WorldWideScience

Sample records for facility naval air

  1. Potential geothermal energy use at the Naval Air Rework Facilities, Norfolk, Virginia and Jacksonville, Florida, and at the naval shipyard, Charleston, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costain, J.K.; Glover, L. III; Newman, R.W.

    1984-05-01

    The feasibility of geothermal energy use at naval installations in Norfolk, VA, Jacksonville, FL, and Charleston, SC was assessed. Geophysical and geological studies of the above areas were performed. Engineering and economic factors, affecting potential energy use, were evaluated. The Norfolk and Jacksonville facilities are identified as candidates for geothermal systems. System costs are predicted. Economic benefits of the proposed geothermal systems are forecast, using the net present value method of predicting future income.

  2. Unliquidated Obligations for Air Force-Funded Projects Administered by The Naval Facilities Engineering Command

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    ... consolidated financial statements. The Air Force Audit Agency requested us to assist in its review of the Statement of Budgetary Resources for the Air Force General Fund by reviewing unliquidated obligations for Air Force-funded...

  3. General Plan Environmental Assessment for Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility, Washington, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    new facility, Building 1535 would be demolished. The new administrative campus would be anchored by the BRAC/NCR facility and will include future...squadron operations facility, Building 1658, provides the anchor to further development of operations-related facilities in this area. The...A!l’ltndm<:r.l b &pp<QVN. Th.it a.:tiGn romplttes MOE’s n:litw of the ()cle, u r~uind by S«tion 9-507 of the E’.nvironmtnt Ankle of !he Annolai.t<l

  4. Defense Base Realignment and Closure Budget Data for Naval Air Technical Training Center, Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul

    1994-01-01

    .... This report provides the results of the audit of 19 projects, valued at $288.9 million, for the realignment of the Naval Air Technical Training Center from Naval Air Station Memphis, Tennessee, to Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida...

  5. Naval Aerodynamics Test Facility (NATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NATF specializes in Aerodynamics testing of scaled and fullsized Naval models, research into flow physics found on US Navy planes and ships, aerosol testing and...

  6. Nuclear training facilities at the Royal Naval College, Greenwich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head, J.L.; Lowther, C.A.; Marsh, J.R.W.

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes some of the nuclear training facilities at the Royal Naval College and the way the facilities are used in the training of personnel for the Naval nuclear propulsion programme. (author)

  7. Supply Inventory Management: Accountability and Control of Materiel at the Naval Air Depot, North Island

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    ... of the $6.8 billion was for operation of three Naval Air Depots. A significant portion of the $1.5 billion was for purchasing materiel used in repair and overhaul processes at the depot maintenance facilities...

  8. Supply Inventory Managment: Accountability and Control of Materiel at the Naval Air Depot, North Island

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young, Shelton

    2002-01-01

    ... of the $6.8 billion was for operation of three Naval Air Depots. A significant portion of the $1.5 billion was for purchasing materiel used in repair and overhaul processes at the depot maintenance facilities...

  9. Documentation and Evaluation of Depot Maintenance Cost Accumulation and Reporting at the Naval Air Rework Facility, Jacksonville, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    Barilla , 1984). B. NARF JACKSONVILLE 1. Activities and Services NARF Jacksonville is one of the six industrially funded maintenance facilities which...MC =arine Corps N =Navy DSA z Defense Security Assistance OFA - Other Federal Agencies NFA a Non-Federal Agencies 80 1" 6 LIST OF REFERENCES Barilla

  10. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other facilities...

  11. Wireless local network architecture for Naval medical treatment facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Deason, Russell C.

    2004-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited In today's Navy Medicine, an approach towards wireless networks is coming into view. The idea of developing and deploying workable Wireless Local Area Networks (WLAN) throughout Naval hospitals is but just a few years down the road. Currently Naval Medical Treatment Facilities (MTF) are using wired Local Area Networks (LANs) throughout the infrastructure of each facility. Civilian hospitals and other medical treatment facilities have b...

  12. POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT - UNITED STATES NAVAL BASE NORFOLK NAVAL AIR STATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes work conducted at the U.S. Navy's Naval Base Norfolk, Naval Air Station (NAS) located at Sewells Point in Norfolk, Virginia, under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) Program. This project w...

  13. Contract Claims Experience at the Naval Air Systems Command

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carty, John

    1999-01-01

    ...) experienced at the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) between January 1997 and December 1998 as a means to identify areas of potential improvement in management practices which could result in reduced numbers of claims being submitted...

  14. Systems Engineering Management Training at Naval Air Systems Command

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rebel, James

    2000-01-01

    Within the past few years, the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) has undergone several major changes including an engineering reorganization from a matrix organization to an Integrated Program Team/Competency Aligned Organization (IPT/CAO...

  15. Naval Research Laboratory Major Facilities 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    consists of two equipment shelters, a chiller for cooling the transmitter, and a 175 kVA diesel generator for use at remote sites. A 40-ft-long... bioremediation , and biodeterioration. INSTRUMENTATION: • ESEM equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray detector and an image acquisition and...a 125 kW uninterruptible power system with diesel backup. Magnetic sensitivity testing of precision Precision Clock Evaluation Facility CONTACT

  16. Air Data Calibration Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is for low altitude subsonic altimeter system calibrations of air vehicles. Mission is a direct support of the AFFTC mission. Postflight data merge is...

  17. 1996 environmental monitoring report for the Naval Reactors Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1996 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The NRF is located on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and contains three naval reactor prototypes and the Expended Core Facility, which examines developmental nuclear fuel material samples, spent naval fuel, and irradiated reactor plant components/materials. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with state and federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE)

  18. Emission Facilities - Air Emission Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Represents the Primary Facility type Air Emission Plant (AEP) point features. Air Emissions Plant is a DEP primary facility type related to the Air Quality Program....

  19. Optimizing Training Event Schedules at Naval Air Station Fallon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-01

    Time VBA Visual Basic for Applications WTI Weapons and Tactics Instructor xiii THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK xiv Executive Summary Naval Air...emitter inventory for each site. Constraint (3.6) ensures scheduled flight events have access to an emitter, at the proper location, required for the...flight event requests and their respective requirements into a specificmacro-enabled excel worksheet (Microsoftl, 2017). A series of VBA ( VBA , 2017

  20. Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2001 at the Naval Reactors Facility are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U. S. Department of Energy

  1. 1997 environmental monitoring report for the Naval Reactors Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1997 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with state and federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE)

  2. Naval Reactors Facility Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2003 at the Naval Reactors Facility are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy

  3. Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1999 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

  4. 1993 environmental monitoring report for the naval reactors facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1993 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with state and federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE)

  5. 1991 environmental monitoring report for the Naval Reactors Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The results of the radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs for 1991 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were within the guidelines established by state and federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or heath and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the EnVironmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE)

  6. Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2000 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

  7. 76 FR 18395 - Safety Zone; Naval Air Station Corpus Christi Air Show, Oso Bay, Corpus Christi, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Naval Air Station Corpus Christi Air Show, Oso Bay, Corpus Christi, TX AGENCY: Coast... zone on the navigable waters of Oso Bay in Corpus Christi, Texas in support of the 2011 Naval Air... entities and very few recreational fisherman utilize this section of Oso Bay, the restriction of vessel...

  8. A Comprehensive Copper Compliance Strategy: Implementing Regulatory Guidance at Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Earley, P. J; Rosen, G; Rivera-Duarte, I; Gauthier, R. D; Arias-Thode, Y; Thompson, J; Swope, B

    2007-01-01

    Studies were performed to develop a new National Pollution Discharge Elimination Systems Permit for the discharge of effluents from the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility into Pearl Harbor...

  9. Environmental Assessment for Waterfront Facilities Maintenance and Improvements, Pearl Harbor Naval Complex, Oahu, Hawaii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2005-01-01

    Commander, Navy Region Hawaii (CNRH) proposes to repair, maintain, and improve waterfront berthing and maintenance facilities for ships and submarines on an as-needed basis within the Pearl Harbor Naval Complex (PHNC...

  10. Indoor air quality and infiltration in multifamily naval housing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, G.B.; Wilfert, G.L.; Dennis, G.W.

    1984-11-01

    Measurements of indoor air quality and air infiltration were taken in three units of a multifamily housing complex at the Naval Submarine base in Bangor, Washington, over 5 consecutive days during the heating season of 1983. Three dwelling units of identical size constructed in 1978 were monitored, each in a separate two-story four-unit complex. One unit was a downstairs unit and the other two units were upstairs units. Two of the units were occupied by smokers (one downstairs and one upstairs). None of the units had combustion appliances. Pollutants monitored indoors included radon, formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, particulate matter, and nitrogen dioxide. Indoor and outdoor temperature and windspeed were also recorded. Outdoor formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide were also measured. Air exchange was measured about three times during each 24-h period, using a perfluorocarbon tracer with automatic tracer sampling. The daily average air exchange rate ranged from 0.22 to 0.91 air changes per hour (ACH). Pollutant concentrations were generally low except for particulate matter in the units with smokers, which were two to four times higher than in the unit with nonsmokers. Levels of carbon monoxide were also slightly elevated in one of the units with a smoker compared to the unit with nonsmokers. 5 references, 4 figures, 4 tables

  11. Reverse Ballistic Air Gun Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This custom-designed facility houses a suite of three air guns capable of generating accelerations up to 100,000 Gs and velocities up to 2,000 ft/s. In addition to a...

  12. Evaluation of High-Performance Rooftop HVAC Unit Naval Air Station Key West, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howett, Daniel H. [ORNL; Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Cox, Daryl [ORNL

    2018-01-01

    This report documents performance of a high performance rooftop HVAC unit (RTU) at Naval Air Station Key West, FL. This report was sponsored by the Federal Energy Management Program as part of the "High Performance RTU Campaign".

  13. Using Net-Zero Energy Projects to Enable Sustainable Economic Redevelopment at the Former Brunswick Air Naval Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huffman, S.

    2011-10-01

    A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites. The Brunswick Naval Air Station is a naval air facility and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Super Fund site that is being cleaned up, and closed down. The objective of this report is not only to look at the economics of individual renewable energy technologies, but also to look at the systemic benefits that can be gained when cost-effective renewable energy technologies are integrated with other systems and businesses in a community; thus multiplying the total monetary, employment, and quality-of-life benefits they can provide to a community.

  14. 32 CFR 766.7 - How to request use of naval aviation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... use of naval aviation facilities. (a) Forms required. Each applicant desiring use of a Navy/Marine... (OPNAV Form 3770/1 (Rev. 7-70)). (2) Submit a Certificate of Insurance (NAVFAC 7-11011/36) showing... instrumentalities of the U.S. Government. (5) Bailed aircraft, provided the bailment contract specifies that the U.S...

  15. Air ventilation/controlling facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1997-12-12

    When all electricity supply from the outside of a power plant are lost, a power generator directly connected to an emergency steam turbine which is driven by steams introduced from a nuclear reactor is driven to supply electricity required in the power plant. Cool water prepared by a refrigerator is used as cooling water in an air ventilation/controlling facility of a room equipped with the power generating facility. As the refrigerator, a refrigerator of an existent emergency air cooling water system for an auxiliary air ventilation/controlling equipment is used. This can extend the period of time till the temperature of the room where the power generator is disposed exceeds the temperature range capable of keeping the integrity of the power generator even when all the AC power supply are lost to inactivate the function of the air ventilation/controlling system. (I.S.)

  16. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): AIRS_AFS Sub Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Air Facility System (AFS) contains compliance and permit data for stationary sources regulated by EPA, state and local air pollution agencies. The sub facility...

  17. Sustainable Acquisition Process Improvement for Naval Facilities Engineering Command

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanders, Erin

    2003-01-01

    .... To meet the new requirements, laws must be implemented through effective policy. For over 6 years, the Navy has been acquiring sustainably designed facilities and has recently set sustainable development policy guidelines...

  18. Defense Base Realignment and Closure Budget Data for Naval Air Stations Dallas, Texas, and Memphis, Tennessee, Realigning to Carswell Air Reserve Base, Texas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul

    1994-01-01

    .... This report provides the results of the audit of 16 projects, valued at $122 million, for the realignment of the Naval Air Stations Memphis, Tennessee, and Dallas, Texas, to Carswell Air Reserve Base, Texas...

  19. Monitoring around the secret nuclear facilities of naval ports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaskierowicz, D.; Quere, St.

    2010-01-01

    Based within large industrial cities (Brest, Toulon, Cherbourg) or more rural areas like Crozon (Ile Longue), French navy exploits nuclear facilities where are built, maintained and decommissioned nuclear power submarines and aircraft-carrier. The safety and the security of these installations as well as the non-impact on people and environment are continuously monitored. The DSND, a governmental regulatory body dedicated to the Defense, applies the same regulations enforced by the ASN for civilian nuclear activities. Concerning environmental monitoring, the navy answers to the DSND or the ASN, depending on the type of survey. In every nuclear site, an automatic nuclear monitoring sensor system (2SNM) runs 24/7, with the supervision of specialized personnel in radioprotection. Each year, more than 7000 samples are collected in the ecosystem and thousands of measurements are carried out in four laboratories (LASEM in Cherbourg, Brest and Toulon) - SPRS ILO) of the navy. These results are sent to the DSND and have been integrated since February 2010 to the brand-new public web site of the national monitoring network of radioactivity in the environment (RMN). (author)

  20. Modeling Anti-Air Warfare With Discrete Event Simulation and Analyzing Naval Convoy Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    W., & Scheaffer, R. L. (2008). Mathematical statistics with applications . Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning. 118 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK...WARFARE WITH DISCRETE EVENT SIMULATION AND ANALYZING NAVAL CONVOY OPERATIONS by Ali E. Opcin June 2016 Thesis Advisor: Arnold H. Buss Co...REPORT DATE June 2016 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MODELING ANTI-AIR WARFARE WITH DISCRETE EVENT

  1. Lighter-Than-Air Systems for Future Naval Missions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bowes, W. C; Engelland, J; Fernandez, F. L; Fratarangelo, P; Kohn, Jr., E. R; Lister, M. J; Neal, W. A; Polmar, N; Rumpf, R. L; Smith, T. B

    2006-01-01

    The Panel concluded that several Lighter-Than-Air (LTA) vehicles now available could provide the endurance and station-keeping needed for persistent ISR, communications relay, and electronic warfare...

  2. Study of Naval Air Station Operations to Reduce Fuel Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    reasons and loyalty of frequent business customers , schedules rarely change significantly from week to week. Following the schedule generation, aircraft...Air Station ppm pounds per minute xiv rft ready for tasking SHARP Sierra Hotel Aviation Readiness Program Simio Simulation Modeling Framework...America, the U.S. airline industry experienced a total of $7.18 billion in delay costs in 2013 at an average cost per minute of $78.17 (Airlines

  3. Geodatabase of environmental information for Air Force Plant 4 and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field, Fort Worth, Texas, 1990-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sachin D.; Quigley, Sean M.

    2005-01-01

    Air Force Plant 4 (AFP4) and adjacent Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base (NAS-JRB) at Fort Worth, Tex., constitute a government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO) facility that has been in operation since 1942. Contaminants from the facility, primarily volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and metals, have entered the groundwater-flow system through leakage from waste-disposal sites (landfills and pits) and from manufacturing processes (U.S. Air Force, Aeronautical Systems Center, 1995). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force (USAF), Aeronautical Systems Center, Environmental Management Directorate (ASC/ENVR), developed a comprehensive database (or geodatabase) of temporal and spatial environmental information associated with the geology, hydrology, and water quality at AFP4 and NAS-JRB. The database of this report provides information about the AFP4 and NAS-JRB study area including sample location names, identification numbers, locations, historical dates, and various measured hydrologic data. This database does not include every sample location at the site, but is limited to an aggregation of selected digital and hardcopy data of the USAF, USGS, and various consultants who have previously or are currently working at the site.

  4. Guidance for air sampling at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breslin, A.J.

    1976-11-01

    The principal uses of air sampling at nuclear facilities are to monitor general levels of radioactive air contamination, identify sources of air contamination, and evaluate the effectiveness of contaminant control equipment, determine exposures of individual workers, and provide automatic warning of hazardous concentrations of radioactivity. These applications of air sampling are discussed with respect to standards of occupational exposure, instrumentation, sample analysis, sampling protocol, and statistical treatment of concentration data. Emphasis is given to the influence of spacial and temporal variations of radionuclide concentration on the location, duration, and frequency of air sampling

  5. Naval Postgraduate School Research. Volume 9, Number 1, February 1999

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Butler, James M; Pace, Phillip E; Powers, John P

    1999-01-01

    .... Topics include featured project, Menneken Award Winner, naval research, naval research facilities, naval research laboratories, technology transfer, conferences, faculty news, student research...

