Two…

  20. Smartphone use and smartphone addiction among young people in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Severin; Castro, Raquel Paz; Kwon, Min; Filler, Andreas; Kowatsch, Tobias; Schaub, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Smartphone addiction, its association with smartphone use, and its predictors have not yet been studied in a European sample. This study investigated indicators of smartphone use, smartphone addiction, and their associations with demographic and health behaviour-related variables in young people. Methods A convenience sample of 1,519 students from 127 Swiss vocational school classes participated in a survey assessing demographic and health-related characteristics as well as indicators of smartphone use and addiction. Smartphone addiction was assessed using a short version of the Smartphone Addiction Scale for Adolescents (SAS-SV). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate demographic and health-related predictors of smartphone addiction. Results Smartphone addiction occurred in 256 (16.9%) of the 1,519 students. Longer duration of smartphone use on a typical day, a shorter time period until first smartphone use in the morning, and reporting that social networking was the most personally relevant smartphone function were associated with smartphone addiction. Smartphone addiction was more prevalent in younger adolescents (15–16 years) compared with young adults (19 years and older), students with both parents born outside Switzerland, persons reporting lower physical activity, and those reporting higher stress. Alcohol and tobacco consumption were unrelated to smartphone addiction. Discussion Different indicators of smartphone use are associated with smartphone addiction and subgroups of young people have a higher prevalence of smartphone addiction. Conclusions The study provides the first insights into smartphone use, smartphone addiction, and predictors of smartphone addiction in young people from a European country, which should be extended in further studies. PMID:26690625

  1. Labeling of mental disorders and stigma in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Annemarie; Jorm, Anthony F; Mackinnon, Andrew J

    2011-08-01

    Mental disorders are common in young people, yet many do not seek help. The use of psychiatric labels to describe mental disorders is associated with effective help-seeking choices, and is promoted in community awareness initiatives designed to improve help-seeking. However these labels may also be coupled with stigmatizing beliefs and therefore inhibit help-seeking: lay mental health or non-specific labels may be less harmful. We examined the association between labeling of mental disorders and stigma in youth using data from a national telephone survey of 2802 Australians aged 12-25 years conducted from June 2006 to August 2006. Label use and stigmatizing beliefs were assessed in response to vignettes of a young person experiencing depression, psychosis or social phobia. Logistic regressions examined the association between a range of labels commonly used, including psychiatric labels, and a range of stigma components. There were no significant associations between label use and the stigma components of "stigma perceived in others", "reluctance to disclose" and for the most part "social distance". Most mental health labels were associated with seeing the person as "sick" rather than "weak" and accurate psychiatric labels had the strongest effect sizes. However, for the psychosis vignette, the "dangerous/unpredictable" component was predicted by the labels "schizophrenia/psychosis", "mental illness" and "psychological problem", and the accurate psychiatric label showed the strongest association. For all vignettes, generic lay labels were not associated with stigma, but also rarely had a counter stigma effect. These findings suggest that the use of accurate psychiatric labels by young people is seldom associated with stigma and may assist young people by reducing perceptions of weakness. However, community education that promotes accurate labeling of psychosis should proceed with caution and address beliefs about dangerousness and unpredictability. Copyright

  2. Smartphone use and smartphone addiction among young people in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Severin; Castro, Raquel Paz; Kwon, Min; Filler, Andreas; Kowatsch, Tobias; Schaub, Michael P

    2015-12-01

    Smartphone addiction, its association with smartphone use, and its predictors have not yet been studied in a European sample. This study investigated indicators of smartphone use, smartphone addiction, and their associations with demographic and health behaviour-related variables in young people. A convenience sample of 1,519 students from 127 Swiss vocational school classes participated in a survey assessing demographic and health-related characteristics as well as indicators of smartphone use and addiction. Smartphone addiction was assessed using a short version of the Smartphone Addiction Scale for Adolescents (SAS-SV). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate demographic and health-related predictors of smartphone addiction. Smartphone addiction occurred in 256 (16.9%) of the 1,519 students. Longer duration of smartphone use on a typical day, a shorter time period until first smartphone use in the morning, and reporting that social networking was the most personally relevant smartphone function were associated with smartphone addiction. Smartphone addiction was more prevalent in younger adolescents (15-16 years) compared with young adults (19 years and older), students with both parents born outside Switzerland, persons reporting lower physical activity, and those reporting higher stress. Alcohol and tobacco consumption were unrelated to smartphone addiction. Different indicators of smartphone use are associated with smartphone addiction and subgroups of young people have a higher prevalence of smartphone addiction. The study provides the first insights into smartphone use, smartphone addiction, and predictors of smartphone addiction in young people from a European country, which should be extended in further studies.

  3. Recognition of Moving and Static Faces by Young Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yumiko; Konishi, Yukuo; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K.; Abdi, Herve; O'Toole, Alice J.

    2009-01-01

    This study compared 3- to 4-month-olds' recognition of previously unfamiliar faces learned in a moving or a static condition. Infants in the moving condition showed successful recognition with only 30 s familiarization, even when different images of a face were used in the familiarization and test phase (Experiment 1). In contrast, infants in the…

  4. Young Entrepreneurs: Young People Dream of Becoming Entrepreneurs, despite America's Lingering Recession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    An August 2010 Harris Interactive[R] survey, commissioned by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, posed questions about entrepreneurship to 5,077 U.S. young people ages eight to twenty-four. The results show that business ownership continues to capture the imaginations of America's youth, particularly for those who know a successful entrepreneur…

  5. An Empirical Study on the Migration Among Young Skilled and Creative People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta-Christina Suciu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the context of a knowledge and innovative-based society and economy, smart and creative cities are attracting an increasing number of young people, most of them being gifted, very talented students and high-skilled workforce, with multiple competences. These young people are pro-active and they involve themselves on enhancing the progress of the community in which they are living. Many cities are facing a higher rate of brain drain, as a consequence of the quality of life and the low level of wages considering also a reduce level of acceptance and implementation of innovative solutions. In the last decades migration phenomenon had been amplified and there is an increased young people migration from emergent countries to the innovation driven countries, witch assure more financial stability and favourable conditions to contribute to both personal and professional development for its residents. Through an empiric research, we have identified the most important factors which contribute to the amplified migration among youths. We have also highlighted the motivational elements for returning to homeland, when the socio-economic situation is favourable. The paper includes also a set of recommendations that could create a proper framework to attract talented, skilled and creative youth, regardless their origin country.

  6. The Composite Effect Is Face-Specific in Young but Not Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Günter; Persike, Malte; Meinhardt-Injac, Bozana

    2016-01-01

    In studying holistic face processing across the life-span there are only few attempts to separate face-specific from general aging effects. Here we used the complete design of the composite paradigm (Cheung et al., 2008) with faces and novel non-face control objects (watches) to investigate composite effects in young (18-32 years) and older adults (63-78 years). We included cueing conditions to alert using a narrow or a wide attentional focus when comparing the composite objects, and used brief and relaxed exposure durations for stimulus presentation. Young adults showed large composite effects for faces, but none for watches. In contrast, older adults showed strong composite effects for faces and watches, albeit the effects were larger for faces. Moreover, composite effects for faces were larger for the wide attentional focus in both age groups, while the composite effects for watches of older adults were alike for both cueing conditions. Older adults showed low accuracy at the same levels for both types of stimuli when attended and non-attended halves were incongruent. Increasing presentation times improved performance strongly for congruent but not for incongruent composite objects. These findings suggest that the composite effects of older adults reflect substantial decline in the ability to control irrelevant stimuli, which takes effect both in non-face objects and in faces. In young adults, highly efficient attentional control mostly precludes interference of irrelevant features in novel objects, thus their composite effects reflect holistic integration specific for faces or objects of expertise.

  7. Person-focused care for young people with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases: young rheumatologists' and EULAR Young PARE perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alunno, Alessia; Studenic, Paul; Nikiphorou, Elena; Balážová, Petra; van Nieuwkoop, Linda; Ramiro, Sofia; Carubbi, Francesco; Richez, Christophe; Caeyers, Nele; Gossec, Laure; Kouloumas, Marios

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the evolution of healthcare challenged the management of people with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs). From disease-centred care to person-focused care, a holistic approach along with patient empowerment about their disease, improved the physician-patient relationship and allowed to achieve better outcomes with lower healthcare costs. Nevertheless, RMDs may occur from childhood to the old age and to date very few studies have addressed the needs and priorities of young people with RMDs. However, the image of RMDs is still associated with the elderly population. In this regard, the group of young people with arthritis and rheumatism in Europe (PARE) was recently developed within European League Against Rheumatism to represent the voice of the young affected and to carry out projects aiming for a better understanding of these specific aspects. This viewpoint discusses the needs and priorities of young people compared with adult people with RMDs, based on the available literature and on the results of the PARE Youth research project, aiming to identify the next steps of actions that need to be taken to improve the current situation.

  8. Automated facial coding software outperforms people in recognizing neutral faces as neutral from standardized datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about people's accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective judge - automated facial coding (AFC) software. I hypothesized that the software would outperform humans in recognizing neutral faces because of the inherently objective nature of computer algorithms. Results confirmed this hypothesis. I provided the first-ever evidence that computer software (90%) was more accurate in recognizing neutral faces than people were (59%). I posited two theoretical mechanisms, i.e., smile-as-a-baseline and false recognition of emotion, as possible explanations for my findings.

  9. Challenges faced by young persons living with HIV: The case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Challenges faced by young persons living with HIV: The case of children on the ... improvement in the supply of pediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens, ... Keywords: HIV and AIDS, orphaned child, antiretroviral therapy, stigma, ...

  10. Food advertising towards children and young people in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugge, Annechen Bahr

    2016-03-01

    Despite the fact that no studies have been carried out to map the amount of unhealthy food advertising aimed at Norwegian children and adolescents, it is still widely held belief that this type of advertising is disproportionately common. As a consequence, one of the issues high on the agenda in Norway in the 2000s was the possibility of imposing restrictions on advertising for unhealthy foods to children. The purpose of this study is to contribute with a research-based foundation for implementing this health initiative by mapping food marketing in media channels widely used by children and adolescents. In sum, the study shows that the food industry spends a lot of resources to influence young consumers' eating and drinking habits. Compared with studies from USA, UK and Australia, however, there are, strong indications that there is significantly less unhealthy food advertising in Scandinavian countries. Similar to a previous Swedish study, this study shows that Norwegian children and young people were exposed to little advertising for unhealthy food products through media channels such as TV, the Internet, magazines, comics and cinemas. The study also supports critical remarks from some researchers that the extensive use of the international discourse as a political argument and recommendation for Norwegian conditions is not accurate. For the future it may be beneficial to look more closely at the relationship between advertising and health policy, and how this relationship can be further developed to improve children and young people's diet.

  11. Oral Sex, Young People, and Gendered Narratives of Reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ruth; Marston, Cicely

    2016-09-01

    Young people in many countries report gender differences in giving and receiving oral sex, yet examination of young people's own perspectives on gender dynamics in oral heterosex are relatively rare. We explored the constructs and discourses 16- to 18-year-old men and women in England used in their accounts of oral sex during in-depth interviews. Two contrasting constructs were in circulation in the accounts: on one hand, oral sex on men and women was narrated as equivalent, while on the other, oral sex on women was seen as "a bigger deal" than oral sex on men. Young men and women used a "give and take" discourse, which constructed the mutual exchange of oral sex as "fair." Appeals to an ethic of reciprocity in oral sex enabled women to present themselves as demanding equality in their sexual interactions, and men as supporting mutuality. However, we show how these ostensibly positive discourses about equality also worked in narratives to obscure women's constrained agency and work with respect to giving oral sex.

  12. Methylphenidate as a cognitive enhancer in healthy young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silmara Batistela

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The so-called cognitive enhancers have been widely and increasingly used by healthy individuals who seek improvements in cognitive performance despite having no pathologies. One drug used for this purpose is methylphenidate, a first-line drug for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Objective: The aim of the present study was to test the effect of acute administration of varying doses of methylphenidate (10 mg, 20 mg, 40 mg and placebo on a wide range of cognitive functions in healthy young people. Methods: A total of 36 young university students and graduates participated in the study. The participants underwent tests of attention and of episodic, and working memory. Results: No differences in performance were observed on any of the tests. There was a dose-dependent (40 mg > placebo effect on self-reported wellbeing. Conclusions: According to the recent literature, psychostimulant medications, such as methylphenidate, improve performance when cognitive processes are below an optimal level, which was not the case for the subjects of the present study. We suggest the impression that methylphenidate enhances cognitive performance in healthy young people, justifying its use, may be due to improvements in subjective wellbeing promoted by the drug.

  13. Individual differences in personality predict how people look at faces.

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    Susan B Perlman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Determining the ways in which personality traits interact with contextual determinants to shape social behavior remains an important area of empirical investigation. The specific personality trait of neuroticism has been related to characteristic negative emotionality and associated with heightened attention to negative, emotionally arousing environmental signals. However, the mechanisms by which this personality trait may shape social behavior remain largely unspecified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We employed eye tracking to investigate the relationship between characteristics of visual scanpaths in response to emotional facial expressions and individual differences in personality. We discovered that the amount of time spent looking at the eyes of fearful faces was positively related to neuroticism. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This finding is discussed in relation to previous behavioral research relating personality to selective attention for trait-congruent emotional information, neuroimaging studies relating differences in personality to amygdala reactivity to socially relevant stimuli, and genetic studies suggesting linkages between the serotonin transporter gene and neuroticism. We conclude that personality may be related to interpersonal interaction by shaping aspects of social cognition as basic as eye contact. In this way, eye gaze represents a possible behavioral link in a complex relationship between genes, brain function, and personality.

  14. How do young people in Cambodia perceive the impact of societal attitudes, media and religion on suicidal behaviour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegannathan, Bhoomikumar; Kullgren, Gunnar; Dahlblom, Kjerstin

    2016-03-01

    Young people in low and middle income countries (LMICs) in societal transitions with rapidly changing norms face an increased risk of suicide. This study explores how young people in Cambodia understand the impact on suicidal behaviour from societal attitudes, media and religion. Focus group discussions were held with school students from a suburban area. Thematic analysis was used to interpret the data. Participants perceived the prevailing suicide-stigmatizing societal attitudes, the double-edged media and suicide-ambiguity in Buddhist religion as challenging. Globalization was recognized as contradicting with traditional Cambodian norms and values. Suicide prevention programmes should take into consideration the complex picture of suicide that young people are exposed to. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Obstacles to creating an environment conducive to HIV prevention for young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nm Kareithi, Roselyn; Lund, Crick

    2011-12-01

    The external environment of an organisation influences the desired goals and interventions of that organisation in many ways. However, strategies for influencing the external context to create a more enabling environment for the interventions of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) are often inadequately addressed. This article draws on an empirical multiple-case study conducted in 2007/08 of four NGOs providing HIV-prevention services to young people in several low-resource, high-HIV-prevalence communities in Cape Town, South Africa. In an earlier study, young people reported that the external environment hampered their ability to institutionalise HIV-prevention messages. The current study explored how the NGOs endeavoured to influence the external environment, and the challenges they faced. The findings show that the NGOs practised a combination of strategies, encompassing inter-organisational relationships, influencing policy, and championing by example. Key constraints to their influencing practices included fear of losing legitimacy as a service provider; inadequate knowledge, skills and opportunity; perceived deviation from their usual work; inadequate funding; conflicts over values and messages; and a habit of focusing more on young people's individual behaviours and less on context. The development management task of influencing the external environment to create an environment more conducive to HIV prevention seemed constrained mainly because: 1) donors focused on funding and monitoring the activities they were interested in and conceptualised as HIV-prevention services; 2) NGO efforts were restricted to programme implementation based on agreed deliverables, thus influencing was mainly confined to championing by example; consequently, 3) 'influencing efforts' to create an environment more conducive to HIV prevention were left mainly to young people themselves, who can affect their peers only to a narrow, albeit crucial extent. The external environment

  16. Mental health service use by young people: the role of caregiver characteristics.

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    Petra C Gronholm

    Full Text Available Many children and adolescents experiencing mental health problems do not receive appropriate care. Strategies to encourage appropriate access to services might be improved by a more detailed understanding of service use determinants within this group. In view of caregivers' key role in young people's pathways to care, this study aimed to advance understanding of caregiver-related characteristics that influence service use among young people.We interviewed 407 primary caregivers of young people aged 9-18 years, recruited from a Greater London (United Kingdom community sample. Caregivers reported on young people's service use in health care sector and/or education settings, and caregivers' intended stigmatising behaviours, help-seeking attitudes, and personal service use. Logistic regression analyses examined the relationship between these caregiver characteristics and young people's service use, controlling for young people's clinical and socio-demographic factors.Caregivers' intended stigmatising behaviours in particular exerted a strong influence on young people's service use within each service setting. The impact of this characteristic interacted with caregivers' service use in influencing young people's service use across health care and education settings and health care settings specifically. For young people's service use within education settings, caregivers' intended stigmatising behaviours score had a main effect.This study highlights the key role caregivers' attitudes and experiences hold in young people's service use. The findings indicate that strategies aiming to bridge the gap between young people's service needs and utilisation might be improved by targeting stigma amongst caregivers.

  17. Existential challenges in young people living with a cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odh, Ida; Löfving, Martina; Klaeson, Kicki

    2016-10-01

    In Sweden, approximately 500 people between the ages of 15 and 39 are diagnosed with cancer each year. When someone is diagnosed with a life-threatening disease, existential issues are easily triggered. Young adults are in a developmental phase of life and are exposed to an extra amount of pressure. The Internet and social media are a daily part of the life of young adults and the use of blogs is common. The aim of this study was to elucidate the theoretical framework of Yalom and his four 'givens' expressed in blogs written by young adults living with various cancer diagnoses in Sweden. This study used a qualitative method in which written stories from six public blogs were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The findings offer valuable in-depth knowledge about the existential issues in this population. The results can be described as a journey with several existential challenges and with death as an impending threat. The bloggers' awareness of their mortality was described as creating a sense of loss and existential loneliness. This study shows that young adults are empowered by the writing of blogs and that blogs can play an important part in increasing wellbeing and a sense of coherence within this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Intact perception but abnormal orientation towards face-like objects in young children with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Quentin; Rogé, Bernadette; Afzali, Mohammad H.; Baduel, Sophie; Kruck, Jeanne; Hadjikhani, Nouchine

    2016-01-01

    There is ample behavioral evidence of diminished orientation towards faces as well as the presence of face perception impairments in autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but the underlying mechanisms of these deficits are still unclear. We used face-like object stimuli that have been shown to evoke pareidolia in typically developing (TD) individuals to test the effect of a global face-like configuration on orientation and perceptual processes in young children with ASD and age-matched TD controls. We show that TD children were more likely to look first towards upright face-like objects than children with ASD, showing that a global face-like configuration elicit a stronger orientation bias in TD children as compared to children with ASD. However, once they were looking at the stimuli, both groups spent more time exploring the upright face-like object, suggesting that they both perceived it as a face. Our results are in agreement with abnormal social orienting in ASD, possibly due to an abnormal tuning of the subcortical pathway, leading to poor orienting and attention towards faces. Our results also indicate that young children with ASD can perceive a generic face holistically, such as face-like objects, further demonstrating holistic processing of faces in ASD. PMID:26912096

  19. Young people, parents and radical right voting. The case of the Swiss People's Party

    OpenAIRE

    Coffé, H.R.; Voorpostel, M.B.J.

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly found that young people tend to adopt the political party choice of their parents. However, far less is known about the applicability of this theory when investigating radical right support. Using the Swiss Household panel data (1999e2007), this study empirically identifies the relationship between parents’ preference for the Swiss radical right party SVP and their attitudes toward immigrants and the EU, and their offspring’s preference for the SVP. Disaggregating fathers’ and ...

  20. What paediatricians should know about eating disorders in children and young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Lee D; Court, Andrew J

    2012-10-01

    Any health professional working with children and young people may become involved in the care of a child or young person with an eating disorder. Morbidity and mortality can be high, and paediatricians have an important role to play. There are broadly two aspects of underweight that the paediatrician may face - acute medical instability and a more chronic underweight which can impact greatly upon growth and development. Ultimate weight restoration means an adequate nutritional status to allow appropriate growth and development. Key to success is a team approach with paediatric and mental health and dietetic expertise combined. This paper provides an overview of eating disorders and explores current best practice, written in collaboration by a paediatrician and child and adolescent psychiatrist.

  1. Managing the Current Situation of Young People in National and European Context in Terms of their Employment

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    Braica Alexandra Patricia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessment and research into this phenomenon of social marginalization and social exclusion of young people at both national and European levels has as a target to find methods of prevention and reduction of this phenomenon and understand the fact that it is only through communication, debates and dialog that will we be able to establish benchmarks for joint action. Young people are one of the age segments which are most affected by the economic recession. It is also accepted that in each of the Member States of the EU, despite different circumstances and levels of economic development, major issues faced by young people are the same: from access to essential services (such as education and health and up to their integration into the labour market with a view to achieving a higher standard of living. The decision makers are constantly interested in solving these stringent problems, which can be found in the policies and strategies for economic recovery and fighting the austerity measures adopted by the Member States of the EU, through a series of programs that have as main objectives combating unemployment and poverty among young people and providing opportunities for more active involvement in their community life: political, social, economic, cultural. In Romania, the problem of young people constitutes an issue of major importance for the Government, which has drawn up for the first time an Integrated Strategy of Romania with regard to young people called "National Strategy for Youth 2014-2020", with particular emphasis on the first role that education must play in this context. Examples of solutions identified by the governors are: an increase in public funding for mentoring programs, for the prevention of school dropout rates, establishment of differentiated educational offers, training schemes designed to eliminate lack of qualification in young people, in such a way as to maintain a competitive and well-prepared generation in the country

  2. Brief Report: Face-Specific Recognition Deficits in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Jessica; Shic, Frederick; Chawarska, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    This study used eyetracking to investigate the ability of young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) to recognize social (faces) and nonsocial (simple objects and complex block patterns) stimuli using the visual paired comparison (VPC) paradigm. Typically developing (TD) children showed evidence for recognition of faces and simple…

  3. What do young people think about their school-based sex and relationship education? A qualitative synthesis of young people's views and experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Pandora; Langford, Rebecca; Campbell, Rona

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Although sex and relationship education (SRE) represents a key strand in policies to safeguard young people and improve their sexual health, it currently lacks statutory status, government guidance is outdated and a third of UK schools has poor-quality SRE. We aimed to investigate whether current provision meets young people's needs. Design Synthesis of qualitative studies of young people's views of their school-based SRE. Setting Eligible studies originated from the UK, Ireland, the USA, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Japan, Iran, Brazil and Sweden. Participants Studies of students aged 4–19 in full-time education, young adults ≤19 (not necessarily in full-time education) or adults ≤25 if recalling their experiences of school-based SRE. Results –69 publications were identified, with 55 remaining after quality appraisal (representing 48 studies). The synthesis found that although sex is a potent and potentially embarrassing topic, schools appear reluctant to acknowledge this and attempt to teach SRE in the same way as other subjects. Young people report feeling vulnerable in SRE, with young men anxious to conceal sexual ignorance and young women risking sexual harassment if they participate. Schools appear to have difficulty accepting that some young people are sexually active, leading to SRE that is out of touch with many young people's lives. Young people report that SRE can be negative, gendered and heterosexist. They expressed dislike of their own teachers delivering SRE due to blurred boundaries, lack of anonymity, embarrassment and poor training. Conclusions SRE should be ‘sex-positive’ and delivered by experts who maintain clear boundaries with students. Schools should acknowledge that sex is a special subject with unique challenges, as well as the fact and range of young people's sexual activity, otherwise young people will continue to disengage from SRE and opportunities for safeguarding and improving their sexual health will be

  4. Young people's perspectives on open communication between family members when a parent is dying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nicola

    2017-07-03

    Living with a parent who is approaching the end of life is profoundly troubling for young people. Research indicates that family communication about life-limiting parental illness can influence how young people manage living with dying. In particular, open communication between family members has been shown to be helpful. This paper reports on a study of young people's experiences of family interaction when a parent is dying and considers the practice of open communication in the context of young people's involvement in giving and receiving family care. A narrative approach was employed based on in-depth semistructured interviews with 10 young people (aged 13-21) living with a parent thought to be in the last year of life. Young people's attitudes toward open communication between family members were more ambivalent and ambiguous than previous research suggests. Parental attempts at open communication were sometimes overlooked by young people, indicating that there may be differences between knowledge given and young people's acknowledgment of sensitive information. Some young people valued open communication as a signifier of the close relationships between family members, while others wanted to exercise more control over what they knew, when, and how. Young people's accounts challenged the positioning of young people as passive recipients of information. Young people were active in shaping family communication in their everyday lives, and deliberative acts of speaking or remaining silent were one way in which young people exercised care for themselves and others. This study extends research on communication within families when a parent has a life-limiting illness and suggests that supporting young people's agency in determining how they receive information may be more beneficial than promoting open communication between family members.

  5. Features of common representations of suiciders in young people

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    I. B. Bovina

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the first phase results of a research project dedicated to study of suicide representations in youth. In the framework of structural approach to social representations, we study features of structure and content of social representations of suiciders in two groups of young people (the criterion for group allocation was their acquaintance with people who has suicide attempts. Our sample (N = 106 consisted of representatives of several youth groups (students and working youths with specialized secondary, higher or incomplete higher education, aged 18 to 35 years (M = 23,48 years, SD = 4,36 years: 67 women and 39 men. The 1st group includes respondents personally acquainted with suicide attempters (44 respondents, the 2nd group – respondents without such experience. The subject of research were common representations of suiciders. We tested assumptions about the specificity of protective functions of social representations, as well as consistency of representations in the two groups of respondents.

