WorldWideScience

Sample records for facility simulator training

  1. Neutron Source Facility Training Simulator Based on EPICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Soo; Wei, Thomas Y.; Vilim, Richard B.; Grelle, Austin L.; Dworzanski, Pawel L.; Gohar, Yousry

    2015-01-01

    A plant operator training simulator is developed for training the plant operators as well as for design verification of plant control system (PCS) and plant protection system (PPS) for the Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology Neutron Source Facility. The simulator provides the operator interface for the whole plant including the sub-critical assembly coolant loop, target coolant loop, secondary coolant loop, and other facility systems. The operator interface is implemented based on Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which is a comprehensive software development platform for distributed control systems. Since its development at Argonne National Laboratory, it has been widely adopted in the experimental physics community, e.g. for control of accelerator facilities. This work is the first implementation for a nuclear facility. The main parts of the operator interface are the plant control panel and plant protection panel. The development involved implementation of process variable database, sequence logic, and graphical user interface (GUI) for the PCS and PPS utilizing EPICS and related software tools, e.g. sequencer for sequence logic, and control system studio (CSS-BOY) for graphical use interface. For functional verification of the PCS and PPS, a plant model is interfaced, which is a physics-based model of the facility coolant loops implemented as a numerical computer code. The training simulator is tested and demonstrated its effectiveness in various plant operation sequences, e.g. start-up, shut-down, maintenance, and refueling. It was also tested for verification of the plant protection system under various trip conditions.

  2. Flow simulation of the Component Development Integration Facility magnetohydrodynamic power train system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.; Petrick, M.

    1997-11-01

    This report covers application of Argonne National Laboratory`s (ANL`s) computer codes to simulation and analysis of components of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train system at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF). Major components of the system include a 50-MWt coal-fired, two-stage combustor and an MHD channel. The combustor, designed and built by TRW, includes a deswirl section between the first and the second-stage combustor and a converging nozzle following the second-stage combustor, which connects to the MHD channel. ANL used computer codes to simulate and analyze flow characteristics in various components of the MHD system. The first-stage swirl combustor was deemed a mature technology and, therefore, was not included in the computer simulation. Several versions of the ICOMFLO computer code were used for the deswirl section and second-stage combustor. The MGMHD code, upgraded with a slag current leakage submodel, was used for the MHD channel. Whenever possible data from the test facilities were used to aid in calibrating parameters in the computer code, to validate the computer code, or to set base-case operating conditions for computations with the computer code. Extensive sensitivity and parametric studies were done on cold-flow mixing in the second-stage combustor, reacting flow in the second-stage combustor and converging nozzle, and particle-laden flow in the deswirl zone of the first-stage combustor, the second-stage combustor, and the converging nozzle. These simulations with subsequent analysis were able to show clearly in flow patterns and various computable measures of performance a number of sensitive and problematical areas in the design of the power train. The simulations of upstream components also provided inlet parameter profiles for simulation of the MHD power generating channel. 86 figs., 18 tabs.

  3. Universal Drive Train Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This vehicle drive train research facility is capable of evaluating helicopter and ground vehicle power transmission technologies in a system level environment. The...

  4. Jake Garn Mission Simulator and Training Facility, Building 5, Historical Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovinac, Trish; Deming, Joan

    2010-01-01

    In response to President George W. Bush's announcement in January 2004 that the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) would end in 2010, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) completed a nation-wide historical survey and evaluation of NASA-owned facilities and properties (real property assets) at all its Centers and component facilities. The buildings and structures which supported the SSP were inventoried and assessed as per the criteria of eligibility for listing in the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) in the context of this program. This study was performed in compliance with Section 110 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) of 1966 (Public Law 89-665), as amended; the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (Public Law 91-190); Executive Order (EO) 11593: Protection and Enhancement of the Cultural Environment; EO 13287, Preserve America, and other relevant legislation. As part of this nation-wide study, in September 2006, historical survey and evaluation of NASA-owned and managed facilities at was conducted by NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. The results of this study are presented in a report entitled, "Survey and Evaluation of NASA-owned Historic Facilities and Properties in the Context of the U.S. Space Shuttle Program, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas," prepared in November 2007 by NASA JSC's contractor, Archaeological Consultants, Inc. As a result of this survey, the Jake Gam Mission Simulator and Training Facility (Building 5) was determined eligible for listing in the NRHP, with concurrence by the Texas State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO). The survey concluded that Building 5 is eligible for the NRHP under Criteria A and C in the context of the U.S. Space Shuttle program (1969-2010). Because it has achieved significance within the past 50 years, Criteria Consideration G applies. At the time of this documentation, Building 5 was still used to support the SSP as an

  5. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  6. EVA Training and Development Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupples, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Overview: Vast majority of US EVA (ExtraVehicular Activity) training and EVA hardware development occurs at JSC; EVA training facilities used to develop and refine procedures and improve skills; EVA hardware development facilities test hardware to evaluate performance and certify requirement compliance; Environmental chambers enable testing of hardware from as large as suits to as small as individual components in thermal vacuum conditions.

  7. Simulators in driver training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    In 2010, about 150 driving simulators were being used for the basic driver training in the Netherlands. According to theories about how people learn, simulator training has both advantages and disadvantages. In order to be able to learn something from a simulator, its technical quality must be

  8. Simulators in driver training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    In 2010, about 150 driving simulators were being used for the basic driver training in the Netherlands. According to theories about how people learn, simulator training has both advantages and disadvantages. In order to be able to learn something from a simulator, its technical quality must be adequ

  9. The Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle Training Facility visual system concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Keith

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) Training Facility (OTF) is to provide effective training for OMV pilots. A critical part of the training environment is the Visual System, which will simulate the video scenes produced by the OMV Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) system. The simulation will include camera models, dynamic target models, moving appendages, and scene degradation due to the compression/decompression of video signal. Video system malfunctions will also be provided to ensure that the pilot is ready to meet all challenges the real-world might provide. One possible visual system configuration for the training facility that will meet existing requirements is described.

  10. Team training/simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Erin A S; Fisher, Janet; Arafeh, Julia; Druzin, Maurice

    2010-03-01

    Obstetrical emergencies require the rapid formation of a team with clear communication, strong leadership, and appropriate decision-making to ensure a positive patient outcome. Obstetric teams can improve their emergency response capability and efficiency through team and simulation training. Postpartum hemorrhage is an ideal model for team and simulation training, as postpartum hemorrhage requires a multidisciplinary team with the capability to produce a protocol-driven, rapid response. This article provides an overview of team and simulation training and focuses on applications within obstetrics, particularly preparation for postpartum hemorrhage.

  11. 14 CFR 141.41 - Flight simulators, flight training devices, and training aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight simulators, flight training devices..., Aircraft, and Facilities Requirements § 141.41 Flight simulators, flight training devices, and training... that its flight simulators, flight training devices, training aids, and equipment meet the following...

  12. Simulators and endourological training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna, M Pilar; Hatzinger, Martin; Rassweiler, Jens

    2002-05-01

    Acquisition of skills laboratory training seems to be of importance in the training of surgeons, and is intended to cover the gap between theoretical learning and real practice. Economic and ethical reasons limit the use of animals during the learning process, while trends in medical change have severely restricted the available time to teach and to learn. With the incorporation of laparoscopy and the blossoming of minimally invasive techniques, mainly endoscopy, simulators have gained wide acceptance as an important tool in the surgeon's learning process. Two types of simulators are currently available: inanimates or mannequins and virtual reality simulators. A review of the recent literature shows that there is generally a significant improvement in dexterity after using simulators, whichever type is used. It is still unknown whether training simulation influences the patient's outcome positively.

  13. Simulation in resuscitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Gavin D

    2007-05-01

    The quality of education, CPR guidelines and the chain of survival all contribute to patient outcome following cardiac arrest. Increasing concerns about patient safety have focused attention on the methods used to train and prepare doctors for clinical practice. Reductions in clinical exposure at both undergraduate and postgraduate level have been implicated in junior doctors inability to recognise and manage critically ill patients. Simulation is used as a central training tool in contemporary advanced life support teaching. Simulation provides a learning opportunity for controlled clinical practice without putting patients or others at risk. This review examines the history and rationale for simulation training in resuscitation and provides some background to the learning theories that underpin it. The role of task trainers, high and low fidelity patient simulators and computer assisted simulation as teaching tools are discussed.

  14. 10 CFR 55.46 - Simulation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Simulation facilities. 55.46 Section 55.46 Energy NUCLEAR... Simulation facilities. (a) General. This section addresses the use of a simulation facility for the... applicants for operator and senior operator licenses. (b) Commission-approved simulation facilities...

  15. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  16. Training a Neural Network Via Large-Eddy Simulation for Autonomous Location and Quantification of CH4 Leaks at Natural Gas Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, J.; Travis, B. J.; Munoz-Esparza, D.; Dubey, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Fugitive methane (CH4) leaks from oil and gas production fields are a potential significant source of atmospheric methane. US DOE's ARPA-E MONITOR program is supporting research to locate and quantify fugitive methane leaks at natural gas facilities in order to achieve a 90% reduction in CH4 emissions. LANL, Aeris and Rice University are developing an LDS (leak detection system) that employs a compact laser absorption methane sensor and sonic anemometer coupled to an artificial neural network (ANN)-based source attribution algorithm. LANL's large-eddy simulation model, HIGRAD, provides high-fidelity simulated wind fields and turbulent CH4 plume dispersion data for various scenarios used in training the ANN. Numerous inverse solution methodologies have been applied over the last decade to assessment of greenhouse gas emissions. ANN learning is well suited to problems in which the training and observed data are noisy, or correspond to complex sensor data as is typical of meteorological and sensor data over a site. ANNs have been shown to achieve higher accuracy with more efficiency than other inverse modeling approaches in studies at larger scales, in urban environments, over short time scales, and even at small spatial scales for efficient source localization of indoor airborne contaminants. Our ANN is intended to characterize fugitive leaks rapidly, given site-specific, real-time, wind and CH4 concentration time-series data at multiple sensor locations, leading to a minimum time-to-detection and providing a first order improvement with respect to overall minimization of methane loss. Initial studies with the ANN on a variety of source location, sensor location, and meteorological condition scenarios are presented and discussed.

  17. Aircraft Simulators and Pilot Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Paul W.

    Flight simulators are built as realistically as possible, presumably to enhance their training value. Yet, their training value is determined by the way they are used. Traditionally, simulators have been less important for training than have aircraft, but they are currently emerging as primary pilot training vehicles. This new emphasis is an…

  18. Training and Simulation in Otolaryngology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiet, Gregory J.; Stredney, Don; Wan, Dinah

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on key issues surrounding the needs and application of simulation technologies for technical skills training in otolaryngology. The discussion includes an overview of key topics in training and learning, the application of these issues in simulation environments, and the subsequent applications of these simulation environments to the field of otolaryngology. Examples of past applications are presented, with discussion of how the interplay of cultural changes in surgical training in general, along with the rapid advancements in technology have shaped and influenced their adoption and adaptation. The authors conclude with emerging trends and potential influences advanced simulation and training will have on technical skills training in otolaryngology. PMID:22032486

  19. Payload IVA training and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsees, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a training program for the intravehicular operation of space shuttle payloads is discussed. The priorities for the program are compliance with established training standards, and accommodating changes. Simulation devices are also reviewed.

  20. Training report of the FBR cycle training facility in 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Toshio; Sasaki, Kazuichi; Sawada, Makoto [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tsuruga, Fukui (Japan); Ozawa, Kazumasa [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nagai, Humio [Fast Technology Engineering Co. (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    The FBR Cycle Training Facility has been operating since Sep. 2000 for staff of FBR 'Monju' and ATR 'Fugen' and fireman of the local community, etc. In 2000, 6 courses of the sodium handling training were held 22 times and also eight courses of the maintenance training were 11 times and total participants were 305. In order to grade up the trainigs for providing restarting of 'Monju', the corresponding training course on sodium piping leakage accident was added as newly sodium handling training course and partial contents of some courses were devised based on some comments by the training discussing committee organized in our center. In 2001, seven sodium handling training courses were carried out 25 times and eight maintenance courses were conducted 11 times and total participated number was 220, i.e. 157 trainees for sodium training courses and 63 trainees for maintenance training courses. Additionally, since a new licensed sodium training course for sodium handling workers included head of worker will be introduced from next year owing to the fire accident of maintenance building in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' occurred Oct in 2001, which was coursed by sodium spontaneous combustion due to inefficient handling on tidy up of the sodium handling working, training curriculum, training text and questions for examination are provided as for preparing its course cooperated with Oarai Engineering Center. (author)

  1. A simulator for perfusion training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, A; Rosinski, D; Noyes, N

    2007-11-01

    In this study, a patient simulator was designed and fabricated to train students to respond to various clinical situations associated with heart-lung bypass machine operation and to respond to changes in patient clinical parameters. The students will use the simulator to gain pre-clinical experience. The training system will initially simulate normal heart-lung bypass conditions. During a training session, the instructor will be able to simulate problems that may happen during a real procedure. Some of these problems are stopping of rotation of one of the roller pump heads, abnormal changes in the vital parameters, such as oxygenation level or biochemical values, high blood pressure, and occlusion in arterial or venous lines. The simulator will train students to respond properly to these situations, hence, allowing them to gain clinical experience without impacting patient safety and the outcome of real life procedures. The simulator can also be used for assessment of the students' competency levels.

  2. Simulator training for endobronchial ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Clementsen, Paul Frost; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    performance.A total of 16 respiratory physicians, without EBUS experience, were randomised to either virtual-reality simulator training or traditional apprenticeship training on patients, and then each physician performed EBUS-TBNA procedures on three patients. Three blinded, independent assessor assessed......-trained novices and apprenticeship-trained novices failing the test, respectively; pVirtual-reality simulator training was shown to be more...... rated higher than procedures performed by apprenticeship-trained novices: mean±sd are 24.2±7.9 points and 20.2±9.4 points, respectively; p=0.006. A pass/fail standard of 28.9 points was established using the contrasting groups method, resulting in 16 (67%) and 20 (83%) procedures performed by simulator...

  3. Measurement of effectiveness for training simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korteling, J.E.; Oprins, E.A.P.B.; Kallen, V.L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses experimental designs, measures, and measurement methods for determining the effectiveness of training simulators. First, we describe experimental designs in which training effects of training simulators are compared to those of conventional training. Next, the most

  4. Patient Simulators Train Emergency Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Johnson Space Center teamed up with Sarasota, Florida-based METI (now CAE Healthcare) through the STTR program to ruggedize the company’s patient simulators for training astronauts in microgravity environments. The design modifications were implemented in future patient simulators that are now used to train first responders in the US military as well as fire departments and other agencies that work in disaster zones.

  5. Evaluation Training: Simulation Exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carl B.; Farr, Roger

    The preparation of this simulation material package is guided by the concept of an evaluator as a decision-maker, based on the definition of evaluation as a continuous assessment concerned with answering decision-making questions. The continuous concept of evaluation is based on the model created by Egon Guba and Daniel Stufflebeam, named by its…

  6. Electronic Concepts Simulation Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The laboratory utilizes state-of-the-art digital models and simulations of both friendly and enemy airborne and ground-based weapon and command and control systems....

  7. INTEGRITY -- Integrated Human Exploration Mission Simulation Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninger, D.; Tri, T.; Daues, K.

    It is proposed to develop a high -fidelity ground facil ity to carry out long-duration human exploration mission simulations. These would not be merely computer simulations - they would in fact comprise a series of actual missions that just happen to stay on earth. These missions would include all elements of an actual mission, using actual technologies that would be used for the real mission. These missions would also include such elements as extravehicular activities, robotic systems, telepresence and teleoperation, surface drilling technology--all using a simulated planetary landscape. A sequence of missions would be defined that get progressively longer and more robust, perhaps a series of five or six missions over a span of 10 to 15 years ranging in durat ion from 180 days up to 1000 days. This high-fidelity ground facility would operate hand-in-hand with a host of other terrestrial analog sites such as the Antarctic, Haughton Crater, and the Arizona desert. Of course, all of these analog mission simulations will be conducted here on earth in 1-g, and NASA will still need the Shuttle and ISS to carry out all the microgravity and hypogravity science experiments and technology validations. The proposed missions would have sufficient definition such that definitive requirements could be derived from them to serve as direction for all the program elements of the mission. Additionally, specific milestones would be established for the "launch" date of each mission so that R&D programs would have both good requirements and solid milestones from which to build their implementation plans. Mission aspects that could not be directly incorporated into the ground facility would be simulated via software. New management techniques would be developed for evaluation in this ground test facility program. These new techniques would have embedded metrics which would allow them to be continuously evaluated and adjusted so that by the time the sequence of missions is completed

  8. Training of nuclear facility personnel: proceedings of the sixth symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-04-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning excellence in operator training; achieving excellence through the accreditation process; managing and organizing the training function; operations training methods and processes; the role of simulators in achieving excellence; maintenance and technical training methods and processes; staffing and qualifying the training organization; and measuring training effectiveness.

  9. Microprocessor Simulation: A Training Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscarson, David J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the design and application of a microprocessor simulation using BASIC for formal training of technicians and managers and as a management tool. Illustrates the utility of the modular approach for the instruction and practice of decision-making techniques. (SK)

  10. Plant model of KIPT neutron source facility simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wei, Thomas Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grelle, Austin L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine are collaborating on constructing a neutron source facility at KIPT, Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility has 100-kW electron beam driving a subcritical assembly (SCA). The electron beam interacts with a natural uranium target or a tungsten target to generate neutrons, and deposits its power in the target zone. The total fission power generated in SCA is about 300 kW. Two primary cooling loops are designed to remove 100-kW and 300-kW from the target zone and the SCA, respectively. A secondary cooling system is coupled with the primary cooling system to dispose of the generated heat outside the facility buildings to the atmosphere. In addition, the electron accelerator has a low efficiency for generating the electron beam, which uses another secondary cooling loop to remove the generated heat from the accelerator primary cooling loop. One of the main functions the KIPT neutron source facility is to train young nuclear specialists; therefore, ANL has developed the KIPT Neutron Source Facility Simulator for this function. In this simulator, a Plant Control System and a Plant Protection System were developed to perform proper control and to provide automatic protection against unsafe and improper operation of the facility during the steady-state and the transient states using a facility plant model. This report focuses on describing the physics of the plant model and provides several test cases to demonstrate its capabilities. The plant facility model uses the PYTHON script language. It is consistent with the computer language of the plant control system. It is easy to integrate with the simulator without an additional interface, and it is able to simulate the transients of the cooling systems with system control variables changing on real-time.

  11. 77 FR 63849 - Facility Security Officer Training Requirements; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Facility Security Officer Training Requirements; Correction AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...), announcing a public meeting to receive comments on the development of a Facility Security Officer training program. The notice contains an inaccurate Internet link to RSVP for the public meeting. DATES: The...

  12. Astronaut Neil Armstrong participates in simulation training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, participates in simulation training in preparation for the scheduled lunar landing mission. He is in the Apollo Lunar Module Mission SImulator in the Kennedy Space Center's Flight Crew Training Building.

  13. Simulation Facilities and Test Beds for Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlarmann, Bernhard Kl.; Leonard, Arian

    2002-01-01

    Galileo is the European satellite navigation system, financed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Commission (EC). The Galileo System, currently under definition phase, will offer seamless global coverage, providing state-of-the-art positioning and timing services. Galileo services will include a standard service targeted at mass market users, an augmented integrity service, providing integrity warnings when fault occur and Public Regulated Services (ensuring a continuity of service for the public users). Other services are under consideration (SAR and integrated communications). Galileo will be interoperable with GPS, and will be complemented by local elements that will enhance the services for specific local users. In the frame of the Galileo definition phase, several system design and simulation facilities and test beds have been defined and developed for the coming phases of the project, respectively they are currently under development. These are mainly the following tools: Galileo Mission Analysis Simulator to design the Space Segment, especially to support constellation design, deployment and replacement. Galileo Service Volume Simulator to analyse the global performance requirements based on a coverage analysis for different service levels and degrades modes. Galileo System Simulation Facility is a sophisticated end-to-end simulation tool to assess the navigation performances for a complete variety of users under different operating conditions and different modes. Galileo Signal Validation Facility to evaluate signal and message structures for Galileo. Galileo System Test Bed (Version 1) to assess and refine the Orbit Determination &Time Synchronisation and Integrity algorithms, through experiments relying on GPS space infrastructure. This paper presents an overview on the so called "G-Facilities" and describes the use of the different system design tools during the project life cycle in order to design the system with respect to

  14. Radar Training Facility Local Area Network

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The RTF LAN system provides a progressive training environment for initial and refresher radar training qualification for new and re-hired FAA employees. Its purpose...

  15. Radiological safety training for uranium facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This handbook contains recommended training materials consistent with DOE standardized core radiological training material. These materials consist of a program management guide, instructor`s guide, student guide, and overhead transparencies.

  16. SSERVI Analog Regolith Simulant Testbed Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minafra, Joseph; Schmidt, Gregory; Bailey, Brad; Gibbs, Kristina

    2016-10-01

    The Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) at NASA's Ames Research Center in California's Silicon Valley was founded in 2013 to act as a virtual institute that provides interdisciplinary research centered on the goals of its supporting directorates: NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and the Human Exploration & Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD).Primary research goals of the Institute revolve around the integration of science and exploration to gain knowledge required for the future of human space exploration beyond low Earth orbit. SSERVI intends to leverage existing JSC1A regolith simulant resources into the creation of a regolith simulant testbed facility. The purpose of this testbed concept is to provide the planetary exploration community with a readily available capability to test hardware and conduct research in a large simulant environment.SSERVI's goals include supporting planetary researchers within NASA, other government agencies; private sector and hardware developers; competitors in focused prize design competitions; and academic sector researchers.SSERVI provides opportunities for research scientists and engineers to study the effects of regolith analog testbed research in the planetary exploration field. This capability is essential to help to understand the basic effects of continued long-term exposure to a simulated analog test environment.The current facility houses approximately eight tons of JSC-1A lunar regolith simulant in a test bin consisting of a 4 meter by 4 meter area, including dust mitigation and safety oversight.Facility hardware and environment testing scenarios could include, Lunar surface mobility, Dust exposure and mitigation, Regolith handling and excavation, Solar-like illumination, Lunar surface compaction profile, Lofted dust, Mechanical properties of lunar regolith, Surface features (i.e. grades and rocks)Numerous benefits vary from easy access to a controlled analog regolith simulant testbed, and

  17. Mock Nuclear Processing Facility-Safeguards Training Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Philip [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hasty, Tim [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Johns, Rissell [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baum, Gregory [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-31

    This document outlines specific training requirements in the topical areas of Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) and Physical Protection(PP) which are to be used as technical input for designing a mock Integrated Security Facility (ISF) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The overall project objective for these requirements is to enhance the ability to deliver training on Material Protection Control and Accounting (MC&A) concepts regarding hazardous material such as irradiated materials with respect to bulk processing facilities.

  18. Europlanet Research Infrastructure: Planetary Simulation Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.; Mason, N. J.; Green, S.; Gómez, F.; Prieto, O.; Helbert, J.; Colangeli, L.; Srama, R.; Grande, M.; Merrison, J.

    2008-09-01

    EuroPlanet The Europlanet Research Infrastructure consortium funded under FP7 aims to provide the EU Planetary Science community greater access for to research infrastructure. A series of networking and outreach initiatives will be complimented by joint research activities and the formation of three Trans National Access distributed service laboratories (TNA's) to provide a unique and comprehensive set of analogue field sites, laboratory simulation facilities, and extraterrestrial sample analysis tools. Here we report on the infrastructure that comprises the second TNA; Planetary Simulation Facilities. 11 laboratory based facilities are able to recreate the conditions found in the atmospheres and on the surfaces of planetary systems with specific emphasis on Martian, Titan and Europa analogues. The strategy has been to offer some overlap in capabilities to ensure access to the highest number of users and to allow for progressive and efficient development strategies. For example initial testing of mobility capability prior to the step wise development within planetary atmospheres that can be made progressively more hostile through the introduction of extreme temperatures, radiation, wind and dust. Europlanet Research Infrastructure Facilties: Mars atmosphere simulation chambers at VUA and OU These relatively large chambers (up to 1 x 0.5 x 0.5 m) simulate Martian atmospheric conditions and the dual cooling options at VUA allows stabilised instrument temperatures while the remainder of the sample chamber can be varied between 220K and 350K. Researchers can therefore assess analytical protocols for instruments operating on Mars; e.g. effect of pCO2, temperature and material (e.g., ± ice) on spectroscopic and laser ablation techniques while monitoring the performance of detection technologies such as CCD at low T & variable p H2O & pCO2. Titan atmosphere and surface simulation chamber at OU The chamber simulates Titan's atmospheric composition under a range of

  19. New Equipment Training Center-Satellite Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ARDEC Satellite Facility is a 24-hour on-site military satellite transmission and downlink capability to Southwest Asia and all other military OCONUS and CONUS...

  20. The Effects of Marine Simulators on Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashed Al Shahin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Simulators have increased its usefulness in marine training over the years. Literature cites its many advantages which should ultimately lead to the increase in sea safety. However, more remarked than the discomfort felt by the trainee due to the lack of human interaction, simulation-training was noted to be costly and does not provide a clear indication of its value in organizations as no information supports this. A comparison of other technology which could be used for training is shown to provide an insight to the probable technology-based alternatives for simulators. In the search for the effects of marine-simulators on training, a few literature indicated its effects. Studies indeed specify favorable effects of simulators to training. However, no definite or quantifiable explanations were shown to relate training to its ultimate purpose of improving sea safety. Studies reviewed explored the effects of training to teamwork and the effects of training on the cognitive abilities of trainees. The Lewin study on the effects of CRM training indicated positive outcomes but was unclear about the link of training effectiveness with safety. The perception study revealed significant results in the perceived change of attitude, knowledge, and skills. The other study was on determining the physiological response related to cognitive activities which revealed that a rise in frequency values was observed during problemsolving in navigational situations. Simulator systems in training institutions were examined to provide a glimpse of how training may be made more effective.

  1. Study on Nuclear Facility Cyber Security Awareness and Training Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung-Woon; Song, Jae-Gu; Lee, Cheol-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Cyber security awareness and training, which is a part of operational security controls, is defined to be implemented later in the CSP implementation schedule. However, cyber security awareness and training is a prerequisite for the appropriate implementation of a cyber security program. When considering the current situation in which it is just started to define cyber security activities and to assign personnel who has responsibilities for performing those activities, a cyber security awareness program is necessary to enhance cyber security culture for the facility personnel to participate positively in cyber security activities. Also before the implementation of stepwise CSP, suitable education and training should be provided to both cyber security teams (CST) and facility personnel who should participate in the implementation. Since such importance and urgency of cyber security awareness and training is underestimated at present, the types, trainees, contents, and development strategies of cyber security awareness and training programs are studied to help Korean nuclear facilities to perform cyber security activities more effectively. Cyber security awareness and training programs should be developed ahead of the implementation of CSP. In this study, through the analysis of requirements in the regulatory standard RS-015, the types and trainees of overall cyber security training programs in nuclear facilities are identified. Contents suitable for a cyber security awareness program and a technical training program are derived. It is suggested to develop stepwise the program contents in accordance with the development of policies, guides, and procedures as parts of the facility cyber security program. Since any training programs are not available for the specialized cyber security training in nuclear facilities, a long-term development plan is necessary. As alternatives for the time being, several cyber security training courses for industrial control systems by

  2. Fuel cell hybrid drive train test facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Bruinsma; Edwin Tazelaar; Bram Veenhuizen; I. Zafina; H. Bosma

    2009-01-01

    Fuel cells are expected to play an important role in the near future as prime energy source on board of road-going vehicles. In order to be able to test all important functional aspects of a fuel cell hybrid drive train, the Automotive Institute of the HAN University has decided to realize a

  3. Fuel cell hybrid drive train test facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Bruinsma; Edwin Tazelaar; Bram Veenhuizen; I. Zafina; H. Bosma

    2009-01-01

    Fuel cells are expected to play an important role in the near future as prime energy source on board of road-going vehicles. In order to be able to test all important functional aspects of a fuel cell hybrid drive train, the Automotive Institute of the HAN University has decided to realize a station

  4. Simulation-based training for colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Louise; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Nerup, Nikolaj;

    2015-01-01

    simulations-based modalities provided reliable and valid assessments of competence in colonoscopy and credible pass/fail standards were established for both the tests. We propose to use these standards in simulation-based training programs before proceeding to supervised training on patients....

  5. Simulation and Aircrew Training and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prophet, Wallace W.; Caro, Paul W.

    This paper outlines some major areas of use of simulation in Army Aviation and comments on current research. Equipment development, crew performance studies, concept development and training are discussed. Only in the training area has the Army made substantial progress. A broad program of simulation research with emphasis on engineering and…

  6. Training for teamwork through in situ simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Asta; Poehlman, Jon; Bollenbacher, John; Riggan, Scott; Davis, Stan; Miller, Kristi; Ivester, Thomas; Kahwati, Leila

    2015-01-01

    In situ simulations allow healthcare teams to practice teamwork and communication as well as clinical management skills in a team's usual work setting with typically available resources and equipment. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate how to plan and conduct in situ simulation training sessions, with particular emphasis on how such training can be used to improve communication and teamwork. The video features an in situ simulation conducted at a labour and delivery unit in response to postpartum hemorrhage. PMID:26294962

  7. Influence of marine engine simulator training to marine engineer's competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Cheng, Xiangxin; Ma, Qiang; Song, Xiufu; Liu, Xinjian; Wang, Lianhai

    2012-01-01

    Marine engine simulator is broadly used in maritime education and training. Maritime education and training institutions usually use this facility to cultivate the hands-on ability and fault-treat ability of marine engineers and students. In this study, the structure and main function of DMS-2005 marine engine simulator is briefly introduced, several teaching methods are discussed. By using Delphi method and AHP method, a comprehensive evaluation system is built and the competence of marine engineers is assessed. After analyzing the calculating data, some conclusions can be drawn: comprehensive evaluation system could be used to assess marine engineer's competence; the training of marine engine simulator is propitious to enhance marine engineers' integrated ability, especially on the aspect of judgment of abnormal situation capacity, emergency treatment ability and safe operation ability.

  8. When experts are oceans apart: comparing expert performance values for proficiency-based laparoscopic simulator training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luursema, J.M.; Rovers, M.M.; Alken, A.P.; Kengen, B.; Goor, H. van

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgical training is moving away from the operating room toward simulation-based skills training facilities. This has led to the development of proficiency-based training courses in which expert performance data are used for feedback and assessment. However, few expert value data sets

  9. THE DIRECTORY FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN--EDUCATIONAL AND TRAINING FACILITIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SARGENT, F. PORTER

    THIS DIRECTORY, INTENDED FOR BOTH THE PROFESSIONAL WORKER AND THE LAY PERSON, LISTS AND FURNISHES DETAILED INFORMATION CONCERNING FACILITIES FOR THERAPY, TRAINING, REHABILITATION, AND EDUCATION OF CHILDREN UNABLE TO ATTEND REGULAR SCHOOL. LISTED ARE SCHOOLS AND TREATMENT CENTERS FOR THE EMOTIONALLY DISTURBED AND SOCIALLY MALADJUSTED, STATE SCHOOLS…

  10. Simulation and Training Package on Corex Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A software package has been developed for simulation on the Corex process. The simulation and training package on the process of shaft furnace using Corex off gas were introduced. The package consists of three main modules, namely the numerical simulation, the system modeling and optimization, and the training module, which are integrated with graphical interfaces. In addition, the equipment starting and stopping operation and typical trouble-shooting were also included in the package, whereby a practical environment can be established for training of operation and management stuff.

  11. SIMULATORS FOR TRAINING OF ROV OPERATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. I. Shakhtarin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article issues of the organization of imitating modeling complexes for training operators of Remotely Operated Underwater Vehicle are considered. It is reported about practical development of sea exercise simulation in Bauman MSTU.

  12. Simulation-based training for thoracoscopic lobectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine; Ringsted, Charlotte; Hansen, Henrik Jessen;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Video-assisted thoracic surgery is gradually replacing conventional open thoracotomy as the method of choice for the treatment of early-stage non-small cell lung cancers, and thoracic surgical trainees must learn and master this technique. Simulation-based training could help trainees...... overcome the first part of the learning curve, but no virtual-reality simulators for thoracoscopy are commercially available. This study aimed to investigate whether training on a laparoscopic simulator enables trainees to perform a thoracoscopic lobectomy. METHODS: Twenty-eight surgical residents were...... randomized to either virtual-reality training on a nephrectomy module or traditional black-box simulator training. After a retention period they performed a thoracoscopic lobectomy on a porcine model and their performance was scored using a previously validated assessment tool. RESULTS: The groups did...

  13. Safety and Quality Training Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scobby, Pete T.

    2009-01-01

    A portable system of electromechanical and electronic hardware and documentation has been developed as an automated means of instructing technicians in matters of safety and quality. The system enables elimination of most of the administrative tasks associated with traditional training. Customized, performance-based, hands-on training with integral testing is substituted for the traditional instructional approach of passive attendance in class followed by written examination.

  14. Intelligent agent supported training in virtual simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelink, A.; Bosch, K. van den; Doesburg, W.A. van; Harbers, M.

    2009-01-01

    Simulation-based training in military decision making often requires ample personnel for playing various roles (e.g. team mates, adversaries). Usually humans are used to play these roles to ensure varied behavior required for the training of such tasks. However, there is growing conviction and evide

  15. Cognitive model supported tactical training simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doesburg, W.A. van; Bosch, K. van den

    2005-01-01

    Simulation-based tactical training can be made more effective by using cognitive software agents to play key roles (e.g. team mate, adversaries, instructor). Due to the dynamic and complex nature of military tactics, it is hard to create agents that behave realistically and support the training lead

  16. Virtual reality simulation in endovascular surgical training.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tsang, J S

    2008-08-01

    Shortened trainingtimes duetothe European Working Time Directive (EWTD) and increased public scrutiny of surgical competency have led to a move away from the traditional apprenticeship model of training. Virtual reality (VR) simulation is a fascinating innovation allowing surgeons to develop without the need to practice on real patients and it may be a solution to achieve competency within a shortened training period.

  17. DECOMMISSIONING AND ENVRIONMENTAL CLEANUP OF SMALL ARMS TRAINING FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kmetz, T.

    2012-12-04

    USDOE performed a (CERCLA) non-time critical removal (NTCR) action at the Small Arms Training Area (SATA) Site Evaluation Area (SEA) located at the Savannah River Site (SRS), in Aiken, South Carolina. From 1951 to May 2010, the SATA was used as a small weapons practice and qualifying firing range. The SATA consisted of 870.1 ha (2,150 ac) of woodlands and open field, of which approximately 2.9 ha (7.3 ac) were used as a firing range. The SATA facility was comprised of three small arms ranges (one static and two interactive), storage buildings for supplies, a weapons cleaning building, and a control building. Additionally, a 113- m (370-ft) long earthen berm was used as a target backstop during live-fire exercises. The berm soils accumulated a large amount of spent lead bullets in the berm face during the facilities 59- years of operation. The accumulation of lead was such that soil concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) residential and industrial worker regional screening levels (RSLs). The RSL threshold values are based on standardized exposure scenarios that estimate contaminant concentrations in soil that the USEPA considers protective of humans over a lifetime. For the SATA facility, lead was present in soil at concentrations that exceed both the current residential (400 mg/kg) and industrial (800 mg/kg) RSLs. In addition, the concentration of lead in the soil exceeded the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 261.24) regulatory limit. The TCLP analysis simulates landfill conditions and is designed to determine the mobility of contaminants in waste. In addition, a principal threat source material (PTSM) evaluation, human health risk assessment (HHRA), and contaminant migration (CM) analysis were conducted to evaluate soil contamination at the SATA SEA. This evaluation determined that there were no contaminants present that constitute PTSM and the CM analysis revealed that no

  18. Simulation Training in Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Brief history of flight simulation. In SimTecT 2000 Proceedings (pp. 11–17). Lindfield, Aus- tralia: Simulation Industry Association of Australia . Park...financial limitations, system availability, ethical reasons, or risk of life (Haluck & Krummel, 2000; Schlectre, Bessemer, & Kolosh, 1992; Taylor, Lintern...National Advanced Driving Simulator (NADS; www.nads-sc.uiowa.edu), have the identical controls, displays, and feel of an automobile since NADS uses a

  19. Phasor Simulator for Operator Training Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, Jim [Electric Power Group, Llc, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2016-09-14

    Synchrophasor systems are being deployed in power systems throughout the North American Power Grid and there are plans to integrate this technology and its associated tools into Independent System Operator (ISO)/utility control room operations. A pre-requisite to using synchrophasor technologies in control rooms is for operators to obtain training and understand how to use this technology in real-time situations. The Phasor Simulator for Operator Training (PSOT) project objective was to develop, deploy and demonstrate a pre-commercial training simulator for operators on the use of this technology and to promote acceptance of the technology in utility and ISO/Regional Transmission Owner (RTO) control centers.

  20. Simulator Motion as a Factor in Flight Simulator Training Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Robert S.

    The document reviews the literature concerning the training effectiveness of flight simulators and describes an experiment in progress at the University of Illinois' Institute of Aviation which is an initial attempt to develop systematically the relationship between motion cue fidelity and resultant training effectiveness. The literature review…

  1. Simulation-based training for thoracoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjurström, Johanna Margareta; Konge, Lars; Lehnert, Per;

    2013-01-01

    An increasing proportion of thoracic procedures are performed using video-assisted thoracic surgery. This minimally invasive technique places special demands on the surgeons. Using simulation-based training on artificial models or animals has been proposed to overcome the initial part of the lear......An increasing proportion of thoracic procedures are performed using video-assisted thoracic surgery. This minimally invasive technique places special demands on the surgeons. Using simulation-based training on artificial models or animals has been proposed to overcome the initial part...... of the learning curve. This study aimed to investigate the effect of simulation-based training and to compare self-guided and educator-guided training....

  2. Simulation-based training for colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Louise; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Nerup, Nikolaj;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to create simulation-based tests with credible pass/fail standards for 2 different fidelities of colonoscopy models.Only competent practitioners should perform colonoscopy. Reliable and valid simulation-based tests could be used to establish basic competency in colonosco...... reliable and valid assessments of competence in colonoscopy and credible pass/fail standards were established for both the tests. We propose to use these standards in simulation-based training programs before proceeding to supervised training on patients....

  3. Benefits of simulation training in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Abas T; Juma FZ

    2016-01-01

    Tamkin Abas, Fatema Zehra JumaManchester Medical School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UKWe read about the satisfaction of simulation experiences of paramedic students1 with great interest. As medical students, with early clinical experience comparative to paramedic training in the UK, we agree that simulation-based learning is well received in health care education. As part of the curriculum at the University of Manchester, we are exposed to a variety of simulation-based environments...

  4. Networked simulation for team training of Space Station astronauts, ground controllers, and scientists - A training and development environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajare, Ankur R.; Wick, Daniel T.; Bovenzi, James J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe plans for the Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) which has been designed to meet the envisioned training needs for Space Station Freedom. To meet these needs, the SSTF will integrate networked simulators with real-world systems in five training modes: Stand-Alone, Combined, Joint-Combined, Integrated, and Joint-Integrated. This paper describes the five training modes within the context of three training scenaries. In addition, this paper describes an authoring system which will support the rapid integration of new real-world system changes in the Space Station Freedom Program.

  5. Benefits of simulation training in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abas T

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tamkin Abas, Fatema Zehra JumaManchester Medical School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UKWe read about the satisfaction of simulation experiences of paramedic students1 with great interest. As medical students, with early clinical experience comparative to paramedic training in the UK, we agree that simulation-based learning is well received in health care education. As part of the curriculum at the University of Manchester, we are exposed to a variety of simulation-based environments, ranging from examining simulated patients to practicing resuscitation and emergency care on mannequins. We would like to provide insight into our understanding of where simulation training fits into health care education and highlight a key aspect of its satisfaction that we feel has been overlooked.View the original paper by Williams and colleagues

  6. In-Flight Simulator for IFR Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    Computer-controlled unit feeds navigation signals to airplane instruments. Electronic training system allows students to learn to fly according to instrument flight rules (IFR) in uncrowded airspace. New system self-contained IFR simulator carried aboard training plane. Generates signals and commands for standard instruments on airplane, including navigational receiver, distance-measuring equipment, automatic direction finder, a marker-beacon receiver, altimeter, airspeed indicator, and heading indicator.

  7. Low Cost Simulator for Heart Surgery Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rocha e Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Introduce the low-cost and easy to purchase simulator without biological material so that any institution may promote extensive cardiovascular surgery training both in a hospital setting and at home without large budgets. Methods: A transparent plastic box is placed in a wooden frame, which is held by the edges using elastic bands, with the bottom turned upwards, where an oval opening is made, "simulating" a thoracotomy. For basic exercises in the aorta, the model presented by our service in the 2015 Brazilian Congress of Cardiovascular Surgery: a silicone ice tray, where one can train to make aortic purse-string suture, aortotomy, aortorrhaphy and proximal and distal anastomoses. Simulators for the training of valve replacement and valvoplasty, atrial septal defect repair and aortic diseases were added. These simulators are based on sewage pipes obtained in construction material stores and the silicone trays and ethyl vinyl acetate tissue were obtained in utility stores, all of them at a very low cost. Results: The models were manufactured using inert materials easily found in regular stores and do not present contamination risk. They may be used in any environment and maybe stored without any difficulties. This training enabled young surgeons to familiarize and train different surgical techniques, including procedures for aortic diseases. In a subjective assessment, these surgeons reported that the training period led to improved surgical techniques in the surgical field. Conclusion: The model described in this protocol is effective and low-cost when compared to existing simulators, enabling a large array of cardiovascular surgery training.

  8. Realistic Radio Communications in Pilot Simulator Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burki-Cohen, Judith; Kendra, Andrew J.; Kanki, Barbara G.; Lee, Alfred T.

    2000-01-01

    Simulators used for total training and evaluation of airline pilots must satisfy stringent criteria in order to assure their adequacy for training and checking maneuvers. Air traffic control and company radio communications simulation, however, may still be left to role-play by the already taxed instructor/evaluators in spite of their central importance in every aspect of the flight environment. The underlying premise of this research is that providing a realistic radio communications environment would increase safety by enhancing pilot training and evaluation. This report summarizes the first-year efforts of assessing the requirement and feasibility of simulating radio communications automatically. A review of the training and crew resource/task management literature showed both practical and theoretical support for the need for realistic radio communications simulation. A survey of 29 instructor/evaluators from 14 airlines revealed that radio communications are mainly role-played by the instructor/evaluators. This increases instructor/evaluators' own workload while unrealistically lowering pilot communications load compared to actual operations, with a concomitant loss in training/evaluation effectiveness. A technology review searching for an automated means of providing radio communications to and from aircraft with minimal human effort showed that while promising, the technology is still immature. Further research and the need for establishing a proof-of-concept are also discussed.

  9. TREE Simulation Facilities, Second Edition, Revision 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    provide to the experimenter? 5. Will adequate ( quality or quantity) test equipment be available at the facility or will the experimenter have to...From Core Center, in Figure 2-32. Average neutron fluence > 3.0 MeV as a function of radial distance from core center, indoo ». < u fO e o in

  10. Procedural specificity in laparoscopic simulator training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Flemming; Sørensen, Jette Led; Konge, Lars

    2014-01-01

    proficiency level on a virtual reality laparoscopy simulator. Upon reaching proficiency, the participants are randomised to either the intervention group, which practices two procedures (an appendectomy followed by a salpingectomy) or to the control group, practicing only one procedure (a salpingectomy...... of procedural practice in laparoscopic simulator training. METHODS/DESIGN: A randomised single-centre educational superiority trial. Participants are 96 surgical novices (medical students) without prior laparoscopic experience. Participants start by practicing a series of basic skills tasks to a predefined...

  11. Training Effectiveness of Visual and Motion Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    and checkride scores. No statistical differeLes between the two groups were found. Creelman (1959) reported that students trained in theSNJ Link with...simulated and aircraft hvurs or sorsies (Dricisom a Burger, 1976; Brown. Matheny, & Fleaman. 1951; Creelman , 1959; Gray et al., 1969- Payne at al., 1976...reirtionohip between flight simulator motion and trainiag requirmumenia. Human Factors. 1979. 2). 493-50)1. Creelman , J.A. Evaluation of approach

  12. Simulation training for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Brum

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO is a complex treatment. Despite this, there are a lack of training programs designed to develop relevant clinical and nonclinical skills required for ECMO specialists. The aim of the current study was to describe the design, implementation and evaluation of a 1-day simulation course for delivering training in ECMO. Methods: A 1-day simulation course was developed with educational and intensive care experts. First, the delegates received a lecture on the principles of simulation training and the importance of human factors. This was, followed by a practical demonstration and discussion of the ECMO circuit, console components, circuit interactions effects and potential complications. There were then five ECMO simulation scenarios with debriefing that covered technical and nontechnical issues. The course culminated in a knowledge-based assessment. Course outcomes were assessed using purpose-designed questionnaires. Results: We held 3 courses with a total of 14 delegates (9 intensive care nurses, 3 adult intensive care consultants and 2 ECMO technicians. Following the course, 8 (57% gained familiarity in troubleshooting an ECMO circuit, 6 (43% increased their familiarity with the ECMO pump and circuit, 8 (57% perceived an improvement in their communication skills and 7 (50% perceived an improvement in their leadership skills. At the end of the course, 13 (93% delegates agreed that they felt more confident in dealing with ECMO. Conclusions: Simulation-training courses may increase knowledge and confidence in dealing with ECMO emergencies. Further studies are indicated to determine whether simulation training improves clinical outcomes and translates to reduced complication rates in patients receiving ECMO.

  13. Simulation training for hyperacute stroke unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roots, Angela; Thomas, Libby; Jaye, Peter; Birns, Jonathan

    National clinical guidelines have emphasized the need to identify acute stroke as a clinical priority for early assessment and treatment of patients on hyperacute stroke units. Nurses working on hyperacute stroke units require stroke specialist training and development of competencies in dealing with neurological emergencies and working in multidisciplinary teams. Educational theory suggests that experiential learning with colleagues in real-life settings may provide transferable results to the workplace with improved performance. Simulation training has been shown to deliver situational training without compromising patient safety and has been shown to improve both technical and non-technical skills (McGaghie et al, 2010). This article describes the role that simulation training may play for nurses working on hyperacute stroke units explaining the modalities available and the educational potential. The article also outlines the development of a pilot course involving directly relevant clinical scenarios for hyperacute stroke unit patient care and assesses the benefits of simulation training for hyperacute stroke unit nurses, in terms of clinical performance and non-clinical abilities including leadership and communication.

  14. Simulation training in brain death determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocker, Sara; Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2015-04-01

    Skill in the determination of brain death is traditionally acquired during training in an apprenticeship model. Brain death is not frequently determined, and thus exposure to the techniques used is marginal. Brain death is therefore ideally suited for competency-based education models such as simulation. Simulation can ensure that all trainees have direct experience in brain death determination irrespective of their specialty, program design, or institutional protocol. In this review, the authors discuss the advantages and barriers to simulation and how to develop simulation scenarios for instruction in the determination of brain death. Future research should focus on validation of brain death simulation methods and assessment tools as well as the impact of simulation on performance in clinical practice.

  15. Pipeline: An Employment and Training Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterly, Jean L.; Meyer, David P.

    This monograph is one of a series developed for curriculum in higher education which prepares personnel for employment in local, state, and regional levels of Employment and Training Administration programs of the U.S. Department of Labor. This publication describes a simulation game called "Pipeline" rather than a regular university course. The…

  16. Simulators for Mariner Training and Licensing: Guidelines for Deck Officer Training Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    34 Shiphandling and Shiphandling Training." TAEG Report Number 1. Training Analysis and Evaluation Group, Naval Training Equipment Cnter, Orlando, Florida...addresses the proper use of the shiphandling /ship bridge simulator in effectively conducting simulator training for senior commercial ship deck officers...the evaluation of simulator training courses for their personnel. Senior Mariner Simulator-Based Training SystemAO ot ? Shiphandling Instructor

  17. GOSTE: Group Oriented Simulation Training Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korichi Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore the contribution of the CSCW (Computer Supported Cooperative Work in the collaborative project conduct and more specifically in the conduct of a simulation training project. We justify the adequacy of the CSCW concepts with the method of conduct of a simulation project. The practice of the web-based simulation as well as the web-based groupware is treated. This allows us to justify the choice of the BSCW system as support of implementation of a GOSTE on the Web. We illustrate our approach by presenting our experiment with BSCW system to implement such an environment.

  18. Clinical training: a simulation program for phlebotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araki Toshitaka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Basic clinical skills training in the Japanese medical education system has traditionally incorporated on-the-job training with patients. Recently, the complementary use of simulation techniques as part of this training has gained popularity. It is not known, however, whether the participants view this new type of education program favorably; nor is the impact of this program known. In this study we developed a new simulation-based training program in phlebotomy for new medical residents and assessed their satisfaction with the program Methods The education program comprised two main components: simulator exercise sessions and the actual drawing of blood from other trainees. At the end of the session, we surveyed participant sentiment regarding the program. Results There were 43 participants in total. In general, they were highly satisfied with the education program, with all survey questions receiving scores of 3 or more on a scale of 1–5 (mean range: 4.3 – 4.8, with 5 indicating the highest level of satisfaction. Additionally, their participation as a 'patient' for their co-trainees was undertaken willingly and was deemed to be a valuable experience. Conclusion We developed and tested an education program using a simulator for blood collection. We demonstrated a high satisfaction level among the participants for this unique educational program and expect that it will improve medical training, patient safety, and quality of care. The development and dissemination of similar educational programs involving simulation for other basic clinical skills will be undertaken in the future.