  6. Air filters for use at nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linder, P [Aktiebolaget Atomenergi, Studsvik, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1970-12-01

    The ventilation system of a nuclear facility plays a vital role in ensuring that the air in working areas and the environment remains free from radioactive contamination. An earlier IAEA publication, Techniques for Controlling Air Pollution from the Operation of Nuclear Facilities, Safety Series No. 17, deals with the design and operation of ventilation systems at nuclear facilities. These systems are usually provided with air-cleaning devices which remove the contaminants from the air. This publication is intended as a guide to those who are concerned with the design of air-filtering systems and with the testing, operation and maintenance of air-filter installations at nuclear facilities. Emphasis is mainly placed on so-called high-efficiency particulate air filters (HEPA filters) and on providing general information on them. Besides describing the usual filter types, their dimensions and construction materials, the guidebook attempts to explain their properties and behaviour under different operating conditions. It also gives advice on testing and handling the filters so that effective and safe performance is ensured. The guidebook should serve as an introduction to the use of high efficiency particulate air filters in countries where work with radioactive materials has only recently commenced. The list of references at the end of the book indicates sources of more advanced information for those who already have comprehensive experience in this field. It is assumed here that the filters are obtained from a manufacturer, and the guidebook thus contains no information on the design and development of the filter itself, nor does it deal with the cleaning of the intake air to a plant, with gas sorption or protective respiratory equipment.

  7. Air filters for use at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linder, P.

    1970-01-01

    The ventilation system of a nuclear facility plays a vital role in ensuring that the air in working areas and the environment remains free from radioactive contamination. An earlier IAEA publication, Techniques for Controlling Air Pollution from the Operation of Nuclear Facilities, Safety Series No. 17, deals with the design and operation of ventilation systems at nuclear facilities. These systems are usually provided with air-cleaning devices which remove the contaminants from the air. This publication is intended as a guide to those who are concerned with the design of air-filtering systems and with the testing, operation and maintenance of air-filter installations at nuclear facilities. Emphasis is mainly placed on so-called high-efficiency particulate air filters (HEPA filters) and on providing general information on them. Besides describing the usual filter types, their dimensions and construction materials, the guidebook attempts to explain their properties and behaviour under different operating conditions. It also gives advice on testing and handling the filters so that effective and safe performance is ensured. The guidebook should serve as an introduction to the use of high efficiency particulate air filters in countries where work with radioactive materials has only recently commenced. The list of references at the end of the book indicates sources of more advanced information for those who already have comprehensive experience in this field. It is assumed here that the filters are obtained from a manufacturer, and the guidebook thus contains no information on the design and development of the filter itself, nor does it deal with the cleaning of the intake air to a plant, with gas sorption or protective respiratory equipment

  8. Completion Summary for Well NRF-16 near the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Fisher, Jason C.; Bartholomay, Roy C.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office, Idaho Branch Office cored and completed well NRF-16 for monitoring the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP) aquifer. The borehole was initially cored to a depth of 425 feet below land surface and water samples and geophysical data were collected and analyzed to determine if well NRF-16 would meet criteria requested by Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) for a new upgradient well. Final construction continued after initial water samples and geophysical data indicated that NRF-16 would produce chemical concentrations representative of upgradient aquifer water not influenced by NRF facility disposal, and that the well was capable of producing sustainable discharge for ongoing monitoring. The borehole was reamed and constructed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act monitoring well complete with screen and dedicated pump. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected after coring and final completion of the monitoring well. Geophysical logs were examined in conjunction with the borehole core to identify primary flow paths for groundwater, which are believed to occur in the intervals of fractured and vesicular basalt and to describe borehole lithology in detail. Geophysical data also were examined to look for evidence of perched water and the extent of the annular seal after cement grouting the casing in place. Borehole videos were collected to confirm that no perched water was present and to examine the borehole before and after setting the screen in well NRF-16. Two consecutive single-well aquifer tests to define hydraulic characteristics for well NRF-16 were conducted in the eastern SRP aquifer. Transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity averaged from the aquifer tests were 4.8 x 103 ft2/d and 9.9 ft/d, respectively. The transmissivity for well NRF-16 was within the range of values determined from past aquifer

  9. 33 CFR 334.778 - Pensacola Bay and waters contiguous to the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, FL; restricted area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pensacola Bay and waters... Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.778 Pensacola Bay and waters contiguous to the Naval Air Station, Pensacola...

  10. Air conditioner for radioactive material handling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takeaki.

    1991-01-01

    An air conditioner intakes open-air from an open-air intake port to remove sands and sea salt particles by air filters. Then, natural and artificial radioactive particles of less than 1 μm are removed by high performance particulate filters. After controlling the temperature by an air heater or an air cooler, air is sent to each of chambers in a facility under pressure elevation by a blower. In this case, glass fibers are used as the filter material for the high performance particulate filter, which has a performance of more than 99.97% for the particles of 0.3 μm grain size. Since this can sufficiently remove the natural radioactive materials intruded from the outside, a detection limit value in each of the chambers of the facility can be set 10 -13 to 10 -14 μci/cm 3 in respect of radiation control. Accordingly, radiation control can be conducted smoothly and appropriately. (I.N.)

  11. Assessment of Fleet Inventory for Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. Task 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schey, Stephen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Francfort, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Task 1includes a survey of the inventory of non-tactical fleet vehicles at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island (NASWI) to characterize the fleet. This information and characterization are used to select vehicles for monitoring that takes place during Task 2. This monitoring involves data logging of vehicle operation in order to identify the vehicle’s mission and travel requirements. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to PEV adoption. It also identifies whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (collectively referred to as PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements and provide observations related to placement of PEV charging infrastructure. This report provides the results of the assessments and observations of the current non-tactical fleet, fulfilling the Task 1 requirements.

  12. Naval electronic warfare simulation for effectiveness assessment and softkill programmability facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lançon, F.

    2011-06-01

    The Anti-ship Missile (ASM) threat to be faced by ships will become more diverse and difficult. Intelligence, rules of engagement constraints, fast reaction-time for effective softkill solution require specific tools to design Electronic Warfare (EW) systems and to integrate it onboard ship. SAGEM Company provides decoy launcher system [1] and its associated Naval Electronic Warfare Simulation tool (NEWS) to permit softkill effectiveness analysis for anti-ship missile defence. NEWS tool generates virtual environment for missile-ship engagement and counter-measure simulator over a wide spectrum: RF, IR, EO. It integrates EW Command & Control (EWC2) process which is implemented in decoy launcher system and performs Monte-Carlo batch processing to evaluate softkill effectiveness in different engagement situations. NEWS is designed to allow immediate EWC2 process integration from simulation to real decoy launcher system. By design, it allows the final operator to be able to program, test and integrate its own EWC2 module and EW library onboard, so intelligence of each user is protected and evolution of threat can be taken into account through EW library update. The objectives of NEWS tool are also to define a methodology for trial definition and trial data reduction. Growth potential would permit to design new concept for EWC2 programmability and real time effectiveness estimation in EW system. This tool can also be used for operator training purpose. This paper presents the architecture design, the softkill programmability facility concept and the flexibility for onboard integration on ship. The concept of this operationally focused simulation, which is to use only one tool for design, development, trial validation and operational use, will be demonstrated.

  13. Air pollution control at a DOE facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curn, B.L.

    1995-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) plutonium production program Produced some of the greatest scientific and engineering accomplishments of all time. It is remarkable to consider the accomplishments of the Manhattan Project. The Reactor on the Hanford Site, the first production reactor in the world, began operation only 13 months after the start of construction. The DOE nuclear production program was also instrumental in pioneering other fields such as health physics an radiation monitoring. The safety record of these installations is remarkable considering that virtually every significant accomplishment was on the technological threshold of the time. One other area that the DOE Facilities pioneered was the control of radioactive particles and gases emitted to the atmosphere. The high efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA) was a development that provided high collection efficiencies of particulates to protect workers and the public. The halogen and noble gases also were of particular concern. Radioactive iodine is captured by adsorption on activated carbon or synthetic zeolites. Besides controlling radioncuclide air pollution, DOE facilities are concerned with other criteria pollutants and hazardous air pollutant emissions. The Hanford Site encompasses all those air pollution challenges

  14. Naval base goes into dry dock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    After 44 years of operation, the Naval Weapons Evaluation Facility (NWEF) at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico closed its doors in April. According to the Navy's open-quotes History of the Naval Weapons Evaluation Facility, Albuquerque, 1948-1993,close quotes it was open-quotes the first nuclear-weapons-related facility in the Free World to be shut down.close quotes This article briefly relates the history of NWEF. Over the years, NWEF helped develop procedures for certifying 21 U.S. naval aircraft and helicopter types as nuclear-capable, integrating nuclear missiles into ships and submarines, and developing nuclear weapons transportation and storage safety rules. The relationship between NWEF and China Lake, California is described. The indirect role played by NWEF in the bombing of Hiroshima is briefly discussed

  15. Electric Vehicle Preparedness - Implementation Approach for Electric Vehicles at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. Task 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schey, Stephen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Francfort, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Several U.S. Department of Defense base studies have been conducted to identify potential U.S. Department of Defense transportation systems that are strong candidates for introduction or expansion of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs). This study is focused on the Naval Air Station Whidbey Island (NASWI) located in Washington State. Task 1 consisted of a survey of the non-tactical fleet of vehicles at NASWI to begin the review of vehicle mission assignments and types of vehicles in service. In Task 2, daily operational characteristics of vehicles were identified to select vehicles for further monitoring and attachment of data loggers. Task 3 recorded vehicle movements in order to characterize the vehicles’ missions. The results of the data analysis and observations were provided. Individual observations of the selected vehicles provided the basis for recommendations related to PEV adoption, i.e., whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements. It also provided the basis for recommendations related to placement of PEV charging infrastructure. This report focuses on an implementation plan for the near-term adoption of PEVs into the NASWI fleet.

  16. Transmissivity and storage coefficient estimates from slug tests, Naval Air Warfare Center, West Trenton, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Alex R.

    2014-01-01

    Slug tests were conducted on 56 observation wells open to bedrock at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) in West Trenton, New Jersey. Aquifer transmissivity (T) and storage coefficient (S) values for most wells were estimated from slug-test data using the Cooper-Bredehoeft-Papadopulos method. Test data from three wells exhibited fast, underdamped water-level responses and were analyzed with the Butler high-K method. The range of T at NAWC was approximately 0.07 to 10,000 square feet per day. At 11 wells, water levels did not change measurably after 20 minutes following slug insertion; transmissivity at these 11 wells was estimated to be less than 0.07 square feet per day. The range of S was approximately 10-10 to 0.01, the mode being 10-10. Water-level responses for tests at three wells fit poorly to the type curves of both methods, indicating that these methods were not appropriate for adequately estimating T and S from those data.

  17. Investigation of ground-water contamination at a drainage ditch, Installation Restoration Site 4, Naval Air Station Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, Texas, 2005–06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Casey, Clifton C.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, used newly developed sampling methods to investigate ground-water contamination by chlorobenzenes beneath a drainage ditch on the southwestern side of Installation Restoration Site 4, Naval Air Station Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, Texas, during 2005-06. The drainage ditch, which is a potential receptor for ground-water contaminants from Installation Restoration Site 4, intermittently discharges water to Corpus Christi Bay. This report uses data from a new type of pore-water sampler developed for this investigation and other methods to examine the subsurface contamination beneath the drainage ditch. Analysis of ground water from the samplers indicated that chlorobenzenes (maximum detected concentration of 160 micrograms per liter) are present in the ground water beneath the ditch. The concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the samples (less than 0.05-0.4 milligram per liter) showed that the ground water beneath and near the ditch is anaerobic, indicating that substantial chlorobenzene biodegradation in the aquifer beneath the ditch is unlikely. Probable alternative mechanisms of chlorobenzene removal in the ground water beneath the drainage ditch include sorption onto the organic-rich sediment and contaminant depletion by cattails through uptake, sorption, and localized soil aeration.

  18. Soils washing for removal of heavy oil: Naval Air Engineering Center, Lakehurst, NJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, J.H.; Traver, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    With the recognition that large tracts of land are currently unusable as a result of either accidental spills or past industrial practices (such as oil field development), the USEPA Office of Research and Development evaluated soil washing as an alternative remedial technology for heavy oil contaminated soil at a site located on the Naval Air Engineering Center (NAEC), Lakehurst, New Jersey. The researchers used a self-contained, 100-pound-per-hour soil washer. Electrical, pneumatic, and fluid-pumping capabilities were provided by the trailer-mounted system at a remote No. 6 type oil spill site at the Navy base. Chloroform extracts of the contaminated sandy soil recovered a 0.91 gram/milliliter, 950 centistoke viscosity, dark brown, non-PCB oil. By using a surfactant/solvent solution at ambient temperatures, contaminant levels on the soil were reduced from 3.8% (38,000 milligram/kilogram-RCRA hazardous waste designation) to as low as 0.035% (350 milligram/kilogram) oil concentration. Supplemental laboratory evaluations extending the pilot field evaluations showed at elevated temperatures (120F) that residual oil contamination was less than 0.01% (100 milligram/kilogram). This final oil concentration in the treated soil would be defined as clean under the New Jersey Environmental Cleanup and Responsibilities Act (ECRA). A continuous belt press filter was used to recover the oil in a 47% solids cake that could be used as a secondary fuel feed to a waste boiler. The wash water solution was treated and recycled permitting economical operations

  19. Vacuum recovery of free phased leaded gasoline plume Naval Air Station Oceana, Virginia Beach, Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, J.D.; DeLattre, E.L.S.; Beatty, T.R.

    1999-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to the remediation and site restoration of contaminated sites resulting from gasoline and diesel underground storage tanks. These sites are generally associated with fuel delivery systems and are readily visible to the public. One such site is located within the Naval Air Station (NAS) Oceana, Virginia Beach, Virginia. The remediation site is located on an active gas station within NAS Oceana. The scope of the project was to construct a dual-phase remediation system for the removal of free product and the treatment of contaminated groundwater. Contaminated groundwater was to have been collected form recovery wells and conveyed via an underground conveyance system to the treatment system. The treatment system would have contained all the necessary equipment to extract groundwater from the subsurface. The estimated effluent limit for lead would necessitate removal of lead with associated modifications to the treatment system design. Such modifications were financially unfeasible; thus, an alternative remediation scheme had to be designed. LANTDIV decided on a remediation scheme that involved product-only recovery via solar-powered product skimmers and free product removal through vapor extraction. The estimated volume of product in the ground prior to starting the system was 18,000 gallons. The volume of product in the ground after one year of operation is estimated to be 11,700 gallons, reducing the total volume by one-third in the first year of operation. Project thickness that was originally measured at >1.0 foot in six monitoring wells in October 1997 is now present in only three wells at a thickness >0.5 feet. This remediation was accomplished using a treatment system that required minimal capital cost and is simple to operate, thereby keeping operation and maintenance (O and M) cost to a minimum

  20. Overview--Development of a geodatabase and conceptual model of the hydrogeologic units beneath Air Force Plant 4 and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field, Fort Worth, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sachin D.