  6. Online Pornography--Should Schools Be Teaching Young People about the Risks? An Exploration of the Views of Young People and Teaching Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Karen Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has made sexually explicit media more accessible to young people. Online pornography is diverse, can be very graphic, and a large amount is available free of charge with restrictions varying by country. Many young people are accessing online pornography, intentionally or unintentionally, and there are fears that this could impact on…

  7. Online Pornography--Should Schools Be Teaching Young People about the Risks? An Exploration of the Views of Young People and Teaching Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Karen Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The Internet has made sexually explicit media more accessible to young people. Online pornography is diverse, can be very graphic, and a large amount is available free of charge with restrictions varying by country. Many young people are accessing online pornography, intentionally or unintentionally, and there are fears that this could impact on…

  8. Both dog and human faces are explored abnormally by young children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Quentin; Hadjikhani, Nouchine; Baduel, Sophie; Kruck, Jeanne; Arnaud, Mado; Rogé, Bernadette

    2014-10-22

    When looking at faces, typical individuals tend to have a right hemispheric bias manifested by a tendency to look first toward the left visual hemifield. Here, we tested for the presence of this bias in young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) for both human and dog faces. We show that children with ASD do not show a left visual hemifield (right hemispheric) bias for human faces. In addition, we show that this effect extends to faces of dogs, suggesting that the absence of bias is not specific to human faces, but applies to all faces with the first-order configuration, pointing to an anomaly at an early stage of visual analysis of faces. The lack of right hemispheric dominance for face processing may reflect a more general disorder of cerebral specialization of social functions in ASD.

  9. Sexual behaviors and their correlates among young people in Mauritius: a cross-sectional study

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    Lang Delia L

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the Indian Ocean region, including Mauritius. National records suggest a prevalence of HIV in Mauritius of Methods We identified 1200 participants using two-stage cluster sampling. Demographic, social, sexual, and knowledge of HIV/AIDS data were obtained in face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire administered by trained interviewers. The prevalence of sexual behaviors was described in relation to gender, and the correlates of ever having had sex and nonuse of condom at last sex were analyzed using logistic regression. Results In the target population, 30.9% of males and 9.7% of females reported a history of sexual intercourse. Of the currently sexually active participants, 50.6% of men and 71.2% of women did not use condoms at their last sexual encounter. Logistic regression revealed that work experience and marijuana use were significantly associated with men's sexual experience, whereas being out of school and drinking experience were significantly associated with women's sexual experience. For both men and women, being Christian and visiting nightclubs were associated with having ever had sexual intercourse (P Conclusion Young people in Mauritius are at risk of a future HIV epidemic because behaviors predisposing to HIV infection are prevalent among sexually experienced youth. A focused prevention program targeting young people should be reinforced as part of the National AIDS Control Program, taking into account the predictors of sexual behaviors identified here.

  10. Early adversity and brain response to faces in young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieslehto, Johannes; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Mäki, Pirjo; Koivukangas, Jenni; Nordström, Tanja; Miettunen, Jouko; Barnett, Jennifer H; Jones, Peter B; Murray, Graham K; Moilanen, Irma; Paus, Tomáš; Veijola, Juha

    2017-09-01

    Early stressors play a key role in shaping interindividual differences in vulnerability to various psychopathologies, which according to the diathesis-stress model might relate to the elevated glucocorticoid secretion and impaired responsiveness to stress. Furthermore, previous studies have shown that individuals exposed to early adversity have deficits in emotion processing from faces. This study aims to explore whether early adversities associate with brain response to faces and whether this association might associate with the regional variations in mRNA expression of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1). A total of 104 individuals drawn from the Northern Finland Brith Cohort 1986 participated in a face-task functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. A large independent dataset (IMAGEN, N = 1739) was utilized for reducing fMRI data-analytical space in the NFBC 1986 dataset. Early adversities were associated with deviant brain response to fearful faces (MANCOVA, P = 0.006) and with weaker performance in fearful facial expression recognition (P = 0.01). Glucocorticoid receptor gene expression (data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas) correlated with the degree of associations between early adversities and brain response to fearful faces (R(2)  = 0.25, P = 0.01) across different brain regions. Our results suggest that early adversities contribute to brain response to faces and that this association is mediated in part by the glucocorticoid system. Hum Brain Mapp 38:4470-4478, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Automated Facial Coding Software Outperforms People in Recognizing Neutral Faces as Neutral from Standardized Datasets

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    Peter eLewinski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about people’s accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective judge – automated facial coding (AFC software. I hypothesized that the software would outperform humans in recognizing neutral faces because of the inherently objective nature of computer algorithms. Results confirmed this hypothesis. I provided the first-ever evidence that computer software (90% was more accurate in recognizing neutral faces than people were (59%. I posited two theoretical mechanisms, i.e. smile-as-a-baseline and false recognition of emotion, as possible explanations for my findings.

  12. Road Safety Related Behaviours of Romanian Young People

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    Lucia Maria LOTREAN

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to assess the behaviors with risk for road traffic injuries among Romanian young people. Material and Method: Self-administered questionnaires were completed by the study sample consisting of 1598 junior high school students, senior high school students and university students aged 11-24 years from both urban and rural areas of two counties (Cluj and Hunedora of Romania. Results: The results show that around 80% of the junior high school students and more than 90% of the senior high school students and university students who go by bike do not wear helmets or use them rarely when they are cycling. Seatbelts are used more frequently than the helmets, but still more than one third of the junior high school students and senior high school students and a quarter of the university students do not use seatbelts or use them rarely. In the month previous the survey around one quarter of the students travelled in a car whose driver used alcohol before driving. Moreover, 15% of the university students who drove recognized that, at least once during their life, they did this after they used alcohol. Conclusions: The results indicate that comprehensive actions must be developed in order to prevent road traffic injuries among Romanian young people. They must include educational programs for youngsters and parents as well as adoption and enforcement of legislative measures and technical actions, which promote road safety.

  13. Sexual assault as a crime against young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felson, Richard B; Cundiff, Patrick R

    2014-02-01

    Evidence based on almost 300,000 sexual assaults from the National Incident-Based Reporting System showed that the modal age of victims was 15 years, regardless of the age of the offender, the gender of the offender, or the gender of the victim. We suggest that adolescents have the highest risk of victimization because of their sexual attractiveness, vulnerability, and exposure to motivated offenders. As a result of these factors, sexual assault is as much an offense against young people as it is against women. The sexual attractiveness of young people also has implications for the age of offenders. Older men have much higher rates of offending than one would expect, given the age-desistance relationship. Thus, we found that older men have much higher rates of sexual assault than physical assault. Finally, evidence suggested that homosexual men were at least as likely as heterosexual men to commit sexual assault. The pattern suggests that the tendency for sexual assaults to involve male offenders and female victims reflects male sexuality rather than attitudes toward women.

  14. On studying religion, media and the young people

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    Nina Maskulin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper charts a unique and important phase of media use and meaning-making processes among young people during the first decade of twenty-first century. The rapid changes in media content and consumption have brought about a transformation which impacts on forms of religion and spirituality for young people. In this article I review four studies on the field of religion and the media. Key concepts of the construction of individuality and the narrative of personal biographies are found in all of them. The role of Evangelical Christianity and the core narrative of the apocalypse, as well as the clear polarities of good and evil are analysed in two of the studies which give a description of the global and transnational dimension, while the other two put more emphasis on the local, cultural and historical dimensions. The significance of the transnational character of religious narratives, the media and popular culture is analysed in reference to a long period of ethnographical inquiry and detailed documentations of the cultural discourses associated with musical subcultures as well as the locality and new media conventions approach in the studies of existential and religious expressions in the mediated environment.

  15. [How the Congolese young people consider their elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikouta, Firmin; Bileckot, Richard; Cauli, Marie; Massamba, Honorine; Puisieux, François

    2015-12-01

    The traditional image of the African family that has long grant a place of choice to the elderly does match maybe any more the reality of today. The WHO report on violence and health 2002 and some studies carried out in other African countries suggest that elder abuse also exists in sub-Saharan Africa. To describe how the young Congolese adults consider their elderly and mistreatments that can result. A cross sectional study was realized between January and April, 2008 with 300 youth and adults aged 15 to 55 years (203 ≤ 25 years old), living in Brazzaville or in Pointe-Noire. The sample of 300 people was constituted according to the method of non-probability sampling. The data collection was made on the ground by state employees of the Ministry of Health, social affairs and family by means of a pre-established questionnaire containing open and closed questions. Youth and adults have contrasted and contradictory representations of the elderly. In 70% of the cases they said have good relationships with the elderly and qualified them as wise persons and as models but, conversely, more than 50% of them found them unwanted and disturbing. Witchcraft accusations are frequent with often serious consequences. Social transformations dispossess little by little the elderly people of their status and their prerogatives in Congo-Brazzaville. They come along with a change of look and behavior of the young adults towards them. Elder abuse in Congo-Brazzaville is an underestimated problem insufficiently denounced and fought.

  16. Literature Helps Young Children Face Problems in Today's World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Mildred R.

    Contemporary realistic fiction allows young readers/listeners to experience events that they would never encounter in real life or practice what they might someday experience. Realistic fiction benefits children as they may: see past the limitations of their own experiences; learn to reflect on choices in their own lives; acquire sympathy for…

  17. The Impact of Enterprise Education on Attitudes to Enterprise in Young People: An Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athayde, Rosemary

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to present evidence on the impact of enterprise education on young people still at school in London, UK. The study was designed to measure the effect of participation in a Young Enterprise (YE) Company Program on young people's attitudes toward starting a business, and on their enterprise potential.…

  18. The Impact of Enterprise Education on Attitudes to Enterprise in Young People: An Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athayde, Rosemary

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to present evidence on the impact of enterprise education on young people still at school in London, UK. The study was designed to measure the effect of participation in a Young Enterprise (YE) Company Program on young people's attitudes toward starting a business, and on their enterprise potential.…

  19. Anxiety disorders in young people: a population-based study

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    Thaíse Campos Mondin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prevalence of anxiety disorders and associated factors in young adults. Methods: Cross-sectional population-based study of individuals between the ages of 18 and 24 years randomly selected from 89 census-based sectors to ensure an adequate sample size. Household selection within the sectors was performed according to a systematic sampling process. Anxiety disorders were assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI. The final sample comprised 1,560 young adults. Results: Of the participants who were diagnosed with anxiety disorders, 12.3% had agoraphobia, 9.7% had generalised anxiety disorder, 4.0% had social phobia, 3.3% had obsessive-compulsive disorder, 2.5% had panic disorder, and 2.1% had post-traumatic stress disorder; only 23.8% had received any previous treatment. Anxiety disorders were associated with sex, socioeconomic status, psychiatric problems in parents, alcohol abuse, and tobacco use. Conclusions: The identification of factors associated with anxiety disorders in young people enables us to develop intervention strategies. Anxiety disorders are not only highly prevalent but are also associated with significant functional impairment, significant reductions in quality of life, lower productivity, and higher rates of comorbidities.

  20. Tools and Techniques to Teach Earth Sciences to Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, R.; Dicelis, G.; Molina, E. C.

    2010-12-01

    This study aims to identify the tools available to disseminate the Earth sciences to young people in Brazil and to propose new techniques that may help in the teaching of such subjects. The use of scientific dissemination can be a great tool for the consolidation of a scientific culture, especially for a public of young students. The starting point of this study is an important characteristic that is present in virtually all the children: curiosity. The young public tries to understand how the world is and how it works. The use of scientific dissemination and some educational experiences have shown that these students have a great ability to learn and deal with various topics within the Earth Sciences. Another relevant point is the possibility to show that the Earth sciences, e.g., geophysics, oceanography, meteorology, geology and geography, can be an educational attractive option. Several ways of disseminating Earth sciences are commonly used with the purpose of attracting and mainly teaching these subjects, such as websites, interactive museums and cultural and educational spaces. The objectives of this work are: i) Investigate the role of science centers as motivators in disseminating the scientific knowledge by examining the communication resources that are being employed, the acceptance, reaction, and interest of children to these means, and ii) From this analysis, to list suggestions of contents and new tools that could be used for obtaining better results.

  1. [Media messages to promote safer sex. Contact with young people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-01

    In 1993, the national radio station of Zambia launched a popular music show on the fight against AIDS. Support of the national AIDS control program put information on HIV, sexually transmitted diseases, and sexuality at the disposal of thousands of youth. Radio is an effective medium to distribute information, to stimulate an awareness that AIDS is bad, and to influence public opinion. The Saturday Beat radio show is broadcast for 45 minutes every Saturday morning when most Zambians are at home. It has jingles about condom use and questions about AIDS with show listeners responding via the telephone, and discussions on HIV prevention. The show also has interviews with HIV-positive people, and with physicians, music stars, and government officials such as the Vice Minister of Health. Saturday Beat is very popular and well praised. Listeners call in from around the country and are encouraged to write and submit questions. The show host answers listeners' letters during the show. The show can organize demonstrations for loyal listeners where youth lead debates and discussions that can be taped and broadcast. Another popular medium is a photo-story (comic book with photographs rather than drawings) about a young woman named Roxy and her friends. The characters of the photo-story have different attitudes about AIDS and sex and offer different options to prevent HIV infection. Young people helped create this photo-story through a series of discussions and an examination of their feelings, their experiences, and their relationships with boy/girl friends. They were also involved in test marketing the photo story. The public appreciates Roxy. Readers can recognize themselves easily in the characters, and those with little education can understand the story. Some parents and teachers found the story too sexually explicit, but many people now agree that the story provides educational benefits.

  2. Judging trustworthiness from faces: Emotion cues modulate trustworthiness judgments in young children

    OpenAIRE

    Caulfield, Frances; Ewing, Louise; Bank, Samantha; Rhodes, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    By adulthood, people judge trustworthiness from appearances rapidly and reliably. However, we know little about these judgments in children. This novel study investigates the developmental trajectory of explicit trust judgments from faces, and the contribution made by emotion cues across age groups. Five-, 7-, 10-year-olds, and adults rated the trustworthiness of trustworthy and untrustworthy faces with neutral expressions. The same participants also rated faces displaying overt happy and ang...

  3. Social media and digital technology use among Indigenous young people in Australia: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Emma S; Haynes, Emma; Royce, Paul; Thompson, Sandra C

    2016-05-25

    The use of social media and digital technologies has grown rapidly in Australia and around the world, including among Indigenous young people who face social disadvantage. Given the potential to use social media for communication, providing information and as part of creating and responding to social change, this paper explores published literature to understand how Indigenous Australian youth use digital technologies and social media, and its positive and negative impacts. Online literature searches were conducted in three databases: PubMed, Google Scholar and Informit in August 2014; with further searches of additional relevant databases (Engineering Village; Communication & mass media complete; Computers & applied sciences complete; Web of Science) undertaken in May 2015. In addition, relevant literature was gathered using citation snowballing so that additional peer-reviewed and grey literature was included. Articles were deemed relevant if they discussed social media and/or digital technologies and Indigenous Australians. After reading and reviewing all relevant articles, a thematic analysis was used to identify overall themes and identify specific examples. A total of 22 papers were included in the review. Several major themes were identified about how and why Indigenous young people use social media: identity, power and control, cultural compatibility and community and family connections. Examples of marketing for health and health promotion approaches that utilize social media and digital technologies were identified. Negative uses of social media such as cyber bullying, cyber racism and the exchange of sexually explicit content between minors are common with limited approaches to dealing with this at the community level. Strong cultural identity and community and family connections, which can be enhanced through social media, are linked to improved educational and health outcomes. The confidence that Indigenous young people demonstrate when approaching the

  4. Alcohol Use, Risk Taking, Leisure Activities and Health Care Use Among Young People in Northern Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Thi Kim Thoa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption is associated with a wide range of health and social consequences. It is also associated with a number of risk taking behaviours. These include illicit drug use and unsafe sex.  Alcohol consumption appears to be increasing in Vietnam. The purpose of this paper is to examine the patterns of alcohol consumption and its relationship with a number of other risk taking behaviours amongst young people.  Information was also obtained concerning leisure activities and use of health care. The paper also sets out to examine possible gender differences in relation to alcohol consumption and risk behaviour and to propose the development and implementation of alcohol monitoring and prevention programs in Vietnam.  The study involved a cross-sectional, community survey using a standardised interview.  This was conducted during face-to-face interviews with 1,408 young people aged 10-19 years.  Respondents were recruited randomly through the lists of the households from 12 selected communes in three areas in Northern Vietnam. The findings presented here were part of a larger health risk behaviour survey.  Levels of alcohol use were low. Overall, 16.5% of participants were experienced drinkers, and only 4% of them were current drinkers. Males were significantly more likely than females to report drinking. This study also showed that rates of alcohol consumption were associated with age, education, geographical area, gender, tobacco smoking, involvement in violence, watching television, computer use and playing computer games, wearing safety helmets and use of health services. Alcohol consumption tended to increase with age for both males and females.  Alcohol and its effects on young people are clearly a growing public health issue in Vietnam.  Because of this, more detailed behavioral research should be conducted into the relationship between alcohol consumption and other risky behaviours amongst young people.  It is also

  5. Implementation of digital interventions for sexual health for young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Mann

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a scoping review of evidence on digital interventions for sexual health promotion for young people aged 13 to 24 years in the UK, defining sexual health in holistic terms, to include physical, emotional, mental and social well-being in relation to sexuality. Interactive digital interventions (IDI are defined as digital media programmes that provide sexual health information and tailored decision support, behaviour-change support, and/or emotional support for sexual health issues. We conducted a thorough review of literature to locate and synthesise available evidence on digital interventions for sexual health spanning the last ten years, integrating the findings with the views of key informants (young people, parents, and experts in digital media/sexual health. Results and conclusions There were few studies that assess the factors related to successful implementation of sexual health promotion IDIs. Potential barriers and facilitators to implementation of IDI should be addressed at the very beginning of an intervention development process. Engaging with sexual health promotion interventions online allows private and convenient access as well as potentially reaching populations who engage less frequently with mainstream services. However, it is difficult to ensure that users will find the intervention, or engage for long enough for them to be effective. The reach of online IDI could be enhanced by linking sexual health promotion interventions with existing digital systems such as STI self-test websites, or with trusted branded websites or popular social networking sites. Offering interventions in static settings such as the clinic or classroom encourages engagement and enables interventions to be delivered with fidelity but potentially at the expense of the privacy and convenience offered by online interventions. Using the knowledge of local staff is vital for both successful intervention development and successful implementation. An effective

  6. Reportable STDs in Young People 15-24 Years of Age, by State

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Twitter STD on Facebook Reportable STDs in Young People 15-24 Years of Age, by State Recommend ... active adolescents and young adults are at increased risk for STDs when compared to older adults. Acknowledging ...

  7. Identity, discourse and practice : a qualitative case study of young people and their sexuality

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    This research is based on a case study of young people's identities, practices and discourses, and takes sexuality as a focus for interrogation. It aims to reveal the issues and processes that impact on young people's conceptions of self (both current and future) by looking at private and public realms of experience. In so doing, social lives, home lives and schooling (particularly sex education), are explored to reveal how far they operate in young people's interest. Lack of a...

  8. Do Online Mental Health Services Improve Help-Seeking for Young People? A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kauer, Sylvia Deidre; Mangan, Cheryl; Sanci, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Background Young people regularly use online services to seek help and look for information about mental health problems. Yet little is known about the effects that online services have on mental health and whether these services facilitate help-seeking in young people. Objective This systematic review investigates the effectiveness of online services in facilitating mental health help-seeking in young people. Methods Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyse...

  9. Attitudes towards political leaders amongst young Thai people (Generation Y) and their influence on electoral choices.

    OpenAIRE

    Chatiratchart, Waraporn

    2007-01-01

    This study endeavours to understand the influence of a politician’s public image on the electoral choices of young Thai people. This interdisciplinary study focuses on Generation Y; young people currently aged 16 to 20, in Bangkok. It uses empirical investigation through surveys and focus groups to examine the opinions, perceptions and political behaviours of a representative sample of young people. The investigation places a special emphasis on their perception of the Prime Minister and pote...

  10. Reducing behaviour problems in young people through social competence programmes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut K. Gundersen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a relatively strong relationship between the concepts of behavioural problems and social competence, in that social competence is regarded as one of the most important protective factors in the prevention of behavioural problems. This paper argues that the concept of social competence should include social skills, social practice and empathic understanding. It identifies the components that form part of an effective social competence programme, including enhancing an understanding of social situations, increasing the generation of adequate social skills, improving the management of provocations which may lead to uncontrolled anger, and developing empathic understanding. The evidence also suggests that effective social competence programmes for children and young people should be multi modal and consist of mixed groups of pupils with and without difficulties. The paper concludes with a brief description of Aggression Replacement Training as an example of a programme which follows the recommended guidelines.

  11. To the Spanish Young People: Don Quixote Dreyfussard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Ramírez Martín

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1898, Spanish press take up part of its pages with a relevant international issue: the Dreyfus affair. The case was widely covered by Spanish newspapers, in special by Don Quijote, a Madrilenian satiric press, whose Director promoted a campaign in favour of Zola collecting signatures in order to the French litterateur was aware that Spain was close to him. This initiative is completed with a call to Spanish young people who is illustrated with a quixotic caricature. Cervantine character personifies the idea of justice getting to transmit during the Spanish crisis at the end of the nineteenth century the image of the nobleman forged by Spanish stereotypical, like a crusader fighting for a noble cause, thus turning Don Quixote into another dreyfussard.

  12. Extremism among young people and its prevention in educational organization

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    A.I. Kirsanov,

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe the results of a survey of 50 experts – representatives of educational institutions of Moscow, district education authorities and the staff of the juvenile justice system. We note that the researchers often miss the opinion of the subjects of preventive work. Expert survey allowed to specify the conditions and behavioral manifestations of contemporary youth extremism, rank his psychological reasons, summarize the available methods and forms of prevention. We show the basic extremist ideas that are common among young people, and extremists speech features. The study revealed the understanding by the subjects of the preventive work of the “extremism” concept content, of goals and mechanisms of prevention, shows the typical difficulties in this work. The results can be used to search for new and more effective forms of prevention and improving the organization of preventive work in general.

  13. Reducing weapon-carrying among urban American Indian young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearinger, Linda H; Pettingell, Sandra L; Resnick, Michael D; Potthoff, Sandra J

    2010-07-01

    To examine the likelihood of weapon-carrying among urban American Indian young people, given the presence of salient risk and protective factors. The study used data from a confidential, self-report Urban Indian Youth Health Survey with 200 forced-choice items examining risk and protective factors and social, contextual, and demographic information. Between 1995 and 1998, 569 American Indian youths, aged 9-15 years, completed surveys administered in public schools and an after-school program. Using logistic regression, probability profiles compared the likelihood of weapon-carrying, given the combinations of salient risk and protective factors. In the final models, weapon-carrying was associated significantly with one risk factor (substance use) and two protective factors (school connectedness, perceiving peers as having prosocial behavior attitudes/norms). With one risk factor and two protective factors, in various combinations in the models, the likelihood of weapon carrying ranged from 4% (with two protective factors and no risk factor in the model) to 80% of youth (with the risk factor and no protective factors in the model). Even in the presence of the risk factor, the two protective factors decreased the likelihood of weapon-carrying to 25%. This analysis highlights the importance of protective factors in comprehensive assessments and interventions for vulnerable youth. In that the risk factor and two protective factors significantly related to weapon-carrying are amenable to intervention at both individual and population-focused levels, study findings offer a guide for prioritizing strategies for decreasing weapon-carrying among urban American Indian young people. Copyright (c) 2010 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A motivation-based explanatory model of street drinking among young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Santana, Josefa D; Beerli-Palacio, Asunción; Fernández-Monroy, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    This social marketing study focuses on street drinking behavior among young people. The objective is to divide the market of young people who engage in this activity into segments according to their motivations. For the three segments identified, a behavior model is created using the beliefs, attitudes, behavior, and social belonging of young people who engage in street drinking. The methodology used individual questionnaires filled in by a representative sample of young people. The results show that the behavior model follows the sequence of attitudes-beliefs-behavior and that social belonging influences these three variables. Similarly, differences are observed in the behavior model depending on the segment individuals belong to.

  15. Young People Out Of Work In South West Newham: Two Years On

    OpenAIRE

    Sampson, Alice

    2002-01-01

    This research project presents findings from a follow-up study of 500 young people who were out of work in South West Newham in 1997/8. Three hundred and thirteen of these young people agreed to participate in the second survey. In July 2000 275 of the young people who participated in the original survey were contacted and 120 were interviewed. The findings provide information on the effect of the training and employment programmes on the lives of these young people and information about thei...

