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Sample records for facility-b mftf-b axicell

  1. Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration: NbTi magnet system. Manufacturing/producibility final report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritschel, A.J.; White, W.L.

    1985-05-01

    This Final MFTF-B Manufacturing/Producibility Report covers facilities, tooling plan, manufacturing sequence, schedule and performance, producibility, and lessons learned for the solenoid, axicell, and transition coils, as well as a deactivation plan, conclusions, references, and appendices

  2. Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration: NbTi magnet system. Manufacturing/producibility final report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritschel, A.J.; White, W.L.

    1985-05-01

    This Final MFTF-B Manufacturing/Producibility Report covers facilities, tooling plan, manufacturing sequence, schedule and performance, producibility, and lessons learned for the solenoid, axicell, and transition coils, as well as a deactivation plan, conclusions, references, and appendices.

  3. High field Nb3Sn Axicell insert coils for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, R.W.; Tatro, R.E.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1984-03-01

    Two 12-tesla superconducting insert coils are being designed by General Dynamics Convair Division for the axicell regions of MFTF-B for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A major challenge of this project is to ensure that combined fabrication and operational strains induced in the conductor are within stringent limitations of the relatively brittle Nb 3 Sn superconductor filaments. These coils are located in the axicell region of MFTF-B. They have a clear-bore diameter of 36.195cm (14.25 inches) and consist of 27 double pancakes (i.e., 54 pancakes per coil) would on an electrically insulated 304LN stainless steel/bobbin helium vessel. Each pancake has 57 turns separated by G-10CR insulation. The complete winding bundle has 4.6 million ampere-turns and uniform current density of 2007 A/cm 2 . In conjunction with the other magnets in the system, they produce a 12-tesla central field and a 12.52-tesla peak field. A multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn conductor was selected to meet these requirements. The conductor consists of a monolithic insert soldered into a copper stabilizer. Sufficient cross-sectional area and work-hardening of the copper stabilizer has been provided for the conductor to self-react the electromagnetic Lorentz force induced hoop stresses with normal operational tensile strains less than 0.07 percent

  4. Axicell MFTF-B superconducting-magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Bulmer, R.; Hanson, C.; Hinkle, R.; Kozman, T.; Shimer, D.; Tatro, R.; VanSant, J.; Wohlwend, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Axicell MFTF-B magnet system will provide the field environment necessary for tandem mirror plasma physics investigation with thermal barriers. The performance of the device will stimulate DT to achieve energy break-even plasma conditions. Operation will be with deuterium only. There will be 24 superconducting coils consisting of 2 sets of yin-yang pairs, 14 central-cell solenoids, 2 sets of axicell mirror-coil pairs, and 2 transition coils between the axicell mirror coil-pairs and the yin-yang coils. This paper describes the progress in the design and construction of MFTF-B Superconducting-Magnet System

  5. Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration: NbTi magnet system. Design and analysis summary. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heathman, J.H.; Wohlwend, J.W.

    1985-05-01

    This report summarizes the designs and analyses produced by General Dynamics Convair for the four Axicell magnets (A1 and A20, east and west), the four Transition magnets (T1 and T2, east and west), and the twelve Solenoid magnets (S1 through S6, east and west). Over four million drawings and specifications, in addition to detailed stress analysis, thermal analysis, electrical, instrumentation, and verification test reports were produced as part of the MFTF-B design effort. Significant aspects of the designs, as well as key analysis results, are summarized in this report. In addition, drawing trees and lists off detailed analysis and test reports included in this report define the locations of the detailed design and analysis data.

  6. Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration: NbTi magnet system. Design and analysis summary. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heathman, J.H.; Wohlwend, J.W.

    1985-05-01

    This report summarizes the designs and analyses produced by General Dynamics Convair for the four Axicell magnets (A1 and A20, east and west), the four Transition magnets (T1 and T2, east and west), and the twelve Solenoid magnets (S1 through S6, east and west). Over four million drawings and specifications, in addition to detailed stress analysis, thermal analysis, electrical, instrumentation, and verification test reports were produced as part of the MFTF-B design effort. Significant aspects of the designs, as well as key analysis results, are summarized in this report. In addition, drawing trees and lists off detailed analysis and test reports included in this report define the locations of the detailed design and analysis data

  7. Axicell design for the end plugs of MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.; Karpenko, V.N.

    1982-01-01

    Certain changes in the end-plug design in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) are described. The Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to implement these changes as soon as possible in order to construct the machine in an axicell configuration. The present physics and technology goals as well as the project cost and schedule will not be affected by these changes

  8. Progress on axicell MFTF-B superconducting magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kozman, T.A.; Hanson, C.L.; Shimer, D.W.; VanSant, J.H.; Zbasnik, J.

    1983-01-01

    Since the entire Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) Magnet System was reconfigured from the original A-cell to an axicell design, much progress has been made on the design, fabrication, and installation planning. The axicell MFTF-B magnet array consists of a total of 26 large superconducting main coils. This paper provides an engineering overview of the progress of these coils. Recent studies on the effects of field errors on the plasma at the recircularizing region (transition coils) show that small field errors will generate large displacements of the field lines. These field errors might enhance radial electron heat transport and deteriorate the plasma confinement. Therefore, 16 superconducting trim coils have been designed to correct the coil misalignments. Progress of the trim coils are reported also

  9. Physics basis for an axicell design for the end plugs of MFTF-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, D.E.; Logan, B.G. (eds.)

    1982-04-21

    The primary motivation for conversion of MFTF-B to an axicell configuration lies in its engineering promise as a reactor geometry based on circular high-magnetic-field coils. In comparing this configuration to the previous A-cell geometry, we find a number of differences that might significantly affect the physics performance. The purpose of the present document is to examine those features and to assess their impact on the performance of the axicell, as compared to the A-cell configuration, for MFTF-B. In so doing, we address only those issues thought to be affected by the change in geometry and refer to the original report Physics Basis for MFTF-B, for discussion of those issues thought not to be affected. In Sec. 1, we summarize these physics issues. In Sec. 2, we describe operating scenarios in the new configuration. In the Appendices, we discuss those physics issues that require more detailed treatment.

  10. DT-burning upgrade to MFTF-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassen, K.I.; Logan, B.G.; Doggett, J.N.; Coensgen, F.H.

    1984-05-07

    To improve MFTF-B, one must raise the ion energy and the electrostatic confining potential. This requires higher beam energy (200 keV in this case) and, to preserve end-plug adiabaticity and hold higher plasma density in the central cell, a higher level of magnetic field. In the MFTF Upgrade we also want to incorporate the new end plug configuration first invented for the MARS reactor. This new magnet design is compared with the present MFTF-B magnet set. The differences include the addition of a pair of recircularizing coils on the ends to be used in conjunction with the end region pumping and direct converter schemes, the use of a yin-yang pair rather than a baseball-type coil in the transition, and the elimination of the axicell in favor of the simple choke coil. Also, as noted earlier, an axisymmetric mirror cell is imbedded in the central cell.

  11. Design and fabrication of the superconducting-magnet system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatro, R.E.; Wohlwend, J.W.; Kozman, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) consists of 24 magnets; i.e. two pairs of C-shaped Yin-Yang coils, four C-shaped transition coils, four solenoidal axicell coils, and a 12-solenoid central cell. General Dynamics Convair Division has designed all the coils and is responsible for fabricating 20 coils. The two Yin-Yang pairs (four coils) are being fabricated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Since MFTF-B is not a magnet development program, but rather a major physics experiment critical to the mirror fusion program, the basic philosophy has been to use proven materials and analytical techniques wherever possible. The transition and axicell coils are currently being analyzed and designed, while fabrication is under way on the solenoid magnets

  12. Central cell confinement in MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The point code TANDEM has been used to survey the range of plasma parameters which can be attained in MFTF-B. The code solves for the electron and ion densities and temperatures in the central cell, yin-yang, barrier, and A-cell regions as well as the plasma potential in each region. In these studies, the A-cell sloshing ion beams were fixed while the neutral beams in the yin-yang and central cell, the gas feed in the central cell, and the applied ECRH power β, central cell ion density and temperature, and the confining potential are discussed

  13. MFTF-B PACE tests and final cost report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, K.H.; Kozman, T.A.; Smith, J.L.; Horan, R.J.

    1986-10-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) construction project was successfully completed in February 1986, with the conclusion of the Plant and Capital Equipment (PACE) Tests. This series of tests, starting in September 1985 and running through February 1986, demonstrated the overall machine capabilities and special facilities accomplishments for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility Project

  14. Physics conceptual design for the MFTF-B transition coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, D.E.; Bulmer, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The physics constraints related to finite-β equilibria, β limits due to curvature-driven MHD modes, and ion transport in the central cell. These physics constraints had to be satisfied subject to certain non-physics constraints. Principal among these were the geometric and structural features of the existing MFTF-B magnet set and the required access for neutral beams for pumping. These constraints and their origins are discussed

  15. Electrical supply for MFTF-B superconducting magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimer, D.W.; Owen, E.W.

    1985-01-01

    The MFTF-B magnet system consists of 42 superconducting magnets which must operate continuously for long periods of time. The magnet power supply system is designed to meet the operational requirements of accuracy, flexibility, and reliability. The superconducting magnets require a protection system to protect against critical magnet faults of quench, current lead overtemperature, and overcurrent. The protection system is complex because of the large number of magnets, the strong coupling between magnets, and the high reliability requirement. This paper describes the power circuits and the components used in the design

  16. Design of the electromagnetic fluctuations diagnostic for MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, P.A.; Goerz, D.A.; Martin, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Electromagnetic Fluctuations (EMF) diagnostic will be used to monitor ion fluctuations which could be unstable in MFTF-B. Each probe assembly includes a high impedance electrostatic probe to measure potential fluctuations, and a group of nested, single turn loops to measure magnetic fluctuations in three directions. Eventually, more probes and loops will be added to each probe assembly for making more detailed measurements. The sensors must lie physically close to the plasma edge and are radially positionable. Also, probes at separate axial locations can be positioned to connect along the same magnetic field line. These probes are similar in concept to the rf probes used on TMX, but the high thermal load for 30-second shots on MFTF-B requires a water-cooled design along with temperature monitors. Each signal channel has a bandwidth of .001 to 150 MHz and is monitored by up to four different data channels which obtain amplitude and frequency information. This paper describes the EMF diagnostic and presents the detailed mechanical and electrical designs

  17. Data triggered data processing at MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.J.; Balch, T.R.; Preckshot, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    A primary characteristic of most batch systems is that the input data files must exist before jobs are scheduled. On the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory we schedule jobs to process experimental data to be collected during a five minute shot cycle. Our data-driven processing system emulates a coarsely granular data flow architecture. Processing jobs are scheduled before the experimental data is collected. Processing jobs ''fire'', or execute, as input data becomes available. Similar to UNIX ''pipes'', data produced by upstream processing nodes may be used as inputs by following nodes. Users, working on our networked SUN workstations, specify data processing templates which define processes and their data dependencies. Data specifications indicate the source of data; actual associations with specific data instantiations are made when the jobs are scheduled. We report here on details of diagnostic data processing and our experiences

  18. Alternative connections for the large MFTF-B solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.; Wang, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    The MFTF-B central-cell solenoids are a set of twelve closely coupled, large superconducting magnets with similar but not exactly equal currents. Alternative methods of connecting them to their power supplies and dump resistors are investigated. The circuits are evaluated for operating conditions and fault conditions. The factors considered are the voltage to ground during a dump, short circuits, open circuits, quenches, and failure of the protection system to detect a quench. Of particular interest are the current induced in coils that remain superconducting when one or more coils quench. The alternative connections include separate power supplies, combined power supplies, individual dump resistors, series dump resistors and combinations of these. A new circuit that contains coupling resistors is proposed. The coupling resistors do not affect normal fast dumps but reduce the peak induced currents while also reducing the energy rating of the dump resistors. Another novel circuit, the series circuit with diodes, is discussed in detail

  19. Design and fabrication of the MFTF-B magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatro, R.E.; Kozman, T.A.

    1985-09-01

    The MFTF-B superconducting magnet system consists of 40 NbTi magnets and two Nb 3 Sn magnets. General Dynamics (GD) designed all magnets except for the small trim coils. GD then fabricated 20 NbTi magnets, while LLNL fabricated 20 NbTi magnets and two Nb 3 Sn magnets. The design phase was completed in February 1984 and included the competitive procurement of magnet structural fabrication, superconductor, G-10CR insulation, support struts and bearings, vapor-cooled leads, and thermal shields for all magnets. Fabrication of all magnets was completed in March 1985. At GD, dual assembly lines were necessary during fabrication in order to meet the aggressive LLNL schedule. The entire magnet system has been installed and aligned at LLNL, and Tech Demo tests will be performed during September-November 1985

  20. Assessment of GAMMA 10 and MFTF-B utilization of TMX-U instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leppelmeier, G.W.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.; Osher, J.

    1985-04-01

    This report examines each of the instruments now on the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX-U) and identifies significant tasks required to use them on either GAMMA 10 or on the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B)

  1. Sparking protection for MFTF-B neutral beam power supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the upgrade of MFTF-B Neutral Beam Power Supplies for sparking protection. High performance ion sources spark repeatedly so ion source power supplies must be insensitive to sparking. The hot deck houses the series tetrode, arc and filament supplies, and controls. Hot deck shielding has been upgraded and a continuous shield around the arc, filament, gradient grid, and control cables now extends from the hot deck, through the core snubber, to the source. The shield carries accelerating current and connects only to the source. Shielded source cables go through an outer duct which now connects to a ground plane under the hot deck. This hybrid transmission line is a low inductance path for sparks discharging the stray capacitance of the hot deck and isolation transformers, reducing coupling to building steel. Parallel dc current return cables inside the duct lower inductance to reduce inductive turn-off transients. MOVs to ground further limit surges in the remote power supply return. Single point grounding is at the source. No control or rectifier components have been damaged nor are there any known malfunctions due to sparking up to 80 kV output

  2. Electrical grounding, shielding, and isolation for the MFTF-B plasma diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deadrick, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    The electrical grounding, shielding, and isolation of plasma diagnostics on the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) is a key part of the overall design. The Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) environment in which the Plasma Diagnostics System (PDS) will be required to operate is very harsh. The electrical grounding and shielding design which is being implemented to cope with this environment follows one which has been used successfully on the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX). Details of the MFTF-B plasma diagnostics facility, equipment grounding, shielding and isolation, and the cabling system are described in this paper

  3. Report on the engineering test of the LBL 30 second neutral beam source for the MFTF-B project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vella, M.C.; Pincosy, P.A.; Hauck, C.A.; Pyle, R.V.

    1984-08-01

    Positive ion based neutral beam development in the US has centered on the long pulse, Advanced Positive Ion Source (APIS). APIS eventually focused on development of 30 second sources for MFTF-B. The Engineering Test was part of competitive testing of the LBL and ORNL long pulse sources carried out for the MFTF-B Project. The test consisted of 500 beam shots with 80 kV, 30 second deuterium, and was carried out on the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility (NBETF). This report summarizes the results of LBL testing, in which the LBL APIS demonstrated that it would meet the requirements for MFTF-B 30 second sources. In part as a result of this test, the LBL design was found to be suitable as the baseline for a Common Long Pulse Source design for MFTF-B, TFTR, and Doublet Upgrade

  4. Startup experience with the MFTF-B ECRH 100 kV dc power supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, S.R.; Goodman, R.A.; Wilson, J.H.

    1983-11-30

    One of the 24 Accel dc Power Supplies (ADCPS) originally intended for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) Neutral Beam Power Supply (NBPS) System has been converted to provide negative polarity output at 90 kV with a load current of 64 A dc. The load duty cycle is a pulse of 30-seconds duration with a pulse repetition period of five minutes. A new control system has been built which will serve as a prototype for the MFTF-B ADCPS controls, and a test setup was built which will be used to test the ADCPS. The Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) dc Power Supply (DCPS) has been tested under both no-load and dummy-load conditions, under remote control, without notable problems. Test results indicate that the power supply should be reliable and safe to operate, and will meet the load duty requirements.

  5. Startup experience with the MFTF-B ECRH 100 kV dc power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, S.R.; Goodman, R.A.; Wilson, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    One of the 24 Accel dc Power Supplies (ADCPS) originally intended for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) Neutral Beam Power Supply (NBPS) System has been converted to provide negative polarity output at 90 kV with a load current of 64 A dc. The load duty cycle is a pulse of 30-seconds duration with a pulse repetition period of five minutes. A new control system has been built which will serve as a prototype for the MFTF-B ADCPS controls, and a test setup was built which will be used to test the ADCPS. The Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) dc Power Supply (DCPS) has been tested under both no-load and dummy-load conditions, under remote control, without notable problems. Test results indicate that the power supply should be reliable and safe to operate, and will meet the load duty requirements

  6. Startup experience with the MFTF-B ECRH 100 kV dc power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, S.R.; Goodman, R.A.; Wilson, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    One of the 24 Accel DC Power Supplies (ADCPS) originally intended for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) Neutral Beam Power Supply (NBPS) System has been converted to provide negative polarity output at 90 kV with a load current of 64 A dc. The load duty cycle is a pulse of 30-seconds duration with a pulse repetition period of five minutes. A new control system has been built which will serve as a prototype for the MFTF-B ADCPS controls, and a test setup was built which will be used to test the ADCPS. The Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) DC Power Supply (DCPS) has been tested under both no-load and dummy-load conditions, under remote control, without notable problems. Test results indicate that the power supply should be reliable and safe to operate, and will meet the load duty requirements

  7. Computer circuit analysis of induced currents in the MFTF-B magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnuson, G.D.; Woods, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis was made of the induced current behavior of the MFTF-B magnet system. Although the magnet system consists of 22 coils, because of its symmetry we considered only 11 coils in the analysis. Various combinations of the coils were dumped either singly or in groups, with the current behavior in all magnets calculated as a function of time after initiation of the dump

  8. Evaluating and tuning system response in the MFTF-B control and diagnostics computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palasek, R.L.; Butner, D.N.; Minor, E.G.