    2004-01-01

    Air Force Plant 4 (AFP4) and adjacent Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field (NAS–JRB) at Fort Worth, Tex., constitute a contractor-owned, government-operated facility that has been in operation since 1942. Contaminants from the 3,600-acre facility, primarily volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and metals, have entered the ground-water-flow system through leakage from waste-disposal sites and from manufacturing processes. Environmental data collected at AFP4 and NAS–JRB during 1993–2002 created the need for consolidation of the data into a comprehensive temporal and spatial geodatabase. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force Aeronautical Systems Center Environmental Management Directorate, developed a comprehensive geodatabase of temporal and spatial environmental data associated with the hydrogeologic units beneath the facility. A three-dimensional conceptual model of the hydrogeologic units integrally linked to the geodatabase was designed concurrently. Three hydrogeologic units—from land surface downward, the alluvial aquifer, the GoodlandWalnut confining unit, and the Paluxy aquifer—compose the subsurface of interest at AFP4 and NAS–JRB. The alluvial aquifer consists primarily of clay and silt with sand and gravel channel deposits that might be interconnected or interfingered. The Goodland-Walnut confining unit directly underlies the alluvial aquifer and consists of limestone, marl, shale, and clay. The Paluxy aquifer is composed of dense mudstone and fine- to coarse-grained sandstone

  1. Workplace air monitoring and sampling practices at DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinth, K.L.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Selby, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) surveyed the current air monitoring and sampling practices at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities as a part of an air monitoring upgrade task. A comprehensive questionnaire was developed and distributed to DOE contractors through the DOE field offices. Twenty-six facilities returned a completed questionnaire. Questionnaire replies indicate a large diversity in air sampling and monitoring practices among DOE facilities. The differences among the facilities exist in monitoring and sampling instrumentation, procedures, calibration, analytical methods, detection levels, and action levels. Many of these differences could be attributed to different operational needs. 5 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  2. Final Report on the Audit of Architect-Engineer Contracting at the Officer in Charge of Construction, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Contracts, Mediterranean, Madrid, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-30

    This is our final report on the audit of Architect-Engineer Contracting for the Officer in Charge of Construction, Naval Facilities Engineering...Command Contracts, Mediterranean, for your information and use. This is the fourth in a series of reports issued as part of the audit of architect-engineer...A-E) contracting. The Contract Management Directorate made the audit from August 1989 through July 1990. When we expanded the audit scope to include

  3. Contamination in fractured-rock aquifers: Research at the former Naval Air Warfare Center, West Trenton, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Daniel J.; Tiedeman, Claire; Lacombe, Pierre J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and cooperators are studying chlorinated solvents in a fractured sedimentary rock aquifer underlying the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, New Jersey. Fractured-rock aquifers are common in many parts of the United States and are highly susceptible to contamination, particularly at industrial sites. Compared to 'unconsolidated' aquifers, there can be much more uncertainty about the direction and rate of contaminant migration and about the processes and factors that control chemical and microbial transformations of contaminants. Research at the NAWC is improving understanding of the transport and fate of chlorinated solvents in fractured-rock aquifers and will compare the effectiveness of different strategies for contaminant remediation.

  4. Operation technology of air treatment system in nuclear facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Chun, Y B; Hwong, Y H; Lee, H K; Min, D K; Park, K J; Uom, S H; Yang, S Y

    2001-01-01

    Effective operation techniques were reviewed on the air treatment system to protect the personnel in nuclear facilities from the contamination of radio-active particles and to keep the environment clear. Nuclear air treatment system consisted of the ventilation and filtering system was characterized by some test. Measurement of air velocity of blowing/exhaust fan in the ventilation system, leak tests of HEPA filters in the filtering, and measurement of pressure difference between the areas defined by radiation level were conducted. The results acquired form the measurements were reflected directly for the operation of air treatment. In the abnormal state of virus parts of devices composted of the system, the repairing method, maintenance and performance test were also employed in operating effectively the air treatment system. These measuring results and techniques can be available to the operation of air treatment system of PIEF as well as the other nuclear facilities in KAERI.

  5. Radionuclide characterization of environmental air around nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gede Sutresna Wijaya; Anung Muharini

    2015-01-01

    Air is an important environmental component in human life. Presence of air pollutants or contaminants will have a negative impact on human health. According to the existence of a nuclear facility in Yogyakarta, the characterization of radionuclides in the air is absolutely necessary to ensure the safety of people and the environment and also to supervise the safe operation of the facility. In this research the characterization of radionuclides in the air was carried through the air sampling by using High Volume Air Sampler equipped with filter TFA 2133, followed by analysis using combination of a gamma and alpha spectrometers. The concentration of radioactivity in the air fluctuates depending on the time and duration of sampling. Characterization of gamma emitting radionuclides in the air is dominated by radon progeny radionuclides such as 214 Pb, 214 Bi with activity 20.09 ± 1.23 until 32.91 ± 4.87 Bq/m 3 and 31.22 ± 1.76 until 44.25 ± 4.91 Bq/m 3 . Alpha emitter radionuclide was dominated by 214 Po (7.69 MeV) which is also radon progeny and a primordial radionuclides. It can be concluded that the presence of radionuclides in the environmental air not as a product resulting from the operation of nuclear facilities in Yogyakarta. (author)

  6. Monitoring around the secret nuclear facilities of naval ports; Surveillance autour des INBS des ports militaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaskierowicz, D. [Marine Nationale, pharmacien en chef, conseiller scientifique et technique, etat-major de la marine, 83 - Toulon (France); Quere, St. [Marine Nationale, capitaine de corvette, adjoint charge de la prise en compte des installations nucleaires sur l' environnement et le personnel, 83 - Toulon (France)

    2010-06-15

    Based within large industrial cities (Brest, Toulon, Cherbourg) or more rural areas like Crozon (Ile Longue), French navy exploits nuclear facilities where are built, maintained and decommissioned nuclear power submarines and aircraft-carrier. The safety and the security of these installations as well as the non-impact on people and environment are continuously monitored. The DSND, a governmental regulatory body dedicated to the Defense, applies the same regulations enforced by the ASN for civilian nuclear activities. Concerning environmental monitoring, the navy answers to the DSND or the ASN, depending on the type of survey. In every nuclear site, an automatic nuclear monitoring sensor system (2SNM) runs 24/7, with the supervision of specialized personnel in radioprotection. Each year, more than 7000 samples are collected in the ecosystem and thousands of measurements are carried out in four laboratories (LASEM in Cherbourg, Brest and Toulon) - SPRS ILO) of the navy. These results are sent to the DSND and have been integrated since February 2010 to the brand-new public web site of the national monitoring network of radioactivity in the environment (RMN). (author)

  7. Robins Air Force Base Solar Cogeneration Facility design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, B.L.; Bodenschatz, C.A.

    1982-06-01

    A conceptual design and a cost estimate have been developed for a Solar Cogeneration Facility at Robins Air Force Base. This demonstration solar facility was designed to generate and deliver electrical power and process steam to the existing base distribution systems. The facility was to have the potential for construction and operation by 1986 and make use of existing technology. Specific objectives during the DOE funded conceptual design program were to: prepare a Solar Cogeneration Facility (overall System) Specification, select a preferred configuration and develop a conceptual design, establish the performance and economic characteristics of the facility, and prepare a development plan for the demonstration program. The Westinghouse team, comprised of the Westinghouse Advanced Energy Systems Division, Heery and Heery, Inc., and Foster Wheeler Solar Development Corporation, in conjunction with the U.S. Air Force Logistics Command and Georgia Power Company, has selected a conceptual design for the facility that will utilize the latest DOE central receiver technology, effectively utilize the energy collected in the application, operate base-loaded every sunny day of the year, and be applicable to a large number of military and industrial facilities throughout the country. The design of the facility incorporates the use of a Collector System, a Receiver System, an Electrical Power Generating System, a Balance of Facility - Steam and Feedwater System, and a Master Control System.

  8. Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

    2008-10-17

    This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

  9. Performance and Economics of a Wind-Diesel Hybrid Energy System: Naval Air Landing Field, San Clemente Island, California; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenna, Ed; Olsen, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the wind resource, economics and operation of the recently installed wind turbines in conjunction with diesel power for the Naval Air Landing Field (NALF), San Clemente Island (SCI), California Project. The primary goal of the SCI wind power system is to operate with the existing diesel power plant and provide equivalent or better power quality and system reliability than the existing diesel system. The wind system is also intended to reduce, as far as possible, the use of diesel fuel and the inherent generation of nitrogen-oxide emissions and other pollutants. The first two NM 225/30 225kW wind turbines were installed and started shake-down operations on February 5, 1998. This report describes the initial operational data gathered from February 1998 through January 1999, as well as the SCI wind resource and initial cost of energy provided by the wind turbines on SCI. In support of this objective, several years of data on the wind resources of San Clemente Island were collected and compared to historical data. The wind resource data were used as input to economic and feasibility studies for a wind-diesel hybrid installation for SCI

  10. Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Air Force facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, David F.

    The Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program is an initiative within the US Air Force to acquire and validate advanced technologies that could be used to sustain superior capabilities in the area or space nuclear propulsion. The SNTP Program has a specific objective of demonstrating the feasibility of the particle bed reactor (PBR) concept. The term PIPET refers to a project within the SNTP Program responsible for the design, development, construction, and operation of a test reactor facility, including all support systems, that is intended to resolve program technology issues and test goals. A nuclear test facility has been designed that meets SNTP Facility requirements. The design approach taken to meet SNTP requirements has resulted in a nuclear test facility that should encompass a wide range of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) test requirements that may be generated within other programs. The SNTP PIPET project is actively working with DOE and NASA to assess this possibility.

  11. The Cooperative Engagement Capability CEC Transforming Naval Anti-air Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    E-2C Aircraft Acquisition Options,” MR-1517-NAVY (Santa Monica: RAND, 2002), 10. 33 Aegis is not an acronym. The ὰιγίς ( Greek ) or ægis (Latin) was...the shield of the mythological god Zeus (Jupiter) and thus represents a sure defense. 34 For an overview of USN surface (not air) AAW...real time, without significant delay. In World War II CICs, radar operators, plotters, CIC evaluators, and FDOs acted as “ animation artists

  12. Air Inflated Greenhouse as Urban Farming Facilities: Architectural Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Abidin, Syed Zainol; Nasihien, Ronny D; Budiyanto, Hery

    2017-01-01

    Urban Farming utilizing land intensification, in order to meet the needs of fresh vegetables and fruits everyday for the community residential / housing in urban areas. Air Inflated Greenhouse as urban farming facilities, can be built and transferred to a residential location / specific housing is easy, safe, fast and lightweight (0,55mm PVC tarpaulin) so that urban farming products closer to consumers in urban settlements, the price impact getting cheaper, but quality. Long-term goal is to d...

  13. Air compliance through pollution prevention at Air Force Materiel Command facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolpa, R.; Ryckman, S.J. Jr.; Smith, A.E.

    1999-03-19

    Options for air compliance through pollution prevention (P2) have been identified at 14 facilities of the US Air Force Materiel Command, ranging from depots with significant light industrial activity to laboratories. Previous P2 efforts concentrated on reducing hazardous and solid wastes, with any reduction in air impacts generally being a collateral benefit. This work focused on reducing air emissions and air compliance vulnerabilities. P2 options were identified in three stages. First, potentially applicable P2 options were identified from Internet and published information. Attention was given to identifying the types of sources to which an option could be applied, the option's state of development, and constraints that could limit its application. Traditional P2 options involving technology or equipment changes and material substitution were considered. In addition, newer approaches based on administrative ''controls'' were considered. These included inserting P2 into operating permits in exchange for administrative relief, privatization, derating boilers, and reducing an installation's potential to emit and compliance vulnerability by separating sources not under the Air Force's ''common control.'' Next, criteria and toxic emissions inventories by source category were prepared from inventory data supplied by facilities. The major problems at this stage were differences in the levels of detail provided by facilities and in the categories used by different installations. Emitting categories were matched to P2 option categories to identify candidate options. Candidates were screened to account for local regulations and technical information about sources in the inventories. When possible, emission reductions were estimated to help facility personnel prioritize options. Some options identified are being actively pursued by facilities to determine their site-specific feasibility. Although much work has been

  14. Chemical and Radiochemical Constituents in Water from Wells in the Vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1997-98

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. C. Bartholomay; L. L. Knobel; B. J. Tucker; B. V. Twining (USGS)

    2000-06-01

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a request from the U.S Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office, sampled water from 13 wells during 1997-98 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for naturally occurring constituents and man-made contaminants. A total of 91 samples were collected from the 13 monitoring wells. The routine samples contained detectable concentrations of total cations and dissolved anions, and nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen. Most of the samples also had detectable concentrations of gross alpha- and gross beta-particle radioactivity and tritium. Fourteen quality-assurance samples were also collected and analyzed; seven were field-blank samples, and seven were replicate samples. Most of the field blank samples contained less than detectable concentrations of target constituents; however some blank samples did contain detectable concentrations of calcium, magnesium, barium, copper, manganese, nickel, zinc, nitrite plus nitrate, total organic halogens, tritium, and selected volatile organic compounds.

  15. Chemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1990--91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Knobel, L.L.; Tucker, B.J.

    1993-01-01

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office, sampled 12 wells as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for manmade contaminants and naturally occurring constituents. Sixty samples were collected from eight groundwater monitoring wells and four production wells. Ten quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. Most of the samples contained concentrations of total sodium and dissolved anions that exceeded reporting levels. The predominant category of nitrogen-bearing compounds was nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen. Concentrations of total organic carbon ranged from less than 0.1 to 2.2 milligrams per liter. Total phenols in 52 of 69 samples ranged from 1 to 8 micrograms per liter. Extractable acid and base/neutral organic compounds were detected in water from 16 of 69 samples. Concentrations of dissolved gross alpha- and gross beta-particle radioactivity in all samples exceeded the reporting level. Radium-226 concentrations were greater than the reporting level in 63 of 68 samples

  16. Development of a geodatabase and conceptual model of the hydrogeologic units beneath air force plant 4 and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field, Fort Worth, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sachin D.

    2004-01-01

    Air Force Plant 4 and adjacent Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field at Fort Worth, Texas, constitute a government-owned, contractor-operated facility that has been in operation since 1942. Contaminants from AFP4, primarily volatile organic compounds and metals, have entered the ground-water-flow system through leakage from waste-disposal sites and from manufacturing processes. The U.S. Geological Survey developed a comprehensive geodatabase of temporal and spatial environmental information associated with the hydrogeologic units (alluvial aquifer, Goodland-Walnut confining unit, and Paluxy aquifer) beneath the facility and a three-dimensional conceptual model of the hydrogeologic units integrally linked to the geodatabase. The geodatabase design uses a thematic layer approach to create layers of feature data using a geographic information system. The various features are separated into relational tables in the geodatabase on the basis of how they interact and correspond to one another. Using the geodatabase, geographic data at the site are manipulated to produce maps, allow interactive queries, and perform spatial analyses. The conceptual model for the study area comprises computer-generated, three-dimensional block diagrams of the hydrogeologic units. The conceptual model provides a platform for visualization of hydrogeologic-unit sections and surfaces and for subsurface environmental analyses. The conceptual model is based on three structural surfaces and two thickness configurations of the study area. The three structural surfaces depict the altitudes of the tops of the three hydrogeologic units. The two thickness configurations are those of the alluvial aquifer and the Goodland-Walnut confining unit. The surface of the alluvial aquifer was created using a U.S. Geological Survey 10-meter digital elevation model. The 2,130 point altitudes of the top of the Goodland-Walnut unit were compiled from lithologic logs from existing wells, available soil

  17. Environmental Assessment - Construct a Ground-to-Air Transmitter and Receiver (GATR) Facility at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    ...) facility on Grand Forks Air Force Base (AFB), North Dakota. The Communication Squadron is preparing to install new GATR communication antennas and systems, for tactical aircraft control and commercial air traffic control...

  18. OPEN AIR DEMOLITION OF FACILITIES HIGHLY CONTAMINATED WITH PLUTONIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2007-01-01

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than ''hands on'' techniques

  19. Air quality impacts due to construction of LWR waste management facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    Air quality impacts of construction activities and induced housing growth as a result of construction activities were evaluated for four possible facilities in the LWR fuel cycle: a fuel reprocessing facility, fuel storage facility, fuel fabrication plant, and a nuclear power plant. Since the fuel reprocessing facility would require the largest labor force, the impacts of construction of that facility were evaluated in detail

  20. 75 FR 6360 - Information on Surplus Land at a Military Installation Designated for Disposal: Newport Naval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-09

    ... Installation Designated for Disposal: Newport Naval Complex, Newport, RI--Former Naval Hospital, Newport... designation, on January 5, 2009, land and facilities at this installation were declared excess to the... the land and facilities at Newport Naval Complex: Former Naval Hospital, Newport, Former Navy Lodge...

  1. The Design of Compressed air system in the Conventional Facility of Proton Accelerator Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, G. P.; Kim, J. Y.; Cho, S. W.; Min, Y. S.; Mun, K. J.; Cho, J. S.; Nam, J. M.; Park, S. S.; Jo, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    The Compressed Air System (CA) supplies compressed air for all air operated devices and instruments, pneumatic equipment and other miscellaneous air user points in the Conventional Facilities of Proton Engineering Frontier Project. CA System consist of the Instrument Air System and the Service air System. The Instrument Air System supplies oil-free, dried, filtered, and compressed instrument air for the air operated control devices and instruments in the Accelerator and Beam Application Building, Ion Beam Application Building, Utility Building and etc.. The Service air System supplies compressed air for pneumatic equipment and other services

  2. 40 CFR 270.315 - What air emissions control information must I keep at my facility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What air emissions control information... Facility § 270.315 What air emissions control information must I keep at my facility? If you have air emission control equipment subject to 40 CFR part 264, subpart CC, you must keep the following information...