  16. Attitudes to Exercise and Diabetes in Young People with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Ryninks

    Full Text Available To investigate young people's attitudes to, and understanding of, physical activity on glycaemic control in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.Four focus groups with 11-14 and 15-16 year olds were conducted with twelve young people with Type 1 Diabetes, from within a larger study investigating physical activity and fitness. Qualitative analysis of the focus group data was performed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.Four superordinate themes were identified: Benefits of Exercise, Knowledge and Understanding, Information and Training and "You can do anything". Young people felt that exercising helped them to manage their diabetes and had a beneficial psychological and physical impact on their bodies. They reported a lack of knowledge and understanding about diabetes among school staff and other young people. The overwhelming sense from young people was that although diabetes impacts upon their lives, with preparation, physical activity can take place as normal.Whilst young people had an awareness of the physical and psychological benefits of exercise in managing their diabetes, they experienced difficulties at school. Professional support and discussions with young people, giving tailored strategies for managing Type 1 Diabetes during exercise are needed. Healthcare teams should ensure that the support and educational needs of school staff are met. Providing more opportunities to empower young people to take on the responsibility for their Type 1 Diabetes care is merited. Young people felt diabetes did not stop them from participating in activities; it is simply a part of them that needs managing throughout life.

  17. The relationship between maternal attitudes and young people's attitudes toward children's rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, David M; Peterson-Badali, Michele; Ruck, Martin D

    2006-04-01

    Relations between maternal socio-political attitudes and parenting style and young people's and mothers' attitudes toward young people's nurturance and self-determination rights were examined. Both young people (n = 121) and mothers (n = 67) were more supportive of nurturance than self-determination rights, although young people were more supportive than their mothers of self-determination rights and mothers were more supportive than young people of nurturance rights. Maternal conservatism was unrelated to young people's support for rights and negatively related to mothers' support for both types of rights. Last, young people who perceived their mother to be either authoritarian or uninvolved showed stronger endorsement of self-determination rights than young people who perceived their mother to be authoritative. The implications of these findings for the development of young people's attitudes toward rights within the context of various family factors are discussed. In particular, it is suggested that a balance needs to be achieved between assertion of rights and a respect for the rights of others.

  18. Blogging as a viable research methodology for young people with arthritis: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Julie; Gray, Nicola J; Smith, Felicity J; McDonagh, Janet E

    2015-03-05

    The development of services that are responsive to the needs of users is a health policy priority. Finding ways of engaging young people in research to gain insights into their particular experiences, perspectives, and needs is vital but challenging. These data are critical to improving services in ways that meet the needs of young people. Our aim was to evaluate Web-based blogging as a viable method for understanding the daily experiences and condition management strategies of young people with juvenile arthritis. To meet the objectives of the study, a qualitative approach was required to gather information on the experiences and perspectives of young people regarding the management of their condition and its daily impact. In collaboration with a group of young people with arthritis, a custom website was developed. This website provided the opportunity for young people (aged 11-19) with arthritis from a United Kingdom pediatric hospital to contribute blogs. It was designed so that young people were free to write about whatever was important to them, but the site also included some structure and prompts to facilitate the writing of blogs. Qualitative analytical procedures were employed, supported by NVivo software. Engagement in the study by young people was variable in terms of their participation rates, frequency of website visits, and the length of their blogs. Young people used the site in different ways, some responding to the website categories and prompts that the team created, while others used it as a diary to record their experiences and thoughts. In line with principles of qualitative inquiry, the data collection was participant-led. Young people were in control of what, how much, and how often they wrote. However, some young people expressed difficulty regarding knowing what they should blog about. For a number of reasons, discussed here, the blogs may also not be fully reflective of experiences and perspectives of the participants. However, the data

  19. Recommendations to reduce inequalities for LGBT people facing advanced illness: ACCESSCare national qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristowe, Katherine; Hodson, Matthew; Wee, Bee; Almack, Kathryn; Johnson, Katherine; Daveson, Barbara A; Koffman, Jonathan; McEnhill, Linda; Harding, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or trans (LGBT) people have higher risk of certain life-limiting illnesses and unmet needs in advanced illness and bereavement. ACCESSCare is the first national study to examine in depth the experiences of LGBT people facing advanced illness. To explore health-care experiences of LGBT people facing advanced illness to elicit views regarding sharing identity (sexual orientation/gender history), accessing services, discrimination/exclusion and best-practice examples. Semi-structured in-depth qualitative interviews analysed using thematic analysis. In total, 40 LGBT people from across the United Kingdom facing advanced illness: cancer ( n = 21), non-cancer ( n = 16) and both a cancer and a non-cancer conditions ( n = 3). In total, five main themes emerged: (1) person-centred care needs that may require additional/different consideration for LGBT people (including different social support structures and additional legal concerns), (2) service level or interactional (created in the consultation) barriers/stressors (including heteronormative assumptions and homophobic/transphobic behaviours), (3) invisible barriers/stressors (including the historical context of pathology/criminalisation, fears and experiences of discrimination) and (4) service level or interactional facilitators (including acknowledging and including partners in critical discussions). These all shape (5) individuals' preferences for disclosing identity. Prior experiences of discrimination or violence, in response to disclosure, were carried into future care interactions and heightened with the frailty of advanced illness. Despite recent legislative change, experiences of discrimination and exclusion in health care persist for LGBT people. Ten recommendations, for health-care professionals and services/institutions, are made from the data. These are simple, low cost and offer potential gains in access to, and outcomes of, care for LGBT people.

  20. [The effects of normal aging on face naming and recognition of famous people: battery 75].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluchon, C; Simonnet, E; Toullat, G; Gil, R

    2002-07-01

    The difficulty to recall proper nouns is often something elderly people complain about. Thus, we tried to build and standardize a tool that could allow a quantified estimation of the naming and recognition abilities about famous people faces, specifying the part of gender, age and cultural level for each kind of test. The performances of 542 subjects divided in 3 age brackets and 3 academic knowledge levels were analysed. To carry out the test material, the artistic team of the Grevin Museum (Paris) was called upon. Their work offers a homogeneous way to shape famous people faces. One same person thus photographed 75 characters from different social categories with the same conditions of light, during only one day. The results of the study show that men perform better than women as concerns naming task, but that there's no difference between genders as concerns recognition task. Recognition performances are significantly better whatever the age, the gender and the cultural level may be. Generally, performances are all the more better since subjects are younger and have a higher cultural level. Our study then confirms the fact that normal aging goes hand in hand with rising difficulties to name faces. Moreover, results tend to show that recognition of faces remains better preserved and that the greater disability to recall a name is linked to difficulties in lexical accessing.

  1. Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender young people's experiences of distress: resilience, ambivalence and self-destructive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scourfield, Jonathan; Roen, Katrina; McDermott, Liz

    2008-05-01

    The research presented in this paper set out to explore the cultural context of youth suicide and more specifically any connections between sexual identity and self-destructive behaviour, in the light of international evidence about the disproportionate risk of suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) young people. The empirical basis for the paper is qualitative research that was carried out in the North West of England and South Wales. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with a total of 69 young people, with a purposive sample to reflect diversity of sexual identity, social class and regional and rural-urban location. The paper presents a thematic analysis of the data specifically relating to the experiences of LGBT young people. A range of strategies that LGBT young people employ in the face of distress are described. These are categorised as resilience, ambivalence and self-destructive behaviour (including self-harm and suicide). The potential implications for health and social care of these strategies include the need for ecological approaches and for sexual cultural competence in practitioners, as well as prioritisation of LGBT risk within suicide prevention policies.

  2. General practitioners' clinical expertise in managing suicidal young people: implications for continued education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michail, Maria; Tait, Lynda; Churchill, Dick

    2017-09-01

    Aim To examine general practitioners' (GPs) clinical expertise in assessing, communicating with, and managing suicidal young people aged 14-25 to inform the development of an educational intervention for GPs on youth suicide prevention. Suicide is the second leading cause of death for young people worldwide. GPs are ideally suited to facilitate early identification and assessment of suicide risk. However, GPs' levels of competence, knowledge, and attitudes towards suicidal young people have not yet been explored. A cross-sectional survey on GPs' levels of confidence in assessing and managing young people at risk of suicide; knowledge of risk factors and warning signs of suicide in young people; attitudes towards young suicidal people; and training preferences on managing suicide risk. Findings Seventy GPs completed the survey (30 males). The majority of GPs reported high levels of confidence in assessing and managing suicidality in young people. Experienced GPs demonstrated high levels of knowledge of suicide risk factors in young people but low levels of knowledge of warning signs that might indicate heightened risk. Although 48% of GPs disagreed that maintaining compassionate care is difficult with those who deliberately self-harm, GPs perceived communication with young people to be difficult, with one-third reporting frustration in managing those at risk of suicide. A total of 75% of GPs said they would be interested in receiving further training on assessing and managing young people at risk of suicide. The study has important implications for providing specialist training to support GPs in assessing and managing youth suicide risk and facilitating attitudinal change. GP education on youth suicide risk assessment and management should promote a holistic understanding and assessment of risk and its individual, social and contextual influences in line with clinical recommendations to facilitate therapeutic engagement and communication with young people.

  3. The memorability of people: Intrinsic memorability across transformations of a person's face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Wilma A

    2017-05-01

    When encountering new people for a brief instant, some seem to last in our memories while others are quickly forgotten. Memorability-whether a stimulus is likely to be later remembered-is highly consistent across different group of observers; people tend to remember and forget the same face images. However, is memorability intrinsic to just the picture of a face, or to a person's identity, generalizable across views and emotions? Thousands of participants completed an online experiment testing face identity recognition over five different emotional and viewpoint transformations (neutral, happy, angry, 3/4 view, and profile view). Memorability was found to be highly consistent within each image, as well as across transformations-if a face was remembered in one image, it was also likely to be remembered in another. Most other face attributes, including what participants thought would be memorable, did not show consistency within an identity. Overall, these results support the existence of memorability as a uniquely intrinsic, core attribute to a person, stable across images. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. The field of library science as a career option for young people. Enrollment, practices and representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Manssero

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The low demand that Library Science as a career choice has among the young population, especially among those who finish secondary school, constitutes nowadays one of the main problems facing the social universe of librarians as a disciplinary field. On the basis of the current situation, in this paper we aim at, on the one hand, surveying the enrollment characteristics of the Library Science career at the National University of Córdoba (UNC -Argentina-, by using as information sources the university statistical yearbooks of the period 2000-2014. On the other hand, through field work carried out in eleven secondary schools in the capital city of Córdoba, we address the practices and perceptions that young people who completed their secondary education in 2015 have about Library Science as a career and the library as an institution. The data collected allow us to infer that the low interest for studying Library Science might be related to this profession as a social universe not occupying a significant place in the perceptual horizon of young secondary school students.

  5. Linking Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and HIV Services for Young People: The Link Up Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackpool-Moore, Lucy; Bajpai, Divya; Caswell, Georgina; Crone, Tyler; Dewar, Fleur; Gray, Greg; Kyendikuwa, Allen; Mellin, Julie; Miller, Andrew; Morgan, Felicity; Orza, Luisa; Stevenson, Jacqui; Westerhof, Nienke; Wong, Felicia; Yam, Eileen; Zieman, Brady

    2017-02-01

    Sexual health and access to services are a pressing need for young people. This article introduces Link Up, a 3-year project in three African and two Asian countries, to enable and scale up access to integrated HIV services and sexual and reproductive health and rights for marginalized young people. The young people we worked with in this project included young men who have sex with men, young sex workers, young people who use drugs, young transgender people, young homeless people, and other vulnerable young people. The research and programmatic activities of Link Up, as illustrated in this Supplement, have highlighted the importance of recognizing and engaging with diversity among young people to improve access to services and outcomes protecting their health and human rights. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. What do young people think about their school-based sex and relationship education? A qualitative synthesis of young people's views and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Pandora; Langford, Rebecca; Campbell, Rona

    2016-09-13

    Although sex and relationship education (SRE) represents a key strand in policies to safeguard young people and improve their sexual health, it currently lacks statutory status, government guidance is outdated and a third of UK schools has poor-quality SRE. We aimed to investigate whether current provision meets young people's needs. Synthesis of qualitative studies of young people's views of their school-based SRE. Eligible studies originated from the UK, Ireland, the USA, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Japan, Iran, Brazil and Sweden. Studies of students aged 4-19 in full-time education, young adults ≤19 (not necessarily in full-time education) or adults ≤25 if recalling their experiences of school-based SRE. -69 publications were identified, with 55 remaining after quality appraisal (representing 48 studies). The synthesis found that although sex is a potent and potentially embarrassing topic, schools appear reluctant to acknowledge this and attempt to teach SRE in the same way as other subjects. Young people report feeling vulnerable in SRE, with young men anxious to conceal sexual ignorance and young women risking sexual harassment if they participate. Schools appear to have difficulty accepting that some young people are sexually active, leading to SRE that is out of touch with many young people's lives. Young people report that SRE can be negative, gendered and heterosexist. They expressed dislike of their own teachers delivering SRE due to blurred boundaries, lack of anonymity, embarrassment and poor training. SRE should be 'sex-positive' and delivered by experts who maintain clear boundaries with students. Schools should acknowledge that sex is a special subject with unique challenges, as well as the fact and range of young people's sexual activity, otherwise young people will continue to disengage from SRE and opportunities for safeguarding and improving their sexual health will be reduced. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission

  7. LIKE TURTLES IN THEIR SHELLS?: CIVIC WITHDRAWAL AMONG YOUNG PEOPLE IN DIVERSE SMALL TOWNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Celeste Lay

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Robert Putnam has argued that ethnic diversity is associated with declines in civic engagement because when faced with diversity, a natural reaction is to retreat into oneself. Goals: This paper tests this proposition by looking at adolescents in small towns that have recently undergone “rapid ethnic diversification”. Immigrants and refugees from Latin America and Southeast Asia have migrated to these small, ethnically homogeneous towns. Methods: I utilize a panel study in which adolescents in five small Iowa public high schools were surveyed at the beginning and the end of an academic year. Conclusions: This paper shows very little evidence of a lasting negative effect of ethnic diversity on civic engagement. In the first wave, young people in the diverse towns have lower levels of political knowledge and trust than those in predominantly-White towns, but they also have higher levels of participation in school activities. At the end of the year, these differences have been alleviated.

  8. Face recognition ability matures late: evidence from individual differences in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, Tirta; Germine, Laura; Duchaine, Bradley

    2013-10-01

    Does face recognition ability mature early in childhood (early maturation hypothesis) or does it continue to develop well into adulthood (late maturation hypothesis)? This fundamental issue in face recognition is typically addressed by comparing child and adult participants. However, the interpretation of such studies is complicated by children's inferior test-taking abilities and general cognitive functions. Here we examined the developmental trajectory of face recognition ability in an individual differences study of 18-33 year-olds (n = 2,032), an age interval in which participants are competent test takers with comparable general cognitive functions. We found a positive association between age and face recognition, controlling for nonface visual recognition, verbal memory, sex, and own-race bias. Our study supports the late maturation hypothesis in face recognition, and illustrates how individual differences investigations of young adults can address theoretical issues concerning the development of perceptual and cognitive abilities.

  9. Sex, love and gender norms: sexual life and experience of a group of young people in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa Ngan; Liamputtong, Pranee

    2007-03-01

    This paper discusses the impacts of gender norms on the sexual life and experience of a group of young Vietnamese people. It is based on a qualitative study on sexuality and abortion among young people in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. There were two general attitudes towards premarital sex. One view supported young people in a serious, loving relationship engaging in sex before marriage; the other opposed premarital sex because it affected the reputation of girls and their families. These general attitudes were similar to the views on virginity: one group believed strongly in girls maintaining their virginity and the other group emphasised love, emotion and trust, not virginity, as the most important criteria for marriage. Among women there were more supporters than opponents of the traditional view of premarital sex and virginity. Premarital sex was more acceptable for young people in a serious, loving relationship with certain commitment to marriage. Young men considered sex a way to express their love and to become more intimate. Women's view was that premarital sex only occurred within a serious, loving relationship or when there was a serious commitment to marriage. It is clear that young people's sexual life is shaped and constrained by gender norms through political interventions, sexual education and moral judgements. Under the pressure of these norms, young people face many difficulties in order to fulfill a safe and satisfying sexual life.

  10. Tough decisions faced by people living with HIV: a literature review of psychosocial problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Paulina; Edwards, Adrian; Rollnick, Stephen; Elwyn, Glyn

    2010-01-01

    People living with HIV have faced a new situation since the arrival of the antiretroviral treatments. HIV has become a long-term condition, which not only affects physical health, but also causes psychological and social problems because of stigma and discrimination. These challenges present many decisions and dilemmas for people living with HIV, which involve complex emotional and psychological issues. The aim of this study was to examine the psychosocial decision needs of people living with HIV. To undertake the literature review, a search strategy was designed. Sources included databases (Web of Science, Scopus, ProQuest, and PubMed) as well as electronic journals (AIDS and Behavior, AIDS Care, and Social Science and Medicine). The following search terms were used: (HIV) AND (decision making; OR decision need; OR decision) AND (psychosocial; OR psychological; OR social). All languages were included, using articles from 1990 to 2009. The search was conducted from September 2008 to November 2009, and identified 123 articles. After analysis, 46 articles were included for detailed assessment. The results show that people living with HIV face three key decisions: (i) whether or not to disclose their diagnosis to others; (ii) decisions about adherence to treatments; and (iii) decisions about sexual activity and desires about parenthood. Problems associated with these decisions often result in isolation and mental illness such as depression and anxiety, lack of access to social support, and refusal to seek treatment. Despite the importance of HIV and its public health impact, few studies have considered the psychosocial needs of people living with HIV, but the results demonstrated the burden as a consequence of those needs and that greater support would be of benefit to face them in an effective way. Therefore, the results of this review highlight the requirement to develop interventions to support the psychosocial needs of people living with HIV, to accurately reflect

  11. Young people's burden: requirement of negative CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James; Sato, Makiko; Kharecha, Pushker; von Schuckmann, Karina; Beerling, David J.; Cao, Junji; Marcott, Shaun; Masson-Delmotte, Valerie; Prather, Michael J.; Rohling, Eelco J.; Shakun, Jeremy; Smith, Pete; Lacis, Andrew; Russell, Gary; Ruedy, Reto

    2017-07-01

    Global temperature is a fundamental climate metric highly correlated with sea level, which implies that keeping shorelines near their present location requires keeping global temperature within or close to its preindustrial Holocene range. However, global temperature excluding short-term variability now exceeds +1 °C relative to the 1880-1920 mean and annual 2016 global temperature was almost +1.3 °C. We show that global temperature has risen well out of the Holocene range and Earth is now as warm as it was during the prior (Eemian) interglacial period, when sea level reached 6-9 m higher than today. Further, Earth is out of energy balance with present atmospheric composition, implying that more warming is in the pipeline, and we show that the growth rate of greenhouse gas climate forcing has accelerated markedly in the past decade. The rapidity of ice sheet and sea level response to global temperature is difficult to predict, but is dependent on the magnitude of warming. Targets for limiting global warming thus, at minimum, should aim to avoid leaving global temperature at Eemian or higher levels for centuries. Such targets now require negative emissions, i.e., extraction of CO2 from the air. If phasedown of fossil fuel emissions begins soon, improved agricultural and forestry practices, including reforestation and steps to improve soil fertility and increase its carbon content, may provide much of the necessary CO2 extraction. In that case, the magnitude and duration of global temperature excursion above the natural range of the current interglacial (Holocene) could be limited and irreversible climate impacts could be minimized. In contrast, continued high fossil fuel emissions today place a burden on young people to undertake massive technological CO2 extraction if they are to limit climate change and its consequences. Proposed methods of extraction such as bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) or air capture of CO2 have minimal estimated costs of

  12. Young people's burden: requirement of negative CO2 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hansen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Global temperature is a fundamental climate metric highly correlated with sea level, which implies that keeping shorelines near their present location requires keeping global temperature within or close to its preindustrial Holocene range. However, global temperature excluding short-term variability now exceeds +1 °C relative to the 1880–1920 mean and annual 2016 global temperature was almost +1.3 °C. We show that global temperature has risen well out of the Holocene range and Earth is now as warm as it was during the prior (Eemian interglacial period, when sea level reached 6–9 m higher than today. Further, Earth is out of energy balance with present atmospheric composition, implying that more warming is in the pipeline, and we show that the growth rate of greenhouse gas climate forcing has accelerated markedly in the past decade. The rapidity of ice sheet and sea level response to global temperature is difficult to predict, but is dependent on the magnitude of warming. Targets for limiting global warming thus, at minimum, should aim to avoid leaving global temperature at Eemian or higher levels for centuries. Such targets now require negative emissions, i.e., extraction of CO2 from the air. If phasedown of fossil fuel emissions begins soon, improved agricultural and forestry practices, including reforestation and steps to improve soil fertility and increase its carbon content, may provide much of the necessary CO2 extraction. In that case, the magnitude and duration of global temperature excursion above the natural range of the current interglacial (Holocene could be limited and irreversible climate impacts could be minimized. In contrast, continued high fossil fuel emissions today place a burden on young people to undertake massive technological CO2 extraction if they are to limit climate change and its consequences. Proposed methods of extraction such as bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS or air capture of CO2

  13. The Leisure of Young People in Contemporary Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts, Ken

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how the leisure of young people in Western Europe has changed since the 1950s. It considers the effects of the extension of the youth life stage, the shift into a post-industrial era, and the steep increases in leisure spending that have occurred. The paper considers the ways in which youth cultures have now become milieu where social relationships and divisions are changed rather than reproduced, argues that this is most plausible in relation to gender, for some but not all ethnic divisions, and wholly implausible in relation to social class. It is argued that class differences in childhood leisure socialisation which result in the acquisition of different amounts and types of cultural capital, plus the social relationships formed among social equals, enable class differences to be maintained throughout the youth life stage even though young people on most social class trajectories share much leisure in common.

    Este artículo examina cómo ha cambiado el ocio de los jóvenes en Europa occidental desde los años 50. Considera los efectos de la extensión de la etapa vital de la juventud, el ingreso en una era post-industrial y el notable aumento del gasto en ocio. El artículo explora las maneras en que las culturas juveniles se han convertido ahora en medios donde las relaciones y divisiones sociales son transformadas antes que reproducidas, y argumenta que esto es más plausible en relación al género, para algunas –aunque no todas– las divisiones étnicas, y totalmente implausible en relación a la clase social. Se aduce que las diferencias de clase en la socialización del ocio durante la infancia, que resultan en la adquisición de diferentes cantidades y tipos de capital cultural, junto a las relaciones sociales formadas entre pares sociales, permiten que las diferencias de clase se mantengan a lo largo de la etapa vital de la juventud, incluso aunque los jóvenes en la mayoría de trayectorias de clase

  14. Context-Specific Drinking Risks Among Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckle, Taisia; Gruenewald, Paul; Ponicki, William R

    2016-05-01

    Limited research suggests the context in which drinking occurs may contribute to specific alcohol-related consequences. Therefore the aims are to (i) determine whether the use of drinking contexts affects risks for several drinking consequences among young people in the general population and (ii) assess the degree to which additional risks are associated with greater levels of drinking in those contexts. A New Zealand survey of 16- to 29-year-olds asked about context-specific drinking and incidence of alcohol-related consequences grouped as follows: total, alcohol-related disorderly behavior, symptoms of dependence, effects of heavier drinking, and felt effects the next day. A context-specific dose-response model separated the effects of frequency (i.e., how often someone consumes 1 drink in each context) and context-specific quantity (i.e., the count of each successive drink consumed above the first), and these were estimated as predictors of consequences. Demographic covariates were included. Exposure (number of visits): Increased exposure to drinking at bars/nightclubs, even at a very low level of consumption, that is, 1 drink, was independently related to the experience of greater consequences, including alcohol-related disorderly behavior. Risks for alcohol-related consequences were more strongly related to exposure to bars/nightclubs than they were to heavier drinking in that context. Greater use of private motor vehicles and outdoor public places was also associated with greater consequences (independently of the heavier drinking in these contexts). Quantity: Risk of consequences associated with others' home, restaurants, and own home depended primarily on quantity consumed. Bars/nightclubs are inherently risky contexts for drinking by young people and improved controls are required. Drinking at others' home, private motor vehicles, and outdoor public places were also associated with consequences; prevention efforts increasing the price and reducing the

  15. Perceptions of adolescents and young people regarding endemic dental fluorosis in a rural area of Brazil: psychosocial suffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castilho, Lia Silva; e Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira; Perini, Edson

    2009-11-01

    Severe dental fluorosis is endemic in some rural areas of Brazil. This paper describes the psychosocial consequences of this condition and how it has affected the self-esteem of adolescents and young people in a rural area in Brazil. Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were carried out with 23 adolescents and young people affected by severe dental fluorosis and 14 of their teachers. The study revealed the affected individuals were embarrassed to smile at strangers due to a presumed association between fluorosis and a lack of dental hygiene. Further findings include conflicts between affected and non-affected students at school, problems in pursuing a romantic relationship and uncertainties regarding a professional future. Disbelief and scepticism were observed regarding the ethical position that science can offer a solution to the problems stemming from the disease. Lesions from severe dental fluorosis appear to be a stigmatizing factor and have contributed toward suffering and self-exclusion among an entire generation of adolescents and young people.

  16. Control over social interactions: an important reason for young people's use of the Internet and mobile phones for communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madell, Dominic E; Muncer, Steven J

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports some research that was undertaken to determine why young people choose to use certain communication media, especially the Internet and mobile phones for social purposes. Focus group methodology was employed in achieving this aim. Specifically, two focus groups containing young people aged 18-20 years were asked to discuss the question "why do you use different communication media, such as the Internet and mobile phones, in your social lives?" Discussions from the sessions were recorded on audiotapes, and then transcribed, and analyzed according to the principles of Grounded Theory. A number of categories emerged from the data. The most significant category indicated that young people often liked to use communication media such as the Internet and mobile phones to communicate because these afforded them control over their interactions. In particular, the data seemed to suggest that participants felt that because some communication media such as email, text messaging and instant messaging can be used asynchronously as well as synchronously, they allow one time to stop and think before giving a response if this is desired, or, alternatively, allowed one to retain the conversational nature of interactions if this is preferred. This gave participants greater control over interactions than they would have if, say, communicating via voice calls using the telephone or face-to-face, which are necessarily synchronous.