  19. Using virtual reality in the training of security staff and evaluation of physical protection barriers in nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augusto, Silas C.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Mol, Pedro C.; Sales, Douglas S. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: silas@ien.gov.br, e-mail: mol@ien.gov.br, e-mail: pedro98@gmail.com, e-mail: dsales@ien.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    The physical security of facilities containing radioactive objects, an already important matter, now has a new aggravating factor: the existence of groups intending to obtain radioactive materials for the purpose of intentionally induce radioactive contamination incidents, as for example the explosion of dirty bombs in populated regions, damaging both people and environment. In this context, the physical security of such facilities must be reinforced so to reduce the possibilities of such incidents. This paper presents a adapted game engine used as a virtual reality system, enabling the modeling and simulation of scenarios of nuclear facilities containing radioactive objects. In these scenarios, the physical protection barriers, as fences and walls, are simulated along with vigilance screens. Using a computer network, several users can participate simultaneously in the simulation, being represented by avatars. Users can play the roles of both invaders and security staff. The invaders have as objective to surpass the facility's physical protection barriers to steal radioactive objects and flee. The security staff have as objective to prevent and stop the theft of radioactive objects from the facility. The system can be used to analysis simulated scenarios and train vigilance/security staff. A test scenario was already developed and used, and the preliminary tests had satisfactory results, as they enabled the evaluation of the physical protection barriers of the virtual facility, and the training of those who participated in the simulations in the functions of a security staff. (author)

  20. Near-peer medical student simulation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Thomas; Brand, Eleanor; Wong, Emma; Richardson, Jay; Athorn, Sam; Chowdhury, Faiza

    2017-06-01

    There is growing concern that medical students are inadequately prepared for life as a junior doctor. A lack of confidence managing acutely unwell patients is often cited as a barrier to good clinical care. With medical schools investing heavily in simulation equipment, we set out to explore if near-peer simulation training is an effective teaching format. Medical students in their third year of study and above were invited to attend a 90-minute simulation teaching session. The sessions were designed and delivered by final-year medical students using clinical scenarios mapped to the Sheffield MBChB curriculum. Candidates were required to assess, investigate and manage an acutely unwell simulated patient. Pre- and post-simulation training Likert scale questionnaires were completed relating to self-reported confidence levels. There is growing concern that medical students are inadequately prepared for life as a junior doctor RESULTS: Questionnaires were completed by 25 students (100% response rate); 52 per cent of students had no prior simulation experience. There were statistically significant improvements in self-reported confidence levels in each of the six areas assessed (p < 0.005). Thematic analysis of free-text comments indicated that candidates enjoyed the practical format of the sessions and found the experience useful. Our results suggest that near-peer medical student simulation training benefits both teacher and learner and that this simplistic model could easily be replicated at other medical schools. As the most junior members of the team, medical students are often confined to observer status. Simulation empowers students to practise independently in a safe and protected environment. Furthermore, it may help to alleviate anxiety about starting work as a junior doctor and improve future patient care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  1. Hysteroscopic simulator for training and educational purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Fabian; Brown, Ian; McColl, Ryan; Seligman, Cory; Alsaraira, Amer

    2006-01-01

    Hysteroscopy is an extensively popular option in evaluating and treating women with infertility. The procedure utilizes an endoscope, inserted through the vagina and cervix to examine the intra-uterine cavity via a monitor. The difficulty of hysteroscopy from the surgeon's perspective is the visual spatial perception of interpreting 3D images on a 2D monitor, and the associated psychomotor skills in overcoming the fulcrum-effect. Despite the widespread use of this procedure, current qualified hysteroscopy surgeons have not been trained the fundamentals through an organized curriculum. The emergence of virtual reality as an educational tool for this procedure, and for other endoscopic procedures, has undoubtedly raised interests. The ultimate objective is for the inclusion of virtual reality training as a mandatory component for gynecological endoscopic training. Part of this process involves the design of a simulator, encompassing the technical difficulties and complications associated with the procedure. The proposed research examines fundamental hysteroscopic factors as well as current training and accreditation norms, and proposes a hysteroscopic simulator design that is suitable for educating and training.

  2. A Dynamical Simulation Facility for Hybrid Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Back, A; Myers, M; Back, Allen; Guckenheimer, John; Myers, Mark

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: This paper establishes a general framework for describing hybrid dynamical systems which is particularly suitable for numerical simulation. In this context, the data structures used to describe the sets and functions which comprise the dynamical system are crucial since they provide the link between a natural mathematical formulation of a problem and the correct application of standard numerical algorithms. We describe a partial implementation of the design methodology and use this simulation tool for a specific control problem in robotics as an illustration of the utility of the approach for practical applications.

  3. Supercritical Hydrocarbon Impinging Injector Simulation Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    PC Beowulf cluster that was purchased under a previous AFOSR Grant (F49620-01-1-0432) managed by Dr. Mitat Birkan. The cluster consists of 22 Intel...computing cluster allows simulations to be conducted in a sufficiently short time period to allow investigation of the effects of operating conditions...hydrocarbon propellants are of interest to the next generation of liquid propellant rocket engines. The procured high performance computing cluster allows

  4. Simulation-based training in echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Monodeep; Patel, Rajendrakumar; German, Charles; Kharod, Anant; Mohamed, Ahmed; Dod, Harvinder S; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Nanda, Navin C

    2016-10-01

    The knowledge gained from echocardiography is paramount for the clinician in diagnosing, interpreting, and treating various forms of disease. While cardiologists traditionally have undergone training in this imaging modality during their fellowship, many other specialties are beginning to show interest as well, including intensive care, anesthesia, and primary care trainees, in both transesophageal and transthoracic echocardiography. Advances in technology have led to the development of simulation programs accessible to trainees to help gain proficiency in the nuances of obtaining quality images, in a low stress, pressure free environment, often with a functioning ultrasound probe and mannequin that can mimic many of the pathologies seen in living patients. Although there are various training simulation programs each with their own benefits and drawbacks, it is clear that these programs are a powerful tool in educating the trainee and likely will lead to improved patient outcomes. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Immersive Learning Simulations in Aircraft Maintenance Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-15

    You might just get a “serious game,” or “as proposed by the eLearning Guild, you could get an Immersive Learning Simulation.”3 Quoting the... eLearning Guild, Caspian Learning, in a report for the United Kingdom Ministry of Defense, defined an Immersive Learning Simulation (ILS) as “an optimized...their studies that “the savings are more likely to be achieved, and the improvements in training quality more easily justified, when technology is

  6. Training by means of simulators; Opplaering ved bruk av simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Hans Petter

    1998-07-01

    This presentation claims that the offshore industry has enough technology and equipment, it does not lack money, if the projects are good enough, and it does not lack new challenging tasks. The challenge is to provide the skill required to accomplish the tasks and to make the personnel, technology and the organisation work together. Thus, tomorrow's winners on the shelf will be those who commit themselves to education and learning. Simulators have been used extensively by the airline companies. This is not the case for the operation of drilling rigs at sea. Some entrepreneurs have begun to realise that simulator training is the modern way of approaching new technology. Operators have been using simulators for many years in offshore process training. The development of software and audio-visual tools brings the student closer to reality by simulation. In cooperation with Maritime Hydraulic, Smedvig Offshore AS developed a Ram Rig simulator. This presentation discusses Version 1 of the RamRig Simulator in some detail and some issues to be incorporated into the next version.

  7. Immersive Simulation Training for the Dismounted Soldier

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    more descriptive definition of largely equivalent and interchangeable terms virtual reality (VR) or virtual environment (VE). "Computer-generated...surgical training, and art." (virtual reality , 2003) For purposes of this report, immersive simulations are defined to include a broad range of virtual...deliver environmental sounds and voice communications. "o Haptic Display - Uses pressure or vibration to provide cues such as physical contact with

  8. Rapid E-Learning Simulation Training and User Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackler, Angeline

    2011-01-01

    A new trend in e-learning development is to have subject matter experts use rapid development tools to create training simulations. This type of training is called rapid e-learning simulation training. Though companies are using rapid development tools to create training quickly and cost effectively, there is little empirical research to indicate…

  9. Rapid E-Learning Simulation Training and User Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackler, Angeline

    2011-01-01

    A new trend in e-learning development is to have subject matter experts use rapid development tools to create training simulations. This type of training is called rapid e-learning simulation training. Though companies are using rapid development tools to create training quickly and cost effectively, there is little empirical research to indicate…

  10. When experts are oceans apart: comparing expert performance values for proficiency-based laparoscopic simulator training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Rovers, Maroeska M; Alken, Alexander; Kengen, Bas; van Goor, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Surgical training is moving away from the operating room toward simulation-based skills training facilities. This has led to the development of proficiency-based training courses in which expert performance data are used for feedback and assessment. However, few expert value data sets have been published, and no standard method for generating expert values has been adopted by the field. To investigate the effect of different proficiency value data sets on simulator training courses, we (1) compared 2 published expert performance data sets for the LapSim laparoscopic virtual-reality simulator (by van Dongen et al. and Heinrichs et al.) and (2) assessed the effect of using either set on LapSim training data obtained from 16 local residents in surgery and gynecology. Across all simulator tasks, the experts consulted by van Dongen et al. performed better on motion efficiency, but not on duration or damage control. Applying both proficiency sets to training data collected during a basic skills laparoscopic simulator course, residents would have graduated on an average in 1.5 fewer sessions using the Heinrichs expert values compared with the van Dongen expert values. The selection of proficiency values for proficiency-based simulator training courses affects training length, skills level assessment, and training costs. Standardized, well-controlled methods are necessary to create valid and reliable expert values for use in training and research. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Real life simulations to train nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Felpete, Alberto Jesús; Abajas Bustillo, Rebeca; De la Horra Gutiérrez, Inmaculada; Hoz Cuerno, Verónica; Llata Agüero, Gema; López López, Luis Mariano; Sánchez Herrán, Beatriz

    2004-01-01

    Nurses must confront critical potential life threatening situations daily. These are very tense situations which must be solved in a rapid, adequate manner in coordination with the rest of the professional health team. How to deal with these crises, which usually follow an established protocol, must be learned and practiced in a safe environment which provides the greatest possible guarantee of success. The best way to acquire this knowledge and skill is through a real life simulation. Nurses from various disciplines carry out their work in the Training Center for Critical Crises at the Marqués de Valdecilla University Hospital in Santander, the only center in Spain which runs this type of simulation. In 2003, this center initiated a specific training simulation for nurses whose purpose is to increase scientific-technical knowledge to the maximum and accelerate the learning of non-technical social and cognitive fundamentals within the working environment of a professional health team. The following article describes a simulation meeting these characteristics, its teaching methods, advantages, importance for professional health teams, and its repercussions on patients.

  12. Maglev Facility for Simulating Variable Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanming; Strayer, Donald M.; Israelsson, Ulf E.

    2010-01-01

    An improved magnetic levitation apparatus ("Maglev Facility") has been built for use in experiments in which there are requirements to impose variable gravity (including zero gravity) in order to assess the effects of gravity or the absence thereof on physical and physiological processes. The apparatus is expected to be especially useful for experiments on the effects of gravity on convection, boiling, and heat transfer in fluids and for experiments on mice to gain understanding of bone loss induced in human astronauts by prolonged exposure to reduced gravity in space flight. The maglev principle employed by the apparatus is well established. Diamagnetic cryogenic fluids such as liquid helium have been magnetically levitated for studying their phase transitions and critical behaviors. Biological entities consist mostly of diamagnetic molecules (e.g., water molecules) and thus can be levitated by use of sufficiently strong magnetic fields having sufficiently strong vertical gradients. The heart of the present maglev apparatus is a vertically oriented superconducting solenoid electromagnet (see figure) that generates a static magnetic field of about 16 T with a vertical gradient sufficient for levitation of water in normal Earth gravity. The electromagnet is enclosed in a Dewar flask having a volume of 100 L that contains liquid helium to maintain superconductivity. The Dewar flask features a 66-mm-diameter warm bore, lying within the bore of the magnet, wherein experiments can be performed at room temperature. The warm bore is accessible from its top and bottom ends. The superconducting electromagnet is run in the persistent mode, in which the supercurrent and the magnetic field can be maintained for weeks with little decay, making this apparatus extremely cost and energy efficient to operate. In addition to water, this apparatus can levitate several common fluids: liquid hydrogen, liquid oxygen, methane, ammonia, sodium, and lithium, all of which are useful

  13. STS-37 crewmembers train in JSC's FB shuttle mission simulator (SMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-37 Commander Steven R. Nagel (left) and Mission Specialist (MS) Jerry L. Ross rehearse some of their scheduled duties on the flight deck of JSC's fixed-based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. During the unsuited simulation, Nagel reviews checklist while seated at the commanders station as Ross looks on from the pilots station.

  14. The Size and Scope of Collegiate Athletic Training Facilities and Staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallucci, Andrew R; Petersen, Jeffrey C

    2017-08-01

      Athletic training facilities have been described in terms of general design concepts and from operational perspectives. However, the size and scope of athletic training facilities, along with staffing at different levels of intercollegiate competition, have not been quantified.   To define the size and scope of athletic training facilities and staffing levels at various levels of intercollegiate competition. To determine if differences existed in facilities (eg, number of facilities, size of facilities) and staffing (eg, full time, part time) based on the level of intercollegiate competition.   Cross-sectional study.   Web-based survey.   Athletic trainers (ATs) who were knowledgeable about the size and scope of athletic training programs.   Athletic training facility size in square footage; the AT's overall facility satisfaction; athletic training facility component spaces, including satellite facilities, game-day facilities, offices, and storage areas; and staffing levels, including full-time ATs, part-time ATs, and undergraduate students.   The survey was completed by 478 ATs (response rate = 38.7%) from all levels of competition. Sample means for facilities were 3124.7 ± 4425 ft(2) (290.3 ± 411 m(2)) for the central athletic training facility, 1013 ± 1521 ft(2) (94 ± 141 m(2)) for satellite athletic training facilities, 1272 ± 1334 ft(2) (118 ± 124 m(2)) for game-day athletic training facilities, 388 ± 575 ft(2) (36 ± 53 m(2)) for athletic training offices, and 424 ± 884 ft(2) (39 ± 82 m(2)) for storage space. Sample staffing means were 3.8 ± 2.5 full-time ATs, 1.6 ± 2.5 part-time ATs, 25 ± 17.6 athletic training students, and 6.8 ± 7.2 work-study students. Division I schools had greater resources in multiple categories (P facilities in recent years was common, and almost half of ATs reported that upgrades have been approved for the near future.   This study provides benchmark descriptive data on athletic training staffing and

  15. A Review of the Literature on Training Simulators: Translators: Transfer of Training and Simulator Fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    RD-R142 732 A REVIEW OF THERLITERATURE ON TRAINING SIMULATORS: / TRANSLATORS :TRANSFER 0 .(U) GEORGIAR INST OF TECH ATLANTA CENTER FOR MAN-MACHINE...Crawford and Crawford 1978) 6. Performance Measure : - What to measure measures of problem solving performance ( Henneman and Rouse 1984) criterion...reported to be a reasonable predictor of errors on fault diagnosis tasks ( Henneman and Rouse 1984). It is therefore reasonable to speculate that training

  16. IGCC Dynamic Simulator and Training Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitney, S.E.; Erbes, M.R. (Enginomix, LLC)

    2006-10-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is emerging as the technology of choice for providing clean, low-cost electricity for the next generation of coal-fired power plants and will play a central role in the development of high-efficiency, zero-emissions power plants such as FutureGen. Several major utilities and developers recently announced plans to build IGCC plants and other major utilities are evaluating IGCC’s suitability for base-load capacity additions. This recent surge of attention to IGCC power generation is creating a growing demand for experience with the analysis, operation, and control of commercial-scale IGCC plants. To meet this need, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has launched a project to develop a generic, full-scope, IGCC dynamic plant simulator for use in establishing a state-of-the-art simulator training center at West Virginia University’s (WVU) National Research Center for Coal and Energy (NRCCE). The IGCC Dynamic Simulator & Training (DS&T) Center will be established under the auspices of the Collaboratory for Process & Dynamic Systems Modeling (“Collaboratory”) organized between NETL, WVU, the University of Pittsburgh, and Carnegie Mellon University.

  17. STS-26 crew during MB shuttle mission simulator (SMS) training in Bldg 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers participate in motion base (MB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) training in JSC Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. Five veteran astronauts recently named to man the Discovery for the STS-26 mission are pictured prior to a training session in the nearby MB SMS. Commander Frederick H. Hauck (top right) stands next to Pilot Richard O. Covey with (left to right) Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson, MS David C. Hilmers, and MS John M. Lounge on front row.

  18. High-fidelity simulation enhances ACLS training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdorf, Mark I; Strom, Suzanne L; Yang, Luanna; Canales, Cecilia; Anderson, Craig L; Amin, Alpesh; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    Medical student training and experience in cardiac arrest situations is limited. Traditional Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) teaching methods are largely unrealistic with rare personal experience as team leader. Yet Postgraduate Year 1 residents may perform this role shortly after graduation. We expanded our ACLS teaching to a "Resuscitation Boot Camp" where we taught 2010 ACLS to 19 pregraduation students in didactic (12 hours) and experiential (8 hours) format. Immediately before the course, we recorded students performing an acute coronary syndrome/ventricular fibrillation (VF) scenario. As a final test, we recorded the same scenario for each student. Primary outcomes were time to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation (DF). Secondary measures were total scenario score, dangerous actions, proportion of students voicing "ventricular fibrillation," 12-lead ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) interpretation, and care necessary for return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Two expert ACLS instructors scored both performances on a 121-point scale, with each student serving as their own control. We used t tests and McNemar tests for paired data with statistical significance at pmask ventilation before DF. After instruction, students scored 97±4/121 points (ptraining, only 4 of 19 (21%) students performed both CPR and DF within 2 minutes, and 3 of these had ROSC. After training, 14 of 19 (74%) achieved CPR+DF≤2 minutes (p=.002), and all had ROSC. Before training, 5 of 19 (26%) students said "VF" and 4 of 19 obtained an ECG, but none identified STEMI. After training, corresponding performance was 13 of 19 "VF" (68%, p=021) and 100% ECG and STEMI identification (ptraining. ACLS training including high-fidelity simulation decreases time to CPR and DF and improves performance during resuscitation.

  19. Simulation of Droplet Trains in Microfluidic Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Behzad, Mehran Djalali; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2009-01-01

    In this work we show that in a microfluidic network and in low Reynolds numbers a system can be irreversible because of hysteresis effects.The network, which is employed in our simulations, is taken from recent experiments. The network consists of one loop connected to input and output pipes. A train of droplets enter the system at a uniform rate, but they may leave it in different patterns, e.g. periodic or even chaotic. The out put pattern depends on the time interval among the incoming droplets as well as the network geometry and for some parameters the system is not reversible.

  20. Development of VR simulator for nurse training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Y.; Tsetserukou, D.; Terashima, K.

    2014-02-01

    Our research focuses on the development of the VR simulator NurseSim to train nurse and hospital aides how to carry unconscious or injured person. The motivation behind this project is the fact that nurses consider patient lifting, transfer, and turning as most physically demanding. The user experiences the 3D environment in which they hold the subject. The task is to maintain such posture so that to prevent further injuries of the patient and distribute the weight of the patient over both hands evenly. Nurses are taught to mitigate and manage fatigue while at work.

  1. Simulation-Based Abdominal Ultrasound Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Ewertsen, C; Konge, L;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim is to provide a complete overview of the different simulation-based training options for abdominal ultrasound and to explore the evidence of their effect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This systematic review was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines and Medline, Embase, Web...... of Science, and the Cochrane Library was searched. Articles were divided into three categories based on study design (randomized controlled trials, before-and-after studies and descriptive studies) and assessed for level of evidence using the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine (OCEBM) system...

  2. The development of a combined effects space simulation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, Carlos A.; Lilly, Taylor C.; Ketsdever, Andrew D. [University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Colorado Springs, CO 80918 (United States)

    2012-11-27

    An overview of the development of a facility to study the combined effects of the space environment on spacecraft is presented. The characterization of a magnetic filter plasma source and a low energy electron flood source for the simulation of the low Earth orbit plasma environment is discussed. Plasma diagnostics show that the magnetic filter plasma source provides streaming ion energies of approximately 5eV and can supply the appropriate density for LEO simulation. Additionally the low energy flood gun is shown to provide the appropriate density for LEO simulation as a function of altitude and solar activity.

  3. 40 CFR 112.21 - Facility response training and drills/exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Facility response training and drills/exercises. 112.21 Section 112.21 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Response Requirements § 112.21 Facility response training and...

  4. Virtual reality simulators and training in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiannakopoulou, Eugenia; Nikiteas, Nikolaos; Perrea, Despina; Tsigris, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Virtual reality simulators provide basic skills training without supervision in a controlled environment, free of pressure of operating on patients. Skills obtained through virtual reality simulation training can be transferred on the operating room. However, relative evidence is limited with data available only for basic surgical skills and for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. No data exist on the effect of virtual reality simulation on performance on advanced surgical procedures. Evidence suggests that performance on virtual reality simulators reliably distinguishes experienced from novice surgeons Limited available data suggest that independent approach on virtual reality simulation training is not different from proctored approach. The effect of virtual reality simulators training on acquisition of basic surgical skills does not seem to be different from the effect the physical simulators. Limited data exist on the effect of virtual reality simulation training on the acquisition of visual spatial perception and stress coping skills. Undoubtedly, virtual reality simulation training provides an alternative means of improving performance in laparoscopic surgery. However, future research efforts should focus on the effect of virtual reality simulation on performance in the context of advanced surgical procedure, on standardization of training, on the possibility of synergistic effect of virtual reality simulation training combined with mental training, on personalized training. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A unique exercise facility for simulating orbital extravehicular activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Rebecca C.; Sharer, Peter J.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    A unique exercise facility has been developed and used to simulate orbital extravehicular activity (EVA). The device incorporates an arm ergometer into a mechanism which places the subject in the zero-g neutral body posture. The intent of this configuration is to elicit muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, and thermoregulatory responses similar to those observed during orbital EVA. Experiments done with this facility will help characterize the astronaut's dynamic heat balance during EVA and will eventually lead to the development of an automated thermal control system which would more effectively maintain thermal comfort.

  6. Physics Detector Simulation Facility Phase II system software description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scipioni, B.; Allen, J.; Chang, C.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Mestad, S.; Pan, J.; Marquez, M.; Estep, P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) Phase II system software. A key element in the design of a distributed computing environment for the PDSF has been the separation and distribution of the major functions. The facility has been designed to support batch and interactive processing, and to incorporate the file and tape storage systems. By distributing these functions, it is often possible to provide higher throughput and resource availability. Similarly, the design is intended to exploit event-level parallelism in an open distributed environment.

  7. Flight Simulator and Training Human Factors Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Scott T.; Leland, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Loss of control has been identified as the leading cause of aircraft accidents in recent years. Efforts have been made to better equip pilots to deal with these types of events, commonly referred to as upsets. A major challenge in these endeavors has been recreating the motion environments found in flight as the majority of upsets take place well beyond the normal operating envelope of large aircraft. The Environmental Tectonics Corporation has developed a simulator motion base, called GYROLAB, that is capable of recreating the sustained accelerations, or G-forces, and motions of flight. A two part research study was accomplished that coupled NASA's Generic Transport Model with a GYROLAB device. The goal of the study was to characterize physiological effects of the upset environment and to demonstrate that a sustained motion based simulator can be an effective means for upset recovery training. Two groups of 25 Air Transport Pilots participated in the study. The results showed reliable signs of pilot arousal at specific stages of similar upsets. Further validation also demonstrated that sustained motion technology was successful in improving pilot performance during recovery following an extensive training program using GYROLAB technology.

  8. Model training curriculum for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyner, C.J.; Birk, S.M.

    1995-09-01

    This document is to assist in the development of the training programs required to be in place for the operating license for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. It consists of an introductory document and four additional appendixes of individual training program curricula. This information will provide the starting point for the more detailed facility-specific training programs that will be developed as the facility hires and trains new personnel and begins operation. This document is comprehensive and is intended as a guide for the development of a company- or facility-specific program. The individual licensee does not need to use this model training curriculum as written. Instead, this document can be used as a menu for the development, modification, or verification of customized training programs.

  9. Simulations of flashing experiments in TOPFLOW facility with TRACE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikuž, Blaž, E-mail: blaz.mikuz@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Engineering Division, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tiselj, Iztok [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Engineering Division, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Beyer, Matthias; Lucas, Dirk [Institute of Fluid Dynamics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Two decompression experiments performed at TOPFLOW are simulated with a TRACE code. • The depressurization triggers flashing of the slightly undersaturated liquid water. • Pressure, temperature and void fractions are compared with measurements. • Prediction of the choked flow is the most critical parameter of simulations. • Good agreement with measurements at high initial pressure (i.e. 65 and 40 bars). - Abstract: The decompression experiments performed at TOPFLOW facility in 2010 have been reproduced using the latest best-estimate thermohydraulic system code TRACE (V 5.0 Patch 3). The main component of TOPFLOW facility was about 8 m long vertical tube with an inner diameter of 195.3 mm. The evaporation of liquid water to steam caused by depressurization was simulated using two different procedures: from stagnant water and during circulating of water in tubes. The liquid water was almost saturated at initial pressure values of 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 6.5 MPa. Our approach applies one-dimensional code to simulate all the important parts of the facility not just the vertical test section, where the measurements were taken. The obtained simulated pressure, temperature and void fractions are compared with measured values. The simulations of the first procedure (stagnant water at beginning) are in a good agreement with measurements, especially for the cases with longer transients and higher initial pressure, however, choked flow model through the blow-off valve had to be adjusted. There is a short transient (about 2 s) after the fast opening valve opens, which was not reproduced correctly with TRACE. The simulations of the second procedure (circulating water in a loop) correctly predict pressure and temperature decrease, but underpredict void fraction. No modification of the default TRACE choked flow model was needed for procedure B.

  10. Sandia Lightning Simulation Facility Building 888. Hazards assessment document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banda, Z.; Barnett, B.

    1994-10-01

    The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Sandia Lightning Simulation Facility, Building 888. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 23 meters. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 65 meters.

  11. Transfer of training and simulator qualification or myth and folklore in helicopter simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohme, Jack

    1992-01-01

    Transfer of training studies at Fort Rucker using the backward-transfer paradigm have shown that existing flight simulators are not entirely adequate for meeting training requirements. Using an ab initio training research simulator, a simulation of the UH-1, training effectiveness ratios were developed. The data demonstrate it to be a cost-effective primary trainer. A simulator qualification method was suggested in which a combination of these transfer-of-training paradigms is used to determine overall simulator fidelity and training effectiveness.

  12. The importance of expert feedback during endovascular simulator training.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, Emily

    2011-07-01

    Complex endovascular skills are difficult to obtain in the clinical environment. Virtual reality (VR) simulator training is a valuable addition to current training curricula, but is there a benefit in the absence of expert trainers?

  13. Does Training Learners on Simulators Benefit Real Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teteris, Elise; Fraser, Kristin; Wright, Bruce; McLaughlin, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Despite limited data on patient outcomes, simulation training has already been adopted and embraced by a large number of medical schools. Yet widespread acceptance of simulation should not relieve us of the duty to demonstrate if, and under which circumstances, training learners on simulation benefits real patients. Here we review the data on…

  14. Exploiting the possibilities of simulators for driver training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, S.

    2013-01-01

    Training in a simulator offers potential advantages compared to training in a non-simulated environment. Generally it is cheaper, safer, there is more control over the environment, and data collection is less complicated. These potential advantages give simulators the possibility to offer effective

  15. Exploiting the possibilities of simulators for driver training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, S.

    2013-01-01

    Training in a simulator offers potential advantages compared to training in a non-simulated environment. Generally it is cheaper, safer, there is more control over the environment, and data collection is less complicated. These potential advantages give simulators the possibility to offer effective

  16. 42 CFR 413.186 - Payment exception: Self-dialysis training costs in pediatric facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment exception: Self-dialysis training costs in....186 Payment exception: Self-dialysis training costs in pediatric facilities. (a) Qualification. To qualify for an exception to the prospective payment rate based on self-dialysis training costs,...

  17. GOTHIC code simulation of thermal stratification in POOLEX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Kudinov, P. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2009-07-15

    Pressure suppression pool is an important element of BWR containment. It serves as a heat sink and steam condenser to prevent containment pressure buildup during loss of coolant accident or safety relief valve opening during normal operations of a BWR. Insufficient mixing in the pool, in case of low mass flow rate of steam, can cause development of thermal stratification and reduction of pressure suppression pool capacity. For reliable prediction of mixing and stratification phenomena validation of simulation tools has to be performed. Data produced in POOLEX/PPOOLEX facility at Lappeenranta University of Technology about development of thermal stratification in a large scale model of a pressure suppression pool is used for GOTHIC lumped and distributed parameter validation. Sensitivity of GOTHIC solution to different boundary conditions and grid convergence study for 2D simulations of POOLEX STB-20 experiment are performed in the present study. CFD simulation was carried out with FLUENT code in order to get additional insights into physics of stratification phenomena. In order to support development of experimental procedures for new tests in the PPOOLEX facility lumped parameter pre-test GOTHIC simulations were performed. Simulations show that drywell and wetwell pressures can be kept within safety margins during a long transient necessary for development of thermal stratification. (au)

  18. Do Army Helicopter Training Simulators Need Motion Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    the Air Force Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ). Pilots were trained in the simulator, with and without 6 DoF motion, in basic contact...approach and landing, and aerobatic tasks. No information is available about the quality of the motion provided by the ASPT motion base. The authors...in the T-37 aircraft. Hagin (1976) used the ASPT to expose Air Force pilot trainees to simulator training with and without 6 DoF motion. Flight tasks

  19. Training, simulation, restoration expert system for power grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The paper introduces some technology for training, simulation, restoration expert system of power grid, the structure of the system including function composition, hardware and software composition are discussed, knowledge representation and the method to establish device graphical library for expert system are given, the fault setting and diagnosis for training and simulation as well as restoration technology with deep first searching arithmetic and heuristic inference are presented. The research provides a good base for developing the training, simulation, restoration system of power companies.

  20. The Operator Training Simulator System for the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudley, Trevor [Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (Proprietary) Limited, Pebble House, Centurion (South Africa)], E-mail: trevor.dudley@pbmr.co.za; Villiers, Piet de; Bouwer, Werner [Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (Proprietary) Limited, Pebble House, Centurion (South Africa); Luh, Robert [GSE Systems, Inc., 7133 Rutherford Suite 200, Baltimore, MD 21244 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a First of a Kind Engineering with respect to the over 200 new innovations used in the design. The PBMR technical design is an inherited modified design from an earlier design such as the German 15 MWe AVR (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchs Reaktor) and the THTR-300 MWe Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR), which ran in Germany as a test and research facility for 20 years. This paper discusses the Operator Training Simulator System for the PBMR Demonstration Power Plant. The Operator Training Simulator System will be used for operator training and licensing of plant operators. Included in the discussion is an overview of the major elements of the Operator Training Simulator System, including some of the main functional areas.

  1. PHYSICAL FIDELITY CONSIDERATIONS FOR NRC ADVANCED REACTOR CONTROL ROOM TRAINING SIMULATORS USED FOR INSPECTOR/EXAMINER TRAINING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branch, Kristi M.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Miller, Mark; Cochrum, Steven

    2010-11-07

    This paper describes research into the physical fidelity requirements of control room simulators to train U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff for their duties as inspectors and license examiners for next-generation nuclear power plants. The control rooms of these power plants are expected to utilize digital instrumentation and controls to a much greater extent than do current plants. The NRC is assessing training facility needs, particularly for control room simulators, which play a central role in NRC training. Simulator fidelity affects both training effectiveness and cost. Research has shown high simulation fidelity sometimes positively affects transfer to the operational environment but sometimes makes no significant difference or actually impedes learning. The conditions in which these different effects occur are often unclear, especially for regulators (as opposed to operators) about whom research is particularly sparse. This project developed an inventory of the tasks and knowledges, skills, and abilities that NRC regulators need to fulfill job duties and used expert panels to characterize the inventory items by type and level of cognitive/behavioral capability needed, difficulty to perform, importance to safety, frequency of performance, and the importance of simulator training for learning these capabilities. A survey of current NRC staff provides information about the physical fidelity of the simulator on which the student trained to the control room to which the student was assigned and the effect lack of fidelity had on learning and job performance. The study concludes that a high level of physical fidelity is not required for effective training of NRC staff.

  2. CFD simulation of air discharge tests in the PPOOLEX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanskanen, V.; Puustinen, M. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2008-07-15

    This report summarizes the CFD simulation results of two air discharge tests of the characterizing test program in 2007 with the scaled down PPOOLEX facility. Air was blown to the dry well compartment and from there through a DN200 blowdown pipe into the condensation pool (wet well). The selected tests were modeled with Fluent CFD code. Test CHAR-09-1 was simulated to 28.92 seconds of real time and test CHAR-09-3 to 17.01 seconds. The VOF model was used as a multiphase model and the standard k epsilon-model as a turbulence model. Occasional convergence problems, usually at the beginning of bubble formation, required the use of relatively short time stepping. The simulation time costs threatened to become unbearable since weeks or months of wall-clock time with 1-2 processors were needed. Therefore, the simulated time periods were limited from the real duration of the experiments. The results obtained from the CFD simulations are in a relatively good agreement with the experimental results. Simulated pressures correspond well to the measured ones and, in addition, fluctuations due to bubble formations and breakups are also captured. Most of the differences in temperature values and in their behavior seem to depend on the locations of the measurements. In the vicinity of regions occupied by water in the experiments, thermocouples getting wet and drying slowly may have had an effect on the measured temperature values. Generally speaking, most temperatures were simulated satisfyingly and the largest discrepancies could be explained by wetted thermocouples. However, differences in the dry well and blowdown pipe top measurements could not be explained by thermocouples getting wet. Heat losses and dry well / wet well heat transfer due to conduction have neither been estimated in the experiments nor modeled in the simulations. Estimation of heat conduction and heat losses should be carried out in future experiments and they should be modeled in future simulations, too. (au)

  3. Virtual reality simulators for rock engineering related training.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Squelch, A

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality (VR) has been investigated by SIMRAC and CSIR Miningtek as a means of providing an enhancement to current training methods that will lead to more effective hazard awareness training programmes. A VR training simulator developed under...

  4. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (904-113G)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This report documents the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment (RFI/RI/BRA) for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (FDTF) (904-113G).

  5. Flight Hour Reductions in Fleet Replacement Pilot Training through Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smode, Alfred F.

    A project was undertaken to integrate the 2F87F operational flight trainer into the program for training replacement patrol plane pilots. The objectives were to determine the potential of the simulator as a substitute environment for learning aircraft tasks and to effectively utilize the simulator in pilot training. The students involved in the…

  6. Determining the Need for Simulated Training of Invasive Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Arin K.; Zurakowski, David; Puder, Mark; Thompson, Kweli

    2006-01-01

    Unlike the airline industry, where pilots first learn to fly on simulators before navigating planes, physicians practice invasive procedures on real patients. To determine the need for the simulated training of invasive procedures prior to working on patients, we studied the views of physicians-in-training. Five hundred medical students,…

  7. Applying virtual environments to training and simulation (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jense, G.J.; Kuijper, F.

    1993-01-01

    Virtual environment (VE) technology is expected to make a big impact on future training and simulation systems. Direct stimulation of human-senses (eyesight, auditory, tactile) and new paradigms for user input will improve the realism of simulations and thereby the effectiveness of training systems.

  8. Applying virtual environments to training and simulation (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jense, G.J.; Kuijper, F.

    1993-01-01

    Virtual environment (VE) technology is expected to make a big impact on future training and simulation systems. Direct stimulation of human-senses (eyesight, auditory, tactile) and new paradigms for user input will improve the realism of simulations and thereby the effectiveness of training systems.

  9. Planetary and Space Simulation Facilities (PSI) at DLR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitz, Corinna; Rabbow, E.; Rettberg, P.; Kloss, M.; Reitz, G.; Horneck, G.

    2010-05-01

    The Planetary and Space Simulation facilities at DLR offer the possibility to expose biological and physical samples individually or integrated into space hardware to defined and controlled space conditions like ultra high vacuum, low temperature and extraterrestrial UV radiation. An x-ray facility stands for the simulation of the ionizing component at the disposal. All of the simulation facilities are required for the preparation of space experiments: - for testing of the newly developed space hardware - for investigating the effect of different space parameters on biological systems as a preparation for the flight experiment - for performing the 'Experiment Verification Tests' (EVT) for the specification of the test parameters - and 'Experiment Sequence Tests' (EST) by simulating sample assemblies, exposure to selected space parameters, and sample disassembly. To test the compatibility of the different biological and chemical systems and their adaptation to the opportunities and constraints of space conditions a profound ground support program has been developed among many others for the ESA facilities of the ongoing missions EXPOSE-R and EXPOSE-E on board of the International Space Station ISS . Several experiment verification tests EVTs and an experiment sequence test EST have been conducted in the carefully equipped and monitored planetary and space simulation facilities PSI of the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at DLR in Cologne, Germany. These ground based pre-flight studies allowed the investigation of a much wider variety of samples and the selection of the most promising organisms for the flight experiment. EXPOSE-E had been attached to the outer balcony of the European Columbus module of the ISS in February 2008 and stayed for 1,5 years in space; EXPOSE-R has been attached to the Russian Svezda module of the ISS in spring 2009 and mission duration will be approx. 1,5 years. The missions will give new insights into the survivability of terrestrial

  10. Simulation in dermatologic surgery: a new paradigm in training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Luke; Toren, Kristen; Bingham, Jonathan; Marquart, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Simulation-based training has become popular in many surgical residencies for acquiring procedural skills, but simulator use is rare in dermatologic training. To evaluate the perceived efficacy of obtaining dermatologic procedural skills using simulators. Opinions of dermatology residents and staff regarding simulator use were assessed using questionnaires completed after a 2-day surgical symposium in which participants were instructed on and practiced with simulators and cadavers. Overall, 93.9% strongly agreed that simulators are helpful in acquiring procedural skills. More than three-quarters of participants agreed that simulators are useful in acquiring, refining, assessing, and learning these skills. Many participants further thought that simulator use would be beneficial in learning anatomy and trouble-shooting techniques. An overwhelming majority of those surveyed believed that training on simulators would be helpful in learning various dermatologic procedures; 90.9% of participants thought that training using simulators should be, at least in part, a mandatory component of residency. It was felt that this training should be conducted at the beginning of residency, with additional with sessions held throughout training. Simulation offers an excellent model for the acquisition and assessment of dermatologic procedural skills. Cost and availability of instructors remain obstacles. Further studies are required to evaluate the implementation and effectiveness of these models. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The Planetary and Space Simulation Facilities at DLR Cologne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbow, Elke; Parpart, André; Reitz, Günther

    2016-06-01

    Astrobiology strives to increase our knowledge on the origin, evolution and distribution of life, on Earth and beyond. In the past centuries, life has been found on Earth in environments with extreme conditions that were expected to be uninhabitable. Scientific investigations of the underlying metabolic mechanisms and strategies that lead to the high adaptability of these extremophile organisms increase our understanding of evolution and distribution of life on Earth. Life as we know it depends on the availability of liquid water. Exposure of organisms to defined and complex extreme environmental conditions, in particular those that limit the water availability, allows the investigation of the survival mechanisms as well as an estimation of the possibility of the distribution to and survivability on other celestial bodies of selected organisms. Space missions in low Earth orbit (LEO) provide access for experiments to complex environmental conditions not available on Earth, but studies on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of adaption to these hostile conditions and on the limits of life cannot be performed exclusively in space experiments. Experimental space is limited and allows only the investigation of selected endpoints. An additional intensive ground based program is required, with easy to access facilities capable to simulate space and planetary environments, in particular with focus on temperature, pressure, atmospheric composition and short wavelength solar ultraviolet radiation (UV). DLR Cologne operates a number of Planetary and Space Simulation facilities (PSI) where microorganisms from extreme terrestrial environments or known for their high adaptability are exposed for mechanistic studies. Space or planetary parameters are simulated individually or in combination in temperature controlled vacuum facilities equipped with a variety of defined and calibrated irradiation sources. The PSI support basic research and were recurrently used for pre

  12. Accurately fitting advanced training. Flexible simulator training by modular training course concepts; Passgenaue Weiterbildung. Flexibilitaet im Simulatortraining durch modulare Kurskonzepte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickora, Katrin; Cremer, Hans-Peter [Kraftwerksschule e.V., Essen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Every employee of a power plant contributes with his individual expertise to the success of the enterprise. Certainly personal skills of employees differ from each other as well as power plants are different. With respect to effective simulator training this means that no two simulator training courses can be identical. To exactly meet the requirements of our customers KWS has developed modules for simulation training courses. Each module represents either a technical subject or addresses a topic in the field of soft skills. An accurately fitting combination of several of these modules to the needs of our customers allows for most efficient simulator training courses. (orig.)

  13. Do Army Helicopter Training Simulators Need Motion Bases?

    OpenAIRE

    McCauley, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    United States Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences This report reviews the arguments and the evidence regarding the need for simulator motion bases in training helicopter pilots. It discusses flight simulators, perceptual fidelity, history of motion bases, disturbance versus maneuver motion, human motion sensation, and reviews the empirical evidence for the training effectiveness of motion bases. The section on training effectiveness reviews research f...

  14. Simulation of photofission experiments at the ELI-NP facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, P., E-mail: paul.constantin@eli-np.ro [Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics, “Horia Hulubei” National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Str. Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest Magurele (Romania); Balabanski, D.L. [Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics, “Horia Hulubei” National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Str. Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest Magurele (Romania); Cuong, P.V. [Centre of Nuclear Physics, Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2016-04-01

    An extensive experimental program for the study of photofission will take place at the Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility, where different actinide targets will be exposed to a brilliant gamma beam to produce fission fragments. We report on the implementation within the Geant4 simulation toolkit of the photofission process, of related background processes, and of extended ionic charge parameterization. These developments are used to evaluate the production rates of photofission fragments and their release efficiency from the actinide targets.

  15. Risk Reduction and Training using Simulation Based Tools - 12180

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Irin P. [Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia 23607 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Process Modeling and Simulation (M and S) has been used for many years in manufacturing and similar domains, as part of an industrial engineer's tool box. Traditionally, however, this technique has been employed in small, isolated projects where models were created from scratch, often making it time and cost prohibitive. Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS) has recognized the value of this predictive technique and what it offers in terms of risk reduction, cost avoidance and on-schedule performance of highly complex work. To facilitate implementation, NNS has been maturing a process and the software to rapidly deploy and reuse M and S based decision support tools in a variety of environments. Some examples of successful applications by NNS of this technique in the nuclear domain are a reactor refueling simulation based tool, a fuel handling facility simulation based tool and a tool for dynamic radiation exposure tracking. The next generation of M and S applications include expanding simulation based tools into immersive and interactive training. The applications discussed here take a tool box approach to creating simulation based decision support tools for maximum utility and return on investment. This approach involves creating a collection of simulation tools that can be used individually or integrated together for a larger application. The refueling simulation integrates with the fuel handling facility simulation to understand every aspect and dependency of the fuel handling evolutions. This approach translates nicely to other complex domains where real system experimentation is not feasible, such as nuclear fuel lifecycle and waste management. Similar concepts can also be applied to different types of simulation techniques. For example, a process simulation of liquid waste operations may be useful to streamline and plan operations, while a chemical model of the liquid waste composition is an important tool for making decisions with respect to waste disposition

  16. Training a team with simulated team members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafstal, A.M.; Hoeft, R.M.; Schaik, M. van

    2002-01-01

    The process of training teams increasingly occurs in synthetic environments. However, it is often still modeled after live team training, including the disadvantages of live training, for example, the fact that all teammates must be available. This paper explores overcoming the disadvantages of huma

  17. Live tissue versus simulation training for emergency procedures: Is simulation ready to replace live tissue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Stephen L; Bukoski, Alex; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Llerena, Luis; Armstrong, John H; Strayhorn, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    Training of emergency procedures is challenging and application is not routine in all health care settings. The debate over simulation as an alternative to live tissue training continues with legislation before Congress to banish live tissue training in the Department of Defense. Little evidence exists to objectify best practice. We sought to evaluate live tissue and simulation-based training practices in 12 life-saving emergency procedures. In the study, 742 subjects were randomized to live tissue or simulation-training. Assessments of self-efficacy, cognitive knowledge, and psychomotor performance were completed pre- and post-training. Affective response to training was assessed through electrodermal activity. Subject matter experts gap analysis of live tissue versus simulation completed the data set. Subjects demonstrated pre- to post-training gains in self-efficacy, cognitive knowledge, psychomotor performance, and affective response regardless of training modality (P training modality in the overall group. Risk estimates on the least pretest performance subgroup favored simulation in 7 procedures. Affective response was greatest in live tissue training (P superior. Wholesale abandonment of live tissue training is not warranted. We maintain that combined live tissue and simulation-based training add value and should be continued. Congressional mandates may accelerate simulation development and improve performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Simulator training in gastrointestinal endoscopy - From basic training to advanced endoscopic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wiel, S E; Küttner Magalhães, R; Rocha Gonçalves, Carla Rolanda; Dinis-Ribeiro, M; Bruno, M J; Koch, A D

    2016-06-01

    Simulator-based gastrointestinal endoscopy training has gained acceptance over the last decades and has been extensively studied. Several types of simulators have been validated and it has been demonstrated that the use of simulators in the early training setting accelerates the learning curve in acquiring basic skills. Current GI endoscopy simulators lack the degree of realism that would be necessary to provide training to achieve full competency or to be applicable in certification. Virtual Reality and mechanical simulators are commonly used in basic flexible endoscopy training, whereas ex vivo and in vivo models are used in training the most advanced endoscopic procedures. Validated models for the training of more routine therapeutic interventions like polypectomy, EMR, stenting and haemostasis are lacking or scarce and developments in these areas should be encouraged.

  19. STS-32 MS Dunbar trains in JSC Manipulator Development Facility (MDF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    STS-32 Mission Specialist (MS) Bonnie J. Dunbar reviews checklist with training personnel in the Manipulator Development Facility (MDF) in JSC's Mockup and Integration Facility (MAIL) Bldg 9A. Dunbar (left) discusses procedures with trainer in front of the aft flight deck onorbit station controls. Overhead window W8 is visible above their heads.

  20. Operator Training Simulator for an Industrial Bioethanol Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Inga Gerlach; Sören Tholin; Hass, Volker C; Carl-Fredrik Mandenius

    2016-01-01

    Operator training simulators (OTS) are software tools for training process operators in large-scale industrial applications. Here, we describe the development, implementation and training of an OTS for a large-scale industrial plant for bioethanol production. The design of the OTS is based on conceptual analysis (previously reported by us in this journal) of various configuration alternatives and training procedures at the plant. In this article, we report on how the conceptual design is used...

  1. The efficacy of virtual reality simulation training in laparoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian Rifbjerg; Oestergaard, Jeanett; Ottesen, Bent S

    2012-01-01

    Background. Virtual reality (VR) simulators for surgical training might possess the properties needed for basic training in laparoscopy. Evidence for training efficacy of VR has been investigated by research of varying quality over the past decade. Objective. To review randomized controlled trials...... medical subject headings (MeSh) terms: Laparoscopy/standards, Computing methodologies, Programmed instruction, Surgical procedures, Operative, and the following free text terms: Virtual real* OR simulat* AND Laparoscop* OR train* Limits: Controlled trials. Study eligibility criteria. All randomized...

  2. Radiological safety training for accelerator facilities: DOE handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This program management guide describes the proper implementation standard for core training as outline in the DOE Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual. Its purpose is to assist DOE employees and Managing and Operating (M&O) contractors having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RadCon Manual.

  3. Spatial Disorientation Training in the Rotor Wing Flight Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell-Dunford, Nicole; Bushby, Alaistair; Leland, Richard A

    This study is intended to identify efficacy, evolving applications, best practices, and challenges of spatial disorientation (SD) training in flight simulators for rotor wing pilots. Queries of a UK Ministry of Defense research database and Pub Med were undertaken using the search terms 'spatial disorientation,' 'rotor wing,' and 'flight simulator.' Efficacy, evolving applications, best practices, and challenges of SD simulation for rotor wing pilots were also ascertained through discussion with subject matter experts and industrial partners. Expert opinions were solicited at the aeromedical physiologist, aeromedical psychologist, instructor pilot, aeromedical examiner, and corporate executive levels. Peer review literature search yielded 129 articles, with 5 relevant to the use of flight simulators for the spatial disorientation training of rotor wing pilots. Efficacy of such training was measured subjectively and objectively. A preponderance of anecdotal reports endorse the benefits of rotor wing simulator SD training, with a small trial substantiating performance improvement. Advancing technologies enable novel training applications. The mobile nature of flight students and concurrent anticollision technologies can make long-range assessment of SD training efficacy challenging. Costs of advanced technologies could limit the extent to which the most advanced simulators can be employed across the rotor wing community. Evidence suggests the excellent training value of rotor wing simulators for SD training. Objective data from further research, particularly with regards to evolving technologies, may justify further usage of advanced simulator platforms for SD training and research. Powell-Dunford N, Bushby A, Leland RA. Spatial disorientation training in the rotor wing flight simulator. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(10):890-893.

  4. Modeling and simulation for train control system using cellular automata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; KePing; GAO; ZiYou; YANG; LiXing

    2007-01-01

    Train control system plays a key role in railway traffic. Its function is to manage and control the train movement on railway networks. In our previous works, based on the cellular automata (CA) model, we proposed several models and algorithms for simulating the train movement under different control system conditions. However, these models are only suitable for some simple traffic conditions. Some basic factors, which are important for train movement, are not considered. In this paper, we extend these models and algorithms and give a unified formula. Using the proposed method, we analyze and discuss the space-time diagram of railway traffic flow and the trajectories of the train movement. The numerical simulation and analytical results demonstrate that the unified CA model is an effective tool for simulating the train control system.

  5. Unannounced in situ simulations: integrating training and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Susanna T; Sevdalis, Nick; McKay, Anthony; Lambden, Simon; Gautama, Sanjay; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Vincent, Charles

    2013-06-01

    Simulation-based training for healthcare providers is well established as a viable, efficacious training tool, particularly for the training of non-technical team-working skills. These skills are known to be critical to effective teamwork, and important in the prevention of error and adverse events in hospitals. However, simulation suites are costly to develop and releasing staff to attend training is often difficult. These factors may restrict access to simulation training. We discuss our experiences of 'in situ' simulation for unannounced cardiac arrest training when the training is taken to the clinical environment. This has the benefit of decreasing required resources, increasing realism and affordability, and widening multidisciplinary team participation, thus enabling assessment and training of non-technical team-working skills in real clinical teams. While there are practical considerations of delivering training in the clinical environment, we feel there are many potential benefits compared with other forms of simulation training. We are able to tailor the training to the needs of the location, enabling staff to see a scenario that is relevant to their practice. This is particularly useful for staff who have less exposure to cardiac arrest events, such as radiology staff. We also describe the important benefit of risk assessment for a clinical environment. During our simulations we have identified a number of issues that, had they occurred during a real resuscitation attempt, may have led to patient harm or patient death. For these reasons we feel in situ simulation should be considered by every hospital as part of a patient safety initiative.