  3. Activation of air and concrete in medical isotope production facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Adam C.; Shackelton, R. J.; Carr, D. A.; Ismail, A.

    2017-05-01

    Medical isotope facilities operating in the 10 to 25 MeV proton energy range have long been used to generate radioisotopes for medical diagnostic imaging. In the last few years the beam currents available in commercially available cyclotrons have increased dramatically, and so the activation of the materials within cyclotron vaults may now pose more serious radiological hazards. This will impact the regulatory oversight of cyclotron operations, cyclotron servicing and future decommissioning activities. Air activation could pose a hazard to cyclotron staff. With the increased cyclotron beam currents it was necessary to examine the issue more carefully. Therefore the ways in which radioactivity may be induced in air by neutron reactions and neutron captures were considered and it was found that the dominant mechanism is neutron capture on Ar-40. A study of the activation of the air by neutron capture on Ar-40 within a cyclotron vault was performed using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The neutron source energy spectrum used was from the production of the widely used F-18 PET isotope. The results showed that the activation of the air within a cyclotron vault does not pose a significant radiological hazard at the beam intensities currently in use and shows how ventilation affects the results. A second MCNP study on the activation of ordinary concrete in cyclotron vaults by neutron capture was made with a view to determining the optimum thickness of borated polyethylene to reduce neutron activation on both the inner surfaces of the vault and around production targets. This is of importance in decommissioning cyclotrons and therefore in the design of new cyclotron vaults. The distribution of activation on the walls as a function of the source position was also studied. Results are presented for both borated and regular polyethylene, and F-18 and Tc-99 neutron spectra.

  4. An Archaeological Curation-Needs Assessment for Fort Irwin, Naval Air Station, North Island, Edwards Air Force Base, Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trimble, Michael

    1997-01-01

    .... Louis District, conducted an investigation of all archaeological materials and associated records in the care of NAS North Island, Edwards Air Force Base, Fort Irwin, and MCAGCC Twentynine Palms...

  5. Air conditioning facilities in a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Michitaka; Oka, Tsutomu

    1987-01-01

    Reprocessing plants are the facilities for separating the plutonium produced by nuclear reaction and unconsumed remaining uranium from fission products in the spent fuel taken out of nuclear reactors and recovering them. The fuel reprocessing procedure is outlined. In order to ensure safety in handling radioactive substances, triple confinement using vessels, concrete cells and buildings is carried out in addition to the prevention of criticality and radiation shielding, and stainless steel linings and drip trays are installed as occasion demands. The ventilation system in a reprocessing plant is roughly divided into three systems, that is, tower and tank ventilation system to deal with offgas, cell ventilation system for the cells in which main towers and tanks are installed, and building ventilation system. Air pressure becomes higher from tower and tank system to building system. In a reprocessing plant, the areas in a building are classified according to dose rate. The building ventilation system deals with green and amber areas, and the cell ventilation system deals with red area. These three ventilation systems are explained. Radiation monitors are installed to monitor the radiation dose rate and air contamination in working places. The maintenance and checkup of ventilation systems are important. (Kako, I.)

  6. Air Kerma above environmental radiometric calibration facility for field equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, C.C.; Sachett, I.A.; Bertelli, L.; Lopes, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    The use of gamma ray spectrometers broadened the aims of gamma ray surveys, stead of measuring only the gross radiation, as was done with the GM tubes, it is now possible to be used for uranium exploration, geological mapping as an aid to the exploration of non radioactive ores like gold and tin, radiation background measurements to identify hot spots for radiation hazard evaluation and environmental monitoring of fallout from radiological and nuclear accidents. It became necessary to carefully and precisely calibrate the field equipment to be used to get all the information from such uses. There is an environmental radiometric calibration facility for field equipment, consisting of eight radioactive concrete sources, at the Institute of Radioprotection and Dosimetry - IRD (CNEN/Brazil). These sources are cylindrical with 3 m diameter, 0.5 m thick and weigh about 7.5 tons each. The amount and type of the radioactive material, 238 U and 232 Th and 40 K ores in secular radioactive equilibrium, added to the concrete to simulate rock outcrops, varies in order to obtain different gamma fields, varying in both energy and intensity. These different radiation fields were measured with a HPGe portable detector, specifically calibrated for spectrum stripping, and the air kerma energy distribution was determined for each concrete source and compared with the total air kerma calculated from the nuclide concentration and by others radiometric methods. (author)

  7. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): AIRS_AQS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  8. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): AIRS_AFS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  9. EPA Facility Registry Service (FRS): AIRS_AFS_MAJOR

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web feature service contains location and facility identification information from EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS) for the subset of facilities that link...

  10. CFD simulation of air discharge tests in the PPOOLEX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanskanen, V.; Puustinen, M. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2008-07-15

    This report summarizes the CFD simulation results of two air discharge tests of the characterizing test program in 2007 with the scaled down PPOOLEX facility. Air was blown to the dry well compartment and from there through a DN200 blowdown pipe into the condensation pool (wet well). The selected tests were modeled with Fluent CFD code. Test CHAR-09-1 was simulated to 28.92 seconds of real time and test CHAR-09-3 to 17.01 seconds. The VOF model was used as a multiphase model and the standard k epsilon-model as a turbulence model. Occasional convergence problems, usually at the beginning of bubble formation, required the use of relatively short time stepping. The simulation time costs threatened to become unbearable since weeks or months of wall-clock time with 1-2 processors were needed. Therefore, the simulated time periods were limited from the real duration of the experiments. The results obtained from the CFD simulations are in a relatively good agreement with the experimental results. Simulated pressures correspond well to the measured ones and, in addition, fluctuations due to bubble formations and breakups are also captured. Most of the differences in temperature values and in their behavior seem to depend on the locations of the measurements. In the vicinity of regions occupied by water in the experiments, thermocouples getting wet and drying slowly may have had an effect on the measured temperature values. Generally speaking, most temperatures were simulated satisfyingly and the largest discrepancies could be explained by wetted thermocouples. However, differences in the dry well and blowdown pipe top measurements could not be explained by thermocouples getting wet. Heat losses and dry well / wet well heat transfer due to conduction have neither been estimated in the experiments nor modeled in the simulations. Estimation of heat conduction and heat losses should be carried out in future experiments and they should be modeled in future simulations, too. (au)

  11. CFD simulation of air discharge tests in the PPOOLEX facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanskanen, V.; Puustinen, M.

    2008-07-01

    This report summarizes the CFD simulation results of two air discharge tests of the characterizing test program in 2007 with the scaled down PPOOLEX facility. Air was blown to the dry well compartment and from there through a DN200 blowdown pipe into the condensation pool (wet well). The selected tests were modeled with Fluent CFD code. Test CHAR-09-1 was simulated to 28.92 seconds of real time and test CHAR-09-3 to 17.01 seconds. The VOF model was used as a multiphase model and the standard k ε-model as a turbulence model. Occasional convergence problems, usually at the beginning of bubble formation, required the use of relatively short time stepping. The simulation time costs threatened to become unbearable since weeks or months of wall-clock time with 1-2 processors were needed. Therefore, the simulated time periods were limited from the real duration of the experiments. The results obtained from the CFD simulations are in a relatively good agreement with the experimental results. Simulated pressures correspond well to the measured ones and, in addition, fluctuations due to bubble formations and breakups are also captured. Most of the differences in temperature values and in their behavior seem to depend on the locations of the measurements. In the vicinity of regions occupied by water in the experiments, thermocouples getting wet and drying slowly may have had an effect on the measured temperature values. Generally speaking, most temperatures were simulated satisfyingly and the largest discrepancies could be explained by wetted thermocouples. However, differences in the dry well and blowdown pipe top measurements could not be explained by thermocouples getting wet. Heat losses and dry well / wet well heat transfer due to conduction have neither been estimated in the experiments nor modeled in the simulations. Estimation of heat conduction and heat losses should be carried out in future experiments and they should be modeled in future simulations, too. (au)

  12. Microscale air quality impacts of distributed power generation facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaguer, Eduardo P; Knipping, Eladio; Shaw, Stephanie; Ravindran, Satish

    2016-08-01

    The electric system is experiencing rapid growth in the adoption of a mix of distributed renewable and fossil fuel sources, along with increasing amounts of off-grid generation. New operational regimes may have unforeseen consequences for air quality. A three-dimensional microscale chemical transport model (CTM) driven by an urban wind model was used to assess gaseous air pollutant and particulate matter (PM) impacts within ~10 km of fossil-fueled distributed power generation (DG) facilities during the early afternoon of a typical summer day in Houston, TX. Three types of DG scenarios were considered in the presence of motor vehicle emissions and a realistic urban canopy: (1) a 25-MW natural gas turbine operating at steady state in either simple cycle or combined heating and power (CHP) mode; (2) a 25-MW simple cycle gas turbine undergoing a cold startup with either moderate or enhanced formaldehyde emissions; and (3) a data center generating 10 MW of emergency power with either diesel or natural gas-fired backup generators (BUGs) without pollution controls. Simulations of criteria pollutants (NO2, CO, O3, PM) and the toxic pollutant, formaldehyde (HCHO), were conducted assuming a 2-hr operational time period. In all cases, NOx titration dominated ozone production near the source. The turbine scenarios did not result in ambient concentration enhancements significantly exceeding 1 ppbv for gaseous pollutants or over 1 µg/m(3) for PM after 2 hr of emission, assuming realistic plume rise. In the case of the datacenter with diesel BUGs, ambient NO2 concentrations were enhanced by 10-50 ppbv within 2 km downwind of the source, while maximum PM impacts in the immediate vicinity of the datacenter were less than 5 µg/m(3). Plausible scenarios of distributed fossil generation consistent with the electricity grid's transformation to a more flexible and modernized system suggest that a substantial amount of deployment would be required to significantly affect air quality on

  13. Air emission points for facilities in Iowa with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act_considered MAJOR permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityAir emission points for facilities in Iowa with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, considered "major" permits. Also includes emission points...

  14. Long-Term Management Strategy for Dredged Material Disposal for Naval Facilities at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Phase III - Analysis of Alternatives and Development of an LTMS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Palermo, Michael

    2000-01-01

    This report documents Phase III of a three-phase study to develop a Long-Term Management Study for disposal of dredged material unsuitable for ocean disposal from Pearl Harbor Naval Complex for the next 30 years...

  15. Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robichaud, R.; Fields, J.; Roberts, J. O.

    2012-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy (RE) on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate RE options at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Newport in Newport, Rhode Island where multiple contaminated areas pose a threat to human health and the environment. Designated a superfund site on the National Priorities List in 1989, the base is committed to working toward reducing the its dependency on fossil fuels, decreasing its carbon footprint, and implementing RE projects where feasible. The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) partnered with NREL in February 2009 to investigate the potential for wind energy generation at a number of Naval and Marine bases on the East Coast. NAVSTA Newport was one of several bases chosen for a detailed, site-specific wind resource investigation. NAVSTA Newport, in conjunction with NREL and NFESC, has been actively engaged in assessing the wind resource through several ongoing efforts. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and a survey of potential wind turbine options based upon the site-specific wind resource.

  16. Army Air and Missile Defense Network Design Facility (AAMDNDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides JTIDS network designs and platform initialization load files for all Joint and Army-only tests, exercises, operations, and contingency events...

  17. 76 FR 55933 - Federal Property Suitable as Facilities To Assist the Homeless

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... written expression of interest to HHS, addressed to Theresa Ritta, Division of Property Management... Management Division, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Washington Navy Yard, 1330 Patterson Ave., SW... Area Ohio Facility 30089 5490 Pearson Wright Patterson AFB OH 45433 Landholding Agency: Air Force...

  18. Radionuclide air emissions at Department of Energy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvall, K. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Facilities operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) handle and process radioactive materials in conjunction with their research, nuclear materials production, remediation and waste disposal activities. Radionuclide emissions to the atmosphere from DOE facilities are regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H for emissions other than radon. Subpart H requires DOE to monitor emissions from stacks and calculate a potential offsite dose to an individual using EPA approved methods and procedures. DOE has applied to EPA for approval to use alternative methods for some of the EPA requirements for continuous monitoring. The use of alternative methods such as single-point sampling with a shrouded probe will have an impact at several major DOE facilities. These facilities are identified.

  19. Analyze the Air Force Methods for Facility Sustainment and Restoration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cole, Ronald

    2003-01-01

    ...) and try to capitalize on industry standard practices to improve the AF methods. Industry has conducted extensive research devoted to the development of predictive models to estimate facility maintenance or sustainment requirements...

  20. A systematic approach to assessing indoor air quality of long term care facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Kulve, M.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; Huisman, E.R.C.M.; Kort, H.S.M.

    2018-01-01

    Not much is known about the favourable indoor air quality in long term care facilities (LTCFs), where older adults suffering from dementia live. Older adults, especially those who suffer from dementia, are more sensible to the indoor environment. However, no special requirements for the indoor air

  1. 32 CFR 245.17 - U.S. civil and military air traffic control facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false U.S. civil and military air traffic control facilities. 245.17 Section 245.17 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS PLAN FOR THE EMERGENCY SECURITY CONTROL OF AIR TRAFFIC (ESCAT) Procedures for Implementation of ESCAT §...

  2. Analyses and estimates of hydraulic conductivity from slug tests in alluvial aquifer underlying Air Force Plant 4 and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field, Fort Worth, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Natalie A.; Braun, Christopher L.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the collection, analyses, and distribution of hydraulic-conductivity data obtained from slug tests completed in the alluvial aquifer underlying Air Force Plant 4 and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field, Fort Worth, Texas, during October 2002 and August 2003 and summarizes previously available hydraulic-conductivity data. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, completed 30 slug tests in October 2002 and August 2003 to obtain estimates of horizontal hydraulic conductivity to use as initial values in a ground-water-flow model for the site. The tests were done by placing a polyvinyl-chloride slug of known volume beneath the water level in selected wells, removing the slug, and measuring the resulting water-level recovery over time. The water levels were measured with a pressure transducer and recorded with a data logger. Hydraulic-conductivity values were estimated from an analytical relation between the instantaneous displacement of water in a well bore and the resulting rate of head change. Although nearly two-thirds of the tested wells recovered 90 percent of their slug-induced head change in less than 2 minutes, 90-percent recovery times ranged from 3 seconds to 35 minutes. The estimates of hydraulic conductivity range from 0.2 to 200 feet per day. Eighty-three percent of the estimates are between 1 and 100 feet per day.

  3. Technical on the TAB of air handling system in IMEF facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Yon Woo; Baik, S. Y.; Kim, S. D.; Lee, B. J.

    2002-08-01

    A T.A.B(Testing, Adjusting and Balancing) technique, the basic technique of air handling facility, is one of the essential technical items which workers in charge of operation of facilities have to acquire. Especially, through scientific and reasonable inspective procedures, the reduction of energy and guarantee of designed skill have become influential important problems in our time rather than in the past days. Entrepreneurs have required more thorough verify of performances and procedure of test in order to raise the investment efficiency and reduce expenditure. For that reason, I hope that cooperator acquire objective and substantial knowledges about air handling facility so that they are helped from them

  4. Techniques for controlling air pollution from the operation of nuclear facilities. Report of a panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    This manual is provided for the guidance of those persons or authorities who are responsible for the organization, control and operation of ventilation systems and air-cleaning installations in nuclear establishments. It is intended to generalize about existing experience in the operation of such systems at nuclear facilities including reactors and laboratories for production, use and handling of radionuclides and other toxic materials. This manual will provide designers and operators of nuclear facilities in which ventilation and air-cleaning systems are used with the factors which have to be considered to create safe working conditions inside facilities and without polluting the atmosphere or the environment to a hazardous level.