    1983-01-01

    The software system running on the Supervisory Control and Diagnostics System (SCDS) of MFTF-B is, for the major part, an event driven one. Regular, periodic polling of sensors' outputs takes place only at the local level, in the sensors' corresponding local control microcomputers (LCC's). An LCC reports a sensor's value to the supervisory computer only if there was a significant change. This report is passed as a message, routed among and acted upon by a network of applications and systems tasks within the supervisory computer (SCDS). Commands from the operator's console are similarly routed through a network of tasks, but in the oppostie direction to the experiment's hardware. In a network such as this, response time is partialy determined by system traffic. Because the hardware of MFTF-B will not be connected to the computer system for another two years, we are using the local control computers to simulate the event driven traffic that we expect to see during MFTF-B operation. In this paper we show how we are using the simulator to measure and evaluate response, loading, throughput, and utilization of components within the computer system. Measurement of the system under simulation allows us to identify bottlenecks and verify their unloosening. We also use the traffic simulators to evaluate prototypes of different algorithms for selected tasks, comparing their responses under the spectrum of traffic intensities

  9. Plasma modeling of MFTF-B and the sensitivity to vacuum conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, G.D.; Rensink, M.

    1984-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) is a large tandem mirror device currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The completed facility will consist of a large variety of components. Specifically, the vacuum vessel that houses the magnetic coils is basically a cylindrical vessel 60 m long and 11 m in diameter. The magnetics system consists of some 28 superconducting coils, each of which is located within the main vacuum vessel. Twenty of these coils are relatively simple solenoidal coils, but the remaining eight are of a more complicated design to provide an octupole component to certain regions of the magnetic field. The vacuum system is composed of a rough vacuum chain, used to evacuate the vessel from atmospheric pressure, and a high vacuum system, used to maintain good vacuum conditions during a plasma shot. High vacuum pumping is accomplished primarily by cryogenic panels cooled to 4.5 0 K. The MFTF-B coil set is shown together with typical axial profiles of magnetic field (a), electrostatic potential (b), and plasma density (c). The plasma is divided into nine regions axially, as labelled on the coil set in Figure 1. The central cell, which is completely azimuthally symmetric, contains a large volume plasma that is confined by a combination of the magnetic fields and the electrostatic potentials in the yin-yang cell

  10. The local area network for the plasma Diagnostics System of MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, N.H.; Minor, E.G.

    1983-01-01

    The MFTF-B Plasma Diagnostics System will be implemented in stages, beginning with a start-up set of diagnostics and evolving toward a basic set. The start-up set contains 12 diagnostics which will acquire a total of about 800 Kbytes of data per machine pulse; the basic set contains 23 diagnostics which will acquire a total of about 8 Mbytes of data per pulse. Each diagnostic is controlled by a ''Foundation System'' consisting of a DEC LSI-11/23 microcomputer connected to CAMAC via a 5 Mbits/second serial fiber-optic link and connected to a supervisory computer (Perkin-Elmer 3250) via a 9600 baud RS232 link. The Foundation System is a building block used throughout MFTF-B for control and status monitoring. However, its 9600 baud link to the supervisor presents a bottleneck for the large data transfers required by diagnostics. To overcome this bottleneck the diagnostics Foundation Systems will be connected together with an additional LSI-11/23 called the ''master'' to form a Local Area Network (LAN) for data acquisition. The Diagnostics LAN has a ring architecture with token passing arbitration

  11. Local area network for the plasma diagnostics system of MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, N.H.; Minor, E.G.

    1983-01-01

    The MFTF-B Plasma Diagnostics System will be implemented in stages, beginning with a start-up set of diagnostics and evolving toward a basic set. The start-up set contains 12 diagnostics which will acquire a total of about 800 Kbytes of data per machine pulse; the basic set contains 23 diagnostics which will acquire a total of about 8 Mbytes of data per pulse. Each diagnostic is controlled by a Foundation System consisting of a DEC LSI-11/23 microcomputer connected to CAMAC via a 5 Mbits/second serial fiber-optic link and connected to a supervisory computer (Perkin-Elmer 3250) via a 9600 baud RS232 link. The Foundation System is a building block used throughout MFTF-B for control and status monitoring. However, its 9600 baud link to the supervisor presents a bottleneck for the large data transfers required by diagnostics. To overcome this bottleneck the diagnostics Foundation Systems will be connected together with an additional LSI-11/23 called the master to form a Local Area Network (LAN) for data acquisition

  12. Overview of the data acquisition and control system for plasma diagnostics on MFTF-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyman, R.H.; Deadrick, F.J.; Lau, N.H.; Nelson, B.C.; Preckshot, G.G.; Throop, A.L.

    1983-11-18

    For MFTF-B, the plasma diagnostics system is expected to grow from a collection of 12 types of diagnostic instruments, initially producing about 1 Megabyte of data per shot, to an expanded set of 22 diagnostics producing about 8 Megabytes of data per shot. To control these diagnostics and acquire and process the data, a system design has been developed which uses an architecture similar to the supervisory/local-control computer system which is used to control other MFTF-B subsystems. This paper presents an overview of the hardware and software that will control and acquire data from the plasma diagnostics system. Data flow paths from the instruments, through processing, and into final archived storage will be described. A discussion of anticipated data rates, including anticipated software overhead at various points of the system, is included, along with the identification of possible bottlenecks. A methodology for processing of the data is described, along with the approach to handle the planned growth in the diagnostic system. Motivations are presented for various design choices which have been made.

  13. Overview of the data acquisition and control system for plasma diagnostics on MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyman, R.H.; Deadrick, F.J.; Lau, N.H.; Nelson, B.C.; Preckshot, G.G.; Throop, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    For MFTF-B, the plasma diagnostics system is expected to grow from a collection of 12 types of diagnostic instruments, initially producing about 1 Megabyte of data per shot, to an expanded set of 22 diagnostics producing about 8 Megabytes of data per shot. To control these diagnostics and acquire and process the data, a system design has been developed which uses an architecture similar to the supervisory/local-control computer system which is used to control other MFTF-B subsystems. This paper presents an overview of the hardware and software that will control and acquire data from the plasma diagnostics system. Data flow paths from the instruments, through processing, and into final archived storage will be described. A discussion of anticipated data rates, including anticipated software overhead at various points of the system, is included, along with the identification of possible bottlenecks. A methodology for processing of the data is described, along with the approach to handle the planned growth in the diagnostic system. Motivations are presented for various design choices which have been made

  14. Drift orbits in the TMX and MFTF-B tandem mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Drift orbits for the TMX and MFTF-B tandem-mirror designs are followed by using a long-thin expansion of the drift equations. Unexpected asymmetries in the field-line curvatures in the yin-yang end-mirror traps, caused by the transition coils between the solenoid and the yin-yang, result in an elliptical distortion of the drift surface with a/b=1.5 at most, a perhaps tolerable deviation from omnigenity. Yushmanov-trapped particles are no worse than the bulk hot particles. Finite-beta plasma fields, coupled to the asymmetric curvature, produce sizeable banana orbits with widths comparable to the plasma radius, but these orbits are possible for only a few of the particles. Details of the transition through resonance in the solenoid are shown, including the banana shapes of the drift surfaces and the disruption of the surface in the stochastic regime. The orbits in the original design for the A-cell of MFTF-B are the most extreme; in the vacuum fields they all have an extended peanut shape that finally closes only at about 3m. This shape is strongly non-omnigenous and suggests a hollow plasma-density profile. Finite-beta B vectorxnablaB drifts can help to minimize the radial extent of these orbits, but the strength of the vacuum curvatures makes omnigenity only marginally possible. Including B vectorxnablaphi drifts makes omnigenity even more unlikely for the ions, for which the B vectorxnablaB and B vectorxnablaphi drifts are of opposite sign, and conversely helps to omnigenize the drift surfaces of the ECRH 200-keV electrons. It is argued that not every class of particles can have good, i.e. near-omnigenous drifts, regardless of the ability of phi(r) to adjust to limit the radial extent of the orbits. This lack of omnigenity leaves one with no theoretical base for describing the MHD equilibrium in the original designs, but a new magnetic field design for MFTF-B A-cell has apparently completely restored omnigenous orbits. (author)

  15. Design lessons from using programmable controllers in the MFTF-B personnel safety and interlocks system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branum, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Applying programmable controllers in critical applications such as personnel safety and interlocks systems requires special considerations in the design of both hardware and software. All modern programmable controller systems feature extensive internal diagnostic capabilities to protect against problems such as program memory errors; however most, if not all present designs lack an intrinsic capability for detecting and countering failures on the field-side of their I/O modules. Many of the most common styles of I/O modules can also introduce potentially dangerous sneak circuits, even without component failure. This paper presents the most significant lessons learned to date in the design of the MFTF-B Personnel Safety and Interlocks System, which utilizes two non-redundant programmable controllers with over 800 I/O points each. Specific problems recognized during the design process as well as those discovered during initial testing and operation are discussed along with their specific solutions in hardware and software

  16. Noise filtering algorithm for the MFTF-B computer based control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minor, E.G.

    1983-01-01

    An algorithm to reduce the message traffic in the MFTF-B computer based control system is described. The algorithm filters analog inputs to the control system. Its purpose is to distinguish between changes in the inputs due to noise and changes due to significant variations in the quantity being monitored. Noise is rejected while significant changes are reported to the control system data base, thus keeping the data base updated with a minimum number of messages. The algorithm is memory efficient, requiring only four bytes of storage per analog channel, and computationally simple, requiring only subtraction and comparison. Quantitative analysis of the algorithm is presented for the case of additive Gaussian noise. It is shown that the algorithm is stable and tends toward the mean value of the monitored variable over a wide variety of additive noise distributions

  17. Integrated operations plan for the MFTF-B Mirror Fusion Test Facility. Volume I. Organization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    This plan and the accompanying MFTF-B Integrated Operations Plan are submitted in response to UC/LLNL Purchase Order 3883801, dated July 1981. The organization plan also addresses the specific tasks and trade studies directed by the scope of work. The Integrated Operations Plan, which includes a reliability, quality assurance, and safety plan and an integrated logistics plan, comprises the burden of the report. In the first section of this volume, certain underlying assumptions and observations are discussed setting the requirements and limits for organization. Section B presents the recommended structure itself. Section C Device Availability vs Maintenance and Support Efforts and Section D Staffing Levels and Skills provide backup detail and justification. Section E is a trade study on maintenance and support by LLNL staff vs subcontract and Section F is a plan for transitioning from the construction phase into operation. A brief summary of schedules and estimated costs concludes the volume

  18. 12-T solenoid-design options for the MFTF-B Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, J.H.; Diatchenko, N.

    1983-01-01

    The major options for the 12 T magnets examined here are the selection of normal, superconducting or hybrid normal/superconducting magnet systems. The tradeoffs are those between the higher initial cost of superconducting magnet system, the need for thick shielding of superconducting magnets, higher recirculating power in the normal magnets and poorly characterized reliability of lightly shielded normal magnets. The size and shielding tradeoffs among these options are illustrated. The design concepts presented here are evaluated only for the first design iteration of MFTF-B + T, mentioned above. In particular, all concepts now being considered have made topological improvements in the center cell, so that neutral beam power is no longer a strong function of choke coil size. This function was strongly favorable to the use of normal magnets over superconducting magnets and its absence will be discussed qualitatively in the cost comparisons

  19. Stress analysis of MFTF-B getter system bellows. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokarz, F.J.; Johnson, J.J.; Mukherjee, A.N.; Dalder, E.N.

    1982-04-01

    The MFTF-B design includes a retractable getter system. Eight getter assemblies are planned (4 in each end plug). Electrically heated Ti wires are mounted on a telescoping insertion mechanism and, between machine shots (pulses), are extended into the chamber in the vicinity of inward-facing water-cooled magnet liners. During the shots, the sublimators must be withdrawn because they will intrude into plasma and diagnostic space. Each of the getter assemblies will be mounted on the exterior of the vacuum vessel. Bellows are used to keep essentially all of the mechanism isolated from the vessel vacuum. The bellows come in two sizes (8.25'' O.D. and 14'' O.D.). The smaller of the two bellows has been qualified by testing up to 94,000 cycles by empirically adjusting details of the bellow design (geometry and thickness). The process required 12 different test samples and took over a one-year period to accomplish. The bellows consistently failed in the inside diameter weld heat-affected zone. Results from stress analysis studies are presented.

  20. Design features of the A-cell and transition coils of MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatro, R.E.; Wohlwend, J.W.; Ring, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    The MFTF-B transition coil and A-cell magnet designs use variations of the copper-stabilized NbTi conductor developed by LLNL for the MFTF Yin-Yang magnets. This conductor will be wound on the one inch thick (12.7 mm) stainless steel coil forms using a two-axis winding machine similar to the existing LLNL Yin-Yang winding machine. After winding, covers will be placed over the coil and welded to the coil form to form a helium-tight jacket around the conductor. These jacketed coils are then enclosed in thick structural cases that react the large Lorentz forces on the magnets. The space between the coil jacket and case will be filled by a stainless steel bladder that will be injected with urethane. The injection bladder will provide cooling passages during cooldown as well as transmitting the Lorentz forces between the jacket and the case. The large self-equilibrating lobe-spreading forces on the magnets (29.10 6 lb, 127.0 MN) for the A-cell are reacted primarily through the thick 304 LN case into the external superstructure. The net Lorentz forces and the inertial forces on the magnet are reacted through support systems into the LLNL vacuum vessel structure

  1. Design of the plasma current sensor diagnostic for MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goerz, D.A.; House, P.A.; Wells, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The Plasma Current Sensor (PCS) diagnostic includes large diamagnetic loops (DL) that fully encircle the plasma as well as small multi-turn pickup coils (PCs) located between the plasma and the superconducting magnets. Both types of sensors respond to changing magnetic flux linkages caused by plasma currents and are used to measure plasma diamagnetism, from which estimates of temperature and density can be made. The DLs are used in the central cell and Axicell regions, while the PCs are used in the Yin-yang regions where DLs are impractical. Other PCs are used in the central cell to detect axial plasma currents, to help tune trim coils in the transition cell and confirm theoretical estimates of radial diffusion limits. This paper describes the PCS diagnostic and presents the detailed mechanical and electrical designs

  2. Integrated operations plan for the MFTF-B Mirror Fusion Test Facility. Volume II. Integrated operations plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    This document defines an integrated plan for the operation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B). The plan fulfills and further delineates LLNL policies and provides for accomplishing the functions required by the program. This plan specifies the management, operations, maintenance, and engineering support responsibilities. It covers phasing into sustained operations as well as the sustained operations themselves. Administrative and Plant Engineering support, which are now being performed satisfactorily, are not part of this plan unless there are unique needs

  3. MFTF-B quasi-control ECRH transmission system/waveguide transmission system for TMX-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, G.