  6. Virtual reality simulation training of mastoidectomy - studies on novice performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts

    2016-08-01

    Virtual reality (VR) simulation-based training is increasingly used in surgical technical skills training including in temporal bone surgery. The potential of VR simulation in enabling high-quality surgical training is great and VR simulation allows high-stakes and complex procedures such as mastoidectomy to be trained repeatedly, independent of patients and surgical tutors, outside traditional learning environments such as the OR or the temporal bone lab, and with fewer of the constraints of traditional training. This thesis aims to increase the evidence-base of VR simulation training of mastoidectomy and, by studying the final-product performances of novices, investigates the transfer of skills to the current gold-standard training modality of cadaveric dissection, the effect of different practice conditions and simulator-integrated tutoring on performance and retention of skills, and the role of directed, self-regulated learning. Technical skills in mastoidectomy were transferable from the VR simulation environment to cadaveric dissection with significant improvement in performance after directed, self-regulated training in the VR temporal bone simulator. Distributed practice led to a better learning outcome and more consolidated skills than massed practice and also resulted in a more consistent performance after three months of non-practice. Simulator-integrated tutoring accelerated the initial learning curve but also caused over-reliance on tutoring, which resulted in a drop in performance when the simulator-integrated tutor-function was discontinued. The learning curves were highly individual but often plateaued early and at an inadequate level, which related to issues concerning both the procedure and the VR simulator, over-reliance on the tutor function and poor self-assessment skills. Future simulator-integrated automated assessment could potentially resolve some of these issues and provide trainees with both feedback during the procedure and immediate

  7. [Effects of Training Students through a Program Simulating Medication Administration and Patient Instructions in Pre-training for Practical Training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Chigusa; Matsunaga, Tamihide; Suzuki, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacy school students were trained in a program simulating medication administration and giving adherence instructions. Following the training, the educational effects were evaluated. Students were separated into two groups. One group of students played the role of pharmacists and instructed simulated patients on medication adherence. Another group of students played the role of patients receiving simulated drug therapy; they were instructed on medication adherence by the students playing the role of pharmacists. The educational effects were evaluated using a questionnaire. The scores for "recognition of factors that influence medication adherence" tended to increase after the simulation, and they increased significantly after practical training. The scores for "self-evaluation of technique for instructing patients on medication adherence" increased significantly after the simulation, and they increased even more after practical training. The students' understanding of the effects on patients who were being instructed also increased significantly after the simulation, and these changes were maintained after practical training. In particular, students became more aware of the influence of pharmacists' attitudes. In practical training, the simulation training was helpful for bedside practice at hospital pharmacies and over-the-counter service at community pharmacies. Thus, the use of role play and simulated patients was an effective method for training pharmacy students to instruct patients on medication adherence.

  8. Virtual reality simulator for training urologists on transurethral prostatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU He; ZHANG Yi; LIU Jin-shun; WANG Gang; YU Cheng-fan; NA Yan-qun

    2013-01-01

    Background A virtual reality simulator provides a novel training model for improving surgical skills in a variety of fields.They can simulate a variety of surgical scenarios to improve the overall skills required for endoscopic operations,and also record the operative process of trainees in real-time and allow for objective evaluation.At present,some simulators for transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) are available.The utility of virtual reality simulators in training of transurethral prostatectomy was investigated.Methods Thirty-eight urologists were randomly selected to take part in a simulation based training of TURP using the TURPSimTM system.Pre and post-training global rate scale (GRS) scores and objective parameters recorded by the simulator were assessed.Then,questionnaires were filled out.Results Compared with baseline levels,the GRS scores of trainees increased (18.0±4.0 vs.12.4±4.2,P<0.001),while the rate of capsule resection (26.3%±0.6% vs.21.2%±0.4%,P <0.001),amount of blood loss ((125.8±86.3) ml vs.(83.7±41.6) ml,P <0.001),external sphincter injury (3.6±2.9 vs.2.0±2.0,P <0.001)decreased significantly after training.Most trainees were satisfied with the simulator based training and believed that the simulator accurately mimicked actual surgical procedures and could help improve their surgical skills.Conclusions As a new method of training on transurethral prostatectomy skills,training of TURP using a virtual simulator can help urologists improve their surgical skills and safety.Therefore,the application of the TURPSimTM system in education and training of urologic surgery is warranted.

  9. T-4G Simulator and T-4 Ground Training Devices in USAF Undergraduate Pilot Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Robert R.; Smith, James F.

    The objective of the project was to investigate the utility of using an A/F37A-T4G T-37 flight simulator within the context of Air Force undergraduate pilot training. Twenty-one subjects, selected from three undergraduate pilot training classes, were given contact flight training in a TP4G/EPT simulator before going to T-37 aircraft for further…

  10. Cadaver-based training is superior to simulation training for cricothyrotomy and tube thoracostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayesu, James Kimo; Peak, David; Stearns, Dana

    2017-02-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) training mandates that residents be able to competently perform low-frequency critical procedures upon graduation. Simulation is the main method of training in addition to clinical patient care. Access to cadaver-based training is limited due to cost and availability. The relative fidelity and perceived value of cadaver-based simulation training is unknown. This pilot study sought to describe the relative value of cadaver training compared to simulation for cricothyrotomy and tube thoracostomy. To perform a pilot study to assess whether there is a significant difference in fidelity and educational experience of cadaver-based training compared to simulation training. To understand how important this difference is in training residents in low-frequency procedures. Twenty-two senior EM residents (PGY3 and 4) who had completed standard simulation training on cricothyrotomy and tube thoracostomy participated in a formalin-fixed cadaver training program. Participants were surveyed on the relative fidelity of the training using a 100 point visual analogue scale (VAS) with 100 defined as equal to performing the procedure on a real patient. Respondents were also asked to estimate how much the cadaveric training improved the comfort level with performing the procedures on a scale between 0 and 100 %. Open-response feedback was also collected. The response rate was 100 % (22/22). The average fidelity of the cadaver versus simulation training was 79.9 ± 7.0 vs. 34.7 ± 13.4 for cricothyrotomy (p training was rated as 78.5 ± 13.3 for tube thoracostomy and 78.7 ± 14.3 for cricothyrotomy. All respondents felt this difference in fidelity to be important for procedural training with 21/22 respondents specifically citing the importance of superior landmark and tissue fidelity compared to simulation training. Cadaver-based training provides superior landmark and tissue fidelity compared to simulation training and may be a valuable addition to EM

  11. Team Training (Training at Own Facility) versus Individual Surgeon’s Training (Training at Trainer’s Facility) When Implementing a New Surgical Technique:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Andresen, Kristoffer; Laursen, Jannie

    2014-01-01

    Background. When implementing a new surgical technique, the best method for didactic learning has not been settled. There are basically two scenarios: the trainee goes to the teacher's clinic and learns the new technique hands-on, or the teacher goes to the trainee's clinic and performs the teach......Background. When implementing a new surgical technique, the best method for didactic learning has not been settled. There are basically two scenarios: the trainee goes to the teacher's clinic and learns the new technique hands-on, or the teacher goes to the trainee's clinic and performs...... these issues on a discussion of barriers for adoption of the new ONSTEP technique for inguinal hernia repair after initial training. Results and Conclusions. The optimal training method would include moving the teacher to the trainee's department to obtain team-training effects simultaneous with surgical...

  12. Is There Bias against Simulation in Microsurgery Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theman, Todd A; Labow, Brian I

    2016-09-01

    Background While other surgical specialties have embraced virtual reality simulation for training and recertification, microsurgery has lagged. This study aims to assess the opinions of microsurgeons on the role of simulation in microsurgery assessment and training. Methods We surveyed faculty members of the American Society of Reconstructive Microsurgery to ascertain opinions on their use of simulation in training and opinions about the utility of simulation for skills acquisition, teaching, and skills assessment. The 21-question survey was disseminated online to 675 members. Results Eighty-nine members completed the survey for a 13.2% response rate. Few microsurgeons have experience with high-fidelity simulation, and opinions on its utility are internally inconsistent. Although 84% of respondents could not identify a reason why simulation would not be useful, only 24% believed simulation is a useful measure of clinical performance. Nearly three-fourths of respondents were skeptical that simulation would improve their skills. Ninety-four percent had no experience with simulator-based assessment. Conclusion Simulation has been shown to improve skills acquisition in microsurgery, but our survey suggests that unfamiliarity may foster bias against the technology. Failure to incorporate simulation may adversely affect training and may put surgeons at a disadvantage should these technologies be adopted for recertification by regulatory agencies.

  13. Status Report of Simulated Space Radiation Environment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Phil Hyun; Nho, Young Chang; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Choi, Jae Hak; Lim, Youn Mook; Jung, Chan Hee; Jeon, Young Kyu

    2007-11-15

    The technology for performance testing and improvement of materials which are durable at space environment is a military related technology and veiled and securely regulated in advanced countries such as US and Russia. This core technology cannot be easily transferred to other country too. Therefore, this technology is the most fundamental and necessary research area for the successful establishment of space environment system. Since the task for evaluating the effects of space materials and components by space radiation plays important role in satellite lifetime extension and running failure percentage decrease, it is necessary to establish simulated space radiation facility and systematic testing procedure. This report has dealt with the status of the technology to enable the simulation of space environment effects, including the effect of space radiation on space materials. This information such as the fundamental knowledge of space environment and research status of various countries as to the simulation of space environment effects of space materials will be useful for the research on radiation hardiness of the materials. Furthermore, it will be helpful for developer of space material on deriving a better choice of materials, reducing the design cycle time, and improving safety.

  14. Virtual reality: emerging role of simulation training in vascular access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Ingemar J A; Lok, Charmaine; Dolmatch, Bart; Gallieni, Maurizio; Nolen, Billy; Pittiruti, Mauro; Ross, John; Slakey, Douglas

    2012-11-01

    Evolving new technologies in vascular access mandate increased attention to patient safety; an often overlooked yet valuable training tool is simulation. For the end-stage renal disease patient, simulation tools are effective for all aspects of creating access for peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis. Based on aviation principles, known as crew resource management, we place equal emphasis on team training as individual training to improve interactions between team members and systems, cumulating in improved safety. Simulation allows for environmental control and standardized procedures, letting the trainee practice and correct mistakes without harm to patients, compared with traditional patient-based training. Vascular access simulators range from suture devices, to pressurized tunneled conduits for needle cannulation, to computer-based interventional simulators. Simulation training includes simulated case learning, root cause analysis of adverse outcomes, and continual update and refinement of concepts. Implementation of effective human to complex systems interaction in end-stage renal disease patients involves a change in institutional culture. Three concepts discussed in this article are as follows: (1) the need for user-friendly systems and technology to enhance performance, (2) the necessity for members to both train and work together as a team, and (3) the team assigned to use the system must test and practice it to a proficient level before safely using the system on patients.

  15. Retention of Mastoidectomy Skills After Virtual Reality Simulation Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts; Konge, Lars; Cayé-Thomasen, Per

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: The ultimate goal of surgical training is consolidated skills with a consistently high performance. However, surgical skills are heterogeneously retained and depend on a variety of factors, including the task, cognitive demands, and organization of practice. Virtual reality (VR...... conditions were retained better than skills acquired under massed practice conditions. Complex psychomotor skills should be regularly reinforced to consolidate both motor and cognitive aspects. Virtual reality simulation training provides the opportunity for such repeated training and should be integrated...... students: 19 from a cohort trained with distributed practice and 17 from a cohort trained with massed practice. INTERVENTIONS: Participants performed 2 virtual mastoidectomies in a VR simulator a mean of 3.2 months (range, 2.4-5.0 months) after completing initial training with 12 repeated procedures...

  16. Status of the EP Simulations and Facilities for the SPL

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, S; Macatrao, M; Skala, A; Sosin, M; de Waele, R; Withofs, Y

    2011-01-01

    CERN is assembling a new vertical electropolishing facility in order to process several niobium cavities of beta 1 and beta 0.65 in the context of the HP-SPL R&D programme. Electrochemical simulations are being used in order to define the optimal cathode geometry to process the cavities in a vertical position. Macroscopic properties of fluid dynamics like the Reynolds number and thermodynamics linked to the power dissipated in the process are taken into account to dimension the main system components. All the materials from the different equipments must be compatible with all chemicals within the required working temperature and pressure. To provide safe operating conditions when handling chemicals or processing cavities, specific safety and protection equipment is also foreseen.

  17. A simulation model for Carson Ice Co-Generation Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, N.K.W.; Elmasri, M. [Thermoflow, Inc., Wellesley, MA (United States); Brownell, G. [SMUD, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The paper describes a software system to simulate the performance of the Carson Ice Co-gen Facility operated by the Carson Energy Group. This 100 MW plant consists of a cogeneration combined cycle and a simple cycle unit powered by LM6000 gas turbine generators. Features of the system include inlet heating/absorption chilling for the gas turbines, supplementary firing capability, and a broad range of steam turbine extractions and admissions. The software enables the operator to model complex operating scenarios. It predicts technical and economic performance under a wide range of conditions, taking into account various equipment constraints and operation preferences. For any set of user-specified operating inputs, the corresponding heat and mass balance diagrams as well as economic figures may be viewed virtually instantaneously. Interactive plots of plant heat rate, incremental heat rate, operating income, and other parameters reveal issues and trade-offs involved in performance and economic optimization.

  18. Training for percutaneous renal access on a virtual reality simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Yu, Cheng-fan; Liu, Jin-shun; Wang, Gang; Zhu, He; Na, Yan-qun

    2013-01-01

    The need to develop new methods of surgical training combined with advances in computing has led to the development of virtual reality surgical simulators. The PERC Mentor(TM) is designed to train the user in percutaneous renal collecting system access puncture. This study aimed to validate the use of this kind of simulator, in percutaneous renal access training. Twenty-one urologists were enrolled as trainees to learn a fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous renal accessing technique. An assigned percutaneous renal access procedure was immediately performed on the PERC Mentor(TM) after watching instruction video and an analog operation. Objective parameters were recorded by the simulator and subjective global rating scale (GRS) score were determined. Simulation training followed and consisted of 2 hours daily training sessions for 2 consecutive days. Twenty-four hours after the training session, trainees were evaluated performing the same procedure. The post-training evaluation was compared to the evaluation of the initial attempt. During the initial attempt, none of the trainees could complete the appointed procedure due to the lack of experience in fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous renal access. After the short-term training, all trainees were able to independently complete the procedure. Of the 21 trainees, 10 had primitive experience in ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Trainees were thus categorized into the group of primitive experience and inexperience. The total operating time and amount of contrast material used were significantly lower in the group of primitive experience versus the inexperience group (P = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). The training on the virtual reality simulator, PERC Mentor(TM), can help trainees with no previous experience of fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous renal access to complete the virtual manipulation of the procedure independently. This virtual reality simulator may become an important training and evaluation tool in

  19. Airway skills training using a human patient simulator

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thesegan Moodley

    2016-04-11

    Apr 11, 2016 ... We incorporated the METI® HPS (Medical Education Technology,. Sarasota, USA) ... developed an airway care skills training programme using. METI's® HPS ..... analyse the cost-effectiveness of the simulator, on its own, or.

  20. Aircraft Electronics Maintenance Training Simulator. Curriculum Outlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackhawk Technical Coll., Janesville, WI.

    Instructional materials are provided for nine courses in an aircraft electronics maintenance training program. Courses are as follows: aviation basic electricity, direct current and alternating current electronics, basic avionic installations, analog electronics, digital electronics, microcomputer electronics, radio communications, aircraft…

  1. OR fire virtual training simulator: design and face validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkin, Denis; Olasky, Jaisa; Jones, Daniel B; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Jones, Stephanie B; Cao, Caroline G L; Molina, Marcos; Henriques, Steven; Wang, Jinling; Flinn, Jeff; De, Suvranu

    2016-12-30

    The Virtual Electrosurgical Skill Trainer is a tool for training surgeons the safe operation of electrosurgery tools in both open and minimally invasive surgery. This training includes a dedicated team-training module that focuses on operating room (OR) fire prevention and response. The module was developed to allow trainees, practicing surgeons, anesthesiologist, and nurses to interact with a virtual OR environment, which includes anesthesia apparatus, electrosurgical equipment, a virtual patient, and a fire extinguisher. Wearing a head-mounted display, participants must correctly identify the "fire triangle" elements and then successfully contain an OR fire. Within these virtual reality scenarios, trainees learn to react appropriately to the simulated emergency. A study targeted at establishing the face validity of the virtual OR fire simulator was undertaken at the 2015 Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons conference. Forty-nine subjects with varying experience participated in this Institutional Review Board-approved study. The subjects were asked to complete the OR fire training/prevention sequence in the VEST simulator. Subjects were then asked to answer a subjective preference questionnaire consisting of sixteen questions, focused on the usefulness and fidelity of the simulator. On a 5-point scale, 12 of 13 questions were rated at a mean of 3 or greater (92%). Five questions were rated above 4 (38%), particularly those focusing on the simulator effectiveness and its usefulness in OR fire safety training. A total of 33 of the 49 participants (67%) chose the virtual OR fire trainer over the traditional training methods such as a textbook or an animal model. Training for OR fire emergencies in fully immersive VR environments, such as the VEST trainer, may be the ideal training modality. The face validity of the OR fire training module of the VEST simulator was successfully established on many aspects of the simulation.

  2. Full scope simulator of a nuclear power plant control room using 3D stereo virtual reality techniques for operators training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.; Almeida, Adino Americo A.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN-CNEN/RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: mag@ien.gov.br; mol@ien.gov.br; adino@ien.gov.br; cmnap@ien.gov.br; Varela, Thiago F.B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia Eletrica]. E-mail: phillips.rj@terra.com.br; Cunha, Gerson G. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Metodos Computacionais em Engenharia (LAMCE)]. E-mail: gerson@lance.ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    Practical training of nuclear power plants operators are partially performed by means of simulators. Usually these simulators are physical copies of the original control roam, needing a large space on a facility being also very expensive. In this way, the proposal of this paper is to implement the use of Virtual Reality techniques to design a full scope control room simulator, in a manner to reduce costs and physical space usage. (author)

  3. Simulation training tools for nonlethal weapons using gaming environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donne, Alexsana; Eagan, Justin; Tse, Gabriel; Vanderslice, Tom; Woods, Jerry

    2006-05-01

    Modern simulation techniques have a growing role for evaluating new technologies and for developing cost-effective training programs. A mission simulator facilitates the productive exchange of ideas by demonstration of concepts through compellingly realistic computer simulation. Revolutionary advances in 3D simulation technology have made it possible for desktop computers to process strikingly realistic and complex interactions with results depicted in real-time. Computer games now allow for multiple real human players and "artificially intelligent" (AI) simulated robots to play together. Advances in computer processing power have compensated for the inherent intensive calculations required for complex simulation scenarios. The main components of the leading game-engines have been released for user modifications, enabling game enthusiasts and amateur programmers to advance the state-of-the-art in AI and computer simulation technologies. It is now possible to simulate sophisticated and realistic conflict situations in order to evaluate the impact of non-lethal devices as well as conflict resolution procedures using such devices. Simulations can reduce training costs as end users: learn what a device does and doesn't do prior to use, understand responses to the device prior to deployment, determine if the device is appropriate for their situational responses, and train with new devices and techniques before purchasing hardware. This paper will present the status of SARA's mission simulation development activities, based on the Half-Life gameengine, for the purpose of evaluating the latest non-lethal weapon devices, and for developing training tools for such devices.

  4. AISIM (Automated Interactive Simulation Modeling System) VAX Version Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    AD-Ri6t 436 AISIM (RUTOMATED INTERACTIVE SIMULATION MODELING 1/2 SYSTEM) VAX VERSION TRAI (U) HUGHES AIRCRAFT CO FULLERTON CA GROUND SYSTEMS GROUP S...Continue on reverse if necessary and Identify by block number) THIS DOCUMENT IS THE TRAINING MANUAL FOR THE AUTOMATED INTERACTIVE SIMULATION MODELING SYSTEM...form. Page 85 . . . . . . . . APPENDIX B SIMULATION REPORT FOR WORKING EXAMPLE Pa jPage.8 7AD-Ai6i 46 ISIM (AUTOMATED INTERACTIVE SIMULATION MODELING 2

  5. Self-directed simulation-based training of emergency cricothyroidotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchiors, Jacob; Todsen, Tobias; Mørkeberg Nilsson, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The emergency cricothyroidotomy (EC) is a critical procedure. The high cost of failures increases the demand for evidence-based training methods. The aim of this study was to present and evaluate self-directed video-guided simulation training. Novice doctors were given an individual 1-h simulatio...

  6. Business Simulations Applied in Support of ERP Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, George

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative, quasi-experimental study examined the application of a business simulation against training in support of an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system. Defining more effective training strategies is a critical concern for organizational leaders and stakeholders concerned by today's economic challenges. The scope of this…

  7. Midwifery students' experiences of simulation- and skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendahls, Lena; Oscarsson, Marie G

    2017-03-01

    In Sweden, simulation- and skills training are implemented in midwifery education in order to prepare students for clinical practice. Research regarding the use of both low to high levels of fidelity in simulation in midwifery programme is limited. The aim of this study was to explore midwifery students' experiences of simulation- and skills training. Midwifery students (n=61), at advanced level, were interviewed in 13 group interviews from 2011 to 2105. A semi-structured interview guide was used, and data were analysed by content analysis. The results are presented in four main categories: develops hands on skills and communication, power of collaborative learning, highly valued learning environment and facilitates clinical practice. The majority of students felt that the simulation- and skills training were necessary to become familiar with hands on skills. Having repetitive practices in a safe and secure environment was viewed as important, and students highly valued that mistakes could be made without fear of comprising patient safety. Student's collaboration, reflections and critical thinking increased learning ability. Simulation- and skills training created links between theory and practice, and the lecturer had an important role in providing instructions and feedback. Students felt prepared and confident before their clinical practice, and simulation- and skills training increased safety for all involved, resulting in students being more confident, as patients in clinical practice became less exposed. Furthermore, mentors were satisfied with students' basic skills. Simulation- and skills training support the development of midwifery skills. It creates links between theory and practice, which facilitates students' learning ability. Training needs to include reflections and critical thinking in order to develop their learning. The lecturer has an important role in encouraging time for reflections and creating safe environment during the skills and simulation

  8. Test facilities for hybrid and electric drive trains; Stazione di prova sistemi di trazione ibridi ed elettrici

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardini, G.; Ciancia, A.; De Andreis, L.; Pagni, G.; Pede, G.; Rossi, E.; Vellone, R. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dip. Energia

    1998-12-31

    ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) is conducting a large research and development programme on innovative vehicles with high energy efficiency and low environmental impact. In particular conducts activities on electric and hybrid vehicles. Testing and evaluation activities play a strong role in this programme. A complete characterization chain has been then defined and set up with a network of facilities which covers main testing needs for single components, subsystems and complete vehicles, in simulated and real operating conditions. The test facility which has been realised is able to experiment and fully characterise complete drive-trains (and subsystems) for pure electric and hybrid vehicles. It is composed by a different section for each subsystem: 1) power generation; 2) energy storage and management; 3) driving motors. Each section acts as an experimental island, able to operate alone or jointly with the other sections. In fact, all the sections are remotely controlled and managed in order to create different assembly of the drive-train. The facility has been sized to allow the testing of drive-trains and subsystems of small and medium-sized vehicles (up to minibuses), but an extension to larger vehicles is possible. During 1996 and part of 1997 the Drive train Test Facility has been completed and made operative. This paper mainly presents the final configurations of these novel testing systems with peculiar features and characteristics. [Italiano] ENEA (Ente Nazionale per le nuove tecnologie, l`Energia e l`Ambiente) sta conducendo un vasto programma di ricerca e sviluppo sui veicoli innovativi ad alto rendimento energetico e basso impatto ambientale.

  9. Direct drive: Simulations and results from the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radha, P. B., E-mail: rbah@lle.rochester.edu; Hohenberger, M.; Edgell, D. H.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Campbell, E. M.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Knauer, J. P.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); and others

    2016-05-15

    Direct-drive implosion physics is being investigated at the National Ignition Facility. The primary goal of the experiments is twofold: to validate modeling related to implosion velocity and to estimate the magnitude of hot-electron preheat. Implosion experiments indicate that the energetics is well-modeled when cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) is included in the simulation and an overall multiplier to the CBET gain factor is employed; time-resolved scattered light and scattered-light spectra display the correct trends. Trajectories from backlit images are well modeled, although those from measured self-emission images indicate increased shell thickness and reduced shell density relative to simulations. Sensitivity analyses indicate that the most likely cause for the density reduction is nonuniformity growth seeded by laser imprint and not laser-energy coupling. Hot-electron preheat is at tolerable levels in the ongoing experiments, although it is expected to increase after the mitigation of CBET. Future work will include continued model validation, imprint measurements, and mitigation of CBET and hot-electron preheat.

  10. Theoretical Insights from Facile Microsecond Simulation of the Glass Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Jui-Hsiang; Patra, Tarak; Simmons, David

    Despite more than half a century of research, the fundamental nature of the glass transition remains one of the major open questions in polymer science and condensed matter physics. Molecular dynamics simulations have provided key insights into this problem, but their ability to firmly establish the underlying nature of glass formation have been limited by the extreme computational difficulty of directly probing the deeply supercooled regime most relevant to this process. Here we describe a new protocol for simulation of the glass transition enabling facile access to in-equilibrium segmental relaxation times approaching and exceeding one microsecond - well into the deeply supercooled regime of most glass-forming liquids. Coupled with a well-validated strategy for extrapolation to experimental timescales, this approach provides vastly improved prediction of experimental glass transition temperatures. Here we combine data acquired through this protocol for the deeply supercooled regime of polymeric, inorganic, organic, and metallic glass formers to robustly test several theories of glass formation and identify microscopic phenomenological features shared across all classes of glass-forming liquid in the deeply supercooled regime. We acknowledge the W. M. Keck Foundation for financial support of this research.

  11. Extended Range Telepresence for Evacuation Training in Pedestrian Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Arias, Antonia Perez; Ehrhardt, Peter; Hengst, Stefan; Kretz, Tobias; Vortisch, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution, we propose a new framework to evaluate pedestrian simula-tions by using Extended Range Telepresence. Telepresence is used as a virtual reality walking simulator, which provides the user with a realistic impression of being present and walking in a virtual environment that is much larger than the real physical environment, in which the user actually walks. The validation of the simulation is performed by comparing motion data of the telepresent user with simulated data at some points of the simulation. The use of haptic feedback from the simulation makes the framework suitable for training in emergency situations.

  12. Four-year experience with a regional program providing simulation-based endovascular training for vascular surgery fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, David L; Lee, Eugene S; Hedayati, Nasim; Pevec, William C

    2009-01-01

    High-fidelity procedure simulation has been found useful for training vascular surgery residents in endovascular procedures, but the costs of acquiring, maintaining, and operating simulators represent a barrier to routine use of endovascular simulation in vascular surgery programs. Providing simulation training opportunities through regional centers may make simulation more cost effective, but the costs and benefits of this approach have not been reported previously. We reviewed participation costs in a regional simulation program to provide a benchmark for comparison with other training options. Simulation-based training was offered annually from 2004 to 2007 to the 11 vascular surgery fellowships in Washington, Oregon, California, Arizona, and Utah. Participation was at the discretion of the program directors and fellows. Sessions were designed to offer individualized, hands-on training with 2-4 participants per 2-day session. SimSuite (Medical Simulation Corporation, Denver, Colorado) simulators were used. During the 4-year period, participation by invited programs averaged 75%. Ten of 11 programs in the western United States region participated, with 34 fellows participating during the 4 years of the program. In addition, 2 program directors or faculty attended sessions to participate as learners, and 8 other individuals were allowed to participate (including 7 senior surgery residents and 1 vascular surgery fellow from out of the region). The average participant costs for travel, which include transportation, lodging, and meals, were $571. Simulation facility expenses, which included use of the simulator, computer-based training modules, and instructional support by an educational specialist, averaged $1055 per participant. Surgical faculty spent 12 hours per 2-day session instructing and in other direct educational activities. Costs for this time were not calculated separately. Vascular surgery fellows' participation in simulation training at regional centers

  13. Reconsidering fidelity in simulation-based training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamstra, Stanley J; Brydges, Ryan; Hatala, Rose; Zendejas, Benjamin; Cook, David A

    2014-03-01

    In simulation-based health professions education, the concept of simulator fidelity is usually understood as the degree to which a simulator looks, feels, and acts like a human patient. Although this can be a useful guide in designing simulators, this definition emphasizes technological advances and physical resemblance over principles of educational effectiveness. In fact, several empirical studies have shown that the degree of fidelity appears to be independent of educational effectiveness. The authors confronted these issues while conducting a recent systematic review of simulation-based health professions education, and in this Perspective they use their experience in conducting that review to examine key concepts and assumptions surrounding the topic of fidelity in simulation.Several concepts typically associated with fidelity are more useful in explaining educational effectiveness, such as transfer of learning, learner engagement, and suspension of disbelief. Given that these concepts more directly influence properties of the learning experience, the authors make the following recommendations: (1) abandon the term fidelity in simulation-based health professions education and replace it with terms reflecting the underlying primary concepts of physical resemblance and functional task alignment; (2) make a shift away from the current emphasis on physical resemblance to a focus on functional correspondence between the simulator and the applied context; and (3) focus on methods to enhance educational effectiveness using principles of transfer of learning, learner engagement, and suspension of disbelief. These recommendations clarify underlying concepts for researchers in simulation-based health professions education and will help advance this burgeoning field.

  14. Pipeline operators training and certification using thermohydraulic simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Claudio V.; Plasencia C, Jose [Pontificia Universidade Catolica (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nucleo de Simulacao Termohidraulica de Dutos (SIMDUT); Montalvao, Filipe; Costa, Luciano [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transporte S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The continuous pipeline operators training and certification of the TRANSPETRO's Pipeline National Operations Control Center (CNCO) is an essential task aiming the efficiency and safety of the oil and derivatives transport operations through the Brazilian pipeline network. For this objective, a hydraulic simulator is considered an excellent tool that allows the creation of different operational scenarios for training the pipeline hydraulic behavior as well as for testing the operator's responses to normal and abnormal real time operational conditions. The hydraulic simulator is developed based on a pipeline simulation software that supplies the hydraulic responses normally acquired from the pipeline remote units in the field. The pipeline simulation software has a communication interface system that sends and receives data to the SCADA supervisory system database. Using the SCADA graphical interface to create and to customize human machine interfaces (HMI) from which the operator/instructor has total control of the pipeline/system and instrumentation by sending commands. Therefore, it is possible to have realistic training outside of the real production systems, while acquiring experience during training hours with the operation of a real pipeline. A pilot Project was initiated at TRANSPETRO - CNCO targeting to evaluate the hydraulic simulators advantages in pipeline operators training and certification programs. The first part of the project was the development of three simulators for different pipelines. The excellent results permitted the project expansion for a total of twenty different pipelines, being implemented in training programs for pipelines presently operated by CNCO as well as for the new ones that are being migrated. The main objective of this paper is to present an overview of the implementation process and the development of a training environment through a pipe simulation environment using commercial software. This paper also presents

  15. Piloted Flight Simulator Developed for Icing Effects Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to expand pilot training methods to avoid icing-related accidents, the NASA Glenn Research Center and Bihrle Applied Research Inc. have developed the Ice Contamination Effects Flight Training Device (ICEFTD). ICEFTD simulates the flight characteristics of the NASA Twin Otter Icing Research Aircraft in a no-ice baseline and in two ice configurations simulating ice-protection-system failures. Key features of the training device are the force feedback in the yoke, the instrument panel and out-the-window graphics, the instructor s workstation, and the portability of the unit.

  16. Design data package and operating procedures for MSFC solar simulator test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Design and operational data for the solar simulator test facility are reviewed. The primary goal of the facility is to evaluate the performance capacibility and worst case failure modes of collectors, which utilize either air or liquid transport media. The facility simulates environmental parameters such as solar radiation intensity, solar spectrum, collimation, uniformity, and solar attitude. The facility also simulates wind conditions of velocity and direction, solar system conditions imposed on the collector, collector fluid inlet temperature, and geometric factors of collector tilt and azimuth angles. Testing the simulator provides collector efficiency data, collector time constant, incident angle modifier data, and stagnation temperature values.

  17. A Full Scope Nuclear Power Plant Training Simulator: Design and Implementation Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro A. Corcuera

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a full scope training simulator for a Spanish nuclear power plant. The simulator is based on a client/server architecture that allows the distributed execution in a network with many users to participate in the same simulation. The interface was designed to support the interaction of the operators with the simulator through virtual panels supported by touch screens with high fidelity graphic displays. The simulation environment is described including the extension added to facilitate an easy operation by instructors. The graphical interface has been developed using component software technology. The appropriate selection of hardware for visualization and interaction, in terms of cost and performance, resulted in a facility much less expensive than the classic hard panels replica simulators and, at the same time, able to fulfill most of the training requirements. The main features of the simulator are the distributed execution control of the models and the flexibility of design and maintenance of the interface. The benefits of virtual panels approach are the automatic switch reposition and tagging, configuration flexibility, low maintenance requirements, or capability to support multiple users distributed across the corporate intranet. After exhaustive validation and testing, the training sessions are being conducted successfully.

  18. Theoretically-Driven Infrastructure for Supporting Healthcare Teams Training at a Military Treatment Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Robert T.; Parodi, Andrea V.

    2011-01-01

    The Team Resource Center (TRC) at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) currently hosts a tri-service healthcare teams training course three times annually . The course consists of didactic learning coupled with simulation exercises to provide an interactive educational experience for healthcare professionals. The course is also the foundation of a research program designed to explore the use of simulation technologies for enhancing team training and evaluation. The TRC has adopted theoretical frameworks for evaluating training readiness and efficacy, and is using these frameworks to guide a systematic reconfiguration of the infrastructure supporting healthcare teams training and research initiatives at NMCP.

  19. Simulation-based training for colonoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Louise; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Nerup, Nikolaj

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to create simulation-based tests with credible pass/fail standards for 2 different fidelities of colonoscopy models. Only competent practitioners should perform colonoscopy. Reliable and valid simulation-based tests could be used to establish basic competency in colonosc...

  20. Training in Tbilisi nuclear facility provides new sampling perspectives for IAEA inspectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brim, Cornelia P.

    2016-06-08

    Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control- (NPAC-) sponsored training in a “cold” nuclear facility in Tbilisi, Georgia provides International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors with a new perspective on environmental sampling strategies. Sponsored by the Nuclear Safeguards program under the NPAC, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) experts have been conducting an annual weeklong class for IAEA inspectors in a closed nuclear facility since 2011. The Andronikashvili Institute of Physics and the Republic of Georgia collaborate with PNNL to provide the training, and the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Embassy in Tbilisi and the U.S. Mission to International Organizations in Vienna provide logistical support.

  1. Operator Training Simulator for an Industrial Bioethanol Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Gerlach

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Operator training simulators (OTS are software tools for training process operators in large-scale industrial applications. Here, we describe the development, implementation and training of an OTS for a large-scale industrial plant for bioethanol production. The design of the OTS is based on conceptual analysis (previously reported by us in this journal of various configuration alternatives and training procedures at the plant. In this article, we report on how the conceptual design is used in simulation models and graphical user interfaces and how the design is applied for training of operators in the real plant environment. The results imply that OTS would be time- and cost-efficient tools for application in the biotechnological industry.

  2. Flight Simulator Platform Motion and Air Transport Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alfred T.; Bussolari, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of flight simulator platform motion on pilot training and performance was examined In two studies utilizing a B-727-200 aircraft simulator. The simulator, located at Ames Research Center, Is certified by the FAA for upgrade and transition training in air carrier operations. Subjective ratings and objective performance of experienced B-727 pilots did not reveal any reliable effects of wide variations In platform motion de- sign. Motion platform variations did, however, affect the acquisition of control skill by pilots with no prior heavy aircraft flying experience. The effect was limited to pitch attitude control inputs during the early phase of landing training. Implications for the definition of platform motion requirements in air transport pilot training are discussed.

  3. Design of 3D simulation engine for oilfield safety training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua-Ming; Kang, Bao-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    Aiming at the demand for rapid custom development of 3D simulation system for oilfield safety training, this paper designs and implements a 3D simulation engine based on script-driven method, multi-layer structure, pre-defined entity objects and high-level tools such as scene editor, script editor, program loader. A scripting language been defined to control the system's progress, events and operating results. Training teacher can use this engine to edit 3D virtual scenes, set the properties of entity objects, define the logic script of task, and produce a 3D simulation training system without any skills of programming. Through expanding entity class, this engine can be quickly applied to other virtual training areas.

  4. Tools for evaluating team performance in simulation-based training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael A; Weaver, Sallie J; Lazzara, Elizabeth H; Salas, Eduardo; Wu, Teresa; Silvestri, Salvatore; Schiebel, Nicola; Almeida, Sandra; King, Heidi B

    2010-10-01

    Teamwork training constitutes one of the core approaches for moving healthcare systems toward increased levels of quality and safety, and simulation provides a powerful method of delivering this training, especially for face-paced and dynamic specialty areas such as Emergency Medicine. Team performance measurement and evaluation plays an integral role in ensuring that simulation-based training for teams (SBTT) is systematic and effective. However, this component of SBTT systems is overlooked frequently. This article addresses this gap by providing a review and practical introduction to the process of developing and implementing evaluation systems in SBTT. First, an overview of team performance evaluation is provided. Second, best practices for measuring team performance in simulation are reviewed. Third, some of the prominent measurement tools in the literature are summarized and discussed relative to the best practices. Subsequently, implications of the review are discussed for the practice of training teamwork in Emergency Medicine.

  5. Virtual agents in a simulated virtual training environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achorn, Brett; Badler, Norman L.

    1993-01-01

    A drawback to live-action training simulations is the need to gather a large group of participants in order to train a few individuals. One solution to this difficulty is the use of computer-controlled agents in a virtual training environment. This allows a human participant to be replaced by a virtual, or simulated, agent when only limited responses are needed. Each agent possesses a specified set of behaviors and is capable of limited autonomous action in response to its environment or the direction of a human trainee. The paper describes these agents in the context of a simulated hostage rescue training session, involving two human rescuers assisted by three virtual (computer-controlled) agents and opposed by three other virtual agents.

  6. Tools for evaluating team performance in simulation-based training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael A; Weaver, Sallie J; Lazzara, Elizabeth H; Salas, Eduardo; Wu, Teresa; Silvestri, Salvatore; Schiebel, Nicola; Almeida, Sandra; King, Heidi B

    2010-01-01

    Teamwork training constitutes one of the core approaches for moving healthcare systems toward increased levels of quality and safety, and simulation provides a powerful method of delivering this training, especially for face-paced and dynamic specialty areas such as Emergency Medicine. Team performance measurement and evaluation plays an integral role in ensuring that simulation-based training for teams (SBTT) is systematic and effective. However, this component of SBTT systems is overlooked frequently. This article addresses this gap by providing a review and practical introduction to the process of developing and implementing evaluation systems in SBTT. First, an overview of team performance evaluation is provided. Second, best practices for measuring team performance in simulation are reviewed. Third, some of the prominent measurement tools in the literature are summarized and discussed relative to the best practices. Subsequently, implications of the review are discussed for the practice of training teamwork in Emergency Medicine. PMID:21063558

  7. Facilitating Conversations across Time: Using Simulations in Living History Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seig, Mary Theresa

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the use of a simulation as a crucial part of a larger training program at a living history museum. The simulation provided an experiential, emotional base from which museum staff could re-envision their interactions with visitors and effect cultural and organizational change from within those interactions. (Contains 1 note.)

  8. Full scale computer simulators in anesthesia training and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Anne K

    2004-05-01

    With the advent of competency-based curriculum, technology such as full scale computer simulators have acquired an increasingly important role in anesthesia both in training and evaluation. This article reviews the current role of full scale computer simulators in teaching and evaluation in anesthesia. This review draws from existing anesthesia and medical education literature in order to examine and assess the current role of full scale computer simulators in anesthesia education today. The last decade has witnessed a major increase in the use of full scale computer simulators in anesthesia. Many applications have been found for these simulators including teaching and training, evaluation and research. Despite the increasing use and application of full scale computers in anesthesia in the area of teaching and training, definitive studies evaluating its cost effectiveness, its efficacy compared to traditional training methods or its impact on patient outcome are still pending. Although there is some preliminary evidence of reliability and validity in using the simulator to evaluate clinical competence, development in this area has not progressed enough to justify its use in formal, summative evaluation of competence in anesthesia at this time. As technology acquires an increasingly important role in medical education, full scale computer simulators represent an exciting potential in anesthesia. However, the full potential and role of simulators in anesthesia is still in development and will require a dovetailing of clinical theory and practice with current research in medical education.

  9. STS-57 crewmembers train in JSC's FB Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-57 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, Mission Specialist 2 (MS2) Nancy J. Sherlock, holding computer diskettes and procedural checklist, discusses equipment operation with Commander Ronald J. Grabe on the middeck of JSC's fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS). Payload Commander (PLC) G. David Low points to a forward locker location as MS3 Peter J.K. Wisoff switches controls on overhead panels MO42F and MO58F, and MS4 Janice E. Voss looks on. The FB-SMS is located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  10. Performance measurements of the effect of simulator training on novice operators in simulated ice conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power MacDonald, Stephanie; MacKinnon, Scott N. [Memorial University, St John' s (Canada); Re, Antonio Simoes; Power, Jonathan [National Research Council, Institute for Ocean Technology, St John' s (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Research in the marine field suggests that training be part of a holistic teaching method, including traditional and other emerging methods. Currently, training for totally enclosed motor propelled survival craft (TEMPSC) operators is provided in sheltered ports in relatively benign conditions. Also the training is very limited for ice-covered water. This paper investigated the effectiveness of simulator-based training on the competency of a novice coxswain to navigate through a simulated ice field. This research compared the performance of simulator training in comparison with traditional standard certification and watchkeeping (STCW) training for lifeboats in ice fields. Virtual marine technologies (VMT) developed the full mission S class simulator used for the training. The full-scale field trials were carried out using a TEMPSC IMO/SOLAS approved for 20 occupants. This research demonstrated through the results of the post testing questionnaire data that simulator training could provide an increased sense of confidence after training on the simulator, and lead to an increase of competency.

  11. Training in surgical oncology - the role of VR simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, T M; Aggarwal, R; Rajaretnam, N; Grantcharov, T P; Darzi, A

    2011-09-01

    There have been dramatic changes in surgical training over the past two decades which have resulted in a number of concerns for the development of future surgeons. Changes in the structure of cancer services, working hour restrictions and a commitment to patient safety has led to a reduction in training opportunities that are available to the surgeon in training. Simulation and in particular virtual reality (VR) simulation has been heralded as an effective adjunct to surgical training. Advances in VR simulation has allowed trainees to practice realistic full length procedures in a safe and controlled environment, where mistakes are permitted and can be used as learning points. There is considerable evidence to demonstrate that the VR simulation can be used to enhance technical skills and improve operating room performance. Future work should focus on the cost effectiveness and predictive validity of VR simulation, which in turn would increase the uptake of simulation and enhance surgical training. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of virtual reality simulation in endoscopy training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Louis; Harpham--Lockyer; Faidon--Marios; Laskaratos; Pasquale; Berlingieri; Owen; Epstein

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in virtual reality graphics and models have allowed virtual reality simulators to be incorporated into a variety of endoscopic training programmes. Use of virtual reality simulators in training programmes is thought to improve skill acquisition amongst trainees which is reflected in improved patient comfort and safety. Several studies have already been carried out to ascertain the impact that usage of virtual reality simulators may have upon trainee learning curves and how this may translate to patient comfort. This article reviews the available literature in this area of medical education which is particularly relevant to all parties involved in endoscopy training and curriculum development. Assessment of the available evidence for an optimal exposure time with virtual reality simula-tors and the long-term benefits of their use are also discussed.

  13. Role of virtual reality simulation in endoscopy training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpham-Lockyer, Louis; Laskaratos, Faidon-Marios; Berlingieri, Pasquale; Epstein, Owen

    2015-12-10

    Recent advancements in virtual reality graphics and models have allowed virtual reality simulators to be incorporated into a variety of endoscopic training programmes. Use of virtual reality simulators in training programmes is thought to improve skill acquisition amongst trainees which is reflected in improved patient comfort and safety. Several studies have already been carried out to ascertain the impact that usage of virtual reality simulators may have upon trainee learning curves and how this may translate to patient comfort. This article reviews the available literature in this area of medical education which is particularly relevant to all parties involved in endoscopy training and curriculum development. Assessment of the available evidence for an optimal exposure time with virtual reality simulators and the long-term benefits of their use are also discussed.

  14. Innovative Debrief Solutions for Mission Training & Simulation: Making fighter pilot training more effective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, L.R.M.A.; Cornelisse, E.; Schavemaker-Piva, O.

    2006-01-01

    To enhance and improve the quality of mission training and simulation for fighter pilots, TNO and the Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF) investigate various innovative debrief concepts. In this paper we will describe our work on Innovative Debrief Solutions for Mission Training through Distributed

  15. Design and simulation of the nuSTORM facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ao

    This thesis provides a full design and simulation of the nuSTORM beam line facility including the pion beam line , the pion and muon orbit combination section, and the muon decay ring. The study also includes the development of numerical optimization methods and their application to the design. At nuSTORM, one proton batch from the Main Injector (MI) is extracted and transported to the target station to bombard a solid target. A magnetic horn is used as the collection device for the secondary particles such as pions and kaons. A pion beam line is designed to transport the secondary particles downstream to the muon decay ring. In order to avoid the use of a fast kicker with a large aperture for the injection, an Orbit Combination Section (OCS) was designed to combine the reference pion orbit with the circulating muon orbit. This fulfills the stochastic injection scheme proposed in the 1980s. It is shown through the simulation that the pion beam line is able to deliver 0.011 muons per proton on target within the acceptance of the ring. In order to improve the circulating muon flux, an optimization of the magnetic collection horn was studied. A Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA), that was modified to integrate Message Passing Interface (MPI) in the process, is applied to the optimization. The number of muons within the ring acceptance from the pion decay is estimated by the pions after the collection horn. This new method was proposed to lower the requirement on the computing resources for the optimization. The study gives a new and better target and horn configuration after a full investigation of the system. The nuSTORM ring is examined with two optics designs. With different features, the two designs are optimized via correcting the nonlinearities with sextupolar field distribution in the ring. A modified MPI-based Simulated Annealing (SA) algorithm was applied to obtain the optimal ring acceptance. The comparison with the GA shows good agreements on the

  16. Design and simulation of the nuSTORM facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ao [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This thesis provides a full design and simulation of the nuSTORM beam line facility including the pion beam line , the pion and muon orbit combination section, and the muon decay ring. The study also includes the development of numerical optimization methods and their application to the design. At nuSTORM, one proton batch from the Main Injector (MI) is extracted and transported to the target station to bombard a solid target. A magnetic horn is used as the collection device for the secondary particles such as pions and kaons. A pion beam line is designed to transport the secondary particles downstream to the muon decay ring. In order to avoid the use of a fast kicker with a large aperture for the injection, an Orbit Combination Section (OCS) was designed to combine the reference pion orbit with the circulating muon orbit. This ful lls the stochastic injection scheme proposed in the 1980s. It is shown through the simulation that the pion beam line is able to deliver 0.011 muons per proton on target within the acceptance of the ring. In order to improve the circulating muon ux, an optimization of the magnetic collection horn was studied. A Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA), that was modi ed to integrate Message Passing Interface (MPI) in the process, is applied to the optimization. The number of muons within the ring acceptance from the pion decay is estimated by the pions after the collection horn. This new method was proposed to lower the requirement on the computing resources for the optimization. The study gives a new and better target and horn con guration after a full investigation of the system. The nuSTORM ring is examined with two optics designs. With di erent features, the two designs are optimized via correcting the nonlinearities with sextupolar eld distribution in the ring. A modi ed MPI-based Simulated Annealing (SA) algorithm was applied to obtain the optimal ring acceptance. The comparison with the GA shows good agreements on the achieved

  17. [Simulation training for German anesthesiologists--case scenarios and training results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädler, Dirk; Heinrichs, Wolfgang; Mönk, Stefan; Elke, Gunnar; Zick, Günther; Scholz, Jens

    2008-06-01

    Training of medical personnel using simulation techniques is an acknowledged measure of process optimization and quality assurance in a clinical setting. In 2006, a simulator-based training of anaesthesiologists was introduced in the University Medical Centre of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Germany. The training was performed on a human patient simulator (Meti, Sarasota, USA) and the course was conducted by instructors and engineers from the Simulation Centre Mainz in an operation room equipped with common anaesthesia devices. Special lectures focused at crisis resource management and human errors were held in separate rooms. Parallel daily trainings of 6 physicians and 4 nurses were conducted during 9 days. The training was offered to the anaesthesia personnel of whole Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. A higher and more balanced overall performance of the participants was determined by the instructor teams in comparison to the training results in their own simulation centre. This improved performance was ascribed to the special circumstances of this training namely the familiar surroundings and team members.

  18. Simulation in Training--The Current Imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-16

    be the latest in training technology --to include the Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System, a position locating system, and changeable target...requirements docu- ment. That adds to the bureaucratic burden and inherent time delay. 12 L4 WIK 10 WEEKS 10 WEEKS ~ U TALEN /I 3* IRA *ProvidedCSIG...the "Buy American" provisions of the procurement regulations often put higher- technology European firms at a competitive disadvantage. System project

  19. Modeling and HIL Simulation of Flight Conditions Simulating Control System for the Altitude Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Shen, Li; Zhang, Tianhong

    2016-12-01

    Simulated altitude test is an essential exploring, debugging, verification and validation means during the development of aero-engine. Free-jet engine test can simulate actual working conditions of aero-engine more realistically than direct-connect engine test but with relatively lower cost compared to propulsion wind tunnel test, thus becoming an important developing area of simulated altitude test technology. The Flight Conditions Simulating Control System (FCSCS) is of great importance to the Altitude Test Facility (ATF) but the development of that is a huge challenge. Aiming at improving the design efficiency and reducing risks during the development of FCSCS for ATFs, a Hardware- in-the-Loop (HIL) simulation system was designed and the mathematical models of key components such as the pressure stabilizing chamber, free-jet nozzle, control valve and aero-engine were built in this paper. Moreover, some HIL simulation experiments were carried out. The results show that the HIL simulation system designed and established in this paper is reasonable and effective, which can be used to adjust control parameters conveniently and assess the software and hardware in the control system immediately.