  17. Physical Restraint in Residential Childcare: The Experiences of Young People and Residential Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckley, Laura; Kendrick, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    There have long been concerns about the use of physical restraint in residential care. This article presents the findings of a qualitative study that explores the experiences of children, young people and residential workers of physical restraint. The research identifies the dilemmas and ambiguities for both staff and young people, and…

  18. Interactive media practices of young people : origins, backgrounds, motives and patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Beemt, A.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Interactive Media Practices of Young People presents empirical studies on students' relations to interactive media, in view of possible consequences for education. From these studies an image arises of diversity regarding young people's interactive media practices. For educators and schools this div

  19. Sexual Violence and Reproductive Health among Young People in Three Communities in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Cynthia Waszak; Wedderburn, Maxine; McCarraher, Donna; Cuthbertson, Carmen; Pottinger, Audrey

    2006-01-01

    A secondary analysis of data collected from 1,130 young people ages 15 to 24 in a population-based household survey to assess the reproductive health needs of young people in three communities in Jamaica was conducted to determine the relationships among three measures of sexual violence, background variables, three measures of sexual risk taking…

  20. "I'm Good, but Not That Good": Digitally-Skilled Young People's Identity in Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Billy

    2017-01-01

    Computers and information technology are fast becoming a part of young people's everyday life. However, there remains a difference between the majority who can use computers and the minority who are computer scientists or professionals. Drawing on 32 semi-structured interviews with digitally skilled young people (aged 13-19), we explore their…

  1. Participation in Home, Extracurricular, and Community Activities among Children and Young People with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlin, Margo N.; Palisano, Robert J.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Kang, Lin-Ju; Polansky, Marcia; Almasri, Nihad; Maggs, Jill

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Participation in home, extracurricular, and community activities is a desired outcome of rehabilitation services for children and young people with cerebral palsy (CP). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of age and gross motor function on participation among children and young people with CP. Method: Five hundred…

  2. School Nurses' Experiences of Managing Young People with Mental Health Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenna, Jean; Cleaver, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Prevalence of mental health disorder is increasing among young people. It is recognized that early intervention is essential in supporting young people, and care provided within schools to support emotional well-being is recommended as part of this process. A scoping review was undertaken examining school nurses' experiences of supporting the…

  3. Acculturation and Religion in Schools: The Views of Young People from Minority Belief Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niens, Ulrike; Mawhinney, Alison; Richardson, Norman; Chiba, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the relationship between religious identity, acculturation strategies and perceptions of acculturation orientation in the school context amongst young people from minority belief backgrounds. Based on a qualitative study including interviews with 26 young people from religious minority belief backgrounds in Northern…

  4. Religious Education in the Experience of Young People from Mixed-Faith Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arweck, Elisabeth; Nesbitt, Eleanor

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of a recent ethnographic study at the University of Warwick of the religious identity formation of young people in "mixed-faith" families, this article focuses on their (and their parents') experiences and perceptions of religious education (RE) and of religious nurture in the community. The young people's experience of RE…

  5. Heterophobia: Subverting Heterosexual Hegemony through Intermedial Applied Performance for Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    This article responds to intermediality through a case study of an intermedial applied performance for young people. "Heterophobia," a hybrid fusion of live performance, digital technology, social media and urban street art, aimed to challenge homophobia in schools and online. Intermediality was used as a tool to enhance young people's…

  6. School Nurses' Experiences of Managing Young People with Mental Health Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenna, Jean; Cleaver, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Prevalence of mental health disorder is increasing among young people. It is recognized that early intervention is essential in supporting young people, and care provided within schools to support emotional well-being is recommended as part of this process. A scoping review was undertaken examining school nurses' experiences of supporting the…

  7. Australian Qualifications Framework Lower-Level Qualifications: Pathways to Where for Young People?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanwick, John

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates where certificate I and II qualifications lead young people aged 15-24 years in terms of employment and further study. A prime motivation for young people undertaking these qualifications is to facilitate transition into the labour market. These qualifications are aimed at developing basic vocational skills or preparatory…

  8. The Global Youth Media Council: Young People Speaking and Learning about Media Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezuanni, Michael Luigi; Miles, Prue

    2011-01-01

    The 5th World Summit on Media for Children and Youth held in Karlstad, Sweden in June 2010 provided a unique media literacy experience for approximately thirty young people from diverse backgrounds through participation in the Global Youth Media Council. This article focuses on the Summit's aim to give young people a "voice" through…

  9. Examining the Conflict and Interconnectedness of Young People's Ideas about Environmental Issues, Responsibility and Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Leigh; Harris, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Young people's environmental views are typically conflicted, with little recognition of the links between environmental issues or between environmental responsibility and action. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether young people's understanding of the environment is in conflict or whether they are forming interconnections…

  10. Constructing Adulthood in Discussions about the Futures of Young People with Moderate-Profound Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Clegg, Jennifer; Almack, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study examines how those planning futures for young people with moderate-profound intellectual disabilities invoke, deploy and interpret contrasting definitions of adulthood and perceived capacity for autonomy and self-determination. Methods: Twenty-eight young people were followed through transition from children: s to adult…

  11. Re-Engaging Young People with Education and Training: What Are the Alternatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kimberley; Stemp, Kellie; McGinty, Sue

    2011-01-01

    Alternative education programs are one way of responding to the disengagement of young people from mainstream schools. While there are a great variety of programs, those where young people experience success have incorporated a number of elements of best practice (Mills & McGregor 2010). This article reviews the attributes of effective…

  12. Young People's Views Regarding Participation in Mental Health and Wellbeing Research through Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monks, Helen; Cardoso, Patricia; Papageorgiou, Alana; Carolan, Catherine; Costello, Leesa; Thomas, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Social media is a central component in the lives of many young people, and provides innovative potential to conduct research among this population. Ethical issues around online research have been subject to much debate, yet young people have seldom been consulted to provide a youth perspective and voice. Eight (8) focus groups involving 48 Grade 9…

  13. What Works for Disconnected Young People: A Scan of the Evidence. MDRC Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treskon, Louisa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to conduct a scan of the current state of the evidence regarding what works in helping disconnected young people, defined as the population of young people ages 16 to 24 who are not connected to work or school. The following four main research questions were investigated: (1) What local, state, and federal policies…

  14. Memory complaints are frequent but qualitatively different in young and elderly healthy people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginó, S.; Mendes, T.; Maroco, J.; Ribeiro, F.; Schmand, B.A.; de Mendonca, A.; Guerreiro, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Subjective memory complaints are frequently reported by the elderly. There is less information about the characterization of subjective memory complaints in young people. Objective: To determine different memory complaints between young and elderly people with the use of the Subjective M

  15. Transitions to Long-Term Unemployment Risk among Young People: Evidence from Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Elish; McGuinness, Seamus; O'Connell, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Many young people have short spells of unemployment during their transition from school to work; however, some often get trapped in unemployment and risk becoming long-term unemployed. Much research has been undertaken on the factors that influence unemployment risk for young people during their school-to-work transition. However, very little is…

  16. From Individual Heroism to Political Resistance: Young People Challenging Everyday Racism on the Labour Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathzel, Nora

    2006-01-01

    The labour market in Sweden today does not offer a rosy picture for young people. Among them are youth with a migrant background that have the lowest chance of becoming employed. The table below shows the unemployment rates of young people with a migrant background. (Contains 1 table, 1 figure and 11 notes.)

  17. Studying Young People's New Media Use: Methodological Shifts and Educational Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    A lack of good information about what youth are doing with new media stimulates fears and hopes about the relationship between young people and digital technologies. This article focuses on new modes of inquiry into youth new media use, highlighting the challenges, complexities, and opportunities inherent in studying young people's digital…

  18. Beyond the Classroom: The Inclusion of Young People with Learning Disabilities in UK Mainstream Counselling Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Sue

    2006-01-01

    Counselling is increasingly seen as a way of addressing the psychological needs of young people with emotional, behavioural and academic problems. This paper explores the existing counselling landscape regarding inclusion of young people with learning disabilities in counselling. The research findings are based on data collected from an empirical…

  19. We Can Dream! Ways of Planning for the Future for Young People with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jill; Burke, Christine; Mattingly, Molly

    2009-01-01

    This booklet is for young people and their families, friends and supporters to read and talk about together. It is based on the stories of four young people. Big changes happened for some of them; others are still waiting for things to change. The goal of the booklet is to give students ideas about how they may want to plan or change things when…

  20. School-Family Relationships, School Satisfaction and the Academic Achievement of Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampden-Thompson, Gillian; Galindo, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Families' perceptions of, and interactions with, schools and teachers can play an essential role in young people's educational outcomes. According to Bronfenbrenner's ecological systems theory, young people grow within multiple nested systems of influence interacting with each other. Thus, their development is affected by persons, processes, and…

  1. Examining the Conflict and Interconnectedness of Young People's Ideas about Environmental Issues, Responsibility and Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Leigh; Harris, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Young people's environmental views are typically conflicted, with little recognition of the links between environmental issues or between environmental responsibility and action. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether young people's understanding of the environment is in conflict or whether they are forming interconnections…

  2. Young People's Conversations about Environmental and Sustainability Issues in Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Erik; Öhman, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Young people's conversations about environmental and sustainability issues in social media and their educational implications are under-researched. Understanding young people's meaning-making in social media and the experiences they acquire could help teachers to stage pluralistic and participatory approaches to classroom discussions about the…

  3. Transitions to Long-Term Unemployment Risk among Young People: Evidence from Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Elish; McGuinness, Seamus; O'Connell, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Many young people have short spells of unemployment during their transition from school to work; however, some often get trapped in unemployment and risk becoming long-term unemployed. Much research has been undertaken on the factors that influence unemployment risk for young people during their school-to-work transition. However, very little is…

  4. The Real Cost of Linking Homeless Young People to Employment, Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Robyn

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the implementation of the Victorian Youth Employment, Education and Training Initiative (YEETI). This statewide initiative delivered brokerage funds to homeless young people through their housing advocates. One of the findings of the project was that the main barrier to young people achieving a stable continuum in their lives…

  5. Perspectives on HIV/AIDS Stigma and Discrimination: Voices of Some Young People in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduro, Georgina Yaa; Otsin, Mercy

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines Ghanaian young people's perceptions of the determinants of HIV- and AIDS-related stigma and discrimination, and how these perceptions may influence the de-stigmatisation process. Drawing on findings from an in-depth, multi-method qualitative study involving 104 school and street young people aged between 14 and 19 years, the…

  6. Acculturation and Religion in Schools: The Views of Young People from Minority Belief Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niens, Ulrike; Mawhinney, Alison; Richardson, Norman; Chiba, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the relationship between religious identity, acculturation strategies and perceptions of acculturation orientation in the school context amongst young people from minority belief backgrounds. Based on a qualitative study including interviews with 26 young people from religious minority belief backgrounds in Northern…

  7. Pain in young people aged 13 to 17 years with cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parkinson, Kathryn N; Dickinson, Heather O; Arnaud, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and associations of self- and parent-reported pain in young people with cerebral palsy (CP).......To determine the prevalence and associations of self- and parent-reported pain in young people with cerebral palsy (CP)....

  8. Can Positive Faith-Based Encounters Influence Australian Young People's Drinking Behaviours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Alison; Whitehead, Dean; Ullah, Shahid

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Alcohol-related accidents and injuries occur disproportionately within young people--especially when gathering at social events. This study represents a partnership between a faith-based group of volunteers specifically trained to counsel and support young people to reduce their risk of alcohol-related harm, Adelaide City Council, and the…

  9. The Turning Tides of Intoxication: Young People's Drinking in Britain in the 2000s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measham, Fiona

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of recent changes in young people's consumption of alcohol in Britain before then charting emerging academic perspectives and some of the recent regulatory and legislative changes. Design/methodology/approach: The approach takes the form of a selective narrative review of young people's…

  10. Navigating the field of housing: housing pathways of young people in Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hochstenbach, C.; Boterman, W.R.

    2015-01-01

    In many western cities, housing opportunities of young people are increasingly constrained due to housing market reforms and decreasing affordability as a result of processes of gentrification. Little is known about how young people deal with these constraints and how this differs across class and

  11. Individualisation and Social Exclusion: The Case of Young People Not in Education, Employment or Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ron

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics, experiences and long-term prospects of young people outside the labour market and education have attracted widespread international attention in recent decades, and the specific category of young people not in education, employment or training (NEET) has been a policy concern for the UK Government since 1997. This paper…

  12. Exploring Transitions with Disabled Young People: Our Experiences, Our Rights and Our Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rome, Aidan; Hardy, Jessica; Richardson, Jamie; Shenton, Felicity

    2015-01-01

    At the beginning of the 2000s there was little evidence of outcomes from the participation of disabled children and young people in decision-making within public services. In the 15 years that have followed, advances have been made in participatory research and in outcome-led research. This paper, written with young people, will present evidence…

  13. The Analysis of Young People's Experiences of Domestic Violence: Spiritual and Emotional Journeys through Suffering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Sue M.

    2009-01-01

    The hermeneutical analysis of the stories of young people who have experienced domestic violence is described as multi-layered having been developed from a voice centred relational methodology. The purpose was to uncover the complexity of lived experience. As the analysis proceeded, the young people's voices emerged as "feeling" voices,…

  14. Children and Young People's Views on Web 2.0 Technologies. LGA Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Peter; Walker, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies are online tools that allow users to share, collaborate and interact with one another. This small-scale project focused on young people's personal use of social media, and on the potential to use these tools to collect the views of young people and involve them in democracy in communities and local authorities. The main…

  15. Being Judged, Being Assessed: Young People's Perspective of Assessment in Youth Justice and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Katie; France, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Research from the Economic and Social Research Council programme on Pathways Into and Out of Crime prioritised young people's "voices" in exploring experiences of crime and a range of intervention services. Drawing on data from interviews with 110 young people, this paper explores their perspectives of professional assessment. Embedded…

  16. Children's and Young People's Reading in 2012: Findings from the 2012 National Literacy Trust's Annual Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This report reveals that children and young people are reading less and more are embarrassed to be seen reading, while many also believe that their parents don't care if they spend time reading. However, not only are children and young people reading less and developing more negative attitudes towards reading, but there is also a clear correlation…

  17. The Dynamics of the Aspirations and Demands of Different Generations of Russia's Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khotkina, Z. A.

    2013-01-01

    Survey data comparing the life aspirations of three generations of Russians show an increase from the level of the Soviet generation of young people to the perestroika generation, followed by a decline in the generation of young people who were born and grew up in today's "market" Russia. One chief cause of the downward dynamic of their…

  18. Young People and School General Certificate of Secondary Education Attainment: Looking for the "Missing Middle"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayle, Vernon; Murray, Susan; Connelly, Roxanne

    2016-01-01

    In Britain, educational qualifications gained at school continue to play an important and central role in young people's educational and employment pathways. Recently there has been growing interest in documenting the lives of "ordinary" young people. In this paper we analyse the Youth Cohort Study of England and Wales in order to better…

  19. Gender, Age, Attendance at a Place of Worship and Young People's Attitudes towards the Bible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freathy, R. J. K.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the outcomes of a questionnaire survey which sought to ascertain the attitudes of young people towards the Bible. One thousand and sixty-six pupils from Years 6, 9 and 12 in nine English schools participated. The young people's attitudes are discussed in relation to gender, age and attendance at a place of worship. The…

  20. Young People and the Environment in Australia: Beliefs, Knowledge, Commitment and Educational Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Sharon; Fien, John; Sykes, Helen; Yencken, David

    2014-01-01

    There is a paucity of research in Australia on the nature of young people's attitudes, knowledge and actions. This paper reports on the findings from one such study of Australian high school students. The research was based on a survey of 5,688 students form Melbourne and Brisbane. These young people identified protection of the environment as the…

  1. Dismissing Disaffection: Young People's Attitudes towards Education, Employment and Participation in a Deprived Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendrick, John; Scott, Gill; Sinclair, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    This article examines whether young people in a deprived area are disaffected with education, training and employment, or disengaged from participation in their community. It draws upon evidence from the Drumchapel Aspirations Survey, a study of the attitudes, aspirations and skills of young people from one of the most deprived areas of Glasgow.…

  2. Young People in Croatia in Times of Crisis and Some Remarks about Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrnjaus, Kornelija; Vrcelj, Sofija; Zlokovic, Jasminka

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors address the youth as a research phenomenon and present the current position of young people in the Croatian society. The authors exhibit interesting results of a recent study of youth in Croatia and present the results of their research conducted among Croatian students aiming to explore the attitudes of young people and…

  3. Help-Seeking for Suicidal Thoughts and Self-Harm in Young People: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelmore, Lisa; Hindley, Peter

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that only a minority of young people experiencing suicidal thoughts or self-harm present to any health services. This is of concern given that young people with suicidal thoughts or self-harm often require treatment for mental illness as well as to reduce their risk of completed suicide. We reviewed…

  4. Subjective Well-Being among Young People in Transition to Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzcinski, Eileen; Holst, Elke

    2008-01-01

    This study used a nationally representative sample of young people in Germany from the German Socio-Economic Panel to examine how demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the young persons and their parents, personality traits of the young persons, quality and quantity of relationships, the parent's level of life satisfaction, and other…

  5. FACTORS AFFECTING CITY DESTINATION CHOICE AMONG YOUNG PEOPLE IN SERBIA

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    Nemanja Tomić

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study is to explore factors which influence city destination choice among young people in Serbia. In order to achieve this we conducted a survey consisting of 20 different items influencing the choice of city destination. Afterwards the principal component exploratory factor analysis (EFA was carried out in order to extract factors. T-test and ANOVA test were also used to determine if there is a difference between different gender and age groups in terms of which factors influence their choice of a city destination. The results indicate four motivating factors extracted by factor analysis, from which Good hospitality and restaurant service seems to be the major motivating factor. The results also show that respondents belonging to the age group of under 25 give more importance to Information and promotion as well as to Good hospitality and restaurant service than those belonging to older age groups. The same two factors are also more important to females than males.

  6. Development of Young Peoples Abilities in Learning to Play Percussion Instruments

    OpenAIRE

    Gžibovskis, Tālis

    2009-01-01

    ANNOTATION Tālis Gžibovskis' doctoral thesis "Development of Young People's Abilities in Learning to Play Percussion Instruments" in the area of music pedagogy has been worked out in the University of Latvia, Faculty of Pedagogy and Psychology, Department of Pedagogy during the period 2004-2008. Research object: the process of learning to play percussion instruments. Research subject: development of young people's abilities. Research objective: to study and test the development of young...

  7. Transactional sex and HIV risks – evidence from a cross-sectional national survey among young people in Uganda

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    Vikas Choudhry

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transactional sex is associated with the HIV epidemic among young people in Uganda. Few quantitative studies based on nationally representative survey data explored the relationship between sexual behaviors, HIV infection, and transactional sex. Objective: This study aimed to determine the associations between risky sexual behaviors, participation in transactional sex, and HIV sero-status among men and women aged 15–24 in Uganda. Design: The study uses data from the Uganda AIDS Indicator Survey, a cross-sectional national HIV serological study conducted in 2011. We analyzed data on 1,516 men and 2,824 women aged 15–24 who had been sexually active in the 12 months preceding the survey. Private, face-to-face interviews were also conducted to record the sociodemographics, sexual history, and experiences of sexual coercion. Logistic regression analysis was performed to measure associations between sexual behaviors and transactional sex, and associations between HIV sero-status and transactional sex. Results: Among young people who had been sexually active in the 12 months prior to the survey, 5.2% of young men reported paying for sex while 3.7% of young women reported receiving gifts, favors, or money for sex. Lower educational attainment (ORadjusted 3.25, CI 1.10–9.60 and experience of sexual coercion (ORadjusted 2.83, CI 1.07–7.47 were significantly associated with paying for sex among men. Multiple concurrent sexual relationships were significantly associated with paying for sex among young men (ORadjusted 5.60, CI 2.08–14.95 and receiving something for sex among young women (ORadjusted 8.04, CI 2.55–25.37. Paying for sex among young men and having three to five lifetime sexual partners among young women were associated with increased odds of testing positive for HIV. Conclusions: Transactional sex is associated with sexual coercion and HIV risk behaviors such as multiple concurrent sexual partnerships among young people

  8. Transactional sex and HIV risks - evidence from a cross-sectional national survey among young people in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, Vikas; Ambresin, Anne-Emmanuelle; Nyakato, Viola Nilah; Agardh, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Transactional sex is associated with the HIV epidemic among young people in Uganda. Few quantitative studies based on nationally representative survey data explored the relationship between sexual behaviors, HIV infection, and transactional sex. This study aimed to determine the associations between risky sexual behaviors, participation in transactional sex, and HIV sero-status among men and women aged 15-24 in Uganda. The study uses data from the Uganda AIDS Indicator Survey, a cross-sectional national HIV serological study conducted in 2011. We analyzed data on 1,516 men and 2,824 women aged 15-24 who had been sexually active in the 12 months preceding the survey. Private, face-to-face interviews were also conducted to record the sociodemographics, sexual history, and experiences of sexual coercion. Logistic regression analysis was performed to measure associations between sexual behaviors and transactional sex, and associations between HIV sero-status and transactional sex. Among young people who had been sexually active in the 12 months prior to the survey, 5.2% of young men reported paying for sex while 3.7% of young women reported receiving gifts, favors, or money for sex. Lower educational attainment (ORadjusted 3.25, CI 1.10-9.60) and experience of sexual coercion (ORadjusted 2.83, CI 1.07-7.47) were significantly associated with paying for sex among men. Multiple concurrent sexual relationships were significantly associated with paying for sex among young men (ORadjusted 5.60, CI 2.08-14.95) and receiving something for sex among young women (ORadjusted 8.04, CI 2.55-25.37). Paying for sex among young men and having three to five lifetime sexual partners among young women were associated with increased odds of testing positive for HIV. Transactional sex is associated with sexual coercion and HIV risk behaviors such as multiple concurrent sexual partnerships among young people in Uganda. In addition, transactional sex appears to place young men at increased

  9. “Disabled People Are Sexual Citizens Too”: Supporting Sexual Identity, Well-being, and Safety for Disabled Young People

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    Sonali Shah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Disabled young people are sexual beings, and deserve equal rights and opportunities to have control over, choices about, and access to their sexuality, sexual expression, and fulfilling relationships throughout their lives. This is critical to their overall physical, emotional, and social health and well-being. However, societal misconceptions of disabled bodies being non-normative, other, or deviant has somewhat shaped how the sexuality of disabled people has been constructed as problematic under the public gaze. The pervasive belief that disabled people are asexual creates barriers to sexual citizenship for disabled young people, thereby causing them to have lower levels of sexual knowledge and inadequate sex education compared to their non-disabled peers. As a consequence, they are more vulnerable to “bad sex”—relationships, which are considered to be exploitative and disempowering in different ways. Access to good sex and relationships education for disabled young people is, therefore, not only important for them to learn about sexual rights, sexual identity, and sexual expression but also about how to ensure their sexual safety. In so doing, it will contribute to the empowerment and societal recognition of disabled people as sexual beings, and also help them resist and report sexual violence. Therefore, it is critical that parents, educationalists, and health and social care professionals are aware and appropriately equipped with knowledge and resources to formally educate disabled young people about sexuality and well-being on par to their non-disabled peers.

  10. Persistent high fertility in Uganda: young people recount obstacles and enabling factors to use of contraceptives

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    Nalwadda Gorrette

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High fertility among young people aged 15-24 years is a public health concern in Uganda. Unwanted pregnancy, unsafe induced abortions and associated high morbidity and mortality among young women may be attributed to low contraceptive use. This study aims at exploring reasons for low contraceptive use among young people. Methods In 16 focus group discussions, the views of young people about obstacles and enabling factors to contraceptive use in Mityana and Mubende districts, Uganda were explored. The groups were homogeneously composed by married and unmarried men and women, between the ages of 15-24. The data obtained was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results Young men and women described multiple obstacles to contraceptive use. The obstacles were categorized as misconceptions and fears related to contraception, gender power relations, socio-cultural expectations and contradictions, short term planning, and health service barriers. Additionally, young people recounted several enabling factors that included female strategies to overcome obstacles, changing perceptions to contraceptive use, and changing attitude towards a small family size. Conclusions Our findings suggest changing perceptions and behavior shift towards contraceptive use and a small family size although obstacles still exist. Personalized strategies to young women and men are needed to motivate and assist young people plan their future families, adopt and sustain use of contraceptives. Reducing obstacles and reinforcing enabling factors through education, culturally sensitive behavior change strategies have the potential to enhance contraceptives use. Alternative models of contraceptive service delivery to young people are proposed.

  11. Insights into the processes of suicide contagion: Narratives from young people bereaved by suicide

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Jo; Stanley, Nicky; Mallon, Sharon; Manthorpe, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Death by suicide can have a profound and long lasting impact on the people left behind. Research has demonstrated that, in comparison to the general population, those bereaved by suicide, particularly young people, are at increased risk for suicide. However, the process of suicide contagion, as it has now become widely known, is poorly understood. This paper examines the phenomenon of suicide contagion amongst young people who have been bereaved by suicide with data from research...