    1983-01-01

    The MFTF-B ECRH transmission system is designed to transmit the rf produced by each gyrotron quasi-optically from a launch point inside of the vacuum vessel wall in a linearly polarized guassian beam mode to an open cavity enclosing the plasma. The open cavity allows the microwave beam to be reflected numerous times through the plasma before it is lost. This increases the heating efficiency at low densities and temperatures when absorption on a single pass is small and also at high (relativistic) temperatures. In addition, the cavities allow unobstructed passage of neutral beams and simplify compensation for resonant zone shifts caused by beta depression, doppler shifting and relativistic effects. The microwave beam feeding the cavity has a guassian amplitude profile and a nominal diameter of 50 cm

  4. Engineering study of the neutral beam and rf heating systems for DIII-D, MFTF-B, JET, JT-60 and TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindquist, W.B.; Staten, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    An engineering study was performed on the rf and neutral beam heating systems implemented for DIII-D, MFTF-B, JET, JT-60 and TFTR. Areas covered include: methodology used to implement the systems, technology, cost, schedule, performance, problems encountered and lessons learned. Systems are compared and contrasted in the areas studied. Summary statements were made on common problems and lessons learned. 3 refs., 6 tabs

  5. Physics basis for MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, D.E.; Logan, B.G.; Simonen, T.C.

    1980-01-01

    The physics topics included here are the following: (1) adiabaticity, (2) MHD stability, (3) radial transport, (4) barrier physics, (5) loss-cone instability, (6) effect of gas recycling and secondary electron emission, (7) Monte Carlo simulations of tandem mirror physics, (8) charge-exchange pumping of thermal barriers, (9) vacuum pumping in the A-cell, and (10) microstability in the central cell

  6. Magnets for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility: testing of the first Yin-Yang and the design and development of other magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozman, T.A.; Wang, S.T.; Chang, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Completed in May 1981, the first Yin-Yang magnet for the tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was successfully tested in February 1982 to its full design field (7.68 T) and current (5775 A). Since that time, the entire magnet array has been reconfigured - from the original A-cell to an axicell design. The MFTF-B magnet array now contains a total of 26 large superconducting coils: 2 sets of yin-yang pairs, 2 sets of transition magnets (each containing two coils), 2 sets of axicell magnets (each containing three coils), and 12 central-cell solenoids. This paper chronicles recent magnet history - from te testing of the initial yin-yang set, through the design of the axicell configuration, to the planned development of the system

  7. MFTF-B plasma-diagnostics-system instrumentation and data-acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goerz, D.A.; Lau, N.H.C.; Mead, J.E.; Throop, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    The change of scope for MFTF from a simple mirror to a tandem mirror configuration utilizing thermal barriers has expanded the range of plasma parameters and increased the requirements of the plasma diagnostics system. The instrument set that is needed for start-up operation has been identified and conceptual design work is proceeding. This paper describes the diagnostic instrumentation as presently envisioned for start-up operation, with a summary of the detectors and data channels. Also presented is an overview of the current conceptual design for the Local Control and Data Acquisition System and the Data Processing and Display system. As more detailed design is done, the exact number and nature of instruments may change, but overall, the system described here is one expected to satisfy the requirements for start-up and be expandable to the basic set of diagnostics

  8. A computer model of the MFTF-B neutral beam accel dc power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Using the SCEPTRE circuit modeling code, a computer model was developed for the MFTF Neutral Beam Power Supply System (NBPSS) Accel DC Power Supply (ADCPS). The ADCPS provides 90 kV, 88 A, to the Accel Modulator. Because of the complex behavior of the power supply, use of the computer model is necessary to adequately understand the power supply's behavior over a wide range of load conditions and faults. The model developed includes all the circuit components and parameters, and some of the stray values. The model has been well validated for transients with times on the order of milliseconds, and with one exception, for steady-state operation. When using a circuit modeling code for a system with a wide range of time constants, it can become impossible to obtain good solutions for all time ranges at once. The present model concentrates on the millisecond-range transients because the compensating capacitor bank tends to isolate the power supply from the load for faster transients. Attempts to include stray circuit elements with time constants in the microsecond and shorter range have had little success because of hugh increases in computing time that result. The model has been successfully extended to include the accel modulator

  9. Computer model of the MFTF-B neutral beam Accel dc power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Using the SCEPTRE circuit modeling code, a computer model was developed for the MFTF Neutral Beam Power Supply System (NBPSS) Accel dc Power Supply (ADCPS). The ADCPS provides 90 kV, 88 A, to the Accel Modulator. Because of the complex behavior of the power supply, use of the computer model is necessary to adequately understand the power supply's behavior over a wide range of load conditions and faults. The model developed includes all the circuit components and parameters, and some of the stray values. The model has been well validated for transients with times on the order of milliseconds, and with one exception, for steady-state operation. When using a circuit modeling code for a system with a wide range of time constants, it can become impossible to obtain good solutions for all time ranges at once. The present model concentrates on the millisecond-range transients because the compensating capacitor bank tends to isolate the power supply from the load for faster transients. Attempts to include stray circuit elements with time constants in the microsecond and shorter range have had little success because of huge increases in computing time that result. The model has been successfully extended to include the accel modulator

  10. A proposed search for dark-matter axions in the 0.6--16 {mu}eV range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagmann, C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Moltz, D.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Turner, M.S. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Sikivie, P.; Sullivan, N.S.; Tanner, D.B. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Bluele, A.I.; Geraskin, E.V.; Golubev, N.A.; Ishkin, V.V.; Kazachenko, O.V.; Kuzmin, V.; Polushkin, V.G. [AN SSSR, Moscow (USSR). Inst. Yadernykh Issledovanij; Anthony, P.L.; van Bibber, K.; Patrick, R.E.; Shen, S.; Slack, D.S.; Steele, J.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Villa, F. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    A proposed experiment is described to search for dark-matter axions in the mass range 0.6--16 {mu}eV. The method is based on the Primakoff conversion of axions into monochromatic microwave photons inside a tunable microwave cavity in a large volume high field magnet. This proposal capitalized on the availability of two Axicell magnets from the MFTF-B fusion machine at LLNL. Assuming a local dark-matter density in axions of {rho}{sub a}= 0.3 GeV/cm{sup 3}, the axion would be found or ruled out at the 97% c.1. in the above mass range in 48 months.

  11. A proposed search for dark-matter axions in the 0. 6--16. mu. eV range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagmann, C. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics); Moltz, D.M. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Turner, M.S. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Sikivie, P.; Sullivan, N.S.; Tanner, D.B. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics); Bluele, A.I

    1991-11-01

    A proposed experiment is described to search for dark-matter axions in the mass range 0.6--16 {mu}eV. The method is based on the Primakoff conversion of axions into monochromatic microwave photons inside a tunable microwave cavity in a large volume high field magnet. This proposal capitalized on the availability of two Axicell magnets from the MFTF-B fusion machine at LLNL. Assuming a local dark-matter density in axions of {rho}{sub a}= 0.3 GeV/cm{sup 3}, the axion would be found or ruled out at the 97% c.1. in the above mass range in 48 months.

  12. Numerical study of the mode selection in response spectrum analysis-condensed version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, D.S.

    1986-01-01

    For quality assurance of the dynamic response spectrum analysis, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) recommends retaining all modes below the cutoff frequency at which the spectral acceleration (S/sub a/) returns to the peak zero period acceleration (ZPA). It also suggests that modes accounting for at least 90 percent of the structural masses be included in the analysis. A simple frame-type structure is generated as a baseline frame. Then groups of oscillators representing substructure are added onto the frame to study substructure behavior. A base case is established for each frame by including the specific number of modes used. The tests are conducted by incrementing the number of modes in the response spectrum analyses starting with one mode. The structural response of each modal increment is compared with the base case to identify the efficiency of mode selection method. All three methods are then applied to the MFTF-B Axicell Vacuum Vessel. The responses in critical components of the vessel, such as hangers and foundations, will be analyzed to confirm the accuracy of the selected method

  13. Thermal and structural analysis of the LBL 10 x 40 cm long pulse accelerator and the 12 x 48 cm common long pulse accelerator for TFTR, doublet III-D, and MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, R.P.

    1985-11-01

    Stress and deflection of the grid rails of the existing, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) designed, 10 x 40 cm Long Pulse (neutral beam) Accelerator (40LPA) and the expanded 12 x 48 cm version, Common Long Pulse Source (CLPS), have been computed for a series of assumed heat load distributions. The combined stress from self-constraint of thermal expansion and rail holder reaction forces has been calculated. A simplification of the gradient grid rail holder was analyzed and was found to work as well or better than the original 40LPA design under the most probable operating conditions. Heat flux non-uniformity over the rail surface for both accelerator designs was estimated from 40LPA grid calorimetry data for arc and beam extraction operation. The extrapolated total heat load per rail for the CLPS was less than the 1.2 kW value used in this analysis. Under worst case assumptions, the maximum equivalent stress in any of the molybdenum grid rails was less than 20% of yield. For the anticipated heat load distribution on the gradient grid, the predicted deflection of the grid rail meets the 0.0457 mm position tolerance except under extremely non-uniform heat loads

  14. Thermal and structural analysis of the LBL 10 x 40 cm Long Pulse Accelerator and the 12 x 48 cm Common Long Pulse Accelerator for TFTR, Doublet III-D, and MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    Stress and deflection of the grid rails of the existing, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) designed, 10 x 40 cm Long Pulse (neutral beam) Accelerator (40LPA) and the expanded 12 x 48 cm version, Common Long Pulse Source (CLPS), have been computed for a series of assumed heat load distributions. The combined stress from self-constraint of thermal expansion and rail holder reaction forces has been calculated. A simplification of the gradient grid rail holder was analyzed and was found to work as well or better than the original 40LPA design under the most probable operating conditions. Heat flux non-uniformity over the rail surface for both accelerator designs was estimated from 40LPA grid calorimetry data for arc and beam extraction operation. The extrapolated total heat load per rail for the CLPS was less than the 1.2 kW value used in this analysis. Under worst case assumptions, the maximum equivalent stress in any of the molybdenum grid rails was less than 20% of yield. For the anticipated heat load distribution on the gradient grid, the predicted deflection of the grid rail meets the 0.0457 mm position tolerant except under extremely non-uniform heat loads

  15. Mirror fusion vacuum technology developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Magnetic Mirror Fusion experiments, such as MFTF-B+T (Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B, Tritium Upgrade) and foreseeable follow-on devices, have operational and maintenance requirements that have not yet been fully demonstrated. Among those associated with vacuum technology are the very-high continuous-pumping speeds, 10 7 to 10 8 l/s for D 2 , T 2 and, to a lesser extent, He; the early detection of water leaks from the very-high heat-flux neutral-beam dumps and the detection and location of leaks in the superconducting magnets not protected by guard vacuums. Possible solutions to these problems have been identified and considerable progress has been made toward successfully demonstrating their feasibility

  16. Model approach for simulating the thermodynamic behavior of the MFTF cryogenic cooling systems - a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, S.B.; Stein, W.; Reitter, T.A.; Hindmarsh, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical model for calculating the thermodynamic behavior of the MFTF-B cryogenic cooling system is described. Nine component types are discussed with governing equations given. The algorithm for solving the coupled set of algebraic and ordinary differential equations is described. The model and its application to the MFTF-B cryogenic cooling system has not been possible due to lack of funding

  17. Spacecraft propulsion research facility (B-2) at the Lewis Research Center, Plum Brook Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, William E.

    1993-01-01

    The B-2 facility is designed to hot fire rocket engines or upper stage launch vehicles with up to 890,000 N thrust, after environmental conditioning of the test article in a simulated thermal vaccum space environment. The facility can handle cryogenic fuels and oxidizers. A steam ejector system maintains vacuum around the test article and on the engine discharge during the test firing. Two high speed computer systems control the test, monitor critical parameters and record all of the desired data.

  18. Options to upgrade the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassen, K.I.; Doggett, J.N. (eds.)

    1983-04-01

    In this document we describe three options for upgrading MFTF-B, and the nomenclature used for these options is shown on the chart, MFTF-B Upgrade Options. We propose to add a 4-m-long reactor-like insert to the central cell, or to change the end plugs to the new MARS-type configuration, or both. LLNL prefers the third option, labeled MFTF-..cap alpha../sup +/T in the chart, in which both the central cell insert is added and the end plugs are modified. All options are long-pulse or steady-state DT burning experiments. Those upgrades with the insert would be constructed beginning in FY 86, with operation beginning in mid-FY 92. Confirmation of our intent to modify the end plugs would be sought in FY 88 based on positive results from MFTF-B experiments. The upgrade with only the end plug modification would not start until MFTF-B data are available. The timeline for constructing and operating the MFTF-B Upgrade included at the end of this preface is for reference while reading the text. The various modes of operation shown on the chart are described later.

  19. Leak testing and repair of fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozman, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The leak testing, reporting and vacuum leak repair techniques of the MFTF yin-yang number one magnet system, the world's largest superconducting magnet system, are discussed. Based on this experience, techniques will be developed for testing and repairing leaks on the 42 MFTF-B magnets. The leak-hunting techniques for the yin-yang magnet systems were applied to two helium circuits (the coil bundle and guard vacuum; both require helium flow for magnet cooldown), their associated piping, liquid nitrogen radiation shields, and piping. Additionally, during MFTF-B operation there will be warm water plasma shields and piping that require leak checking

  20. Alarm points for fixed oxygen monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.C.

    1987-05-01

    Oxygen concentration monitors were installed in a vault where numerous pipes carried inert cryogens and gases to the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) experimental vessel at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The problems associated with oxygen-monitoring systems and the reasons why such monitors were installed were reviewed. As a result of this review, the MFTF-B monitors were set to sound an evacuation alarm when the oxygen concentration fell below 18%. We chose the 18% alarm criterion to minimize false alarms and to allow time for personnel to escape in an oxygen-deficient environment

  1. Computer control and data acquisition system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating System (ICRH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheshire, D.L.; Thomas, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) large Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) will employ an Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) system for plasma startup. As the MFTF-B Industrial Participant, TRW has responsibility for the ICRH system, including development of the data acquisition and control system. During the MFTF-B Supervisory Control and Diagnostic System (SCDS). For subsystem development and checkout at TRW, and for verification and acceptance testing at LLNL, the system will be run from a stand-alone computer system designed to simulate the functions of SCDS. The ''SCDS Simulator'' was developed originally for the MFTF-B ECRH System; descriptions of the hardware and software are updated in this paper. The computer control and data acquisition functions implemented for ICRH are described, including development status, and test schedule at TRW and at LLNL. The application software is written for the SCDS Simulator, but it is programmed in PASCAL and designed to facilitate conversion for use on the SCDS computers

  2. Analysis of large scale UO2 Na interactions performed in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthoud, G.; Jacobs, H.; Knowles, B.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of the European out of pile Fuel Sodium Interaction Experiments involving kilogram masses of molten oxide is reported i.e. CORECT 2 (CEA), SUS and MFTF-B (AEA), THINA (KfK). Then common conclusions are drawn. (author)

  3. EE Technical Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-06-01

    Areas of research reported include: ultrafast gating of microchannel plate x-ray spectrometers, study of power MOS fast switching techniques, lightning vulnerability of nuclear explosive test systems at the Nevada Test Site, and a computer model of the MFTF-B neutral beam accel dc power supply.

  4. Designs of tandem-mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Barr, W.L.; Boghosian, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    We have completed a comparative evaluation of several end plug configurations for tandem mirror fusion reactors with thermal barriers. The axi-cell configuration has been selected for further study and will be the basis for a detailed conceptual design study to be carried out over the next two years. The axi-cell end plug has a simple mirror cell produced by two circular coils followed by a transition coil and a yin-yang pair, which provides for MHD stability

  5. Mirror Fusion Test Facility: an intermediate device to a mirror fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpenko, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) now under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory represents more than an order-of-magnitude step from earlier magnetic-mirror experiments toward a future mirror fusion reactor. In fact, when the device begins operating in 1986, the Lawson criteria of ntau = 10 14 cm -3 .s will almost be achieved for D-T equivalent operation, thus signifying scientific breakeven. Major steps have been taken to develop MFTF-B technologies for tandem mirrors. Steady-state, high-field, superconducting magnets at reactor-revelant scales are used in the machine. The 30-s beam pulses, ECRH, and ICRH will also introduce steady-state technologies in those systems

  6. Design of the background gas pressure diagnostic for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.R.; Stever, R.D.; Goerz, D.A.; Pickles, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Background Gas Pressure (BGP) diagnostic is a collection of pressure gauges inside the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) vacuum vessel to measure neutral gas density near the plasma region. These measurements will help us understand the role of background neutrals in particle and power balance, particularly in the maintenance of the cold halo plasma that shields the hot core plasma from returning neutrals. The diagnostic consists of magnetron-type, cold-cathode gauges, each stripped of its permanent magnet, and utilizing the MFTF-B ambient B-field in strengths of 1 to 25 kG. As part of the design effort, tests were performed to characterize gauge operation in strong magnetic field strengths and to evaluate the parameters affecting performance. This paper describes the BGP diagnostic and presents the details of the mechanical and electrical design

  7. Long-pulse beamlines for the mirror fusion test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, R.R.; Goldner, A.I.; Poulsen, P.

    1984-01-01

    We have recently obtained test results indicating that a beam of pure full-energy deuterium particles can be delivered to the plasma targets in MFTF-B. We used a close-coupled separator magnet with the ion source to separate the impurities from the full-energy deuterium particles. Our completed studies show that the usual iron-core sweep magnet and shielding used in neutral beamlines can be eliminated and the gas flow out of the beamline decreased. This design also reduces beam losses. We will use smooth-bore OFHC tube arrays brazed to manifolds for the active heat transfer surfaces. Tests indicate that both burnout and life requirements are met by this design. In this paper, we present test results and discuss the MFTF-B long-pulse beamline configuration

  8. Electrical energy and cost for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pence, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    An operational scenario has been developed for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) based on the System Requirements, our experience with existing systems, and discussions with the project engineers and designers who are responsible for the systems. This scenario was used to predict the amount of electrical energy needed for running the facility. A generic type listing is included for the equipment considered in each system

  9. Tandem mirror reactor studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, FY 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, G.A.; Neef, W.S. Jr.

    1981-03-20

    The principles of tandem mirror operation with thermal barriers will be demonstrated in the upgrade of the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX-U) in 1981 and the tandem configuration of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) in 1984. Continued analysis and conceptual design over this period will evolve the optimal configuration and parameters for a power-producing reactor. In this article we describe the progress we have made in this reactor design study effort during 1980.

  10. Superconducting magnet development capability of the LLNL [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory] High Field Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.R.; Shen, S.; Summers, L.T.

    1990-02-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: High-Field Test Facility Equipment at LLNL; FENIX Magnet Facility; High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) 2-m Solenoid; Cryogenic Mechanical Test Facility; Electro-Mechanical Conductor Test Apparatus; Electro-Mechanical Wire Test Apparatus; FENIX/HFTF Data System and Network Topology; Helium Gas Management System (HGMS); Airco Helium Liquefier/Refrigerator; CTI 2800 Helium Liquefier; and MFTF-B/ITER Magnet Test Facility

  11. Operation of the cryogenic system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronis, W.C.; Slack, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The cryogenic system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was designed to cool the entire MFTF-B system from ambient to operating temperature in less than 10 days. The system was successfully operated in the recent plant and capital equipment (PACE) acceptance tests, and results from these tests helped us correct problem areas and improve the system

  12. Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

    1980-09-01

    The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort.