  20. Training the Primary Care Internist to Provide Care in Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, John A.

    1983-01-01

    A pilot program at the University of California, Davis, that incorporated skilled nursing facility training into the required curriculum of their primary care internal medicine residency is described. The goal was to increase the residents' knowledge in the care of geriatric patients. (MLW)

  1. Training the Staff of a Drug Addiction Treatment Facility: A Case Study of Hogar De Encuentro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Andrew A.; Leske, M. Cristina

    1977-01-01

    This paper, presented at the American Public Health Association meeting; Chicago, November 1975, discusses a staff training program at a drug addiction treatment facility established for Spanish-speaking (and other) drug addicts. Staff improved counseling skills and knowledge of drug addiction, but changed little in attitudes toward drug use and…

  2. The Risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss During Simulated Dives in Canadian Forces Hyperbaric Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The risk of noise-induced hearing loss during simulated dives in Canadian Forces hyperbaric facilities Sharon M...2012-084 October 2012 The risk of noise-induced hearing loss during simulated dives in Canadian Forces hyperbaric ...transferred into the dive chamber of a hyperbaric facility. The mechanism is audible and sufficiently high in level in adjacent areas to warrant the

  3. Simulation of mass storage systems operating in a large data processing facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, R.

    1972-01-01

    A mass storage simulation program was written to aid system designers in the design of a data processing facility. It acts as a tool for measuring the overall effect on the facility of on-line mass storage systems, and it provides the means of measuring and comparing the performance of competing mass storage systems. The performance of the simulation program is demonstrated.

  4. Development in Rubber Preparation for Endoscopic Training Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Surangsrirat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopy is one of the most important procedures in diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal tract problems. While endoscopic procedure has tremendous benefits, physicians require considerable practice and time to develop competency. Current endoscopic training process involves cognitive learning and hands-on training under the supervision of an expert gastroenterologist. Previous studies have shown that fellow involvement prolongs procedural time and incurs additional expenses to the institution. Moreover, the patient also experiences more discomfort and injury risk. Introduction of training simulator into the training process could reduce the involvement of the patients and thus reduce the risk. Porcine model is commonly used for training in endoscopy due to the similar tactile response to a human gastrointestinal tract. However, information on elastic behavior of pig or human gastrointestinal tract for the engineering purposes was limited. In this study, the modulus of elasticity and ultimate tensile stress data of the pig stomach and intestines, small and large intestines, were measured and compared with multiple rubber stomach and intestines models. Based on the experimental results and experienced gastroenterologists feedback, the proposed dipped rubber composition can provide a satisfactory tactile feedback and could be used to simulate a human gastrointestinal tract for an endoscopic simulation training model.

  5. Training for percutaneous renal access on a virtual reality simulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi; YU Cheng-fan; LIU Jin-shun; WANG Gang; ZHU He; NA Yan-qun

    2013-01-01

    Background The need to develop new methods of surgical training combined with advances in computing has led to the development of virtual reality surgical simulators.The PERC MentorTM is designed to train the user in percutaneous renal collecting system access puncture.This study aimed to validate the use of this kind of simulator,in percutaneous renal access training.Methods Twenty-one urologists were enrolled as trainees to learn a fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous renal accessing technique.An assigned percutaneous renal access procedure was immediately performed on the PERC MentorTM after watching instruction video and an analog operation.Objective parameters were recorded by the simulator and subjective global rating scale (GRS) score were determined.Simulation training followed and consisted of 2 hours daily training sessions for 2 consecutive days.Twenty-four hours after the training session,trainees were evaluated performing the same procedure.The post-training evaluation was compared to the evaluation of the initial attempt.Results During the initial attempt,none of the trainees could complete the appointed procedure due to the lack of experience in fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous renal access.After the short-term training,all trainees were able to independently complete the procedure.Of the 21 trainees,10 had primitive experience in ultrasound-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy.Trainees were thus categorized into the group of primitive experience and inexperience.The total operating time and amount of contrast material used were significantly lower in the group of primitive experience versus the inexperience group (P=0.03 and 0.02,respectively).Conclusions The training on the virtual reality simulator,PERC MentorTM,can help trainees with no previous experience of fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous renal access to complete the virtual manipulation of the procedure independently.This virtual reality simulator may become an important training and evaluation tool

  6. Fidelity of Simulation for Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    virtualI measurement hous* FI4A Flight Simulator 1-Sigma V 35K Asmly Csae ig’ 4 "lCoonn""’ Calligraphi 46~i I-wiodow folded,. iie efrac S F95 (4 units...Film (photographic) d) Shadowgraph Presentation to the pilot for a) and b) is normally by CRT, with the information written calligraphi - cally or

  7. ASCAN Helms simulates parachute jump during VAFB training exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    1990 Group 13 Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) Susan J. Helms simulates a parachute jump during ground egress and parasail training exercises at Vance Air Force Base (VAFB), Enid, Oklahoma. With her arms folded against her chest, Helms jumps from a brick platform onto the ground. In line behind her are Charles J. Precourt followed by Leroy Chiao. The training is designed to prepare the ASCANs for proper survival measures to take in the event of an emergency aboard the T-38 jet trainer aircraft they will frequently use once they become full-fledged astronauts. ASCANs completed the VAFB training courses from 07-29-90 through 07-31-90.

  8. Modeling and Simulation of Virtual Clay Pigeon shooter Training System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yanxia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available As a popular sports event, clay pigeon uses real guns and bullets as its tools. To improve the training effect, reduce its cost and danger, the development of a real-time interactive and perceptive virtual training system by using simulation technology becomes urgent. This system uses Visual C++、Vega、Creator as its development platform to conduct modeling and simulation of clay pigeon’s and grapeshot ‘s flying path and the collision effect of the two objects.  

  9. Team Training and Retention of Skills Acquired Above Real Time Training on a Flight Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Syed Friasat; Guckenberger, Dutch; Crane, Peter; Rossi, Marcia; Williams, Mayard; Williams, Jason; Archer, Matt

    2000-01-01

    Above Real-Time Training (ARTT) is the training acquired on a real time simulator when it is modified to present events at a faster pace than normal. The experiments related to training of pilots performed by NASA engineers (Kolf in 1973, Hoey in 1976) and others (Guckenberger, Crane and their associates in the nineties) have shown that in comparison with the real time training (RTT), ARTT provides the following benefits: increased rate of skill acquisition, reduced simulator and aircraft training time, and more effective training for emergency procedures. Two sets of experiments have been performed; they are reported in professional conferences and the respective papers are included in this report. The retention of effects of ARTT has been studied in the first set of experiments and the use of ARTT as top-off training has been examined in the second set of experiments. In ARTT, the pace of events was 1.5 times the pace in RTT. In both sets of experiments, university students were trained to perform an aerial gunnery task. The training unit was equipped with a joystick and a throttle. The student acted as a nose gunner in a hypothetical two place attack aircraft. The flight simulation software was installed on a Universal Distributed Interactive Simulator platform supplied by ECC International of Orlando, Florida. In the first set of experiments, two training programs RTT or ART7 were used. Students were then tested in real time on more demanding scenarios: either immediately after training or two days later. The effects of ARTT did not decrease over a two day retention interval and ARTT was more time efficient than real time training. Therefore, equal test performance could be achieved with less clock-time spent in the simulator. In the second set of experiments three training programs RTT or ARTT or RARTT, were used. In RTT, students received 36 minutes of real time training. In ARTT, students received 36 minutes of above real time training. In RARTT, students

  10. Models and Methods for Adaptive Management of Individual and Team-Based Training Using a Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisitsyna, L. S.; Smetyuh, N. P.; Golikov, S. P.

    2017-05-01

    Research of adaptive individual and team-based training has been analyzed and helped find out that both in Russia and abroad, individual and team-based training and retraining of AASTM operators usually includes: production training, training of general computer and office equipment skills, simulator training including virtual simulators which use computers to simulate real-world manufacturing situation, and, as a rule, the evaluation of AASTM operators’ knowledge determined by completeness and adequacy of their actions under the simulated conditions. Such approach to training and re-training of AASTM operators stipulates only technical training of operators and testing their knowledge based on assessing their actions in a simulated environment.

  11. A Training Transfer Study of Simulation Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    protagonist, Ender , was a 12-year-old boy who played video games well. He did so well, in fact, that the government sent him to Battle School for... Ender made a risky move in the game and consequently won the day. Exhausted, he left the simulator to find out the secret of the game and of Battle...the Third Invasion. There were no games , the battles were real, and the only enemy you fought was the buggers. (p. 296) Ender , in fact, had been

  12. Review of 3-Dimensional Printing on Cranial Neurosurgery Simulation Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakharia, Vejay N; Vakharia, Nilesh N; Hill, Ciaran S

    2016-04-01

    Shorter working times, reduced operative exposure to complex procedures, and increased subspecialization have resulted in training constraints within most surgical fields. Simulation has been suggested as a possible means of acquiring new surgical skills without exposing patients to the surgeon's operative "learning curve." Here we review the potential impact of 3-dimensional printing on simulation and training within cranial neurosurgery and its implications for the future. In accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines, a comprehensive search of PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was performed. In total, 31 studies relating to the use of 3-dimensional (3D) printing within neurosurgery, of which 16 were specifically related to simulation and training, were identified. The main impact of 3D printing on neurosurgical simulation training was within vascular surgery, where patient-specific replication of vascular anatomy and pathologies can aid surgeons in operative planning and clip placement for reconstruction of vascular anatomy. Models containing replicas of brain tumors have also been reconstructed and used for training purposes, with some providing realistic representations of skin, subcutaneous tissue, bone, dura, normal brain, and tumor tissue. 3D printing provides a unique means of directly replicating patient-specific pathologies. It can identify anatomic variation and provide a medium in which training models can be generated rapidly, allowing the trainee and experienced neurosurgeon to practice parts of operations preoperatively. Future studies are required to validate this technology in comparison with current simulators and show improved patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Decommissioning and Environmental Cleanup of a Small Arms Training Facility - 13225

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Karen M. [United States Department of Energy - Savannah River Operations Office (United States); Kmetz, Thomas F.; Smith, Sandra B.; Blount, Gerald C. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (United States)

    2013-07-01

    US DOE performed a (CERCLA) non-time critical removal (NTCR) action at the Small Arms Training Area (SATA) Site Evaluation Area (SEA) located at the Savannah River Site (SRS), in Aiken, South Carolina. From 1951 to May 2010, the SATA was used as a small weapons practice and qualifying firing range. The SATA consisted of 870.1 ha (2,150 ac) of woodlands and open field, of which approximately 2.9 ha (7.3 ac) were used as a firing range. The SATA facility was comprised of three small arms ranges (one static and two interactive), storage buildings for supplies, a weapons cleaning building, and a control building. Additionally, a 113- m (370-ft) long earthen berm was used as a target backstop during live-fire exercises. The berm soils accumulated a large amount of spent lead bullets in the berm face during the facilities 59- years of operation. The accumulation of lead was such that soil concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) residential and industrial worker regional screening levels (RSLs). The RSL threshold values are based on standardized exposure scenarios that estimate contaminant concentrations in soil that the USEPA considers protective of humans over a lifetime. For the SATA facility, lead was present in soil at concentrations that exceed both the current residential (400 mg/kg) and industrial (800 mg/kg) RSLs. In addition, the concentration of lead in the soil exceeded the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) (40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 261.24) regulatory limit. The TCLP analysis simulates landfill conditions and is designed to determine the mobility of contaminants in waste. In addition, a principal threat source material (PTSM) evaluation, human health risk assessment (HHRA), and contaminant migration (CM) analysis were conducted to evaluate soil contamination at the SATA SEA. This evaluation determined that there were no contaminants present that constitute PTSM and the CM analysis revealed that no

  14. Development of the scenario-based training system to reduce hazards and prevent accidents during decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, KwanSeong; Choi, Jong-Won; Moon, JeiKwon; Choi, ByungSeon; Hyun, Dongjun; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, IkJune; Kim, GeunHo; Kang, ShinYoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Decommissioning of nuclear facilities has to be accomplished by assuring the safety of workers. Decommissioning workers need familiarization with working environments because working environment is under high radioactivity and work difficulty during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. On-the-job training of decommissioning works could effectively train decommissioning workers but this training approach could consume much costs and poor modifications of scenarios. The efficiency of virtual training system could be much better than that of physical training system. This paper was intended to develop the training system to prevent accidents for decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The requirements for the training system were drawn. The data management modules for the training system were designed. The training system of decommissioning workers was developed on the basis of virtual reality which is flexibly modified. The visualization and measurement in the training system were real-time done according as changes of the decommissioning scenario. It can be concluded that this training system enables the subject to improve his familiarization about working environments and to prevent accidents during decommissioning of nuclear facilities. In the end, the safety during decommissioning of nuclear facilities will be guaranteed under the principle of ALARA.

  15. Real-Time Simulation of Ship Impact for Crew Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    2003-01-01

    Real-time simulation of marine accidents and representation in a realistic, virtual environment may be an efficient way to train emergency procedures for ship?s crews and thus improve safety at sea. However, although various fast, simplified methods have been presented over the past decades...... be advantageous to use in other types of time simulation where it is desirable to switch between direct time integration and some other known, stabilized solution, without a major redesign of the program architecture....

  16. Addressing Army Aviation Collective Training Challenges with Simulators and Simulations Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Aptima, Inc. Technical Review by William Bickley, U.S. Army Research Institute Heather Priest-Walker, U.S. Army Research Institute...training challenges at home station and at Aviation Training Exercises. This report benefitted from the thoughtful comments of Drs. William Bickley and...environment, cockpit instrumentation, communications, weapons systems, gunnery environment, AH64 TADS , NVG (Night Vision Goggles) Simulation, EDMs

  17. Simulation training in neurosurgery: advances in education and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konakondla, Sanjay; Fong, Reginald; Schirmer, Clemens M

    2017-01-01

    The current simulation technology used for neurosurgical training leaves much to be desired. Significant efforts are thoroughly exhausted in hopes of developing simulations that translate to give learners the “real-life” feel. Though a respectable goal, this may not be necessary as the application for simulation in neurosurgical training may be most useful in early learners. The ultimate uniformly agreeable endpoint of improved outcome and patient safety drives these investments. We explore the development, availability, educational taskforces, cost burdens and the simulation advancements in neurosurgical training. The technologies can be directed at achieving early resident milestones placed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. We discuss various aspects of neurosurgery disciplines with specific technologic advances of simulation software. An overview of the scholarly landscape of the recent publications in the realm of medical simulation and virtual reality pertaining to neurologic surgery is provided. We analyze concurrent concept overlap between PubMed headings and provide a graphical overview of the associations between these terms. PMID:28765716

  18. Focusing the research agenda for simulation training visual system requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Charles J.

    2014-06-01

    Advances in the capabilities of the display-related technologies with potential uses in simulation training devices continue to occur at a rapid pace. Simultaneously, ongoing reductions in defense spending stimulate the services to push a higher proportion of training into ground-based simulators to reduce their operational costs. These two trends result in increased customer expectations and desires for more capable training devices, while the money available for these devices is decreasing. Thus, there exists an increasing need to improve the efficiency of the acquisition process and to increase the probability that users get the training devices they need at the lowest practical cost. In support of this need the IDEAS program was initiated in 2010 with the goal of improving display system requirements associated with unmet user needs and expectations and disrupted acquisitions. This paper describes a process of identifying, rating, and selecting the design parameters that should receive research attention. Analyses of existing requirements documents reveal that between 40 and 50 specific design parameters (i.e., resolution, contrast, luminance, field of view, frame rate, etc.) are typically called out for the acquisition of a simulation training display system. Obviously no research effort can address the effects of this many parameters. Thus, we developed a defensible strategy for focusing limited R&D resources on a fraction of these parameters. This strategy encompasses six criteria to identify the parameters most worthy of research attention. Examples based on display design parameters recommended by stakeholders are provided.

  19. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Dangerous Waste Training Plan (DWTP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    2000-03-29

    This Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) Dangerous Waste Training Plan (DWTP) applies to personnel who perform work at, or in support of WESF. The plan, along with the names of personnel, may be given to a regulatory agency inspector upon request. General workers, subcontractors, or visiting personnel who have not been trained in the management of dangerous wastes must be accompanied by an individual who meets the requirements of this training plan. Dangerous waste management includes handling, treatment, storage, and/or disposal of dangerous and/or mixed waste. Dangerous waste management units covered by this plan include: less-than-90-day accumulation area(s); pool cells 1-8 and 12 storage units; and process cells A-G storage units. This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the WESF permitted miscellaneous storage units and the Less-than-90-Day Accumulation Areas.

  20. Native American Technical Assistance and Training for Renewable Energy Resource Development and Electrical Generation Facilities Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. David Lester

    2008-10-17

    The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) will facilitate technical expertise and training of Native Americans in renewable energy resource development for electrical generation facilities, and distributed generation options contributing to feasibility studies, strategic planning and visioning. CERT will also provide information to Tribes on energy efficiency and energy management techniques.This project will provide facilitation and coordination of expertise from government agencies and private industries to interact with Native Americans in ways that will result in renewable energy resource development, energy efficiency program development, and electrical generation facilities management by Tribal entities. The intent of this cooperative agreement is to help build capacity within the Tribes to manage these important resources.

  1. Native American Technical Assistance and Training for Renewable Energy Resource Development and Electrical Generation Facilities Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. David Lester

    2008-10-17

    The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) will facilitate technical expertise and training of Native Americans in renewable energy resource development for electrical generation facilities, and distributed generation options contributing to feasibility studies, strategic planning and visioning. CERT will also provide information to Tribes on energy efficiency and energy management techniques.This project will provide facilitation and coordination of expertise from government agencies and private industries to interact with Native Americans in ways that will result in renewable energy resource development, energy efficiency program development, and electrical generation facilities management by Tribal entities. The intent of this cooperative agreement is to help build capacity within the Tribes to manage these important resources.

  2. Astronaut Neil Armstrong participates in lunar surface simulation training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), participates in lunar surface simulation training on April 18, 1969 in bldg 9, Manned Spacecraft Center. Armstrong is the prime crew commander of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. Here, he is standing on Lunar Module mockup foot pad preparing to ascend steps.

  3. Disaster Medicine Training Through Simulations for Fourth-Year Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, Marc G.; Cowan, Michael L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of a six-day multiple-simulation exercise in the military disaster medical services training program of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences is described. It is the second part of a clerkship that includes a classroom/laboratory phase using a disaster problem-solving board game. (MSE)

  4. TACOP : A cognitive agent for a naval training simulation environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doesburg, W.A. van; Heuvelink, A.; Broek, E.L. van den

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes how cognitive modeling can be exploited in the design of software agents that support naval training sessions. The architecture, specifications, and embedding of the cognitive agent in a simulation environment are described. Subsequently, the agent's functioning was evaluated in

  5. Simulation of spinal nerve blocks for training anesthesiology residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blezek, Daniel J.; Robb, Richard A.; Camp, Jon J.; Nauss, Lee A.; Martin, David P.

    1998-06-01

    Deep nerve regional anesthesiology procedures, such as the celiac plexus block, are challenging to learn. The current training process primarily involves studying anatomy and practicing needle insertion is cadavers. Unfortunately, the training often continues on the first few patients subjected to the care of the new resident. To augment the training, we have developed a virtual reality surgical simulation designed to provide an immersive environment in which an understanding of the complex 3D relationships among the anatomic structures involved can be obtained and the mechanics of the celiac block procedure practiced under realistic conditions. Study of the relevant anatomy is provided by interactive 3D visualization of patient specific data nd the practice simulated using a head mounted display, a 6 degree of freedom tracker, and a haptic feedback device simulating the needle insertion. By training in a controlled environment, the resident may practice procedures repeatedly without the risks associated with actual patient procedures, and may become more adept and confident in the ability to perform nerve blocks. The resident may select a variety of different nerve block procedures to practice, and may place the virtual patient in any desired position and orientation. The preliminary anatomic models used in the simulation have been computed from the Visible Human Male; however, patient specific models may be generated from patient image data, allowing the physician to evaluate, plan, and practice difficult blocks and/or understand variations in anatomy before attempting the procedure on any specific patient.

  6. Virtual Reality: Toward Fundamental Improvements in Simulation-Based Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Richard A.; Mattoon, Joseph S.

    1994-01-01

    Considers the role and effectiveness of virtual reality in simulation-based training. The theoretical and practical implications of verity, integration, and natural versus artificial interface are discussed; a three-dimensional classification scheme for virtual reality is described; and the relationship between virtual reality and other…

  7. The Effect of Simulation Training on the Performance of Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    In December, 2005, the Air Force Auditing Agency conducted an interview of 282 nurses and physicians stationed in Iraq. The majority of the nurses from the interview reported they were not prepared to care for critically injured soldiers. This study investigated whether a new training technology, using scenario-based simulations, could improve…

  8. Visuospatial Ability Factors and Performance Variables in Laparoscopic Simulator Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Verwey, Willem B.; Burie, Remke

    2012-01-01

    Visuospatial ability has been shown to be important to several aspects of laparoscopic performance, including simulator training. Only a limited subset of visuospatial ability factors however has been investigated in such studies. Tests for different visuospatial ability factors differ in stimulus complexity, in their emphasis on identifying…

  9. Visuospatial ability factors and performance variables in laparoscopic simulator training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luursema, J.-M.; Verwey, W.B.; Burie, R.

    2012-01-01

    Visuospatial ability has been shown to be important to several aspects of laparoscopic performance, including simulator training. Only a limited subset of visuospatial ability factors however has been investigated in such studies. Tests for different visuospatial ability factors differ in stimulus c

  10. 14 CFR 142.59 - Flight simulators and flight training devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight simulators and flight training... Equipment Requirements § 142.59 Flight simulators and flight training devices. (a) An applicant for, or holder of, a training center certificate must show that each flight simulator and flight training device...

  11. An augmented reality haptic training simulator for spinal needle procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Colin; Hashtrudi-Zaad, Keyvan; Sellens, Rick; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Mousavi, Parvin

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the prototype for an augmented reality haptic simulation system with potential for spinal needle insertion training. The proposed system is composed of a torso mannequin, a MicronTracker2 optical tracking system, a PHANToM haptic device, and a graphical user interface to provide visual feedback. The system allows users to perform simulated needle insertions on a physical mannequin overlaid with an augmented reality cutaway of patient anatomy. A tissue model based on a finite-element model provides force during the insertion. The system allows for training without the need for the presence of a trained clinician or access to live patients or cadavers. A pilot user study demonstrates the potential and functionality of the system.

  12. Retention of Mastoidectomy Skills After Virtual Reality Simulation Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts; Konge, Lars; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Sørensen, Mads Sølvsten

    2016-07-01

    The ultimate goal of surgical training is consolidated skills with a consistently high performance. However, surgical skills are heterogeneously retained and depend on a variety of factors, including the task, cognitive demands, and organization of practice. Virtual reality (VR) simulation is increasingly being used in surgical skills training, including temporal bone surgery, but there is a gap in knowledge on the retention of mastoidectomy skills after VR simulation training. To determine the retention of mastoidectomy skills after VR simulation training with distributed and massed practice and to investigate participants' cognitive load during retention procedures. A prospective 3-month follow-up study of a VR simulation trial was conducted from February 6 to September 19, 2014, at an academic teaching hospital among 36 medical students: 19 from a cohort trained with distributed practice and 17 from a cohort trained with massed practice. Participants performed 2 virtual mastoidectomies in a VR simulator a mean of 3.2 months (range, 2.4-5.0 months) after completing initial training with 12 repeated procedures. Practice blocks were spaced apart in time (distributed), or all procedures were performed in 1 day (massed). Performance of the virtual mastoidectomy as assessed by 2 masked senior otologists using a modified Welling scale, as well as cognitive load as estimated by reaction time to perform a secondary task. Among 36 participants, mastoidectomy final-product skills were largely retained at 3 months (mean change in score, 0.1 points; P = .89) regardless of practice schedule, but the group trained with massed practice took more time to complete the task. The performance of the massed practice group increased significantly from the first to the second retention procedure (mean change, 1.8 points; P = .001), reflecting that skills were less consolidated. For both groups, increases in reaction times in the secondary task (distributed practice group: mean

  13. In situ simulation training for neonatal resuscitation: an RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Gurung, Sophie; Putet, Guy; Touzet, Sandrine; Gauthier-Moulinier, Hélène; Jordan, Isabelle; Beissel, Anne; Labaune, Jean-Marc; Blanc, Sébastien; Amamra, Nassira; Balandras, Catherine; Rudigoz, René-Charles; Colin, Cyrille; Picaud, Jean-Charles

    2014-09-01

    High-fidelity simulation is an effective tool in teaching neonatal resuscitation skills to professionals. We aimed to determine whether in situ simulation training (for ∼80% of the delivery room staff) improved neonatal resuscitation performed by the staff at maternities. A baseline evaluation of 12 maternities was performed: a random sample of 10 professionals in each unit was presented with 2 standardized scenarios played on a neonatal high-fidelity simulator. The medical procedures were video recorded for later assessments. The 12 maternities were then randomly assigned to receive the intervention (a 4-hour simulation training session delivered in situ for multidisciplinary groups of 6 professionals) or not receive it. All maternities were evaluated again at 3 months after the intervention. The videos were assessed by 2 neonatologists blinded to the pre-/postintervention as well as to the intervention/control groups. The performance was assessed using a technical score and a team score. After intervention, the median technical score was significantly higher for scenarios 1 and 2 for the intervention group compared with the control group (P = .01 and 0.004, respectively), the median team score was significantly higher (P 90 per minute at 3 minutes improved significantly (P = .003), and the number of hazardous events decreased significantly (P < .001). In situ simulation training with multidisciplinary teams can effectively improve technical skills and teamwork in neonatal resuscitation. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Need for simulation in laparoscopic colorectal surgery training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valerio; Celentano

    2015-01-01

    The dissemination of laparoscopic colorectal surgery(LCS) has been slow despite increasing evidence for the clinical benefits, with a prolonged learning curve being one of the main restrictions for a prompt uptake. Performing advanced laparoscopic procedures requires dedicated surgical skills and new simulation methods designed precisely for LCS have been established: These include virtual reality simulators, box trainers, animal andhuman tissue and synthetic materials. Studies have even demonstrated an improvement in trainees’ laparoscopic skills in the actual operating room and a staged approach to surgical simulation with a combination of various training methods should be mandatory in every colorectal training program. The learning curve for LCS could be reduced through practice and skills development in a riskfree setting.

  15. Airway management education: simulation based training versus non-simulation based training-A systematic review and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanxia; Pan, Chuxiong; Li, Tianzuo; Gan, Tong J

    2017-02-01

    Simulation-based training (SBT) has become a standard for medical education. However, the efficacy of simulation based training in airway management education remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate all published evidence comparing the effectiveness of SBT for airway management versus non-simulation based training (NSBT) on learner and patient outcomes. Systematic review with meta-analyses were used. Data were derived from PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from inception to May 2016. Published comparative trials that evaluated the effect of SBT on airway management training in compared with NSBT were considered. The effect sizes with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for outcomes measures. Seventeen eligible studies were included. SBT was associated with improved behavior performance [standardized mean difference (SMD):0.30, 95% CI: 0.06 to 0.54] in comparison with NSBT. However, the benefits of SBT were not seen in time-skill (SMD:-0.13, 95% CI: -0.82 to 0.52), written examination score (SMD: 0.39, 95% CI: -0.09 to 0.86) and success rate of procedure completion on patients [relative risk (RR): 1.26, 95% CI: 0.96 to 1.66]. SBT may be not superior to NSBT on airway management training.

  16. Combination of Neural Networks and Fuzzy Clustering Algorithm to Evalution Training Simulation-Based Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lida Pourjafar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement of computer technology, computer simulation in the field of education are more realistic and more effective. The definition of simulation is to create a virtual environment that accurately and real experiences to improve the individual. So Simulation Based Training is the ability to improve, replace, create or manage a real experience and training in a virtual mode. Simulation Based Training also provides large amounts of information to learn, so use data mining techniques to process information in the case of education can be very useful. So here we used data mining to examine the impact of simulation-based training. The database created in cooperation with relevant institutions, including 17 features. To study the effect of selected features, LDA method and Pearson's correlation coefficient was used along with genetic algorithm. Then we use fuzzy clustering to produce fuzzy system and improved it using Neural Networks. The results showed that the proposed method with reduced dimensions have 3% better than other methods.

  17. Developing a Field Artillery Training System Based on Devices and Simulations: Evaluation of Training Devices and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    development of a recoil simulator be given the highest priority due to its potential in training to prevent serious injury from a recoiling howitzer. In...those that are not cued by the equipment or previous steps. The implication here is to " overtrain " those tasks or steps most likely to be forgotten

  18. Methods for using computer training facilities in studies of special disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.L. Tashlykov

    2016-12-01

    The use of the analytical simulator is illustrated by a laboratory research project entitled “BN-800 Reactor Power Maneuvering”, which investigates the reactor facility power control modes in a power range of 100–80–100% of the rated power.

  19. Naval electronic warfare simulation for effectiveness assessment and softkill programmability facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lançon, F.

    2011-06-01

    The Anti-ship Missile (ASM) threat to be faced by ships will become more diverse and difficult. Intelligence, rules of engagement constraints, fast reaction-time for effective softkill solution require specific tools to design Electronic Warfare (EW) systems and to integrate it onboard ship. SAGEM Company provides decoy launcher system [1] and its associated Naval Electronic Warfare Simulation tool (NEWS) to permit softkill effectiveness analysis for anti-ship missile defence. NEWS tool generates virtual environment for missile-ship engagement and counter-measure simulator over a wide spectrum: RF, IR, EO. It integrates EW Command & Control (EWC2) process which is implemented in decoy launcher system and performs Monte-Carlo batch processing to evaluate softkill effectiveness in different engagement situations. NEWS is designed to allow immediate EWC2 process integration from simulation to real decoy launcher system. By design, it allows the final operator to be able to program, test and integrate its own EWC2 module and EW library onboard, so intelligence of each user is protected and evolution of threat can be taken into account through EW library update. The objectives of NEWS tool are also to define a methodology for trial definition and trial data reduction. Growth potential would permit to design new concept for EWC2 programmability and real time effectiveness estimation in EW system. This tool can also be used for operator training purpose. This paper presents the architecture design, the softkill programmability facility concept and the flexibility for onboard integration on ship. The concept of this operationally focused simulation, which is to use only one tool for design, development, trial validation and operational use, will be demonstrated.

  20. Simulator Training Requirements and Effectiveness Study (STRES): Future Research Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    simulation technology. The AFHRL/OT program, using the ASPT and SAAC devices, is already embarked on an extensive visual technology research effort, one...facilities that would be required to conduct the research described. In some cases, specific research devices are mentioned, such as ASPT , SAAC, and the...configuration of a particular device cannot be foreseen at this point (e.g., the ASPT might have a variety of possible specific cockpit configurations), no

  1. Creating virtual humans for simulation-based training and planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stansfield, S.; Sobel, A.

    1998-05-12

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a distributed, high fidelity simulation system for training and planning small team Operations. The system provides an immersive environment populated by virtual objects and humans capable of displaying complex behaviors. The work has focused on developing the behaviors required to carry out complex tasks and decision making under stress. Central to this work are techniques for creating behaviors for virtual humans and for dynamically assigning behaviors to CGF to allow scenarios without fixed outcomes. Two prototype systems have been developed that illustrate these capabilities: MediSim, a trainer for battlefield medics and VRaptor, a system for planning, rehearsing and training assault operations.

  2. Pedestrian choice behavior analysis and simulation of vertical walking facilities in transfer station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Xing; Jia, Hong-Fei; Li, Jun; Zhou, Ya-Nan; Yuan, Zhi-Lu; Li, Yan-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    Considering the interlayer height, luggage, the difference between queuing pedestrians, and walking speed, the pedestrian choice model of vertical walking facilities is established based on a support vector machine. This model is verified with the pedestrian flow data of Changchun light-rail transfer station and Beijing Xizhimen transfer station. Adding the pedestrian choice model of vertical walking facilities into the pedestrian simulation model which is based on cellular automata, the pedestrian choice behavior is simulated. In the simulation, the effects of the dynamic influence factors are analyzed. To reduce the conflicts between pedestrians in opposite directions, the layout of vertical walking facilities is improved. The simulations indicate that the improved layout of vertical walking facilities can improve the efficiency of pedestrians passing. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51278221 and 51378076) and the Science Technology Development Project of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 20140204027SF).

  3. Simulator sickness in a helicopter flight training school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Catherine M; Bass, Julie M; Johnson, David M; Kelley, Amanda M; Martin, Christopher R; Wildzunas, Robert M

    2009-06-01

    Simulator sickness (SS) is a common problem during flight training and can affect both instructor pilots (IP) and student pilots (SP). This study was conducted in response to complaints about a high incidence of SS associated with use of new simulators for rotary-wing aircraft. The problem was evaluated using the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ) to collect data on 73 IP and 129 SP who used the new simulators. Based on analysis of these data, operator comments, and a search of the literature, we recommended limiting simulator flights to 2 h, removing unusual or unnatural maneuvers, turning off the sidescreens to reduce the field-of-view, avoiding use of improperly calibrated simulators until repaired, and stressing proper rest and health discipline among the pilots. The success of these measures was evaluated 1 yr later by collecting SSQ data on 25 IP and 50 SP. There was a main effect of time, in that after the recommendations were implemented, there was a significant reduction in nausea, oculomotor, and total SSQ scores from the pre-study to the post-study. There was also a main effect of experience, as IP reported significantly greater SS than SP for the same scores. Implementation of the recommendations reduced SS in the new simulators at the cost of limiting session duration and shutting down some simulator features. Although the optimal solution to the SS problem lies in addressing SS during a simulator's design stage, these recommendations can be used as interim solutions to reduce SS.

  4. Vertical flight training: An overview of training and flight simulator technology with emphasis on rotary-wing requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, Thomas S.; Ascencio-Lee, Carmen E.; Bray, Richard; Carlton, John; Dohme, Jack; Eshow, Michelle M.; Francis, Stephen; Lee, Owen M.; Lintern, Gavan; Lombardo, David A.

    1994-01-01

    The principal purpose of this publication is to provide a broad overview of the technology that is relevant to the design of aviation training systems and of the techniques applicable to the development, use, and evaluation of those systems. The issues addressed in our 11 chapters are, for the most part, those that would be expected to surface in any informed discussion of the major characterizing elements of aviation training systems. Indeed, many of the same facets of vertical-flight training discussed were recognized and, to some extent, dealt with at the 1991 NASA/FAA Helicopter Simulator Workshop. These generic topics are essential to a sound understanding of training and training systems, and they quite properly form the basis of any attempt to systematize the development and evaluation of more effective, more efficient, more productive, and more economical approaches to aircrew training. Individual chapters address the following topics: an overview of the vertical flight industry: the source of training requirements; training and training schools: meeting current requirements; training systems design and development; transfer of training and cost-effectiveness; the military quest for flight training effectiveness; alternative training systems; training device manufacturing; simulator aero model implementation; simulation validation in the frequency domain; cockpit motion in helicopter simulation; and visual space perception in flight simulators.

  5. Availability simulation software adaptation to the IFMIF accelerator facility RAMI analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Bargalló Font, Enric; Sureda, Pere Joan; Arroyo Macias, José Manuel; Abal López, Javier; Blas Del Hoyo, Alfredo de; Dies Llovera, Javier; Tapia Fernández, Carlos; Mollá Lorente, Joaquin; Ibarra Sanchez, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Several problems were found when using generic reliability tools to perform RAM! (Reliability Availability Maintainability Inspectability) studies for the IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) accelerator. A dedicated simulation tool was necessary to model properly the complexity of the accelerator facility.; AvailSim, the availability simulation software used for the International Linear Collider (ILC) became an excellent option to fulfill RAMI analyses needs. Neverthel...

  6. A real-time simulation facility for advanced digital guidance and control system research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, W. H.; Downing, D. R.; Ostroff, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    A real-time simulation facility built at NASA's Langley Research Center to support digital guidance and control research and development activities is examined. The unit has recently been used to develop autoland systems for VTOL. The paper describes the autoland experiment and the flight environment, the simulation facility hardware and software, and presents typical simulation data to illustrate the type of data analysis carried out during software development. Finally, flight data for a later version of the autoland system are presented to demonstrate the simulation's capability to predict overall system behavior.

  7. [Training for real: simulation, team-training and communication to improve trauma management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happel, Oliver; Papenfuss, Tim; Kranke, Peter

    2010-06-01

    The focus on the role of non-technical skills such as communication, dynamic decision making, situational awareness and teamwork in emergency medicine has gained importance over the past few years. Especially during time-critical and complex treatment of severely injured patients in a multidisciplinary and interprofessional trauma-team these factors play an important role for patient-safety and process optimization and are a key factor influencing the perceived quality of a given scenario by the team members. Thus, apart from medical expertise and technical excellence of single actors within a trauma team, non-technical skills need to be incorporated in trainings for trauma management. For the improvement of non-technical skills, particularly team communication and teamwork, a simulator-based training represents a valuable tool. The technical performance of portable manikin-based simulators has improved tremendously during the last decade, which facilitates realistic and true-to-life multidisciplinary team-training in trauma management.

  8. The surgical ensemble: choreography as a simulation and training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satava, Richard M; Hunter, Anne Marie

    2011-09-01

    Team training and interprofessional training have recently emerged as critical new simulations that enhance performance by coordinating communication, leadership, professional, and, to a certain extent, technical skills. In describing these new training tools, the term choreography has been loosely used, but no critical appraisal of the role of the science of choreography has been applied to a surgical procedure. By analogy, the surgical team, including anesthetists, surgeons, nurses, and technicians, constitutes a complete ensemble, whose physical actions and interactions constitute the "performance of surgery." There are very specific "elements" (tools) that are basic to choreography, such as space, timing, rhythm, energy, cues, transitions, and especially rehearsal. This review explores whether such a metaphor is appropriate and the possibility of applying the science of choreography to the surgical team in the operating theater.

  9. SIDH: A Game-Based Architecture for a Training Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Backlund

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Game-based simulators, sometimes referred to as “lightweight” simulators, have benefits such as flexible technology and economic feasibility. In this article, we extend the notion of a game-based simulator by introducing multiple screen view and physical interaction. These features are expected to enhance immersion and fidelity. By utilizing these concepts we have constructed a training simulator for breathing apparatus entry. Game hardware and software have been used to produce the application. More important, the application itself is deliberately designed to be a game. Indeed, one important design goal is to create an entertaining and motivating experience combined with learning goals in order to create a serious game. The system has been evaluated in cooperation with the Swedish Rescue Services Agency to see which architectural features contribute to perceived fidelity. The modes of visualization and interaction as well as level design contribute to the usefulness of the system.

  10. Waste Tank Size Determination for the Hanford River Protection Project Cold Test, Training, and Mockup Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Yasuo; Wells, Beric E.; Kuhn, William L.

    2001-03-30

    The objective of the study was to determine the minimum tank size for the Cold Test Facility process testing of Hanford tank waste. This facility would support retrieval of waste in 75-ft-diameter DSTs with mixer pumps and SSTs with fluidic mixers. The cold test model will use full-scale mixer pumps, transfer pumps, and equipment with simulated waste. The study evaluated the acceptability of data for a range of tank diameters and depths and included identifying how the test data would be extrapolated to predict results for a full-size tank.

  11. The emerging role of screen based simulators in the training and assessment of colonoscopists

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Morven; Fernando, Bimbi; Berlingieri, Pasquale

    2010-01-01

    Incorporation of screen based simulators into medical training has recently gained momentum, as advances in technology have coincided with a government led drive to increase the use of medical simulation training to improve patient safety with progressive reductions in working hours available for junior doctors to train. High fidelity screen based simulators hold great appeal for endoscopy training. Potentially, their incorporation into endoscopy training curricula could enhance speed of acqu...

  12. Simulation Modeling of a Facility Layout in Operations Management Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Hulya Julie

    2006-01-01

    Teaching quantitative courses can be challenging. Similarly, layout modeling and lean production concepts can be difficult to grasp in an introductory OM (operations management) class. This article describes a simulation model developed in PROMODEL to facilitate the learning of layout modeling and lean manufacturing. Simulation allows for the…

  13. Simulation Modeling of a Facility Layout in Operations Management Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Hulya Julie

    2006-01-01

    Teaching quantitative courses can be challenging. Similarly, layout modeling and lean production concepts can be difficult to grasp in an introductory OM (operations management) class. This article describes a simulation model developed in PROMODEL to facilitate the learning of layout modeling and lean manufacturing. Simulation allows for the…

  14. Web-based VR training simulator for percutaneous rhizotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Brodlie, K; Phillips, N

    2000-01-01

    Virtual Reality offers great potential for surgical training--yet is typically limited by the dedicated and expensive equipment required. Web-based VR has the potential to offer a much cheaper alternative, in which simulations of fundamental techniques are downloaded from a server to run within a web browser. The equipment requirement is modest--an Internet-connected PC or small workstation--and the simulation can be accessed worldwide. In a collaboration between computer scientists and neurosurgeons, we have studied the use of web-based VR to train neurosurgeons in Percutaneous Rhizotomy--a treatment for the intractable facial pain which occurs in trigeminal neuralgia. This involves the insertion of a needle so as to puncture the foramen ovale, and lesion the nerve. Our simulation uses VRML to provide a 3D visualization environment, but the work immediately exposes a key limitation of VRML for surgical simulation. VRML does not support collision detection between objects--only between viewpoint and object. Thus collision between needle and skull cannot be detected and fed back to the trainee. We have developed a novel solution in which the training simulation has linked views: a normal view, plus a view as seen from the tip of the needle. Collision detection is captured in the needle view, and fed back to the viewer. A happy consequence of this approach has been the chance to aid the trainee with this additional view from needle tip, which helps locate the foramen ovale. The technology to achieve this is Java software communicating with the VRML worlds through the External Authoring Interface (EAI). The training simulator is available on the Web, with accompanying tutorial on its use. A major advantage of web-based VR is that the techniques generalize to a whole range of surgical simulations. Thus we have been able to use exactly the same approach as described above for neurosurgery, to develop a shoulder arthroscopy simulator--where again collision detection, and

  15. Simulation training for residents focused on mechanical ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spadaro, Savino; Karbing, Dan Stieper; Fogagnolo, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    to lag. High-fidelity simulation with a mannequin allows students to interact in lifelike situations; this may be a valuable addition to traditional didactic teaching. The purpose of this study is to compare computer-based and mannequin-based approaches for training residents on MV. METHODS......: This prospective randomized single-blind trial involved 50 residents. All participants attended the same didactic lecture on respiratory pathophysiology and were subsequently randomized into two groups: the mannequin group (n = 25) and the computer screenbased simulator group (n = 25). One week later, each...

  16. RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) personnel training guidance manual for owners or operators of hazardous-waste-management facilities. Draft report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    The manual provides guidance to an audience consisting of owners or operators of hazardous waste-management facilities and also regulatory personnel responsible for facility permitting. Information is provided concerning general training strategies and program design, types of training, training modules pertinent to hazardous-waste management, suggested training module elements, and sources of information.

  17. Master Training in Radiological Protection Facilities Radioactive and Nuclear; Formacion de Master en Proteccion Radiologica en Instalaciones Radiactivas y Nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdu, G.; Mayo, P.; Campayo, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    The master includes general aspects of radiation protection in nuclear facilities. also an advanced module to acquire a high level training highlights as nuclear decommissioning, shielding calculation using advanced codes, particle accelerators, international law, etc.

  18. Visuo-spatial ability in colonoscopy simulator training

    OpenAIRE

    Luursema, J.-M.; Buzink, S.N.; Verwey, W.B.; Jakimowicz, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Visuo-spatial ability is associated with a quality of performance in a variety of surgical and medical skills. However, visuo-spatial ability is typically assessed using Visualization tests only, which led to an incomplete understanding of the involvement of visuo-spatial ability in these skills. To remedy this situation, the current study investigated the role of a broad range of visuo-spatial factors in colonoscopy simulator training. Fifteen medical trainees (no clinical experience in colo...

  19. Characterisation of the TRIUMF neutron facility using a Monte Carlo simulation code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, S D; Abram, T; Joyce, M J

    2015-04-01

    Here, the characterisation of the high-energy neutron field at TRIUMF (The Tri Universities Meson Facility, Vancouver, British Columbia) with Monte Carlo simulation software is described. The package used is MCNPX version 2.6.0, with the neutron fluence rate determined at three locations within the TRIUMF Thermal Neutron Facility (TNF), including the exit of the neutron channel where users of the facility can test devices that may be susceptible to the effects of this form of radiation. The facility is often used to roughly emulate the field likely to be encountered at high altitudes due to radiation of galactic origin and thus the simulated information is compared with the energy spectrum calculated to be due to neutron radiation of cosmic origin at typical aircraft altitudes. The calculated values were also compared with neutron flux measurements that were estimated using the activation of various foils by the staff of the facility, showing agreement within an order of magnitude.

  20. A Review of Simulators with Haptic Devices for Medical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Castillejos, David; Noguez, Julieta; Neri, Luis; Magana, Alejandra; Benes, Bedrich

    2016-04-01

    Medical procedures often involve the use of the tactile sense to manipulate organs or tissues by using special tools. Doctors require extensive preparation in order to perform them successfully; for example, research shows that a minimum of 750 operations are needed to acquire sufficient experience to perform medical procedures correctly. Haptic devices have become an important training alternative and they have been considered to improve medical training because they let users interact with virtual environments by adding the sense of touch to the simulation. Previous articles in the field state that haptic devices enhance the learning of surgeons compared to current training environments used in medical schools (corpses, animals, or synthetic skin and organs). Consequently, virtual environments use haptic devices to improve realism. The goal of this paper is to provide a state of the art review of recent medical simulators that use haptic devices. In particular we focus on stitching, palpation, dental procedures, endoscopy, laparoscopy, and orthopaedics. These simulators are reviewed and compared from the viewpoint of used technology, the number of degrees of freedom, degrees of force feedback, perceived realism, immersion, and feedback provided to the user. In the conclusion, several observations per area and suggestions for future work are provided.

  1. Designing a Digital Medical Management Training Simulator Using Distributed Cognition Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Rybing, Jonas; Prytz, Erik; Hornwall, Johan; Nilsson, Helene; Jonson, Carl-Oscar; Bång, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Background Training of medical professionals is important to improve care during mass-causality events. Therefore, it is essential to extend knowledge on how to design valid and usable simulation-based training environments. Purpose This article investigates how distributed cognition and simulation theory concepts can guide design of simulation-based training environments. We present the design and user evaluation of DigEmergo, a simulator for training and assessing emergency medicine managem...

  2. 14 CFR 125.297 - Approval of flight simulators and flight training devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Approval of flight simulators and flight... Flight Crewmember Requirements § 125.297 Approval of flight simulators and flight training devices. (a) Flight simulators and flight training devices approved by the Administrator may be used in training...

  3. Monte Carlo simulations for design of the KFUPM PGNAA facility

    CERN Document Server

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; Kidwai, S

    2003-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to design a 2.8 MeV neutron-based prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) setup for elemental analysis of cement samples. The elemental analysis was carried out using prompt gamma rays produced through capture of thermal neutrons in sample nuclei. The basic design of the PGNAA setup consists of a cylindrical cement sample enclosed in a cylindrical high-density polyethylene moderator placed between a neutron source and a gamma ray detector. In these simulations the predominant geometrical parameters of the PGNAA setup were optimized, including moderator size, sample size and shielding of the detector. Using the results of the simulations, an experimental PGNAA setup was then fabricated at the 350 kV Accelerator Laboratory of this University. The design calculations were checked experimentally through thermal neutron flux measurements inside the PGNAA moderator. A test prompt gamma ray spectrum of the PGNAA setup was also acquired from a Portland cement samp...

  4. A Healthy Investment: Building the Facilities to Train the Next Generation of Nursing and Allied Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Bob

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of community colleges are investing in new facilities and programs to train health care workers in a variety of professions, including nursing, radiology, health information technology, physical therapy, dentistry, and surgical technology. Community colleges have historically offered job training programs in health care, but with…

  5. A Healthy Investment: Building the Facilities to Train the Next Generation of Nursing and Allied Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Bob

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of community colleges are investing in new facilities and programs to train health care workers in a variety of professions, including nursing, radiology, health information technology, physical therapy, dentistry, and surgical technology. Community colleges have historically offered job training programs in health care, but with…

  6. Adherence and perceptions regarding simulation training in undergraduate health Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Perpétuo Elias

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Simulation techniques are spreading rapidly in medicine. Suc h resources are increasingly concentrated in Simulation Laboratories. The MSRP-USP is structuring such a laboratory and is interested in the prevalence of individual initiatives that could be centralized there. The MSRP-USP currently has five full-curriculum courses in the health sciences: Medicine, Speech Therapy, Physical Therapy, Nutrition, and Occupational Therapy, all consisting of core disciplines. GOAL: To determine the prevalence of simulation techniques in the regular courses at MSRP-USP. METHODS: Coordinators of disciplines in the various courses were interviewed using a specifically designed semi-structured questionnaire, and all the collected data were stored in a dedicated database. The disciplines were grouped according to whether they used (GI or did not use (GII simulation resources. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: 256 disciplines were analyzed, of which only 18.3% used simulation techniques, varying according to course: Medicine (24.7.3%, Occupational Therapy (23.0%, Nutrition (15.9%, Physical Therapy (9.8%, and Speech Therapy (9.1%. Computer simulation programs predominated (42.5% in all five courses. The resources were provided mainly by MSRP-USP (56.3%, with additional funding coming from other sources based on individual initiatives. The same pattern was observed for maintenance. There was great interest in centralizing the resources in the new Simulation Laboratory in order to facilitate maintenance, but there was concern about training and access to the material. CONCLUSIONS: 1 The MSRP-USP simulation resources show low complexity and are mainly limited to computer programs; 2 Use of simulation varies according to course, and is most prevalent in Medicine; 3 Resources are scattered across several locations, and their acquisition and maintenance depend on individual initiatives rather than central coordination or curricular guidelines

  7. A Dynamical Training and Design Simulator for Active Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Dumont

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the design of an active multi-link micro-catheter actuated by Shape Memory Alloy (SMA micro actuators. This may be a response to one medical major demand on such devices, which will be useful for surgical explorations and interventions. In this paper, we focus on a training and design simulator dedicated to such catheters. This simulator is based on an original simulation platform (OpenMASK. The catheter is a robotic system, which is evaluated by a dynamical simulation addressing a navigation task in its environment. The design of the prototype and its mechanical model are presented. We develop an interaction model for contact. This model uses a real medical database for which distance cartography is proposed. Then we focus on an autonomous control model based on a multi-agent approach and including the behaviour description of the SMA actuators. Results of mechanical simulations including interaction with the ducts are presented. Furthermore, the interest of such a simulator is presented by applying virtual prototyping techniques for the design optimization. This optimization process is achieved by using genetic algorithms at different stages with respect to the specified task.