  12. What young people want from health-related online resources: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergie, Gillian; Hunt, Kate; Hilton, Shona

    2013-08-01

    The growth of the Internet as an information source about health, particularly amongst young people, is well established. The aim of this study was to explore young people's perceptions and experiences of engaging with health-related online content, particularly through social media websites. Between February and July 2011 nine focus groups were facilitated across Scotland with young people aged between 14 and 18 years. Health-related user-generated content seems to be appreciated by young people as a useful, if not always trustworthy, source of accounts of other people's experiences. The reliability and quality of both user-generated content and official factual content about health appear to be concerns for young people, and they employ specialised strategies for negotiating both areas of the online environment. Young people's engagement with health online is a dynamic area for research. Their perceptions and experiences of health-related content seem based on their wider familiarity with the online environment and, as the online environment develops, so too do young people's strategies and conventions for accessing it.

  13. Mass media interventions for preventing smoking in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Kristin V; Ameer, Faisal; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Hnin, Khin; van Agteren, Joseph Em; Sayehmiri, Fatemeh; Brinn, Malcolm P; Esterman, Adrian J; Chang, Anne B; Smith, Brian J

    2017-06-02

    Mass media interventions can be used as a way of delivering preventive health messages. They have the potential to reach and modify the knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of a large proportion of the community. To assess the effects of mass media interventions on preventing smoking in young people, and whether it can reduce smoking uptake among youth (under 25 years), improve smoking attitudes, intentions and knowledge, improve self-efficacy/self-esteem, and improve perceptions about smoking, including the choice to follow positive role models. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register, with additional searches of MEDLINE and Embase in June 2016. This is an update of a review first published in 1998. Randomized trials, controlled trials without randomization and interrupted time-series studies that assessed the effect of mass media campaigns (defined as channels of communication such as television, radio, newspapers, social media, billboards, posters, leaflets or booklets intended to reach large numbers of people and which are not dependent on person-to-person contact) in influencing the smoking behaviour (either objective or self-reported) of young people under the age of 25 years. We define smoking behaviour as the presence or absence of tobacco smoking or other tobacco use, or both, and the frequency of tobacco use. Eligible comparators included education or no intervention. Two review authors independently extracted information relating to the characteristics and the content of media interventions, participants, outcomes, methods of the study and risks of bias. We combined studies using qualitative narrative synthesis. We assessed the risks of bias for each study using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool, alongside additional domains to account for the nature of the intervention. We assessed the quality of evidence contributing to outcomes using GRADE. We identified eight eligible studies reporting information about mass media smoking

  14. MARKETING AND INNOVATION: YOUNG PEOPLE'S ATTITUDE TOWARDS NEW PRODUCTS

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    Onisor Lucian-Florin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the perceptions of young students, who are training in the field of economics, to the very new products and outlines the role that marketing plays in bringing to market products based on innovative technologies. The study is conducted in Romania and tries to highlight Romanian specific features about the relationship between marketing and innovation. The goal is to outline in a clear and actual image of young people thoughts about new technologies insertion on the market. The pursued objectives are: motivation investigation of option for new products; determining predisposition to the radical or incremental innovations, assessing perceptions of the link between marketing and innovation. Research have been made in this field on various areas of activity. At the level of the European Community there are several organizations which activate in the field of innovation research. Eurobarometer through its subdivision Innobarometer brings in the attention of the public on a regular basis, through a series of publications, the results of researches undertaken from the business perspective, and are concerning all areas of action. Research aims to identify the impact that new technologies have on the consumers most open to innovation. This exploratory research is based on a direct gathering of information, using an online questionnaire. Data are processed using SPSS software package, and the results show the type and nature of links between variables to be examined by applying bivariate and multivariate correlation tests. Analysis report provides descriptive, easy to follow, for all the situations covered and investigated in the questionnaire. The results show a clear output of the relationship between compromises that those open to using new technologies are making to obtain superior advantages from the newest products on the market. Research carried out by the author being the first one in this area, only manages to outline the

  15. Sense of coherence in young people with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apers, Silke; Luyckx, Koen; Goossens, Eva; Rassart, Jessica; Budts, Werner; Moons, Philip

    2015-05-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have been found to play a role in the development of clinical complications. Hence, it is crucial to understand why some patients do well in terms of PROs and others do not and to identify these groups of patients. Sense of coherence (SOC), capturing a person's outlook on life, is associated with PROs in adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, we (1) examine how SOC develops in young people with CHD, (2) identify subgroups of SOC development, and (3) characterize subgroups in terms of demographic and clinical variables and PROs. In this 4-wave longitudinal study, 429 adolescents with CHD (53.4% boys; median age = 16.3 years) completed assessments of SOC (SOC-13). PROs included quality of life (linear analog scale), loneliness (UCLA-8), depression (CES-D), and perceived health (PedsQL). Latent class growth analysis was used to identify clinically meaningful subgroups of SOC development. Patients with CHD had a moderate SOC that slightly decreased over the first 18 months. Four subgroups of SOC development emerged: Consistently High (27%), Intermediate Stable (41%), Intermediate Decreasing (25%), and Chronically Low (7%). Subgroups differed in terms of sex and PROs, but not in terms of age, disease complexity, primary diagnosis, or surgical history. Patients with a strong and stable SOC over time showed a better adaptation than patients with a lower and/or decreasing SOC. Our results can guide the identification of patients at risk for adverse health outcomes and the development of interventions to enhance optimal living in patients with CHD.

  16. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN FREE TIME OF YOUNG PEOPLE IN MONTENEGRO

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    Nela Tatar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The creation of positive attitudes and opinions of students toward physical education is one of the tasks of enduring value and should be achieved through teaching in physical education. Achievement of this objective is achieved by the enduring value and attitude to deal with the activities in the field of physical education. Given the importance of physical education as a subject or a part of education in the upbringing of the younger generation, cannot but emphasize its importance and impact on the ability of proper awareness of health, physical, mental and functional abilities, and even influence the formation of attitudes and interests of physical Education.The aim of this study is to determine whether there is an awareness of the importance of the school population movement and physical activity, you practice sports or recreational activities in their spare time or amount of exercise they meet in class, and if there is and how much interest to add additional hours of physical education in the form of compulsory or optional. Also how young people of different regions involved in sports and that, and that is to evaluate what their perception is sports.Data on data obtained during field research. The questionnaire consisted of three parts. The first part included demographic characteristics of the patients, other sports and physical activities, and the third part which relates to the subjective assessment of students on the importance of physical activity and the equipment room for the same. It is important to note that the data processing is done in such a summary and sex, municipality, region... As such; the data give us the possibility of regional and other comparisons ninth grade students in Montenegro.

  17. The Internet and Video Games: Causes of Increased Aggressiveness Among Young People

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    Nataša Ružić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The increase in youth violence is among the most serious problems facing modern society. Many experts adhere to the opinion that responsibility for this phenomenon is borne by families, schools, and the media. The so-called digital generation spends much of its free time on the Internet and accepts the values imposed by the media. The modern criterion of success is to reach glory by any means necessary. As such, it is understandable that young people, eager for publicity, look for creative ways to attract attention. One of the most expedient ways to achieve fame and prove their ‘originality’ is by posting videos of violent behavior on websites like YouTube. The Internet has brought limitless freedom in the exposure of inappropriate content and has thus contributed to an increase in violence among the young, primarily through the video games industry. Based on all the above, we argue that the Internet has spurred and intensified the development of cyberbullying.

  18. Young people who are being bullied - do they want general practice support?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Emma; Dale, Jeremy; Russell, Rachel; Wolke, Dieter

    2016-08-22

    Childhood bullying is a major risk factor for health, education and social relationships, with effects persisting into adulthood. It affects half of all children at some point, with 10-14 % experiencing bullying that lasts for years. With the advent of cyberbullying, it can happen at all times and places. There have been calls for GPs to take a more active role in identifying and supporting young people who are being bullied. This paper explores young people's and parents' opinions about whether general practice should be involved in identifying and supporting young people who are being bullied. Two hundred six young people (85.9 % female, mean ± sd age 16.2 ± 3.2 years) and 44 parents were recruited through established bullying charity websites and their social media channels to complete an online questionnaire comprising multiple-choice questions and unlimited narrative responses. Questionnaire responses were analysed by age and gender using descriptive statistics. A descriptive analysis of the narrative responses was undertaken and key themes identified. Young people (90.8 %) and parents (88.7 %) thought it was important for GPs to be better able to recognise and help young people who are being bullied. Most recognised the link between bullying and health. The doctor's independence was seen as advantageous. Young people preferred completing a screening questionnaire to disclose experience of being bullied than being asked directly. They expressed concerns about how questions would be asked and whether information would be shared with parents/guardians. Parents were supportive of the use of a screening questionnaire, and most expected their child's disclosure to be shared with them. Young people and parents recruited through anti-bullying websites and social media would welcome greater GP involvement in identifying and supporting young people who are being bullied and their families, provided it is offered in a caring, compassionate and

  19. People's behaviour in the face of volcanic hazards: Perspectives from Javanese communities, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Franck; De Coster, Benjamin; Juvin, Nancy; Flohic, François; Gaillard, Jean-Christophe; Texier, Pauline; Morin, Julie; Sartohadi, Junun

    2008-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the way in which the Indonesian people living on the slopes or near active volcanoes behave in the face of volcanic threats. It explores the role of three factors in the shaping of this behaviour, e.g. risk perception, cultural beliefs and socio-economic constraints. The paper is mainly based on field data collected during the last 5 years on four volcanoes in Central Java, namely Sumbing, Sindoro, Dieng, and Merapi. The common assumption that hazard knowledge, risk perception and people's behaviour are closely related and conditional on volcanic activity is debatable in the Indonesian context. Factors that play a role in hazard knowledge—e.g. basic knowledge of volcanic processes, personal experience of volcanic crisis, time lapsed since the last volcanic eruption, etc.—differ from those that influence risk perception. Indeed, local people often underestimate the scientifically or statistically estimated risk. This poor risk perception is characterized by an approximate personal representation of the volcanic processes, an excess of trust in concrete countermeasures, the presence of a physical-visual obstructions, or cultural beliefs related to former eruptions. In addition, the commonly-acknowledged factors that influence hazard knowledge and/or risk perception may be at odds with the non hazard-related factors that prompt or force people to live in or to exploit areas at risk. These factors may be either socio-cultural—e.g., attachment to place, cultural beliefs, etc.—or social and socio-economical —e.g., standard of living, strength of people's livelihoods, well-being. These factors are fundamental in explaining the short-term behaviour in the face of a developing threat during a volcanic crisis.

  20. Accessing stored knowledge of familiar people from faces, names and voices: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, John Richard

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings from neuropsychology and experimental psychology appear incompatible with the claim that feelings of familiarity about known people require activation of amodal person identity nodes. Evidence suggests that there are modality-specific effects after the point at which faces, names and voices have been found familiar. It therefore appears that activation of distinct modality-specific face, name and voice processing systems can signal that a known person is familiar. There is no convincing evidence, however, of modular effects on the way that information about familiar people is represented in semantic memory. Instead, semantic information about people appears to be stored separately from other forms of knowledge such as knowledge of objects. Anatomical evidence suggests that amodal person-specific semantic knowledge is stored in the right anterior temporal lobe where it has close connections with modality specific recognition systems. Failures to retrieve names in proper name anomia may be caused by impairments to the links between semantic knowledge in the right anterior temporal lobe and lexical representations in the left temporal pole.

  1. THE ROLE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN THE EFFECTIVENESS INCREASING OF SOCIAL WORK WITH YOUNG PEOPLE

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    Elena V. Lyapuncova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncovers the need to develop new approachesto social work with young people through theuse of modern information technologies.Find the actual material, confirming the relevance of the research topic. Recommendations concerning the expansion of the contentof social orientation in the Internet, use of social networking technologies and computergames in order to form a high moral and Patriotic foundations of Russian society, attracting young people to social work, to assist them inaddressing a wide range of problems.Also provides guidance on the youth socialtourism development as a highly effective and popular with young people method of socialwork.

  2. Where next with theory and research on how the school environment influences young people's substance use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonell, Chris; Fletcher, Adam; Jamal, Farah; Aveyard, Paul; Markham, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Substance use (smoking, drinking and illicit drug use) remains, a serious problem for young people living in industrialised countries. There is increasing interest in interventions to modify the school, environment, addressing the multiple upstream determinants of young, people's health. This article provides an overview of current theory, about how secondary school environments influence young people's, substance use before focusing on the Theory of Human Functioning and, School Organisation. It critically examines the extent to which this, theory is substantiated by quantitative and qualitative evidence and, considers how the theory might be elaborated to better inform future, empirical research.

  3. School-Based Service-Learning for Promoting Citizenship in Young People: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-06

    School-Based Service-Learning for Promoting Citizenship in Young People : A Systematic Review By Kathleen A. Dildy September 6th, 2005...for Promoting Citizenship in Young People : A Systematic Review 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...Approaches to Promoting Citizenship in Young People …………………...…….............7 School-Based Service-Learning…..…………………………………………………….10 Citizenship as an

  4. Holistic face perception in young and older adults: effects of feedback and attentional demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt-Injac, Bozana; Persike, Malte; Meinhardt, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Evidence exists for age-related decline in face cognition ability. However, the extents to which attentional demand and flexibility to adapt viewing strategies contribute to age-related decline in face cognition tests is poorly understood. Here, we studied holistic face perception in older (age range 65-78 years, mean age 69.9) and young adults (age range 20-32 years, mean age 23.1) using the complete design for a sequential study-test composite face task (Richler et al., 2008b). Attentional demand was varied using trials that required participants to attend to both face halves and to redirect attention to one face half during the test (high attentional demand), and trials that allowed participants to keep a pre-adjusted focus (low attentional demand). We also varied viewing time and provided trial-by-trial feedback or no feedback. We observed strong composite effects, which were larger for the elderly in all conditions, independent of viewing time. Composite effects were smaller for low attentional demand, and larger for high attentional demand. No age-related differences were found in this respect. Feedback also reduced the composite effects in both age groups. Young adults could benefit from feedback in conditions with low and high attentional demands. Older adults performed better with feedback only in trials with low attentional demand. When attentional demand was high, older adults could no longer use the feedback signal, and performed worse with feedback than without. These findings suggest that older adults tend to use a global focus for faces, albeit piecemeal analysis is required for the task, and have difficulties adapting their viewing strategies when task demands are high. These results are consistent with the idea that elderly rely more on holistic strategies as a means to reduce perceptual and cognitive load when processing resources are limited (Konar et al., 2013).

  5. "They Have Opened Our Mouths": Increasing Women's Skills and Motivation for Sexual Communication with Young People in Rural South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phetla, Godfrey; Busza, Joanna; Hargreaves, James R.; Pronyk, Paul M.; Kim, Julia C.; Morison, Linda A.; Watts, Charlotte; Porter, John D. H.

    2008-01-01

    Communication between parents and young people about sex has been identified as a positive influence on young people's sexual behavior. This article presents findings from South Africa, where a social intervention to reduce levels of HIV and intimate partner violence actively promoted sexual communication between adults and young people. We…

  6. What Can Be Learned from the Roller Coaster Journeys of Young People Making Ultimately Successful Transitions beyond School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Jennifer; Anderson, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    This project investigated the interrelationships between family expectations and young people's post-school plans. All of the participants were from financially disadvantaged families. The research used interviews to understand these young people's perspectives of their transition experiences: the ways in which young people's school experiences…

  7. Young People's Participation in the Development of a Self-Care Intervention--A Multi-Site Formative Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kime, Nicola; McKenna, Jim; Webster, Liz

    2013-01-01

    The poor outcomes of young people with chronic health conditions indicate that current services and self-care programmes are not meeting the needs of young people. How young people self-manage their condition impacts on long-term health outcomes, but there is little published evidence that details the development of self-care programmes and their…

  8. "Religious Parents... Just Want the Best for Their Kids": Young People's Perspectives on the Influence of Religious Beliefs on Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Janet; Horwath, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Challenging some of the current predominantly negative representations of the effects of religion on young people requires further research into faith and family life, particularly from the perspective of young people themselves. This article presents a preliminary report of a study of 40 young people, mostly Christians and Muslims, aged 13-15…

  9. Young People and E-Safety: The Results of the 2015 London Grid for Learning E-Safety Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wespieser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This report looks at the online activities of London's young people. The report highlights that children and young people use technology to have fun, study and communicate with others. Most children and young people have positive experiences online. On the whole they are sensible online and do not put themselves "at risk". However, the…

  10. How They Got It and How They Wanted It: Marginalised Young People's Perspective on Their Experiences of Sexual Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Graham; Sorenson, Anne; Hildebrand, Janina

    2012-01-01

    Young people in Australia are at greatest risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections, and priority actions are necessary for this population group. This study of marginalised and at-risk young people in out-of-school environments was conducted in Western Australia with the aim of obtaining young people's perceptions about their experience…

  11. What Can Be Learned from the Roller Coaster Journeys of Young People Making Ultimately Successful Transitions beyond School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Jennifer; Anderson, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    This project investigated the interrelationships between family expectations and young people's post-school plans. All of the participants were from financially disadvantaged families. The research used interviews to understand these young people's perspectives of their transition experiences: the ways in which young people's school experiences…

  12. Young people, the Internet and political participation : findings of a web survey in Italy, Spain and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calenda, D.; Meijer, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Do young people participate in politics? Some claim that young people are not as much involved in politics as their parents were, others argue that young people are interested in politics but in a different way than previous generations. The Internet is said to play an important role in 'new politic

  13. Perceived barriers and facilitators to mental health help-seeking in young people: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffiths Kathleen M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescents and young adults frequently experience mental disorders, yet tend not to seek help. This systematic review aims to summarise reported barriers and facilitators of help-seeking in young people using both qualitative research from surveys, focus groups, and interviews and quantitative data from published surveys. It extends previous reviews through its systematic research methodology and by the inclusion of published studies describing what young people themselves perceive are the barriers and facilitators to help-seeking for common mental health problems. Methods Twenty two published studies of perceived barriers or facilitators in adolescents or young adults were identified through searches of PubMed, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane database. A thematic analysis was undertaken on the results reported in the qualitative literature and quantitative literature. Results Fifteen qualitative and seven quantitative studies were identified. Young people perceived stigma and embarrassment, problems recognising symptoms (poor mental health literacy, and a preference for self-reliance as the most important barriers to help-seeking. Facilitators were comparatively under-researched. However, there was evidence that young people perceived positive past experiences, and social support and encouragement from others as aids to the help-seeking process. Conclusions Strategies for improving help-seeking by adolescents and young adults should focus on improving mental health literacy, reducing stigma, and taking into account the desire of young people for self-reliance.

  14. Developing Social Media-Based Suicide Prevention Messages in Partnership With Young People: Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jo; Bailey, Eleanor; Hetrick, Sarah; Paix, Steve; O'Donnell, Matt; Cox, Georgina; Ftanou, Maria; Skehan, Jaelea

    2017-10-04

    Social media is increasingly being used by young people for health-related issues, including communicating about suicide. Due to the concerns about causing distress or inducing suicidal thoughts or behaviors, to date young people neither have been engaged in the development of social media-based suicide prevention interventions nor have interventions focused on educating young people about safe ways to communicate about suicide online. Given the potential that social media holds to deliver messages to vast numbers of people across space and time and the fact that young people often prefer to seek help from their friends and peers, safely educating and engaging young people to develop suicide prevention messages that can be delivered via social media is an obvious next step. The objectives of this study were to (1) provide education to a small number of secondary school students about safe ways to communicate about suicide via social media; (2) engage the same young people in the development of a suite of social media-based suicide prevention multimedia messages; (3) assess the impact of this on participants; and (4) assess the acceptability and safety of the messages developed. This study involved two phases. In phase 1, 20 participants recruited from two schools took part in an 8- to 10-week program during which they were provided with psychoeducation about mental health and suicide, including how to talk safely about suicide online, and they were then supported to design and develop their own media messages. These participants completed an evaluation questionnaire at the conclusion of the program. In phase 2, a larger group of participants (n=69), recruited via an opt-in process, viewed the media messages and completed a short questionnaire about each one. Participants in phase 1 enjoyed the program and reported that they learned new skills, such as how to talk safely about suicide online, and felt more able to provide emotional support to others (16/20, 80%). No

  15. SKILLS MISMATCH OF THE YOUNG PEOPLE AT THE EUROPEAN LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatos Roxana

    2015-07-01

    are: What are the main types of skills mismatch? What are the main ways to measure skills mismatch? What are the indicators of skills mismatch? What is the level of over-education and under-education in European countries? How to calculate skills mismatch between demand and supply of labor at European level? What factors explain the different labor market chances of young people compared to adults? What are the predictors at the macro level and individual level of skills mismatch?

  16. CHALLENGES OF EDUCATION OF YOUNG PEOPLE FOR RESPONSIBLE FOOD CONSUMPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanta POPESCU

    2014-06-01

    opinions differ. The research aimed also to test a measuring scale for aggregation of the indicators, which measure purchasing behavior. Taking into account the recommendations of specialists in the field (Equité, 2004, p. 12 we consider that all the actors that comprise the system of interactions in which one can shape a sustainable consumption (public powers and organizations/communities, businesses, media and associations have to cooperate actively and interactively to educate young people in the spirit of responsible consumption.

  17. Anger and Globalization among Young People in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchday, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the challenges faced by youth in developing countries. Using India as an example of a fast-globalizing country, this article highlights the experience and challenges faced by adolescents and emerging adults as they search for their interpersonal and professional identities. The difficulties of defining identity in the…

  18. Supply and demand of jobs for young people in the metropolitan area of Goiânia (2010-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heliane Prudente Nunes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the conceptual aspects of employment and unemployment in Brazil and the state Goiás, as theoretical support for understanding the phenomenon on the offer and search of jobs by young people in the metropolitan region of Goiânia (GO. The importance of this research is justified by the fact that unemployment is a major problem in the contemporary world, particularly in Brazil, which has been facing a mismatch between population growth and the supply and demand of employment. The article discusses the socio-cultural universe of unemployed youth, seeking to examine how the different dimensions of family and school life interfere with their performance, encouraging or hindering their inclusion in the workplace. It also evaluates the relation between the highest labor supply of unskilled work, low education rate among young people who are seeking employment and workers' skills required by entrepreneurs. It starts with reference anchored in Bourdieu, Enguita and Mannheim, as well as resorting to government officials. The data are based on empirical research with young people and entrepreneurs in the metropolitan area of Goiânia.JEL-Code | J21; J82; R12.

  19. The Correlation Between Personality Dimensions and Young People's Choice of a Medical Career

    OpenAIRE

    Popa Cosmin Octavian; Rus Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The research assumes that there is a correlation between personality dimensions Extraversion and Conscientiousness which mean autonomy, ambition and consistency of purpose, self-efficacy and determination for young people who want to aspire to a medical career.

  20. Designing movement-based play with young people using powered wheelchairs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerling, Kathrin M; Hicks, Kieran C; Kalyn, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Young people using powered wheelchairs have limited access to engaging leisure activities. We address this issue through a two-stage project; 1) the participatory development of a set of wheelchair-controlled, movement-based games (with 9 participants at a school that provides education for young...... people who have special needs) and 2) three case studies (4 participants) exploring player perspectives on a set of three wheelchair-controlled casual games. Our results show that movement-based playful experiences are engaging for young people using powered wheelchairs. However, the participatory design...... process and case studies also reveal challenges for game accessibility regarding the integration of movement in games, diversity of abilities among young people using powered wheelchairs, and the representation of disability in games. In our paper, we explore how to address those challenges...

  1. Health knowledge and the impact of social exclusion on young people with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pownall, Jaycee; Wilson, Sarah; Jahoda, Andrew

    2017-01-24

    Cognitive impairments are often assumed to underlie individuals' difficulties with understanding health issues. However, it was predicted that socially excluded individuals would have greater difficulty gaining understanding of sensitive topics related to sexuality than other public health messages, such as alcohol use. The health knowledge of 31 typically developing young people, 29 young people with mild intellectual disabilities (ID) and 23 participants with physical disabilities but no cognitive impairments was compared. The largest group differences were related to more private and personal health issues, such as pregnancy/contraception. Both groups of young people with disabilities had less knowledge of pregnancy/contraception than their non-disabled peers. Thus, deficits in this sexual knowledge did not just appear to be the result of cognitive deficits. The findings suggest social exclusion may contribute to young people with intellectual disabilities' poorer knowledge of pregnancy and contraception. The results have implications for interventions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Collaboration Technology for Education of the Young People with Special Needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavendels, Jurijs; Sitikovs, Vjaceslavs; Latisheva, Eleonora

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Lavendels, J., Sitikovs, V., & Latisheva, E. (2006). Collaboration Technology for Education of the Young People with Special Needs. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-3

  3. Parental factors and sexual risk-taking among young people in C& ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... parental factors and sexual risk-taking among young people using logistic regression ... with primary sexual abstinence (defined as yet to experience sexual debut), ... It is important to promote parent-child communication about sexual issues ...

  4. Alcohol consumption behaviour of young people in Thailand: perspectives of stakeholders in Petchaburi Province

    OpenAIRE

    Glomjai, Thanee

    2016-01-01

    This thesis examines the issue of young people and alcohol consumption in order to understand their behaviour and experiences in Thailand. Alcohol consumption is socially accepted as a pleasurable activity in many countries world-wide. Alcohol consumption among young people in Thailand has been affected by the spread of western culture, which has encouraged an acceptance of drinking alcohol as being fashionable and as a means of promoting social relationships. This study aimed ...