  13. Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

    1980-09-01

    The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort

  14. MFTF-α + T progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.D.

    1985-04-01

    Early in FY 1983, several upgrades of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) were proposed to the fusion community. The one most favorably received was designated MFTF-α+T. The engineering design of this device, guided by LLNL, has been a principal activity of the Fusion Engineering Design Center during FY 1983. This interim progress report represents a snapshot of the device design, which was begun in FY 1983 and will continue for several years. The report is organized as a complete design description. Because it is an interim report, some parts are incomplete; they will be supplied as the design study proceeds. As described in this report, MFTF-α+T uses existing facilities, many MFTF-B components, and a number of innovations to improve on the physics parameters of MFTF-B. It burns deuterium-tritium and has a central-cell Q of 2, a wall loading GAMMA/sub n/ of 2 MW/m 2 (with a central-cell insert module), and an availability of 10%. The machine is fully shielded, allows hands-on maintenance of components outside the vacuum vessel 24 h after shutdown, and has provisions for repair of all operating components

  15. MFTF-. cap alpha. + T progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, W.D. (ed.)

    1985-04-01

    Early in FY 1983, several upgrades of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) were proposed to the fusion community. The one most favorably received was designated MFTF-..cap alpha..+T. The engineering design of this device, guided by LLNL, has been a principal activity of the Fusion Engineering Design Center during FY 1983. This interim progress report represents a snapshot of the device design, which was begun in FY 1983 and will continue for several years. The report is organized as a complete design description. Because it is an interim report, some parts are incomplete; they will be supplied as the design study proceeds. As described in this report, MFTF-..cap alpha..+T uses existing facilities, many MFTF-B components, and a number of innovations to improve on the physics parameters of MFTF-B. It burns deuterium-tritium and has a central-cell Q of 2, a wall loading GAMMA/sub n/ of 2 MW/m/sup 2/ (with a central-cell insert module), and an availability of 10%. The machine is fully shielded, allows hands-on maintenance of components outside the vacuum vessel 24 h after shutdown, and has provisions for repair of all operating components.

  16. TMX tandem-mirror experiments and thermal-barrier theoretical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, T.C.; Baldwin, D.E.; Allen, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes recent analysis of energy confinement in the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX). TMX data also indicates that warm plasma limits the amplitude of the anisotropy driven Alfven ion cyclotron (AIC) mode. Theoretical calculations show strong AIC stabilization with off-normal beam injection as planned in TMX-U and MFTF-B. This paper reports results of theoretical analysis of hot electrons in thermal barriers including electron heating calculations by Monte Carlo and Fokker-Planck codes and analysis of hot electron MHD and microinstability. Initial results from the TMX-U experiment are presented which show the presence of sloshing ions

  17. Review of MFTF yin-yang magnet displacement and magnetic field measurements and calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, C.L.; Myall, J.O.; Wohlwend, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    During the recent testing of the MFTF yin-yang magnet, measurements of coil position, structural case strain, and magnetic field were made to verify calculated values. Measurements to detect magnet movement were taken throughout cooldown and during the operation of the magnet. The magnetic field at the mirror points was measured by Hall-effect probes. The magnet position, structural case strain, and magntic field measurements indicated a reasonably close correlation with calculated values. Information obtained from the yin-yang test has been very useful in setting realistic mechanical alignment values for the new MFTF-B magnet system

  18. Review of MFTF yin-yang magnet displacement and magnetic field measurements and calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, C.L.; Myall, J.O.; Wohlwend, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    During the recent testing of the MFTF yin-yang magnet, measurements of coil position, structural case strain, and magnetic field were made to verify calculated values. Measurements to detect magnet movement were taken throughout cooldown and during the operation of the magnet. The magnetic field at the mirror points was measured by Hall-effect probes. The magnet position, structural case strain, and magnetic field measurements indicated a reasonably close correlation with calculated values. Information obtained from the yin-yang test has been very useful in setting realistic mechanical alignment values for the new MFTF-B magnet system

  19. Thermal performance of the MFTF magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSant, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    A yin-yang pair of liquid-helium (LHe) cooled, superconducting magnets were tested last year at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of a series of tests with the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF). These tests were performed to determine the success of engineering design used in major systems of the MFTF and to provide a technical base for rescoping from a single-mirror facility to the large tandem-mirror configuration (MFTF-B) now under construction. The magnets were cooled, operated at their design current and magnetic field, and warmed to atmospheric temperature. In this report, we describe their thermal behavior during these tests

  20. Superconducting (radiation hardened) magnets for mirror fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Miller, J.R.; Perkins, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Superconducting magnets for mirror fusion have evolved considerably since the Baseball II magnet in 1970. Recently, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) yin-yang has been tested to a full field of 7.7 T with radial dimensions representative of a full scale reactor. Now the emphasis has turned to the manufacture of very high field solenoids (choke coils) that are placed between the tandem mirror central cell and the yin-yang anchor-plug set. For MFTF-B the choke coil field reaches 12 T, while in future devices like the MFTF-Upgrade, Fusion Power Demonstration and Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) reactor the fields are doubled. Besides developing high fields, the magnets must be radiation hardened. Otherwise, thick neutron shields increase the magnet size to an unacceptable weight and cost. Neutron fluences in superconducting magnets must be increased by an order of magnitude or more. Insulators must withstand 10 10 to 10 11 rads, while magnet stability must be retained after the copper has been exposed to fluence above 10 19 neutrons/cm 2

  1. User interface on networked workstations for MFTF plasma diagnostic instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renbarger, V.L.; Balch, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    A network of Sun-2/170 workstations is used to provide an interface to the MFTF-B Plasma Diagnostics System at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Plasma Diagnostics System (PDS) is responsible for control of MFTF-B plasma diagnostic instrumentation. An EtherNet Local Area Network links the workstations to a central multiprocessing system which furnishes data processing, data storage and control services for PDS. These workstations permit a physicist to command data acquisition, data processing, instrument control, and display of results. The interface is implemented as a metaphorical desktop, which helps the operator form a mental model of how the system works. As on a real desktop, functions are provided by sheets of paper (windows on a CRT screen) called worksheets. The worksheets may be invoked by pop-up menus and may be manipulated with a mouse. These worksheets are actually tasks that communicate with other tasks running in the central computer system. By making entries in the appropriate worksheet, a physicist may specify data acquisition or processing, control a diagnostic, or view a result

  2. Alternative power supply and dump resistor connections for similar, mutally coupled, superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.; Wang, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Alternative methods of connecting similar mutually coupled coils to their power supplies and dump resistors are investigated. The circuits are evaluated for both operating and fault conditions. The factors considered are the voltage to ground during a dump, short circuits, open circuits, quenches, and failure of the protection system to detect a quench. Of particular interest are the currents induced in coils that remain superconducting when one or more coils quench. The alternative connections include combined power supplies, individual dump resistors, combined resistors and series and parallel dump resistors. A new circuit that contains coupling resistors is proposed. The coupling resistors do not affect normal fast dumps but reduce the peak induced currents while also reducing the energy rating of the dump resistors. Another novel circuit, the series circuit with diodes, is discussed. The MFTF-B central-cell solenoids are used as an example

  3. Alternative power supply and dump resistor connections for similar, mutually coupled, superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, W.; Wang, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Alternative methods of connecting similar mutually coupled coils to their power supplies and dump resistors are investigated. The circuits are evaluated for both operating and fault conditions. The factors considered are the voltage to ground during a dump, short circuits, open circuits, quenches, and failure of the protection system to detect a quench. Of particular interest are the currents induced in coils that remain superconducting when one or more coils quench. The alternative connections include combined power supplies, individual dump resistors, combined resistors and series and parallel dump resistors. A new circuit that contains ''coupling'' resistors is proposed. The coupling resistors do not affect normal fast dumps but reduce the peak induced currents while also reducing the energy rating of the dump resistors. Another novel circuit, the series circuit with diodes, is discussed. The MFTF-B central-cell solenoids are used as an example

  4. Mechanical-engineering aspects of mirror-fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.K.; Doggett, J.N.

    1982-01-01

    The mirror approach to magnetic fusion has evolved from the original simple mirror cell to today's mainline effort: the tandem-mirror machine with thermal barriers. Physics and engineering research is being conducted throughout the world, with major efforts in Japan, the USSR, and the US. At least one facility under construction (MFTF-B) will approach equivalent energy breakeven in physics performance. Significant mechanical engineering development is needed, however, before a demonstration reactor can be constructed. The principal areas crucial to mirror reactor development include large high-field superconducting magnets, high-speed continuous vacuum-pumping systems, long-pulse high-power neutral-beam and rf-plasma heating systems, and efficient high-voltage high-power direct converters. Other areas common to all fusion systems include tritium handling technology, first-wall materials development, and fusion blanket design

  5. MFTF sensor verification computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, H.K.

    1984-01-01

    The design, requirements document and implementation of the MFE Sensor Verification System were accomplished by the Measurement Engineering Section (MES), a group which provides instrumentation for the MFTF magnet diagnostics. The sensors, installed on and around the magnets and solenoids, housed in a vacuum chamber, will supply information about the temperature, strain, pressure, liquid helium level and magnet voltage to the facility operator for evaluation. As the sensors are installed, records must be maintained as to their initial resistance values. Also, as the work progresses, monthly checks will be made to insure continued sensor health. Finally, after the MFTF-B demonstration, yearly checks will be performed as well as checks of sensors as problem develops. The software to acquire and store the data was written by Harry Chow, Computations Department. The acquired data will be transferred to the MFE data base computer system

  6. Magnetic systems for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.

    1985-02-01

    Mirror experiments have led the way in applying superconductivity to fusion research because of unique requirements for high and steady magnetic fields. The first significant applications were Baseball II at LLNL and IMP at ORNL. More recently, the MFTF-B yin-yang coil was successfully tested and the entire tandem configuration is nearing completion. Tokamak magnets have also enjoyed recent success with the large coil project tests at ORNL, preceded by single coil tests in Japan and Germany. In the USSR, the T-7 Tokamak has been operational for many years and the T-15 Tokamak is under construction, with the TF coils nearing completion. Also the Tore Supra is being built in France

  7. Mirror Fusion Test Facility magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSant, J.H.; Kozman, T.A.; Bulmer, R.H.; Ng, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    In 1979, R.H. Bulmer of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) discussed a proposed tandem-mirror magnet system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) at the 8th symposium on Engineering Problems in Fusion Research. Since then, Congress has voted funds for expanding LLNL's MFTF to a tandem-mirror facility (designated MFTF-B). The new facility, scheduled for completion by 1985, will seek to achieve two goals: (1) Energy break-even capability (Q or the ratio of fusion energy to plasma heating energy = 1) of mirror fusion, (2) Engineering feasibility of reactor-scale machines. Briefly stated, 22 superconducting magnets contained in a 11-m-diam by 65-m-long vacuum vessel will confine a fusion plasma fueled by 80 axial streaming-plasma guns and over 40 radial neutral beams. We have already completed a preliminary design of this magnet system

  8. Design of tandem mirror reactors with thermal barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    End-plug technologies for tandem mirror reactors include high-field superconducting magnets, neutral beam injectors, and gyrotrons for electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH). In addition to their normal use for sustenance of the end-plug plasmas, neutral beam injectors are used for ''pumping'' trapped ions from the thermal barrier regions by charge exchange. An extra function of the axially directed pump beams is the removal of thermalized alpha particles from the reactor. The principles of tandem mirror operation with thermal barriers will be demonstrated in the upgrade of the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX-U) in 1981 and the tandem configuration of the Mirror fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) in 1984

  9. Tandem mirror magnet system for the mirror fusion test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulmer, R.H.; Van Sant, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) will be a large magnetic fusion experimental facility containing 22 supercounducting magnets including solenoids and C-coils. State-of-the-art technology will be used extensively to complete this facility before 1985. Niobium titanium superconductor and stainless steel structural cases will be the principle materials of construction. Cooling will be pool boiling and thermosiphon flow of 4.5 K liquid helium. Combined weight of the magnets will be over 1500 tonnes and the stored energy will be over 1600 MJ. Magnetic field strength in some coils will be more than 8 T. Detail design of the magnet system will begin early 1981. Basic requirements and conceptual design are disclosed in this paper

  10. Stability and disturbance of large dc superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.

    1981-01-01

    This paper addresses the stability aspects of several successful dc superconducting magnets such as large bubble chamber magnets, and magnets for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility and MHD Research Facility. Specifically, it will cover Argonne National Laboratory 12-Foot Bubble Chamber magnets, the 15-foot Bubble Chamber magnets at Fermi National Laboratory, the MFTF-B Magnet System at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the U-25B Bypass MHD Magnet, and the CFFF Superconducting MHD magnet built by Argonne National Laboratory. All of these magnets are cooled in pool-boiling mode. Magnet design is briefly reviewed. Discussed in detail are the adopted stability critera, analyses of stability and disturbance, stability simulation, and the final results of magnet performance and the observed coil disturbances

  11. Tandem mirrors for neutron production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doggett, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    Two mirror machine concepts are being studied as early-time, low-cost, neutron-producing devices for testing and demonstrating reactor-relevant fusion technology. The first of these concepts is for a new, small, driven, steady-state, D-T reactor, called the Technology Demonstration Facility (TDF). The second concept is for upgrades to the MFTF-B machine that burn tritium and run for pulse lengths of some hours. Both devices operate in the Kelley mode in order to provide high-wall loadings of 14-MeV neutrons, thereby providing a valuable test bed for reactor-relevant hardware and subsystems. Either one of these devices could be running in the early 1990's with first wall fluxes between 1.4 and 2.0 MW m -2

  12. Power deposition profiles in Maxwellian magneto-active plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziolkowski, R.W.; Peterson, J.C.

    1983-02-01

    The numerical modeling of the microwave power deposition in a plasma for waves that are launched from an arbitrary array of pyramidal horns will be described. The waves are modeled in three dimensions with geometrical optics assuming the plasma is cold, magneto-active and Maxwellian. The power absorption at the fundamental harmonic is calculated along those rays with warm plasma absorption formulas. A newly developed post-processor synthesizes power deposition profiles from these ray tracing results. Graphical output includes the power density as a function of the distance along the axis of the plasma and the physical or midplane radius, the z-integrated power density as a function of the midplane radius, and the cumulative power absorbed as a function of the midplane radius. Examples for ECRH in the TMX-U and the axisymmetric MFTF-B tandem mirror machines at LLNL will be presented

  13. Safety and protection for large scale superconducting magnets. FY 1984 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, R.J.; Pillsbury, R.D. Jr.; Minervini, J.V.

    1984-11-01

    The Fusion Program is moving rapidly into design and construction of systems using magnets with stored energies in the range of hundreds of megajoules to gigajoules. For example, the toroidal field coil system alone for TFCX would store about 4 GJ and the mirror system MFTF-B would store about 1.6 GJ. Safety and protection analyses of the magnet subsystems become progressively more important as the size and complexity of the installations increase. MIT has been carrying out a program for INEL oriented toward safety and protection in large scale superconducting magnet systems. The program involves collection and analysis of information on actual magnet failures, analyses of general problems associated with safety and protection, and performance of safety oriented experiments. This report summarizes work performed in FY 1984

  14. Data triggered data processing at the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.J.; Balch, T.R.; Preckshot, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    A primary characteristic of most batch systems is that the input data files must exist before jobs are scheduled. On the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory the authors schedule jobs to process experimental data to be collected during a five minute shot cycle. The data driven processing system emulates a coarsely granular data flow architecture. Processing jobs are scheduled before the experimental data is collected. Processing jobs ''fire'', or execute, as input data becomes available. Similar to UNIX ''pipes'', data produced by upstream processing nodes may be used as inputs by following nodes. Users, working on the networked SUN workstations, specify data processing templates which define processes and their data dependencies. Data specifications indicate the source of data; actual associations with specific data instantiations are made when the jobs are scheduled. The authors report here on details of diagnostic data processing and their experiences

  15. MFTF-α+T end plug magnet design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, V.C.; O'Toole, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The conceptual design of the end-plug magnets for MFTF-α+T is described. MFTF-α+ T is a near-term upgrade of MFTF-B, which features new end plugs to improve performance. The Fusion Engineering Design Center has performed the engineering design of MFTF-α+T under the overall direction of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Each end plug consists of two Yin-Yang pairs, each with approx.2.5:1 mirror ratio and approx.5-T peak field on axis; two transition coils; and a recircularizing solenoid. This paper describes the end-plug magnet system functional requirements and presents a conceptual design that meets them. The peak field at the windings of the end-plug coils is approx.6-T. These coils are designed using the NbTi MFTF-B conductor and cooled by a 4.2K liquid helium bath. All the end-plug magnets are designed to operate in the cryostable mode with adequate quench protection for safety. Shielding requirements are stated and a summary of heat loads is provided. Field and force calculations are discussed. The field on axis is shown to meet the functional requirements. Force resultants are reported in terms of winding running loads and resultant coil forces are also given. The magnet structural support is described. A trade study to determine the optimum end-cell coil internal nuclear shield thickness and the resulting coil size based on minimizing the end-cell life cycle cost is summarized

  16. Overview and direction in the tandem mirror program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1983-04-01

    There are two main thrusts to the tandem mirror program at the present time. One is to gather the experimental data base to verify the axicell thermal-barrier concept and the other to improve the end plugs for tandems. With such improvements one might approach the ideal fusion reactor, a simple solenoid of modular elements whose ends are but a modest perturbation on the configuration from both a cost and technological viewpoint. Progress toward these two goals is discussed here, and the directions to be taken in the immediate future are described

  17. Engineering problems of tandem-mirror reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Barr, W.L.; Boghosian, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    We have completed a comparative evaluation of several end plug configurations for tandem mirror fusion reactors with thermal barriers. The axi-cell configuration has been selected for further study and will be the basis for a detailed conceptual design study to be carried out over the next two years. The axi-cell end plug has a simple mirror cell produced by two circular coils followed by a transition coil and a yin-yang pair, which provides for MHD stability. This paper discusses some of the many engineering problems facing the designer. We estimated the direct cost to be 2$/W/sub e/. Assuming total (direct and indirect) costs to be twice this number, we need to reduce total costs by factors between 1.7 and 2.3 to compete with future LWRs levelized cost of electricity. These reductions may be possible by designing magnets producing over 20T made possible by use of combinations of superconducting and normal conducting coils as well as improvements in performance and cost of neutral beam and microwave power systems. Scientific and technological understanding and innovation are needed in the area of thermal barrier pumping - a process by which unwanted particles are removed (pumped) from certain regions of velocity and real space in the end plug. Removal of exhaust fuel ions, fusion ash and impurities by action of a halo plasma and plasma dump in the mirror end region is another challenging engineering problem discussed in this paper