  8. Dryden Fllight Reseach Facility, Edwards, California STA (Shuttle Training Aircraft, Gulf Stream II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Dryden Fllight Reseach Facility, Edwards, California STA (Shuttle Training Aircraft, Gulf Stream II) flys chase as STS-41returns from it's mission to Deploy Ulysses Spacecraft... Discovery's main gear is about to touch down at Edwards Air Foce Base to end a four-day mission in space for it's five-man crew. The vehicle landed at 6:57 a.m. Onboard the spacecraft were Astronauts Richard N. Richards, Robert D Cabana, William M Sheperd, Bruce E. Melnick and Thomas D. Akers.

  9. Validation of a realistic simulator for veterinary gastrointestinal endoscopy training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usón-Gargallo, Jesús; Usón-Casaús, Jesús M; Pérez-Merino, Eva M; Soria-Gálvez, Federico; Morcillo, Esther; Enciso, Silvia; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the face, content, and construct validity of a new realistic composite simulator (Simuldog) used to provide training in canine gastrointestinal flexible endoscopy. The basic endoscopic procedures performed on the simulator were esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), gastric biopsy (GB), and gastric foreign body removal (FBR). Construct validity was assessed by comparing the performance of novices (final-year veterinary students and recent graduates without endoscopic experience, n=30) versus experienced subjects (doctors in veterinary medicine who had performed more than 50 clinical upper gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures as a surgeon, n=15). Tasks were scored based on completion time, and specific rating scales were developed to assess performance. Internal consistency and inter-rater agreement were assessed. Face and content validity were determined using a 5-point Likert-type scale questionnaire. The novices needed considerably more time than the experts to perform EGD, GB, and FBR, and their performance scores were significantly lower (pendoscopy scenarios were very realistic. The experts highly valued the usefulness of Simuldog for veterinary training and as a tool for assessing endoscopic skills. Simuldog is the first validated model specifically developed to be used as a training tool for endoscopy techniques in small animals.

  10. Availability simulation software adaptation to the IFMIF accelerator facility RAMI analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargalló, Enric, E-mail: enric.bargallo-font@upc.edu [Fusion Energy Engineering Laboratory (FEEL), Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) Barcelona-Tech, Barcelona (Spain); Sureda, Pere Joan [Fusion Energy Engineering Laboratory (FEEL), Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) Barcelona-Tech, Barcelona (Spain); Arroyo, Jose Manuel [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión por Confinamiento Magnético – CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Abal, Javier; De Blas, Alfredo; Dies, Javier; Tapia, Carlos [Fusion Energy Engineering Laboratory (FEEL), Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) Barcelona-Tech, Barcelona (Spain); Mollá, Joaquín; Ibarra, Ángel [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión por Confinamiento Magnético – CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The reason why IFMIF RAMI analyses needs a simulation is explained. • Changes, modifications and software validations done to AvailSim are described. • First IFMIF RAMI results obtained with AvailSim 2.0 are shown. • Implications of AvailSim 2.0 in IFMIF RAMI analyses are evaluated. - Abstract: Several problems were found when using generic reliability tools to perform RAMI (Reliability Availability Maintainability Inspectability) studies for the IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) accelerator. A dedicated simulation tool was necessary to model properly the complexity of the accelerator facility. AvailSim, the availability simulation software used for the International Linear Collider (ILC) became an excellent option to fulfill RAMI analyses needs. Nevertheless, this software needed to be adapted and modified to simulate the IFMIF accelerator facility in a useful way for the RAMI analyses in the current design phase. Furthermore, some improvements and new features have been added to the software. This software has become a great tool to simulate the peculiarities of the IFMIF accelerator facility allowing obtaining a realistic availability simulation. Degraded operation simulation and maintenance strategies are the main relevant features. In this paper, the necessity of this software, main modifications to improve it and its adaptation to IFMIF RAMI analysis are described. Moreover, first results obtained with AvailSim 2.0 and a comparison with previous results is shown.

  11. Simulator-based crew resource management training for interhospital transfer of critically ill patients by a mobile ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droogh, Joep M; Kruger, Hanneke L; Ligtenberg, Jack J M; Zijlstra, Jan G

    2012-12-01

    Transporting critically ill ICU patients by standard ambulances, with or without an accompanying physician, imposes safety risks. In 2007 the Dutch Ministry of Public Health required that all critically ill patients transferred between ICUs in different hospitals be transported by a mobile ICU (MICU). Since March 2009 a specially designed MICU and a retrieval team have served the region near University Medical Center Groningen, in the northeastern region of the Netherlands. The MICU transport program includes simulator-based crew resource management (CRM) training for the intensivists and ICU nurses, who, with the drivers, constitute the MICU crews. Training entails five pivotal aspects: (1) preparation, (2) teamwork, (3) new equipment, (4) mobility, and (5) safety. For example, the training accustoms participants to working in the narrow, moving ambulance and without benefit of additional manpower. The scenario-based team training, which takes about four hours, occurs in a training facility, with its reconstructed ICU, and then in the MICU itself. A "wireless" patient simulator that is able to mimic hemodynamic and respiratory patterns and to simulate lung and heart sounds is used. All scenarios can be adjusted to simulate medical, logistic, or technical problems. Since the start of MICU training in 2009, more than 70 training sessions, involving 100 team members, have been conducted. Quality issues identified include failure to anticipate possible problems (such as failing to ask for intubation of a respiratory-compromised patient at intake); late responses to alarms of the ventilator, perfusor pump, or monitor; and not anticipating a possible shortage of medication. Setting up and implementing simulator-based CRM training provides feasible and helpful preparation for an MICU team.

  12. AFHRL/FT [Air Force Human Resources Laboratory/Flight Training] Capabilities in Undergraduate Pilot Training Simulation Research: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheny, W. G.; And Others

    The document presents a summary description of the Air Force Human Resource Laboratory's Flying Training Division (AFHRL/FT) research capabilities for undergraduate pilot training. One of the research devices investigated is the Advanced Simulator for Undergraduate Pilot Training (ASUPT). The equipment includes the ASUPT, the instrumented T-37…

  13. The Use of Simulation Training to Accelerate the Rate of Forward Ice Skating Skill Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan J Washington

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Australia’s interest and participation in ice hockey is increasing, however a lack of access to facilities means familiarity with this sport is limited, and so too is the facilitation of skill development within an ecologically valid context. Objective: While numerous methods may be employed to address this, one resource which remains relatively unexplored is the StrideDeck Treadmill, therefore the purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of this equipment with specific reference to the biomechanical changes for skating ability. Methods: N = 16 male athletes (Mage = 15.0 ± 0.76 yrs from a junior league competition participated in this intervention based study. n = 9 were assigned to the training intervention (StrideDeck once a week, while the control group (n = 7 continued their normal training routines. Further, monthly sprint tests both on the StrideDeck and an on-ice protocol were conducted to track progress via kinematic analysis. Results: Data analysis revealed no significant overall effects for on-ice sprint skating performance after StrideDeck training; however there were significant kinematic differences between StrideDeck and ice conditions. Conclusions: Therefore while the StrideDeck may have merit in regard to physiological paramters, the results of this study do not support its use as a skill acquisition tool in regard to increasing skating ability. Keywords: Simulation training, skill acquisition, treadmill, ice skating, ice hockey skating, ice skating stride

  14. Qualification requirements and training programs for nonreactor nuclear facility personnel in the Operations Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, E.L.; Culbert, W.H.; Baldwin, M.E.; McCormack, K.E.; Rivera, A.L.; Setaro, J.A.

    1985-11-01

    This document describes the program for training, retraining, and qualification of nonreactor nuclear operators in the Operations Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The objective of the program is to provide the Operators and Supervisors of nuclear facilities the knowledge and skills needed to perform assigned duties in a safe and efficient manner and to comply with US Department of Energy Order 5480.1A Chapter V. This order requires DOE nuclear facilities to maintain formal training programs for their operating staff and documentation of that training.

  15. The effect of self-directed virtual reality simulation on dissection training performance in mastoidectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts; Foghsgaard, Søren; Konge, Lars

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To establish the effect of self-directed virtual reality (VR) simulation training on cadaveric dissection training performance in mastoidectomy and the transferability of skills acquired in VR simulation training to the cadaveric dissection training setting. STUDY DESIGN......: Prospective study. METHODS: Two cohorts of 20 novice otorhinolaryngology residents received either self-directed VR simulation training before cadaveric dissection training or vice versa. Cadaveric and VR simulation performances were assessed using final-product analysis with three blinded expert raters....... RESULTS: The group receiving VR simulation training before cadaveric dissection had a mean final-product score of 14.9 (95 % confidence interval [CI] [12.9-16.9]) compared with 9.8 (95% CI [8.4-11.1]) in the group not receiving VR simulation training before cadaveric dissection. This 52% increase...

  16. 14 CFR 61.64 - Use of a flight simulator and flight training device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of a flight simulator and flight... Ratings and Pilot Authorizations § 61.64 Use of a flight simulator and flight training device. (a) Use of a flight simulator for the airplane rating. If an applicant uses a flight simulator for training or...

  17. Advanced Flight Simulator: Utilization in A-10 Conversion and Air-to-Surface Attack Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    CLASSIFIC.TION OF THIS PAGE(1Whl Data Emiterd) Item 20 (Continued) -" blocks of instruction on the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ). The first...training, the transfer of training from the ASPT to the A-10 is nearly 100 percent. therefore, in the early phases of AiS training, one simulator... ASPT ) could be suitably modified, an alternative to initially dangerous and expensive aircraft training would exist which also offered considerable

  18. Enhancing Job-Site Training of Supported Workers With Autism: A Reemphasis on Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Perry Lattimore, L; Parsons, Marsha B.; Reid, Dennis H; Ahearn, William

    2006-01-01

    Currently recommended practice in supported work emphasizes training job skills to workers with severe disabilities while on the job. Early behavioral research indicated that skills needed in natural environments could also be trained in simulated settings. We compared job-site plus simulation training for teaching job skills to supported workers with autism to provision of training exclusively on the job. Job-site training occurred in a small publishing company during the regular work routin...

  19. Assessment of Simulated Emergency Scenarios: Are Trained Observers Necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noveanu, Juliane; Amsler, Felix; Ummenhofer, Wolfgang; von Wyl, Thomas; Zuercher, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Simulation-based medical training is associated with superior educational outcomes and improved cost efficiency. Self- and peer-assessment may be a cost-effective and flexible alternative to expert-led assessment. We compared accuracy of self- and peer-assessment of untrained raters using basic evaluation tools to expert assessment using advanced validation tools including validated questionnaires and post hoc video-based analysis. Twenty-eight simulated emergency airway management scenarios were observed and video-recorded for further assessment. Participants consisted of 28 emergency physicians who were involved in four different airway management scenarios with different roles: One scenario as a team leader, one as an assisting team member, and two as an observer. Non-technical skills (NTS) and technical skills (TS) were analyzed by three independent groups: 1) the performing team (PT) consisted of the two emergency physicians acting either in the role of team leader or team member (self-assessment); 2) the observing team (OT), consisted of two of the participating emergency physicians not involved in the current clinical scenario (peer-assessment) and assessment occurred during (OT) or directly after (PT) the simulation without prior specific interpretational training but using standardized questionnaires; and 3) the expert team (ET) consisted of two specifically trained external observers (one psychologist and one emergency physician) using video-assisted objective assessment combined with standardized questionnaires. Intragroup reliability demonstrated by intra-class correlation (ICC) was moderate to good for TS (ICC 0.42(*)) and NTS (ICC 0.55(*)) in PT and moderate to good for TS (ICC 0.41(*)) or poor for NTS (ICC 0.27) in OT. ET showed an excellent intragroup reliability for both TS (ICC 0.78(*)) and NTS (ICC 0.81(*)). Interrater reliability was significantly different between ET and PT and between ET and OT for both TS and NTS. There was no difference

  20. The emerging role of screen based simulators in the training and assessment of colonoscopists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Morven; Fernando, Bimbi; Berlingieri, Pasquale

    2010-07-01

    Incorporation of screen based simulators into medical training has recently gained momentum, as advances in technology have coincided with a government led drive to increase the use of medical simulation training to improve patient safety with progressive reductions in working hours available for junior doctors to train. High fidelity screen based simulators hold great appeal for endoscopy training. Potentially, their incorporation into endoscopy training curricula could enhance speed of acquisition of skills and improve patient comfort and safety during the initial phase of learning. They could also be used to demonstrate competence as part of the future relicensing and revalidation of trained endoscopists. Two screen based simulators are widely available for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy training, with a third recently produced in prototype. The utility of these simulators in lower gastrointestinal endoscopy training has been investigated, and construct and expert validity has been shown. Novices demonstrate a learning curve with simulator training that appears to represent real learning of colonoscopy skills. This learning transfers well to the real patient environment, with improvements in performance and patient discomfort scores in subsequent initial live colonoscopy. The significant limitations of currently available screen based simulators include cost implications, and restrictions on a role in certification and revalidation. Many questions remain to be answered by future research, including how best to incorporate screen based simulators into a colonoscopy training programme, their role in training in therapeutic endoscopy and the impact of simulator training on patient safety.

  1. Simulation of a spatial, servo-hydraulic test facility for space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimbach, K.-D.; Hahn, H.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper different control concepts for servo-hydraulic test facilities are derived using exact linearization techniques. Based on different linear and nonlinear models of the test table and the actuator dynamics several nonlinear controllers of different complexity are derived. The closed loop system performance of the controlled servo-hydraulic test facility is tested in various computer simulations using both, standard test signals and large test signals as system inputs. The simulation results turn out, that in case of standard input signals the test facility controller must include a linear test table mechanics model and a nonlinear servo-hydraulic actuator model. Additional simulations demonstrate the robustness of the control concept selected for standard test signals with respect to variations of plant parameters.

  2. Advanced virtual energy simulation training and research: IGCC with CO2 capture power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Provost, G.

    2011-01-01

    AVESTAR Center is poised to develop a workforce well-prepared to operate and control commercial-scale gasification-based power plants capable of 90% pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture and compression, as well as low sulfur, mercury, and NOx emissions. With additional support from the NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA), the Center will educate and train engineering students and researchers by providing hands-on 'learning by operating' experience The AVESTAR Center also offers unique collaborative R&D opportunities in high-fidelity dynamic modeling, advanced process control, real-time optimization, and virtual plant simulation. Objectives and goals are aimed at safe and effective management of power generation systems for optimal efficiency, while protecting the environment. To add another dimension of realism to the AVESTAR experience, NETL will introduce an immersive training system with innovative three-dimensional virtual reality technology. Wearing a stereoscopic headset or eyewear, trainees will enter an interactive virtual environment that will allow them to move freely throughout the simulated 3-D facility to study and learn various aspects of IGCC plant operation, control, and safety. Such combined operator and immersive training systems go beyond traditional simulation and include more realistic scenarios, improved communication, and collaboration among co-workers.

  3. How we developed an emergency psychiatry training course for new residents using principles of high-fidelity simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Alex B; Cross, Sean; Key, Suzie; Jaye, Peter; Iversen, Amy C

    2013-10-01

    New psychiatry residents must rapidly acquire new clinical skills and learn to work effectively with new colleagues. In medical and surgical specialties, high-fidelity simulation with structured debriefing is widely used, but so far this has not been applied to psychiatry. We have developed a one-day simulation-based training course for emergency psychiatry which incorporates clinical and team-working skills training. Five scenarios covering key psychiatric emergencies are delivered in a purpose-built simulation facility. Patients are played by an actor or a high-fidelity manikin. Each scenario is followed by a 45-minute group debrief. Evaluation of a pilot group found that the course was well received and improved participants' workplace confidence. We are now planning to expand the course, provide it to all new residents and conduct further evaluation.

  4. Peta-scale QMC simulations on DOE leadership computing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongnim; Ab Initio Network Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Continuum quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) has proved to be an invaluable tool for predicting the properties of matter from fundamental principles. Even with numerous innovations in methods, algorithms and codes, QMC simulations of realistic problems of 1000s and more electrons are demanding, requiring millions of core hours to achieve the target chemical accuracy. The multiple forms of parallelism afforded by QMC algorithms and high compute-to-communication ratio make them ideal candidates for acceleration in the multi/many-core paradigm. We have ported and tuned QMCPACK to recently deployed DOE doca-petaflop systems, Titan (Cray XK7 CPU/GPGPU) and Mira (IBM Blue Gene/Q). The efficiency gains through improved algorithms and architecture-specific tuning and, most importantly, the vast increase in computing powers have opened up opportunities to apply QMC at unprecedent scales, accuracy and time-to-solution. We present large-scale QMC simulations to study energetics of layered materials where vdW interactions play critical roles. Collaboration supported through the Predictive Theory and Modeling for Materials and Chemical Science program by the Basic Energy Science, Department of Energy.

  5. Helicopter Emergency Medical Service Simulation Training in the Extreme: Simulation-based Training in a Mountain Weather Chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Urs; Ney, Ludwig; Kreuzer, Oliver; Berner, Armin; Lischke, Volker

    Mountain rescue operations often confront crews with extreme weather conditions. Extremely cold temperatures make standard treatment sometimes difficult or even impossible. It is well-known that most manual tasks, including those involved in mountain rescue operations, are slowed by extremely cold weather. To lessen and improve the decrement in performance of emergency medical treatment caused by cold-induced manual impairment and inadequate medical equipment and supplies, simulation training in a weather chamber, which can produce wind and temperatures up to -22°C, was developed. It provides a promising tool to train the management of complex multidisciplinary settings, thus reducing the occurrence of fatal human and technical errors and increasing the safety for both the patient and the mountain emergency medical service crew. Copyright © 2017 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Training Project of Star Researchers, Outstanding Teaching Staff and Leaders with Facilities Available

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer KARAHAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a general consensus on the requirement of a serious regulation at our universities. It is argued that it is necessary to change Constitution and Institution of Higher Education Law for the serious regulation. However, it is impossible to say that all the facilities of the present legislation are used. Our aim is to create a project based on benefiting from continuing education centers to meet the need of star researchers, outstanding teaching staff and leaders in Turkey via the legislation in force. In this study, accessible studies from publications related to university, higher education and continuing education centers are studied. Th e current situation and solution off ers, applications and continuing education centers'activities have been determined. In accordance with these data, solution off ers have been proposed and discussed in line with the literature. According to the data obtained, our students who come with deficiencies from high schools to universities are not given the adequate undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate education. Th ere are studies such as ‘Double Major Program', ‘Medical-Science Physicians Integrated (MD-PhD Doctorate Program which upgrade the qualities. However, these programs are not suff icient and common. Th erefore, it is imposssible to train outstanding teaching staff , star researchesr and leaders who will meet the needs of our country and contribute to the World. Our academic potential needs a quality training except for branch training. On the other hand, the contribution of the Continuing Education Centers existing in university embodiments is limited. It is possible to provide basic skills, integration and research education to the outstanding teaching staff , star researcher and leader candidates. Th ese trainings should be given in a continuous instutionalization and in the formal education system. For this purpose, an academician school can be established within the body continuing

  7. Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility. Volume 2: Hardware specifications/descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, F. M.; Resnick, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    An FMP (Flow Model Processor) was designed for use in the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF). The NASF was developed to simulate fluid flow over three-dimensional bodies in wind tunnel environments and in free space. The facility is applicable to studying aerodynamic and aircraft body designs. The following general topics are discussed in this volume: (1) FMP functional computer specifications; (2) FMP instruction specification; (3) standard product system components; (4) loosely coupled network (LCN) specifications/description; and (5) three appendices: performance of trunk allocation contention elimination (trace) method, LCN channel protocol and proposed LCN unified second level protocol.

  8. Simulating train movement in railway traffic using a car-following model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ke-Ping; Guan Li-Jia

    2009-01-01

    Based on a car-following model, in this paper, we propose a new traffic model for simulating train movement in railway traffic. In the proposed model, some realistic characteristics of train movement are considered, such as the distance headway and the safety stopping distance. Using the proposed traffic model, we analyse the space-time diagram of traffic flow, the trajectory of train movement, etc. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed model can be successfully used for simulating the train movement. Some complex phenomena can be reproduced, such as the complex acceleration and deceleration of trains and the propagation of train delay.

  9. Sustained effect of simulation-based ultrasound training on clinical performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, M G; Ringsted, C; Dreisler, E

    2015-01-01

    on a virtual-reality transvaginal ultrasound simulator until an expert performance level was attained followed by training on a pelvic mannequin. After two months of clinical training, one transvaginal ultrasound scan was recorded for assessment of participants' clinical performance. Two blinded ultrasound......, new residents in OB-GYN (N = 33) without prior ultrasound experience were included from three teaching hospitals. Participants were allocated to simulation-based training and subsequent clinical training (n = 18) or only clinical training (n = 15). The simulation-based training was performed...

  10. FLIGHT SIMULATION IN AIR FORCE TRAINING. A KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER EFICIENCY PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru GHEORGHIU

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available For decades the issue of training through simulation has been discussed and studied to show its value and importance in fighter pilot training programs. Besides the fact that simulators are less expensive than a real airplane, and eliminate the operational risks that are present in a real flight they bring a significant contribution to the pilot training by their fidelity and realism that they show in such scenarios as in the reality. To measure the efficiency of training transfer from simulator to the aircraft, performance indicators were defined. The purpose of this article is to define these performance indicators and measurement of training transfer within the flight simulator involvement.

  11. Temporal bone dissection simulator for training pediatric otolaryngology surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Pooneh R.; Sang, Hongqiang; Talari, Hadi F.; Preciado, Diego; Monfaredi, Reza; Reilly, Brian; Arikatla, Sreekanth; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Cleary, Kevin

    2017-03-01

    Cochlear implantation is the standard of care for infants born with severe hearing loss. Current guidelines approve the surgical placement of implants as early as 12 months of age. Implantation at a younger age poses a greater surgical challenge since the underdeveloped mastoid tip, along with thin calvarial bone, creates less room for surgical navigation and can result in increased surgical risk. We have been developing a temporal bone dissection simulator based on actual clinical cases for training otolaryngology fellows in this delicate procedure. The simulator system is based on pre-procedure CT (Computed Tomography) images from pediatric infant cases (surgery environment, (2) a newly developed haptic interface for holding the surgical drill, (3) an Oculus Rift to provide a microscopic-like view of the temporal bone surgery, and (4) user interface to interact with the simulator through the Oculus Rift and the haptic device. To evaluate the system, we have collected 10 representative CT data sets and segmented the key structures: cochlea, round window, facial nerve, and ossicles. The simulator will present these key structures to the user and warn the user if needed by continuously calculating the distances between the tip of surgical drill and the key structures.

  12. The Effects of Simulation-based Transvaginal Ultrasound Training on Quality and Efficiency of Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    xgz472, xgz472; Ringsted, Charlotte; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of adding simulation-based transvaginal ultrasound training to trainees' clinical training compared with only clinical training on quality of and efficiency of care. BACKGROUND: Simulation-based ultrasound training may be an effective adjunct to clinical training,......, 33.5-55.1) and 19.8% (95% CI, 4.1-32.9) in the intervention and control group, respectively (P = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Simulation-based ultrasound training improved quality of care and reduced the need for repeated patient examination and trainee supervision.......OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of adding simulation-based transvaginal ultrasound training to trainees' clinical training compared with only clinical training on quality of and efficiency of care. BACKGROUND: Simulation-based ultrasound training may be an effective adjunct to clinical training......, but no studies have examined its effects on quality and efficiency of care. METHODS: Trainees from 4 University Hospitals in East Denmark were included (N = 54). Participants were randomized to either simulation-based ultrasound training and clinical training (intervention group, n = 28), or to clinical training...

  13. ANALYSIS OF THE CURRENT STATE OF THE PROBLEM OF FLIGHT SIMULATOR TRAINING OF CIVIL AVIATHION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Elisov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problems of the simulator training of the crew of civil aviation. It is noted that the particular attention of the simulator training is paid to practising flying skills, though more complex activity remains out of the sphere of the estimation of the results of training.

  14. Data-Driven Scenario Generation for Enhanced Realism of Equipment Training Simulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vahdatikhaki, Faridaddin; Hammad, Amin; olde Scholtenhuis, Léon Luc; Miller, Seirgei Rosario; Makarov, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Improving the training of heavy equipment operators can make a significant contribution to improving the safety of construction sites. In recent years, Virtual Reality (VR)-based simulators have gained increased popularity for the use in equipment training programs. While VR training simulators for

  15. Procedure for the training of workers of facilities of service of the trade retailer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Ivón Sosa Ibarra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The benefit of the services transforms quickly. To improve this activity is vital to reach the excellence and a fundamental element is the human factor that should be motivated and highly qualified to satisfy the necessities of the clients, of there the importance of its superación. In this investigation a training procedure is designed for workers of facilities of service of the trade that it facilitates, starting from an appropriate detection of the training necessities, to execute actions to achieve an improvement in the benefit of the services. These transformations in the superación of the workers impact significantly in their conceptions, in order to achieve the formation of a professional of the sector from the much more competent and adjusted services to the demands that it demands the current moment. The procedure is feasible of applying in all the establishments of the commercial net and it contemplates four moments: diagnostic, projection, execution and the control. It constitutes a novel experience, to the being a proposal of change and innovation in the environment of the training and the benefit of the services in the sector of the trade and it can favor the development of work values.

  16. Using an operator training simulator in the undergraduate chemical engineering curriculim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    An operator training simulator (OTS) is to the chemical engineer what a flight simulator is to the aerospace engineer. The basis of an OTS is a high-fidelity dynamic model of a chemical process that allows an engineer to simulate start-up, shut-down, and normal operation. It can also be used to test the skill and ability of an engineer or operator to respond and control some unforeseen situation(s) through the use of programmed malfunctions. West Virginia University (WVU) is a member of the National Energy Technology Laboratory’s Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA). Working through the NETL-RUA, the authors have spent the last four years collaborating on the development of a high-fidelity OTS for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture that is the cornerstone of the AVESTARTM (Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training And Research) Center with sister facilities at NETL and WVU in Morgantown, WV. This OTS is capable of real-time dynamic simulation of IGCC plant operation, including start-up, shut-down, and power demand load following. The dynamic simulator and its human machine interfaces (HMIs) are based on the DYNSIM and InTouch software, respectively, from Invensys Operations Management. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the authors’ experiences in using this sophisticated dynamic simulation-based OTS as a hands-on teaching tool in the undergraduate chemical engineering curriculum. At present, the OTS has been used in two separate courses: a new process simulation course and a traditional process control course. In the process simulation course, concepts of steady-state and dynamic simulations were covered prior to exposing the students to the OTS. Moreover, digital logic and the concept of equipment requiring one or more permissive states to be enabled prior to successful operation were also covered. Students were briefed about start-up procedures and the importance of following a predetermined

  17. An integrated neural-symbolic cognitive agent architecture for training and assessment in simulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning, H.L.H. de; d'Avila Garcez, A.S.; Lamb, L.C.; Meyer, J.J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Training and assessment of complex tasks has always been a complex task in itself. Training simulators can be used for training and assessment of low-order skills. High-order skills (e.g. safe driving, leadership, tactical manoeuvring, etc.) are generally trained and assessed by human experts, due t

  18. An integrated neural-symbolic cognitive agent architecture for training and assessment in simulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning, H.L.H. de; d'Avila Garcez, A.S.; Lamb, L.C.; Meyer, J.J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Training and assessment of complex tasks has always been a complex task in itself. Training simulators can be used for training and assessment of low-order skills. High-order skills (e.g. safe driving, leadership, tactical manoeuvring, etc.) are generally trained and assessed by human experts, due

  19. Simulator fidelity and training effectiveness: a comprehensive bibliography with selected annotations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rankin, W.L.; Bolton, P.A.; Shikiar, R.; Saari, L.M.

    1984-05-01

    This document contains a comprehensive bibliography on the topic of simulator fidelity and training effectiveness, prepared during the preliminary phases of work on an NRC-sponsored project on the Role of Nuclear Power Plant Simulators in Operator Licensing and Training. Section A of the document is an annotated bibliography consisting of articles and reports with relevance to the psychological aspects of simulator fidelity and the effectiveness of training simulators in a variety of settings, including military. The annotated items are drawn from a more comprehensive bibliography, presented in Section B, listing documents treating the role of simulators in operator training both in the nuclear industry and elsewhere.

  20. A New Optimization via Simulation Approach for Dynamic Facility Layout Problem with Budget Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parham Azimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new efficient heuristic algorithm has been developed for the dynamic facility layout problem with budget constraint (DFLPB using optimization via simulation technique. The heuristic integrates integer programming and discrete event simulation to address DFLPB. In the proposed algorithm, the nonlinear model of the DFLP has been changed to a pure integer programming (PIP model. Then, the optimal solution of the PIP model has been used in a simulation model that has been designed in a similar manner as the DFLP for determining the probability of assigning a facility to a location. After a sufficient number of runs, the simulation model obtains near optimum solutions. Finally, to test the performance of the algorithm, several test problems have been taken from the literature and solved. The results show that the proposed algorithm is more efficient in terms of speed and accuracy than other heuristic algorithms presented in previous works.

  1. Simulation experiments for maximising the availability of a commercial octene production facility

    OpenAIRE

    RF Rossouw; RLJ Coetzer; PD Pretorius

    2010-01-01

    Overall availability of a chemical process is of critical importance in industry. In this paper we evaluate the process design factors that influence the availability of a new chemical production facility by performing computer experiments on a stochastic simulation model. Experimental designs commonly used in the Design and Analysis of Computer Experiments (DACE) and Classical Design of Experiments (DOE) are evaluated and compared for application by means of simulation experiments. Furthermo...

  2. The Drive-Wise Project: Driving Simulator Training increases real driving performance in healthy older drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianclaudio eCasutt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age-related cognitive decline is often associated with unsafe driving behavior. We hypothesized that 10 active training sessions in a driving simulator increase cognitive and on-road driving performance. In addition, driving simulator training should outperform cognitive training.Methods: Ninety-one healthy active drivers (62 – 87 years were randomly assigned to either (1 a driving simulator training group, (2 an attention training group (vigilance and selective attention, or (3 a control group. The main outcome variables were on-road driving and cognitive performance. Seventy-seven participants (85% completed the training and were included in the analyses. Training gains were analyzed using a multiple regression analysis with planned comparisons.Results: The driving simulator training group showed an improvement in on-road driving performance compared to the attention training group. In addition, both training groups increased cognitive performance compared to the control group. Conclusion: Driving simulator training offers the potential to enhance driving skills in older drivers. Compared to the attention training, the simulator training seems to be a more powerful program for increasing older drivers’ safety on the road.

  3. Measuring Virtual Simulations Value in Training Exercises - USMC Use Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-04

    The assessment results provide support for the thesis that both the primary and secondary training audiences are able to realize training value through...assessments for T&R standards. Post Event Training Impacts In addition to the data collected during LSE-14, the realized training value of...The realized value of the LVC integrated training capability has resulted in it being a required training event prior to Integrated Training Exercise

  4. Clinical simulation training improves the clinical performance of Chinese medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-ya Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modern medical education promotes medical students’ clinical operating capacity rather than the mastery of theoretical knowledge. To accomplish this objective, clinical skill training using various simulations was introduced into medical education to cultivate creativity and develop the practical ability of students. However, quantitative analysis of the efficiency of clinical skill training with simulations is lacking. Methods: In the present study, we compared the mean scores of medical students (Jinan University who graduated in 2013 and 2014 on 16 stations between traditional training (control and simulative training groups. In addition, in a clinical skill competition, the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE scores of participating medical students trained using traditional and simulative training were compared. The data were statistically analyzed and qualitatively described. Results: The results revealed that simulative training could significantly enhance the graduate score of medical students compared with the control. The OSCE scores of participating medical students in the clinical skill competition, trained using simulations, were dramatically higher than those of students trained through traditional methods, and we also observed that the OSCE marks were significantly increased for the same participant after simulative training for the clinical skill competition. Conclusions: Taken together, these data indicate that clinical skill training with a variety of simulations could substantially promote the clinical performance of medical students and optimize the resources used for medical education, although a precise analysis of each specialization is needed in the future.

  5. Characterization of Vacuum Facility Background Gas Through Simulation and Considerations for Electric Propulsion Ground Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, John T.; Burt, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The background gas in a vacuum facility for electric propulsion ground testing is examined in detail through a series of cold flow simulations using a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code. The focus here is on the background gas itself, its structure and characteristics, rather than assessing its interaction and impact on thruster operation. The background gas, which is often incorrectly characterized as uniform, is found to have a notable velocity within a test facility. The gas velocity has an impact on the proper measurement of pressure and the calculation of ingestion flux to a thruster. There are also considerations for best practices for tests that involve the introduction of supplemental gas flows to artificially increase the background pressure. All of these effects need to be accounted for to properly characterize the operation of electric propulsion thrusters across different ground test vacuum facilities.

  6. Simulation of the neutron flux in the irradiation facility at RA-3 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortolussi, S., E-mail: silva.bortolussi@pv.infn.it [Department of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, University of Pavia, via Bassi 6 27100, Pavia (Italy)] [National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Section of Pavia, via Bassi 6 27100, Pavia (Italy); Pinto, J.M. [Department of Research and Production Reactors, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Av. del Libertador 8250 (1429), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thorp, S.I. [Department of Instrumentations and Control, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Presbitero Luis Gonzalez y Aragon 15 (B1802AYA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Farias, R.O. [CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917, (1033) C.A.B.A. Argentina (Argentina); Soto, M.S. [FCEyN, Universidad de Buenos Aires (1428), Cdad. Universitaria. C.A.B.A. Argentina (Argentina); Sztejnberg, M. [Department of Instrumentations and Control, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Presbitero Luis Gonzalez y Aragon 15 (B1802AYA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pozzi, E.C.C. [Department of Research and Production Reactors, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Av. del Libertador 8250 (1429), Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Department of Radiobiology, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Av. del Libertador 8250 (1429), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    A facility for the irradiation of a section of patients' explanted liver and lung was constructed at RA-3 reactor, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Argentina. The facility, located in the thermal column, is characterized by the possibility to insert and extract samples without the need to shutdown the reactor. In order to reach the best levels of security and efficacy of the treatment, it is necessary to perform an accurate dosimetry. The possibility to simulate neutron flux and absorbed dose in the explanted organs, together with the experimental dosimetry, allows setting more precise and effective treatment plans. To this end, a computational model of the entire reactor was set-up, and the simulations were validated with the experimental measurements performed in the facility.

  7. Simulator-based Transesophageal Echocardiographic Training with Motion Analysis A Curriculum-based Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matyal, Robina; Mitchell, John D.; Hess, Philip E.; Chaudary, Bilal; Bose, Ruma; Jainandunsing, Jayant S.; Wong, Vanessa; Mahmood, Feroze

    Background: Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a complex endeavor involving both motor and cognitive skills. Current training requires extended time in the clinical setting. Application of an integrated approach for TEE training including simulation could facilitate acquisition of skills and

  8. Fundamental Study of Evaluation at Berthing Training for Pilot Trainees Using a Ship Maneuvering Simulator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kazuki Inoue; Tadatsugi Okazaki; Koji Murai; Yuji Hayashi

    2013-01-01

    Use of the ship maneuvering simulator (SMS) is at the core of pilot trainees education and training, so it is desirable to have an evaluation method that can be completed shortly after each berthing training session...

  9. Simulator-based Transesophageal Echocardiographic Training with Motion Analysis A Curriculum-based Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matyal, Robina; Mitchell, John D.; Hess, Philip E.; Chaudary, Bilal; Bose, Ruma; Jainandunsing, Jayant S.; Wong, Vanessa; Mahmood, Feroze

    2014-01-01

    Background: Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a complex endeavor involving both motor and cognitive skills. Current training requires extended time in the clinical setting. Application of an integrated approach for TEE training including simulation could facilitate acquisition of skills and

  10. 14 CFR 61.4 - Qualification and approval of flight simulators and flight training devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... simulators and flight training devices. 61.4 Section 61.4 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... GROUND INSTRUCTORS General § 61.4 Qualification and approval of flight simulators and flight training devices. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (b) or (c) of this section, each flight simulator and flight...

  11. Description and Preliminary Training Evaluation of an Arc Welding Simulator. Research Report SRR 73-23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Macy L.; And Others

    A prototype arc welding training simulator was designed to provide immediate, discriminative feedback and the capacity for concentrated practice. Two randomly selected groups of welding trainees were compared to evaluate the simulator, one group being trained using the simulator and the other using conventional practice. Preliminary data indicated…

  12. Simulation studies of laser wakefield acceleration based on typical 100 TW laser facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李大章; 高杰; 朱雄伟; 何安

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, 2-D Particle-In-Cell simulations are made for Laser Wakefield Accelerations (LWFA). As in a real experiment, we perform plasma density scanning for typical 100 TW laser facilities. Several basic laws for self-injected acceleration in a bubb

  13. Design and Evaluation of Wood Processing Facilities Using Object-Oriented Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Earl Kline; Philip A. Araman

    1992-01-01

    Managers of hardwood processing facilities need timely information on which to base important decisions such as when to add costly equipment or how to improve profitability subject to time-varying demands. The overall purpose of this paper is to introduce a tool that can effectively provide such timely information. A simulation/animation modeling procedure is described...

  14. Robotic Surgery Simulator: Elements to Build a Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillou, Xavier; Collon, Sylvie; Martin-Francois, Sandrine; Doerfler, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Face, content, and construct validity of robotic surgery simulators were confirmed in the literature by several studies, but elements to build a training program are still lacking. The aim of our study was to validate a progressive training program and to assess according to prior surgical experience the amount of training needed with a robotic simulator to complete the program. Exercises using the Da Vinci Skill Simulator were chosen to ensure progressive learning. A new exercise could only be started if a minimal score of 80% was achieved in the prior one. The number of repetitions to achieve an exercise was not limited. We devised a "performance index" by calculating the ratio of the sum of scores for each exercise over the number of repetitions needed to complete the exercise with at least an 80% score. The study took place at the François Baclesse Cancer Center. Participants all work at the primary care university Hospital located next to the cancer center. A total of 32 surgeons participated in the study- 2 experienced surgeons, 8 junior and 8 senior residents in surgery, 6 registrars, and 6 attending surgeons. There was no difference between junior and senior residents, whereas the registrars had better results (p < 0.0001). The registrars performed less exercise repetitions compared to the junior or senior residents (p = 0.012). Attending surgeons performed significantly more repetitions than registrars (p = 0.024), but they performed fewer repetitions than junior or senior residents with no statistical difference (p = 0.09). The registrars had a performance index of 50, which is the best result among all novice groups. Attending surgeons were between senior and junior residents with an index at 33.85. Choice of basic exercises to manipulate different elements of the robotic surgery console in a specific and progressive order enables rapid progress. The level of prior experience in laparoscopic surgery affects outcomes. More advanced laparoscopic expertise

  15. Training and supervision of residential staff in Community-based Treatment Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axer, Andrzej

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Oregon’s Public Mental Health System employs a large number of unlicensed personnel with limited formal mental health training, both in state hospitals and in residential treatment programs. These mentalhealth paraprofessionals often have the most frequent and direct contact with seriously mentally ill individuals, and therefore have significant impact on their lives. The authors describe organization as well as clinical and administrative supervision of a mostly paraprofessional team working with severely and persistently mentally ill (SPMI criminal offenders. The purpose of this article is to delineate the most important factors allowing for effective and safe utilization of the fairy unsophisticated personnel in the community based-secure treatment facility for individuals under criminal commitment, conditionally released from Oregon State Hospital.

  16. Impact of E4 Training and Field Auditing of GSA Heartland Region Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Gowri, Krishnan; Underhill, Ronald M.; Goddard, James K.

    2012-04-01

    To assess the impact of energy efficiency expert evaluation (E4) training and field audits performed since 2007, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) undertook a follow-up study on the implementation of E4 recommendations and an analysis of energy savings. The building property manager and O and M contractor of each facility were interviewed to obtain feedback and implementation status of the E4 recommendations. Overall, there were more than 160 recommendations documented in the E4 reports; about 50% of these recommendations were fully implemented and the remaining 50% either partially implemented or not implemented. In four buildings, the E4 recommendations were aligned with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) projects replacing HVAC equipment or upgrading the building control system. The E4 recommendations were not followed-up in two buildings because of uncertainty of the long-term use of the facility or personnel changes. Results of this followon study are reported in this document.

  17. CosmoQuest: Training Educators and Engaging Classrooms in Citizen Science through a Virtual Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Bracey, Georgia; Summer, Theresa; Cobb, Whitney; Gay, Pamela L.; Finkelstein, Keely D.; Gurton, Suzanne; Felix-Strishock, Lisa; Kruse, Brian; Lebofsky, Larry A.; Jones, Andrea J.; Tweed, Ann; Graff, Paige; Runco, Susan; Noel-Storr, Jacob; CosmoQuest Team

    2016-10-01

    CosmoQuest is a Citizen Science Virtual Research Facility that engages scientists, educators, students, and the public in analyzing NASA images. Often, these types of citizen science activities target enthusiastic members of the public, and additionally engage students in K-12 and college classrooms. To support educational engagement, we are developing a pipeline in which formal and informal educators and facilitators use the virtual research facility to engage students in real image analysis that is framed to provide meaningful science learning. This work also contributes to the larger project to produce publishable results. Community scientists are being solicited to propose CosmoQuest Science Projects take advantage of the virtual research facility capabilities. Each CosmoQuest Science Project will result in formal education materials, aligned with Next Generation Science Standards including the 3-dimensions of science learning; core ideas, crosscutting concepts, and science and engineering practices. Participating scientists will contribute to companion educational materials with support from the CosmoQuest staff of data specialists and education specialists. Educators will be trained through in person and virtual workshops, and classrooms will have the opportunity to not only work with NASA data, but interface with NASA scientists. Through this project, we are bringing together subject matter experts, classrooms, and informal science organizations to share the excitement of NASA SMD science with future citizen scientists. CosmoQuest is funded through individual donations, through NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX16AC68A, and through additional grants and contracts that are listed on our website, cosmoquest.org.

  18. USU Patient Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — he National Capital Area (NCA) Medical Simulation Center is a state-of-the-art training facility located near the main USU campus. It uses simulated patients (i.e.,...

  19. Cost-effective and low-technology options for simulation and training in neonatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Christie J; Glass, Kristen M

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore low-cost options for simulation and training in neonatology. Numerous cost-effective options exist for simulation and training in neonatology. Lower cost options are available for teaching clinical skills and procedural training in neonatal intubation, chest tube insertion, and pericardiocentesis, among others. Cost-effective, low-cost options for simulation-based education can be developed and shared in order to optimize the neonatal simulation training experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Naval Marksmanship Training Transfer Study: The Use of Indoor Simulated Marksmanship Trainers to Train for Live Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    marksmanship training and would benefit the Navy to incorporate ISMT as an at-sea marksmanship trainer. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Simulation...marksmanship training and would benefit the Navy to incorporate ISMT as an at-sea marksmanship trainer. vi THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK vii...Survey (Firearms) Control Simulation Dominant Shooting Hand (%): Ambidextrous 6 6 Right 88 88 Left 6 6 Self-Reported Proficiency

  1. Geant4 simulation of the CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopovich, D A; Reinhard, M I; Cornelius, I M; Rosenfeld, A B

    2010-09-01

    The CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility is used for testing and calibrating both active and passive radiation dosemeters for radiation protection applications in space and aviation. Through a combination of a primary particle beam, target and a suitable designed shielding configuration, the facility is able to reproduce the neutron component of the high altitude radiation field relevant to the jet aviation industry. Simulations of the facility using the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) toolkit provide an improved understanding of the neutron particle fluence as well as the particle fluence of other radiation components present. The secondary particle fluence as a function of the primary particle fluence incident on the target and the associated dose equivalent rates were determined at the 20 designated irradiation positions available at the facility. Comparisons of the simulated results with previously published simulations obtained using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, as well as with experimental results of the neutron fluence obtained with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, are made.

  2. Using "The Burns Suite" as a Novel High Fidelity Simulation Tool for Interprofessional and Teamwork Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadideen, Hazim; Wilson, David; Moiemen, Naiem; Kneebone, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Educational theory highlights the importance of contextualized simulation for effective learning. The authors recently published the concept of "The Burns Suite" (TBS) as a novel tool to advance the delivery of burns education for residents/clinicians. Effectively, TBS represents a low-cost, high-fidelity, portable, immersive simulation environment. Recently, simulation-based team training (SBTT) has been advocated as a means to improve interprofessional practice. The authors aimed to explore the role of TBS in SBTT. A realistic pediatric burn resuscitation scenario was designed based on "advanced trauma and life support" and "emergency management of severe burns" principles, refined utilizing expert opinion through cognitive task analysis. The focus of this analysis was on nontechnical and interpersonal skills of clinicians and nurses within the scenario, mirroring what happens in real life. Five-point Likert-type questionnaires were developed for face and content validity. Cronbach's alpha was calculated for scale reliability. Semistructured interviews captured responses for qualitative thematic analysis allowing for data triangulation. Twenty-two participants completed TBS resuscitation scenario. Mean face and content validity ratings were high (4.4 and 4.7 respectively; range 4-5). The internal consistency of questions was high. Qualitative data analysis revealed two new themes. Participants reported that the experience felt particularly authentic because the simulation had high psychological and social fidelity, and there was a demand for such a facility to be made available to improve nontechnical skills and interprofessional relations. TBS provides a realistic, novel tool for SBTT, addressing both nontechnical and interprofessional team skills. Recreating clinical challenge is crucial to optimize SBTT. With a better understanding of the theories underpinning simulation and interprofessional education, future simulation scenarios can be designed to provide

  3. Learning curves and long-term outcome of simulation-based thoracentesis training for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Kezhong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simulation-based medical education has been widely used in medical skills training; however, the effectiveness and long-term outcome of simulation-based training in thoracentesis requires further investigation. The purpose of this study was to assess the learning curve of simulation-based thoracentesis training, study skills retention and transfer of knowledge to a clinical setting following simulation-based education intervention in thoracentesis procedures. Methods Fifty-two medical students were enrolled in this study. Each participant performed five supervised trials on the simulator. Participant's performance was assessed by performance score (PS, procedure time (PT, and participant's confidence (PC. Learning curves for each variable were generated. Long-term outcome of the training was measured by the retesting and clinical performance evaluation 6 months and 1 year, respectively, after initial training on the simulator. Results Significant improvements in PS, PT, and PC were noted among the first 3 to 4 test trials (p 0.05. Clinical competency in thoracentesis was improved in participants who received simulation training relative to that of first year medical residents without such experience (p Conclusions This study demonstrates that simulation-based thoracentesis training can significantly improve an individual's performance. The saturation of learning from the simulator can be achieved after four practice sessions. Simulation-based training can assist in long-term retention of skills and can be partially transferred to clinical practice.

  4. Randomized trial to examine procedure-to-procedure transfer in laparoscopic simulator training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, F; Sorensen, J L; Konge, L

    2016-01-01

    -centre educational superiority trial. Surgical novices practised basic skills on a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator. On reaching proficiency, participants were randomized to proficiency-based training. The intervention group practised two procedures on the simulator (appendicectomy followed by salpingectomy...

  5. Nuclear power plant simulators: their use in operator training and requalification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D.W.; Baer, D.K.; Francis, C.C.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the results of a study performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the capabilities and use of nuclear power plant simulators either built or being built by the US nuclear power industry; to determine the adequacy of existing standards for simulator design and for the training of power plant operators on simulators; and to assess the issues about simulator training programs raised by the March 28, 1979, accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2.

  6. A system simulation model applied to the production schedule of a fish processing facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Roberta Pereira

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The simulation seeks to import the reality to a controlled environment, where it is possible to study it behavior, under several conditions, without involving physical risks and/or high costs. Thus, the system simulation becomes a useful and powerful technique in emergence markets, as the tilapiculture sector that needs to expand its business. The main purpose of this study was the development of a simulation model to assist the decisions making of the production scheduling of a fish processing facility. It was applied, as research method, the case study and the modeling/simulation, including in this set the SimuCAD methodology and the development phases of a simulation model. The model works with several alternative scenarios, testing different working shifts, types of flows and production capacity, besides variations of the ending inventory and sales. The result of this research was a useful and differentiated model simulation to assist the decision making of the production scheduling of fish processing facility studied.

  7. Vision Paper : Integrating VV&A methods and cost-effectiveness analysis in the acquisition process for training simulation solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huiskamp, W.; Voogd, J.; Korteling, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Simulation is an important technology that enables NATO and its member nations to train their soldiers. The benefits of simulation-based training include saving of time, money, and even lives, when training for unsafe scenarios. Simulation also facilitates joint and combined training. Moreover, simu

  8. Vision Paper : Integrating VV&A methods and cost-effectiveness analysis in the acquisition process for training simulation solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huiskamp, W.; Voogd, J.; Korteling, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Simulation is an important technology that enables NATO and its member nations to train their soldiers. The benefits of simulation-based training include saving of time, money, and even lives, when training for unsafe scenarios. Simulation also facilitates joint and combined training. Moreover,

  9. Training auscultatory skills: computer simulated heart sounds or additional bedside training? A randomized trial on third-year medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solheim Svein

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study compares the value of additional use of computer simulated heart sounds, to conventional bedside auscultation training, on the cardiac auscultation skills of 3rd year medical students at Oslo University Medical School. Methods In addition to their usual curriculum courses, groups of seven students each were randomized to receive four hours of additional auscultation training either employing a computer simulator system or adding on more conventional bedside training. Cardiac auscultation skills were afterwards tested using live patients. Each student gave a written description of the auscultation findings in four selected patients, and was rewarded from 0-10 points for each patient. Differences between the two study groups were evaluated using student's t-test. Results At the auscultation test no significant difference in mean score was found between the students who had used additional computer based sound simulation compared to additional bedside training. Conclusions Students at an early stage of their cardiology training demonstrated equal performance of cardiac auscultation whether they had received an additional short auscultation course based on computer simulated training, or had had additional bedside training.