  5. Functional Family Therapy (FFT) for Young People in Treatment for Non-opioid Drug Use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Andersen, Ditte; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this review is to evaluate the current evidence on the effects of FFT on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use.......The main aim of this review is to evaluate the current evidence on the effects of FFT on drug abuse reduction for young people in treatment for non-opioid drug use....

  6. ACE Action Fellowship Bridges Climate Education into Action for Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    Alliance for Climate Education educates young people on the science of climate change and empowers them to take action. Since 2009, ACE has educated over two million students and trained more than 4,000 young leaders. The ACE Action Fellowship is a yearlong training program that gives young people the knowledge, skills and confidence to be strong climate leaders. Here, we present the results of the first year of evaluation of the Fellowship program in the 2014-15 school year. Sixty high school students completed matched surveys before and after completing the program. Students were evaluated on skills learned, actions taken, confidence gained, civic engagement, and plans to continue action on climate in the future. Results show that the Fellowship increases young people's confidence: 52% of Fellows report an increase in confidence in leading a group of peers on a climate-related campaign. Fellows also gained leadership skills. More than half of Fellows say they improved in the areas of recruitment, interpersonal communication skills, campaign planning, and public speaking. 50% of Fellows reported an increase in their likelihood of seeking elected office when of age. The Fellowship positively influences young people's intent to study a climate, energy or sustainability-related field. 63% of Fellows identify as people of color. Notably, despite entering the Fellowship with significantly lower self-ratings than white students in experience and skill sets, young people of color reported greater improvement in the areas of public speaking (25% improvement vs. 6% improvement) and petitioning (27% improvement vs. 1% improvement). These results show that the ACE Fellowship gives young people tangible skills and confidence that puts them on a path of climate leadership. Further evaluation will be done to expand the dataset, but early indications show that these young people are poised to make valuable contributions and bring a much needed diverse youth perspective to the

  7. The Career Development of Young Japanese People: The Attainment of Self-Confidence in Career Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ogawa, Chisato

    2006-01-01

    Many young Japanese people seem to be able to determine goals towards their career development. However, many appear to struggle to take action towards their intended goal, often due to a lack of confidence, or an inability to make decisions without guidance or assistance from others. As a result, we think that perhaps a misconception is formulated by the community that young Japanese people drift around aimlessly without a sense of purpose or direction towards a career path, even after gradu...

  8. Involving children and young people in the development of art-based research tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Jane; Plumridge, Gill; Metcalfe, Alison

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they worked with children and young people to develop art-based techniques and activities for use in a study exploring family communication about genetic conditions. It highlights key methodological issues about children and young people's participation in research, the concept of what constitutes an art-based activity and how this was applied to developing art-based data collection tools.

  9. Standpoints: attitudes of young people & youth workers to development & global justice issues

    OpenAIRE

    Devlin, Maurice; Tierney, Hilary

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the findings of a qualitative research project investigating the attitudes of adults and young people involved in youth work towards development and global justice issues, and explores the implications of these findings for youth work practice. Twelve focus groups (six each with young people and youth workers) were conducted in different parts of the country, concentrated in three different 'sites': Dublin (city), Mayo (county) and Waterford (city and county). In total 48...

  10. Impact of functional severity on self concept in young people with spina bifida.

    OpenAIRE

    Minchom, P E; Ellis, N C; Appleton, P. L.; Lawson, V; Böll, V.; Jones, P.; Elliott, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between medical and functional severity of disability and levels of self esteem and self concept in 79 young people with spina bifida. Greater feelings of global self worth and of self esteem in physical appearance were associated with greater severity of disability. This was only in part an effect of lower IQ among the most disabled young people. Many of the least disabled had marked impairment of self esteem. Analysis of the impact of individual aspects ...

  11. MARKETING AND INNOVATION: YOUNG PEOPLE'S ATTITUDE TOWARDS NEW PRODUCTS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Onisor Lucian-Florin

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the perceptions of young students, who are training in the field of economics, to the very new products and outlines the role that marketing plays in bringing to market products...

  12. Transitioning behaviourally infected HIV- positive young people into ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-03

    Mar 3, 2013 ... Ensuring continuity in HIV care and treatment beyond young adult HIV ... Corresponding author: C Katusiime (katutina1@gmail.com) ... Health Sciences, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, was. Member. Joi. The car diff.

  13. Public Policies of Professional Integration of Young People in the EU and in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela NEAGU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available At present almost a quarter of the young people in the EU (29.7% of the young people aged 15-29 years are to be found in the situation of risk of poverty and social exclusion and in Romania, the situation is even more serious: 45.2% of the young people are in this situation. One of the main causes of this situation would be difficult access of young people to a place of employment. The objective we have in the work is to analyze public policies intended for professional integration the young people in some other European countries in order to find out to what extent Romania can be gathered from their experience, may adopt principles, standards which have been proved effective in these countries and which could improve the situation and at national level. The work will be structured in two main parts. In the first part we will make a comparative analysis of the measures applied in some European state, the results obtained and the possibility for their acquisition in another socio-economic context. In the second section we will examine the measures integration young people applied at national level.

  14. Influence of legal status on the uptake of cannabis in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirisu, Osasuyi; Shickle, Darren; Elsey, Helen

    2016-07-01

    Policies that limit young people's access to cannabis may reduce early onset of use and minimize health-related harm. This review article provides an update of recent research examining the influence of the cannabis policy frameworks on the use of cannabis by young people. There are significant concerns that ongoing policy changes in favour of legalization will increase the uptake of cannabis by young people. Evidence to support a causal effect of cannabis policy changes on increased uptake by young people is lacking; more time may be needed to assess the impact because the policies are still evolving. Policy changes in favour of legalization were associated with reduced risk perception although this may be a cause or consequence. The need to situate the impact of these policies in the context of specific policy features, social norms and perceptions about cannabis has been highlighted. A more nuanced understanding of the impact of the legal status of cannabis on young people is needed to build evidence for future policy options. The impact of these policies may not be immediately apparent but limiting young people's access to cannabis must be prioritized during policy deliberations.

  15. Young people and ICT – materials shaping resource-intensive practices?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Toke Haunstrup; Rommes, Els

    2016-01-01

    . The use of ICT is particularly widespread among young people, and this paper investigates the practices related to young people’s use of ICT. More specifically, we focus on the use of smart phones and laptops. The paper focuses on how the material qualities of smart phones, laptops and their related...

  16. Young People, Social Exclusion and Inter-Generational Tension in a Rural Somerset Town

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Rosie

    2008-01-01

    This article seeks to explore how the myth of the "rural idyll" can be detrimental to those who currently experience some of the greatest social exclusion in rural areas--children and young people. The research explores the views and experiences of the young residents of a small town in the south-west of England (n = 157, ages 12-18…

  17. School Memories of Young People with Disabilities: An Analysis of Barriers and Aids to Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Anabel Morina

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a selection of the results gleaned from research analyzing the way social exclusion processes are constructed among young adults between the ages of 18 and 25. The paper focuses on a subset of the population studied: young people with disabilities. Likewise, we limit our study to the dimension of school-related experiences.…

  18. Having Confidence in Therapeutic Work with Young People: Constraints and Challenges to Confidentiality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Confidentiality presents particular challenges to practitioners working with young people, on account of the latter's vulnerability and emotional immaturity. Ethical codes place a key importance on confidentiality, from deontological and teleological perspectives. However, young clients may rely on a more pragmatic approach in deciding whether to…

  19. Cyberbullying: Experiences, Impacts and Coping Strategies as Described by Australian Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Megan; Dalgleish, John

    2010-01-01

    Cyberbullying impacts on the wellbeing, schooling, family and peer relationships of many young people. The current study of 548 young Australians revealed that cyberbullying is a group phenomenon most prevalent during the transitional ages between primary and secondary school. It takes on many forms and shows an overlap in roles between…

  20. Cyberbullying: Experiences, Impacts and Coping Strategies as Described by Australian Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Megan; Dalgleish, John

    2010-01-01

    Cyberbullying impacts on the wellbeing, schooling, family and peer relationships of many young people. The current study of 548 young Australians revealed that cyberbullying is a group phenomenon most prevalent during the transitional ages between primary and secondary school. It takes on many forms and shows an overlap in roles between…

  1. Why do young people become Jihadists? A theoretical account on radical identity development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeus, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Identity status theory and Lofland and Starks' (1965, Becoming a world-saver: A theory of conversion to a deviant perspective, American Sociological Review, 30, 862–875) model of religious conversion were used to explain why young people become jihad fighters. Both theories maintain that young

  2. Why do young people become Jihadists? : A theoretical account on radical identity development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeus, W.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Identity status theory and Lofland and Starks' (1965, Becoming a world-saver: A theory of conversion to a deviant perspective, American Sociological Review, 30, 862–875) model of religious conversion were used to explain why young people become jihad fighters. Both theories maintain that young

  3. Disconnected Young People in New York City: Crisis and Opportunity. P/PV Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Laura; Cooney, Siobhan M.; Djakovic, Danijela Korom; McClanahan, Wendy S.

    2008-01-01

    This report, the first in a series relating to disconnected young adults commissioned by JobsFirst NYC, examines what is known about New York City's disconnected youth--16 to 24 year-olds who are not working and not in school. The report explores the roots of disconnection and identifies five priority populations of young people who are at high…

  4. Deaf Young People with Sequential Bilateral Cochlear Implants: The Experience of Parents and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Julie; Archbold, Sue; Gregory, Sue

    2011-01-01

    A semi-structured interview format was used to explore the experiences and attitudes of twelve parents and twelve teachers of young people, aged 11-18 years, who had received sequential bilateral cochlear implants. The parents stressed the importance of involving the young person in the decision to go ahead with the second implant. Although all…

  5. Sexual Behavior, Pregnancy, and Schooling among Young People in Urban South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Marteleto, Letícia; Lam, David; Ranchhod, Vimal

    2008-01-01

    This study examines transitions in schooling, sexual activity, and pregnancy for adolescents and young adults in urban South Africa. The study analyzes data from the Cape Area Panel Study (CAPS), a recently collected longitudinal survey of young adults and their families in metropolitan Cape Town. South African youth have high school enrollment rates through their teenage years, combined with relatively early sexual initiation, with most young people becoming sexually active while they are en...

  6. A qualitative investigation of the role of the family in structuring young people's alcohol use

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, Nina Katherine; MacArthur, Georgie; Hickman, Matthew; Campbell, Rona

    2015-01-01

    Background: Few qualitative studies have investigated young people’s perspectives around influences on substance use. We aimed to examine young people’s understandings, attitudes and experiences around alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use and factors influencing substance use behaviour. Methods: Qualitative interview study involving 28 young people (13 males and 15 females) aged 18–20 years, recruited purposively on the basis of substance use, who were participating in the Avon Longitudinal Stud...

  7. A comparison of remote therapy, face to face therapy and an attention control intervention for people with aphasia: a quasi-randomised controlled feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Celia; Caute, Anna; Haigh, Zula; Galliers, Julia; Wilson, Stephanie; Kessie, Awurabena; Hirani, Shashi; Hegarty, Barbara; Marshall, Jane

    2016-04-01

    To test the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial comparing face to face and remotely delivered word finding therapy for people with aphasia. A quasi-randomised controlled feasibility study comparing remote therapy delivered from a University lab, remote therapy delivered from a clinical site, face to face therapy and an attention control condition. A University lab and NHS outpatient service. Twenty-one people with aphasia following left hemisphere stroke. Eight sessions of word finding therapy, delivered either face to face or remotely, were compared to an attention control condition comprising eight sessions of remotely delivered supported conversation. The remote conditions used mainstream video conferencing technology. Feasibility was assessed by recruitment and attrition rates, participant observations and interviews, and treatment fidelity checking. Effects of therapy on word retrieval were assessed by tests of picture naming and naming in conversation. Twenty-one participants were recruited over 17 months, with one lost at baseline. Compliance and satisfaction with the intervention was good. Treatment fidelity was high for both remote and face to face delivery (1251/1421 therapist behaviours were compliant with the protocol). Participants who received therapy improved on picture naming significantly more than controls (mean numerical gains: 20.2 (remote from University); 41 (remote from clinical site); 30.8 (face to face); 5.8 (attention control); P <.001). There were no significant differences between groups in the assessment of conversation. Word finding therapy can be delivered via mainstream internet video conferencing. Therapy improved picture naming, but not naming in conversation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Sexual behaviours and associated risks in Chinese young people: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-ming; Guo, Shuai-Jun; Sun, Yu-ying

    2013-11-01

    The earlier and unprotected sexual behaviour of young Chinese, and the consequences of these actions, have become a health concern, posing a challenge to traditional Chinese concepts. The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in sexual behaviour and associated risks among adolescents and young people in mainland China over the past three decades. A meta-analysis was undertaken to comprehensively review the sexual behaviour of Chinese young people (aged from 10 to 24 years) over the past 30 years. Relevant data published from 1979 to 2009 in the Chinese literature database were identified and retrieved. Analysis was performed based on set criteria. Seventy-five studies were identified that were published after 1990. Overall, the estimated prevalence of sexual intercourse among young people was 12.6%, with an average age at sexual debut of 19.4 years. The rate of condom use at sexual debut was 37.2%; 53.6% of young people reported not using a condom during the most recent act of sexual intercourse. The rates of unintentional pregnancy and abortion among the sexually active were 15.1% and 10.8%, respectively. Reviewing the data according to decades revealed that the number of young people engaging in sexual intercourse decreased from 14.3% in 1990-1999 to 11.8% in 2000-2009. However, these rates are higher than the prevalence of sexual activity reported before 1990, which, according to sporadic studies, did not exceeded 1%. There have been increases in sexual activity and high-risk sexual behaviour in Chinese young people in the decades since the adoption of the open door policy in China, particularly since the mid-1990s. High-risk sexual behaviours have contributed to certain adverse consequences in adolescents and young people, such as unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmissible infection. Thus, efficacious intervention strategies need to be developed and implemented.

  9. Technology into practice: young people's, parents' and nurses' perceptions of WISECARE+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Faith; Miller, Morven; Kearney, Nora

    2007-12-01

    Technology is a central aspect of young people's lives, with the internet and mobile phone technology providing the preferred means of communication. This pilot explored perceptions and experiences of young people, parents and healthcare professionals on the role of technology in monitoring and managing chemotherapy-related toxicity. To introduce the WISECARE+ process for recording and communicating symptoms following chemotherapy to a teenage patient population and evaluate its usefulness with patients, parents and nursing staff. A convenience sample of 11 young people (aged 13 to 20 years) with a haematological or solid tumour undergoing primary treatment, were recruited from two UK regional paediatric oncology centres. The young people completed a daily symptom questionnaire for 14 consecutive days following a course of chemotherapy. They evaluated the presence or absence of symptoms of nausea, vomiting, fatigue and oral problems, their severity and how much the symptom bothered them. Perception questionnaires were completed by the 11 young people, four parents and eight nurses at the end of the 14 days. Young people and parents found the symptom questionnaire simple to understand, easy to complete and they liked the paper format. The nurses' confidence with IT varied but all felt that it could be useful in their clinical practice. These young people appeared to gain from their participation in the project, especially in relation to completing the questionnaire as they were able to see a change in symptoms over time that was encouraging, particularly in situations where the young person had been quite ill. This work is continuing with formats such as a handheld computer or mobile phone being considered to collect symptom information. Additional factors such as reading levels and dyslexia are also being considered.

  10. How young people describe the impact of living with and beyond a cancer diagnosis: feasibility of using social media as a research method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, F; Hibbins, S; Grew, T; Morgan, S; Pearce, S; Stark, D; Fern, L A

    2016-11-01

    Young people with cancer exhibit unique needs. During a time of normal physical and psychological change, multiple disease and treatment-related symptoms cause short and long-term physical and psychosocial effects. Little is known about how young people cope with the impact of cancer and its treatment on daily routines and their strategies to manage the challenges of cancer and treatments. We aimed to determine how young people describe these challenges through a social media site. Using the principles of virtual ethnography and watching videos on a social media site we gathered data from young people describing their cancer experience. Qualitative content analysis was employed to analyse and interpret the narrative from longitudinal 'video diaries' by 18 young people equating to 156 films and 27 h and 49 min of recording. Themes were described then organized and clustered into typologies grouping commonalities across themes. Four typologies emerged reflective of the cancer trajectory: treatment and relenting side effects, rehabilitation and getting on with life, relapse, facing more treatment and coming to terms with dying. This study confirms the need for young people to strive towards normality and creating a new normal, even where uncertainty prevailed. Strategies young people used to gain mastery over their illness and the types of stories they choose to tell provide the focus of the main narrative. Social Media sites can be examined as a source of data, to supplement or instead of more traditional routes of data collection known to be practically challenging with this population. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Being as Normal as Possible: How Young People Ages 16-25 Years Evaluate the Risks and Benefits of Treatment for Inflammatory Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Ruth I; McDonagh, Janet E; Thompson, Ben; Foster, Helen E; Kay, Lesley; Myers, Andrea; Rapley, Tim

    2016-09-01

    To explore how young people (ages 16-25 years) with inflammatory arthritis evaluate the risks and benefits of treatment, particularly treatment with biologic therapies. This qualitative study involved in-depth interviews (n = 44) with young people, trusted others (e.g., parents), and health professionals; audio-recordings (n = 4) of biologic therapy-related consultations; and focus groups (n = 4). Analysis used techniques from grounded theory (open and focused coding, constant comparison, memoing, and mapping). Young people aspired to live what they perceived as a "normal" life. They saw treatment as presenting both an opportunity for and a threat to achieving this. Treatment changes were therefore subject to complex and ongoing evaluation, covering administration, associated restrictions, anticipated effects, and side effects. Information sources included expert opinion (of professionals and other patients) and personal experience. Previous treatments provided important reference points. Faced with uncertain outcomes, young people made provisional decisions. Both trusted others and health professionals expressed concern that young people were too focused on short-term outcomes. Young people value treatment that helps them to live a "normal" life. There is more to this than controlling disease. The emotional, social, and vocational consequences of treatment can be profound and lasting: opportunities to discuss the effects of treatment should be provided early and regularly. While making every effort to ensure understanding of the long-term clinical consequences of taking or not taking medication, the wider impact of treatment should not be dismissed. Only through understanding young people's values, preferences, and concerns can a sustainable balance between disease control and treatment burden be achieved. © 2016 The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology.

  12. Optimizing a Retention Strategy with Young People for BRIGHTLIGHT, a Longitudinal Cohort Study Examining the Value of Specialist Cancer Care for Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rachel M; Aslam, Natasha; Lea, Sarah; Whelan, Jeremy S; Fern, Lorna A

    2017-09-01

    To maximize retention of participants in a longitudinal cohort study, we sought to understand young peoples' views about barriers and facilitators to continuing study participation. Ten young people with a previous cancer diagnosis aged 15-24 participated in a 1 day workshop. The workshop used participatory methodology consisting of three exercises as follows: role play/scene setting; force field analysis of research participation in small groups; and focus group discussion. A final prioritization exercise was administered individually after the workshop. Twenty-four barriers to maintaining participation were summarized in five themes as follows: life commitments; concerns specific to the study; emotional barriers; practical barriers; and other reasons. The top 3 specific barriers were as follows: not a priority/other things are more important; too time consuming; and forgetting/memory. The top 3 facilitators for participation were as follows: wishing to help other young people; giving back to the cancer community; and honoring an initial commitment to participation. The top 3 suggested solutions to encourage continued participation were as follows: reminder text message or email before each survey to check preferred method of delivery; breaking up the online survey into modules to make completion less overwhelming; and consolidation of study information in one location. Involving young people in designing a retention strategy for young people with cancer has informed the BRIGHTLIGHT retention strategy. Patient and public involvement is imperative for successful research but measuring impact is challenging. The success of implementing the changes to optimize retention was shown in the increase in retention in Wave 3 from 30% to final participation of 58%.

  13. Systematic review of barriers and facilitators to accessing and engaging with mental health care among at-risk young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adrienne; Rice, Simon M; Rickwood, Debra J; Parker, Alexandra G

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to review the literature on barriers and facilitators to accessing and engaging with mental health care among young people from potentially disadvantaged groups, including young people identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander (ATSI); culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD); lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, or intersex (LGBTQI); homeless; substance using; and youth residing in rural or remote areas. Fourteen databases were searched to identify qualitative and quantitative researches that examined barriers and/or facilitators to mental health care among the six groups of potentially disadvantaged young people. Out of 62 studies identified, 3 were conducted with ATSI young people, 1 with CALD young people, 4 with LGBTQI young people, 14 with homeless young people, 24 with substance-using young people, and 16 with young people residing in rural or remote areas. Findings generally confirmed barriers already established for all young people, but indicated that some may be heightened for young people in the six identified groups. Findings also pointed to both similarities and differences between these groups, suggesting that ATSI, CALD, LGBTQI, homeless, substance-using, and rural young people have some similar needs with respect to not only mental health care, but also other needs likely to reflect their individual circumstances. This systematic review highlights that young people from potentially disadvantaged groups have distinct needs that must be recognized to improve their experiences with mental health care. Future research of good methodological quality with young people is needed to increase accessibility of, and engagement with, mental health care. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Short-term Internet search using makes people rely on search engines when facing unknown issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Wu, Lingdan; Luo, Liang; Zhang, Yifen; Dong, Guangheng

    2017-01-01

    The Internet search engines, which have powerful search/sort functions and ease of use features, have become an indispensable tool for many individuals. The current study is to test whether the short-term Internet search training can make people more dependent on it. Thirty-one subjects out of forty subjects completed the search training study which included a pre-test, a six-day's training of Internet search, and a post-test. During the pre- and post- tests, subjects were asked to search online the answers to 40 unusual questions, remember the answers and recall them in the scanner. Un-learned questions were randomly presented at the recalling stage in order to elicited search impulse. Comparing to the pre-test, subjects in the post-test reported higher impulse to use search engines to answer un-learned questions. Consistently, subjects showed higher brain activations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex in the post-test than in the pre-test. In addition, there were significant positive correlations self-reported search impulse and brain responses in the frontal areas. The results suggest that a simple six-day's Internet search training can make people dependent on the search tools when facing unknown issues. People are easily dependent on the Internet search engines.

  15. Mental Health Problems in Children and Young People with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Sheykhjan, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    We all have mental health. Mental health relates to how we think, feel, behave and interact with other people. At its simplest, good mental health is the absence of a mental disorder or mental health problem. Adults, children and young people with good mental health are likely to have high levels of mental wellbeing. The World Health Organisation…

  16. Physical Activity Engagement in Young People with Down Syndrome: Investigating Parental Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alesi, Marianna; Pepi, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite the wide documentation of the physical/psychological benefits derived from regular physical activity (PA), high levels of inactivity are reported among people with Down syndrome. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 parents of young people with Down syndrome. Results Three facilitation themes were…

  17. Physical Activity Engagement in Young People with Down Syndrome: Investigating Parental Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alesi, Marianna; Pepi, Annamaria

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite the wide documentation of the physical/psychological benefits derived from regular physical activity (PA), high levels of inactivity are reported among people with Down syndrome. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 parents of young people with Down syndrome. Results Three facilitation themes were…

  18. Leading by Example: Creating Motivation That Fosters Positive Change in Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikens, Curtis G., Sr.

    2013-01-01

    It is not what one has in life; rather, what is left as the legacy. Personally I have received many awards. However, I feel so much better when I help people receive their own awards. Now, I want to use positive language and positive action to help motivate young people, encouraging them to achieve their own success, as well as foster success in…

  19. "It Is Only Natural….": Attitudes of Young People with Intellectual Disabilities toward Sexuality in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karellou, Ioanna

    2017-01-01

    Although there is an increasing awareness of the rights of people with intellectual disabilities, limited progress has been made in supporting people with intellectual disabilities to create and sustain intimate personal relationships in Greece. This article looks at the attitudes of 66 adolescents and young adults with intellectual disabilities…

  20. The Process of Perceiving Stigmatization: Perspectives from Taiwanese Young People with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Hsuan; Shu, Bih-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is a dearth of studies about the causes of stigmatization in people with intellectual disability. This study is aimed at gaining an understanding of how feelings of stigmatization are formed and perceived among young people with intellectual disability in Taiwanese cultural and social contexts. Materials and Methods: Fourteen…

  1. Traffic safety behaviour among young people in different residential settings: the use of seat belts, bicycle helmets, and reflectors by young people in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Erika

    2009-12-01

    This study examines if, and how, the size of the community in which people live may contribute to explaining differences in traffic safety behaviour (self-reported behaviour regarding the use of seat belts, bicycle helmets and reflectors) among young people in Sweden. The study is based on a Swedish nationwide traffic safety survey with a net sample of 2854 respondents aged 16-25. Ordered logit regressions were performed, and place of residence is shown to have an impact on traffic safety behaviour. The results are presented and discussed in relation to risk exposure and traffic safety facilities in different settings. The implications of the study are considered, and the importance of investigating the way in which young people see traffic safety behaviour is emphasised.