  18. Axicabtagene Ciloleucel CAR T-Cell Therapy in Refractory Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelapu, Sattva S; Locke, Frederick L; Bartlett, Nancy L; Lekakis, Lazaros J; Miklos, David B; Jacobson, Caron A; Braunschweig, Ira; Oluwole, Olalekan O; Siddiqi, Tanya; Lin, Yi; Timmerman, John M; Stiff, Patrick J; Friedberg, Jonathan W; Flinn, Ian W; Goy, Andre; Hill, Brian T; Smith, Mitchell R; Deol, Abhinav; Farooq, Umar; McSweeney, Peter; Munoz, Javier; Avivi, Irit; Castro, Januario E; Westin, Jason R; Chavez, Julio C; Ghobadi, Armin; Komanduri, Krishna V; Levy, Ronald; Jacobsen, Eric D; Witzig, Thomas E; Reagan, Patrick; Bot, Adrian; Rossi, John; Navale, Lynn; Jiang, Yizhou; Aycock, Jeff; Elias, Meg; Chang, David; Wiezorek, Jeff; Go, William Y

    2017-12-28

    In a phase 1 trial, axicabtagene ciloleucel (axi-cel), an autologous anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy, showed efficacy in patients with refractory large B-cell lymphoma after the failure of conventional therapy. In this multicenter, phase 2 trial, we enrolled 111 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, or transformed follicular lymphoma who had refractory disease despite undergoing recommended prior therapy. Patients received a target dose of 2×10 6 anti-CD19 CAR T cells per kilogram of body weight after receiving a conditioning regimen of low-dose cyclophosphamide and fludarabine. The primary end point was the rate of objective response (calculated as the combined rates of complete response and partial response). Secondary end points included overall survival, safety, and biomarker assessments. Among the 111 patients who were enrolled, axi-cel was successfully manufactured for 110 (99%) and administered to 101 (91%). The objective response rate was 82%, and the complete response rate was 54%.With a median follow-up of 15.4 months, 42% of the patients continued to have a response, with 40% continuing to have a complete response. The overall rate of survival at 18 months was 52%. The most common adverse events of grade 3 or higher during treatment were neutropenia (in 78% of the patients), anemia (in 43%), and thrombocytopenia (in 38%). Grade 3 or higher cytokine release syndrome and neurologic events occurred in 13% and 28% of the patients, respectively. Three of the patients died during treatment. Higher CAR T-cell levels in blood were associated with response. In this multicenter study, patients with refractory large B-cell lymphoma who received CAR T-cell therapy with axi-cel had high levels of durable response, with a safety profile that included myelosuppression, the cytokine release syndrome, and neurologic events. (Funded by Kite Pharma and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Therapy

  19. Investigation of auxiliary heating in tandem mirrors and tokamaks and barrier cell pumping. Annual progress report, October 1, 1980 to December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Scharer, J.

    1981-06-01

    The research has focussed on physics questions concerned with ECRH heating in tandem mirror plugs, pumping of tandem mirror thermal barriers by drift orbits, ICRH heating in tokamaks, and bundle divertors. We have concluded that drift-orbit pumping of thermal barriers is not feasible because the azimuthal E Vector X B Vector drift limits the excursion of trapped ions from a flux surface. We have developed a three-dimensional weakly relativistic (T/sub e/ less than or equal to 50 keV) ray tracing and absorption code for electron cyclotron heating in tandem mirror plugs and barriers. Cases run for TMX, MFTF-B and reactors at T/sub e/ > 10 keV show that strong absorption per pass is present and a careful choice of wave frequency and launch angle is required to ensure wave penetration and absorption in the plasma core. In the area of ion cyclotron frequency range heating in tokamaks, a three-dimensional hot plasma ray tracing theory and code has been developed to handle rays launched from any poloidal angle in the tokamak cross section. Wave heating in the central strong absorption zones is currently being investigated using a full wave solution for the various heating regimes

  20. Fusion technology development: role of fusion facility upgrades and fission test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.; Deis, G.A.; Miller, L.G.; Longhurst, G.R.; Schmunk, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The near term national fusion program is unlikely to follow the aggressive logic of the Fusion Engineering Act of 1980. Faced with level budgets, a large, new fusion facility with an engineering thrust is unlikely in the near future. Within the fusion community the idea of upgrading the existing machines (TFTR, MFTF-B) is being considered to partially mitigate the lack of a design data base to ready the nation to launch an aggressive, mission-oriented fusion program with the goal of power production. This paper examines the cost/benefit issues of using fusion upgrades to develop the technology data base which will be required to support the design and construction of the next generation of fusion machines. The extent of usefulness of the nation's fission test reactors will be examined vis-a-vis the mission of the fusion upgrades. We will show that while fission neutrons will provide a useful test environment in terms of bulk heating and tritium breeding on a submodule scale, they can play only a supporting role in designing the integrated whole modules and systems to be used in a nuclear fusion machine

  1. Fusion engineering design center appendix to the MINIMARS interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.D.; Blackfield, D.T.; Bussell, G.T.; Gorker, G.E.; Keeton, D.C.; Lousteau, D.C.; Spampinato, P.T.; Taylor, G.E.; Yugo, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    Personnel at the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) have been contributing partners in the mirror program for the past four years. These years have involved work on machines such as the Technology Demonstration Facility (TDF), the MFTF-Alpha+T (an upgrade of the MFTF-B), and the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) device. This year, the effort was directed toward the MINIMARS design. The principle role for the FEDC has been to integrate the various concepts into an overall, integrated engineering design. The present design is not, at this time in the study effort, a self-consistent design, but it will be by the end of the study. In addition to integrating the design, FEDC has played a major innovation and design role in electrical systems, plasma heating systems, maintenance, availability, fueling, facilities, and reactor components. FEDC has also played a major role in developing an optimization code for tandem mirrors, which has been used to establish baseline MINIMARS physics and engineering parameters and to perform many physics and engineering trade studies. In addition, the Design Center has supplied cost estimates for the MINIMARS reactor. This appendix contains two kinds of material. The first is an expansion of the material found in the FY 1985 MINIMARS summary report and the second is a description of background studies performed during the year that led to the concepts and conclusions described in the summary report

  2. 3D equilibrium codes for mirror machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    The codes developed for cumputing three-dimensional guiding center equilibria for quadrupole tandem mirrors are discussed. TEBASCO (Tandem equilibrium and ballooning stability code) is a code developed at LLNL that uses a further expansion of the paraxial equilibrium equation in powers of β (plasma pressure/magnetic pressure). It has been used to guide the design of the TMX-U and MFTF-B experiments at Livermore. Its principal weakness is its perturbative nature, which renders its validity for high-β calculation open to question. In order to compute high-β equilibria, the reduced MHD technique that has been proven useful for determining toroidal equilibria was adapted to the tandem mirror geometry. In this approach, the paraxial expansion of the MHD equations yields a set of coupled nonlinear equations of motion valid for arbitrary β, that are solved as an initial-value problem. Two particular formulations have been implemented in computer codes developed at NYU/Kyoto U and LLNL. They differ primarily in the type of grid, the location of the lateral boundary and the damping techniques employed, and in the method of calculating pressure-balance equilibrium. Discussions on these codes are presented in this paper. (Kato, T.)

  3. High field solenoids and cryogenic refrigeration system for the MFTF α + T tandem mirror facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, J.H.; Diatchenko, N.

    1984-01-01

    MFTF-α + T is a next step mirror device, specifically designed to be an upgrade of the MFTF-B tandem mirror facility into a generic nuclear testing facility for the magnetic fusion program. The solenoid magnet concepts, in particular an 18 T choke coil and a 12 T central cell coil, reflect the dependence of the tandem mirror concept on high performance, highly irradiated solenoids. The achievement of an 18 T solenoid with a 22 cm bore is a significant accomplishment in the total absence of radiation. The achievement of a normal magnet with a fluence of 4 x 10 12 rads of absorbed neutron and gamma radiation in its insulation is a significant achievement in the total absence of field. The achievement of a superconducting magnet with an instantaneous radiation absorption of 65 mW/cm 3 and an insulation fluence of 10 10 rads, let along a magnet with a peak field of nearly 16 T and a 107 cm bore is unprecedented. The superconducting and normal coils in the 18 T magnet system are also subjected to asymmetric axial loads from external magnets, adding the requirement of being able to support normal and fault loads in either axial direction. Nevertheless, it appears that design solutions do exist. The possible approaches to the simultaneous achievement of very high field, very high irradiation and asymmetric loading are the subject of this paper, using MFTF-α + T as the worked example

  4. 10 CFR 36.1 - Purpose and scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... building code requirements for industrial facilities. (b) The regulations in this part apply to panoramic... radiology or teletherapy, radiography (the irradiation of materials for nondestructive testing purposes...

  5. Plum Brook facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Research Facility (B-2); the Hydrogen Heat Transfer Facility (HHTF); the Rocket Dynamics and Control Facility (B-3); the Cryogenic Propellant Tank Site (K-Site); and the Space Power Facility (SPF).

  6. Physics of mirror systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    1982-05-01

    In recent years the emphasis in research on the magnetic mirror approach to fusion has been shifted to address what are essentially economically-motivated issues. The introduction of the Tandem Mirror idea solved in principal the problem of low Q (low fusion power gain) of mirror-based fusion systems. In order to optimize the tandem mirror idea from an economic standpoint, some important improvements have been suggested. These improvements include the thermal barrier idea of Baldwin and Logan and the axicell concept of Kesner. These new modifications introduce some special physics considerations. Among these are (1) The MHD stability properties of high energy electron components in the end cells; (2) The optimization of end-cell magnetic field configurations with the objective of minimizing equilibrium parallel currents; (3) The suppression of microstabilities by use of sloshing ion distributions. Following a brief outline of tandem mirror concepts, the above three topics are discussed, with illustrative examples taken from earlier work or from recent design studies

  7. 7 CFR 70.4 - Services available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... facilities. (b) Grading of specified poultry food products in official plants. (c) Auditing service. This... assurance and value added standards for production, processing, and distribution of poultry and rabbits...

  8. B-Cell waste classification sampling and analysis plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOBART, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents the methods used to collect and analyze samples to obtain data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the 324 Facility B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream

  9. B-cell waste classification sampling plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOBART, R.L.

    1999-11-20

    This report documents the methods used to collect samples and analyze data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the 324 Facility B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream.

  10. 7 CFR 4284.909 - Limitations on use of funds and awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., or other planning work, for a physical facility; (b) The total amount provided to any Value-Added project shall not exceed $500,000; (c) The aggregate amount of awards to majority controlled producer...

  11. 7 CFR Exhibit H to Subpart A of... - Prohibition of Lead-Based Paints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... rehabilitated for human habitation with financial assistance provided by this agency. Paints used on applicable..., hospitals, group practice facilities, community facilities, and business or industrial facilities. B... paints, of the symptoms and treatment of lead poisoning, and of the importance and availability of...

  12. 33 CFR 127.1111 - Communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Communication systems. 127.1111... systems. (a) The marine transfer area for LHG must possess a communication system that enables continuous... in charge of transfer for the facility. (b) The communication system required by paragraph (a) of...

  13. Higher Order Multiple Births in Nigeria: Experiences, Challenges ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Higher Order Multiple Births in Nigeria: Experiences, Challenges and. Neonatal Outcomes in a Private Health Facility. B Ezenwa, O Oseni, P Akintan1, P Aligwekwe, B Chukwukelu2, O Fashola3, A Ogunmokun3, O Odukoya3. Original Article. Departments of Paediatrics,. 2Obstetrics and Gynaecology and 3Family Medicine,.

  14. 47 CFR 69.112 - Direct-trunked transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Direct-trunked transport. 69.112 Section 69.112... Computation of Charges § 69.112 Direct-trunked transport. (a) A flat-rated direct-trunked transport charge... other persons that use telephone company direct-trunked transport facilities. (b)(1) For telephone...

  15. 9 CFR 93.308 - Quarantine requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... available; however, copies of “Protocol for the Complement-Fixation Test for Equine Piroplasmosis” and... arrange for a supply of water adequate to clean and disinfect the facility. (B) All feed and bedding must... attendants for the care and feeding of horses while in the quarantine facility. (C) Persons working in the...

  16. 9 CFR 3.78 - 0utdoor housing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE STANDARDS Specifications for the Humane Handling, Care, Treatment, and... facility at that time of year without stress or discomfort, may be kept in outdoor facilities. (b) Shelter...) The housing facility is surrounded by a natural barrier that restricts the nonhuman primates to the...

  17. Syntheses, characterization and crystal structures of potassium and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and barium complexes of a Schiff base ligand with different anions. BHAVESH PARMARa, KAMAL KUMAR BISHTa,b, PRATYUSH MAITIc, PARIMAL PAULa,b, and ERINGATHODI SURESHa,b,∗. aAnalytical Discipline and Centralized Instrument Facility, bAcademy of Scientific and Innovative Research. (AcSIR), cScale-up ...

  18. 50 CFR 85.43 - Signs and symbols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signs and symbols. 85.43 Section 85.43... Use/Acceptance of Funds § 85.43 Signs and symbols. (a) Signs. Facilities must display appropriate... for boaters to get additional information or to report an inoperable facility. (b) Pumpout symbol. (1...

  19. Influence of Wallow on Some Hematological Parameters and Serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the influence of wallow on some hematological and serum enzymes of growing pigs. Six pre-pubertal pigs of average age 2months were randomly assigned to two treatment groups, comprising of Wallow (A) and Non-Wallow facilities (B) in a Completely Randomized Design(CRD).

  20. Requirements of on-site facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchardt, H.

    1977-01-01

    1) Requirements of on-site facilities: a) brief description of supplying the site with electricity and water; communication facilities, b) necessary facilities for containment and pipeline installation, c) necessary facilities for storage, safety, accommodation of personnel, housing; workshops; 2) Site management: a) Organisation schedules for 'turn-key-jobs' and 'single commission', b) Duties of the supervisory staff. (orig.) [de

  1. 7 CFR 372.5 - Classification of actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLEMENTING PROCEDURES § 372.5... conducted outside of a laboratory or other containment area (field trials, for example); or (ii) Reaches a... (iii) Permitting of: (A) Importation of nonindigenous species into containment facilities, (B...

  2. 12 CFR 725.5 - Capital stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Capital stock. 725.5 Section 725.5 Banks and... ADMINISTRATION CENTRAL LIQUIDITY FACILITY § 725.5 Capital stock. (a) The capital stock of the Facility is divided... or hypothecated except to the Facility. (b) The capital stock subscriptions provided for in §§ 725.3...

  3. 47 CFR 74.631 - Permissible service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... a television studio, to its associated television broadcast station, to an associated television... any 30-day period. Television pickup stations may be used to provide temporary studio-transmitter... licensed as an auxiliary facility. (b) A television broadcast STL station is authorized to transmit visual...

  4. Further assessment of houseflies (Musca domestica) as vectors for the mechanical transport and transmission of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus under field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkin, Andrea; Deen, John; Otake, Satoshi; Moon, Roger; Dee, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for houseflies (Musca domestica) to mechanically transport and transmit porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) between pig populations under controlled field conditions. The study employed swine housed in commercial livestock facilities and a release-recapture protocol involving marked (ochre-eyed) houseflies. To assess whether transport of PRRSV by insects occurred, ochre-eyed houseflies were released and collected from a facility housing an experimentally PRRSV-inoculated population of pigs (facility A) and collected from a neighboring facility located 120 m to the northwest that housed a naïve pig population (facility B). All samples were tested for PRRSV RNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To assess transmission between the 2 populations, blood samples were collected from naïve pigs in facility B at designated intervals and tested by PCR. A total of 7 replicates were conducted. During 2 of 7 replicates (1 and 5), PCR-positive ochre-eyed houseflies were recovered in facility B and pigs in this facility became infected with PRRSV. Chi-squared analysis indicated that the presence of PRRSV in an insect sample was significantly (P = 0.0004) associated with infection of facility B pigs. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus was not recovered from other reported routes of transmission during the study period, including air, fomites, and personnel. In conclusion, while an insufficient number of replicates were conducted to predict the frequency of the event, houseflies may pose some level of risk for the transport and transmission of PRRSV between pig populations under field conditions. PMID:19436589

  5. Technical specifications, Hanford production reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, W.D. [comp.

    1962-06-25

    These technical specifications are applicable to the eight operating production reactor facilities, B, C, D, DR, F, H, KE, and KW. Covered are operating and performance restrictions and administrative procedures. Areas covered by the operating and performance restrictions are reactivity, reactor control and safety elements, power level, temperature and heat flux, reactor fuel loadings, reactor coolant systems, reactor confinement, test facilities, code compliance, and reactor scram set points. Administrative procedures include process control procedures, training programs, audits and inspections, and reports and records.