  10. The efficacy of virtual reality simulation training in laparoscopy: a systematic review of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Christian Rifbjerg; Oestergaard, Jeanett; Ottesen, Bent S; Soerensen, Jette Led

    2012-09-01

    Virtual reality (VR) simulators for surgical training might possess the properties needed for basic training in laparoscopy. Evidence for training efficacy of VR has been investigated by research of varying quality over the past decade. To review randomized controlled trials regarding VR training efficacy compared with traditional or no training, with outcome measured as surgical performance in humans or animals. In June 2011 Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science and Google Scholar were searched using the following medical subject headings (MeSh) terms: Laparoscopy/standards, Computing methodologies, Programmed instruction, Surgical procedures, Operative, and the following free text terms: Virtual real* OR simulat* AND Laparoscop* OR train* Controlled trials. All randomized controlled trials investigating the effect of VR training in laparoscopy, with outcome measured as surgical performance. A total of 98 studies were screened, 26 selected and 12 included, with a total of 241 participants. Operation time was reduced by 17-50% by VR training, depending on simulator type and training principles. Proficiency-based training appeared superior to training based on fixed time or fixed numbers of repetition. Simulators offering training for complete operative procedures came out as more efficient than simulators offering only basic skills training. Skills in laparoscopic surgery can be increased by proficiency-based procedural VR simulator training. There is substantial evidence (grade IA - IIB) to support the use of VR simulators in laparoscopic training. © 2012 The Authors  Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  11. Simulators in catheter-based interventional radiology: training or computer games?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, D.A. [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: dgould@liv.ac.uk; Kessel, D.O. [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Healey, A.E. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ont. (Canada); Johnson, S.J. [Department of Occupational Psychology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Lewandowski, W.E

    2006-07-15

    Training in interventional radiology (IR) relies on a traditional apprenticeship; to protect patients, expert supervision is mandatory until knowledge, attitudes and practical skills have been certified as satisfactory. However, the current quality of IR training is threatened by reduced time for trainees to learn, as well as a loss of basic diagnostic, training cases to non-invasive imaging. At the same time, IR techniques are becoming a focus of interest to a range of other clinical specialities. To address this training shortfall there is a need to develop novel training alternatives such as simulator models. Few simulator models in any medical field have been successfully validated to show improved clinical skills in treating patients. To date no endovascular simulator has met this standard. A good simulator must be based around key performance measures (metrics) derived from careful analysis of the procedure to be replicated. Metrics can be determined by trained psychologists from a direct analysis of the content of the job or task to be tested. The identification of these critical measures of performance is a complex process which must be tailored to a training curriculum to be effective. Simulators based on flawed metrics will invariably lead to unsatisfactory assessment. It follows that simulator development must involve the statutory licensing authorities. Equally it is essential that we do not assume that training on a particular simulator will correlate with the ability to perform the task in the real world. This 'transfer of training' must be rigorously proven by validation studies.

  12. Research priorities in light of current trends in microsurgical training: revalidation, simulation, cross-training, and standardisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Rebecca Spenser; Madada-Nyakauru, Rudo N; Irri, Renu Anita; Myers, Simon Richard; Ghanem, Ali Mahmoud

    2014-05-01

    Plastic surgery training worldwide has seen a thorough restructuring over the past decade, with the introduction of formal training curricula and work-based assessment tools. Part of this process has been the introduction of revalidation and a greater use of simulation in training delivery. Simulation is an increasingly important tool for educators because it provides a way to reduce risks to both trainees and patients, whilst facilitating improved technical proficiency. Current microsurgery training interventions are often predicated on theories of skill acquisition and development that follow a 'practice makes perfect' model. Given the changing landscape of surgical training and advances in educational theories related to skill development, research is needed to assess the potential benefits of alternative models, particularly cross-training, a model now widely used in non-medical areas with significant benefits. Furthermore, with the proliferation of microsurgery training interventions and therefore diversity in length, cost, content and models used, appropriate standardisation will be an important factor to ensure that courses deliver consistent and effective training that achieves appropriate levels of competency. Key research requirements should be gathered and used in directing further research in these areas to achieve on-going improvement of microsurgery training.

  13. Development of a full-scale training simulator for an 800-MW power unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, S. K.; Andreev, A. M.

    2013-07-01

    Stages of work involving preparation of requirements specification, development, and subsequent implementation of a project for constructing a full-scale training simulator of an 800-MW power unit are considered. The training simulator is constructed using the Kosmotronika-Venets computerized automation system developed by PIK Progress (Moscow). The entire personnel training system, the arrangement of drills, and the concept of structuring the entire personnel education system at the Surgut GRES-2 district power station, a branch of E.ON Rossiya, had to be touched in drawing up the requirements specification for elaborating the training simulator. The article describes how these problems were solved.

  14. Comparing the Cost-Effectiveness of Simulation Modalities: A Case Study of Peripheral Intravenous Catheterization Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Brydges, Ryan; Carnahan, Heather; Backstein, David; Dubrowski, Adam

    2014-01-01

    While the ultimate goal of simulation training is to enhance learning, cost-effectiveness is a critical factor. Research that compares simulation training in terms of educational- and cost-effectiveness will lead to better-informed curricular decisions. Using previously published data we conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis of three…

  15. Web-Based Simulation in Psychiatry Residency Training: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorrindo, Tristan; Baer, Lee; Sanders, Kathy M.; Birnbaum, Robert J.; Fromson, John A.; Sutton-Skinner, Kelly M.; Romeo, Sarah A.; Beresin, Eugene V.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Medical specialties, including surgery, obstetrics, anesthesia, critical care, and trauma, have adopted simulation technology for measuring clinical competency as a routine part of their residency training programs; yet, simulation technologies have rarely been adapted or used for psychiatry training. Objective: The authors describe…

  16. Medical Team Training: Using Simulation as a Teaching Strategy for Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Michael R.; Brown, Rhonda Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Described is an innovative approach currently being used to inspire group work, specifically a medical team training model, referred to as The Simulation Model, which includes as its major components: (1) Prior Training in Group Work of Medical Team Members; (2) Simulation in Teams or Groups; (3) Multidisciplinary Teamwork; (4) Team Leader…

  17. Mapping the plateau of novices in virtual reality simulation training of mastoidectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A.W. Andersen, Steven; Konge, Lars; Mikkelsen, Peter Trier

    2016-01-01

    To explore why novices' performance plateau in directed, self-regulated virtual reality (VR) simulation training and how performance can be improved.......To explore why novices' performance plateau in directed, self-regulated virtual reality (VR) simulation training and how performance can be improved....

  18. Effect of Training in Rational Decision Making on the Quality of Simulated Career Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumboltz, John D.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Determined if training in rational decision making improves the quality of simulated career decisions. Training in rational decision making resulted in superior performance for females on one subscore of the knowledge measure. It also resulted in superior simulated career choices by females and younger males. (Author)

  19. Medical Team Training: Using Simulation as a Teaching Strategy for Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Michael R.; Brown, Rhonda Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Described is an innovative approach currently being used to inspire group work, specifically a medical team training model, referred to as The Simulation Model, which includes as its major components: (1) Prior Training in Group Work of Medical Team Members; (2) Simulation in Teams or Groups; (3) Multidisciplinary Teamwork; (4) Team Leader…

  20. A framework-based approach to designing simulation-augmented surgical education and training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, Sayra M; Moussa, Fuad; Dubrowski, Adam

    2011-09-01

    The goal of simulation-based medical education and training is to help trainees acquire and refine the technical and cognitive skills necessary to perform clinical procedures. When designers incorporate simulation into programs, their efforts should be in line with training needs, rather than technology. Designers of simulation-augmented surgical training programs, however, face particular problems related to identifying a framework that guides the curricular design activity to fulfill the particular requirements of such training programs. These problems include the lack of (1) an objective identification of training needs, (2) a systematic design methodology to match training objectives with simulation resources, (3) structured assessments of performance, and (4) a research-centered view to evaluate and validate systematically the educational effectiveness of the program. In this report, we present a process called "Aim - FineTune - FollowThrough" to enable the connection of the identified problems to solutions, using frameworks from psychology, motor learning, education and experimental design.

  1. A simulated annealing methodology to multiproduct capacitated facility location with stochastic demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jin; Xiang, Hui; Ye, Yong; Ni, Linglin

    2015-01-01

    A stochastic multiproduct capacitated facility location problem involving a single supplier and multiple customers is investigated. Due to the stochastic demands, a reasonable amount of safety stock must be kept in the facilities to achieve suitable service levels, which results in increased inventory cost. Based on the assumption of normal distributed for all the stochastic demands, a nonlinear mixed-integer programming model is proposed, whose objective is to minimize the total cost, including transportation cost, inventory cost, operation cost, and setup cost. A combined simulated annealing (CSA) algorithm is presented to solve the model, in which the outer layer subalgorithm optimizes the facility location decision and the inner layer subalgorithm optimizes the demand allocation based on the determined facility location decision. The results obtained with this approach shown that the CSA is a robust and practical approach for solving a multiple product problem, which generates the suboptimal facility location decision and inventory policies. Meanwhile, we also found that the transportation cost and the demand deviation have the strongest influence on the optimal decision compared to the others.

  2. Disaster Response Team FAST Skills Training with a Portable Ultrasound Simulator Compared to Traditional Training: Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paddock, Michael T.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pre-hospital focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST has been effectively used to improve patient care in multiple mass casualty events throughout the world. Although requisite FAST knowledge may now be learned remotely by disaster response team members, traditional live instructor and model hands-on FAST skills training remains logistically challenging. The objective of this pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of a novel portable ultrasound (US simulator with traditional FAST skills training for a deployed mixed provider disaster response team. Methods: We randomized participants into one of three training groups stratified by provider role: Group A. Traditional Skills Training, Group B. US Simulator Skills Training, and Group C. Traditional Skills Training Plus US Simulator Skills Training. After skills training, we measured participants’ FAST image acquisition and interpretation skills using a standardized direct observation tool (SDOT with healthy models and review of FAST patient images. Pre- and post-course US and FAST knowledge were also assessed using a previously validated multiple-choice evaluation. We used the ANOVA procedure to determine the statistical significance of differences between the means of each group’s skills scores. Paired sample t-tests were used to determine the statistical significance of pre- and post-course mean knowledge scores within groups. Results: We enrolled 36 participants, 12 randomized to each training group. Randomization resulted in similar distribution of participants between training groups with respect to provider role, age, sex, and prior US training. For the FAST SDOT image acquisition and interpretation mean skills scores, there was no statistically significant difference between training groups. For US and FAST mean knowledge scores, there was a statistically significant improvement between pre- and post-course scores within each group, but again there was not

  3. Discrete event simulation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanahan, K.L.

    1992-02-01

    A discrete event simulation of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) analytical laboratory has been constructed in the GPSS language. It was used to estimate laboratory analysis times at process analytical hold points and to study the effect of sample number on those times. Typical results are presented for three different simultaneous representing increasing levels of complexity, and for different sampling schemes. Example equipment utilization time plots are also included. SRS DWPF laboratory management and chemists found the simulations very useful for resource and schedule planning.

  4. A study of human behavior simulation in architectural design for healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumann, Davide; Pilosof, Nirit Putievsky; Date, Kartikeya; Kalay, Yehuda E

    2016-01-01

    Current tools and methods in architectural design do not allow predicting and evaluating how people will use designed environments before their actual realization. To investigate how computational simulation can help in evaluating design proposals as far as their use by people is concerned. Simulation of a medicine distribution procedure in a general hospital facility, while accounting for serendipitous social interactions made possible by the presence of different users in the same space, at the same time. The simulation shows how use patterns are influenced by the social and physical context in which actors are situated, and demonstrates the significance of the proposed method of evaluating hospital designs before construction. The system allows simulating use patterns with different degrees of complexity, and enables architects to ask new types of questions related to the interactions between people and physical settings.

  5. The SPES3 Experimental Facility Design for the IRIS Reactor Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Carelli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available IRIS is an advanced integral pressurized water reactor, developed by an international consortium led by Westinghouse. The licensing process requires the execution of integral and separate effect tests on a properly scaled reactor simulator for reactor concept, safety system verification, and code assessment. Within the framework of an Italian R&D program on Nuclear Fission, managed by ENEA and supported by the Ministry of Economic Development, the SPES3 facility is under design and will be built and operated at SIET laboratories. SPES3 simulates the primary, secondary, and containment systems of IRIS with 1 : 100 volume scale, full elevation, and prototypical thermal-hydraulic conditions. The simulation of the facility with the RELAP5 code and the execution of the tests will provide a reliable tool for data extrapolation and safety analyses of the final IRIS design. This paper summarises the main design steps of the SPES3 integral test facility, underlying choices and phases that lead to the final design.

  6. A Study on Evaluation of Training Program for MCR Operators of SMART Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Jun; Lee, Joon Ku; Jeong, Kwang Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    It is important to develop a training program by simulators in main control room of nuclear power plants because there is no an operation expert and no operating experience in the pre-construction phase of nuclear power plants. It is also necessary to develop a training program and its evaluation method taking human error into account. The purpose of this study is developing evaluation model of simulators. In a training program, once training requirements are selected, evaluation of training is as important as its implementation. Training effectiveness is available value in a simulator-based environment. The main control room of SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) is consist of workstation, visual display units such as LDP and FPD based on digital systems. Cognitive behaviors of a high level are required to operators in these man-machine interface system (MMIS). Therefore, it is essential to identify training requirements and to develop its evaluation model. Virtual Environments such as a simulator have utilized by a lot of industries and companies for training and accident prevention. Simulators have three primary benefits. The first is that training by simulators is less expensive than those in real environment. The second is that simulators enable safety enhancement using systematic training program. The third is that simulators provide a preliminary to prevent human error. It is significant to apply TER, TCR, TCE in evaluation of training effect. It is expected that these could be applied to revise training criteria and enable to consider efficiency in terms of cost and benefit.

  7. Medical simulation is needed in anesthesia training to achieve patient's safety

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chul-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Many medical schools and hospitals throughout the world are equipped with a simulation center for the purpose of training anesthesiologists to perform both technical and non-technical skills. Because induction, maintenance, and emergence of general anesthesia are critical to patient welfare, various simulation mannequins and tools are utilized for the purpose of training anesthesiologists for safer patient care. Traditionally, anesthesia residency training mostly consisted of didactic lecture...

  8. Lack of transfer of skills after virtual reality simulator training with haptic feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Våpenstad, Cecilie; Hofstad, Erlend Fagertun; Bø, Lars Eirik; Kuhry, Esther; Johnsen, Gjermund; Mårvik, Ronald; Langø, Thomas; Hernes, Toril Nagelhus

    2017-05-09

    Virtual reality (VR) simulators enrich surgical training and offer training possibilities outside of the operating room (OR). In this study, we created a criterion-based training program on a VR simulator with haptic feedback and tested it by comparing the performances of a simulator group against a control group. Medical students with no experience in laparoscopy were randomly assigned to a simulator group or a control group. In the simulator group, the candidates trained until they reached predefined criteria on the LapSim(®) VR simulator (Surgical Science AB, Göteborg, Sweden) with haptic feedback (Xitact(TM) IHP, Mentice AB, Göteborg, Sweden). All candidates performed a cholecystectomy on a porcine organ model in a box trainer (the clinical setting). The performances were video rated by two surgeons blinded to subject training status. In total, 30 students performed the cholecystectomy and had their videos rated (N = 16 simulator group, N = 14 control group). The control group achieved better video rating scores than the simulator group (p < .05). The criterion-based training program did not transfer skills to the clinical setting. Poor mechanical performance of the simulated haptic feedback is believed to have resulted in a negative training effect.

  9. The use of simulation for training teamwork skills in health care: how low can you go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaubien, J M; Baker, D P

    2004-10-01

    High fidelity simulation has become a popular technique for training teamwork skills in high risk industries such as aviation, health care, and nuclear power production. Simulation is a powerful training tool because it allows the trainer to systematically control the schedule of practice, presentation of feedback, and introduction (or suppression) of environmental distractions within a safe, controlled learning environment. Unfortunately, many within the training community have begun to use the terms simulation and high fidelity simulation almost synonymously. This is unfortunate because doing so overemphasises the instructional technology to the detriment of more substantive issues, such as the training's goals, content, and design. It also perpetuates several myths: simulation fidelity is unidimensional, or higher levels of simulation fidelity lead to increased training effectiveness. The authors propose a typology of simulation fidelity and provide examples of how the different classes of simulation have been successfully used to train teamwork skills in high risk industries. Guidelines are also provided to maximise the usefulness of simulation for training teamwork skills in health care.

  10. Design principles for the use of simulation as an aid in interventional cardiology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Learning complex skills through simulation is a goal for training physicians in specialties such as interventional cardiology, where traditional training puts patients at risk. Intuitively, interactive simulation of anatomy, pathology and therapeutic actions should lead to shortening of the learning curve for novice or inexperienced physicians. An accurate recreation of the interactions among anatomy, pathology and therapeutic actions is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for the development of a simulation-based training system. In addition to real-time graphic interactivity coupled with haptic response, a successful training tool will require features of a 'learning system' such as: an embedded curriculum, functionality that allows rehearsal and practice, hypertext links to educational information, personal archiving, and instructor review and testing capabilities. We describe how such a system might look for the field of interventional cardiology, and suggest that designing a simulation with both technical and pedagogical fidelity is essential in developing simulation-based training systems in any field of medicine.

  11. Virtual reality simulation training for health professions trainees in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Catharine M; Sherlock, Mary E; Ling, Simon C; Carnahan, Heather

    2012-06-13

    Traditionally, training in gastrointestinal endoscopy has been based upon an apprenticeship model, with novice endoscopists learning basic skills under the supervision of experienced preceptors in the clinical setting. Over the last two decades, however, the growing awareness of the need for patient safety has brought the issue of simulation-based training to the forefront. While the use of simulation-based training may have important educational and societal advantages, the effectiveness of virtual reality gastrointestinal endoscopy simulators has yet to be clearly demonstrated. To determine whether virtual reality simulation training can supplement and/or replace early conventional endoscopy training (apprenticeship model) in diagnostic oesophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy and/or sigmoidoscopy for health professions trainees with limited or no prior endoscopic experience. Health professions, educational and computer databases were searched until November 2011 including The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, Biosis Previews, CINAHL, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, ERIC, Education Full Text, CBCA Education, Career and Technical Education @ Scholars Portal, Education Abstracts @ Scholars Portal, Expanded Academic ASAP @ Scholars Portal, ACM Digital Library, IEEE Xplore, Abstracts in New Technologies and Engineering and Computer & Information Systems Abstracts. The grey literature until November 2011 was also searched. Randomised and quasi-randomised clinical trials comparing virtual reality endoscopy (oesophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy) simulation training versus any other method of endoscopy training including conventional patient-based training, in-job training, training using another form of endoscopy simulation (e.g. low-fidelity simulator), or no training (however defined by authors) were included.  Trials comparing one method of virtual reality training versus

  12. Evaluation of simulation-based training for aircraft carrier marshalling with learning cubic and Kirkpatrick’s models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Yongliang; Liu Hu; Yin Jiao; Luo Mingqiang; Wu Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    Simulation-based training is a promising way to train a carrier flight deck crew because of the complex and dangerous working environment. Quantitative evaluation of simulation-based training quality is vital to make simulation-based training practical for aircraft carrier marshalling. This paper develops a personal computer-based aircraft carrier marshalling simulation system and a cave automatic virtual environment (CAVE)-based immersive environment. In order to compare the training effectiveness of simulation-based training and paper-based training, a learning cubic model is proposed and a contrast experiment is carried out as well. The experimental data is ana-lyzed based on a simplified Kirkpatrick’s model. The results show that simulation-based training is better than paper-based training by 26.80%after three rounds of testing, which prove the effective-ness of simulation-based aircraft carrier marshalling training.

  13. ISRU Soil Mechanics Vacuum Facility: Soil Bin Preparation and Simulant Strength Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Wilkinson, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Testing in relevant environments is key to exploration mission hardware development. This is true on both the component level (in early development) and system level (in late development stages). During ISRU missions the hardware will interface with the soil (digging, roving, etc) in a vacuum environment. A relevant test environment will therefore involve a vacuum chamber with a controlled, conditioned simulant bed. However, in earth-based granular media, such as lunar soil simulant, gases trapped within the material pore structures and water adsorbed to all particle surfaces will release when exposed to vacuum. Early vacuum testing has shown that this gas release can occur violently, which loosens and weakens the simulant, altering the consolidation state. The Vacuum Facility #13, a mid-size chamber (3.66m tall, 1.5m inner diameter) at the NASA Glenn Research Center has been modified to create a soil mechanics test facility. A 0.64m deep by 0.914m square metric ton bed of lunar simulant was placed under vacuum using a variety of pumping techniques. Both GRC-3 and LHT-3M simulant types have been used. An electric cone penetrometer was used to measure simulant strength properties at vacuum including: cohesion, friction angle, bulk density and shear modulus. Simulant disruptions, caused by off gassing, affected the strength properties, but could be mitigated by reducing pump rate. No disruptions were observed at pressures below 2.5Torr, regardless of the pump rate. However, slow off gassing of the soil lead to long test times, a full week, to reach 10-5Torr. This work highlights the need for robotic machine-simulant hardware and operations in vacuum to expeditiously perform (sub-)systems tests.

  14. Simulation optimization for train movement on a single-track railway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Jing-Jing; Li Ke-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing train movement has a great significance for railway traffic.In this paper,based on the optimal velocity car-following model,we propose a new simulation model for optimizing train movement in railway traffic.Here a kind of single-track railway is considered.Our aim is to reduce the energy consumption of train movement and ensure the train being on time by controlling the velocity curve of train movement.The simulation results indicate that the proposed model is effective for optimizing train movement.In addition,some major characteristics of train movement can be well captured.This method provides a new way to optimize train movement in railway traffic.

  15. A Simulation-Based Approach to Training Operational Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. Lewis

    2010-01-01

    Cultural knowledge and skills are critically important for military operations, emergency response, or any job that involves interaction with a culturally diverse population. However, it is not obvious what cultural knowledge and skills need to be trained, and how to integrate that training with the other training that trainees must undergo. Cultural training needs to be broad enough to encompass both regional (culture-specific) and cross-cultural (culture-general) competencies, yet be focused enough to result in targeted improvements in on-the-job performance. This paper describes a comprehensive instructional development methodology and training technology framework that focuses cultural training on operational needs. It supports knowledge acquisition, skill acquisition, and skill transfer. It supports both training and assessment, and integrates with other aspects of operational skills training. Two training systems will be used to illustrate this approach: the Virtual Cultural Awareness Trainer (VCAT) and the Tactical Dari language and culture training system. The paper also discusses new and emerging capabilities that are integrating cultural competence training more strongly with other aspects of training and mission rehearsal.

  16. A Simulated Annealing Approach for the Train Design Optimization Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Alonso-Pecina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Train Design Optimization Problem regards making optimal decisions on the number and movement of locomotives and crews through a railway network, so as to satisfy requested pick-up and delivery of car blocks at stations. In a mathematical programming formulation, the objective function to minimize is composed of the costs associated with the movement of locomotives and cars, the loading/unloading operations, the number of locomotives, and the crews’ return to their departure stations. The constraints include upper bounds for number of car blocks per locomotive, number of car block swaps, and number of locomotives passing through railroad segments. We propose here a heuristic method to solve this highly combinatorial problem in two steps. The first one finds an initial, feasible solution by means of an ad hoc algorithm. The second step uses the simulated annealing concept to improve the initial solution, followed by a procedure aiming to further reduce the number of needed locomotives. We show that our results are competitive with those found in the literature.

  17. Field of View Evaluation for Flight Simulators Used in Spatial Disorientation Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    to develop SD training scenarios for integration into the Naval Aviation Survival Training Program. Since 2005, NSTI has provided hypoxia ...February 2012, NSTI accepted delivery of a prototype part-task training simulator system intended to provide both a hypoxia familiarization training...strength of the OKCR (5, 12). Identification of OKCR has led to the realization that during sustained turns with intermittent IMC, inaccurate

  18. High-fidelity simulation in anesthesiology training: a survey of Canadian anesthesiology residents' simulator experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James W; Price, John R; Pratt, Dan D; Collins, John B; McDonald, Julie

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this survey was to explore Canadian anesthesiology residents' educational experience with high-fidelity simulation and to improve understanding of the factors perceived to have either a positive or a negative effect on residents' learning. In 2008, all Canadian anesthesiology residents (n = 599) were invited to complete a ten-minute anonymous online survey. Survey questions were derived from two sources, a literature search of MEDLINE (1966 to present), EMBASE (1980 to present), and the Cochrane and Campbell collaboration libraries and the experience of 25 pilot residents and the lead author. The survey response rate was 27.9% (n = 167). Junior residents (PGY1-3) responded that it would be helpful to have an introductory simulation course dealing with common intraoperative emergencies. The introduction of multidisciplinary scenarios (where nurses and colleagues from different specialties were involved in scenarios) was strongly supported. With respect to gender, male anesthesia residents indicated their comfort in making mistakes and asking for help in the simulator more frequently than female residents. In accordance with the ten Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) principles of successful simulator education, Canadian centres could improve residents' opportunities for repetitive practice (with feedback), individualization of scenarios, and defined learning outcomes for scenarios. Anesthesiology residents indicate that simulation-based education is an anxiety provoking experience, but value its role in promoting safe practice and enhancing one's ability to deal with emergency situations. Suggestions to improve simulation training include increasing residents' access, adopting a more student-centred approach to learning, and creating a safer learning environment.

  19. Simulation of medical emergencies in dental practice: development and evaluation of an undergraduate training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, J P; Keast, J; Adam, W R

    2010-12-01

    The evidence available suggests that many dentists on graduation do not feel competent managing medical emergencies; a problem requiring improved undergraduate training. This study developed a comprehensive simulation based training programme for final year undergraduate dental students and assessed student attitudes towards training. Final year dental students (n = 52) from The University of Melbourne were required to complete simulation training incorporating an interactive tutorial and realistic, simulated emergency scenarios conducted in the students' real clinical environment. A post-participation questionnaire utilizing a 5-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree) assessed student attitudes. Student responses supported simulation training, evidenced by the following selected questionnaire responses: achieved greater confidence in managing emergencies 4.65 ± 0.48 (n = 52); prefer lecture to simulation 1.46 ± 0.74 (n = 52); simulation training is important in undergraduate teaching 4.86 ± 0.35 (n = 43). Realistic simulation training in management of medical emergencies for dental students is an effective adjunct to traditional lecture style teaching. Given the importance of this subject, this mode of training would benefit students if incorporated into undergraduate dental courses. © 2010 Australian Dental Association.

  20. Team Training (Training at Own Facility versus Individual Surgeon’s Training (Training at Trainer’s Facility When Implementing a New Surgical Technique: Example from the ONSTEP Inguinal Hernia Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Rosenberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. When implementing a new surgical technique, the best method for didactic learning has not been settled. There are basically two scenarios: the trainee goes to the teacher’s clinic and learns the new technique hands-on, or the teacher goes to the trainee’s clinic and performs the teaching there. Methods. An informal literature review was conducted to provide a basis for discussing pros and cons. We also wanted to discuss how many surgeons can be trained in a day and the importance of the demand for a new surgical procedure to ensure a high adoption rate and finally to apply these issues on a discussion of barriers for adoption of the new ONSTEP technique for inguinal hernia repair after initial training. Results and Conclusions. The optimal training method would include moving the teacher to the trainee’s department to obtain team-training effects simultaneous with surgical technical training of the trainee surgeon. The training should also include a theoretical presentation and discussion along with the practical training. Importantly, the training visit should probably be followed by a scheduled visit to clear misunderstandings and fine-tune the technique after an initial self-learning period.

  1. Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgical Simulation Training Curriculum: Transfer Reliability and Maintenance of Skill Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, John C; Belmont, Philip J; Lanzi, Joseph; Martin, Kevin; Bader, Julia; Owens, Brett; Waterman, Brian R

    2015-01-01

    Surgical education is evolving as work hour constraints limit the exposure of residents to the operating room. Potential consequences may include erosion of resident education and decreased quality of patient care. Surgical simulation training has become a focus of study in an effort to counter these challenges. Previous studies have validated the use of arthroscopic surgical simulation programs both in vitro and in vivo. However, no study has examined if the gains made by residents after a simulation program are retained after a period away from training. In all, 17 orthopedic surgery residents were randomized into simulation or standard practice groups. All subjects were oriented to the arthroscopic simulator, a 14-point anatomic checklist, and Arthroscopic Surgery Skill Evaluation Tool (ASSET). The experimental group received 1 hour of simulation training whereas the control group had no additional training. All subjects performed a recorded, diagnostic arthroscopy intraoperatively. These videos were scored by 2 blinded, fellowship-trained orthopedic surgeons and outcome measures were compared within and between the groups. After 1 year in which neither group had exposure to surgical simulation training, all residents were retested intraoperatively and scored in the exact same fashion. Individual surgical case logs were reviewed and surgical case volume was documented. There was no difference between the 2 groups after initial simulation testing and there was no correlation between case volume and initial scores. After training, the simulation group improved as compared with baseline in mean ASSET (p = 0.023) and mean time to completion (p = 0.01). After 1 year, there was no difference between the groups in any outcome measurements. Although individual technical skills can be cultivated with surgical simulation training, these advancements can be lost without continued education. It is imperative that residency programs implement a simulation curriculum and

  2. Drive-train dynamics technology - State-of-the-art and design of a test facility for advanced development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badgley, R. H.; Fleming, D. P.; Smalley, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    A program for the development and verification of drive-train dynamic technology is described along with its basis and the results expected from it. A central feature of this program is a drive-train test facility designed for the testing and development of advanced drive-train components, including shaft systems, dampers, and couplings. Previous efforts in designing flexible dynamic drive-train systems are reviewed, and the present state of the art is briefly summarized. The design of the test facility is discussed with major attention given to the formulation of the test-rig concept, dynamic scaling of model shafts, and the specification of design parameters. Specific efforts envisioned for the test facility are briefly noted, including evaluations of supercritical test shafts, stability thresholds for various sources and types of instabilities that can exist in shaft systems, effects of structural flexibility on the dynamic performance of dampers, and methods for vibration control in two-level and three-level flexible shaft systems.

  3. A pilot study of surgical training using a virtual robotic surgery simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tergas, Ana I; Sheth, Sangini B; Green, Isabel C; Giuntoli, Robert L; Winder, Abigail D; Fader, Amanda N

    2013-01-01

    Our objectives were to compare the utility of learning a suturing task on the virtual reality da Vinci Skills Simulator versus the da Vinci Surgical System dry laboratory platform and to assess user satisfaction among novice robotic surgeons. Medical trainees were enrolled prospectively; one group trained on the virtual reality simulator, and the other group trained on the da Vinci dry laboratory platform. Trainees received pretesting and post-testing on the dry laboratory platform. Participants then completed an anonymous online user experience and satisfaction survey. We enrolled 20 participants. Mean pretest completion times did not significantly differ between the 2 groups. Training with either platform was associated with a similar decrease in mean time to completion (simulator platform group, 64.9 seconds [P = .04]; dry laboratory platform group, 63.9 seconds [P virtual reality platform. The majority found the training "definitely useful" in improving robotic surgical skills (mean, 4.6) and would attend future training sessions (mean, 4.5). Training on the virtual reality robotic simulator or the dry laboratory robotic surgery platform resulted in significant improvements in time to completion and economy of motion for novice robotic surgeons. Although there was a perception that both simulators improved performance, there was a preference for the virtual reality simulator. Benefits unique to the simulator platform include autonomy of use, computerized performance feedback, and ease of setup. These features may facilitate more efficient and sophisticated simulation training above that of the conventional dry laboratory platform, without loss of efficacy.

  4. Integrating Soft Set Theory and Fuzzy Linguistic Model to Evaluate the Performance of Training Simulation Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuei-Hu; Chang, Yung-Chia; Chain, Kai; Chung, Hsiang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of high technologies and the arrival of the information age have caused changes to the modern warfare. The military forces of many countries have replaced partially real training drills with training simulation systems to achieve combat readiness. However, considerable types of training simulation systems are used in military settings. In addition, differences in system set up time, functions, the environment, and the competency of system operators, as well as incomplete information have made it difficult to evaluate the performance of training simulation systems. To address the aforementioned problems, this study integrated analytic hierarchy process, soft set theory, and the fuzzy linguistic representation model to evaluate the performance of various training simulation systems. Furthermore, importance-performance analysis was adopted to examine the influence of saving costs and training safety of training simulation systems. The findings of this study are expected to facilitate applying military training simulation systems, avoiding wasting of resources (e.g., low utility and idle time), and providing data for subsequent applications and analysis. To verify the method proposed in this study, the numerical examples of the performance evaluation of training simulation systems were adopted and compared with the numerical results of an AHP and a novel AHP-based ranking technique. The results verified that not only could expert-provided questionnaire information be fully considered to lower the repetition rate of performance ranking, but a two-dimensional graph could also be used to help administrators allocate limited resources, thereby enhancing the investment benefits and training effectiveness of a training simulation system.

  5. HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT IN INDIAN SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIES : A STUDY WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO LIBRARY PROFESSIONALS TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT FACILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lt. Rajashekara G.R.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Information explosion and rapid growth in technology made the existing knowledge of software technology library professionals ineffective, which they had at the time of entering into the organization. Hence, professionals have to be trained to operate new techniques and equipment‘s, to handle the present as well as new jobs more effectively. Training is useful not only for the organizations, but also for the employees as it develops knowledge, problem-solving ability and skill of the newly recruited employees on the one hand and serves as a refresher course in updating old employees on the other hand. It aims at improving the organization‘s performance through the enhanced performance of its employees. Because of these reasons training has become an integral part of human resource development in software technology libraries. Knowing this fact following study has been conducted to identify the training and development facilities provided to in Indian software technology libraries.

  6. Expanding Simulations as a Means of Tactical Training with Multinational Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-09

    military.90 Zero military sales alone are not enough evidence that simulations are not a viable means of training from CONUS to OCONUS. However, the...Planning Studies by ANDREW S. EAGEN, MAJOR, U.S. ARMY B.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, 2006 Fort...the simulation technology available, and the viewpoint of NATO and European Union partners on simulations training. Each category provided evidence to

  7. Laparoscopic simulation training in gynaecology: Current provision and staff attitudes - a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Christy; Fox, Robert; Hinshaw, Kim; Draycott, Timothy J; James, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore current provision of laparoscopic simulation training, and to determine attitudes of trainers and trainees to the role of simulators in surgical training across the UK. An anonymous cross-sectional survey with cluster sampling was developed and circulated. All Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) Training Programme Directors (TPD), College Tutors (RCT) and Trainee representatives (TR) across the UK were invited to participate. One hundred and ninety-six obstetricians and gynaecologists participated. Sixty-three percent of hospitals had at least one box trainer, and 14.6% had least one virtual-reality simulator. Only 9.3% and 3.6% stated that trainees used a structured curriculum on box and virtual-reality simulators, respectively. Respondents working in a Large/Teaching hospital (p = 0.008) were more likely to agree that simulators enhance surgical training. Eighty-nine percent agreed that simulators improve the quality of training, and should be mandatory or desirable for junior trainees. Consultants (p = 0.003) and respondents over 40 years (p = 0.011) were more likely to hold that a simulation test should be undertaken before live operation. Our data demonstrated, therefore, that availability of laparoscopic simulators is inconsistent, with limited use of mandatory structured curricula. In contrast, both trainers and trainees recognise a need for greater use of laparoscopic simulation for surgical training.

  8. Effects of a prior short simulated training session on the subsequent occurrence of ventilatory thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhem, Gaël; Dorel, Sylvain; Hug, Francois

    2009-03-01

    The concept of ventilatory thresholds (VTs) has been shown to be particularly useful to prescribe exercise intensities, yet, to date no study has examined the effects of previous submaximal exercise (i.e. a simulated training session) on the subsequent occurrence of VTs. We designed the present study to test the hypothesis that a previous short simulated training session induces an earlier VTs occurrence. Thirteen trained subjects perfomed two classical incremental tests on a cycle ergometer. The two tests were separated by a time period of 2-5 days, and the second test was preceded by a 34-min simulated training session. The first and second VTs (VT(1) and VT(2), respectively) were detected and expressed in their corresponding values of time, V O(2), and power output. The simulated training session did not modify VT(1) occurrence. In contrast, VT(2) was influenced by the simulated training session, showing a significant earlier occurence when VT(2) was expressed in time [-42 (-72; -13)s] and in power output [-15 (-25; -5)W]. Maximal power tolerated (MPT) was also significantly reduced by the previous exercise [-17 (-27; -7)W]. As a consequence, training intensities based on power output (associated with VT(2) or in %MPT) would be overestimated (i.e. higher metabolic state) after a short period of training session. Thus, doubt is cast on the pertinence of using the power output (or running speed by extension) for prescription of exercise during prolonged training sessions.

  9. Tube thoracostomy training with a medical simulator is associated with faster, more successful performance of the procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Sun Wook; You, Je Sung; Chung, Hyun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Tube thoracostomy (TT) is a commonly performed intensive care procedure. Simulator training may be a good alternative method for TT training, compared with conventional methods such as apprenticeship and animal skills laboratory. However, there is insufficient evidence supporting use of a simulator. The aim of this study is to determine whether training with medical simulator is associated with faster TT process, compared to conventional training without simulator. Methods This is a simulation study. Eligible participants were emergency medicine residents with very few (≤3 times) TT experience. Participants were randomized to two groups: the conventional training group, and the simulator training group. While the simulator training group used the simulator to train TT, the conventional training group watched the instructor performing TT on a cadaver. After training, all participants performed a TT on a cadaver. The performance quality was measured as correct placement and time delay. Subjects were graded if they had difficulty on process. Results Estimated median procedure time was 228 seconds in the conventional training group and 75 seconds in the simulator training group, with statistical significance (P=0.040). The difficulty grading did not show any significant difference among groups (overall performance scale, 2 vs. 3; P=0.094). Conclusion Tube thoracostomy training with a medical simulator, when compared to no simulator training, is associated with a significantly faster procedure, when performed on a human cadaver. PMID:27752610

  10. Simulation training of community job skills for adults with autism: a further analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattimore, L Perry; Parsons, Marsha B; Reid, Dennis H

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the benefits of training work skills in a simulated situation to adults with autism by examining their performance at a job site. In the first study, simulation training on new work tasks included the same materials and job coach from the job setting (i.e., a common stimuli approach to promote generalization). In the second study, each participant received training on new work tasks using materials that were different from those in the job setting. In both studies, simulation training was accompanied by improvement in each participant's subsequent job performance. Results are discussed regarding the importance of using research-based procedures in supported work versus practices that are currently popular but not necessarily based on research. Working guidelines are offered for using simulation training to promote more success in supported work among adults with disabilities on the severe end of the autism spectrum.

  11. Simulator program as a form of implementation of electronic teaching tools for self-study of foreign students at the stage of pre-university training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriy O. Savel'ev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Questions of empowerment the organization of classroom and extracurricular self-study of foreign students at the stage of pre-university training through the implementation of electronic teaching tools as a component of computer training facilities in educational process are considered. Classification of modern electronic teaching tools as a component of computer hardware training, developed on the basis of modern information and communication technologies is offered. Version of program-simulator "Introductory course" is offered. The program is created by means of WEB-programming and uses training material of introductory course. Introductory course is one of the most important elements of teaching of scientific style of speech within the language training for the foreign students at the preparatory faculty.

  12. SPOKES: an End-to-End Simulation Facility for Spectroscopic Cosmological Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Nord, B; Refregier, A; Gamper, La; Gamper, Lu; Hambrecht, B; Chang, C; Forero-Romero, J E; Serrano, S; Cunha, C; Coles, O; Nicola, A; Busha, M; Bauer, A; Saunders, W; Jouvel, S; Kirk, D; Wechsler, R

    2016-01-01

    The nature of dark matter, dark energy and large-scale gravity pose some of the most pressing questions in cosmology today. These fundamental questions require highly precise measurements, and a number of wide-field spectroscopic survey instruments are being designed to meet this requirement. A key component in these experiments is the development of a simulation tool to forecast science performance, define requirement flow-downs, optimize implementation, demonstrate feasibility, and prepare for exploitation. We present SPOKES (SPectrOscopic KEn Simulation), an end-to-end simulation facility for spectroscopic cosmological surveys designed to address this challenge. SPOKES is based on an integrated infrastructure, modular function organization, coherent data handling and fast data access. These key features allow reproducibility of pipeline runs, enable ease of use and provide flexibility to update functions within the pipeline. The cyclic nature of the pipeline offers the possibility to make the science outpu...

  13. Modeling and simulation of the data communication network at the ASRM Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirgudkar, R. P.; Moorhead, R. J.; Smith, W. D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling and simulation of the communication network for the NASA Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) facility under construction at Yellow Creek near Luka, Mississippi. Manufacturing, testing, and operations at the ASRM site will be performed in different buildings scattered over an 1800 acre site. These buildings are interconnected through a local area network (LAN), which will contain one logical Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) ring acting as a backbone for the whole complex. The network contains approximately 700 multi-vendor workstations, 22 multi-vendor workcells, and 3 VAX clusters interconnected via Ethernet and FDDI. The different devices produce appreciably different traffic patterns, each pattern will be highly variable, and some patterns will be very bursty. Most traffic is between the VAX clusters and the other devices. Comdisco's Block Oriented Network Simulator (BONeS) has been used for network simulation. The two primary evaluation parameters used to judge the expected network performance are throughput and delay.

  14. Design and Implementation of Training Simulator for Multi-purpose Construction Crawler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen-hong; SUN Shao-wen; ZHANG Qi; SUN Wei; SHI Ben-guang

    2008-01-01

    An efficient multi-purpoee construction crawler training simulator is developed based on windows platform using digital signal processing, multimedia, sensing, simulation modeling and real-time visualization simulation technologies. The simulator architecture and each part are discussed in this paper. The module designs for data acquisition, dynamic modeling and visual, sound and assess simulation are focused. The system has been put into practice and the satisfactory results are got.

  15. The effect of virtual endoscopy simulator training on novices: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguang Qiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Advances in virtual endoscopy simulators have paralleled an interest in medical simulation for gastrointestinal endoscopy training. OBJECTIVE: The primary objective was to determine whether the virtual endoscopy simulator training could improve the performance of novices. DESIGN: A systematic review. SETTING: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs that compared virtual endoscopy simulator training with bedside teaching or any other intervention for novices were collected. PATIENTS: Novice endoscopists. INTERVENTIONS: The PRISMA statement was followed during the course of the research. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ScienceDirect were searched (up to July 2013. Data extraction and assessment were independently performed. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Independent procedure completion, total procedure time and required assistance. RESULTS: Fifteen studies (n = 354 were eligible for inclusion: 9 studies designed for colonoscopy training, 6 for gastroscopy training. For gastroscopy training, procedure completed independently was reported in 87.7% of participants in simulator training group compared to 70.0% of participants in control group (1 study; 22 participants; RR 1.25; 95% CI 1.13-1.39; P<0.0001. For colonoscopy training, procedure completed independently was reported in 89.3% of participants in simulator training group compared to 88.9% of participants in control group (7 study; 163 participants; RR 1.10; 95% CI 0.88-1.37; P = 0.41; I(2 = 85%. LIMITATIONS: The included studies are quite in-homogeneous with respect to training schedule and procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Virtual endoscopy simulator training might be effective for gastroscopy, but so far no data is available to support this for colonoscopy.

  16. The Relationship of Endoscopic Proficiency to Educational Expense for Virtual Reality Simulator Training Amongst Surgical Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raque, Jessica; Goble, Adam; Jones, Veronica M; Waldman, Lindsey E; Sutton, Erica

    2015-07-01

    With the introduction of Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery, training methods in flexible endoscopy are being augmented with simulation-based curricula. The investment for virtual reality simulators warrants further research into its training advantage. Trainees were randomized into bedside or simulator training groups (BED vs SIM). SIM participated in a proficiency-based virtual reality curriculum. Trainees' endoscopic skills were rated using the Global Assessment of Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Skills (GAGES) in the patient care setting. The number of cases to reach 90 per cent of the maximum GAGES score and calculated costs of training were compared. Nineteen residents participated in the study. There was no difference in the average number of cases required to achieve 90 per cent of the maximum GAGES score for esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 13 (SIM) versus11 (BED) (P = 0.63), or colonoscopy 21 (SIM) versus 4 (BED) (P = 0.34). The average per case cost of training for esophagogastroduodenoscopy was $35.98 (SIM) versus $39.71 (BED) (P = 0.50), not including the depreciation costs associated with the simulator ($715.00 per resident over six years). Use of a simulator appeared to increase the cost of training without accelerating the learning curve or decreasing faculty time spent in instruction. The importance of simulation in endoscopy training will be predicated on more cost-effective simulators.

  17. The Role of Ultrasound Simulation in Obstetrics and Gynecology Training: A UK Trainees' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hersha; Chandrasekaran, Dhivya; Myriokefalitaki, Eva; Gebeh, Alpha; Jones, Kate; Jeve, Yadava B

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasonography is a core skill required by all obstetrics and gynecology trainees; however, training opportunities in clinical ultrasound are declining. Simulation ultrasound training has been proposed as a strategy to overcome this.The study aims were to determine the current availability of clinical and simulation ultrasound training in obstetrics and gynecology in the United Kingdom and to explore the trainees' perspective on the role of ultrasound simulation. All obstetrics and gynecology trainees within the East Midlands Local Education Training Board in the United Kingdom were asked to complete an anonymous web-based survey in July 2014. Of 140 trainees, 70 (50%) responded to the survey, and 69% reported rarely having dedicated clinical ultrasound sessions. Fifty percent had failed to achieve ultrasound competencies required for their stage of training, and 83% felt that the pressures of service provision limited their exposure to clinical ultrasound.Seventy-three percent of the trainees considered ultrasound simulation to be an essential component of training, and 69% agreed that it would help improve their clinical skills. Only 50% had access to an ultrasound simulator. Seventy-seven percent of the trainees thought that it would be useful to have ultrasound simulation integrated into training. Trainees are struggling to achieve minimal ultrasound competences with clinical ultrasound training alone. They believe that ultrasound simulation will shorten the learning curve and improve their clinical skills and knowledge. Despite the cost implications of simulation training, we propose that consideration is given to formal integration of ultrasound simulation into the curriculum as a possible way forward.

  18. Simulation in neurosurgical training: a blueprint and national approach to implementation for initial years trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihan; Kamaly, Ian; Luthra, Pramod; Whitfield, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Simulation has played an increasing role in surgical training in recent years, this follows from various reports such as the Chief Medical Officer annual report and Sir John Temple's 'Time for Training' and also from other factors such as increasing focus on efficiency and transparency within the healthcare system. Evidence has shown that simulation can develop and improve technical, clinical, communication and management skills. With technological advances, the quality of simulation has also improved with more realistic models and environment. We have undertaken a review of recent drivers for simulation training in the UK, current techniques and have focused on the application of simulation training within the current UK Neurosurgical curriculum for newly appointed trainees.

  19. CFD Simulations of Selected Steady-State and Transient Experiments in the PLANDTL Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgacz, S.; Bieder, U.; Gorsse, Y.; Swirski, K.

    2016-09-01

    In Sodium Cooled Fast Neutron Reactors natural convection flow and thermal stratification in the upper plenum may occur under emergency shutdown conditions. Thermal stratification phenomena have been examined experimentally in the PLANDTL facility of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. This paper presents the results of numerical simulations of selected steady-state and transient experiments in the PLANDTL facility, using TrioCFD/MC2 code developed at CEA. CFD approach for the flow in large volumes and a sub-channel approach for the flow in the core region are used. Calculated results have been validated against experimental values. Validation of the upper plenum modelling has been also made based on CEA Sodium mixed convection experiments.

  20. Validation Through Simulations of a Cn2 Profiler for the ESO/VLT Adaptive Optics Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Rissmann, A; Kolb, J; Louarn, M Le; Madec, P -Y; Neichel, B

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) project envisages transforming one of the VLT units into an adaptive telescope and providing its ESO (European Southern Observatory) second generation instruments with turbulence corrected wavefronts. For MUSE and HAWK-I this correction will be achieved through the GALACSI and GRAAL AO modules working in conjunction with a 1170 actuators Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF). Multiple wavefront sensors will enable GLAO and LTAO capabilities, whose performance can greatly benefit from a knowledge about the stratification of the turbulence in the atmosphere. This work, totally based on end-to-end simulations, describes the validation tests conducted on a Cn2 profiler adapted for the AOF specifications. Because an absolute profile calibration is strongly dependent on a reliable knowledge of turbulence parameters r0 and L0, the tests presented here refer only to normalized output profiles. Uncertainties in the input parameters inherent t...

  1. The Effects of Computer-Simulation Game Training on Participants' Opinions on Leadership Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewiorek, Anna; Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Lainema, Timo; Saarinen, Eeli; Lehtinen, Erno

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to elucidate new information on the possibility of leadership training through business computer-simulation gaming in a virtual working context. In the study, a business-simulation gaming session was organised for graduate students ("n"?=?26). The participants played the simulation game in virtual teams…

  2. The Effects of Computer-Simulation Game Training on Participants' Opinions on Leadership Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewiorek, Anna; Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Lainema, Timo; Saarinen, Eeli; Lehtinen, Erno

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to elucidate new information on the possibility of leadership training through business computer-simulation gaming in a virtual working context. In the study, a business-simulation gaming session was organised for graduate students ("n"?=?26). The participants played the simulation game in virtual teams…

  3. An intrinsically safe facility for forefront research and training on nuclear technologies — General description of the system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansani, L.; Bruzzone, M.; Frambati, S.; Reale, M.

    2014-04-01

    In the framework of research on generation-IV reactors, it is very important to have infrastructures specifically dedicated to the study of fundamental parameters in dynamics and kinetics of future fast-neutron reactors. Among various options pursued by international groups, Italy focused on lead-cooled reactors, which guarantee minimal neutron slowdown and capture and efficient cooling. In this paper it is described the design of a the low-power prototype generator, LEADS, that could be used within research facilities such as the National Laboratory of Legnaro of the INFN. The LEADS has a high safety standard in order to be used as a training facility, but it has also a good flexibility so as to allow a wide range of measurements and experiments. A high safety standard is achieved by limiting the reactor power to less than few hundred kW and the neutron multiplication factor k eff to less than 0.95 (a limiting value for spent fuel pool), by using a pure-uranium fuel (no plutonium) and by using solid lead as a diffuser. The proposed core is therefore intrinsically subcritical and has to be driven by an external neutron source generated by a proton beam impinging in a target. Preliminary simulations, performed with the MCNPX code indicated, for a 0.75mA continuous proton beam current at 70MeV proton energy, a reactor power of about 190kW when using a beryllium converter. The enriched-uranium fuel elements are immersed in a solid-lead matrix and contained within a steel vessel. The system is cooled by helium gas, which is transparent to neutrons and does not undergo activation. The gas is pumped by a compressor through specific holes at the entrance of the active volume with a temperature which varies according to the operating conditions and a pressure of about 1.1MPa. The hot gas coming out of the vessel is cooled by an external helium-water heat exchanger. The beryllium converter is cooled by its dedicated helium gas cooling system. After shutdown, the decay is

  4. 20th International Training Course (ITC-20) on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials evaluation report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Amanda Ann

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this evaluation report is to provide the information necessary to improve the effectiveness of the ITC provided to the International Atomic Energy Agency Member States. This report examines ITC-20 training content, delivery methods, scheduling, and logistics. Ultimately, this report evaluates whether the course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the participants needs in the protection of nuclear materials and facilities.