  2. Hypertension in Young People: Epidemiology, Diagnostic Assessment and Therapeutic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistoni, Allegra; Canichella, Flaminia; Pignatelli, Giulia; Ferrucci, Andrea; Tocci, Giuliano; Volpe, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    High blood pressure (BP) still remains one of the most relevant cardiovascular risk factors, also due to its persistently high prevalence and growing incidence in the general adult and elderly population. Since almost all hypertension-related cardiovascular complications, mostly including coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and congestive heart failure, occurred in adult and elderly individuals, evidence on both prevalence and clinical management of hypertension in young individuals are lacking. Therefore, the clinical impact of high BP levels in young populations remains to be explored. In the recent years, the attitude of the scientific community has changed and more attention was devoted to young individuals with hypertension, also in view of the fact that early identification of these subjects may prevent developing of established hypertension in adulthood. In addition, unhealthy lifestyle habits have progressively involved children and adolescents worldwide, thus contributing to further increase the risk of developing hypertension in young individuals. On the basis of these considerations, the present review is aimed at providing a brief reappraisal of the major aspects of hypertension in the young age, as well as at promoting interest and discussion on this important issue.

  3. ["I'll tell you if you ask me"; screening young people for substance use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Germond-Burquier, V; Haller, D M; Narring, F

    2010-06-16

    Substance use among young people is an important issue for educational, social and medical providers. More than 75% young people have had a medical visit in the last 12 months, making primary care settings ideal for screening and early intervention programs. The prevalence of substance misuse was assessed with the DEP-ADO screen test among young patients attending the primary care consultation of Geneva University Hospitals. The screen was well accepted by both patients and providers and only took about 10 minutes to complete. One in five screened positive for problematic substance use, supporting the current guidelines recommending annual screening for substance misuse in adolescent primary care outpatients.

  4. Attitudes towards young people who self-harm: age, an influencing factor

    OpenAIRE

    Cleaver, Karen; Meerabeau, Liz; Maras, Pam

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To determine the attitudes of emergency care staff towards young people (aged 12–18 years) who self-harm and to gain an understanding of the basis of attitudes that exist.\\ud \\ud Background: Young people frequently attend emergency services following self-harm; it is unclear whether being a young person influences attitudes held.\\ud \\ud Design: Mixed methods using a triangulation convergent design.\\ud \\ud Methods: Survey of 143 staff members from four accident & emergency departments and...

  5. ‘Interrupted Interviews’: listening to young people with autism in transition to college

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqui Shepherd

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the methodological approaches used in a research project that investigated the lived experiences of young people with autism as they made the transition from special schools to mainstream colleges of Further Education. A combination of visual methods using iPad applications and walking interviews were explored in an attempt to develop ways of engaging young people with autism in research and to privilege their voice in their own transition. The strengths and challenges of these methods are examined here and illustrated through the experience and responses of one young person in the study and his engagement with the research.

  6. Vocational education and training (VET) as a career path for young people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kersh, Natasha; Juul, Ida

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of the issues of perceptions and motivations of young people towards Vocational Education and Training (VET) in England and Denmark. It specifically focuses on factors that facilitate their either positive or negative attitudes. Complex...... interdependencies between the labour market, young people’s occupational choices, and career routes have been a focus of policy concern, discussions and research across European countries. VET, as a pathway for young people to a career, has been and continues to be open to wide interpretation and debate...

  7. Psychopathology among young homeless people: longitudinal mental health outcomes for different subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Kate J; Shelton, Katherine H; van den Bree, Marianne B M

    2015-09-01

    Homeless young people are recognized as a very vulnerable group in terms of mental health; however, few studies in the UK have examined this. Furthermore, homeless young people represent a heterogeneous group in terms of their mental health and greater characterization could improve intervention work. The aims of this study were to examine prevalence and subtypes of psychopathology among a British sample of young homeless people and to investigate potential associations between identified typologies and a priori specified current and past experiences. In addition, the study intended to explore physical health, mental health, and housing outcomes for the different mental health subgroups. A prospective longitudinal design was used. Structured interviews including a mental health assessment were conducted with 90 young homeless people aged 16-23 years. Follow-up interviews were conducted approximately 10 and 20 months later. Cluster analysis at baseline was used to identify groups based on lifetime mental health problems. The current and lifetime incidence of mental health problems was high (88% and 93%, respectively). Three subgroups of homeless young people were identified: (1) minimal mental health issues; (2) mood, substance, and conduct disorder; and (3) post-traumatic stress disorder, mood, and anxiety issues. These groups differed with respect to follow-up indicators of change and stability of mental health status, service use, and suicide risk, but not housing outcome. Other characteristics (gender ratio, past experiences) also distinguished the subgroups. Typologies of young homeless people based on psychopathology reveal differences in lifetime and future experiences including mental health at follow-up. Identified groups could be used to tailor interventions towards differing needs. Low mood, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and psychosis are common mental health issues among young homeless people in the UK. Subgroups of young homeless people with

  8. [The young people of foreign extraction in the Federal Republic of Germany and the labor market in 2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Delhaes-guenther, D

    1988-03-01

    This study analyzes immigration trends and prospects with respect with to the Federal Republic's changing demography and economy. Low birth rates and an aging population will result in a decrease in the local population and an increase in the foreign population of the Federal Republic in the next decades. After 1990 the demand for foreign labor will diminish. There will, however, still be a need for highly specialized personnel for the new technological sectors. In this context the professional qualification of young people of foreign extraction acquires an even greater significance, since they also face difficulties at a cultural and linguistic level. The technological challenges demand scholastic and professional training programs which maximize migrant labor force potential and help to eliminate socioeconomic conflicts. By the year 2000 60% of the jobs in the Federal Republic will be in service-related industries and the "third industrial revolution" based on innovations in microelectronics will demand a trained labor force that can easily shift and adapt. Local and national institutions will have to form a trained and competent labor force. However, foreign young people educated in German public schools face difficulties in achieving professional certificates and gaining superior employment. The potential exists for ever greater problems as minimum skill jobs diminish and higher-skilled jobs increase in the changing German economy. Language barriers and lack of sufficient skills prevent the complete integration of foreign young people and can lead to frustration, mental depression, and even criminal behavior. The author proposes closer contacts between parents of foreign youths and local and Federal authorities and better bilingual education.

  9. Avoiding shame: young LGBT people, homophobia and self-destructive behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Elizabeth; Roen, Katrina; Scourfield, Jonathan

    2008-11-01

    This paper reports on findings from qualitative research conducted in the UK that sought to explore the connections between sexual identities and self-destructive behaviours in young people. International evidence demonstrates that there are elevated rates of suicide and alcohol abuse amongst lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth. Rarely included in this body of research are investigations into young LGBT people's views and experiences of self-destructive behaviours. Data from interviews and focus groups with young LGBT participants suggest a strong link between homophobia and self-destructive behaviours. Utilising a discourse analytic approach, we argue that homophobia works to punish at a deep individual level and requires young LGBT people to manage being positioned, because of their sexual desire or gendered ways of being, as abnormal, dirty and disgusting. At the centre of the complex and multiple ways in which young LGBT people negotiate homophobia are 'modalities of shame-avoidance' such as: the routinization and minimizing of homophobia; maintaining individual 'adult' responsibility; and constructing 'proud' identities. The paper argues that these strategies of shame-avoidance suggest young LGBT people manage homophobia individually, without expectation of support and, as such, may make them vulnerable to self-destructive behaviours.

  10. Interpersonal communication in the web 2.0. The relations of young people with strangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JA Ruiz San-Román

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This article presents the results of a research study on the new forms of interpersonal communication that young people establish in the Web 2.0. The general objective is to identify the transformations that have occurred in interpersonal computer-mediated-communication. The particular objectives are: a to determine whether communication with strangers is a common practice among young people; b to establish young internet users’ perception of “stranger”; and c to establish the degree of trust young people place on strangers. Methods: The study (whose reference code is CSO2008-01496 is based on a survey carried out in Spain among 1121 young participants. Results: More than half (53.1% of young people consider online communication with strangers to be a normal type of social relation; the profile of the internet users who talk to strangers on the internet is different from that of the people who do not talk to strangers online, as this latter group conceives interpersonal communications as more sincere, more controllable and more personal.

  11. Pornography, Sexual Coercion and Abuse and Sexting in Young People's Intimate Relationships: A European Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Nicky; Barter, Christine; Wood, Marsha; Aghtaie, Nadia; Larkins, Cath; Lanau, Alba; Överlien, Carolina

    2016-03-06

    New technology has made pornography increasingly accessible to young people, and a growing evidence base has identified a relationship between viewing pornography and violent or abusive behavior in young men. This article reports findings from a large survey of 4,564 young people aged 14 to 17 in five European countries which illuminate the relationship between regular viewing of online pornography, sexual coercion and abuse and the sending and receiving of sexual images and messages, known as "sexting." In addition to the survey, which was completed in schools, 91 interviews were undertaken with young people who had direct experience of interpersonal violence and abuse in their own relationships. Rates for regularly viewing online pornography were very much higher among boys and most had chosen to watch pornography. Boys' perpetration of sexual coercion and abuse was significantly associated with regular viewing of online pornography. Viewing online pornography was also associated with a significantly increased probability of having sent sexual images/messages for boys in nearly all countries. In addition, boys who regularly watched online pornography were significantly more likely to hold negative gender attitudes. The qualitative interviews illustrated that, although sexting is normalized and perceived positively by most young people, it has the potential to reproduce sexist features of pornography such as control and humiliation. Sex and relationships education should aim to promote a critical understanding of pornography among young people that recognizes its abusive and gendered values. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Material deprivation affects high sexual risk behavior among young people in urban slums, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamndaya, Mphatso; Thomas, Liz; Vearey, Jo; Sartorius, Benn; Kazembe, Lawrence

    2014-06-01

    Young people in urban slums adopt HIV risk behaviors influenced by their neighborhood factors. Three critical factors in urban slums of Southern and Eastern Africa--the region most affected by the HIV epidemic in the world--are unmet needs of housing, food, and health care, which are associated with HIV sexual risks. Yet, there has been limited attention on how the combination of unmet needs of housing, food, and health care--i.e., material deprivation-relates to sexual risk behavior among young people in urban slums. Cross-sectional data were extracted from the LoveLife survey in South African four provinces--KwaZulu Natal, Mpumalanga, Eastern Cape, and Gauteng, to examine the association between material deprivation and sexual risk behavior among young people aged 18-23 years (263 males, 267 females) in urban slums. Adjusted logistic regression models showed that material deprivation was significantly associated with increased odds of high sexual risk taking for young men (adjusted OR = 1.20; 95 % CI = 1.10, 5.58) and young women (adjusted OR = 1.43; 95 % CI = 1.35, 3.28). Financial difficulty--a proxy for other deprivations--was the most salient influence on young women's high sexual risk taking (adjusted OR = 2.11; 95 % CI = 1.66, 2.70). Localized behavioral HIV prevention interventions should target young people in deprived households.

  13. The moral panic about the socializing of young people in Minangkabau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyn Parker

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the discourse surrounding the perceived threat of free seks and pergaulan bebas (free socializing to the moral health of young Minangkabau people, and in particular, young women, in West Sumatra. It uses the sociological frame of “moral panic” to examine contemporary discussions about globalization and the influence of “the West” in West Sumatra. The paper examines the way in which “the authorities” in West Sumatra (media, such as teen magazines and newspapers, academics, government and law, teachers, and community leaders present the threat, and the way in which young people, who are the target of the moral panic onslaught, see themselves in relation to the threat. I argue that, unlike the original “folk devils” of the moral panics in Britain, young people in Minangkabau broadly give their consent to the authorities, displaying a striking commitment to social conservatism, local culture, and Islamic values.

  14. Young people navigating political engagement through post-war instability and mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzenevica, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The everyday politics of rural young people who live in post-war settings in the Global South is poorly explored. In the aftermath of a recent civil war in Nepal (1996-2006), villages have been operating without elected bodies, and poorly functioning local governance has been concentrated around...... party patronage networks and community development. In the lives of many young people, the aspirations and practices of educational and labour mobility have been dominant. Based on fieldwork carried out in the Panchthar District, this article discusses how ordinary young people nevertheless engage...... activists balance their daily lives, mobility and household obligations with involvement in party and local development politics? By exploring their motivations and engagement, I come to two conclusions. Firstly, young men navigate party politics by juggling the legacy of patronage and rejecting parties...

  15. Training trainees, young activists, to conduct awareness campaigns about prevention of substance abuse among Lebanese/Armenian young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevian, Mary

    2010-03-01

    Alcohol, tobacco and other drugs (ATOD) abuse and addiction are serious problems among Lebanese youth. Peer education on ATOD abuse in several settings has been found to be an effective way of prevention. This paper describes a collaborative project which trained 30 young activists to lead awareness campaigns in the Lebanon about ATOD abuse and healthy alternatives for relieving stress. The project was initiated by the Armenian Relief Cross in Lebanon (ARCL), funded by the Oxfam Canadian Fund for Social Development and implemented in collaboration with stakeholders in the Armenian community and Oum El Nour organization. Following training, the activists offered awareness sessions to a total audience of 5200:1250 secondary students, 50 university students, 1050 scouts, 300 working adolescents, 50 policemen and 2500 parents. Workshop objectives were met and awareness campaigns evaluated positively by the activists, parents of young people, ARCL and other stakeholders: leaders of Armenian institutions dealing with adolescents and the mayor of Bourj Hammoud. Resource constraints precluded seeking feedback from the young people who participated. Collaboration was deemed to have enhanced the capacity of ARCL, Oum El Nour, and the stakeholders in training young trainees to offer awareness campaigns. The author recommends continuing the project; offering another workshop to support the trainees and building in ways to evaluate the impact of the awareness campaigns on knowledge, attitude and behaviors of the young people taking part. To this effect, evaluation of the impact of the awareness campaigns is already started among school students with the use of control/comparison group design.

  16. The impact of beliefs about face recognition ability on memory retrieval processes in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Joyce E; Flowe, Heather D; Hall, Louise C; Williams, Louise C; Ryder, Hannah L

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether beliefs about face recognition ability differentially influence memory retrieval in older compared to young adults. Participants evaluated their ability to recognise faces and were also given information about their ability to perceive and recognise faces. The information was ostensibly based on an objective measure of their ability, but in actuality, participants had been randomly assigned the information they received (high ability, low ability or no information control). Following this information, face recognition accuracy for a set of previously studied faces was measured using a remember-know memory paradigm. Older adults rated their ability to recognise faces as poorer compared to young adults. Additionally, negative information about face recognition ability improved only older adults' ability to recognise a previously seen face. Older adults were also found to engage in more familiarity than item-specific processing than young adults, but information about their face recognition ability did not affect face processing style. The role that older adults' memory beliefs have in the meta-cognitive strategies they employ is discussed.

  17. Problems Faced by Complete Denture-Wearing Elderly People Living in Jammu District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumeet; Singh, Sarbjeet; Wazir, Nikhil; Raina, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Context: Poor oral health is increasing dramatically among old people especially those living in rural and remote areas. Various factors such as low education background, low income, poor living conditions, unhealthy lifestyle, inadequate oral hygiene and tobacco use lead to poor oral health among older people which in turn lead to risks to their general health. The older people especially from rural areas are apprehensive about seeing a dentist and do not visit them regularly. This may lead to various problems which may have a detrimental influence on their quality of life. Aim: To know the problems faced by complete denture wearers in rural areas in Jammu district. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients from rural area Bishna, initially treated with a complete denture in the maxilla or mandibles were examined. The data were collected with the help of a questionnaire. Results: The results revealed that majority of respondents were in the age – group of 65-70 y. Majority of respondents complained of "difficulty chewing", "sore spots”, “painful and swollen gums". Majority of respondents had difficulty in speech, it was difficult for them to interact and communicate with their dentures on. Most of the respondents had lost confidence and had low self esteem. Clinical observations revealed that the commonest condition associated with denture wearing was Oral Stomatitis/ Burning mouth Syndrome, Superimposed infection and Angular cheilitis. Conclusion: Older people should Communicate and visit dentists, regularly, so that the dentists can adjust the treatment and pace according to their needs. Behavioural therapy techniques can make dental visits relatively anxiety and pain-free. PMID:25654025

  18. Traffic safety and step-by-step driving licence for young people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønning, Charlotte; Agerholm, Niels

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the traffic safety, the Danish Government considered introducing and afterwards implemented a step-by-step driving licence for young drivers. Due to this topicality a literature review on the experiences from step-by-step driving licence for young drivers was conducted. All...... investigated studies show that young people are heavily overrepresented in traffic accident statistics. This is partly due to lack of experience, but also due to poor understanding of the risks involving actions taken in traffic. In order to prevent this, a number of countries have started introducing a step......-by-step driving licence for young drivers. The initiatives in the various countries are the young people driving with an adult, limitations to when and where they may drive, limitations to the number of passengers and their age along with a number of tests and interviews in connection with acquiring the step...

  19. Investing in Our Young People. NBER Working Paper No. 16201

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Flavio; Heckman, James J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent literature on the production of skills of young persons. The literature features the multiplicity of skills that explain success in a variety of life outcomes. Noncognitive skills play a fundamental role in successful lives. The dynamics of skill formation reveal the interplay of cognitive and noncognitive skills, and…

  20. Mixing It up: Bringing Young People's Digital Creativity to Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwell, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Remix is the practice of recombining music, sound, images, and words from sources such as film, television, video, online games, advertising, and novels into new kinds of creative blends. It is a process of re-assembling, recontextualizing, and creating new meanings, and a practice at which young, media-savvy creators excel. Increasingly, youth…

  1. A Typology of Religious Attitudes among Young People in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebertz, Hans-Georg; Kalbheim, Boris; Riegel, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    Issues like faith and Church, religion and religiousness are not valued particularly highly among the young. At the same time a search for the meaning of life and an orientation in one's own behaviour still seem to be significant and transcendent focal points are being sought to deal with these issues. This article questions the value that…

  2. Perception of Mooney Faces by Young Infants: The Role of Local Feature Visibility, Contrast Polarity, and Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yumiko; Hill, Harold C. H.; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K.; Spehar, Branka

    2012-01-01

    We examined the ability of young infants (3- and 4-month-olds) to detect faces in the two-tone images often referred to as Mooney faces. In Experiment 1, this performance was examined in conditions of high and low visibility of local features and with either the presence or absence of the outer head contour. We found that regardless of the…

  3. Age-Related Differences in Face Recognition: Neural Correlates of Repetition and Semantic Priming in Young and Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Holger; Komes, Jessica; Tüttenberg, Simone; Leidinger, Jana; Schweinberger, Stefan R.

    2017-01-01

    Difficulties in person recognition are among the common complaints associated with cognitive ageing. The present series of experiments therefore investigated face and person recognition in young and older adults. The authors examined how within-domain and cross-domain repetition as well as semantic priming affect familiar face recognition and…

  4. Restructuring family planning in the health service: the case of young people's clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, J

    1995-04-01

    A review of the experience of adolescent reproductive health clinics in Liverpool and Bristol highlights the potentially disruptive impact of new National Health Service (NHS) policies and competing professional interests on the attempt to provide integrated, high-quality services. In particular, responsiveness to client needs often collides with NHS demands for efficiency. UK health authorities accept, in principle, the need for separate, informal family planning centers for young people. The 34 Brook Advisory Centers, which deliver confidential contraceptive and counseling services to adolescents, face pressure to become population rather than client-based and to reduce time spent on individual sessions. Moreover, new NHS contracting arrangements have greatly increased the role of general practitioners (GPs) in contraceptive provision, with serious implications for family planning clinics. At present, about 70% of UK women obtain contraceptive and sexual health services from a GP. This encroachment has further increased the marginalization of family planning practitioners, the majority of whom are female, within the medical profession. Concerns have been expressed, however, that GPs are not able to offer the comprehensive services available in clinics and lack sufficient female staff.

  5. Gender and class differences in young people's sexuality and HIV/AIDS risk-taking behaviours in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thianthai, Chulanee

    2004-05-01

    This study examines gender and class differences in young people's beliefs about sexuality and HIV/AIDS risk-taking behaviours in Thailand. Sixty young people aged 15-19, divided equally by gender and socioeconomic background, participated in focus groups and in-depth interviews. Four topics were explored: the differences between 'good' and 'bad' girls/boys; young people's perceptions of sexuality; social class variations in young people's knowledge of HIV/AIDS and perceptions of risk; and the most influential institutions shaping young people's sexual attitudes. Results showed that young people screened potential sexual partners utilizing an image of 'good girls/boys' as potential HIV/AIDS-free partners; young people defined sexuality in terms of love/sexual relationships, premarital sex, promiscuity, and virginity; and HIV/AIDS awareness varied according to class. Young people of all classes failed to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of how they can contract AIDS. They neither viewed themselves as being in an at-risk group, nor considered their sexual behaviours to be at-risk behaviours. Finally, family, friends, and mass media were reported to be among the most influential institutions shaping young people's sexual attitudes. In the struggle against HIV/AIDS, these institutions together with health education not only protect but also can empower young people in Thailand.

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease in young patients: challenges faced by black and minority ethnic communities in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, Christopher; Nash, Avril; Lloyd, Michele; Brooks, Fiona; Lindsay, James O; Poullis, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    There is strong evidence indicating that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing among black and minority ethnic (BME) communities. Despite this rise in prevalence, there is a paucity of research relating to ethnicity and IBD outside the USA. Furthermore, the symptoms of IBD are reported to start during childhood or adolescence in 20-25% of people with the condition. It is therefore important that young people's experiences of diagnosis, treatment and living with IBD are fully understood to ensure effective services and information provision. The study reported on in this paper was commissioned by a UK charity (Crohn's and Colitis UK) with the aim of increasing understanding of the specific issues and service needs of young people with IBD from BME communities. Empirical research entailed in-depth semi-structured interviews with 20 young people from BME groups accessed through gastroenterology departments at three collaborating NHS hospitals in England serving ethnically diverse populations. Interviews were carried out from June to December 2010 and sought to capture young people's views with IBD. A thematic analysis of their experiences identified many commonalities with other young people with IBD, such as the problematic route to formal diagnosis and the impact of IBD on education. The young people also experienced tensions between effective self-management strategies and cultural norms and practices relating to food. Moreover, the ability of parents to provide support was hampered for some young people by the absence of culturally competent services that were responsive to the families' communication needs. The findings highlight the need for more culturally appropriate information concerning IBD, and improved responsiveness to young people with IBD within primary care and the education system, as well as culturally competent messaging relating to the specific nature of the condition among the wider South Asian and black communities.

  7. "Young people want to be a part of the answer"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B. B.; Larsen, Niels; Simovska, V.

    : the student project-work is directed towards action and change. Students? ideas and visions have a crucial role in deciding about actions to be taken with regard to improving the environment and health in their schools and communities. · Cross-cultural collaboration: students cooperate across national borders...... schools working within the frames of environment and health. The action component this time is linked to WHO?s Fourth Ministerial Conference on Environment and Health, entitled ?The future for our children?, that took take place in Budapest 23-25 June, 2004. "Young Minds" was invited to actively...... participate in this conference. The Main Approach of Young Minds The main approach builds on the following key elements: · Student participation: students are genuinely involved in dialogue and decision making about specific aspects of the topics they are working with · Action and change orientation...

  8. ThinkQuest to help Internet people Think Young!

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The ThinkQuest Internet Challenge Awards are given to young teams of web site designers. This year, the award ceremony was hosted by CERN on 19 March.   Young visitors to CERN are not unusual. But those you may have seen around the Laboratory last Monday were here for a special event - the ThinkQuest Internet Challenge Awards. This is an international program for students from 12 to 19 working in teams, across different schools and cultures, to design exciting, interactive, and educational web sites. At stake in the competition was over $1 million in scholarships and awards. Martine Brunschwig Graf (top left), Geneva State Councillor responsible for public education, at the ThinkQuest award ceremony at CERN where some 70 young finalists were assembled. For this year's Award Ceremony, the 70 finalists were CERN's guests on Monday after spending three days in Geneva. Ranging in age from 14 to 19 years and representing over 20 countries, the finalists were welcomed to the awards day by CERN Director G...

  9. Using Literature for Young People to Teach about Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Caroline C.; Cruz, Barbara C.

    2012-01-01

    Using literature in the social studies classroom is a useful pedagogy that is particularly well-suited in human rights education. Literature can give voice to people who cannot speak for themselves and gives students an opportunity to consider perspectives that are often foreign to them. When used with delicacy and care, these literary…

  10. Using Literature for Young People to Teach about Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Caroline C.; Cruz, Barbara C.

    2012-01-01

    Using literature in the social studies classroom is a useful pedagogy that is particularly well-suited in human rights education. Literature can give voice to people who cannot speak for themselves and gives students an opportunity to consider perspectives that are often foreign to them. When used with delicacy and care, these literary…

  11. Ethnic Tolerance in the Consciousness of Young People in Tula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonova, Ekaterina Anatol'evna; Iudina, Ekaterina Iur'evna

    2010-01-01

    In the ethnosociological literature, the term "ethnic tolerance" is interpreted as a specific trait of the national character of some particular people, its mentality, a trait that is oriented toward tolerance, harmony, and a willingness to deal constructively with any problems that arise in interethnic relations. The variegated…

  12. Representations of Black Experience in Literature for Young People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Beverley

    This paper reviews the role of black experience in worldwide literature, focusing primarily on particular texts from the viewpoint of colonial whites in South Africa. Black people were represented as savages, comic buffoons, or faithful servants and slaves; all three representations dehumanized, rationalized, and justified the oppression of black…

  13. headspace: National Youth Mental Health Foundation: making headway with rural young people and their mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Craig A; O'Brien, Matthew S; McGorry, Patrick D

    2007-04-01

    Mental health is the number one health issue affecting young people in Australia today, yet only one in four of these young people receive professional help. Approximately 14% of 12- to 17-year-olds and 27% of 18- to 25-year-olds experience mental health problems each year. However, many do not have ready access to treatment or are reluctant to seek that help. These issues might be exacerbated in the rural and remote regions of Australia where sociocultural barriers such as stigma, lack of anonymity and logistic difficulties including cost and availability of transport can hinder young people accessing mental health services. headspace: the National Youth Mental Health Foundation has been funded to address these issues. headspace will provide funding for the establishment of communities of youth services across Australia, provide national and local community awareness campaigns and plans, establish a centre of excellence that will identify and disseminate evidence-based practice in addressing youth mental health issues, and translate findings into education and training programs that are targeted at service providers to work with youth mental health. The communities of youth services will build the capacity of local communities to identify early, and provide effective responses to, young people aged 12-25 years with mental health and related substance use disorders. Specific approaches in rural, regional and remote areas will be developed as well as specific programs to involve young Indigenous people.