  6. International Conference on the Methods of Aerophysical Research 98 "ICMAR 98". Part 3: Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Math . - 1952. - Vol. 5. 118 INLET PERFORMANCES MEASUREMENT IN SHORT-DURATION AERODYNAMIC FACILITY B.N. Giljazetdinov, V.I. Zvegintsev Institute of...ludlw t It( m OromenetumI equaiiion, I li agrik iar Imomenrt 1ii1 c~iii e I 81 ir. arid t lie con,1 i nlit v clil i 8 ( ortalra rv to Hoiis-iriesq...Presidium of SB RAS, 68. Lutsky A.E., Novosibirsk, Russia Inst. Appl. Math ., Moscow, Russia 97. Rakhimov RD., 69. Lysenko V.I., ITAM, Novosibirsk

  7. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL). Pre-NRC trhough December 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    Nine categories of events involving NRC licensed material or licensees are included. As additional information is obtained on an event, it will be incorporated in future editions. The list contains incidents as well as less significant events. The nine categories are: bomb-related (divided into two sections: (a) those events in which a bomb or explosive material was located or an explosion occurred at or in the vicinity of a licensed facility, (b) a complete chronological list), intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation-related, vandalism, arson, firearms-related, sabotage, and miscellaneous

  8. Regular Advisory Group on Spent Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Regular Advisory Group on Spent Fuel Management (RAGSFM) was established in accordance with the recommendations of the Expert Group on International Spent Fuel Management in 1982. The Advisory Group consists of nominated experts from countries with considerable experience and/or requirements in such aspects of the back-end of the fuel cycle as storage, safety, transportation and treatment of spent fuel. The RAGSFM activities cover the following main topics: a) Analysis and summary of spent fuel arisings and storage facilities; b) Interface between spent fuel storage and transportation activities; c) Spent fuel storage process and technology and related safety issues; d)Treatment of spent fuel

  9. Principles and techniques for post-accident assessment and recovery in a contaminated environment of a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    To assist operators and public authorities alike in their advance preparation of emergency plans and in the establishment of emergency preparedness infrastructures, the IAEA has already issued several Safety Series publications dealing with these matters. This Safety Guide complements the technical guidance already published. It provides: a) Information and practical guidance relevant to assessing the off-site consequences during the late phase of a serious accident in a nuclear facility; b) Guidance on recovery operations off the site and the associated decision making process; and c) Proposals for consideration by national authorities regarding the organizational structure for the conduct of recovery operations. 52 refs, 8 figs, 4 tabs.

  10. Operation manual for the INEL on-line mass-separator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderl, R.A.

    1984-06-01

    This report is an operation manual for an on-line mass-separator facility which is located in Building 661 at the Test Reactor Area of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The facility provides mass-separated sources of short-lived fission-product radionuclides whose decay properties can be studied using a variety of nuclear spectroscopic techniques. This facility is unique in that it utilizes the gas-jet technique to transport fission products from a 252 Cf source located in a hot cell to the ion source of the mass separator. This document includes the following: (a) a detailed description of the facility, (b) identification of equipment hazards and safety controls, (c) detailed operating procedures for startup, continuous operation and shutdown, (d) operating procedures for the californium hot cell, and (e) an operator's manual for the automated moving tape collector/data acquisition system. 7 references, 16 figures, 8 tables

  11. Characterization of the Neutron Fields in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radiation Calibration Laboratory Low Scatter Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radev, Radoslav [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2009-08-20

    The issuance of Part 10 CFR 835 (2007) with revised radiation weighting factors and the installation of a new Hopewell N40 irradiator necessitated a re-characterization of the neutron fields in RCL's Low Scatter Calibration Facility (B255, Room 183 A). The emission rates of the RCL's two 252Cf calibration sources were re-evaluated and the updated emission rates are provided in Appendix A. The neutron dose rates from the new Hopewell N40 irradiator configuration were evaluated using three different instruments. the measurement methodology and the experimental set up as well as calibration of the instruments are discussed in detail.

  12. Fire protection research for energy technology projects; FY 79 year-end report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, H.K.; Alvares, N.J.; Lipska, A.E.; Ford, H.; Beason, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes work performed in fiscal year 1979, on a DOE funded study entitled Fire Protection Research for Energy Technology Projects. The primary goal of this program is to ensure that fire protection measures for Fusion Energy Experiments (FEE) evolve concurrently with the complexity of FEE. Ultimately, it is planned that the detailed study of fusion experiments will provide an analytical methodology which can be applied to the full range of energy technology projects. We attempt to achieve this objective by coordinately advancing 3 (three) major task areas; (a) determine the fire hazards of current FEE facilities (b) assess the ability of accepted fire management strategies to meet and negate the hazard, (c) perform unique research into problem areas we have identified to provide input into analytical fire growth and damage assessment models

  13. Fuel cycle based safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Montmollin, J.M.; Higinbotham, W.A.; Gupta, D.

    1985-07-01

    In NPT safeguards the same model approach and absolute-quantity inspection goals are applied at present to all similar facilities, irrespective of the State's fuel cycle. There is a continuing interest and activity on the part of the IAEA in new NPT safeguards approaches that more directly address a State's nuclear activities as a whole. This fuel cycle based safeguards system is expected to a) provide a statement of findings for the entire State rather than only for individual facilities; b) allocate inspection efforts so as to reflect more realistically the different categories of nuclear materials in the different parts of the fuel cycle and c) provide more timely and better coordinated information on the inputs, outputs and inventories of nuclear materials in a State. (orig./RF) [de

  14. Spiral 2 workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The accelerator and experimental facilities at GANIL will be transformed over the next 5-10 years. The centerpiece of the additions to the accelerator complex will be Spiral-2. This is the first phase of a new radioactive beam facility based on the ISOL principle. The main aim of Spiral-2 will be to produce intense, high quality beams of neutron-rich nuclei created in neutron-induced fission of heavy elements and accelerated by the existing CIME cyclotron. The principal aims of this workshop will be a) to publicize the new facilities, b) to discuss and define the science which might be carried out with them, c) to discuss the instrumentation and infrastructure required to exploit the new facilities and d) to help form collaborations of scientists wishing to design and construct the equipment needed to undertake the science programme. This document gathers most of the slides presented in the workshop.

  15. Training courses run by the Department of Atomic Energy, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), India, conducts a large number of courses covering a variety of fields, mainly concerned with nuclear energy and its applications. These courses are : (1) a comprehensive multidisciplinary course in nuclear sciences and engineering, (2) courses in safety aspects of: (a) the medical uses of radioisotopes, (b) research applications of ionising radiations, (c) the industrial applications of radiation sources, and (d) industrial radiography; (3) industrial radiographer's certification course, (4) course in hospital physics and radiological physics, (5) diploma course in radiation medicine, (6) courses in operation and maintenance of: (a) research reactors and facilities, (b) nuclear power reactors, and (7) course in exploration of atomic minerals. Detailed information on these courses, covering institutions of DAE conducting them, duration, academic requirements for admission to them, method of adimission, detailed syllabus, and general information such as fees, accommodation, stipend if any, etc. is given. (M.G.B.)

  16. A study on implementation plan of decontamination and decommissioning R and D and evaluation of KAERI soil decontamination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.

    2001-08-01

    A. Decontamination Technology Development of Uranium Conversion Facility. Understanding of uranium conversion facility and related decontamination technologies, and analysis of current status of decontamination technologies. Establishment of the objective and research items of the middle and long term R and D project. Discussion of the erformance plan and about the methodology for connection with the project of environmental restoration of uranium conversion facility B. Treatment Technology Development of Uranium Sludge Analysis of the domestic and overseas research development status. Suggestion of treatment methodology of uranium slurry and cooperative R and D among industries, universities and research institute. Establishment of the objective and research items of the middle and long term R and D project. Discussion about the performance plan and about the methodology for connection with the project of environmental restoration of uranium conversion facility C. Decommissioning Technology Development Analysis of the domestic and overseas research development status and the overview of decommissioning technologies. Establishment of the objective and research items of the middle and long term R and D project. Discussion about the performance plan and about the methodology for connection with the project of TRIGA decommissioning D. Evaluation of KAERI Soil Decontamination Technology. Evaluation of soil decontamination process and the liquid decontamination waste treatment technology. Performance of soil decontamination test using solvent flushing test equipment for evaluation of residual radioactivity after decontami- nation and modeling of the results

  17. Low-pressure RF remote plasma cleaning of carbon-contaminated B4C-coated optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Fernández, H.; Thomasset, M.; Sauthier, G.; Rogler, D.; Dietsch, R.; Barrett, R.; Carlino, V.; Pellegrin, E.

    2017-05-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) - due to its exceptional mechanical properties - is one of the few existing materials that can withstand the extremely high brilliance of the photon beam from free electron lasers (FELs) and is thus of considerable interest for optical applications in this field. However, as in the case of many other optics operated at modern accelerator-, plasma-, or laser-based light source facilities, B4C-coated optics are subject to ubiquitous carbon contaminations. These contaminations - that are presumably produced via cracking of CHx and CO2 molecules by photoelectrons emitted from the optical components - represent a serious issue for the operation of the pertinent high performance beamlines due to a severe reduction of photon flux and beam coherence, not necessarily restricted to the photon energy range of the carbon K-edge. Thus, a variety of B4C cleaning technologies have been developed at different laboratories with varying success [1]. Here, we present a study regarding the low-pressure RF plasma cleaning of a series of carbon-contaminated B4C test samples via an inductively coupled O2/Ar and Ar/H2 remote RF plasma produced using the IBSS GV10x plasma source following previous studies using the same RF plasma source [2, 3]. Results regarding the chemistry, morphology as well as other aspects of the B4C optical coatings and surfaces before and after the plasma cleaning process are reported.

  18. Requirements for US regulatory approval of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petti, D.A.; Haire, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is the first fusion machine that will have sufficient decay heat and activation product inventory to pose potential nuclear safety concerns. As a result, nuclear safety and environmental issues will be much more important in the approval process for the design, siting, construction, and operation of ITER in the United States than previous fusion devices, such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor. The purpose of this report is (a) to provide an overview of the regulatory approval process for a Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility; (b) to present the dose limits used by DOE to protect workers, the public, and the environment from the risks of exposure to radiation and hazardous materials; (c) to discuss some key nuclear safety-related issues that must be addressed early in the Engineering Design Activities (EDA) to obtain regulatory approval; and (d) to provide general guidelines to the ITER Joint Central Team (JCT) concerning the development of a regulatory framework for the ITER project

  19. UMCP MIST counter-part test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    di Marzo, M.; Almenas, K.; Hsu, Y.Y.; Pertmer, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Two small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) transients are compared to illustrate a scaling methodology for reduced pressure integral facilities. Mapping test 3004 is conducted in the Multiloop Integral System Test (MIST) full pressure, full height facility. The counter-part test MISO3l7 is scaled and performed in the reduced height, reduced pressure UMCP facility. Inventory is used as the chronological scale and pressure, normalized with the initial and system saturation pressures, is used as characteristic parameter to describe the system behavior. The appropriately normalized results conclusively demonstrate that: (a) the same phenomena are observed in the two facilities; (b) the sequence of events is analogous and (c) the trends described by the normalized pressure versus inventory traces are in good quantitative agreement. Each energy transport mode traversed by the two facilities is compared and the phenomena present are described in detail. The differences between the high and reduced pressure tests are outlined. The findings clearly indicate that pressure and height can be scaled for transient where limited boundary conditions are applied and where the break is subcooled. A statement on sensitivity to the initial conditions is also included to define the limitations of the quantitative results

  20. On the scaling of pressure for integral test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Marzo, M.; Almenas, K.; Hsu, Y.Y.

    1991-01-01

    Two Small Break LOCA transients are compared to illustrate a scaling methodology for reduced pressure integral facilities. Mapping test 3004 is conducted in the MIST full pressure, full height facility. The counter-part test MIS0317 is scaled and performed in the reduced height, reduced pressure UMCP facility. Inventory is used as the chronological scale and pressure, normalized with the initial and system saturation pressures, is used as characteristic parameter to describe the system behavior. The appropriately normalized results conclusively demonstrate that: (a) the same phenomena are observed in the two facilities; (b) the sequence of events is analogous and (c) the trends described by the normalized pressure versus inventory traces are in good quantitative agreement. Each energy transport mode traversed by the two facilities is compared and the phenomena present are described in detail. The differences between the high and reduced pressure test are outlined. The findings clearly indicate that pressure and height can be scaled for transients where limited boundary conditions are applied (Auxiliary Feed Water only) and where the break is subcooled. A statement on sensitivity to the initial conditions is also included to define the limitations of the quantitative results. (orig.)

  1. Characterization of Carbon-Contaminated B4C-Coated Optics after Chemically Selective Cleaning with Low-Pressure RF Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Fernández, H; Rogler, D; Sauthier, G; Thomasset, M; Dietsch, R; Carlino, V; Pellegrin, E

    2018-01-22

    Boron carbide (B 4 C) is one of the few materials that is expected to be most resilient with respect to the extremely high brilliance of the photon beam generated by free electron lasers (FELs) and is thus of considerable interest for optical applications in this field. However, as in the case of many other optics operated at light source facilities, B 4 C-coated optics are subject to ubiquitous carbon contaminations. Carbon contaminations represent a serious issue for the operation of FEL beamlines due to severe reduction of photon flux, beam coherence, creation of destructive interference, and scattering losses. A variety of B 4 C cleaning technologies were developed at different laboratories with varying success. We present a study regarding the low-pressure RF plasma cleaning of carbon contaminated B 4 C test samples via inductively coupled O 2 /Ar, H 2 /Ar, and pure O 2 RF plasma produced following previous studies using the same ibss GV10x downstream plasma source. Results regarding the chemistry, morphology as well as other aspects of the B 4 C optical coating before and after the plasma cleaning are reported. We conclude that among the above plasma processes only plasma based on pure O 2 feedstock gas exhibits the required chemical selectivity for maintaining the integrity of the B 4 C optical coatings.

  2. ASEAN Mineral Database and Information System (AMDIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Y.; Ohno, T.; Bandibas, J. C.; Wakita, K.; Oki, Y.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    AMDIS has lunched officially since the Fourth ASEAN Ministerial Meeting on Minerals on 28 November 2013. In cooperation with Geological Survey of Japan, the web-based GIS was developed using Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) and the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards. The system is composed of the local databases and the centralized GIS. The local databases created and updated using the centralized GIS are accessible from the portal site. The system introduces distinct advantages over traditional GIS. Those are a global reach, a large number of users, better cross-platform capability, charge free for users, charge free for provider, easy to use, and unified updates. Raising transparency of mineral information to mining companies and to the public, AMDIS shows that mineral resources are abundant throughout the ASEAN region; however, there are many datum vacancies. We understand that such problems occur because of insufficient governance of mineral resources. Mineral governance we refer to is a concept that enforces and maximizes the capacity and systems of government institutions that manages minerals sector. The elements of mineral governance include a) strengthening of information infrastructure facility, b) technological and legal capacities of state-owned mining companies to fully-engage with mining sponsors, c) government-led management of mining projects by supporting the project implementation units, d) government capacity in mineral management such as the control and monitoring of mining operations, and e) facilitation of regional and local development plans and its implementation with the private sector.

  3. Influenza outbreaks at two correctional facilities -- Maine, March 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    On March 8, 2011, the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention (Maine CDC) received a laboratory report of a positive influenza specimen from an intensive-care unit patient who was an inmate at a prison (facility A). That same day, the state medical examiner notified Maine CDC of an inmate death suspected to be have been caused by influenza at another, nearby prison (facility B). On March 9, Correctional Medical Services (CMS), which provides health services to both facilities, notified Maine CDC that additional inmates and staff members from both facilities were ill with influenza-like illness (ILI). CMS reported that influenza vaccination coverage among inmates was very low (low. Maine CDC assisted CMS and the Maine Department of Corrections (DOC) in conducting an epidemiologic investigation to gather more information about the two cases, initiate case finding, and implement control measures, which included emphasizing respiratory hygiene and cough etiquette, closing both facilities to new admissions and transfers, and offering vaccination and antiviral drugs to inmates and staff members. This report describes the public health response and highlights the importance of collaboration between public health and corrections officials to identify quickly and mitigate communicable disease outbreaks in these settings, where influenza can spread rapidly in a large and concentrated population. Correctional facilities should strongly consider implementing the following measures during each influenza season: 1) offering influenza vaccination to all inmates and staff members, 2) conducting education on respiratory etiquette, and 3) making documentation regarding the vaccination status of inmates and staff members accessible.

  4. The effects of microstructure on the corrosion of glycine/nitrate processed cermet inert anodes: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windisch, Jr, C F; Chick, L A; Maupin, G D; Stice, N D

    1991-07-01

    The Inert Electrodes Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supported by the Office of Industrial Processes of the US Department of Energy and is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of Hall-Heroult cells through the development of inert anodes. The inert anodes currently under the study are composed of a cermet material of the general composition NiO-NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-Cu. The program has three primary objectives: (a) to evaluate the anode material in a scaled-up, pilot cell facility, (b) to investigate the mechanisms of the electrochemical reactions at the anodes surface, and (c) to develop sensors for monitoring various anode and/or electrolyte conditions. This report covers the results of a portion of the studies on anode reaction mechanisms. The anode mechanism studies were focused in four areas in FY 1990 and FY 1991: (a) the determination of whether a film formed on cermet inert anodes and (if it existed) the characterization of this film, (b) the determination of the sources of the anode impedance, (c) the evaluation of the effects of silica and a precorroded state on anode corrosion, and (d) a preliminary study on the effect of microstructure on the corrosion properties of the anodes. This report discusses the results of the microstructure studies. 6 refs., 32 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Contractor Work Preparation Process Improvement Using Lean Six Sigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asana Kusnadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To ensure the health and safety of their workforce and protection of their assets and the environment, a global oil and gas company operating in Indonesia requires comprehensive identification and evaluation of job hazards that were included in work permitting process prior work execution in the field. Based on 20 data points obtained in August 2013, start-working time for contractors who worked for Capital Project Management (CPM Team in Facility B was in average at 09.05 a.m. The aim of this paper is to present how the firm implemented Lean Six Sigma to reduce non-added value activities while fulfilling to its safety requirements and to share lessons learned from practical and theory testing perspective. The methodology used is Lean Six Sigma’s DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control as mandated by the corporate policy of the firm. This research adopts a mix-methods approach, by using both qualitative and quantitative data. This study was a one year longitudinal study of the Lean Six Sigma implementation to improve contractors’ work preparation process. The improvement resulted in reduction of non-value added activities and successfully increased the available working time per day by 59.3 minutes in average. The results of this case study reconfirm Lean Six Sigma as a good management theory since it shows a consistency between the theory and the real practice in a global oil and gas company in Indonesia.