  5. Safety of sports facilities and training of graduates in physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano Spica, V; Giampaoli, S; Di Onofrio, V; Liguori, G

    2015-01-01

    Post-industrial societies have to face the problem of physical inactivity and inappropriate lifestyles. Programs to promote physical activity are strongly supported by supranational, national and local institutions and organizations. These programs can be developed in sport facilities but also in places that are not institutionally dedicated to sport. The use of urban and working sites has the advantage of better reach the various segments of the population, but at the same time requires coordination between various professionals in structuring an effective intervention. Bibliographical research in the historical archives of the library of the University of Rome Foro Italico, online databases, paleoigiene (wikigiene), documents archives (GSMS-SItI, WHO, ISS, OsEPi, INAIL, ISTAT, national laws). Several guidelines and regulations face the problem of safety in sport environments. The context is in rapid evolution and directions are provided by public health authorities. Graduates in Sport and Physical Activity, represent an additional resource in terms of: prevention and safety in the workplace, health education, application of preventive and adapted physical activities in the territory. These tasks can be integrated in all prevention stages: e.g. childhood and primary prevention programs in school, adapted physical activity for the elderly. The contribution of public health specialists is strategic in the surveillance and coordination of integrated projects. At the same time, graduates in Physical Education appear to be pivots for health promotion and qualified resources for institutions in the territory. Their training should always include contents related to prevention and safety, regulations on sport and working environments, along with bases of preventive medicine related to the context of physical activity.

  6. [Endoscopy training by using ex vivo and simulators: a new teaching tool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artifon, Everson L A; Tchekmedyian, Asadur J; Fernandes, Kaie; Artifon, Aline N; Fonseca, Alvaro; Otoch, Jose P

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the traditional teaching model of gastrointestinal endoscopy has been based on the teacher-student tutorial method based on theoretical models. Today, simulators have the advantages of virtual reality. The handling apparatus is similar to that used in clinical practice; it is safe, which allows unlimited use, cost-effective for institutions and with superior performance over other training models. Besides, biological simulators are a viable, accessible and affordable tool to simulate gastrointestinal lesions, allowing training in endoscopy with a high degree of similarity in the endoscopic appearance. In this review, we analyze both models, showing its advantages for the training of the endoscopist of the times.

  7. The patient simulator for training of anesthesia residents in the management of one lung ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Zaki-Udin; Dorfling, Johannes; McLarney, John T; Sloan, Paul A

    2008-01-01

    Simulators are used extensively for the training of medical personnel. All anesthesia providers should be prepared and trained in the management of one lung ventilation for pulmonary surgery, yet familiarization with one lung ventilation may not be possible on a routine basis in the operating room. Therefore, this reports details the first use of the patient simulator (PS) to enhance the training of anesthesia residents in the management of one lung ventilation. A detailed report of our computer program for simulating one lung ventilation is included.

  8. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of LTR Training versus Simulation Training and Stress Inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    measuring electrodermal activity during didactic and hands-on training. Training participants completed a survey regarding perceived value of the...of change (e.g., recruiting, training, gaining experience) and the clouds represent the sources and sinks that define the material and information

  9. Development of a Distributed Simulation Environment for Crisis Management Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vullings, H.J.L.M.; Kleermaeker, S. de; Vermeulen, C.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Disasters happen; you simply cannot prevent them. So you need to be adequately trained for managing a crisis when it occurs. Most crisis management professionals, however, do not have sufficient time to train regularly, as they often have demanding regular jobs too. In addition, most current-day tra

  10. Low-Cost Avionics Simulation for Aircrew Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Bernell J.

    This report documents an experiment to determine the training effectiveness of a microcomputer-based avionics system trainer as a cost-effective alternative to training in the actual aircraft. Participants--26 operationally qualified C-141 pilots with no prior knowledge of the Fuel Saving Advisory System (FSAS), a computerized fuel management…

  11. Simulation Models for Teacher Training: Perspectives and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manisha

    2015-01-01

    It has always been a mind dwelling exercise for the trainers to meet the training needs of the future role players of any organization. May it be corporate offices, Government offices and charitable organizations; training is needed at various stages of job from executives to administrators, from teachers to principals, from line officer to JE and…

  12. CACTUS: Command and Control Training Using Knowledge-Based Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Roger; Ravenscroft, Andrew; Williams, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    The CACTUS project was concerned with command and control training of large incidents where public order may be at risk, such as large demonstrations and marches. The training requirements and objectives of the project are first summarized justifying the use of knowledge-based computer methods to support and extend conventional training…

  13. Simulation of loss of feedwater transient of MASLWR test facility by MARS-KS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Juyeop [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    MASLWR test facility is a mock-up of a passive integral type reactor equipped with helical coil steam generator. Since SMART reactor which is being current developed domestically also adopts helical coil steam generator, KINS has joined this ICSP to evaluate performance of domestic regulatory audit thermal-hydraulic code (MARS-KS code) in various respects including wall-to-fluid heat transfer model modification implemented in the code by independent international experiment database. In the ICSP, two types of transient experiments have been focused and they are loss of feedwater transient with subsequent ADS operation and long term cooling (SP-2) and normal operating conditions at different power levels (SP-3). In the present study, KINS simulation results by the MARS-KS code (KS-002 version) for the SP-2 experiment are presented in detail and conclusions on MARS-KS code performance drawn through this simulation is described. Performance of the MARS-KS code is evaluated through the simulation of the loss of feedwater transient of the MASLWR test facility. Steady state run shows helical coil specific heat transfer models implemented in the code is reasonable. However, through the transient run, it is also found that three-dimensional effect within the HPC and axial conduction effect through the HTP are not well reproduced by the code.

  14. Simulation of cryogenic He spills as basis for planning of experimental campaign in the EVITA facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, G.; Bartels, H. W.; Iseli, M.; Meyder, R.; Nordlinder, S.; Pasler, V.; Porfiri, M. T.

    2006-01-01

    Code validation activities have been promoted inside the European fusion development agreement (EFDA) to test the capability of codes in simulating accident phenomena in fusion facilities and, specifically, in the International thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). This work includes a comparison between three different computer codes (CONSEN, MAGS and MELCOR) and one analytical model (ITER Model) in simulating cryogenic helium releases into the vacuum vessel (VV) which contains hot structures. The scope was the evaluation of the transient pressure inside the VV. The results will be used to design a vent duct (equivalent diameter, length and roughness) to allow pressure relief for the protection of the VV, which has a maximum design pressure of 200 kPa. The model geometry is a simplified scheme preserving the main features of the ITER design. Based on the results of the simulations, a matrix of experiments was developed to validate the calculated results and to design the vent duct for the ITER VV. The experiments are planned to be performed in the EVITA test facility, located in the CEA Cadarache research centre (France).

  15. Phase 1 Testing Results of Immobilization of WTP Effluent Management Facility Evaporator Bottoms Core Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, Alex D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-05

    simulant of the LAW Melter Off-gas Condensate expected during DFLAW operations and use it in evaporator testing to predict the composition of the effluents from the Effluent Management Facility (EMF) evaporator to aid in planning for their disposition. The objective of this task was to test immobilization options for this evaporator bottoms aqueous stream. This document describes the method used to formulate a simulant of this EMF evaporator bottoms stream, immobilize it, and determine if the immobilized waste forms meet disposal criteria.

  16. Simulation studies of laser wakefield acceleration based on typical 100 TW laser facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Da-Zhang; GAO Jie; ZHU Xiong-Wei; HE An

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,2-D Particle-In-Cell simulations are made for Laser Wakefield Accelerations(LWFA).As in a real experiment,we perform plasma density scanning for typical 100 TW laser facilities.Several basic laws for self-injected acceleration in a bubble regime are presented.According to these laws,we choose a proper plasma density and then obtain a high quality quasi-monoenergetic electron bunch with arms energy of more than 650 MeV and a bunch length of less than 1.5 μn.

  17. Beam-loading Compensation Experiment in the CLIC Test Facility. Modelling and Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Kononenko, Oleksiy; Grudiev, Alexej; Tecker, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Transient beam-loading in the main linac is an important performance issue for a Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study. In order to keep the luminosity losses less than 1%, the rms bunch-to-bunch relative energy spread must be below 0.03%. Beam-loading model and a compensation scheme, which meet this requirement, have been recently developed for CLIC. In this paper we propose ways to confirm the feasibility of the compensation scheme experimentally in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3). As a part of this study a CTF3-specific model to simulate an RF power production is developed and the corresponding numerical results are discussed

  18. 3D numerical simulations of a LOVA reproduction inside the new facility STARDUST-UPGRADE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciparisse, J. F.; Malizia, A.; Poggi, L. A.; Tieri, F.; Gelfusa, M.; Murari, A.; Del Papa, C.; Giovannangeli, I.; Gaudio, P.

    2017-02-01

    A loss of vacuum in a vessel, containing or not dust, is the typical case study considered in the STARDUST-UPGRADE facility of the Quantum Electronics and Plasma Group of the university of Rome Tor Vergata. This kind of accident was simulated numerically, without including the presence of dust, for two mass flow rates and three different inlet ports (C, E and F). Numerical settings are explained and the results obtained in each case are shown and discussed. At the end of the work, conclusions about what seen and further foreseen developments of this research are presented.

  19. Monte-Carlo simulations of the new LNHB manganese bath facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogheard, F; Chartier, J L; Cassette, P

    2012-04-01

    The new manganese bath facility of the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel has been modeled by using three Monte-Carlo codes: MCNPX, GEANT4, and FLUKA, in order to determine the correction factors needed in the neutron source calibration process. The most realistic source geometry has been determined, and the most reliable cross sections library has been chosen. The models were compared, and discrepancies between the codes have been pointed out. Potential causes of deviations between results were assessed and discussed using additional models. Finally, an experimental process is proposed to validate the accuracy of the different codes and their abilities in simulating the neutron capture by the manganese bath.

  20. Simulation of Cascaded Longitudinal-Space-Charge Amplifier at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (Fast) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Northern Illinois U.; Piot, P. [Northern Illinois U.

    2015-12-01

    Cascaded Longitudinal Space Charge Amplifiers (LSCA) have been proposed as a mechanism to generate density modulation over a board spectral range. The scheme has been recently demonstrated in the optical regime and has confirmed the production of broadband optical radiation. In this paper we investigate, via numerical simulations, the performance of a cascaded LSCA beamline at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility to produce broadband ultraviolet radiation. Our studies are carried out using elegant with included tree-based grid-less space charge algorithm.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations of the complex field in the LHC radiation test facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Tsoulou, A; Rausch, R; Wijnands, Thijs

    2004-01-01

    The hard radiation environment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) demands for a careful choice of COTS (Components Off The Shelf) that will be installed in the tunnel. All the electronic equipment should be tested in a mixed radiation field, similar to that of the LHC. To obtain optimum results it is essential to study thoroughly the complex radiation field in the test facility at CERN. For this purpose a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the test area was carried out and the calculations were compared with the dosimetry measurements already available.

  2. Numerical simulations of the first operational conditions of the negative ion test facility SPIDER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serianni, G., E-mail: gianluigi.serianni@igi.cnr.it; Agostinetti, P.; Antoni, V.; Baltador, C.; Chitarin, G.; Marconato, N.; Pasqualotto, R.; Sartori, E.; Toigo, V.; Veltri, P. [Consorzio RFX (CNR, ENEA, INFN, UNIPD, Acciaierie Venete SpA), Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN-LNL, Viale dell’Università n. 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    In view of the realization of the negative ion beam injectors for ITER, a test facility, named SPIDER, is under construction in Padova (Italy) to study and optimize production and extraction of negative ions. The present paper is devoted to the analysis of the expected first operations of SPIDER in terms of single-beamlet and multiple-beamlet simulations of the hydrogen beam optics in various operational conditions. The effectiveness of the methods adopted to compensate for the magnetic deflection of the particles is also assessed. Indications for a sequence of the experimental activities are obtained.

  3. Evaporation Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Effluent Management Facility Core Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Mcclane, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation, and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator, in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF), and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator, so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of the LMOGC stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would reduce the need for closely integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Long-term implementation of this option after WTP start-up would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste, amongst the other operational complexities such a recycle stream presents. In order to accurately plan for the disposition path, it is key to experimentally determine the fate of contaminants. To do this, testing is needed to accurately account for the buffering chemistry of the components, determine the achievable evaporation end point, identify insoluble solids that form, and determine the distribution of key regulatory-impacting constituents. The LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures, have limited solubility in the glass waste form, and represent a materials corrosion concern, such as halides and sulfate. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components will accumulate in the Melter Condensate

  4. A different kind of weapon focus: simulated training with ballistic weapons reduces change blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J Eric T; Witt, Jessica K; Pratt, Jay

    2017-01-01

    Attentional allocation is flexibly altered by action-related priorities. Given that tools - and specifically weapons - can affect attentional allocation, we asked whether training with a weapon or holding a weapon during search would affect change detection. In three experiments, participants searched for changes to agents, shootable objects, or environments in the popular flicker paradigm. Participants trained with a simulated weapon or watched a video from the same training perspective and then searched for changes while holding a weapon or a control object. Results show an effect of training, highlighting the importance of sensorimotor experience for the action-relevant allocation of attention, and a possible interaction between training and the object held during search. Simulated training with ballistic weapons reduces change blindness. This result has implications for the interaction between tool use and attentional allocation.

  5. The effect of dyad versus individual simulation-based ultrasound training on skills transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Madsen, Mette E; Oxlund, Birgitte S

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Dyad practice may be as effective as individual practice during clinical skills training, improve students' confidence, and reduce costs of training. However, there is little evidence that dyad training is non-inferior to single-student practice in terms of skills transfer. OBJECTIVES......: This study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of simulation-based ultrasound training in pairs (dyad practice) with that of training alone (single-student practice) on skills transfer. METHODS: In a non-inferiority trial, 30 ultrasound novices were randomised to dyad (n = 16) or single-student (n...... = 14) practice. All participants completed a 2-hour training programme on a transvaginal ultrasound simulator. Participants in the dyad group practised together and took turns as the active practitioner, whereas participants in the single group practised alone. Performance improvements were evaluated...

  6. Impact of a simulation training curriculum on technical and nontechnical skills in colonoscopy: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Samir C; Garg, Ankit; Scaffidi, Michael A; Yu, Jeffrey J; Plener, Ian S; Yong, Elaine; Cino, Maria; Grantcharov, Teodor P; Walsh, Catharine M

    2015-12-01

    GI endoscopy simulation-based training augments early clinical performance; however, the optimal manner by which to deliver training is unknown. We aimed to validate a simulation-based structured comprehensive curriculum (SCC) designed to teach technical, cognitive, and integrative competencies in colonoscopy. Single-blinded, randomized, controlled trial. Endoscopic simulation course at an academic hospital. Thirty-three novice endoscopists were allocated to an SCC group or self-regulated learning (SRL) group. The SCC group received a curriculum consisting of 6 hours of didactic lectures and 8 hours of virtual reality simulation-based training with expert feedback. The SRL group was provided a list of desired objectives and was instructed to practice on the simulator for an equivalent time (8 hours). Clinical transfer was assessed during 2 patient colonoscopies using the Joint Advisory Group Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (JAG DOPS) scale. Secondary outcome measures included differences in procedural knowledge, immediate post-training simulation performance, and delayed post-training (4-6 weeks) performance during an integrated scenario test on the JAG DOPS communication and integrated scenario global rating scales. There was no significant difference in baseline or post-training performance on the simulator task. The SCC group performed superiorly during their first and second clinical colonoscopies. Additionally, the SCC group demonstrated significantly better knowledge and colonoscopy-specific performance, communication, and global performance during the integrated scenario. We were unable to measure SRL participants' effort outside of mandatory training. In addition, feedback metrics and number of available simulation cases are limited. These results support integration of endoscopy simulation into a structured curriculum incorporating instructional feedback and complementary didactic knowledge as a means to augment technical, cognitive, and

  7. Simulation of a gamma reaction history (GRH) detector for use at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafil, Elliot; Toebbe, Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    Reaction history measurements are critical to diagnosing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. As such they will be essential components of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) diagnostics. One proposed method to record the reaction history is the construction of a gamma-sensitive gas Cerenkov detector. An array of these Cerenkov detectors can be used to discriminate between the different gamma ray energies produced during the ICF implosion. These fusion gammas are converted to optical photons for collection by fast recording systems. We have simulated the gamma reaction history (GRH) detector under development at NIF and LANL using Geant4. Our simulations have been used to determine energy cut-off ranges for photon production in various gases, optimizing converter material and thickness, and discriminating between proposed detector geometries in order to minimize the temporal spread of the signal.

  8. Development and Analysis of Train Brake Curve Calculation Methods with Complex Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bela Vincze

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an efficient method using simulation for developing and analyzing train brake curve calculation methods for the on-board computer of the ETCS system. An application example with actual measurements is also presented.

  9. Iteration in instructional design : an empirical study on the specification of training simulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstegen, D.M.L.

    2004-01-01

    Instructional design and development methods prescribe how specifications for advanced instructional products, such as training simulators, should be designed. In practice, however, the design process is disturbed by many 'pragmatic' factors, such as conflicting constraints, interference from manage

  10. Iteration in instructional design : an empirical study on the specification of training simulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstegen, D.M.L.

    2004-01-01

    Instructional design and development methods prescribe how specifications for advanced instructional products, such as training simulators, should be designed. In practice, however, the design process is disturbed by many 'pragmatic' factors, such as conflicting constraints, interference from manage

  11. Evaluation of a Radiation Worker Safety Training Program at a nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, J.E.

    1993-05-01

    A radiation safety course was evaluated using the Kirkpatrick criteria of training evaluation as a guide. Thirty-nine employees were given the two-day training course and were compared with 15 employees in a control group who did not receive the training. Cognitive results show an immediate gain in knowledge, and substantial retention at 6 months. Implications of the results are discussed in terms of applications to current radiation safety training was well as follow-on training research and development requirements.

  12. Design of a new IRSN thermal neutron field facility using Monte-Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, V

    2007-01-01

    The Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety owns a graphite-moderated AmBe neutron field facility, SIGMA, that has to be reconstructed. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to study the design of a new thermal facility based on IRSN existing facilities. Studies related to an update version of SIGMA concerned the enhancement of the thermal neutrons contribution to the dose equivalent. Calculations were mainly performed for a (252)Cf neutron source distribution located at the centre of a graphite moderator block. A quasi-pure thermal neutron field was obtained with a 2.4 x 2.4 x 2.4-m(3) block of graphite. A second acceptable neutron field was obtained with 3.3-MeV mono-energetic neutrons created by a 400-kV accelerator coupled to a graphite assembly of 1.5 x 1.5 x 1.5 m(3). The characteristics of the studied thermal fields with the requirement for a reference calibration field are compared, and the advantages and drawbacks of the different producing methods are discussed.

  13. A different kind of weapon focus: simulated training with ballistic weapons reduces change blindness

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, J. Eric T.; Witt, Jessica K.; Pratt, Jay

    2017-01-01

    Attentional allocation is flexibly altered by action-related priorities. Given that tools – and specifically weapons – can affect attentional allocation, we asked whether training with a weapon or holding a weapon during search would affect change detection. In three experiments, participants searched for changes to agents, shootable objects, or environments in the popular flicker paradigm. Participants trained with a simulated weapon or watched a video from the same training perspective and ...

  14. Experiment and simulations of sub-ps electron bunch train generation at Fermilab photoinjectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y.-E; Church, M.; /Fermilab; Piot, P.; Prokop, C.R.; /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-10-01

    Recently the generation of electron bunch trains with sub-picosecond time structure has been experimentally demonstrated at the A0 photoinjector of Fermilab using a transverse-longitudinal phase-space exchange beamline. The temporal profile of the bunch train can be easily tuned to meet the requirements of the applications of modern accelerator beams. In this paper we report the A0 bunch-train experiment and explore numerically the possible extension of this technique to shorter time scales at the Fermilab SRF Accelerator Test Facility, a superconducting linear electron accelerator currently under construction in the NML building.

  15. Unique Methodologies for Nano/Micro Manufacturing Job Training Via Desktop Supercomputer Modeling and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, Clyde [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Karonis, Nicholas [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Lurio, Laurence [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Piot, Philippe [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Xiao, Zhili [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Glatz, Andreas [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Pohlman, Nicholas [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Hou, Minmei [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Demir, Veysel [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Song, Jie [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Duffin, Kirk [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Johns, Mitrick [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Sims, Thomas [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Yin, Yanbin [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    2012-11-21

    This project establishes an initiative in high speed (Teraflop)/large-memory desktop supercomputing for modeling and simulation of dynamic processes important for energy and industrial applications. It provides a training ground for employment of current students in an emerging field with skills necessary to access the large supercomputing systems now present at DOE laboratories. It also provides a foundation for NIU faculty to quantum leap beyond their current small cluster facilities. The funding extends faculty and student capability to a new level of analytic skills with concomitant publication avenues. The components of the Hewlett Packard computer obtained by the DOE funds create a hybrid combination of a Graphics Processing System (12 GPU/Teraflops) and a Beowulf CPU system (144 CPU), the first expandable via the NIU GAEA system to ~60 Teraflops integrated with a 720 CPU Beowulf system. The software is based on access to the NVIDIA/CUDA library and the ability through MATLAB multiple licenses to create additional local programs. A number of existing programs are being transferred to the CPU Beowulf Cluster. Since the expertise necessary to create the parallel processing applications has recently been obtained at NIU, this effort for software development is in an early stage. The educational program has been initiated via formal tutorials and classroom curricula designed for the coming year. Specifically, the cost focus was on hardware acquisitions and appointment of graduate students for a wide range of applications in engineering, physics and computer science.

  16. Laparoscopic skill improvement after virtual reality simulator training in medical students as assessed by augmented reality simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tsutomu; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Matsutani, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Fujita, Isturo; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Fujikura, Terumichi; Miyashita, Masao; Uchida, Eiji

    2015-11-01

    Definitive assessment of laparoscopic skill improvement after virtual reality simulator training is best obtained during an actual operation. However, this is impossible in medical students. Therefore, we developed an alternative assessment technique using an augmented reality simulator. Nineteen medical students completed a 6-week training program using a virtual reality simulator (LapSim). The pretest and post-test were performed using an object-positioning module and cholecystectomy on an augmented reality simulator(ProMIS). The mean performance measures between pre- and post-training on the LapSim were compared with a paired t-test. In the object-positioning module, the execution time of the task (P reality simulator improved the operative skills of medical students as objectively evaluated by assessment using an augmented reality simulator instead of an actual operation. We hope that these findings help to establish an effective training program for medical students. © 2015 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Voluntary autonomous simulator based training in minimally invasive surgery, residents' compliance and reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Empel, P.J.; Verdam, M.G.E.; Strypet, M.; van Rijssen, L.B.; Huirne, J. A.; Scheele, F.; Bonjer, H.J.; Meijerink, W.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Knot tying and suturing skills in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) differ markedly from those in open surgery. Appropriate MIS training is mandatory before implementation into practice. The Advanced Suturing Course (ASC) is a structured simulator based training course that includes a 6-w

  18. Aerodynamic simulation of high-speed trains based on the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aerodynamic simulation of high-speed trains has been carried out by using Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). Non-simplified train model was used and the number of space grids reached tens of millions. All results under different working conditions reflected the actual situation.

  19. A DEVELOPMENTAL STUDY OF MEDICAL TRAINING SIMULATORS FOR ANESTHESIOLOGISTS. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABRAHAMSON, STEPHEN; DENSON, JUDSON S.

    IN THIS STUDY, A COMPUTER-CONTROLLED PATIENT SIMULATOR (SIM ONE) WAS DESIGNED, CONSTRUCTED, AND TESTED FOR THE TRAINING OF ANESTHESIOLOGY RESIDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. THE TRAINING INVOLVED THE DEVELOPMENT OF SKILL IN ENDOTRACHEAL INTUBATION. THE EXPERIMENT INVOLVED 10 ANESTHESIOLOGY RESIDENTS. FIVE WERE…

  20. Student peer teaching in paediatric simulation training is a feasible low-cost alternative for education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Michael; Mileder, Lukas P; Goeral, Katharina; Klebermass-Schrehof, Katrin; Cardona, Francesco S; Berger, Angelika; Schmölzer, Georg M; Olischar, Monika

    2017-06-01

    The World Health Organization recommends regular simulation training to prevent adverse healthcare events. We used specially trained medical students to provide paediatric simulation training to their peers and assessed feasibility, cost and confidence of students who attended the courses. Students at the Medical University of Vienna, Austria were eligible to participate. Students attended two high-fidelity simulation training sessions, delivered by peers, which were videorecorded for evaluation. The attendees then completed questionnaires before and after the training. Associated costs and potential benefits were analysed. From May 2013 to June 2015, 152 students attended the sessions and 57 (37.5%) completed both questionnaires. Satisfaction was high, with 95% stating their peer tutor was competent and 90% saying that peer tutors were well prepared. The attendees' confidence in treating critically ill children significantly improved after training (p < 0.001). The average costs for a peer tutor were six Euros per working hour, compared to 35 Euros for a physician. Using peer tutors for paediatric simulation training was a feasible and low-cost option that increased the number of medical students who could be trained and increased the self-confidence of the attendees. Satisfaction with the peer tutors was high. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Extending the features of RBMK refuelling machine simulator with a training tool based on virtual reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoudiakov, M.; Slonimsky, V.; Mitrofanov, S. (and others)

    2004-07-01

    The paper describes a continuation of efforts of an international Russian - Norwegian joint team to improve operational safety during the refuelling process of an RBMK-type reactor by implementing a training simulator based on an innovative Virtual Reality (VR) approach. During the preceding 1st stage of the project a display-based simulator was extended with VR models of the real Refuelling Machine (RM) and its environment in order to improve both the learning process and operation's effectiveness. The simulator's challenge is to support the performance (operational activity) of RM operational staff firstly by helping them to develop basic knowledge and skills as well as to keep skilled staff in close touch with the complex machinery of the Refuelling Machine. During the 2nd stage of the joint project the functional scope of the VR-simulator was greatly enhanced - firstly, by connecting to the RBMK-unit full-scope simulator, and, secondly, by including a training program and simulator model upgrade. The present 3rd stage of the Project is primarily oriented towards the improvement of the training process for maintenance and operational personnel by means of a development of the Training Support Methodology and Courses (TSMC) to be based on Virtual Reality and enlarged functionality of 3D and process modelling. The TMSC development is based on Russian and International Regulatory Bodies requirements and recommendations. Design, development and creation of a specialised VR-based Training System for RM Maintenance Personnel are very important for the Russian RBMK plants. The main goal is to create a powerful, autonomous VR-based simulator for training technical maintenance personnel on the Refuelling Machine. VR based training is expected to improve the effect of training compared to the current training based on traditional methods using printed documentation. The LNPP management and the Regulatory Bodies supported this goal. The VR-based Training System

  2. A new possibility in thoracoscopic virtual reality simulation training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine; Bjerrum, Flemming; Hansen, Henrik Jessen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to develop virtual reality simulation software for video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) lobectomy, to explore the opinions of thoracic surgeons concerning the VATS lobectomy simulator and to test the validity of the simulator metrics. METHODS: Experienced...... VATS surgeons worked with computer specialists to develop a VATS lobectomy software for a virtual reality simulator. Thoracic surgeons with different degrees of experience in VATS were enrolled at the 22nd meeting of the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) held in Copenhagen in June 2014...... content validity. Metrics were compared between the three groups. RESULTS: We succeeded in developing the first version of a virtual reality VATS lobectomy simulator. A total of 103 thoracic surgeons completed the simulated lobectomy and were distributed as follows: novices n = 32, intermediates n = 45...

  3. Development and training of a learning expert system in an autonomous mobile robot via simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spelt, P.F.; Lyness, E.; DeSaussure, G. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA). Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research)

    1989-11-01

    The Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) conducts basic research in the area of intelligent machines. Recently at CESAR a learning expert system was created to operate on board an autonomous robot working at a process control panel. The authors discuss two-computer simulation system used to create, evaluate and train this learning system. The simulation system has a graphics display of the current status of the process being simulated, and the same program which does the simulating also drives the actual control panel. Simulation results were validated on the actual robot. The speed and safety values of using a computerized simulator to train a learning computer, and future uses of the simulation system, are discussed.

  4. Defense Waste Processing Facility Simulant Chemical Processing Cell Studies for Sludge Batch 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Tara E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. David [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Woodham, Wesley H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-10

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received a technical task request from Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Saltstone Engineering to perform simulant tests to support the qualification of Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) and to develop the flowsheet for SB9 in the DWPF. These efforts pertained to the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). CPC experiments were performed using SB9 simulant (SB9A) to qualify SB9 for sludge-only and coupled processing using the nitric-formic flowsheet in the DWPF. Two simulant batches were prepared, one representing SB8 Tank 40H and another representing SB9 Tank 51H. The simulant used for SB9 qualification testing was prepared by blending the SB8 Tank 40H and SB9 Tank 51H simulants. The blended simulant is referred to as SB9A. Eleven CPC experiments were run with an acid stoichiometry ranging between 105% and 145% of the Koopman minimum acid equation (KMA), which is equivalent to 109.7% and 151.5% of the Hsu minimum acid factor. Three runs were performed in the 1L laboratory scale setup, whereas the remainder were in the 4L laboratory scale setup. Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed on nine of the eleven. The other two were SRAT cycles only. One coupled flowsheet and one extended run were performed for SRAT and SME processing. Samples of the condensate, sludge, and off-gas were taken to monitor the chemistry of the CPC experiments.

  5. Needs assessment for simulation training in neuroendoscopy: a Canadian national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, Faizal A; Dubrowski, Adam; Drake, James; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, dramatic changes in surgical education have increased interest in simulation-based training for complex surgical skills. This is particularly true for endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV), given the potential for serious intraoperative errors arising from surgical inexperience. However, prior to simulator development, a thorough assessment of training needs is essential to ensure development of educationally relevant platforms. The purpose of this study was to conduct a national needs assessment addressing specific goals of instruction, to guide development of simulation platforms, training curricula, and assessment metrics for ETV. Canadian neurosurgeons performing ETV were invited to participate in a structured online questionnaire regarding the procedural steps for ETV, the frequency and significance of intraoperative errors committed while learning the technique, and simulation training modules of greatest potential educational benefit. Descriptive data analysis was completed for both quantitative and qualitative responses. Thirty-two (55.2%) of 58 surgeons completed the survey. All believed that virtual reality simulation training for ETV would be a valuable addition to clinical training. Selection of ventriculostomy site, navigation within the ventricles, and performance of the ventriculostomy ranked as the most important steps to simulate. Technically inadequate ventriculostomy and inappropriate fenestration site selection were ranked as the most frequent/significant errors. A standard ETV module was thought to be most beneficial for resident training. To inform the development of a simulation-based training program for ETV, the authors have conducted a national needs assessment. The results provide valuable insight to inform key design elements necessary to construct an educationally relevant device and educational program.

  6. Culturally Competent Palliative and Hospice Care Training for Ethnically Diverse Staff in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka-Yahiro, Merle R; McFarlane, Sandra; Koijane, Jeannette; Li, Dongmei

    2016-03-29

    Between 2013 and 2030, older adults 65 years and older of racial/ethnic populations in the U.S. is projected to increase by 123% in comparison to the Whites (Non-Hispanics). To meet this demand, training of ethnically diverse health staff in long-term care facilities in palliative and hospice care is imperative. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a palliative and hospice care training of staff in two nursing homes in Hawaii - (a) to evaluate knowledge and confidence over three time periods, and (b) to compare staff and family caregiver satisfaction at end of program. The educational frameworks were based on cultural and communication theories. Fifty-two ethnically diverse staff, a majority being Asian (89%), participated in a 10-week module training and one 4 hour communication skills workshop. Staff evaluation included knowledge and confidence surveys, pre- and post-test knowledge tests, and FAMCARE-2 satisfaction instrument. There were nine Asian (89%) and Pacific Islander (11%) family caregivers who completed the FAMCARE-2 satisfaction instrument. The overall staff knowledge and confidence results were promising. The staff rated overall satisfaction of palliative care services lower than the family caregivers. Implications for future research, practice, and education with palliative and hospice care training of ethnically diverse nursing home staff is to include patient and family caregiver satisfaction of palliative and hospice care services, evaluation of effectiveness of cross-cultural communication theories in palliative and hospice care staff training, and support from administration for mentorship and development of these services in long term care facilities.

  7. Simulation-based training in flexible fibreoptic intubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Philip M; Russell, Lene; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    : Twenty-three anaesthesia residents in their first year of training in anaesthesiology with no experience in FOI, and 10 anaesthesia consultants experienced in FOI. INTERVENTIONS: The novices to FOI were allocated randomly to receive either part-task or whole-task training of FOI on virtual reality...... and to relate the performance levels achieved by the novices to the standard of performance of experienced FOI practitioners. DESIGN: A randomised controlled study. SETTING: Centre for Clinical Education, University of Copenhagen and the Capital Region of Denmark, between January and April 2013. PARTICIPANTS...

  8. Hand-assisted laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy skills acquisition: augmented reality simulator versus human cadaver training models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Fabien; Senagore, Anthony J; Ellis, Clyde N; Champagne, Bradley J; Augestad, Knut M; Neary, Paul C; Delaney, Conor P

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a simulator with the human cadaver model for hand-assisted laparoscopic colorectal skills acquisition training. An observational prospective comparative study was conducted to compare the laparoscopic surgery training models. The study took place during the laparoscopic colectomy training course performed at the annual scientific meeting of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons. Thirty four practicing surgeons performed hand-assisted laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy on human cadavers (n = 7) and on an augmented reality simulator (n = 27). Prior laparoscopic colorectal experience was assessed. Trainers and trainees completed independently objective structured assessment forms. Training models were compared by trainees' technical skills scores, events scores, and satisfaction. Prior laparoscopic experience was similar in both surgeon groups. Generic and specific skills scores were similar on both training models. Generic events scores were significantly better on the cadaver model. The 2 most frequent generic events occurring on the simulator were poor hand-eye coordination and inefficient use of retraction. Specific events were scored better on the simulator and reached the significance limit (p = 0.051) for trainers. The specific events occurring on the cadaver were intestinal perforation and left ureter identification difficulties. Overall satisfaction was better for the cadaver than for the simulator model (p = 0.009). With regard to skills scores, the augmented reality simulator had adequate qualities for the hand-assisted laparoscopic colectomy training. Nevertheless, events scores highlighted weaknesses of the anatomical replication on the simulator. Although improvements likely will be required to incorporate the simulator more routinely into the colorectal training, it may be useful in its current form for more junior trainees or those early on their learning curve. Copyright 2010 Association of Program

  9. Medical simulation is needed in anesthesia training to achieve patient's safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chul-Ho

    2013-03-01

    Many medical schools and hospitals throughout the world are equipped with a simulation center for the purpose of training anesthesiologists to perform both technical and non-technical skills. Because induction, maintenance, and emergence of general anesthesia are critical to patient welfare, various simulation mannequins and tools are utilized for the purpose of training anesthesiologists for safer patient care. Traditionally, anesthesia residency training mostly consisted of didactic lectures and observations. After completion of "traditional" training, anesthesia residents were allowed to perform procedures on patients under supervision. However, simulation would be a more effective training tool for which to teach anesthesiologists the skills necessary to perform invasive procedures, such as endotracheal intubation, central venous catheter insertion, and epidural catheter insertion. Recently, non-technical skills, such as the Anesthesia Non-Technical Skills developed by anesthesiologists from Aberdeen University, have been emphasized as an important training resource. Technical skills and non-technical skills can be learned by anesthesiology residents through a standardized and organized simulation program. Such programs would be beneficial in training anesthesia residents to work efficiently as a team in the operation room.

  10. Modulating lights aerodrome simulators in aviation training visual environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ю.М. Квач

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available  There was considered the possibility of the air field lights simulation in the imitators of flight simulator. The attempt of forming the database of the air field lights with realization in the lighting program DIALux is presented in this paper.

  11. An Application of Simulated Annealing to Scheduling Army Unit Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    Simulated annealing operates by analogy to the metalurgy process which strengthens metals through successive heating and cooling. The method is highly...diminishing returns is observed. The simulated annealing heuristic operates by analogy to annealing in physical systems. Annealing in a physical

  12. Handbook of Low-Cost Simulation for Military Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korteling, J.E.; Helsdingen, A.S.; Baeyer, A. von

    2000-01-01

    The EUCLID program enables the European Industry to develop and produce in a cost- effective way the systems that can fulfil future European military needs. One of the Research Technology Projects (RTP) within EUCLID is RTP 11.8, entitled: Low-cost Simulators. Low-cost simulators are defined as a ne

  13. Constraint-based soft tissue simulation for virtual surgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wen; Wan, Tao Ruan

    2014-11-01

    Most of surgical simulators employ a linear elastic model to simulate soft tissue material properties due to its computational efficiency and the simplicity. However, soft tissues often have elaborate nonlinear material characteristics. Most prominently, soft tissues are soft and compliant to small strains, but after initial deformations they are very resistant to further deformations even under large forces. Such material characteristic is referred as the nonlinear material incompliant which is computationally expensive and numerically difficult to simulate. This paper presents a constraint-based finite-element algorithm to simulate the nonlinear incompliant tissue materials efficiently for interactive simulation applications such as virtual surgery. Firstly, the proposed algorithm models the material stiffness behavior of soft tissues with a set of 3-D strain limit constraints on deformation strain tensors. By enforcing a large number of geometric constraints to achieve the material stiffness, the algorithm reduces the task of solving stiff equations of motion with a general numerical solver to iteratively resolving a set of constraints with a nonlinear Gauss-Seidel iterative process. Secondly, as a Gauss-Seidel method processes constraints individually, in order to speed up the global convergence of the large constrained system, a multiresolution hierarchy structure is also used to accelerate the computation significantly, making interactive simulations possible at a high level of details. Finally, this paper also presents a simple-to-build data acquisition system to validate simulation results with ex vivo tissue measurements. An interactive virtual reality-based simulation system is also demonstrated.

  14. Handbook of Low-Cost Simulation for Military Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korteling, J.E.; Helsdingen, A.S.; Baeyer, A. von

    2000-01-01

    The EUCLID program enables the European Industry to develop and produce in a cost- effective way the systems that can fulfil future European military needs. One of the Research Technology Projects (RTP) within EUCLID is RTP 11.8, entitled: Low-cost Simulators. Low-cost simulators are defined as a

  15. Medical Students as Facilitators for Laparoscopic Simulator Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Cathrine; Bjerrum, Flemming; Mahmood, Badar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Teaching basic clinical skills to student peers and residents by medical students has previously been shown effective. This study examines if medical students can facilitate laparoscopic procedural tasks to residents using a virtual reality simulator. METHODS: This was a retrospective...... practicing on a laparoscopic virtual reality simulator....

  16. Development of a Five-Day Basic Microsurgery Simulation Training Course: A Cost Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masha Singh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of microsurgery in numerous surgical fields has increased the need for basic microsurgical training outside of the operating room. The traditional start of microsurgical training has been in undertaking a 5-day basic microsurgery course. In an era characterised by financial constraints in academic and healthcare institutions as well as increasing emphasis on patient safety, there has been a shift in microsurgery training to simulation environments. This paper reviews the stepwise framework of microsurgical skill acquisition providing a cost analysis of basic microsurgery courses in order to aid planning and dissemination of microsurgical training worldwide.

  17. Thermal nuclear blast simulation at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, C.P.; Ghanbari, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility is operated by Sandia National Laboratories and located on Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The facility includes a heliostat field and associated receiver tower, two solar furnaces, and two point-focus parabolic concentrators. All can be used for simulating the thermal portion of nuclear pulses. The heliostat field contains 222 computer-controlled mirrors, which reflect concentrated solar energy to test stations on a 61-m tower. The field produces a peak flux density of 250 W/cm/sup 2/ over a 15-cm diameter with a total beam power of over 5 MW/sub t/. Thermal nuclear blasts have been simulated using a high-speed shutter (opening and closing time of 0.15 sec over a 1-m wide aperture) in combination with heliostat control to produce square or shaped pulses. The shutter can accommodate samples up to 1 /times/ 1 m and it has been used by several US and Canadian agencies. A glass-windowed wind tunnel located behind the shutter can accommodate samples up to 48 /times/ 76 cm with simultaneous exposure to the thermal flux and air flow at velocities up to 120 m/s. Each solar furnace at the facility includes a heliostat, a non-tracking parabolic concentrator, and an attenuator. One solar furnace produces flux levels of 270 W/cm/sup 2/ over a 6-mm diameter and total power of 16 kW/sub t/. A second furnace, currently under construction, will produce flux levels up to 1000 W/cm/sup 2/ over a 4-cm diameter and total power of 65 kW/sub t/. Both furnaces include shutters and attenuators that can provide square or shaped pulses. The two 11-m diameter tracking parabolic point-focusing concentrators at the facility can each produce peak flux levels of 1500 W/cm/sup 2/ over a 2.5-cm diameter and total power of 75 kW/sub t/. High-speed shutters have been used to produce square pulses. 5 figs.

  18. Moral imagination in simulation-based communication skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruth P

    2011-01-01

    Clinical simulation is used in nursing education and in other health professional programs to prepare students for future clinical practice. Simulation can be used to teach students communication skills and how to deliver bad news to patients and families. However, skilled communication in clinical practice requires students to move beyond simply learning superficial communication techniques and behaviors. This article presents an unexplored concept in the simulation literature: the exercise of moral imagination by the health professional student. Drawing from the works of Hume, Aristotle and Gadamer, a conceptualization of moral imagination is first provided. Next, this article argues that students must exercise moral imagination on two levels: towards the direct communication exchange before them; and to the representative nature of simulation encounters. Last, the limits of moral imagination in simulation-based education are discussed.

  19. Virtual vitreoretinal surgery: construction of a training programme on the Eyesi Surgical Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Vestergaard, Anders Højslet; Grauslund, Jakob

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the construct validity of a full virtual reality vitreoretinal training program at the Eyesi Surgical simulator. Design and methods: A virtual vitreoretinal training program was composed on the Eyesi Surgical simulator, software version 2.9.2 (VRmagic...... GmbH, Manheim, Germany). It was completed twice by three groups: Group 1: Twenty medical students Group 2: Ten ophthalmology residents Group 3: Five vitreoretinal surgeons The program consisted of six training modules (Figure 1): Navigation level 2 (Nav2) Forceps Training level 5 (ForT5) Bimanual...... Training level 3 (BimT3) Laser Coagulation level 3 (LasC3) Posterior Hyaloid level 3 (PostH3) Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling level 3 (ILMP3). Construct validity for a module was obtained if the median score for Group 3 was higher than for Group 2, which in turn was higher than for Group 1.This...

  20. Studying distributed cognition of simulation-based team training with DiCoT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybing, Jonas; Nilsson, Heléne; Jonson, Carl-Oscar; Bang, Magnus

    2016-03-01

    Health care organizations employ simulation-based team training (SBTT) to improve skill, communication and coordination in a broad range of critical care contexts. Quantitative approaches, such as team performance measurements, are predominantly used to measure SBTTs effectiveness. However, a practical evaluation method that examines how this approach supports cognition and teamwork is missing. We have applied Distributed Cognition for Teamwork (DiCoT), a method for analysing cognition and collaboration aspects of work settings, with the purpose of assessing the methodology's usefulness for evaluating SBTTs. In a case study, we observed and analysed four Emergo Train System® simulation exercises where medical professionals trained emergency response routines. The study suggests that DiCoT is an applicable and learnable tool for determining key distributed cognition attributes of SBTTs that are of importance for the simulation validity of training environments. Moreover, we discuss and exemplify how DiCoT supports design of SBTTs with a focus on transfer and validity characteristics. Practitioner Summary: In this study, we have evaluated a method to assess simulation-based team training environments from a cognitive ergonomics perspective. Using a case study, we analysed Distributed Cognition for Teamwork (DiCoT) by applying it to the Emergo Train System®. We conclude that DiCoT is useful for SBTT evaluation and simulator (re)design.

  1. Simulating disturbances and modelling expected train passenger delays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2006-01-01

    Forecasts of regularity for railway systems have traditionally – if at all – been computed for trains, not for passengers. It has only relatively recently become possible to model and evaluate the actual passenger delays. This paper describes how it is possible to use a passenger regularity model...

  2. [OPTIMIZATION OF PRECLINICAL TRAINING OF ANAESTHESIOLOGISTS BASED ON THE FORMATION OF PATHOGENIC SIMULATION LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasechnik, I N; Gubaidullin, R R; Skobelev, E I; Krylov, V V; Volkova, N N; Blokhina, N V; Kontarev, S I

    2015-01-01

    Simulation training has become an important component of the postgraduate training of anaesthesiologists for several reasons: organizational difficulties in obtaining primary professional skills in a clinical setting, the opportunity to study in a hospital existing pathology only and not planned in accordance with the curriculum. This increases the risk of medical malpractice of young specialist and study may be accompanied by complications and increasing the cost of treatment. In our work, we have studied the factors of continuity of preclinical and clinical stages of anaesthesiologists training in inhalation anaesthesia based on the use of modern simulation technologies. We compared the training programs and the results of traditional and simulation techniques, defined the concept of quasi physiology and propedeutics of robots and simulators, the role of clinical scenarios and reliability of robots of 6th level of realism in the formation of pathogenic environment for simulation training. In formulating the concept of pathogenetic simulation environment, we evaluated its impact on the motivation of the trainees of studied category. The study included 23 interns, divided approximately in half into 2 groups, the 1st of which at the preclinical stage of training was trained at the real operating theater gradually studying the technique of inhalation anaesthesia with an experienced curator The 2nd group studied the same anaesthesia in clinical scenarios of a simulator robot in a simulation operating theater Other components of the curriculum in the groups did not differ. According to the results of pre-clinical training interns started prforming an anaesthesia their self under the control of supervisor (i.e. to the clinical stage). In the 1st group, a supervisor made the verdict of readiness for clinical stage, and in the 2nd trainees were tested by the performing a robotic anaesthesia maintaining targeted qualitative and quantitative parameters. The evaluation was

  3. Utilizing Simulation-Based Training of Video Clip Instruction for the Store Service Operations Practice Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Che-Hung; Yen, Yu-Ren; Wu, Pai-Lu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a store service operations practice course based on simulation-based training of video clip instruction. The action research of problem-solving strategies employed for teaching are by simulated store operations. The counter operations course unit used as an example, this study developed 4 weeks of subunits for…

  4. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Simulation for M4 Marksmanship Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    interests include cognition , human performance measurement, resilience, skill development, and team training...change the appearance of the target; for example, by using a plain white or orange target. Most marksmanship simulators have an authoring function ...and rifle marksmanship during live and simulator firing with and without caffeine consumption. Technical Report 2003-003. Defence R&D Canada (DRDC

  5. B-1 Systems Approach to Training. Simulation Technology Assessment Report (STAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    Cinematic Simulators in Pilot Training. Anacapa Sciences, Inc. Report NAVTRAEQUIPCEN 70-C-0305-1, March 1973. (AD 766 507). 5-16 ■PI mumm** I...Assn., San Francisco, Calif., May 5-8, 1969. Ruocco, J.N., Vitale, P.A., Benfari, R.C., Kinetic Cueing in Simulated Carrier Approaches. Navy

  6. The Use of Simulation to Improve the Effectiveness of Training in Performance Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachman-Moore, Dalia; Kenett, Ron S.

    2006-01-01

    Performance management is an important managerial tool that directs employees' goals and behavior toward the organization's strategic goals. This article focuses on simulation-based training in performance management systems. The simulation developed at the School of Business Administration of the College of Management in Israel is based on a…

  7. Using Social Simulations to Assess and Train Potential Leaders to Make Effective Decisions in Turbulent Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, L. Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe two social simulations created to assess leadership potential and train leaders to make effective decisions in turbulent environments. One is set in the novel environment of a lunar moon colony and the other is a military combat command. The research generated from these simulations for assessing…

  8. Take-home training in a simulation-based laparoscopy course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thinggaard, Ebbe; Konge, Lars; Bjerrum, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    modalities, and four practised first on box trainers then on virtual reality simulators. Twelve practised only at home, while five practised at both places and one practised solely at the simulation centre. After a delayed start, most practised for some time, then had a period without training...

  9. Simulation training based on observation with minimal participation improves paediatric emergency medicine knowledge, skills and confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Scott A; Bloch, Amy J

    2015-03-01

    Simulation is becoming standard during emergency medicine (EM) training. To determine if observation-based simulation with minimal participation improves knowledge, skill performance and confidence, we created and evaluated 12 paediatric emergency medicine (PEM) simulations focusing on the educational value of observation. Thirty-one EM residents participated in 1-2 simulations each and observed multiple others. Scores obtained on a knowledge test presimulation and postsimulation, clinical skills assessed for changes in performance over the course of the study, and confidence questionnaires given presimulation and postsimulation were analysed. Participants' feedback regarding the observation model was also evaluated. Average scores obtained on the knowledge test improved significantly presimulation to postsimulation (36.3% vs 51.4%), and remained consistent postsimulation to 4 months after simulation training (51.4% vs 48.8%). Gain scores for participants who observed >80% of the simulations were significantly higher than for those who observedobserved was stressful but beneficial, as clinical emergencies are stressful as well. Using observation with minimal participation as the foundation of simulation training may lead to improvement in observer knowledge, skills and confidence. Observation-based simulation training may also save time and resources, allowing a broader coverage of clinical scenarios than programmes requiring active participation by all learners. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Porcine cadaver organ or virtual-reality simulation training for laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bruwaene, Siska; Schijven, Marlies P; Napolitano, Daniel; De Win, Gunter; Miserez, Marc

    2015-01-01

    As conventional laparoscopic procedural training requires live animals or cadaver organs, virtual simulation seems an attractive alternative. Therefore, we compared the transfer of training for the laparoscopic cholecystectomy from porcine cadaver organs vs virtual simulation to surgery in a live animal model in a prospective randomized trial. After completing an intensive training in basic laparoscopic skills, 3 groups of 10 participants proceeded with no additional training (control group), 5 hours of cholecystectomy training on cadaver organs (= organ training) or proficiency-based cholecystectomy training on the LapMentor (= virtual-reality training). Participants were evaluated on time and quality during a laparoscopic cholecystectomy on a live anaesthetized pig at baseline, 1 week (= post) and 4 months (= retention) after training. All research was performed in the Center for Surgical Technologies, Leuven, Belgium. In total, 30 volunteering medical students without prior experience in laparoscopy or minimally invasive surgery from the University of Leuven (Belgium). The organ training group performed the procedure significantly faster than the virtual trainer and borderline significantly faster than control group at posttesting. Only 1 of 3 expert raters suggested significantly better quality of performance of the organ training group compared with both the other groups at posttesting (p groups at retention testing. The virtual trainer group did not outperform the control group at any time. For trainees who are proficient in basic laparoscopic skills, the long-term advantage of additional procedural training, especially on a virtual but also on the conventional organ training model, remains to be proven. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Class notes from the first international training course on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, P.B. (ed.)