  5. AEC Regulatory view of the reliability of air cleaning systems in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, R.R.; Zavadoski, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    Air cleaning systems in nuclear facilities can be divided into three categories: ventilation exhaust systems, containment atmosphere cleanup systems, and process offgas systems. These systems have been the subject of numerous reports, regulatory guides, discussions, and meetings. Some of the analyses have been critical of the operation and design of these air cleaning systems--in particular, the engineered safety features containment atmosphere cleanup systems. Although for the most part the criticism is applicable, and recognizing that there are a number of unresolved issues pertaining to gaseous waste management systems, there are data to show that air cleaning systems in use in nuclear facilities are performing their intended function. (U.S.)

  6. Ventilation and air conditioning system in waste treatment and storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hirotsugu; Sugawara, Kazushige.

    1987-01-01

    So far, the measures concerning the facilities for treating and storing radioactive wastes in nuclear fuel cycle in Japan were in the state which cannot be said to be sufficient. In order to cope with this situation, electric power companies constructed and operated radioactive waste concentration and volume reduction facilities, solid waste storing facilities for drums, high level solid waste storing facilities, spent fuel cask preserving facilities and so on successively in the premises of nuclear power stations, and for the wastes expected in future, the research and the construction plan of the facilities for treating and storing low, medium and high level wastes have been advanced. The ventilation and air conditioning system for these facilities is the important auxiliary system which has the mission of maintaining safe and pleasant environment in the facilities and lowering as far as possible the release of radioactive substances to outside. The outline of waste treatment and storage facilities is explained. The design condition, ventilation and air conditioning method, the features of respective waste treatment and storage facilities, and the problems for the future are described. Hereafter, mechanical ventilation system continues to be the main system, and filters become waste, while the exchange of filters is accompanied by the radiation exposure of workers. (Kako, I.)

  7. Summary of radionuclide air emissions from Department of Energy facilities for CY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) operates a number of facilities that handle radioactive materials in conjunction with its research and nuclear materials production activities. These include laboratories for research, production facilities for nuclear materials and weapons, and facilities for storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. During normal operations, some of these facilities have the potential to release small quantities of radionuclides to the atmosphere which the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates under the authority of Section 112 of the Clean Air Act. The regulations are specifiedin the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), in 40 CFR Part 61. Subpart H of the NESHAP sets standards for public exposure to airborne radioactive materials (other than radon) released by DOE facilities

  8. Development of Facility Type Information Packages for Design of Air Force Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    Washington: Government Printing Office. 49. U.S. Department of the Army. Project Development Brochures ; Part I, Functional Requirements. TM 5-800-3...Washington: Government Printing Office. May, 1974. 50. U.S. Department of the Air Force. Air Force Interior Design Pamplet . AFP 88-41. Washington: Govern

  9. [Indoor air quality in school facilities in Cassino (Italy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langiano, Elisa; Lanni, Liana; Atrei, Patrizia; Ferrara, Maria; La Torre, Giuseppe; Capelli, Giovanni; De Vito, Elisabetta

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the indoor air quality of 26 classrooms of secondary schools in the city of Cassino (Italy). Two types of school buildings were assessed: buildings specifically designed as schools, and former dwellings converted to schools. Measurements were taken in both winter and spring months, before students entered the classrooms and while the classrooms were occupied. Lower thermal comfort levels were observed during the winter months; in fact, during the winter, ideal temperature, humidity and air speed parameters were found in only a small percentage of classrooms and students were found to experience thermal discomfort as a result. Air velocity was often found to be inadequate both in winter and spring months and in both types of school buildings evaluated. Illumination levels measured during the winter months with both natural daylight and mixed illumination, were found to be below 200 lux, the minimum recommended level recommended by the ministerial decree 18.12.1975. Noise levels above the maximum level recommended by the ministerial decree 01.03.1991 were also frequently observed. The symptoms most frequently reported by students were headache, difficulties in concentrating, cough, and unusual tiredness. The various discomfort situations observed in both types of school buildings point toward a need for greater attention toward indoor air quality of schools as this can have affect students' attention, concentration, productivity and comfort.

  10. Design of ventilation and air cleaning systems for the new Los Alamos Plutonium Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, R.; DeField, J.; Stafford, R.; McNeese, W.; Eberhardt, W.; Laushkin, N.

    1975-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's new plutonium facility will conform to AECM Appendix 6301-Part II, Section H-Minimum Design Criteria for New Plutonium Facilities. The glove box process exhaust air is filtered through three or four stages of HEPA filters. The design of this multi-stage filter installation is shown with a method of in-place testing of each stage individually. A glove box filter holder and the in-place test procedure is described. General room air from plutonium work areas is recirculated at the rate of eight air changes per hour with a 10 percent fresh air make-up. The filter plenums for the recirculated air are designed to permit in-place testing of each of the two filter stages. (U.S.)

  11. Fuel cells for naval aviation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satzberg, S.; Field, S.; Abu-Ali, M.

    2003-01-01

    Recent advances in fuel cell technology have occurred which make fuel cells increasingly attractive for electric power generation on future naval and commercial aircraft applications. These advances include significant increases in power density, the development of compact fuel reformers, and cost reductions due to commercialization efforts. The Navy's interest in aircraft fuel cells stems from their high energy efficiency (up to 40-60% for simple cycle; 60-70% for combined gas turbine/fuel cell hybrid cycles), and their negligible NOx and hydrocarbon emissions compared to conventional generators. While the U.S. Navy has been involved with fuel cell research and development as early as the 1960s, many of the early programs were for special warfare or undersea applications. In 1997, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) initiated a program to marinize commercial fuel cell technology for future Navy shipboard applications. The power density of fuel cell power systems is approaching the levels necessary for serious consideration for aircraft suitability. ONR and Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) are initiating a program to develop a fuel cell power system suitable for future Navy aircraft applications, utilizing as much commercially-available technology as possible. (author)

  12. Installation Development Environmental Assessment at Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington Prince George’s County, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    system. Many pipes, lift stations, and sewer manholes are in poor condition. Terrapin has begun to rehabilitate or replace the entire wastewater...A number of renovations to the system have been proposed to meet regulatory requirements, including rehabilitating many BMPs. 3.6.1.4 Electrical...a landfill . There are no known capacity issues at area landfills , and recycling or reuse of waste generated during construction reduces the quantity

  13. Final Environmental Assessment Airfield Storm Drainage System Repair Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    the airfield. • Phase 1–September 2015 to October 2016: Replace or rehabilitate storm drain pipes between the West Runway and Taxiway Whiskey...activities, landfills , and other support and training operations have affected groundwater and surface waters at JBA with metals, volatile organic...the airfield.  Phase 1: September 2015 to October 2016: Replace or rehabilitate storm drain pipes between the West Runway and Taxiway Whiskey

  14. The actual practice of air cleaning in Belgian nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goossens, W.R. [PEGO, Mol (Belgium)

    1995-02-01

    With 60% of its power generation from nuclear stations Belgium has 7 nuclear power stations in operation with a total capacity of 5.4 MWe. Enriched uranium is imported and converted to fuel assemblies. The actinides of reprocessed fuel are recycled as MOX fuel. A main waste conditioning operation has been performed in the PAMELA vitrifier. The actual practice of nuclear air cleaning in the Belgian PWR station DOEL-4 and in the PAMELA -vitrification plant for high level liquid waste is reviewed.

  15. Survey and assessment of radioactive waste management facilities in the United States. Section 2.5. Air-cooled vault storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    There are two basic types of air-cooled vaults for the storage of spent nuclear fuel or vitrified HLRW. The two types, differentiated by the method of air cooling used, are the open-vault concept and the closed-vault concept. The following aspects of these air-cooled vault storage facility concepts are discussed: description and operation of facilities; strucutral design considerations and analysis; nuclear design considerations and analyses; vault environmental design considerations; unique design features; and accident analysis

  16. Air pollution control system testing at the DOE offgas components test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.B.; Speed, D.; VanPelt, W.; Burns, H.H.

    1997-01-01

    In 1997, the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) plans to begin operation of the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) leads an extensive technical support program designed to obtain incinerator and air pollution control equipment performance data to support facility start-up and operation. A key component of this technical support program includes the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), a pilot-scale offgas system test bed. The primary goal for this test facility is to demonstrate and evaluate the performance of the planned CIF Air Pollution Control System (APCS). To accomplish this task, the OCTF has been equipped with a 1/10 scale CIF offgas system equipment components and instrumentation. In addition, the OCTF design maximizes the flexibility of APCS operation and facility instrumentation and sampling capabilities permit accurate characterization of all process streams throughout the facility. This allows APCS equipment performance to be evaluated in an integrated system under a wide range of possible operating conditions. This paper summarizes the use of this DOE test facility to successfully demonstrate APCS operability and maintainability, evaluate and optimize equipment and instrument performance, and provide direct CIF start-up support. These types of facilities are needed to permit resolution of technical issues associated with design and operation of systems that treat and dispose combustible hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive waste throughout and DOE complex

  17. Air pollution control systems and technologies for waste-to-energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Getz, N.P.; Amos, C.K. Jr.; Siebert, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    One of the primary topics of concern to those planning, developing, and operating waste-to-energy (W-T-E) [also known as municipal waste combustors (MWCs)] facilities is air emissions. This paper presents a description of the state-of-the-art air pollution control (APC) systems and technology for particulate, heavy metals, organics, and acid gases control for W-T-E facilities. Items covered include regulations, guidelines, and control techniques as applied in the W-T-E industry. Available APC technologies are viewed in detail on the basis of their potential removal efficiencies, design considerations, operations, and maintenance costs

  18. Monitoring plan for routine organic air emissions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, K.J.; Jolley, J.G.

    1994-06-01

    This monitoring plan provides the information necessary to perform routine organic air emissions monitoring at the Waste Storage Facilities located at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Waste Storage Facilities include both the Type I and II Waste Storage Modules. The plan implements a dual method approach where two dissimilar analytical methodologies, Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) and ancillary SUMMA reg-sign canister sampling, following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical method TO-14, will be used to provide qualitative and quantitative volatile organic concentration data. The Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy will provide in situ, real time monitoring of volatile organic compound concentrations in the ambient air of the Waste Storage Facilities. To supplement the OP-FTIR data, air samples will be collected using SUMMA reg-sign, passivated, stainless steel canisters, following the EPA Method TO-14. These samples will be analyzed for volatile organic compounds with gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry analysis. The sampling strategy, procedures, and schedules are included in this monitoring plan. The development of this monitoring plan is driven by regulatory compliance to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, State of Idaho Toxic Air Pollutant increments, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The various state and federal regulations address the characterization of the volatile organic compounds and the resultant ambient air emissions that may originate from facilities involved in industrial production and/or waste management activities

  19. Health physics experience with nondestructive X-radiation facilities in the US Air Force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, J.R.; Piltingsrud, H.V.

    1976-01-01

    Radiation safety experience in the construction and use of enclosed nondestructive inspection (NDI) facilities in the US Air Force, has reaffirmed the constant need for the health physicist to continually monitor and assit in upgrading these facilities. Health physics contributions include evaluation of initial shielding requirements, proper selection of construction material, insuring that adequate safety devices are installed and adequate personnel dosimetry devices are available, surveying the facility, and assisting in the safety education program. There is a need to better define NDI warning/safety devices, using the National Bureau of Standards, (NBS) Handbook 107 as the most applicable guide

  20. Naval Aviation Attrition 1950-1976: Implications for the Development of Future Research and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-08-01

    threat. NAMI-1077, Naval Aerospace Medical Institute, Pensacola, Fla.: 1969. 67. Creelman , J. A., An analysis of the physical fitness index in relation...to training criteria in naval air trining. NSAM-180, Naval School of Aviation Medicine, Pensacola, Fla.: 1954. 68. Creelman , J. A., Evaluation of

  1. An indoor air quality study of an alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) holding facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S C; Holder, H W; Martin, J M; Brasel, T L; Andriychuk, L A; Wu, C; Straus, D C; Aguilar, R

    2006-06-01

    An environmental microbiologic investigation was conducted in an alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) holding facility in a zoo in the southeastern U.S. The facility had housed five alligators between March 1999 and February 2005. In the exhibit, one alligator died and all experienced poor health. It was hypothesized that environmental microbial contamination was associated with these issues. Samples were collected for fungal identification and quantification, microcystin analysis, and airborne mycotoxins. Analyses of air and water were conducted and an examination of the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning system (HVAC) for design, maintenance, and operating issues was made. Two control sites, a facility for false gharials (Tomistoma schlegelii) and an off-site alligator breeding facility, were also tested. Morbidity and mortality records were examined for all sites. Results showed that, compared to the control sites, the test alligator facility and its HVAC system were extensively contaminated with a range of fungi. Nearly all sampled surfaces featured fungal growth. There were also significantly higher counts of Penicillium/Aspergillus-like and Chrysosporium-like spores in the air (P conditioned and mold-contaminated air being introduced to the facility. Morbidity records revealed solitary pulmonary disorders over time in three alligators, with one dying as a result. The other two alligators suffered from general malaise and a range of nonspecific symptoms. The control facilities had no morbidity or mortality issues. In conclusion, although no causal links could be demonstrated because of the nature of the morbidity data, environmental mold contamination appeared to be associated with the history of morbidity and mortality in the alligator exhibit.

  2. Ground-water flow in the surficial aquifer system and potential movement of contaminants from selected waste-disposal sites at Cecil Field Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the Installation Restoration Program, Cecil Field Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida, is considering remedialaction alternatives to control the possible movement of contaminants from sites that may discharge to the surface. This requires a quantifiable understanding of ground-water flow through the surficial aquifer system and how the system will respond to any future stresses. The geologic units of interest in the study area consist of sediments of Holocene to Miocene age that extend from land surface to the base of the Hawthorn Group. The hydrogeology within the study area was determined from gamma-ray and geologists? logs. Ground-water flow through the surficial aquifer system was simulated with a seven-layer, finite-difference model that extended vertically from the water table to the top of the Upper Floridan aquifer. Results from the calibrated model were based on a long-term recharge rate of 6 inches per year, which fell in the range of 4 to 10 inches per year, estimated using stream hydrograph separation methods. More than 80 percent of ground-water flow circulates within the surficial-sand aquifer, which indicates that most contaminant movement also can be expected to move through the surficial-sand aquifer alone. The surficial-sand aquifer is the uppermost unit of the surficial aquifer system. Particle-tracking results showed that the distances of most flow paths were 1,500 feet or less from a given site to its discharge point. For an assumed effective porosity of 20 percent, typical traveltimes are 40 years or less. At all of the sites investigated, particles released 10 feet below the water table had shorter traveltimes than those released 40 feet below the water table. Traveltimes from contaminated sites to their point of discharge ranged from 2 to 300 years. The contributing areas of the domestic supply wells are not very extensive. The shortest traveltimes for particles to reach the domestic supply wells from their respective

  3. A Technical Basis for Employing Facility Ventilation Air Exchange Rates in the Decision to Downpost

    CERN Document Server

    Mantooth, D S

    2001-01-01

    Utilizing the ventilation exchange rate as a basis for the decision to downpost a location within a facility from an airborne radiation area (ARA) based on initial air count(DAC). Not used in the case of a confirmed or suspected contamination release.

  4. 78 FR 40015 - Approval and Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants; District of Columbia; Control of Emissions From Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerator Units AGENCY: Environmental... negative declaration for hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerator (HMIWI) units within the District of...

  5. 75 FR 78952 - Approval and Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants; Commonwealth of Virginia; Control of Emissions From Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerator (HMIWI) Units, Negative... Quality, 629 East Main Street, Richmond, Virginia 23219. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: James B. Topsale...

  6. 75 FR 78916 - Approval and Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants, Commonwealth of Virginia; Control of Emissions From Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerator (HMIWI) Units, Negative... 19103. Copies of the State submittal are available at the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality...

  7. 77 FR 3389 - Approval and Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants, State of West Virginia; Control of Emissions From Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerator Units, Plan Revision... final action to approve a revision to the West Virginia hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerator...

  8. 78 FR 40087 - Approval and Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants; District of Columbia; Control of Emissions From Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerator Units AGENCY: Environmental...) section 111(d)/129 negative declaration for the District of Columbia for hospital/medical/infectious waste...

  9. 75 FR 73967 - Approval and Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants, State of Delaware; Control of Emissions From Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerator (HMIWI) Units, Negative Declaration... Environmental Control, 89 Kings Highway, P.O. Box 1401, Dover, Delaware 19903. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  10. 75 FR 73996 - Approval and Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants; State of Delaware; Control of Emissions From Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerator (HMIWI) Units, Negative Declaration... Resources and Environmental Control, 89 Kings Highway, P.O. Box 1401, Dover, Delaware 19903. FOR FURTHER...