  6. Energy extraction and achievement of the saturation limit in a discharge pumped table-top soft x-ray amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, J. J.; Clark, D. P.; Chilla, J. L. A.; Shlyaptsev, V. N.; Marconi, M. C.

    1996-11-01

    There is significant interest in the demonstration of compact soft x-ray amplifiers capable of generating pulses of substantial energy for applications. This motivates the demonstration of gain media generated by compact devices, that can be successfully scaled in length to reach gain saturation. To date, gain saturation had only been achieved in a few soft x-ray laser lines in plasmas generated by some of the world's largest laser facilities.(B. J. MacGowan et al.), Phys. Fluids B 4, 2326 (1992); A. Carillon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 68, 2917 (1992);B. Rus et al., in AIP Conf. Proc. 332, X-ray lasers 1994, p. 152; S. Wang et al., ibid., p. 293. Previosly we reported large amplification at 46.9 nm in Ne-like argon in a plasma column generated by a fast capillary discharge.(J. J. Rocca et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 2192 (1994). Herein we report the generation of laser pulse energies up to 30 μJ at 46.9 nm in such discharge and the first clear evidence of gain saturation of a table-top soft x-ray amplifier. Single pass amplification experiments yielded laser pulse energies up to 6 μJ and double pass amplification using an iridium mirror yielded 30 μJ. The observed saturation of the gain and laser pulse energy are in good agreement with the results of radiation transport calculations. Work supported by the National Science Foundation.

  7. B cell remote-handled waste shipment cask alternatives study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RIDDELLE, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    The decommissioning of the 324 Facility B Cell includes the onsite transport of grouted remote-handled radioactive waste from the 324 Facility to the 200 Areas for disposal. The grouted waste has been transported in the leased ATG Nuclear Services 3-82B Radioactive Waste Shipping Cask (3-82B cask). Because the 3-82B cask is a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-certified Type B shipping cask, the lease cost is high, and the cask operations in the onsite environment may not be optimal. An alternatives study has been performed to develop cost and schedule information on alternative waste transportation systems to assist in determining which system should be used in the future. Five alternatives were identified for evaluation. These included continued lease of the 3-82B cask, fabrication of a new 3-82B cask, development and fabrication of an onsite cask, modification of the existing U.S. Department of Energy-owned cask (OH-142), and the lease of a different commercially available cask. Each alternative was compared to acceptance criteria for use in the B Cell as an initial screening. Only continued leasing of the 3-82B cask, fabrication of a new 3-82B cask, and the development and fabrication of an onsite cask were found to meet all of the B Cell acceptance criteria

  8. Scope and approach to management of mixed wastes: introduction to the session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ausmus, B.S.

    1986-01-01

    Mixed wastes are those that are termed both radioactive and chemically hazardous based on regulatory criteria in the United States. Historically, mixed wastes that could be classified as radioactive wastes were treated, stored, and disposed under statutes governing radioactive wastes. In recent years, it has become apparent that: (a) hazardous wastes are generated in nuclear facilities; (b) many wastes are both radioactive and chemically hazardous; and (c) the management of chemically hazardous wastes and mixed wastes requires reexamination of current waste treatment/disposal methods and development/implementation of modified methods. The purpose of this session is to discuss specific aspects of the mixed waste management problems and to provide a forum for discussion of the technical and institutional barriers to problem solutions. The paper addresses several mixed waste problems and current approaches to their solutions, including: (1) mixed waste management in fuel cycle facilities; (2) mixed waste management in a US Dept. of Energy production facility; and (3) mixed wastes impacts on 10CFR61 compliance. Technical and institutional approaches to mixed waste management are explored in three areas: (1) alternatives for treatment prior to shallow land disposal; (2) potential benefits of recovery of strategic/critical materials from mixed wastes; and (3) shallow land disposal system compatibilities/problems

  9. Language barriers, location of care, and delays in follow-up of abnormal mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, Leah S; Ma, Lin; Hofmann, Michael; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2012-02-01

    Breast cancer is frequently diagnosed after an abnormal mammography result. Language barriers can complicate communication of those results. We evaluated the association of non-English language with delay in follow-up. Retrospective cohort study of women at 3 mammography facilities participating in the San Francisco Mammography Registry with an abnormal mammogram result from 1997 to 2008. We measured median time from report of abnormal result to first follow-up test. Of 13,014 women with 16,109 abnormal mammograms, 4027 (31%) had a non-English patient language. Clinical facilities differed in proportion of non-English speakers and in time to first follow-up test: facility A (38%; 25 d), facility B (18%; 14 d), and facility C (51%; 41 d). Most mammography examinations (67%) had breast imaging and reporting data system 0 (incomplete) assessment, requiring radiographic follow-up. At 30 days of follow-up, 67% of all English speakers with incomplete assessments had a follow-up examination compared with 50% of all non-English speakers (Planguage; compared with English speakers and adjusting for education, non-English speakers had twice the odds ratio of >30-day delay in follow-up (odds ratio=2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-3.9). There are considerable differences among facilities in delays in diagnostic follow-up of abnormal mammography results. More attention must be paid to understanding mammography facility factors, such as wait time to schedule diagnostic mammography and radiology workload, to improve rates of timely follow-up, particularly for those facilities disproportionately serving vulnerable non-English speaking patients.

  10. Characterization of the Neutron Fields in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radiation Calibration Laboratory Low Scatter Calibration Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radev, R

    2009-09-04

    In June 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) revised its rule on Occupational Radiation Protection, Part 10 CFR 835. A significant aspect of the revision was the adoption of the recommendations outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Report 60 (ICRP-60), including new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated internal dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. ICRP-60 uses the quantities defined by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) for personnel and area monitoring including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d). A Joint Task Group of ICRU and ICRP has developed various fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients which are published in ICRP-74 for both protection and operational quantities. In February 2008, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) replaced its old pneumatic transport neutron irradiation system in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RCL) Low Scatter Calibration Facility (B255, Room 183A) with a Hopewell Designs irradiator model N40. The exposure tube for the Hopewell system is located close to, but not in exactly the same position as the exposure tube for the pneumatic system. Additionally, the sources for the Hopewell system are stored in Room 183A where, prior to the change, they were stored in a separate room (Room 183C). The new source configuration and revision of the 10 CFR 835 radiation weighting factors necessitate a re-evaluation of the neutron dose rates in B255 Room 183A. This report deals only with the changes in the operational quantities ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms 'neutron dose' and 'neutron dose rate' will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose equivalent and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent unless otherwise stated.

  11. Food irradiation in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Ghazali Hj Abd Rahman.

    1985-01-01

    Food irradiation has recently been visited as a technology that can contribute to the solution of problems associated with food preservation of Malaysia's agriculture produce and products thereby improving the economic status of the rural sector. However, the history of food irradiation in Malaysia is very recent. Research carried out on food irradiation only began in 1974 as a result of the installation of a 60 Co facility (initially 10,000 Ci) at the National University of Malaysia. Since its installation several studies have been carried out pertaining to the food irradiation. Presently its development has been slow. Research in this area has been confined to laboratory scale and purely academic. This limitation is due to a number of reasons, among others are: a) limited number of facilities; b) lack of expertise to conduct its research; c) other preservation methods can be improved with lower capital output. An important step towards its development was made when Malaysia actively participated in the RCA/IAEA food irradiation project, viz. the irradiation of pepper which was carried out at the National University of Malaysia in the 80's. As a result of this venture, research and development activities in food irradiation have been geared toward semi-plot scale with the view ot commercialization in the future. In 1982, a group of researchers was formed to conduct feasibility studies using irradiation techniques in trying to overcome several problems associated with our local paddy and rice. Another group is being organized by the National University of Malaysia to look into the problems associated with the preservation of frozen shrimps. (author)

  12. Language Barriers, Location of Care and Delays in Follow-up of Abnormal Mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, LS; Ma, L; Hofmann, M; Kerlikowske, K

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is frequently diagnosed after an abnormal mammography result. Language barriers can complicate communication of those results. Objectives We evaluated the association of non-English language with delay in follow-up. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of women at three mammography facilities participating in the San Francisco Mammography Registry (SFMR) with an abnormal mammogram result from 1997-2008. We measured median time from report of abnormal result to first follow-up test. Results Of 13,014 women with 16,109 abnormal mammograms, 4,027 (31%) had a non-English patient language. Clinical facilities differed in proportion of non-English-speakers and in time to first follow-up test: facility A (38%; 25 days), facility B (18%; 14 days), facility C (51%; 41 days). Most (67%) mammography examinations had BIRADS 0 (incomplete) assessment, requiring radiographic follow-up. At 30 days of follow-up 67% of all English speakers with incomplete assessments had a follow-up exam compared with 50% of all non-English speakers (p30 day delay in follow-up (OR 2.3; 95 CI 1.4-3.9). Conclusions There are considerable differences among facilities in delays in diagnostic follow-up of abnormal mammography results. More attention must be paid to understanding mammography facility factors, such as wait time to schedule diagnostic mammography and radiology workload, in order to improve rates of timely follow-up, particularly for those facilities disproportionately serving vulnerable non-English speaking patients. PMID:21993060

  13. The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: A quality control program for radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehl, S.R.; Mount, M.E.; Robison, W.L.

    1995-09-01

    From 1979 to 1989, approximately 25,000 Post Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (PNMIRS) samples were collected, and over 71,400 radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed to establish the concentration of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 241 Am, and plutonium isotopes in soil, vegetation, fish, and animals in the Northern Marshall Islands. While the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility (B379) in the Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division accounted for over 80% of all gamma spectroscopy analyses, approximately 4889 radiochemical and 5437 gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed on 4784 samples of soil, vegetation, terrestrial animal, and marine organisms by outside laboratories. Four laboratories were used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform the radiochemical analyses: Thermo Analytical Norcal, Richmond, California (TMA); Nuclear Energy Services, North Carolina State University (NCSU); Laboratory of Radiation Ecology, University of Washington (LRE); and Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division, LLNL, Livermore, California. Additionally, LRE and NCSU were used to perform gamma spectroscopy analyses. The analytical precision and accuracy were monitored by including blind duplicates and natural matrix standards in each group of samples analyzed. On the basis of reported analytical values for duplicates and standards, 88% of the gamma and 87% of the radiochemical analyses in this survey were accepted. By laboratory, 93% of the radiochemical analyses by TMA; 88% of the gamma-ray spectrometry and 100% of the radiochemistry analyses by NCSU; 89% of the gamma spectroscopy and 87% of the radiochemistry analyses by LRE; and 90% of the radiochemistry analyses performed by HEA's radiochemistry department were accepted

  14. Environmental assessment for the Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory proposes to build, permit, and operate the Explosive Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF) to treat explosive waste at LLNL`s Experimental Test Site, Site 300. It is also proposed to close the EWTF at the end of its useful life in accordance with the regulations. The facility would replace the existing Building 829 Open Burn Facility (B829) and would treat explosive waste generated at the LLNL Livermore Site and at Site 300 either by open burning or open detonation, depending on the type of waste. The alternatives addressed in the 1992 sitewide EIS/EIR are reexamined in this EA. These alternatives included: (1) the no-action alternative which would continue open burning operations at B829; (2) continuation of only open burning at a new facility (no open detonation); (3) termination of open burning operations with shipment of explosive waste offsite; and (4) the application of alternative treatment technologies. This EA examines the impact of construction, operation, and closure of the EWTF. Construction of the EWTF would result in the clearing of a small amount of previously disturbed ground. No adverse impact is expected to any state or federal special status plant or animal species (special status species are classified as threatened, endangered, or candidate species by either state or federal legislation). Operation of the EWTF is expected to result in a reduced threat to involved workers and the public because the proposed facility would relocate existing open burning operations to a more remote area and would incorporate design features to reduce the amount of potentially harmful emissions. No adverse impacts were identified for activities necessary to close the EWTF at the end of its useful life.

  15. Coil-On-Plug Ignition for LOX/Methane Liquid Rocket Engines in Thermal Vacuum Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, John C.; Atwell, Matthew J.; Morehead, Robert L.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Bugarin, Luz; Chaidez, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    A coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed and tested for Liquid Oxygen (LOX) / liquid methane rocket engines operating in thermal vacuum conditions. The igniters were developed and tested as part of the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA), previously tested as part of the Project Morpheus test vehicle. The ICPTA uses an integrated, pressure-fed, cryogenic LOX/methane propulsion system including a reaction control system (RCS) and a main engine. The ICPTA was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) under vacuum and thermal vacuum conditions. In order to successfully demonstrate ignition reliability in the vacuum conditions and eliminate corona discharge issues, a coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed. The ICPTA uses spark-plug ignition for both the main engine igniter and the RCS. The coil-on-plug configuration eliminates the conventional high-voltage spark plug cable by combining the coil and the spark-plug into a single component. Prior to ICPTA testing at Plum Brook, component-level reaction control engine (RCE) and main engine igniter testing was conducted at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), which demonstrated successful hot-fire ignition using the coil-on-plug from sea-level ambient conditions down to 10(exp.-2) torr. Integrated vehicle hot-fire testing at JSC demonstrated electrical and command/data system performance. Lastly, Plum Brook testing demonstrated successful ignitions at simulated altitude conditions at 30 torr and cold thermal-vacuum conditions at 6 torr. The test campaign successfully proved that coil-on-plug technology will enable integrated LOX/methane propulsion systems in future spacecraft.

  16. Coil-On-Plug Ignition for Oxygen/Methane Liquid Rocket Engines in Thermal-Vacuum Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, John C.; Atwell, Matthew J.; Morehead, Robert L.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Bugarin, Luz; Chaidez, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    A coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed and tested for Liquid Oxygen (LOX)/liquid methane (LCH4) rocket engines operating in thermal vacuum conditions. The igniters were developed and tested as part of the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA), previously tested as part of the Project Morpheus test vehicle. The ICPTA uses an integrated, pressure-fed, cryogenic LOX/LCH4 propulsion system including a reaction control system (RCS) and a main engine. The ICPTA was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) under vacuum and thermal vacuum conditions. A coil-on-plug ignition system has been developed to successfully demonstrate ignition reliability at these conditions while preventing corona discharge issues. The ICPTA uses spark plug ignition for both the main engine igniter and the RCS. The coil-on-plug configuration eliminates the conventional high-voltage spark plug cable by combining the coil and the spark plug into a single component. Prior to ICPTA testing at Plum Brook, component-level reaction control engine (RCE) and main engine igniter testing was conducted at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), which demonstrated successful hot-fire ignition using the coil-on-plug from sea-level ambient conditions down to 10(exp -2) torr. Integrated vehicle hot-fire testing at JSC demonstrated electrical and command/data system performance. Lastly, hot-fire testing at Plum Brook demonstrated successful ignitions at simulated altitude conditions at 30 torr and cold thermal-vacuum conditions at 6 torr. The test campaign successfully proved that coil-on-plug technology will enable integrated LOX/LCH4 propulsion systems in future spacecraft.

  17. ASOURCE: Source Term Analysis Tool for Advanced Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Dong Keun; Kook, Dong Hak; Choi, Jong Won; Choi, Heui Joo; Jeong, Jong Tae

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the 3 rd Comprehensive Nuclear Energy Promotion Plan, passed at the 254 th meeting of the Atomic Energy Commission, was announced as an R and D action plan for the development of an advanced fuel cycle adopting a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) in connection with a pyroprocess for a sustainable stable energy supply and a reduction in the amount of spent fuel (SF). It is expected that this fuel cycle can greatly reduce the SF inventory through a recycling process in which transuranics (TRU) and long-lived nuclides are burned in the SFR and cesium and strontium are disposed of after sufficient interim storage. For the success of the R and D plan, there are several issues related to the source term analysis. These are related with the following: (a) generation of inflow and outflow source terms of mixed SF in each process for the design of the pyroprocess facility, (b) source terms of mixed radwaste in a canister for the design of storage and disposal systems, (c) overall inventory estimation for TRU and long-lived nuclides for the design of the SFR, and (d) best estimate source terms for the practical design of the interim storage facility of SFs. A source term evaluation for a SF or radwaste with a single irradiation profile can be easily accomplished with the conventional computation tool. However, source term assessment for a batch of SFs or a mixture of radwastes generated from SFs with different irradiation profiles. A task that is essential to support the aforementioned activities is not possible with the conventional tool. Therefore, hybrid computing program for source term analysis to support the advanced fuel cycle was developed

  18. Energy-Water Microgrid Case Study at the University of Arizona's BioSphere 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daw, J.; Macknick, J.; Kandt, A.; Giraldez, J.