    1979-05-01

    The International Training Course on Physical Protection of Nuclear Facilities and Materials was intended for representatives from the developing countries who are responsible for preparing regulations and designing and assessing physical protection systems. The first part of the course consists of lectures on the objectives, organizational characteristics, and licensing and regulations requirements of a state system of physical protection. Since the participants may have little experience in nuclear energy, background information is provided on the topics of nuclear materials, radiation hazards, reactor systems, and reactor operations. Transportation of nuclear materials is addressed and emphasis is placed on regulations. Included in these discussions are presentations by guest speakers from countries outside the United States of America who present their countries' threat to nuclear facilities. Effectiveness evaluation methodology is introduced to the participants by means of instructions which teach them how to use logic trees and the EASI (Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption) program. The following elements of a physical protection system are discussed: barriers, protective force, intrusion detection systems, communications, and entry-control systems. Total systems concepts of physical protection system design are emphasized throughout the course. Costs, manpower/technology trade-offs, and other practical considerations are discussed. Approximately one-third of the course is devoted to practical exercises during which the attendees participatein problem solving. A hypothetical nuclear facility is introduced, and the attendees participate in the conceptual design of a physical protection system for the facility.

  12. Who's Driving? The role and training of the human patient simulation operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Laura

    2012-11-01

    Within the airline industry, where much of simulation-based education originated, cockpit simulators are operated by current or former pilots whose expertise ensures the authenticity of the training experience. As yet, identifying the most appropriate person to run a patient simulator has not been translated into healthcare. Furthermore, few training resources exist for those who must learn the intricacies of the relationship between patient simulators, simulation scenarios, and educational objectives. This article reviews literature related to the role, educational preparation, and training of the patient simulator operator and explores solutions to the uncertainty about the difference between simulator operators and technicians. Because simulators are operationally intensive and because scarce faculty may be best used to facilitate student learning within the laboratory, the tendency has been to use a variety of personnel to manage patient simulators. Recommendations for standardizing the role of the operator that are consistent with the pedagogical purposes of simulation are offered. Potential questions are posed, and methods for future work are discussed.

  13. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; May, M. J.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Shingleton, N.; Kane, J. O.; Holtmeier, G.; Loey, H.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Dunlop, W. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-481, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Guyton, R. L.; Huffman, E. [National Securities Technologies, Vasco Rd., Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  14. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, C. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); May, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Compton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walton, O. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shingleton, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kane, J. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Holtmeier, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Loey, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mirkarimi, P. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlop, W. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Guyton, R. L. [National Security Technologies, Livermore, CA (United States); Huffman, E. [National Security Technologies, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  15. Thermal nuclear pulse simulation at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, C.P.; Ralph, M.E. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Ghanbari, C.M. (Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Oeding, R.; Shaw, K. (PDA Engineering, Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico is being used to simulate the thermal pulse from a nuclear weapon on relatively large surfaces. Pulses varying in length from 2 seconds to 7 seconds have been produced. The desired pulse length varies as a function of the yield of the weapon being simulated. The present experiment capability can accommodate samples as large as 1.2 {times} 1.5 meters. Samples can be flat or three-dimensional. Samples exposed have ranged from fabrics (protective clothing) to an aircraft canopy and cockpit system, complete with a mannequin in a flight suit and helmet. In addition, a windowed wind tunnel has been constructed which permits exposure of flight surface materials to thermal transients with air speed of Mach 0.8. The wind tunnel can accommodate samples up to .48 {times} .76 meters or an array of smaller samples. The maximum flux capability of the NSTTF is about 70 calories/cm{sup 2}-sec. A black-body temperature of about 6000 K is produced by the solar beam and is therefore ideal for simulating the nuclear source. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Training Surgical Residents With a Haptic Robotic Central Venous Catheterization Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepley, David F; Gordon, Adam B; Yovanoff, Mary A; Mirkin, Katelin A; Miller, Scarlett R; Han, David C; Moore, Jason Z

    2017-06-20

    Ultrasound guided central venous catheterization (CVC) is a common surgical procedure with complication rates ranging from 5 to 21 percent. Training is typically performed using manikins that do not simulate anatomical variations such as obesity and abnormal vessel positioning. The goal of this study was to develop and validate the effectiveness of a new virtual reality and force haptic based simulation platform for CVC of the right internal jugular vein. A CVC simulation platform was developed using a haptic robotic arm, 3D position tracker, and computer visualization. The haptic robotic arm simulated needle insertion force that was based on cadaver experiments. The 3D position tracker was used as a mock ultrasound device with realistic visualization on a computer screen. Upon completion of a practice simulation, performance feedback is given to the user through a graphical user interface including scoring factors based on good CVC practice. The effectiveness of the system was evaluated by training 13 first year surgical residents using the virtual reality haptic based training system over a 3 month period. The participants' performance increased from 52% to 96% on the baseline training scenario, approaching the average score of an expert surgeon: 98%. This also resulted in improvement in positive CVC practices including a 61% decrease between final needle tip position and vein center, a decrease in mean insertion attempts from 1.92 to 1.23, and a 12% increase in time spent aspirating the syringe throughout the procedure. A virtual reality haptic robotic simulator for CVC was successfully developed. Surgical residents training on the simulation improved to near expert levels after three robotic training sessions. This suggests that this system could act as an effective training device for CVC. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Why Simulation-Based Team Training Has Not Been Used Effectively and What Can Be Done about It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiello, Italo

    2012-01-01

    Advanced medical education simulators are broadly used today to train both technical/procedural and team-based skills. While there is convincing evidence of the benefits of training technical skills, this is not the case for team-based skills. Research on medical expertise could drive the creation of a new regime of simulation-based team training.…

  18. Why Simulation-Based Team Training Has Not Been Used Effectively and What Can Be Done about It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiello, Italo

    2012-01-01

    Advanced medical education simulators are broadly used today to train both technical/procedural and team-based skills. While there is convincing evidence of the benefits of training technical skills, this is not the case for team-based skills. Research on medical expertise could drive the creation of a new regime of simulation-based team training.…

  19. Developing an anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion simulator for neurosurgical resident training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Wilson Z; Ganju, Aruna; Harrop, James S; Hoh, Daniel J

    2013-10-01

    Surgical simulators are useful in many surgical disciplines to augment residency training. Duty hour restrictions and increasing emphasis on patient safety and attending oversight have changed neurosurgical education from the traditional apprenticeship model. The Congress of Neurological Surgeons Simulation Committee has been developing neurosurgical simulators for the purpose of enhancing resident education and assessing proficiency. To review the initial experience with an anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) simulator. The first ACDF training module was implemented at the 2012 Congress of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting. The 90-minute curriculum included a written pretest, didactics, a practical pretest on the simulator, hands-on training, a written posttest, a practical posttest, and postcourse feedback. Didactic material covered clinical indications for ACDF, comparison with other cervical procedures, surgical anatomy and approach, principles of arthrodesis and spinal fixation, and complication management. Written pretests and posttests were administered to assess baseline knowledge and evidence of improvement after the module. Qualitative evaluation of individual performance on the practical (simulator) portion was included. Three neurosurgery residents, 2 senior medical students, and 1 attending neurosurgeon participated in the course. The pretest scores were an average 9.2 (range, 6-13). Posttest scores improved to 11.0 (range, 9-13; P = .03). Initial experience with the ACDF simulator suggests that it may represent a meaningful training module for residents. Simulation will be an important training modality for residents to practice surgical technique and for teachers to assess competency. Further development of an ACDF simulator and didactic curriculum will require additional verification of simulator validity and reliability.

  20. Unsteady simulation for a high-speed train entering a tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-hua LI; Jian DENG; Da-wei CHEN; Fang-fang XIE; Yao ZHENG

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the unsteady aerodynamics effects in railway turmels,the 3D Reynolds average Navier-Stokes equations of a viscous compressible fluid are solved,and the two-equation k-ε model is used in the simulation of turbulence,while the dynamic grid technique is employed for moving bodies.We focus on obtaining the changing tendencies of the aerodynamic force of the train and the aerodynamic pressures on the tunnel wall and train surface,and discovering the relationship between the velocity of the train and the intensity of the micro pressure wave at the tunnel exit.It is shown that the amplitudes of the pressure changes in the tunnel and on the train surface are both approximately proportional to the square of the train speed,so are the microwave and the drag of the train.

  1. Computer modeling and simulators as part of university training for NPP operating personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volman, M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers aspects of a program for training future nuclear power plant personnel developed by the NPP Department of Ivanovo State Power Engineering University. Computer modeling is used for numerical experiments on the kinetics of nuclear reactors in Mathcad. Simulation modeling is carried out on the computer and full-scale simulator of water-cooled power reactor for the simulation of neutron-physical reactor measurements and the start-up - shutdown process.

  2. Modeling and Simulation of Radiative Compressible Flows in Aerodynamic Heating Arc-Jet Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensassi, Khalil; Laguna, Alejandro A.; Lani, Andrea; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations of an arc heated flow inside NASA's 20 [MW] Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF) are performed in order to investigate the three-dimensional swirling flow and the current distribution inside the wind tunnel. The plasma is considered in Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium(LTE) and is composed of Air-Argon gas mixture. The governing equations are the Navier-Stokes equations that include source terms corresponding to Joule heating and radiative cooling. The former is obtained by solving an electric potential equation, while the latter is calculated using an innovative massively parallel ray-tracing algorithm. The fully coupled system is closed by the thermodynamics relations and transport properties which are obtained from Chapman-Enskog method. A novel strategy was developed in order to enable the flow solver and the radiation calculation to be preformed independently and simultaneously using a different number of processors. Drastic reduction in the computational cost was achieved using this strategy. Details on the numerical methods used for space discretization, time integration and ray-tracing algorithm will be presented. The effect of the radiative cooling on the dynamics of the flow will be investigated. The complete set of equations were implemented within the COOLFluiD Framework. Fig. 1 shows the geometry of the Anode and part of the constrictor of the Aerodynamics heating facility (AHF). Fig. 2 shows the velocity field distribution along (x-y) plane and the streamline in (z-y) plane.

  3. NUMERICAL FLOW AND TRANSPORT SIMULATIONS SUPPORTING THE SALTSTONE FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G.

    2009-02-28

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment (PA) is being revised to incorporate requirements of Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA), and updated data and understanding of vault performance since the 1992 PA (Cook and Fowler 1992) and related Special Analyses. A hybrid approach was chosen for modeling contaminant transport from vaults and future disposal cells to exposure points. A higher resolution, largely deterministic, analysis is performed on a best-estimate Base Case scenario using the PORFLOW numerical analysis code. a few additional sensitivity cases are simulated to examine alternative scenarios and parameter settings. Stochastic analysis is performed on a simpler representation of the SDF system using the GoldSim code to estimate uncertainty and sensitivity about the Base Case. This report describes development of PORFLOW models supporting the SDF PA, and presents sample results to illustrate model behaviors and define impacts relative to key facility performance objectives. The SDF PA document, when issued, should be consulted for a comprehensive presentation of results.

  4. Comparing the cost-effectiveness of simulation modalities: a case study of peripheral intravenous catheterization training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Brydges, Ryan; Carnahan, Heather; Backstein, David; Dubrowski, Adam

    2014-05-01

    While the ultimate goal of simulation training is to enhance learning, cost-effectiveness is a critical factor. Research that compares simulation training in terms of educational- and cost-effectiveness will lead to better-informed curricular decisions. Using previously published data we conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis of three simulation-based programs. Medical students (n = 15 per group) practiced in one of three 2-h intravenous catheterization skills training programs: low-fidelity (virtual reality), high-fidelity (mannequin), or progressive (consisting of virtual reality, task trainer, and mannequin simulator). One week later, all performed a transfer test on a hybrid simulation (standardized patient with a task trainer). We used a net benefit regression model to identify the most cost-effective training program via paired comparisons. We also created a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve to visually represent the probability that one program is more cost-effective when compared to its comparator at various 'willingness-to-pay' values. We conducted separate analyses for implementation and total costs. The results showed that the progressive program had the highest total cost (p willingness-to-pay value, the progressive training program was generally most educationally- and cost-effective. Our analyses suggest that a progressive program that strategically combines simulation modalities provides a cost-effective solution. More generally, we have introduced how a cost-effectiveness analysis may be applied to simulation training; a method that medical educators may use to investment decisions (e.g., purchasing cost-effective and educationally sound simulators).

  5. Mastoidectomy performance assessment of virtual simulation training using final-product analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steven A W; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Sørensen, Mads S

    2015-01-01

    in virtual simulation and traditional dissection training. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective trial with blinding. METHODS: A total of 34 novice residents performed a mastoidectomy on the Visible Ear Simulator and on a cadaveric temporal bone. Two blinded senior otologists assessed the final-product performance using.......59) for dissection final-product assessment was found. The simulation and dissection performance scores had significant correlation (P = .014). None of the basic simulator metrics correlated significantly with the final-product score except for number of steps completed in the simulator. CONCLUSIONS: A modified...

  6. Performance simulation of the ERIS pyramid wavefront sensor module in the VLT adaptive optics facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Agapito, Guido; Riccardi, Armando; Esposito, Simone; Le Louarn, Miska; Marchetti, Enrico

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the performance analysis based on numerical simulations of the Pyramid Wavefront sensor Module (PWM) to be included in ERIS, the new Adaptive Optics (AO) instrument for the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). We have analyzed the performance of the PWM working either in a low-order or in a high-order wavefront sensing mode of operation. We show that the PWM in the high-order sensing mode can provide SR > 90% in K band using bright guide stars under median seeing conditions (0.85 arcsec seeing and 15 m/s of wind speed). In the low-order sensing mode, the PWM can sense and correct Tip-Tilt (and if requested also Focus mode) with the precision required to assist the LGS observations to get an SR > 60% and > 20% in K band, using up to a ~16.5 and ~19.5 R-magnitude guide star, respectively.

  7. Natural circulation in a VVER reactor geometry: Experiments with the PACTEL facility and Cathare simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raussi, P.; Kainulainen, S. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Lappeenranta (Finland); Kouhia, J. [VTT Energy, Lappeenranta (Finland)

    1995-09-01

    There are some 40 reactors based on the VVER design in use. Database available for computer code assessment for VVER reactors is rather limited. Experiments were conducted to study natural circulation behaviour in the PACTEL facility, a medium-scale integral test loop patterned after VVER pressurized water reactors. Flow behaviour over a range of coolant inventories was studied with a small-break experiment. In the small-break experiments, flow stagnation and system repressurization were observed when the water level in the upper plenum fell below the entrances to the hot legs. The cause was attributed to the hot leg loop seals, which are a unique feature of the VVER geometry. At low primary inventories, core cooling was achieved through the boiler-condenser mode. The experiment was simulated using French thermalhydraulic system code CATHARE.

  8. Adaptive Training Considerations for Use in Simulation-Based Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Mercado Anthony J. Aakre KAEGAN Corporation NAVAL AIR WARFARE CENTER TRAINING SYSTEMS DIVISION 12350 Research Parkway Orlando, FL, 32826-3275...NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Carla R. Landsberg, Wendi L. Van Buskirk, Randolph S. Astwood Jr., Alyssa D. Mercado , Anthony J. Aakre 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...1204). Arlington, VA: US Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences. (C-15) Miyake, A. & Shah, P. (Eds.) (1999). Models of working

  9. Use of Virtual Environment Training Technology for Individual Combat Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    the same training environments as Level 3 display technology (except 31 that use of a HMD does not necessarily require the use of Level 3 haptic sensing...through limits on the allowable movement speed Finally, Level 3 technology improves upon (or augments ) Level 2 through: High-resolution HMD Measurement...of eye position if required by the high-resolution HMD Advanced speech recognition technology Programmable general-purpose haptic interfaces (e.g

  10. Crisis resource management, simulation training and the medical emergency team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, Stuart; Radford, Sam; Chalwin, Richard; Devita, Michael; Endacott, Ruth; Jones, Daryl

    2012-09-01

    Recently there has been increased focus on improved detection and management of deteriorating patients in Australian hospitals. Since the introduction of the medical emergency team (MET) model there has been an increased role for intensive care unit staff in responding to deterioration of patients in hospital wards. Review and management of MET patients differs from the traditional model of ward patient review, as ICU staff may not know the patient. Furthermore, assessment and intervention is often time-critical and must occur simultaneously. Finally, about 10% of MET patients require intensive care-level interventions to be commenced on the ward, and this requires participation of non-ICU-trained ward staff. • To date, the interventions performed by MET staff and approaches to training responders have been relatively under investigated, particularly in the Australian and New Zealand context. In this article we briefly review the principles of the MET and contend that activation of the MET by ward staff represents a response to a medical crisis. We then outline why MET intervention differs from traditional ward-based doctor-patient encounters, and emphasise the importance of non-technical skills during the MET response. Finally, we suggest ways in which the skills required for crisis resource management within the MET can be taught to ICU staff, and the potential benefits, barriers and difficulties associated with the delivery of such training in New Zealand and Australia.

  11. First 3D numerical simulations validated with experimental measurements during a LOVA reproduction inside the new facility STARDUST-Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciparisse, J.F.; Malizia, A. [Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome 00133 (Italy); Poggi, L.A., E-mail: poggi@ing.uniroma2.it [Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome 00133 (Italy); Gelfusa, M. [Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome 00133 (Italy); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA per la Fusione, Padova I-35127 (Italy); Mancini, A.; Gaudio, P. [Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome 00133 (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • We model supersonic, turbulent 3D flow in the “STARDUST-Upgrade” facility. • We simulate air expansion into a low pressure vessel. • We compare numerical results with experimental results. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to simulate a Loss of Vacuum Accident (LOVA) in the STARDUST (Small Tank for Aerosol Removal and DUST)-UPGRADE facility. These events are one of the major safety concerns in Tokamaks, since they can cause the mobilization and the dispersion of radioactive dust contained in a fusion reactor. The first step in the study of a LOVA event is the estimation, by means of numerical simulations, of the pressurization transient in the vacuum chamber. The STARDUST-UPGRADE facility, which has a cylindrical shape, is considered as a case study. An air inlet is located in a radial position with respect to the facility, so the numerical domain is symmetric and, therefore, only a half of it has been considered in the simulation. A time-dependent mass flow rate is imposed at the inlet, in a range consistent with experimental estimates. The simulation takes 20 s and the attention is focused on the mean pressure value over time and on the Mach number distribution. The results are presented and discussed in the perspective of simulating LOVAs in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  12. A combined approach of simulation and analytic hierarchy process in assessing production facility layouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Razamin; Cheng, Kok-Min

    2014-07-01

    One of the important areas of concern in order to obtain a competitive level of productivity in a manufacturing system is the layout design and material transportation system (conveyor system). However, changes in customers' requirements have triggered the need to design other alternatives of the manufacturing layout for existing production floor. Hence, this paper discusses effective alternatives of the process layout specifically, the conveyor system layout. Subsequently, two alternative designs for the conveyor system were proposed with the aims to increase the production output and minimize space allocation. The first proposed layout design includes the installation of conveyor oven in the particular manufacturing room based on priority, and the second one is the one without the conveyor oven in the layout. Simulation technique was employed to design the new facility layout. Eventually, simulation experiments were conducted to understand the performance of each conveyor layout design based on operational characteristics, which include predicting the output of layouts. Utilizing the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), the newly and improved layout designs were assessed before the final selection was done. As a comparison, the existing conveyor system layout was included in the assessment process. Relevant criteria involved in this layout design problem were identified as (i) usage of space of each design, (ii) operator's utilization rates, (iii) return of investment (ROI) of the layout, and (iv) output of the layout. In the final stage of AHP analysis, the overall priority of each alternative layout was obtained and thus, a selection for final use by the management was made based on the highest priority value. This efficient planning and designing of facility layout in a particular manufacturing setting is able to minimize material handling cost, minimize overall production time, minimize investment in equipment, and optimize utilization of space.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of Flight Simulators for Military Training. Volume 2. Estimating Costs of Training in Simulators and Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    POL Petroleum, oil , and lubricants POM Program Objective Memorandum PY Prior year RDT/E Research, development, test, and evaluation ROC Required...while peel assigned to undergraduate training arganizations do not. 󈨘 22 keys the relationships relevant for estimating each require- ment and

  14. Cardiovascular Surgery Residency Program: Training Coronary Anastomosis Using the Arroyo Simulator and UNIFESP Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, Miguel Angel; Gomes, Walter José; Bras, Ademir Massarico; Araújo, Thiago Cavalcante Vila Nova de; Mota, André Lupp; Cardoso, Caio Cesar; Coutinho, Rafael Viana dos S

    2015-01-01

    Engage the UNIFESP Cardiovascular Surgery residents in coronary anastomosis, assess their skills and certify results, using the Arroyo Anastomosis Simulator and UNIFESP surgical models. First to 6th year residents attended a weekly program of technical training in coronary anastomosis, using 4 simulation models: 1. Arroyo simulator; 2. Dummy with a plastic heart; 3. Dummy with a bovine heart; and 4. Dummy with a beating pig heart. The assessment test was comprised of 10 items, using a scale from 1 to 5 points in each of them, creating a global score of 50 points maximum. The technical performance of the candidate showed improvement in all items, especially manual skill and technical progress, critical sense of the work performed, confidence in the procedure and reduction of the time needed to perform the anastomosis after 12 weeks practice. In response to the multiplicity of factors that currently influence the cardiovascular surgeon training, there have been combined efforts to reform the practices of surgical medical training. 1 - The four models of simulators offer a considerable contribution to the field of cardiovascular surgery, improving the skill and dexterity of the surgeon in training. 2 - Residents have shown interest in training and cooperate in the development of innovative procedures for surgical medical training in the art.

  15. Cardiovascular Surgery Residency Program: Training Coronary Anastomosis Using the Arroyo Simulator and UNIFESP Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Maluf

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Engage the UNIFESP Cardiovascular Surgery residents in coronary anastomosis, assess their skills and certify results, using the Arroyo Anastomosis Simulator and UNIFESP surgical models. METHODS: First to 6th year residents attended a weekly program of technical training in coronary anastomosis, using 4 simulation models: 1. Arroyo simulator; 2. Dummy with a plastic heart; 3. Dummy with a bovine heart; and 4. Dummy with a beating pig heart. The assessment test was comprised of 10 items, using a scale from 1 to 5 points in each of them, creating a global score of 50 points maximum. RESULTS: The technical performance of the candidate showed improvement in all items, especially manual skill and technical progress, critical sense of the work performed, confidence in the procedure and reduction of the time needed to perform the anastomosis after 12 weeks practice. In response to the multiplicity of factors that currently influence the cardiovascular surgeon training, there have been combined efforts to reform the practices of surgical medical training. CONCLUSION: 1 - The four models of simulators offer a considerable contribution to the field of cardiovascular surgery, improving the skill and dexterity of the surgeon in training. 2 - Residents have shown interest in training and cooperate in the development of innovative procedures for surgical medical training in the art.

  16. Evaluation of a new virtual-reality training simulator for hysteroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajka, Michael; Tuchschmid, Stefan; Streich, Matthias; Fink, Daniel; Székely, Gábor; Harders, Matthias

    2009-09-01

    To determine realism and training capacity of HystSim, a new virtual-reality simulator for the training of hysteroscopic interventions. Sixty-two gynaecological surgeons with various levels of expertise were interviewed at the 13(th) Practical Course in Gynaecologic Endoscopy in Davos, Switzerland. All participants received a 20-min hands-on training on the simulator and filled out a four-page questionnaire. Twenty-three questions with respect to the realism of the simulation and the training capacity were answered on a seven-point Likert scale along with 11 agree-disagree statements concerning the HystSim training in general. Twenty-six participants had performed more than 50 hysteroscopies ("experts") and 36 equal to or fewer than 50 ("novices"). Four of 60 (6.6%) responding participants judged the overall impression as "7--absolutely realistic", 40 (66.6%) as "6--realistic", and 16 (26.6%) as "5--somewhat realistic". Novices (6.48; 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.28-6.7) rated the overall training capacity significantly higher than experts (6.08; 95% CI 5.85-6.3), however, high-grade acceptance was found in both groups. In response to the statements, 95.2% believe that HystSim allows procedural training of diagnostic and therapeutic hysteroscopy, and 85.5% suggest that HystSim training should be offered to all novices before performing surgery on real patients. Face validity has been established for a new hysteroscopic surgery simulator. Potential trainees and trainers assess it to be a realistic and useful tool for the training of hysteroscopy. Further systematic validation studies are needed to clarify how this system can be optimally integrated into the gynaecological curriculum.

  17. A simulation and training environment for robotic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaefer, Alexander [University of Luebeck, Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, Luebeck (Germany); Stanford University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford, CA (United States); Gill, Jakub; Schweikard, Achim [University of Luebeck, Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, Luebeck (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    To provide a software environment for simulation of robotic radiosurgery, particularly to study the effective robot workspace with respect to the treatment plan quality, and to illustrate the concepts of robotic radiosurgery. A simulation environment for a robotic radiosurgery system was developed using Java and Java3D. The kinematics and the beam characteristics were modeled and linked to a treatment planning module. Simulations of different robot workspace parameters for two example radiosurgical patient cases were performed using the novel software tool. The first case was an intracranial lesion near the left inner ear, the second case was a spinal lesion. The planning parameters for both cases were visualized with the novel simulation environment. An incremental extension of the robot workspace had limited effect for the intracranial case, where the original workspace already covered the left side of the patient. For the spinal case, a larger workspace resulted in a noticeable improvement in plan quality and a large portion of the beams being delivered from the extended workspace. The new software environment is useful to simulate and analyze parameters and configurations for robotic radiosurgery. An enlarged robot workspace may result in improved plan quality depending on the location of the target region. (orig.)

  18. Proceedings of the eighth symposium on training of nuclear facility personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    This conference brought together those persons in the nuclear industry who have a vital interest in the training and licensing of nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel processing plant operators, senior operators, and support personnel for the purpose of an exchange of ideas and information related to the various aspects of training, retraining, examination, and licensing. The document contains 64 papers; each paper was abstracted for the data.

  19. Innovative teaching methods in the professional training of nurses – simulation education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Miertová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The article is aimed to highlight usage of innovative teaching methods within simulation education in the professional training of nurses abroad and to present our experience based on passing intensive study programme at School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Salford (United Kingdom, UK within Intensive EU Lifelong Learning Programme (LPP Erasmus EU RADAR 2013. Methods: Implementation of simulation methods such as role-play, case studies, simulation scenarios, practical workshops and clinical skills workstation within structured ABCDE approach (AIM© Assessment and Management Tool was aimed to promote the development of theoretical knowledge and skills to recognize and manage acutely deteriorated patients. Structured SBAR approach (Acute SBAR Communication Tool was used for the training of communication and information sharing among the members of multidisciplinary health care team. OSCE approach (Objective Structured Clinical Examination was used for student’s individual formative assessment. Results: Simulation education is proved to have lots of benefits in the professional training of nurses. It is held in safe, controlled and realistic conditions (in simulation laboratories reflecting real hospital and community care environment with no risk of harming real patients accompanied by debriefing, discussion and analysis of all activities students have performed within simulated scenario. Such learning environment is supportive, challenging, constructive, motivated, engaging, skilled, flexible, inspiring and respectful. Thus the simulation education is effective, interactive, interesting, efficient and modern way of nursing education. Conclusion: Critical thinking and clinical competences of nurses are crucial for early recognition and appropriate response to acute deterioration of patient’s condition. These competences are important to ensure the provision of high quality nursing care. Methods of

  20. Mannequin or standardized patient: participants' assessment of two training modalities in trauma team simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisborg Torben

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trauma team training using simulation has become an educational compensation for a low number of severe trauma patients in 49 of Norway's 50 trauma hospitals for the last 12 years. The hospitals' own simple mannequins have been employed, to enable training without being dependent on expensive and advanced simulators. We wanted to assess the participants' assessment of using a standardized patient instead of a mannequin. Methods Trauma teams in five hospitals were randomly exposed to a mannequin or a standardized patient in two consecutive simulations for each team. In each hospital two teams were trained, with opposite order of simulation modality. Anonymous, written questionnaires were answered by the participants immediately after each simulation. The teams were interviewed as a focus group after the last simulation, reflecting on the difference between the two simulation modalities. Outcome measures were the participants' assessment of their own perceived educational outcome and comparison of the models, in addition to analysis of the interviews. Results Participants' assessed their educational outcome to be high, and unrelated to the order of appearance of patient model. There were no differences in assessment of realism and feeling of embarrassment. Focus groups revealed that the participants felt that the choice between educational modalities should be determined by the simulated case, with high interaction between team and patient being enhanced by a standardized patient. Conclusion Participants' assessment of the outcome of team training seems independent of the simulation modality when the educational goal is training communication, co-operation and leadership within the team.

  1. Facility and Methods Developed for Simulated Space Vacuum Ultraviolet Exposure Testing of Polymer Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Pietromica, Anthony J.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Messer, Russell K.

    2002-01-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation of wavelengths between 115 and 200 nm produced by the Sun in the space environment can degrade polymer films, producing changes in their optical, mechanical, and chemical properties. These effects are particularly important for thin polymer films being considered for ultralightweight space structures, because, for most polymers, VUV radiation is absorbed in a thin surface layer. The NASA Glenn Research Center has developed facilities and methods for long-term ground testing of polymer films to evaluate space environmental VUV radiation effects. VUV exposure can also be used as part of combined or sequential simulated space environmental exposures to determine combined damaging effects with other aspects of the space environment, which include solar ultraviolet radiation, solar flare x-rays, electron and proton radiation, atomic oxygen (for low-Earth-orbit missions), and temperature effects. Because the wavelength sensitivity of VUV damage is not well known for most materials, Glenn's VUV facility uses a broad-spectrum deuterium lamp with a magnesium fluoride window that provides output between 115 and 200 nm. Deuterium lamps of this type were characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology and through measurements at Glenn. Spectral irradiance measurements show that from approximately 115 to 160 nm, deuterium lamp irradiance can be many times that of air mass zero solar irradiance, and as wavelength increases above approximately 160 nm, deuterium lamp irradiance decreases in comparison to the Sun. The facility is a cryopumped vacuum chamber that achieves a system pressure of approximately 5310(exp -6) torr. It contains four individual VUV-exposure compartments in vacuum, separated by water-cooled copper walls to minimize VUV radiation and any sample contamination cross interactions between compartments. Each VUV-exposure compartment contains a VUV deuterium lamp, a motor-controlled sample stage coupled with a

  2. Research Capabilities for Oil-Free Turbomachinery Expanded by New Rotordynamic Simulator Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Samuel A.

    2004-01-01

    A new test rig has been developed for simulating high-speed turbomachinery shafting using Oil-Free foil air bearing technology. Foil air journal bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings with a flexible inner sleeve surface using air as the lubricant. These bearings have been used in turbomachinery, primarily air cycle machines, for the past four decades to eliminate the need for oil lubrication. More recently, interest has been growing in applying foil bearings to aircraft gas turbine engines. They offer potential improvements in efficiency and power density, decreased maintenance costs, and other secondary benefits. The goal of applying foil air bearings to aircraft gas turbine engines prompted the fabrication of this test rig. The facility enables bearing designers to test potential bearing designs with shafts that simulate the rotating components of a target engine without the high cost of building actual flight hardware. The data collected from this rig can be used to make changes to the shaft and bearings in subsequent design iterations. The rest of this article describes the new test rig and demonstrates some of its capabilities with an initial simulated shaft system. The test rig has two support structures, each housing a foil air journal bearing. The structures are designed to accept any size foil journal bearing smaller than 63 mm (2.5 in.) in diameter. The bearing support structures are mounted to a 91- by 152-cm (3- by 5-ft) table and can be separated by as much as 122 cm (4 ft) and as little as 20 cm (8 in.) to accommodate a wide range of shaft sizes. In the initial configuration, a 9.5-cm (3.75-in.) impulse air turbine drives the test shaft. The impulse turbine, as well as virtually any number of "dummy" compressor and turbine disks, can be mounted on the shaft inboard or outboard of the bearings. This flexibility allows researchers to simulate various engine shaft configurations. The bearing support structures include a unique bearing mounting

  3. Building intelligence in third-generation training and battle simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Dennis; Anderson, Don; von Borries, Vance; Elmaghraby, Adel; Kantardzic, Mehmed; Ragade, Rammohan

    2003-09-01

    Current war games and simulations are primarily attrition based, and are centered on the concept of force on force. They constitute what can be defined as "second generation" war games. So-called "first generation" war games were focused on strategy with the primary concept of mind on mind. We envision "third generation" war games and battle simulations as concentrating on effects with the primary concept being system on system. Thus the third generation systems will incorporate each successive generation and take into account strategy, attrition and effects. This paper will describe the principal advantages and features that need to be implemented to create a true "third generation" battle simulation and the architectural issues faced when designing and building such a system. Areas of primary concern are doctrine, command and control, allied and coalition warfare, and cascading effects. Effectively addressing the interactive effects of these issues is of critical importance. In order to provide an adaptable and modular system that will accept future modifications and additions with relative ease, we are researching the use of a distributed Multi-Agent System (MAS) that incorporates various artificial intelligence methods. The agent architecture can mirror the military command structure from both vertical and horizontal perspectives while providing the ability to make modifications to doctrine, command structures, inter-command communications, as well as model the results of various effects upon one another, and upon the components of the simulation. This is commonly referred to as "cascading effects," in which A affects B, B affects C and so on. Agents can be used to simulate units or parts of units that interact to form the whole. Even individuals can eventually be simulated to take into account the affect to key individuals such as commanders, heroes, and aces. Each agent will have a learning component built in to provide "individual intelligence" based on

  4. Applied Research on Laparoscopic Simulator in the Resident Surgical Laparoscopic Operation Technical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shangxi; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Meisheng; Wang, Liming

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the effects of surgical laparoscopic operation course on laparoscopic operation skills after the simulated training for medical students with relatively objective results via data gained before and after the practice course of laparoscopic simulator of the resident standardized trainees. Experiment 1: 20 resident standardized trainees with no experience in laparoscopic surgery were included in the inexperienced group and finished simulated cholecystectomy according to simulator videos. Simulator data was collected (total operation time, path length, average speed of instrument movement, movement efficiency, number of perforations, the time cautery is applied without appropriate contact with adhesions, number of serious complications). Ten attending doctors were included in the experienced group and conducted the operation of simulated cholecystectomy directly. Data was collected with simulator. Data of two groups was compared. Experiment 2: Participants in inexperienced group were assigned to basic group (receiving 8 items of basic operation training) and special group (receiving 8 items of basic operation training and 4 items of specialized training), and 10 persons for each group. They received training course designed by us respectively. After training level had reached the expected target, simulated cholecystectomy was performed, and data was collected. Experimental data between basic group and special group was compared and then data between special group and experienced group was compared. Results of experiment 1 showed that there is significant difference between data in inexperienced group in which participants operated simulated cholecystectomy only according to instructors' teaching and operation video and data in experienced group. Result of experiment 2 suggested that, total operation time, number of perforations, number of serious complications, number of non-cauterized bleeding and the time cautery is applied

  5. Guidelines for Simulator-Based Marine Pilot Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    Naccara, USCG 16. Ahatrac This report contains inf’ormiation relatino to the proper use of a shjphandling/ship bridge simulator by marine pilots for...inadequate for evolutions that require reader should also contact the follow- astern motion. ing organizations for their latest publications on this

  6. Digital Simulation-Based Training: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Quesada-Pallarès, Carla; Knogler, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how design characteristics in digital simulation-based learning environments moderate self-efficacy and transfer of learning. Drawing on social cognitive theory and the cognitive theory of multimedia learning, the meta-analysis psychometrically cumulated k?=?15 studies of 25 years of research with a total sample size of…

  7. Astronaut Russell Schweickart inside simulator for EVA training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot of the Apollo 9 (Spacecraft 104/Lunar Module 3/Saturn 504) space mission, is seen inside Chamber 'A', Space Environment Simulation Laboratory, bldg 32, participating in dry run activity in preparpation for extravehicular activity.

  8. Training Community Modeling and Simulation Business Plan: 2009 Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    HLA user community • Develop Federate compliance test tools • Revise the HLA Object Model Template ( OMT ) • Update the Distributed Simulation...Ocean, Atmosphere, and Space Environmental Services OCONUS Outside of the Continental United States OFT Office of Force Transformation OMT Object

  9. SIMULATION STUDY OF LONGITUDINAL FORCES IN THE COUPLING DEVICE OF HEAVY FREIGHT TRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Stokłosa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available On the LHS line (Broad-gauge Metallurgical Line, far out West of the railway line with a gauge of 1520 mm, heavy goods trains for a gross weight 5500 tons and a length of 850 m are operated. The article presents the results of a simulation study of the forces that occur in the automatic coupling device of SA-3 type of Russian production train consisting of 60 coal wagons of Russian construction of gross mass 91 tons each. The train moves on the 1520 mm gauge tracks curve S type (the radius of curvature of curves 300 m. Simulation studies were conducted using the Train Module of program to dynamic study multi-elements systems of Universal Mechanism UM 6.0.

  10. The introduction of emergency cricothyroidotomy simulation training in Zimbabwe contributed to the saving of two lives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avnstorp, M. B.; Jensen, P. V. F.; Dzongodza, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In developing countries with limited access to ENT services, performing emergency cricothyroidotomy in patients with upper airway obstruction may be a life-saving last resort. An established Danish-Zimbabwean collaboration of otorhinolaryngologists enrolled Zimbabwean doctors into a v...... surgeons, anaesthetists and, eventually, emergency and recovery room personnel in developing countries. A video-guided simulation training programme on emergency cricothyroidotomy in Zimbabwe proved its value in this regard....... into a video-guided simulation training programme on emergency cricothyroidotomy. This paper presents the positive effect of this training, illustrated by two case reports. Case reports: A 56-year-old female presented with upper airway obstruction due to a rapidly progressing infectious swelling of the head...... extubated, the patient exhibited severe stridor followed by respiratory arrest. Re-intubation attempts were unsuccessful and emergency cricothyroidotomy was performed to secure the airway, preserving the life of the patient. Conclusion: Emergency cricothyroidotomy training should be considered for all...

  11. Team size impact on assessment of teamwork in simulation-based trauma team training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yong-Su; Steinemann, Susan; Berg, Benjamin W

    2014-11-01

    Non-technical skills (teamwork) assessment is used to improve competence during training for interprofessional trauma teams. We hypothesized non-technical skills assessment is less reliable for large size teams, and evaluated team size effects during teamwork training. Small-teams (n = 5; 5-7 members) and Large-teams (n = 6; 8-9 members) participated in three simulation-based trauma team training scenarios. Following each scenario, teamwork was scored by participating trauma attending physicians (TA), non-participating critical care trauma nurses (CRN), and two expert teamwork debriefers (E), using the Trauma Nontechnical Skills Assessment tool (T-NOTECHS). Large-team scores by TA and CRN were higher than E scores (P teamwork rating instruments such as T-NOTECHS for assessment of simulated or actual trauma teams. Modified rating scales and enhanced training for raters of large groups versus small groups may be warranted.

  12. Simulator-Based Air Medical Training Program Christoph Life: From Concept to Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Marcel; Friedrich, Lars; Schröter, Christian; Flemming, Andreas; Eismann, Hendrik; Sieg, Lion; Mommsen, Philipp; Krettek, Christian; Zeckey, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Christoph Life is a simulator-based air medical training program and a new and innovative educational concept. Participants pass different scenarios with a fully equipped and movable helicopter simulator. Main focuses of the program are crew resource management (CRM) elements and team training. Information about expectations end effectiveness of the training is sparse. During a 2-day training, participants learn CRM basics and complete various emergency medical scenarios. For evaluation, we used an anonymous questionnaire either with polar questions or a 6-coded psychometric Likert scale. The Wilcoxon test was used for statistical analysis. The significance level was set at P CRM basics (3.5 ± 1.2 vs. 5.4 ± 0.7, P benefit for the participants' nontechnical skills. Copyright © 2016 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A simulation-based training program improves emergency department staff communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Lynn A; Warren, Otis; Gardner, Liz; Rojek, Adam; Lindquist, David G

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of Project CLEAR!, a novel simulation-based training program designed to instill Crew Resource Management (CRM) as the communication standard and to create a service-focused environment in the emergency department (ED) by standardizing the patient encounter. A survey-based study compared physicians' and nurses' perceptions of the quality of communication before and after the training program. Surveys were developed to measure ED staff perceptions of the quality of communication between staff members and with patients. Pretraining and posttraining survey results were compared. After the training program, survey scores improved significantly on questions that asked participants to rate the overall communication between staff members and between staff and patients. A simulation-based training program focusing on CRM and standardizing the patient encounter improves communication in the ED, both between staff members and between staff members and patients.

  14. Randomized Clinical Trial of Virtual Reality Simulation Training for Transvaginal Gynecologic Ultrasound Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Coline; Chalouhi, Gihad E; Bouhanna, Philippe; Ville, Yves; Dommergues, Marc

    2015-09-01

    To compare the impact of virtual reality simulation training and theoretical teaching on the ability of inexperienced trainees to produce adequate virtual transvaginal ultrasound images. We conducted a randomized controlled trial with parallel groups. Participants included inexperienced residents starting a training program in Paris. The intervention consisted of 40 minutes of virtual reality simulation training using a haptic transvaginal simulator versus 40 minutes of conventional teaching including a conference with slides and videos and answers to the students' questions. The outcome was a 19-point image quality score calculated from a set of 4 images (sagittal and coronal views of the uterus and left and right ovaries) produced by trainees immediately after the intervention, using the same simulator on which a new virtual patient had been uploaded. Experts assessed the outcome on stored images, presented in a random order, 2 months after the trial was completed. They were blinded to group assignment. The hypothesis was an improved outcome in the intervention group. Randomization was 1 to 1. The mean score was significantly greater in the simulation group (n = 16; mean score, 12; SEM, 0.8) than the control group (n = 18; mean score, 9; SEM, 1.0; P= .0302). The quality of virtual vaginal images produced by inexperienced trainees was greater immediately after a single virtual reality simulation training session than after a single theoretical teaching session. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. Measurements and simulations of wakefields at the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snuverink, J.; Ainsworth, R.; Boogert, S. T.; Cullinan, F. J.; Lyapin, A.; Kim, Y. I.; Kubo, K.; Kuroda, S.; Okugi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; White, G. R.

    2016-09-01

    Wakefields are an important factor in accelerator design, and are a real concern when preserving the low beam emittance in modern machines. Charge dependent beam size growth has been observed at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF2), a test accelerator for future linear collider beam delivery systems. Part of the explanation of this beam size growth is wakefields. In this paper we present numerical calculations of the wakefields produced by several types of geometrical discontinuities in the beam line as well as tracking simulations to estimate the induced effects. We also discuss precision beam kick measurements performed with the ATF2 cavity beam position monitor system for a test wakefield source in a movable section of the vacuum chamber. Using an improved model independent method we measured a wakefield kick for this movable section of about 0.49 V /pC /mm , which, compared to the calculated value from electromagnetic simulations of 0.41 V /pC /mm , is within the systematic error.

  16. Comparison of Staged Z-pinch Experiments at the NTF Zebra Facility with Mach2 simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruskov, E.; Wessel, F. J.; Rahman, H. U.; Ney, P.; Darling, T. W.; Johnson, Z.; McGee, E.; Covington, A.; Dutra, E.; Valenzuela, J. C.; Conti, F.; Narkis, J.; Beg, F.

    2016-10-01

    Staged Z-pinch experiments at the University of Nevada, Reno, 1MA Z-pinch Zebra facility were conducted. A hollow shell of argon gas liner is injected between 1 cm anode-cathode gap through a supersonic nozzle of 2.0 cm diameter with a throat gap of 240 microns. A deuterium plasma fill is injected inside the argon gas shell through a plasma gun as a fusible target plasma. An axial magnetic field is also applied throughout the pinch region. Experimental measurements such as pinch current, X-ray signal, neutron yield, and streak images are compared with MACH2 radiation hydrodynamic code simulations. The argon liner density profiles, obtained from the CFD (FLUENT), are used as an input to MACH2. The comparison suggests a fairly close agreement between the experimental measurements and the simulation results. This study not only helps to benchmark the code but also suggests the importance of the Z-pinch implosion time, optimizing both liner and target plasma density to obtain the maximum energy coupling between the circuit and the load. Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy, DE-AR0000569.

  17. Large eddy simulation of Loss of Vacuum Accident in STARDUST facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, Miriam; Gaudio, Pasquale; Lupelli, Ivan [Associazione ENEA EURATOM Quantum Electronics and Plasma Physics Research Group, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Malizia, Andrea, E-mail: malizia@ing.uniroma2.it [Associazione ENEA EURATOM Quantum Electronics and Plasma Physics Research Group, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Porfiri, Maria Teresa [Associazione ENEA EURATOM Nuclear Fusion Tecnologies, Via Enrico Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Richetta, Maria [Associazione ENEA EURATOM Quantum Electronics and Plasma Physics Research Group, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Fusion safety, plasma material interaction. ► Numerical and experimental data comparison to analyze the consequences of Loss of Vacuum Accident that can provoke dust mobilization inside the Vacuum Vessel of the Nuclear Fusion Reactor ITER-like. -- Abstract: The development of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models of air ingress into the vacuum vessel (VV) represents an important issue concerning the safety analysis of nuclear fusion devices, in particular in the field of dust mobilization. The present work deals with the large eddy simulations (LES) of fluid dynamic fields during a vessel filling at near vacuum conditions to support the safety study of Loss of Vacuum Accidents (LOVA) events triggered by air income. The model's results are compared to the experimental data provided by STARDUST facility at different pressurization rates (100 Pa/s, 300 Pa/s and 500 Pa/s). Simulation's results compare favorably with experimental data, demonstrating the possibility of implementing LES in large vacuum systems as tokamaks.

  18. Simulations of indirectly driven gas-filled capsules at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Eder, D. C.; Pino, J. E.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Remington, B. A.; Rowley, D. P.; Yeamans, C. B.; Tipton, R. E.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, R.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Divol, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-11-15

    Gas-filled capsules imploded with indirect drive on the National Ignition Facility have been employed as symmetry surrogates for cryogenic-layered ignition capsules and to explore interfacial mix. Plastic capsules containing deuterated layers and filled with tritium gas provide a direct measure of mix of ablator into the gas fuel. Other plastic capsules have employed DT or D{sup 3}He gas fill. We present the results of two-dimensional simulations of gas-filled capsule implosions with known degradation sources represented as in modeling of inertial confinement fusion ignition designs; these are time-dependent drive asymmetry, the capsule support tent, roughness at material interfaces, and prescribed gas-ablator interface mix. Unlike the case of cryogenic-layered implosions, many observables of gas-filled implosions are in reasonable agreement with predictions of these simulations. Yields of TT and DT neutrons as well as other x-ray and nuclear diagnostics are matched for CD-layered implosions. Yields of DT-filled capsules are over-predicted by factors of 1.4–2, while D{sup 3}He capsule yields are matched, as well as other metrics for both capsule types.

  19. Staged Z-pinch Simulations for the UNR, Nevada Terawatt Zebra Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, Paul; Rahman, Hafiz; Wessel, Frank; Narkis, Jeff; Valenzuela, Julio; Beg, Farhat; Presura, Radu; Darling, Tim; McKee, Erik; Covington, Aaron

    2015-11-01

    We simulate a Staged Z-pinch imploded on the 1 MA, 130 ns, 100 kJ, Nevada Terawatt Zebra Facility. The load is a magnetized, cylindrical, double gas-puff, plasma liner imploding onto a plasma target. Simulations use the 2-1/2 D, radiation-MHD code, MACH2. Three different liner gases are evaluated: Ar, Kr, and Xe and the target is either: DD, or DT, with a liner-plasma radius of: 1.0 cm and 2.0 cm, and a 5.0-mm thickness. Initial conditions are optimized to produce the highest neutron yield. Shocks propagate at different speeds in the liner and target, leading to a shock front at the interface. Magnetosonic shock waves pre-heat the target plasma and provide a stable implosion. The shock front provides a secondary conduction channel which builds up during implosion. The axial magnetic field controls the MRT instability and traps α-particles, leading to ignition. Magnetic flux is compressed, and at peak parameters the magnetic field and current density exceed, by an order of magnitude, values outside the pinch, providing a magneto-inertial confinement. A smaller radius provides 102 -103 × higher neutron yield. Funded by the US Department of Energy, ARPA-E, Control Number 1184-1527.

  20. Multidisciplinary In Situ Simulation-Based Training as a Postpartum Hemorrhage Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutgendorf, Monica A; Spalding, Carmen; Drake, Elizabeth; Spence, Dennis; Heaton, Jason O; Morocco, Kristina V

    2017-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage is a common obstetric emergency affecting 3 to 5% of deliveries, with significant maternal morbidity and mortality. Effective management of postpartum hemorrhage requires strong teamwork and collaboration. We completed a multidisciplinary in situ postpartum hemorrhage simulation training exercise with structured team debriefing to evaluate hospital protocols, team performance, operational readiness, and real-time identification of system improvements. Our objective was to assess participant comfort with managing obstetric hemorrhage following our multidisciplinary in situ simulation training exercise. This was a quality improvement project that utilized a comprehensive multidisciplinary in situ postpartum hemorrhage simulation exercise. Participants from the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Anesthesia, Nursing, Pediatrics, and Transfusion Services completed the training exercise in 16 scenarios run over 2 days. The intervention was a high fidelity, multidisciplinary in situ simulation training to evaluate hospital protocols, team performance, operational readiness, and system improvements. Structured debriefing was conducted with the participants to discuss communication and team functioning. Our main outcome measure was participant self-reported comfort levels for managing postpartum hemorrhage before and after simulation training. A 5-point Likert scale (1 being very uncomfortable and 5 being very comfortable) was used to measure participant comfort. A paired t test was used to assess differences in participant responses before and after the simulation exercise. We also measured the time to prepare simulated blood products and followed the number of postpartum hemorrhage cases before and after the simulation exercise. We trained 113 health care professionals including obstetricians, midwives, residents, anesthesiologists, nurse anesthetists, nurses, and medical assistants. Participants reported a higher comfort level in managing