  11. 77 FR 3422 - Approval and Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... Promulgation of State Air Quality Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants; State of West Virginia; Control of Emissions From Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerator Units, Plan Revision... revision to the West Virginia hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerator (HMIWI) Section 111(d)/ 129...

  12. Indoor air in long term care facilities and spread of infectious diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Kulve, M.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; Huisman, E.; Kort, H.S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Not much is known about the favourable indoor air conditions in long term care facilities (ltcf’s), where older adults suffering from dementia live. Due to the decrease in cognition function, it is hard to evaluate comfort and health in this group. Nevertheless, infectious diseases are a persistent

  13. Ambient air quality at the wider area of an industrial mining facility at Stratoni, Chalkidiki, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidajis, Georgios; Angelakoglou, Komninos; Gazea, Emmy

    2012-01-01

    To assess ambient air quality at the wider area of a mining-industrial facility in Chalkidiki, Greece, the particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm (PM(10)) and its content in characteristic elements, i.e., As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn were monitored for a period of three years (2008-2010). Gravimetric air samplers were employed for the particulate matter sampling at three sampling stations located in the immediate vicinity of the industrial facility and at a neighbouring residential site. Monitoring data indicated that the 3-year median PM(10) concentrations were 23.3 μg/m(3) at the residential site close to the facility and 28.7 μg/m(3) at the site within the facility indicating a minimal influence from the industrial activities to the air quality of the neighbouring residential area. Both annual average and median PM(10) concentration levels were below the indicative European standards, whereas similar spatial and temporal variation was observed for the PM(10) constituents. The average Pb concentrations measured for the three sampling sites were 0.2, 0.146 and 0.174 μg/m(3) respectively, well below the indicative limit of 0.5 μg/m(3). The quantitative and qualitative comparison of PM(10) concentrations and its elemental constituent for the three sampling stations did not indicate any direct influence of the mining-industrial activities to the air quality of the Stratoni residential area.

  14. Evaluation of Legionella Air Contamination in Healthcare Facilities by Different Sampling Methods: An Italian Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Maria Teresa; De Giglio, Osvalda; Cristina, Maria Luisa; Napoli, Christian; Pacifico, Claudia; Agodi, Antonella; Baldovin, Tatjana; Casini, Beatrice; Coniglio, Maria Anna; D’Errico, Marcello Mario; Delia, Santi Antonino; Deriu, Maria Grazia; Guida, Marco; Laganà, Pasqualina; Liguori, Giorgio; Moro, Matteo; Mura, Ida; Pennino, Francesca; Privitera, Gaetano; Romano Spica, Vincenzo; Sembeni, Silvia; Spagnolo, Anna Maria; Tardivo, Stefano; Torre, Ida; Valeriani, Federica; Albertini, Roberto; Pasquarella, Cesira

    2017-01-01

    Healthcare facilities (HF) represent an at-risk environment for legionellosis transmission occurring after inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In general, the control of water is preferred to that of air because, to date, there are no standardized sampling protocols. Legionella air contamination was investigated in the bathrooms of 11 HF by active sampling (Surface Air System and Coriolis®μ) and passive sampling using settling plates. During the 8-hour sampling, hot tap water was sampled three times. All air samples were evaluated using culture-based methods, whereas liquid samples collected using the Coriolis®μ were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Legionella presence in the air and water was then compared by sequence-based typing (SBT) methods. Air contamination was found in four HF (36.4%) by at least one of the culturable methods. The culturable investigation by Coriolis®μ did not yield Legionella in any enrolled HF. However, molecular investigation using Coriolis®μ resulted in eight HF testing positive for Legionella in the air. Comparison of Legionella air and water contamination indicated that Legionella water concentration could be predictive of its presence in the air. Furthermore, a molecular study of 12 L. pneumophila strains confirmed a match between the Legionella strains from air and water samples by SBT for three out of four HF that tested positive for Legionella by at least one of the culturable methods. Overall, our study shows that Legionella air detection cannot replace water sampling because the absence of microorganisms from the air does not necessarily represent their absence from water; nevertheless, air sampling may provide useful information for risk assessment. The liquid impingement technique appears to have the greatest capacity for collecting airborne Legionella if combined with molecular investigations. PMID:28640202

  15. Evaluation of Legionella Air Contamination in Healthcare Facilities by Different Sampling Methods: An Italian Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Maria Teresa; De Giglio, Osvalda; Cristina, Maria Luisa; Napoli, Christian; Pacifico, Claudia; Agodi, Antonella; Baldovin, Tatjana; Casini, Beatrice; Coniglio, Maria Anna; D'Errico, Marcello Mario; Delia, Santi Antonino; Deriu, Maria Grazia; Guida, Marco; Laganà, Pasqualina; Liguori, Giorgio; Moro, Matteo; Mura, Ida; Pennino, Francesca; Privitera, Gaetano; Romano Spica, Vincenzo; Sembeni, Silvia; Spagnolo, Anna Maria; Tardivo, Stefano; Torre, Ida; Valeriani, Federica; Albertini, Roberto; Pasquarella, Cesira

    2017-06-22

    Healthcare facilities (HF) represent an at-risk environment for legionellosis transmission occurring after inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In general, the control of water is preferred to that of air because, to date, there are no standardized sampling protocols. Legionella air contamination was investigated in the bathrooms of 11 HF by active sampling (Surface Air System and Coriolis ® μ) and passive sampling using settling plates. During the 8-hour sampling, hot tap water was sampled three times. All air samples were evaluated using culture-based methods, whereas liquid samples collected using the Coriolis ® μ were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Legionella presence in the air and water was then compared by sequence-based typing (SBT) methods. Air contamination was found in four HF (36.4%) by at least one of the culturable methods. The culturable investigation by Coriolis ® μ did not yield Legionella in any enrolled HF. However, molecular investigation using Coriolis ® μ resulted in eight HF testing positive for Legionella in the air. Comparison of Legionella air and water contamination indicated that Legionella water concentration could be predictive of its presence in the air. Furthermore, a molecular study of 12 L. pneumophila strains confirmed a match between the Legionella strains from air and water samples by SBT for three out of four HF that tested positive for Legionella by at least one of the culturable methods. Overall, our study shows that Legionella air detection cannot replace water sampling because the absence of microorganisms from the air does not necessarily represent their absence from water; nevertheless, air sampling may provide useful information for risk assessment. The liquid impingement technique appears to have the greatest capacity for collecting airborne Legionella if combined with molecular investigations.

  16. Continuous measurements of ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane from air scrubbers at pig housing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Heyden, C; Brusselman, E; Volcke, E I P; Demeyer, P

    2016-10-01

    Ammonia, largely emitted by agriculture, involves a great risk for eutrophication and acidification leading to biodiversity loss. Air scrubbers are widely applied to reduce ammonia emission from pig and poultry housing facilities, but it is not always clear whether their performance meets the requirements. Besides, there is a growing international concern for the livestock related greenhouse gases methane and nitrous oxide but hardly any data concerning their fate in air scrubbers are available. This contribution presents the results from measurement campaigns conducted at a chemical, a biological and a two-stage biological air scrubber installed at pig housing facilities in Flanders. Ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane at the inlet and outlet of the air scrubbers were monitored on-line during one week using a photoacoustic gas monitor, which allowed to investigate diurnal fluctuations in the removal performance of air scrubbers. Additionally, the homogeneity of the air scrubbers, normally checked by gas detection tubes, was investigated in more detail using the continuous data. The biological air scrubber with extra nitrification tank performed well in terms of ammonia removal (86 ± 6%), while the two-stage air scrubber suffered from nitrifying bacteria inhibition. In the chemical air scrubber the pH was not kept constant, lowering the ammonia removal efficiency. A lower ammonia removal efficiency was found during the day, when the ventilation rate was the highest. Nitrous oxide was produced inside the biological and two-stage scrubber, resulting in an increased outlet concentration of more than 200%. Methane could not be removed in the different air scrubbers because of its low water solubility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Techniques for controlling air pollution from the operation of nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1966-03-01

    This manual is provided for the guidance of those persons or authorities who are responsible for the organization, control and operation of ventilation systems and air-cleaning installations in nuclear establishments. It is intended to generalize about existing experience in the operation of such systems at nuclear facilities including reactors and laboratories for production, use and handling of radionuclides and other toxic materials. This manual will provide designers and operators of nuclear facilities in which ventilation and air-cleaning systems are used with the factors which have to be considered to create safe working conditions inside facilities and without polluting the atmosphere or the environment to a hazardous level. Refs, 24 figs, 5 tabs.

  18. Atmospheric ammonia mixing ratios at an open-air cattle feeding facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Brooks, Sarah D; Thornton, Daniel C O; Auvermann, Brent W

    2010-02-01

    Mixing ratios of total and gaseous ammonia were measured at an open-air cattle feeding facility in the Texas Panhandle in the summers of 2007 and 2008. Samples were collected at the nominally upwind and downwind edges of the facility. In 2008, a series of far-field samples was also collected 3.5 km north of the facility. Ammonium concentrations were determined by two complementary laboratory methods, a novel application of visible spectrophotometry and standard ion chromatography (IC). Results of the two techniques agreed very well, and spectrophotometry is faster, easier, and cheaper than chromatography. Ammonia mixing ratios measured at the immediate downwind site were drastically higher (approximately 2900 parts per billion by volume [ppbv]) than thos measured at the upwind site (open-air animal feeding operations, especially under the hot and dry conditions present during these measurements.

  19. Air-conditioning and ventilation systems and components of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Guide defines the requirements for the design, implementation and operation of the air-conditioning and ventilation systems of nuclear facilities belonging to safety classes 3 and 4, and for the related documents to be submitted to STUK (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Finland). Furthermore, the Guide describes the inspections of air-conditioning and ventilation systems to be conducted by STUK during construction and operation of the facilities. As far as systems and components belonging to safety class 2 are concerned, STUK sets additional requirements case by case. In general, air-conditioning systems refer to systems designed to manage the indoor air cleanness, temperature, humidity and movement. In some rooms of a nuclear power plant, ventilation systems are also used to prevent radioactive materials from spreading outside the rooms. Guide YVL1.0 defines the safety principles concerning the air-conditioning and ventilation of nuclear power plants. Guide YVL2.0 gives the requirements for the design of nuclear power plant systems. In addition, YVLGuide groups 3, 4, 5 and 7 deal with the requirements for air-conditioning and ventilation systems with regard to the mechanical equipment, fire prevention, electrical systems, instrumentation and control technology, and the restriction of releases. The rules and regulations issued by the Ministry of the Environment and the Ministry of the Interior (RakMK, the Finnish building code) concerning the design and operation of air-conditioning and ventilation systems and the related fire protection design bases also apply to nuclear facilities. Exhaust gas treatment systems, condenser vacuum systems of boiling water reactor plants and leak collection systems are excluded from the scope of this Guide

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING USING LOCATION SPECIFIC AIR MONITORING IN BULK HANDLING FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sexton, L.; Hanks, D.; Degange, J.; Brant, H.; Hall, G.; Cable-Dunlap, P.; Anderson, B.

    2011-06-07

    Since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors (1992-1997), international nuclear safeguards inspectors have been able to utilize environmental sampling (ES) (e.g. deposited particulates, air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) in their safeguarding approaches at bulk uranium/plutonium handling facilities. Enhancements of environmental sampling techniques used by the IAEA in drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear materials or activities will soon be able to take advantage of a recent step change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at these facilities. Location specific air monitoring feasibility tests have been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) collection, was performed with the standard bulk sampling protocol used throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories (NWAL). The results yielded bulk isotopic values expected for the operations. Advanced designs of air monitoring instruments such as the ACE may be used in gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) to detect the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or enrichments not declared by a State. Researchers at Savannah River National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples that could become an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Location specific air monitoring to be used to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility employed for comparison of consistencies in declared operations will be described in this paper. Implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear

  1. Monitoring of fungal spores in the indoor air of preschool institution facilities in Novi Sad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaković Milana S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal spores can cause a range of health problems in humans such as respiratory diseases and mycotoxicoses. Since children are the most vulnerable, the presence of fungal spores in the facilities of preschool and school institutions should be investigated readily. In order to estimate air contamination by fungal spores, air sampling was conducted in eight facilities of the preschool institution in Novi Sad during February and March, 2007. Sedimentation plate method was used for the detection of viable fungal spores, mostly being members of subdv. Deuteromycota (Fungi imperfecti. In 32 samples a total of 148 colonies were developed, among which five genera were identified: Penicillium, Cladosporium, Aspergillus, Alternaria and Acremonium while non-sporulating fungal colonies were labeled as sterile mycelia. Most frequently recorded genera were Penicillium with 46 colonies and Cladosporium with 44 colonies. The genera Aspergillus and Alternaria were represented with 3 colonies each and Acremonium with only 1 colony. The greatest number of colonies emerged in the samples from the day care facilities “Vendi” (58 colonies and “Panda” (49 colonies. Most diverse samples were obtained from the day care center “Zvončica”, with presence of all identified genera. These results showed notable presence of fungal spores in the indoor air of Preschool institution facilities and indicated the need for further, more complete seasonal research. Obtained information is considered useful for the evaluation of potential mycofactors that endanger health of children. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43002

  2. A Distributed Simulation Facility to Support Human Factors Research in Advanced Air Transportation Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonlirdviman, Keith; Farley, Todd C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Ladik, John F.; Sherer, Dana Z.

    1998-01-01

    A distributed real-time simulation of the civil air traffic environment developed to support human factors research in advanced air transportation technology is presented. The distributed environment is based on a custom simulation architecture designed for simplicity and flexibility in human experiments. Standard Internet protocols are used to create the distributed environment, linking all advanced cockpit simulator, all Air Traffic Control simulator, and a pseudo-aircraft control and simulation management station. The pseudo-aircraft control station also functions as a scenario design tool for coordinating human factors experiments. This station incorporates a pseudo-pilot interface designed to reduce workload for human operators piloting multiple aircraft simultaneously in real time. The application of this distributed simulation facility to support a study of the effect of shared information (via air-ground datalink) on pilot/controller shared situation awareness and re-route negotiation is also presented.

  3. Air-kerma evaluation at the maze entrance of HDR brachytherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujades, M C; Granero, D; Vijande, J; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J; Papagiannis, P; Siebert, F A

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of procedures for evaluating the design of brachytherapy (BT) facilities for radiation protection purposes, the methodology used for external beam radiotherapy facilities is often adapted. The purpose of this study is to adapt the NCRP 151 methodology for estimating the air-kerma rate at the door in BT facilities. Such methodology was checked against Monte Carlo (MC) techniques using the code Geant4. Five different facility designs were studied for 192 Ir and 60 Co HDR applications to account for several different bunker layouts. For the estimation of the lead thickness needed at the door, the use of transmission data for the real spectra at the door instead of the ones emitted by 192 Ir and 60 Co will reduce the lead thickness by a factor of five for 192 Ir and ten for 60 Co. This will significantly lighten the door and hence simplify construction and operating requirements for all bunkers. The adaptation proposed in this study to estimate the air-kerma rate at the door depends on the complexity of the maze: it provides good results for bunkers with a maze (i.e. similar to those used for linacs for which the NCRP 151 methodology was developed) but fails for less conventional designs. For those facilities, a specific Monte Carlo study is in order for reasons of safety and cost-effectiveness. (paper)

  4. Air-kerma evaluation at the maze entrance of HDR brachytherapy facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujades, M C; Granero, D; Vijande, J; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J; Papagiannis, P; Siebert, F A

    2014-12-01

    In the absence of procedures for evaluating the design of brachytherapy (BT) facilities for radiation protection purposes, the methodology used for external beam radiotherapy facilities is often adapted. The purpose of this study is to adapt the NCRP 151 methodology for estimating the air-kerma rate at the door in BT facilities. Such methodology was checked against Monte Carlo (MC) techniques using the code Geant4. Five different facility designs were studied for (192)Ir and (60)Co HDR applications to account for several different bunker layouts.For the estimation of the lead thickness needed at the door, the use of transmission data for the real spectra at the door instead of the ones emitted by (192)Ir and (60)Co will reduce the lead thickness by a factor of five for (192)Ir and ten for (60)Co. This will significantly lighten the door and hence simplify construction and operating requirements for all bunkers.The adaptation proposed in this study to estimate the air-kerma rate at the door depends on the complexity of the maze: it provides good results for bunkers with a maze (i.e. similar to those used for linacs for which the NCRP 151 methodology was developed) but fails for less conventional designs. For those facilities, a specific Monte Carlo study is in order for reasons of safety and cost-effectiveness.