    2016-12-01

    Microgrids can provide reliable and cost-effective energy services in a variety of conditions and locations. To date, there has been minimal effort invested in developing energy-water microgrids that demonstrate the feasibility and leverage the synergies associated with designing and operating renewable energy and water systems in a coordinated framework. Water and wastewater treatment equipment can be operated in ways to provide ancillary services to the electrical grid and renewable energy can be utilized to power water-related infrastructure, but the potential for co-managed systems has not yet been quantified or fully characterized. Co-management and optimization of energy and water resources could lead to improved reliability and economic operating conditions. Energy-water microgrids could be a promising solution to improve energy and water resource management for islands, rural communities, distributed generation, Defense operations, and many parts of the world lacking critical infrastructure.The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the University of Arizona have been jointly researching energy-water microgrid opportunities through an effort at the university's BioSphere 2 (B2) Earth systems science research facility. B2 is an ideal case study for an energy-water microgrid test site, given its size, its unique mission and operations, the existence and criticality of water and energy infrastructure, and its ability to operate connected-to or disconnected-from the local electrical grid. Moreover, the B2 is a premier facility for undertaking agricultural research, providing an excellent opportunity to evaluate connections and tradeoffs in the food-energy-water nexus. The research effort at B2 identified the technical potential and associated benefits of an energy-water microgrid through the evaluation of energy ancillary services and peak load reductions and quantified the potential for B2 water-related loads to be utilized and modified to provide

  19. Tritium resources available for fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovari, M.; Coleman, M.; Cristescu, I.; Smith, R.

    2018-02-01

    The tritium required for ITER will be supplied from the CANDU production in Ontario, but while Ontario may be able to supply 8 kg for a DEMO fusion reactor in the mid-2050s, it will not be able to provide 10 kg at any realistic starting time. The tritium required to start DEMO will depend on advances in plasma fuelling efficiency, burnup fraction, and tritium processing technology. It is in theory possible to start up a fusion reactor with little or no tritium, but at an estimated cost of 2 billion per kilogram of tritium saved, it is not economically sensible. Some heavy water reactor tritium production scenarios with varying degrees of optimism are presented, with the assumption that only Canada, the Republic of Korea, and Romania make tritium available to the fusion community. Results for the tritium available for DEMO in 2055 range from zero to 30 kg. CANDU and similar heavy water reactors could in theory generate additional tritium in a number of ways: (a) adjuster rods containing lithium could be used, giving 0.13 kg per year per reactor; (b) a fuel bundle with a burnable absorber has been designed for CANDU reactors, which might be adapted for tritium production; (c) tritium production could be increased by 0.05 kg per year per reactor by doping the moderator with lithium-6. If a fusion reactor is started up around 2055, governments in Canada, Argentina, China, India, South Korea and Romania will have the opportunity in the years leading up to that to take appropriate steps: (a) build, refurbish or upgrade tritium extraction facilities; (b) extend the lives of heavy water reactors, or build new ones; (c) reduce tritium sales; (d) boost tritium production in the remaining heavy water reactors. All of the alternative production methods considered have serious economic and regulatory drawbacks, and the risk of diversion of tritium or lithium-6 would also be a major concern. There are likely to be serious problems with supplying tritium for future

  20. Endoparasitos em cobaias (Cavia porcellus (Mammalia, Rodentia, Caviidae provenientes de biotérios de criação e experimentação do município do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil Endoparasites in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus (Mammalia, Rodentia, Caviidae from breeding and experimentation animal housing of the municipality of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Casartelli Alves

    2007-10-01

    uncinata (34% and Giardia muris (24%. The prevalences of endoparasites found throught Ritchie's and Kinyoun's techniques in facility A were: E. caviae (74%, Balantidium sp. (68%, Cyathodinium sp. (68% and Cryptosporidium sp. (5%. In facility B: E. caviae (58%, Balantidium sp. (42%, Cyathodinium sp. (25% and G. muris (8% were found. The high prevalences in both facilities suggest that the efficacy of the sanitary barriers adopted in the prevention of parasitic infections should be revised.

  1. A tuberculose nas prisões do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil: uma urgência de saúde pública Tuberculosis in Rio de Janeiro prisons, Brazil: an urgent public health problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Roma Sánchez

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Em 2004, a taxa de incidência da tuberculose nas prisões do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, foi trinta vezes superior à da população geral do Estado. Essa taxa provavelmente é subestimada, especialmente pela dificuldade de acesso ao serviço de saúde nesse ambiente. Com o objetivo de melhor avaliar a situação, um primeiro inquérito radiológico sistemático foi realizado e mostrou taxa de prevalência de 4,6% (prisão A, n = 1.052. Dois inquéritos adicionais revelaram, nas unidades B (n = 590 e C (n = 1.372, taxas maiores (6,3% e 8,6%, respectivamente. A comparação das características sócio-demográficas das prisões A, B e C mostrou que a população encarcerada não é homogênea. Em comparação com prisão A, os indivíduos encarcerados nas prisões B e C são oriundos de comunidades mais desfavorecidas e têm mais freqüentemente história de encarceramento anterior e de tuberculose. Essas diferenças, coerentes com os dados de prevalência, implicam a adaptação das medidas de controle da tuberculose ao perfil epidemiológico e sócio-demográfico de cada unidade prisional.The tuberculosis incidence rate in prisons in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, was 30 times higher in 2004 than in the general population and is probably underestimated, particularly given the difficult access to care in the prison setting. To obtain a better estimate, a survey used systematic X-ray screening and showed a prevalence rate of 4.6% in one such detention facility, A (n = 1,052. Two additional surveys, in facilities B (n = 590 and C (n = 1,372, showed even higher prevalence rates (6.3% and 8.6% respectively. A comparison of socio-demographic characteristics between A, B, and C showed a heterogeneous prison population. As compared to facility A, inmates in B and C come from poorer urban communities and have more frequent histories of incarceration and tuberculosis. These differences, consistent with the prevalence data, imply the necessary

  2. Technical Proposal Salton Sea Geothermal Power Pilot Plant Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1975-03-28

    The proposed Salton Sea Geothermal Power Pilot Plant Program comprises two phases. The objective of Phase 1 is to develop the technology for power generation from high-temperature, high-salinity geothermal brines existing in the Salton Sea known geothermal resources area. Phase 1 work will result in the following: (a) Completion of a preliminary design and cost estimate for a pilot geothermal brine utilization facility. (b) Design and construction of an Area Resource Test Facility (ARTF) in which developmental geothermal utilization concepts can be tested and evaluated. Program efforts will be divided into four sub-programs; Power Generation, Mineral Extraction, Reservoir Production, and the Area Resources Test Facility. The Power Generation Subprogram will include testing of scale and corrosion control methods, and critical power cycle components; power cycle selection based on an optimization of technical, environmental and economic analyses of candidate cycles; preliminary design of a pilot geothermal-electric generating station to be constructed in Phase 2 of this program. The Mineral Extraction Subprogram will involve the following: selection of an optimum mineral recovery process; recommendation of a brine clean-up process for well injection enhancement; engineering, construction and operation of mineral recovery and brine clean-up facilities; analysis of facility operating results from environmental, economical and technical point-of-view; preliminary design of mineral recovery and brine clean-up facilities of sufficient size to match the planned pilot power plant. The Reservoir Production Subprogram will include monitoring the operation and maintenance of brine production, handling and injection systems which were built with private funding in phase 0, and monitoring of the brine characteristics and potential subsidence effects during well production and injection. Based on the above, recommendations and specifications will be prepared for production and

  3. SU-E-T-365: Estimation of Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalents for Radioprotection Exposed Workers in Radiotherapy Facilities Based On Characterization Patient Risk Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irazola, L; Terron, J; Sanchez-Doblado, F [Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Domingo, C; Romero-Exposito, M [Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Garcia-Fuste, M [Health and Safety Department, ALBA Synchrotron Light Source, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Sanchez-Nieto, B [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Bedogni, R [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Previous measurements with Bonner spheres{sup 1} showed that normalized neutron spectra are equal for the majority of the existing linacs{sup 2}. This information, in addition to thermal neutron fluences obtained in the characterization procedure{sup 3}3, would allow to estimate neutron doses accidentally received by exposed workers, without the need of an extra experimental measurement. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations demonstrated that the thermal neutron fluence distribution inside the bunker is quite uniform, as a consequence of multiple scatter in the walls{sup 4}. Although inverse square law is approximately valid for the fast component, a more precise calculation could be obtained with a generic fast fluence distribution map around the linac, from MC simulations{sup 4}. Thus, measurements of thermal neutron fluences performed during the characterization procedure{sup 3}, together with a generic unitary spectra{sup 2}, would allow to estimate the total neutron fluences and H*(10) at any point{sup 5}. As an example, we compared estimations with Bonner sphere measurements{sup 1}, for two points in five facilities: 3 Siemens (15–23 MV), Elekta (15 MV) and Varian (15 MV). Results: Thermal neutron fluences obtained from characterization, are within (0.2–1.6×10{sup 6}) cm−{sup 2}•Gy{sup −1} for the five studied facilities. This implies ambient equivalent doses ranging from (0.27–2.01) mSv/Gy 50 cm far from the isocenter and (0.03–0.26) mSv/Gy at detector location with an average deviation of ±12.1% respect to Bonner measurements. Conclusion: The good results obtained demonstrate that neutron fluence and H*(10) can be estimated based on: (a) characterization procedure established for patient risk estimation in each facility, (b) generic unitary neutron spectrum and (c) generic MC map distribution of the fast component. [1] Radiat. Meas (2010) 45: 1391 – 1397; [2] Phys. Med. Biol (2012) 5 7:6167–6191; [3] Med. Phys (2015) 42

  4. DeSa News. No. 2, February 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-02-01

    The international project on Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety during Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities (DeSa Project) was launched in November 2004 with the aim of developing a harmonized methodology for the safety assessment of decommissioning activities, providing recommendations on a systematic regulatory review procedure and applying the graded approach in the development and review of safety assessments for decommissioning. Significant work has been accomplished since the first project meeting (1-5 November 2004) in the following main areas: a. Development of a draft Safety Report on Safety Assessment Methodologies for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities; b. Development of first draft documents on the Regulatory Review and Application of the Graded Approach to Safety Assessments for Decommissioning; c. Six nuclear facilities volunteered by Member States as candidates for the preparation of a selected number of test cases during Phase 2 of the DeSa Project; d. Presentation of the Project at three international events in Canada and USA; e. Promotion of the Project through the first DeSa newsletter and the Project website (http://wwwns.iaea.org/tech-areas/waste-safety/desa). The second DeSa Project meeting (17-21 October 2005) attracted forty-two experts from twenty-six countries with the aim to: - Review progress on the five DeSa Project working groups (WGs) [Assessment Framework and System Description, Hazard Analysis, Analysis of Results and Confidence Building, Regulatory Review and Graded Approach] activities; - Review the draft Safety Report on Safety Assessment Methodologies for Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities, as revised by the Coordinating Group of the DeSa Project in June 2005; - Review progress and further develop recommendations on the regulatory review of safety assessments for decommissioning and the application of a graded approach to be used during the development and review of such assessments; - Develop the DeSa work plan

  5. Performance Assessment of a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site using GoldSim Integrated Systems Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrell, G.; Singh, A.; Tauxe, J.; Perona, R.; Dornsife, W.; grisak, G. E.; Holt, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Texas Commission on Environmental Quality has approved licenses for four landfills at the Waste Control Specialists (WCS) site located in Andrews County, West Texas. The site includes a hazardous waste landfill and three landfills for radioactive waste. An updated performance assessment is necessary prior to acceptance of waste at the landfills. The updated performance assessment a) provides for more realistic and flexible dose modeling capabilities, b) addresses all plausible release and accident scenarios as they relate to the performance objectives, c) includes impact of climate and hydrologic scenarios that may impact long-term performance of the landfill, d) addresses impact of cover naturalization and degradation on the landfill, and e) incorporates uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for critical parameters. For the updated performance assessment, WCS has developed an integrated systems level performance assessment model using the GoldSim platform. GoldSim serves as a model for integrating all of the major components of a performance assessment, which include the radionuclide source term, facility design, environmental transport pathways, exposure scenarios, and radiological doses. Unlike many computer models that are based on first principles, GoldSim is a systems level model that can be used to integrate and abstract more complex sub-models into one system. This can then be used to assess the results into a unified model of the disposal system and environment. In this particular application, the GoldSim model consists of a) hydrogeologic model that simulates flow and transport through the Dockum geologic unit that underlies all of the waste facilities, b) waste cells that represent the containment unit and simulate degradation of waste forms, radionuclide leaching, and partitioning into the liquid and vapor phase within the waste unit, c) a cover system model that simulates upward diffusive transport from the underground repository to the atmosphere. In

  6. One Dimensional Analysis Model of a Condensing Spray Chamber Including Rocket Exhaust Using SINDA/FLUINT and CEA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowski, Barbara; Edwards, Daryl; Dickens, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Modeling droplet condensation via CFD codes can be very tedious, time consuming, and inaccurate. CFD codes may be tedious and time consuming in terms of using Lagrangian particle tracking approaches or particle sizing bins. Also since many codes ignore conduction through the droplet and or the degradating effect of heat and mass transfer if noncondensible species are present, the solutions may be inaccurate. The modeling of a condensing spray chamber where the significant size of the water droplets and the time and distance these droplets take to fall, can make the effect of droplet conduction a physical factor that needs to be considered in the model. Furthermore the presence of even a relatively small amount of noncondensible has been shown to reduce the amount of condensation [Ref 1]. It is desirable then to create a modeling tool that addresses these issues. The path taken to create such a tool is illustrated. The application of this tool and subsequent results are based on the spray chamber in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B2) located at NASA's Plum Brook Station that tested an RL-10 engine. The platform upon which the condensation physics is modeled is SINDAFLUINT. The use of SINDAFLUINT enables the ability to model various aspects of the entire testing facility, including the rocket exhaust duct flow and heat transfer to the exhaust duct wall. The ejector pumping system of the spray chamber is also easily implemented via SINDAFLUINT. The goal is to create a transient one dimensional flow and heat transfer model beginning at the rocket, continuing through the condensing spray chamber, and finally ending with the ejector pumping system. However the model of the condensing spray chamber may be run independently of the rocket and ejector systems detail, with only appropriate mass flow boundary conditions placed at the entrance and exit of the condensing spray chamber model. The model of the condensing spray chamber takes into account droplet

  7. Quantitative Planetary Protection for Sample Return from Ocean Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Marc; Takano, Yoshinori; Porco, Carolyn; McKay, Christopher P.; Glavin, Daniel; Anbar, Ariel; Sherwood, Brent; Yano, Hajime

    2016-07-01

    the sample [undergoes] sterilization […], the sample container must be sealed [via] fail-safe containment with a method for verification of its operation before Earth return;" (B2) "for unsterilized samples, […] containment […] shall be maintained until [sample transfer to] an appropriate receiving facility;" (B3) "a method to 'break the chain of contact' with the target" be specified; (B4) "no uncontained hardware that contacted the target […] shall be returned to Earth;" (B5) "reviews and approval of the continuation of the flight mission shall be required [prior to] launch from Earth; leaving the target for return to Earth; and commitment to Earth reentry;" and (B6) "life detection and biohazard testing, or a proven sterilization process, shall be [a] precondition for the controlled distribution of […] the sample." These provisions and their means of evaluation could be quantified. A maximum leakage rate could be specified for particles above 10 nm (the size of prions, the smallest known pathogens [21]) (B1-B2), even for terminal velocity impact, whether unintended or otherwise (minimizing the risk of failure of reentry system elements, but requiring preservation of the samples and of sensors monitoring their thermal and structural integrity). For leak detection, He is commonly used [22], but its van-der-Waals radius of 0.14 nm could place too stringent a constraint for containment of pathogens over 70 times larger. To meet (B3)-(B4), uncontained parts in contact with ocean world material could be jettisoned prior to reentry with maximum probabilities of Earth/Moon impact, or of microbial survival upon reentry. (B6) could require either life detection prior to or after opening the sealed container [16,23-25], or sterilization [26]. Further guidance on (1) evaluating the 10 ^{-4} probability of forward contamination, (2) possibly extending this probability to ocean worlds other than Europa, (3) quantifying backward PP requirements, and (4) assessing the

  8. Pressure-Fed LOX/LCH4 Reaction Control System for Spacecraft: Transient Modeling and Thermal Vacuum Hotfire Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, Matthew J.; Hurlbert, Eric A.; Melcher, J. C.; Morehead, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    An integrated cryogenic liquid oxygen, liquid methane (LOX/LCH4) reaction control system (RCS) was tested at NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility (B-2) under vacuum and thermal vacuum conditions. The RCS is a subsystem of the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA), a pressure-fed LOX/LCH4 propulsion system composed of a single 2,800 lbf main engine, two 28 lbf RCS engines, and two 7 lbf RCS engines. Propellants are stored in four 48 inch diameter 5083 aluminum tanks that feed both the main engine and RCS engines in parallel. Helium stored cryogenically in a composite overwrapped pressure vessel (COPV) flows through a heat exchanger on the main engine before being used to pressurize the propellant tanks to a design operating pressure of 325 psi. The ICPTA is capable of simultaneous main engine and RCS operation. The RCS engines utilize a coil-on-plug (COP) ignition system designed for operation in a vacuum environment, eliminating corona discharge issues associated with a high voltage lead. There are two RCS pods on the ICPTA, with two engines on each pod. One of these two engines is a heritage flight engine from Project Morpheus. Its sea level nozzle was removed and replaced by an 85:1 nozzle machined using Inconel 718, resulting in a maximum thrust of 28 lbf under altitude conditions. The other engine is a scaled down version of the 28 lbf engine, designed to match the core and overall mixture ratios as well as other injector characteristics. This engine can produce a maximum thrust of 7 lbf with an 85:1 nozzle that was additively manufactured using Inconel 718. Both engines are film-cooled and capable of limited duration gas-gas and gas-liquid operation, as well as steady-state liquid-liquid operation. Each pod contains one of each version, such that two engines of the same thrust level can be fired as a couple on opposite pods. The RCS feed system is composed of symmetrical 3/8 inch lines