  14. Creating intoxigenic environments: marketing alcohol to young people in Aotearoa New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreanor, Tim; Barnes, Helen Moewaka; Kaiwai, Hector; Borell, Suaree; Gregory, Amanda

    2008-09-01

    Alcohol consumption among young people in New Zealand is on the rise. Given the broad array of acute and chronic harms that arise from this trend, it is a major cause for alarm and it is imperative that we improve our knowledge of key drivers of youth drinking. Changes wrought by the neoliberal political climate of deregulation that characterised the last two decades in many countries including Aotearoa (Aotearoa is a Maori name for New Zealand) New Zealand have transformed the availability of alcohol to young people. Commercial development of youth alcohol markets has seen the emergence of new environments, cultures and practices around drinking and intoxication but the ways in which these changes are interpreted and taken up are not well understood. This paper reports findings from a qualitative research project investigating the meaning-making practices of young people in New Zealand in response to alcohol marketing. Research data included group interviews with a range of Maori and Pakeha young people at three time periods. Thematic analyses of the youth data on usages of marketing materials indicate naturalisation of tropes of alcohol intoxication. We show how marketing is used and enjoyed in youth discourses creating and maintaining what we refer to as intoxigenic social environments. The implications are considered in light of the growing exposure of young people to alcohol marketing in a discussion of strategies to manage and mitigate its impacts on behaviour and consumption.

  15. Confidentiality in Family Planning Services for Young People: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittain, Anna W; Williams, Jessica R; Zapata, Lauren B; Moskosky, Susan B; Weik, Tasmeen S

    2015-08-01

    Family planning services are essential for reducing high rates of unintended pregnancies among young people, yet a perception that providers will not preserve confidentiality may deter youth from accessing these services. This systematic review, conducted in 2011, summarizes the evidence on the effect of assuring confidentiality in family planning services to young people on reproductive health outcomes. The review was used to inform national recommendations on providing quality family planning services. Multiple databases were searched to identify articles addressing confidentiality in family planning services to youth aged 10-24 years. Included studies were published from January 1985 through February 2011. Studies conducted outside the U.S., Canada, Europe, Australia, or New Zealand, and those that focused exclusively on HIV or sexually transmitted diseases, were excluded. The search strategy identified 19,332 articles, nine of which met the inclusion criteria. Four studies examined outcomes. Examined outcomes included use of clinical services and intention to use services. Of the four outcome studies, three found a positive association between assurance of confidentiality and at least one outcome of interest. Five studies provided information on youth perspectives and underscored the idea that young people greatly value confidentiality when receiving family planning services. This review demonstrates that there is limited research examining whether confidentiality in family planning services to young people affects reproductive health outcomes. A robust research agenda is needed, given the importance young people place on confidentiality. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Systematic review: psychological morbidity in young people with inflammatory bowel disease - risk factors and impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, A J; Rowse, G; Ryder, A; Peach, E J; Corfe, B M; Lobo, A J

    2016-07-01

    Psychological morbidity in young people aged 10-24 years, with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increased, but risk factors for and impacts of this are unclear. To undertake a systematic literature review of the risk factors for and impact of psychological morbidity in young people with IBD. Electronic searches for English-language articles were performed with keywords relating to psychological morbidity according to DSM-IV and subsequent criteria; young people; and IBD in the MEDLINE, PsychInfo, Web of Science and CINAHL databases for studies published from 1994 to September 2014. One thousand four hundred and forty-four studies were identified, of which 30 met the inclusion criteria. The majority measured depression and anxiety symptoms, with a small proportion examining externalising behaviours. Identifiable risk factors for psychological morbidity included: increased disease severity (r(2) = 0.152, P young people with IBD were wide-ranging and included abdominal pain (r = 0.33; P young people with IBD in a range of ways, highlighting the need for psychological interventions to improve outcomes. Identified risk factors provide an opportunity to develop targeted therapies for a vulnerable group. Further research is required to examine groups under-represented in this review, such as those with severe IBD and those from ethnic minorities. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Sickle cell, habitual dys-positions and fragile dispositions: young people with sickle cell at school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Simon M; Atkin, Karl; Culley, Lorraine A; Dyson, Sue E; Evans, Hala

    2011-01-01

    The experiences of young people living with a sickle cell disorder in schools in England are reported through a thematic analysis of forty interviews, using Bourdieu’s notions of field, capital and habitus. Young people with sickle cell are found to be habitually dys-positioned between the demands of the clinic for health maintenance through self-care and the field of the school, with its emphases on routines, consistent attendance and contextual demands for active and passive pupil behaviour. The tactics or dispositions that young people living with sickle cell can then employ, during strategy and struggle at school, are therefore fragile: they work only contingently, transiently or have the unintended consequences of displacing other valued social relations. The dispositions of the young people with sickle cell are framed by other social struggles: innovations in school procedures merely address aspects of sickle cell in isolation and are not consolidated into comprehensive policies; mothers inform, liaise, negotiate and advocate in support of a child with sickle cell but with limited success. Reactions of teachers and peers to sickle cell have the enduring potential to drain the somatic, cultural and social capital of young people living with sickle cell. PMID:21375541

  18. Do online mental health services improve help-seeking for young people? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauer, Sylvia Deidre; Mangan, Cheryl; Sanci, Lena

    2014-03-04

    Young people regularly use online services to seek help and look for information about mental health problems. Yet little is known about the effects that online services have on mental health and whether these services facilitate help-seeking in young people. This systematic review investigates the effectiveness of online services in facilitating mental health help-seeking in young people. Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, literature searches were conducted in PubMed, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane library. Out of 608 publications identified, 18 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria of investigating online mental health services and help-seeking in young people aged 14-25 years. Two qualitative, 12 cross-sectional, one quasi-experimental, and three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were reviewed. There was no change in help-seeking behavior found in the RCTs, while the quasi-experimental study found a slight but significant increase in help-seeking. The cross-sectional studies reported that online services facilitated seeking help from a professional source for an average of 35% of users. The majority of the studies included small sample sizes and a high proportion of young women. Help-seeking was often a secondary outcome, with only 22% (4/18) of studies using adequate measures of help-seeking. The majority of studies identified in this review were of low quality and likely to be biased. Across all studies, young people regularly used and were generally satisfied with online mental health resources. Facilitators and barriers to help-seeking were also identified. Few studies examine the effects of online services on mental health help-seeking. Further research is needed to determine whether online mental health services effectively facilitate help-seeking for young people.

  19. Social media, help or hindrance: what role does social media play in young people's mental health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Alfie

    2014-11-01

    Social media is a huge force in the lives of young people with wide ranging effects on their development; given the importance of adolescence in the genesis of mental illness, social media is a factor in the mental health of young people. Despite the role that social media obviously plays in the development of mental illness, little research has been done into the impact that social media has on in the mental illness of young people. In general, what research there is points towards social media having a large impact on young people in both positive and negative ways. In particular, certain studies show a greater incidence and severity of bullying online compared to offline which may contribute to the development of depression. This contrasts with the positive impact that social media seems to have for young people in minority groups (ethnic minorities and those with chronic disease or disability) by allowing them to connect with others who live similar lives despite geographical separation. This acts as a positive influence in these people's lives though a direct link to mental illness was not shown. Overall, several important issues are raised: firstly, the lack of research that has been conducted in the area; secondly, the gulf that exists between the generation of younger, 'digital native' generations and the older generations who are not as engaged with social media; and finally, the huge potential that exists for the use of social media as a protective influence for adolescents. With proper engagement, policy makers and health professionals could use social media to connect with young people on issues like mental health.

  20. The role of self-help in the treatment of mild anxiety disorders in young people: an evidence-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Debra Rickwood1,2, Sally Bradford31Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 2headspace: National Youth Mental Health Foundation, North Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaAbstract: Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problems experienced by young people, and even mild anxiety can significantly limit social, emotional, and cognitive development into adulthood. It is, therefore, essential that anxiety is treated as early and effectively as possible. Young people are unlikely, however, to seek professional treatment for their problems, increasing their chance of serious long-term problems such as impaired peer relations and low self-esteem. The barriers young people face to accessing services are well documented, and self-help resources may provide an alternative option to respond to early manifestations of anxiety disorders. This article reviews the potential benefits of self-help treatments for anxiety and the evidence for their effectiveness. Despite using inclusive review criteria, only six relevant studies were found. The results of these studies show that there is some evidence for the use of self-help interventions for anxiety in young people, but like the research with adult populations, the overall quality of the studies is poor and there is need for further and more rigorous research.Keywords: adolescent, young adult, children, mental disorder, self-administered, bibliotherapy, therapist-guided

  1. Synthetic Marijuana Lands Thousands of Young People in the ER, Especially Young Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs Related Topics Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults ...

  2. Supporting Identity Development in Cross-Cultural Children and Young People: Resources, Vulnerability, Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildegunn Schuff

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Children and young people with cross-cultural backgrounds are significantly influenced by multiple cultures during their upbringing. They face the ambivalence and challenges of regularly dealing with multiple cultural frames of reference, norms and expectations, and often experience particular identity challenges. One might say that much of the ambivalence of modern intercultural societies may show up as internalized ambivalence in these “children of migration”. This article explores cross-cultural identity development. The aim is to further our understanding of how the identities of cross-cultural children and young people can be supported and their resources activated. This can both strengthen their resilience and well- being, and be of great value to society at large. Psychosocial/cultural interventions and creative projects in cross-cultural settings are potential arenas for this type of cultural health promotion. One example is the multicultural music project Fargespill (‘Kaleidoscope’. In a case study of Kaleidoscope, I describe and discuss how these participatory creative activities work, and ask how they may foster the development of constructive cross-cultural identities. Participant observation was conducted in Kaleidoscope throughout a year. In the light of theoretical perspectives from social and cultural psychology, the article analyzes identity issues and possibilities within this empirical context. Supporting cross-cultural identity development in a constructive manner is here operationalized as allowing, increasing and acknowledging identity complexity. The findings are categorized under the headings of resources, vulnerability and creativity. The project leaders make an effort to establish trust and a safe, supportive space. They apply a participatory method, in which the participants are seen as resources and their strengths and contributions are emphasized. In some situations, the vulnerability that may be caused by

  3. Here's an idea: ask the users! Young people's views on navigation, design and content of a health information website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Linda S; Noble, Genevieve

    2007-12-01

    Use of the internet to provide health information to young people is a relatively recent development. Few studies have explored young people's views on how they use internet health websites. This study investigated the navigation, design and content preferences of young people using the Children First for Health (CFfH) website. Young people from five secondary schools completed an internet site navigation exercise, website evaluation questionnaire and participated in informal discussions. Of the participants, 45 percent visited the website section aimed at older adolescents within their first two clicks, regardless of their age. There were conflicting preferences for design and strong preference for gender-specific information on topics such as appearance, relationships, fitness and sexual health. The findings indicate the importance of gaining young people's views to ensure that health information websites meet the needs of their intended audience. Cooperation from schools can facilitate the process of gaining young people's views on internet website navigation, design and content.

  4. School Nurses' Experiences of Managing Young People With Mental Health Problems: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenna, Jean; Cleaver, Karen

    2016-02-01

    Prevalence of mental health disorder is increasing among young people. It is recognized that early intervention is essential in supporting young people, and care provided within schools to support emotional well-being is recommended as part of this process. A scoping review was undertaken examining school nurses' experiences of supporting the mental health of schoolchildren. Findings suggest that school nurses have a central role in supporting young peoples' mental health, although a number of barriers exist which impact on school nurses' preparedness for this aspect of their role. While there are inconsistencies in the provision of mental health training available to support school nurses, when training is implemented it has positive outcomes for service provision and quality of care. A number of challenges for school nurses were also identified, and recommendations for practice are suggested in the article. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Lost in transition: child to adult cancer services for young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInally, Wendy

    Cancer nursing care across the UK has dramatically improved for children and young people with cancer over the past 20 years (Department of Health, 2007). Around 70% of young people diagnosed with cancer survive into adulthood, albeit with long-term health complications (Scottish Government, 2012). This raises the contemporary concern of how best to transition these patients to an adult-focused care regime (National Cancer Survivorship Initiative, 2012). With support from a Florence Nightingale Foundation Travel Scholarship in 2012, this study compared the various transition models currently in use across the UK, Finland and the USA with a clear focus on individual patient choice, staff education and preparation to care for this group of patients and their families. The findings revealed wide discrepancy in current nursing practices across the globe. This article presents a series of findings and recommendations to improve further the overall cancer experience for young people living with and beyond a cancer diagnosis.

  6. EMPLOYMENT DIFFICULTIES EXPERIENCED BY YOUNG PEOPLE IN THE RURAL AREAS OF THE REPUBLIC OF MOLDOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica PRISĂCARU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The basic aim of our investigation was to elucidate the problems of young people as part of the human potential ofrural areas. As a result of processing statistical data related to the evolution of the labour market in the Republic ofMoldova, there were highlighted the differences between the average indicators of the labour market in the country,both in urban and rural areas, putting a particular emphasis on young people. Also, according to the generalizationof a survey data there were found the causes that repress the desire of graduates of agricultural educationinstitutions to find jobs in rural areas. The final conclusion is that even if in the country at governmental level,certain attempts are made to attract young people to work in villages, their efficiency is still insufficient.

  7. In or out? Barriers and facilitators to refugee-background young people accessing mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Erminia; Minas, Harry; Szwarc, Josef; Guerra, Carmel; Paxton, Georgia

    2015-12-01

    Refugee young people have been identified as a group with high risk for mental health problems, due to their experience of trauma, forced migration, and stressors associated with settlement. A high prevalence of mental health problems is reported in this group, however some research suggests refugee young people have low rates of mental health service access. There is little information available on barriers and facilitators to mental service delivery for this group. Using data from 15 focus groups and five key informant interviews with a total of 115 service providers from 12 agencies in Melbourne, Australia, this paper explores barriers and facilitators to engaging young people from refugee backgrounds with mental health services. Eight key themes emerged: cultural concepts of mental health, illness, and treatment; service accessibility; trust; working with interpreters; engaging family and community; the style and approach of mental health providers; advocacy; and continuity of care.

  8. Metaphors We Love By: Conceptualizations of Sex among Young People in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undie, Chi-Chi; Crichton, Joanna; Zulu, Eliya

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores how young people in Malawi conceptualize sex and sexual relations through an analysis of their personal narratives about these phenomena. Eleven focus group discussions were conducted with 114 youth aged 14–19 years. Participants were asked to describe behaviors, attitudes, and motivations to reduce unplanned pregnancies and the spread of HIV/AIDS, with appropriate probes to illuminate their sexual world-views. The various metaphors that emanated from the discussions suggest that young people in this study take a utilitarian approach to sex, and conceive it as a natural and routine activity of which pleasure and passion are essential components. Future research and prevention efforts (around sexuality education in particular) would do well to incorporate adolescents’ language in programming as this can enhance understanding of the world of young people as well as the effectiveness of interventions addressing problems related to early sexual behavior. PMID:18458743

  9. Can improvised somatic dance reduce acute pain for young people in hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowler, Lisa

    2016-11-08

    Aim This study explores the effects of improvised somatic dance (ISD) on children and young people experiencing acute pain following orthopaedic or cardiac surgery, or post-acquired brain injury. Methods The study involved 25 children and young people and adopted a mixed methods approach. This included a descriptive qualitative approach to help the participants and witnesses verbalise their experience of ISD, and pain scores were assessed before and after ISD using validated pain assessment tools. Data were analysed using descriptive statistical analysis. Findings A total of 92% of participants experienced a reduction in pain, with 80% experiencing a >50% reduction. There was an improved sense of well-being for all. Conclusion Although not a replacement for pharmacological treatments, a multidimensional, child-centred and inclusive approach with ISD can be a useful complementary, non-pharmacological method of pain management in children and young people.

  10. High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise: Effect on Young People's Cardiometabolic Health and Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Simon B; Dring, Karah J; Nevill, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    With only a quarter of young people currently meeting physical activity guidelines, two key areas of concern are the effects of exercise on cardiometabolic health and cognition. Despite the fact that physical activity in young people is typically high intensity and intermittent in nature, much of the literature examines traditional endurance-type exercise. This review provides an update on the effects of high-intensity intermittent exercise on young people's cardiometabolic health and cognition. High-intensity intermittent exercise has acute beneficial effects on endothelial function and postprandial lipemia and chronic positive effects on weight management. In addition, there is emerging evidence regarding chronic benefits on the blood lipid profile, blood pressure, and proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, emerging evidence suggests beneficial acute and chronic effects of high-intensity intermittent exercise on cognition. However, further research is required in both cardiometabolic health and cognition, particularly regarding the impact of school-based interventions in adolescents.

  11. ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION IN YOUNG PEOPLE: EFFICACY OF SYMPATHOLYTIC THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Nikitina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the effect of imidasoline agonist, rilmenidine (Albarel, on 24-hour blood pressure (BP profile and autonomic regulation of cardiovascular system in young patients with arterial hypertension (HT and exogenous constitutional obesity (ECO.Material and methods. The study included 80 men aged 18-32 ( average age 20,5 years, including 34 patients with HT and normal body weight, 36 patients with HT and ECO, 10 healthy men as a control group. All hypertensive patients were treated with rilmenidine 1-2 mg daily during 12 weeks. BP 24-hour profile and heart rate variability (HRV were estimated before and after therapy.Results. Rilmenidine monotherapy resulted in significant reduction in average 24-hour, day-time and night-time BP as well as indices of BP loading in both groups. Indices of HRV proved the initial sympathetic overdrive among hypertensive patients especially among those with ECO. This sympathetic overdrive significantly reduced after 12 weeks of therapy.Conclusion. Rilmenidine effectively controls BP and reduces sympathetic system overdrive in young hypertensive patients with ECO.

  12. The structural influence of family and parenting on young people's sexual and reproductive health in rural northern Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Wamoyia, Joyce; Wight, Daniel; Remes, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the structural role of the family and parenting in young people's sexual and reproductive health. The study involved eight weeks of participant observation, 26 in-depth interviews, and 11 group discussions with young people aged 14–24 years, and 20 in-depth interviews and 6 group discussions with parents/carers of children in this age group. At an individual level, parenting and family structure were found to affect young people's sexual behaviour by influencing children's...

  13. Special units for young people on the autistic spectrum in mainstream schools: sites of normalisation, abnormalisation, inclusion, and exclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Louise Holt; Jennifer Lea; Sophie Bowlby

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the experiences of young people on the autistic spectrum (AS) who attend a special unit within a mainstream secondary school in England. The paper feeds into contemporary debates about the nature of inclusive schooling and, more broadly, special education. Young people on the AS have been largely neglected within these debates. The paper focuses upon processes of normalisation and abnormalisation to which the young people on the AS are subject, and how these are interconne...

  14. Development of practice principles for the management of ongoing suicidal ideation in young people diagnosed with major depressive disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Simon M.; Simmons, Magenta B; Alan P. Bailey; Alexandra G Parker; Hetrick, Sarah E; Davey, Christopher G; Mark Phelan; Simon Blaikie; Jane Edwards

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: There is a lack of clear guidance regarding the management of ongoing suicidality in young people experiencing major depressive disorder. This study utilised an expert consensus approach in identifying practice principles to complement relevant clinical guidelines for the treatment of major depressive disorder in young people. The study also sought to outline a broad treatment framework for clinical intervention with young people experiencing ongoing suicidal ideation. Methods: In...

  15. Basic prerequisites of appearance and resocialization of children and young people of the risk group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Тамара Василівна Говорун

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Social and psychological factors of the appearance of young people of the "risk" group, the best practices of their resocialization have been determined. Children of vulnerable categories from young age have predispositions for acquiring properties and antisocial behavior caused by everyday stress in family life, conflict situations in school interaction. Youth is marked by lag in education, substance abuse, criminal acts, variance of exploitation. Psychocorrectional programs activate subjectivity of undergrads in anger management skills, education and communication

  16. Draw a Young and an Older Person: Schoolchildren's Images of Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Feliciano; Faba, Josep

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore stereotypes of older people as expressed in drawings by a sample of primary school children. Sixty children from fourth to sixth grades (30 boys and 30 girls aged 9 to 12 years) were asked to draw a young man, a young woman, an old man, and an old woman. The drawings were content analyzed. Children in our…

  17. Kinematics of hip, knee, ankle of the young and elderly Chinese people during kneeling activity*

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Hai; Wang, Dong-Mei; Liu, Tao-ran; Zeng, Xiang-sen; Wang, Cheng-tao

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to measure the kinematics of the lower limbs of Chinese people during normal kneeling activity, as such data could be valuable in designing joint prosthesis and arthroplasty that meet the needs of Chinese citizens’ daily activities. Methods: Thirty young and twenty elderly Chinese participants with no personal history of joint diseases were recruited, and matched by age (average age: 23.8 years for the young group, 60.8 years for the elderly group). Ea...

  18. Natural experience modulates the processing of older adult faces in young adults and 3-year-old children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Proietti

    Full Text Available Just like other face dimensions, age influences the way faces are processed by adults as well as by children. However, it remains unclear under what conditions exactly such influence occurs at both ages, in that there is some mixed evidence concerning the presence of a systematic processing advantage for peer faces (own-age bias across the lifespan. Inconsistency in the results may stem from the fact that the individual's face representation adapts to represent the most predominant age traits of the faces present in the environment, which is reflective of the individual's specific living conditions and social experience. In the current study we investigated the processing of younger and older adult faces in two groups of adults (Experiment 1 and two groups of 3-year-old children (Experiment 2 who accumulated different amounts of experience with elderly people. Contact with elderly adults influenced the extent to which both adult and child participants showed greater discrimination abilities and stronger sensitivity to configural/featural cues in younger versus older adult faces, as measured by the size of the inversion effect. In children, the size of the inversion effect for older adult faces was also significantly correlated with the amount of contact with elderly people. These results show that, in both adults and children, visual experience with older adult faces can tune perceptual processing strategies to the point of abolishing the discrimination disadvantage that participants typically manifest for those faces in comparison to younger adult faces.

  19. Professionals' perception of intimate partner violence in young people: a qualitative study in northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquibar, Amaia; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; Goicolea, Isabel

    2017-07-20

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a public health problem with devastating effects on young women's health. These negative effects increase when the exposure to IPV lasts for a long time and exposure at an early age increases the risk of adult IPV. Despite efforts made in the last few decades, data show little progress has been made towards its reduction. Thus, the aim of the study reported here is to explore professionals' perceptions regarding intimate partner violence (IPV) among young people, focusing on the characteristics of the phenomenon and their perceptions about existing programmes and campaigns aimed at addressing it. Twelve professionals from education, health and municipal social services were interviewed. All but one of the interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed according to the methodology of inductive thematic analysis, with the support of Atlas.ti software. The transcripts were read several times and coded line by line. Afterwards, codes were grouped into themes. The developed themes were refined into two phases with the participation of all the authors. From the analysis, the following three themes were identified: "A false sense of gender equity", "IPV among young people: subtle, daily and normalized", and "Mass media campaigns do not fit young people's needs". According to the participants, psychological abuse in the form of controlling behaviour by their partners is the most common type of IPV young women are exposed to, although exposure to other types of IPV was also acknowledged. This violence was described as something subtle, daily and normalized and, consequently, not something that is easy to recognize for the girls that are exposed to it, nor for adults working with young people. The study participants showed good knowledge of the characteristics IPV has among young people. This knowledge was reflected in locally implemented IPV prevention projects, which they considered successful in addressing young

  20. The Self-Conscious Researcher—Post-Modern Perspectives of Participatory Research with Young People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire McCartan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research in young people by young people is a growing trend and considered a democratic approach to exploring their lives. Qualitative research is also seen as a way of redistributing power; with participatory research positioned by many as a democratic paradigm of qualitative inquiry. Although participatory research may grant a view on another world, it is fraught with a range of relationships that require negotiation and which necessitate constant self-reflection. Drawing on experiential accounts of participatory research with young people, this paper will explore the power relationship from the perspective of the adult researcher, the young peer researcher and also that of the researched. It will explore the self-conscious exchange of power; and describe how it is relinquished and reclaimed with increasing degrees of compliance as confidence and security develops. Co-authored by a peer researcher and adult researchers, this paper will illustrate a range of practical examples of participatory research with young people, decode the power struggle and consider the implications. It will argue that although the initial stages of the research process are artificial, self-conscious and undemocratic it concludes that the end may justify the means with the creation of social agency knowledge, experience and reality. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs120192