  5. Potential of roof-integrated solar collectors for preheating air at drying facilities in Northern Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, Franz; Nagle, Marcus; Leis, Hermann; Mueller, Joachim [Institute of Agricultural Engineering 440e, University of Hohenheim, Garbenstrasse 9, 70599 Stuttgart (Germany); Janjai, Serm [Department of Physics, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom (Thailand); Mahayothee, Busarakorn [Department of Food Technology, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom (Thailand); Haewsungcharoen, Methinee [Department of Food Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2009-07-15

    Longan is one of the most widely cropped fruits in Northern Thailand, where a significant amount of the annual harvest is commercially dried and exported as a commodity. Liquefied petroleum gas is generally used as the energy source for heating the drying air, but concern is growing as fuel prices are expected to increase for the foreseeable future. Meanwhile, with the ample solar radiation in Thailand, the roofs of drying facilities could be adapted to serve as solar collectors to preheat the drying air, thus reducing the energy requirement from fossil fuels. In this study, a simulation program for a flat-plate solar air heater was used to estimate the potential to preheat drying air given the conditions of several longan drying facilities. Results showed that solar collectors can replace up to 19.6% of the thermal energy demand during the drying season. Bigger collectors and smaller air channels result in more useful heat, but attention has to be paid to costs and pressure drop, respectively. Annual monetary savings can reach up to THB 56,000 ({approx}US$ 1800 at US$ 1 THB 31). (author)

  6. Hazardous emissions, operating practices, and air regulations at industrial wood-fired facilities in Wisconsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbard, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    Since October of 1988 the State of Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has regulated over four hundred substances as hazardous air pollutants. The rule regulates new as well as existing sources of air pollution in Wisconsin. Consequently, all permits to operate an air pollution source in Wisconsin must address the hazardous air emissions potential of the source. While widely perceived as a clean-burning fuel, wood is often burned in a manner which clearly results in significant emissions of very hazardous air pollutants. Research conducted on a 20 million BTU per hour wood-fired spreader stoker boiler in northern Wisconsin showed that this boiler has the potential to emit 0.022 pound of benzene and 0.012 pound of formaldehyde per ton (lb/ton) of wood fired. Recent stack tests at more than a dozen other small industrial wood-fired facilities in Wisconsin show a range of formaldehyde emissions of 0.0007--0.1950 lb/ton. Work at Birchwood Lumber ampersand Veneer showed that the benzene and formaldehyde emission rates under good firing conditions are an order of magnitude lower than the benzene and formaldehyde emission rates under poor firing conditions. This finding has supported Wisconsin's regulatory approach of encouraging wood-fired facilities to enhance the quality of the combustion process as a technique to minimize the hazardous air pollution potential of industrial wood combustion. The Wisconsin strategy is to define open-quotes good combustion technologyclose quotes through easily measurable combustion parameters rather than emission standards. This paper presents several techniques in use in Wisconsin to comply with open-quotes good combustion technologyclose quotes for industrial wood-fired furnaces. These techniques include fuel blending overfire air, furnace insulation, and proper grate design

  7. Air quality investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutman, W.M.; Silver, R.J.

    1994-12-01

    The air quality implications of the test and evaluation activities at the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility are examined. All facets of the activity that affect air quality are considered. Air contaminants produced directly include exhaust products of rocket motors used to accelerate test articles, dust and gas from chemical explosives, and exhaust gases from electricity generators in the test arenas. Air contaminants produced indirectly include fugitive dust and exhaust contaminants from vehicles used to transport personnel and material to the test area, and effluents produced by equipment used to heat the project buildings. Both the ongoing program and the proposed changes in the program are considered. Using a reliable estimate of th maximum annual testing level, the quantities of contaminants released by project activities ar computed either from known characteristics of test items or from EPA-approved emission factors Atmospheric concentrations of air contaminants are predicted using EPA dispersion models. The predicted quantities and concentrations are evaluated in relation to Federal, New Mexico, an Bernalillo County air quality regulations and the human health and safety standards of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists

  8. Revealing the costs of air pollution from industrial facilities in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, M. (EMRC, Brussels (Belgium)); Wagner, A.; Davies, T. (AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)); Spadaro, J. (SERC, Charlotte, NC (United States)); Adams, M. (EEA, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2011-11-15

    This European Environment Agency (EEA) report assesses the damage costs to health and the environment resulting from pollutants emitted from industrial facilities. It is based on the latest information, namely for 2009, publicly available through the European Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (E-PRTR, 2011) in line with the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Aarhus Convention regarding access to environmental information. This report investigates the use of a simplified modelling approach to quantify, in monetary terms, the damage costs caused by emissions of air pollutants from industrial facilities reported to the E-PRTR pollutant register. The approach is based on existing policy tools and methods, such as those developed under the EU's CAFE programme for the main air pollutants. This study also employs other existing models and approaches used to inform policymakers about the damage costs of pollutants. Together, the methods are used to estimate the impacts and associated economic damage caused by a number of pollutants emitted from industrial facilities, including: (1) ammonia (NH{sub 3}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs), particulate matter (PM{sub 10}) and sulphur oxides (SO{sub x}); (2) heavy metals; (3) benzene, dioxins and furans, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); (4) carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The cost of damage caused by emissions from the E-PRTR industrial facilities in 2009 is estimated as being at least EUR 102-169 billion. A small number of industrial facilities cause the majority of the damage costs to health and the environment. Fifty per cent of the total damage cost occurs as a result of emissions from just 191 (or 2 %) of the approximately 10 000 facilities that reported at least some data for releases to air in 2009. Three quarters of the total damage costs are caused by the emissions of 622 facilities, which comprise 6 % of the total number. Of the

  9. Naval Forward Presence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keledei, Raymond F

    2006-01-01

    .... Forward deployed Naval forces have consistently been stationed in the world s hotspots and are usually the first on the scene for emergent crises giving credence to the oft quoted line Where are the...

  10. Naval Preventive Diplomacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cassel, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Naval power, as part of a U.S. preventive diplomacy effort, can be flexibly mixed with political, economic, and informational power to intervene early in places of incipient crisis or before mass violence...

  11. Development of a non-radiological air emissions inventory for a nuclear industrial facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patnoe, C.A.; Porter, G.V.; Almquist, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the major issues that impacted the organization and structure of a project for developing a comprehensive non- radiological air emissions inventory for a nuclear weapons facility. The major issues addressed paralleled the development of the inventory project and fall into the following categories: (1) defining the scope of work, (2) developing and managing the air emission inventory project, and (3) field investigations and evaluating operations for air emissions. This paper also describes the lines of communication that were established with state regulators to resolve problems and develop a successful working relationship. This paper illustrates a means to complete a complex air emission inventory with proper organization and cooperation with regulatory agencies. Further, it indicates the need of critical evaluation of project tasks to evaluate their impact on project schedule; it provides a method for implementing a quality assurance program that audits all phases of the emission survey; and it demonstrates a way of effectively managing outside contractors to meet schedule requirements and assure a high quality product. This paper is of value to those undertaking a similar complex air emission survey. 2 refs

  12. Radiation impact caused by activation of air from the future GSI accelerator facility fair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutermuth, F.; Wildermuth, H.; Radon, T.; Fehrenbacher, G.

    2005-01-01

    The Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt is planning a new accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). Two future experimental areas are regarded to be the most decisive points concerning the activation of air. One is the area for the production of antiprotons. A second crucial experimental area is the so-called Super Fragment Separator. The production of radioactive isotopes in air is calculated using the residual nuclei option of the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The results are compared with the data for the activation of air given by Sullivan and in IAEA report 283. The resulting effective dose is calculated using a program package from the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection, the Bundesamt fuer Stranlenschutz. The results demonstrate that a direct emission of the total radioactivity produced into the air will probably conflict with the limits of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance. Special measures have to be planned in order to reduce the amount of radioactivity released into the air. (authors)

  13. Facile preparation of Ag-Cu bifunctional electrocatalysts for zinc-air batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Yachao; Chen, Fuyi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ag-Cu dendrites are observed for the first time to exhibit high catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction. • Ag-Cu dendrites are directly synthesized through galvanic displacement on the current collector layer made of Ni foams. • A bifunctional air cathode is fabricated using Ag-Cu dendrites as a carbon-free, binder-free catalyst layer. • Both the primary and rechargeable zinc–air batteries fabricated by Ag-Cu catalysts exhibit excellent performance. - ABSTRACT: An inexpensive, facile galvanic displacement reaction for the direct growth of silver–copper (Ag-Cu) catalysts on nickel foams is developed for the first time. The resulting Ag-Cu catalysts exhibit dendritic morphologies. Ag and Cu atoms are in their metallic state while the presence of CuO and Cu 2 O are limited on the surface of catalyst. The catalysts demonstrate high catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline solution, as evaluated by both linear scanning voltammetry and rotating disk electrode polarization measurements. The ORR catalysed by Ag-Cu catalyst in alkaline solution proceeds through a four-electron pathway. An air cathode is fabricated using Ag-Cu catalyst as a carbon-free, binder-free catalyst layer. Using this Ag-Cu catalyst based air cathode, both the primary and rechargeable zinc-air batteries show excellent battery performance. The specific capacity of the primary zinc-air battery is 572 mAh g −1 . Especially, the rechargeable zinc-air battery shows high round-trip efficiency, appealing stability at a long charge-discharge cycle period

  14. Ground-water hydrology and simulation of ground-water flow at Operable Unit 3 and surrounding region, U.S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    The Naval Air Station, Jacksonville (herein referred to as the Station), occupies 3,800 acres adjacent to the St. Johns River in Duval County, Florida. Operable Unit 3 (OU3) occupies 134 acres on the eastern side of the Station and has been used for industrial and commercial purposes since World War II. Ground water contaminated by chlorinated organic compounds has been detected in the surficial aquifer at OU3. The U.S. Navy and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a cooperative hydrologic study to evaluate the potential for ground water discharge to the neighboring St. Johns River. A ground-water flow model, previously developed for the area, was recalibrated for use in this study. At the Station, the surficial aquifer is exposed at land surface and forms the uppermost permeable unit. The aquifer ranges in thickness from 30 to 100 feet and consists of unconsolidated silty sands interbedded with local beds of clay. The low-permeability clays of the Hawthorn Group form the base of the aquifer. The USGS previously conducted a ground-water investigation at the Station that included the development and calibration of a 1-layer regional ground-water flow model. For this investigation, the regional model was recalibrated using additional data collected after the original calibration. The recalibrated model was then used to establish the boundaries for a smaller subregional model roughly centered on OU3. Within the subregional model, the surficial aquifer is composed of distinct upper and intermediate layers. The upper layer extends from land surface to a depth of approximately 15 feet below sea level; the intermediate layer extends from the upper layer down to the top of the Hawthorn Group. In the northern and central parts of OU3, the upper and intermediate layers are separated by a low-permeability clay layer. Horizontal hydraulic conductivities in the upper layer, determined from aquifer tests, range from 0.19 to 3.8 feet per day. The horizontal hydraulic

  15. Evaluation of a prototype air transport system for use in a crate handling and size reduction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes in detail the design features and evaluation, under simulated active conditions, of a purpose designed remotely operated air transporter system. The paper concludes by recommending that an air transporter, based on this concept, is considered for the alpha active facility. (author)

  16. Evaluation of a prototype air transport system for use in a crate handling and size reduction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, S.T.

    1987-09-01

    This paper describes the design features and evaluation, under simulated active conditions, of a purpose designed remotely operated air transporter system. The paper concludes by recommending that an air transporter, based on this concept, is considered for the alpha active facility. (author)

  17. Air Motion and Thermal Environment in Pig Housing Facilities with Diffuse Inlet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lis

    A ventilation system with ambient air supply through diffuse ceiling used in pig production facilities is presented. The climatic conditions were examined both experimentally and numerically in an full scale experimental room and the inlet boundary conditions of the diffuse inlet were examined...... in ambient temperature and air exchange rate. The effect of housing equipment on environmental conditions has been examined both experimental and numerically and it was found that impervious housing equipment has a significant effect on the climatic conditions close to the wall in the occupational zone...... in a wind tunnel model. In the full scale experiments the focus has been on the correlation between variations in ambient climatic conditions and changes in environmental condition in the occupational zone. It was found that the environmental conditions in the occupational zone were independent on changes...

  18. Naval War College Review. Volume 66, Number 3, Summer 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Naval Mine and Anti-submarine Warfare Command, Corpus Christi, Texas. He also served at the U.S. Naval Academy as a company of- ficer, celestial... Mine Warfare • Electronic Warfare • Air Defense • C4ISR • Civil Affairs • Installation Management Navy-centric Common Areas USMC...Brinsfield, and Col. jamie Iñiguez of the NATO SOF Coordination Centre. 37. Barbara Opall -Rome, “U.S. Seeks global Spec Ops Network,” Defense News, 12

  19. Long-Term Management Strategy for Dredged Material Disposal for Naval Facilities at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Phase II - Evaulation of Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    phytoremediation , or soil amendments. The levels of uptake pose insignificant environmental concern during the service life of the facility because plant growth...adsorption, degradation, dilution, or other means. Ammonia, copper, lead, mercury , nickel, silver, DDT, dieldrin, and PCB-1 260 exceed the Hawaii...0.755 Copper 2.9 588 44.7 15.4 Lead 5.6 150 209. 37.4 Mercury 0.025 1.18 1.65 65.8 Nickel 8.3 74.3 21.9 2.64 Selenium 71 2.0 9.6 0.135 Silver 0.92 1.87

  20. Reliability and Maintainability Analysis of a High Air Pressure Compressor Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safie, Fayssal M.; Ring, Robert W.; Cole, Stuart K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability (RAM) independent assessment conducted to support the refurbishment of the Compressor Station at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The paper discusses the methodologies used by the assessment team to derive the repair by replacement (RR) strategies to improve the reliability and availability of the Compressor Station (Ref.1). This includes a RAPTOR simulation model that was used to generate the statistical data analysis needed to derive a 15-year investment plan to support the refurbishment of the facility. To summarize, study results clearly indicate that the air compressors are well past their design life. The major failures of Compressors indicate that significant latent failure causes are present. Given the occurrence of these high-cost failures following compressor overhauls, future major failures should be anticipated if compressors are not replaced. Given the results from the RR analysis, the study team recommended a compressor replacement strategy. Based on the data analysis, the RR strategy will lead to sustainable operations through significant improvements in reliability, availability, and the probability of meeting the air demand with acceptable investment cost that should translate, in the long run, into major cost savings. For example, the probability of meeting air demand improved from 79.7 percent for the Base Case to 97.3 percent. Expressed in terms of a reduction in the probability of failing to meet demand (1 in 5 days to 1 in 37 days), the improvement is about 700 percent. Similarly, compressor replacement improved the operational availability of the facility from 97.5 percent to 99.8 percent. Expressed in terms of a reduction in system unavailability (1 in 40 to 1 in 500), the improvement is better than 1000 percent (an order of magnitude improvement). It is worthy to note that the methodologies, tools, and techniques used in the LaRC study can be used to evaluate

  1. Hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emission characterization of sewage treatment facilities in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyoung-Hee; Dong, Jong-In

    2010-04-01

    Until recently, nearly all sewage treatment-related regulations and researches have focused on the removal of the conventional and toxic pollutants from liquid effluents. The discharge of toxic compounds to the atmosphere has been implicitly regarded as a way of removal or destruction. During sewage treatment, the fate mechanism of volatilization/stripping, sorption and biotransformation primarily determines the fate of volatile HAPs. The objectives of this study are to investigate the emission characteristics of HAPs, which are generated from the liquid surface of sewage treatment facilities, by using an emission isolation flux chamber. HAP emissions increased at the inlet of the aerobic chamber during summer due to the relatively high atmospheric temperature. The percent ratio of flux for toluene reached its peak in winter, accounting for 33.6-34.2% of the total, but decreased to 25.1-28.6% in summer. In autumn, trichloroethene (TCE) was the highest, recording 17.6-18.1%, with chloroform and toluene showing similar levels. It seems that the ratio of chlorinated hydrocarbons increases in both summer and autumn because the chamber temperature during that time is higher than winter. This study is the initial study to investigate the emission characteristics of volatile HAPs emitted from domestic sewage treatment facilities to the air in Korea. Therefore, the isolation flux chamber will be used as an emission estimations tool to measure HAPs from sewage treatment facilities and may be applied to develop the emission factor and national source inventory of HAPs.

  2. Air mycopopulations in Petrovská klobása producing facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škrinjar Marija M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Different types of filamentous fungi periodically cause problems in small-scale facilities for traditional dry fermented sausages, such as Petrovská klobása from Vojvodina province (Serbia. Mould contamination can be observed during processing, ripening, and storage. Sausages may become spoiled due to visible mould colonies on the surface and off-flavours they produce. The most important - if mycotoxin production occurs it might promote a number of health disorders. Knowledge and control of filamentous fungi are, therefore, essential to produce sausages that satisfy the criteria of hygienic quality, sensorial characteristics, and food safety. The aim of this study was to survey mycoflora of a small-scale facility producing traditional dry fermented sausage - Petrovská klobása. The mould contamination of the air in processing unit and ripening chambers was investigated, in order to determine the important fungi in terms of spoilage of the products and ability to produce mycotoxins. The mould contamination of air in processing unit and ripening chambers examined was in range 0.22 - 1.89 log CFU/P.d. Isolated moulds belong to 6 genera: Aspergillus (3 species, Cladosporium (1 species, Eurotium (2 species, Fusarium (1 species, Penicillium (12 species and Scopulariopsis (1 species. The most abundant were species of Penicillium genus, many of which are capable for mycotoxin production. The level and diversity of fungal contamination of air varied between samples, influenced by the general hygiene, the buildings, the airflow, the outdoor environments, and the time of year. This knowledge is crucial for the improvement of hygiene control systems in small-scale processing units.

  3. Two years of outstanding AFGD performance, pure air on the Lakes Bailly Scrubber Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, J.; Vymazal, D.C. [Pure Air, Allentown, PA (United States); Styf, D.A. [Northern Indiana Public Service Company (NIPSCO), Chesterton, IN (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The {open_quotes}Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project{close_quotes} is a $151.3 million cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy and a project company of Pure Air, a general partnership of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc. The goal of the AFGD project is to demonstrate that, by combining state-of-the-art technology, highly efficient plant operation and maintenance capabilities, and by-product gypsum sales, significant reductions of SO{sub 2} emissions can be achieved at approximately one-half the life cycle of a conventional Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system. Further, this emission reduction is achieved without generating solid waste and while minimizing liquid wastewater effluent. Briefly, this project entails the design, construction and operation of a nominal 600 MWe AFGD facility to remove SO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company`s Bailly Generating Station, located approximately 40 miles southeast of Chicago, Illinois. The facility is used to demonstrate a variety of advanced technical and business-related features, during a three-year period of operation which began in the summer of 1992. The aim of this demonstration is to accelerate near-term commercialization. Key features of the AFGD project are discussed. Construction of the scrubber is complete; operations began in June 1992, ahead of schedule and within budget. The Clean Coal demonstration project calls for three years of operations. After the three-year demonstration period, Pure Air on the Lake will continue to Own-and-Operate the scrubber for the next 17 years. This paper review the advanced wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) design features, and the environmental and business features of the project. Also included are data on the first two years of successful operation.

  4. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, C. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); May, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Compton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walton, O. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shingleton, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kane, J. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Holtmeier, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Loey, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mirkarimi, P. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dunlop, W. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Guyton, R. L. [National Security Technologies, Livermore, CA (United States); Huffman, E. [National Security Technologies, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  5. A geophysical shock and air blast simulator at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; May, M. J.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Shingleton, N.; Kane, J. O.; Holtmeier, G.; Loey, H.; Mirkarimi, P. B.; Dunlop, W. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-481, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Guyton, R. L.; Huffman, E. [National Securities Technologies, Vasco Rd., Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The energy partitioning energy coupling experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been designed to measure simultaneously the coupling of energy from a laser-driven target into both ground shock and air blast overpressure to nearby media. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from the NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of full-scale seismic and air blast phenomena. This report summarizes the development of the platform, the simulations, and calculations that underpin the physics measurements that are being made, and finally the data that were measured. Agreement between the data and simulation of the order of a factor of two to three is seen for air blast quantities such as peak overpressure. Historical underground test data for seismic phenomena measured sensor displacements; we measure the stresses generated in our ground-surrogate medium. We find factors-of-a-few agreement between our measured peak stresses and predictions with modern geophysical computer codes.

  6. Technical assessment of workplace air sampling requirements at tank farm facilities. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, P.A.

    1994-01-01

    WHC-CM-1-6 is the primary guidance for radiological control at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). It was written to implement DOE N 5480.6 ''US Department of Energy Radiological Control Manual'' as it applies to programs at Hanford which are now overseen by WHC. As such, it complies with Title 10, Part 835 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In addition to WHC-CM-1-6, there is HSRCM-1, the ''Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual'' and several Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, national consensus standards, and reports that provide criteria, standards, and requirements for workplace air sampling programs. This document provides a summary of these, as they apply to WHC facility workplace air sampling programs. This document also provides an evaluation of the compliance of Tank Farms' workplace air sampling program to the criteria, standards, and requirements and documents compliance with the requirements where appropriate. Where necessary, it also indicates changes needed to bring specific locations into compliance

  7. Measurement of the Tracer Gradient and Sampling System Bias of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Air Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2011-07-20

    This report describes tracer gas uniformity and bias measurements made in the exhaust air discharge of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility at Idaho National Laboratory. The measurements were a follow-up on earlier measurements which indicated a lack of mixing of the two ventilation streams being discharged via a common stack. The lack of mixing is detrimental to the accuracy of air emission measurements. The lack of mixing was confirmed in these new measurements. The air sampling probe was found to be out of alignment and that was corrected. The suspected sampling bias in the air sample stream was disproved.

  8. Subsurface occurrence and potential source areas of chlorinated ethenes identified using concentrations and concentration ratios, Air Force Plant 4 and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field, Fort Worth, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C. Amanda

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force Aeronautical Systems Center, Environmental Management Directorate, conducted a study during 2003-05 to characterize the subsurface occurrence and identify potential source areas of the volatile organic compounds classified as chlorinated ethenes at U.S. Air Force Plant 4 (AFP4) and adjacent Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field (NAS-JRB) at Fort Worth, Texas. The solubilized chlorinated ethenes detected in the alluvial aquifer originated as either released solvents (tetrachloroethene [PCE], trichloroethene [TCE], and trans-1,2-dichloroethene [trans-DCE]) or degradation products of the released solvents (TCE, cis-1,2-dichloroethene [cis-DCE], and trans-DCE). The combined influences of topographic- and bedrock-surface configurations result in a water table that generally slopes away from a ground-water divide approximately coincident with bedrock highs and the 1-mile-long aircraft assembly building at AFP4. Highest TCE concentrations (10,000 to 920,000 micrograms per liter) occur near Building 181, west of Building 12, and at landfill 3. Highest PCE concentrations (500 to 920 micrograms per liter) occur near Buildings 4 and 5. Highest cis-DCE concentrations (5,000 to 710,000 micrograms per liter) occur at landfill 3. Highest trans-DCE concentrations (1,000 to 1,700 micrograms per liter) occur just south of Building 181 and at landfill 3. Ratios of parent-compound to daughter-product concentrations that increase in relatively short distances (tens to 100s of feet) along downgradient ground-water flow paths can indicate a contributing source in the vicinity of the increase. Largest increases in ratio of PCE to TCE concentrations are three orders of magnitude from 0.01 to 2.7 and 7.1 between nearby wells in the northeastern part of NAS-JRB. In the northern part of NAS-JRB, the largest increases in TCE to total DCE concentration ratios relative to ratios at upgradient wells are from 17 to

  9. Filtered air plastic chamber as an experimental facility to prove visible damage of crops due to air pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, Y; Yoda, H; Omichi, S; Shiratori, K

    1975-01-01

    An experimental filtered air chamber was constructed to prove the visible damage of crops due to air pollution. The chamber was provided with another room into which non-filtered ambient air was introduced. The purified air was prepared by filtering ambient air with activated carbon. The average content of air pollutants in the purified air chamber was less than 10 to 20% of the ozone and 20% of the sulfur oxides in the ambient air. However, cultivated vegetables such as tobacco and spinach, which are susceptible to oxidant, showed no visible damage in the filtered air chamber, and showed the same damage in the nonfiltered air chamber as was seen in fields at the same time.

  10. An assessment of air sampling location for stack monitoring in nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Bok [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyoung; Lee, Jong Il; Kim, Bong Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this study, air sampling locations in the stack of the Advanced Fuel Science Building (AFSB) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) were assessed according to the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 specification. The velocity profile, flow angle and 10 μm aerosol particle profile at the cross-section as functions of stack height L and stack diameter D (L/D) were assessed according to the sampling location criteria using COMSOL. The criteria for the velocity profile were found to be met at 5 L/D or more for the height, and the criteria for the average flow angle were met at all locations through this assessment. The criteria for the particle profile were met at 5 L/D and 9 L/D. However, the particle profile at the cross-section of each sampling location was found to be non-uniform. In order to establish uniformity of the particle profile, a static mixer and a perimeter ring were modeled, after which the degrees of effectiveness of these components were compared. Modeling using the static mixer indicated that the sampling locations that met the criteria for the particle profile were 5-10 L/D. When modeling using the perimeter ring, the sampling locations that met the criteria for particle profile were 5 L/D and 7-10 L/D. The criteria for the velocity profile and the average flow angle were also met at the sampling locations that met the criteria for the particle profile. The methodologies used in this study can also be applied during assessments of air sampling locations when monitoring stacks at new nuclear facilities as well as existing nuclear facilities.

  11. Energy Beverage Consumption Among Naval Aviation Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sather, Thomas E; Delorey, Donald R

    2016-06-01

    Since the debut of energy beverages, the consumption of energy beverages has been immensely popular with young adults. Research regarding energy beverage consumption has included college students, European Union residents, and U.S. Army military personnel. However, energy beverage consumption among naval aviation candidates in the United States has yet to be examined. The purpose of this study was to assess energy beverage consumption patterns (frequency and volume) among naval aviation candidates, including attitudes and perceptions regarding the benefits and safety of energy beverage consumption. A 44-item survey was used to assess energy beverage consumption patterns of 302 students enrolled in the Aviation Preflight Indoctrination Course at Naval Air Station Pensacola, FL. Results indicated that 79% of participants (N = 239) reported consuming energy beverages within the last year. However, of those who reported consuming energy beverages within the last year, only 36% (N = 85) reported consuming energy beverages within the last 30 d. Additionally, 51% (N = 153) of participants reported no regular energy beverages consumption. The majority of participants consumed energy beverages for mental alertness (67%), mental endurance (37%), and physical endurance (12%). The most reported side effects among participants included increased mental alertness (67%), increased heart rate (53%), and restlessness (41%). Naval aviation candidates appear to use energy drinks as frequently as a college student population, but less frequently than expected for an active duty military population. The findings of this study indicate that naval aviation candidates rarely use energy beverages (less than once per month), but when consumed, they use it for fatigue management.

  12. A method for predicting the impact velocity of a projectile fired from a compressed air gun facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attwood, G.J.

    1988-03-01

    This report describes the development and use of a method for calculating the velocity at impact of a projectile fired from a compressed air gun. The method is based on a simple but effective approach which has been incorporated into a computer program. The method was developed principally for use with the Horizontal Impact Facility at AEE Winfrith but has been adapted so that it can be applied to any compressed air gun of a similar design. The method has been verified by comparison of predicted velocities with test data and the program is currently being used in a predictive manner to specify test conditions for the Horizontal Impact Facility at Winfrith. (author)

  13. Experiments on hydraulically-compensated Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system using large-diameter vertical pipe two-phase flow test facility: test facility and test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsu, Iwao; Murata, Hideo; Kukita, Yutaka; Kumamaru, Hiroshige.

    1996-07-01

    JAERI, the University of Tokyo, the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry and Shimizu Corporation jointing performed and experimental study on two-phase flow in the hydraulically-compensated Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system with a large-diameter vertical pipe two-phase flow test facility from 1993 to 1995. A hydraulically-compensated CAES system is a proposed, conceptual energy storage system where energy is stored in the form of compressed air in an underground cavern which is sealed by a deep (several hundred meters) water shaft. The shaft water head maintains a constant pressure in the cavern, of several mega Pascals, even during loading or unloading of the cavern with air. The dissolved air in the water, however, may create voids in the shaft when the water rises through the shaft during the loading, being forced by the air flow into the cavern. The voids may reduce the effective head of the shaft, and thus the seal may fail, if significant bubbling should occur in the shaft. This bubbling phenomenon (termed 'Champaign effect') and potential failure of the water seal ('blowout') are simulated in a scaled-height, scaled-diameter facility. Carbon dioxide is used to simulate high solubility of air in the full-height, full-pressure system. This report describes the expected and potential two-phase flow phenomena in a hydraulically-compensated CAES system, the test facility and the test procedure, a method to estimate quantities which are not directly measured by using measured quantities and hydrodynamic basic equations, and desirable additional instrumentation. (author)

  14. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for the Waste Receiving And Processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The mission of the Waste Receiving And Processing (WRAP) Module 1 facility (also referred to as WRAP 1) includes: examining, assaying, characterizing, treating, and repackaging solid radioactive and mixed waste to enable permanent disposal of the wastes in accordance with all applicable regulations. The solid wastes to be handled in the WRAP 1 facility include low-level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU) waste, TRU mixed wastes, and low-level mixed wastes (LLMW). Airborne releases from the WRAP 1 facility will be primarily in particulate forms (99.999 percent of total unabated emissions). The release of two volatilized radionuclides, tritium and carbon-14 will contribute less than 0.001 percent of the total unabated emissions. Table 2-1 lists the radionuclides which are anticipated to be emitted from WRAP 1 exhaust stack. The Clean Air Assessment Package 1988 (CAP-88) computer code (WHC 1991) was used to calculate effective dose equivalent (EDE) from WRAP 1 to the maximally exposed offsite individual (MEI), and thus demonstrate compliance with WAC 246-247. Table 4-1 shows the dose factors derived from the CAP-88 modeling and the EDE for each radionuclide. The source term (i.e., emissions after abatement in curies per year) are multiplied by the dose factors to obtain the EDE. The total projected EDE from controlled airborne radiological emissions to the offsite MEI is 1.31E-03 mrem/year. The dose attributable to radiological emissions from WRAP 1 will, then, constitute 0.013 percent of the WAC 246-247 EDE regulatory limit of 10 mrem/year to the offsite MEI

  15. 77 FR 25435 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School Training Operations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... B harassment, incidental to Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School (NEODS) training operations at... Importing Marine Mammals; Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School Training Operations at Eglin Air Force... and the Issuance of Letters of Authorization to Take Marine Mammals, by Level B Harassment, Incidental...

  16. 75 FR 60694 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School Training Operations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Marine Mammals, by Harassment, Incidental to Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School Training Operations... School Training Operations at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service... authorization to take marine mammals, by Level B harassment, incidental to Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal...

  17. Naval Waste Package Design Sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Schmitt

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the sensitivity of the structural response of the Naval waste packages to varying inner cavity dimensions when subjected to a comer drop and tip-over from elevated surface. This calculation will also determine the sensitivity of the structural response of the Naval waste packages to the upper bound of the naval canister masses. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of through-wall stress intensities in the outer corrosion barrier. This calculation is intended for use in support of the preliminary design activities for the license application design of the Naval waste package. It examines the effects of small changes between the naval canister and the inner vessel, and in these dimensions, the Naval Long waste package and Naval Short waste package are similar. Therefore, only the Naval Long waste package is used in this calculation and is based on the proposed potential designs presented by the drawings and sketches in References 2.1.10 to 2.1.17 and 2.1.20. All conclusions are valid for both the Naval Long and Naval Short waste packages

  18. Risk of Decompression Sickness in Shallow No-Stop Air Diving An Analysis of Naval Safety Center Data 1990-1994

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flynn, E

    1998-01-01

    ...) in shallow no-stop air diving using current U.S. Navy no-decompression limits (USN57). Navy and Marine Corp divers performed 163,400 no-decompression dives between 21 and 55 feet of sea water (fsw...

  19. On Major Naval Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    operation were to take Turkey out of the war, open a direct link with the Entente’s embattled ally Russia, force the Ger- mans to shift troops from the...heavy losses. By August 1915, the allied forces amounted to twelve divisions. A new landing was conducted in early August at Suvla Bay aimed to link ...lethal weapons, such as antiship missiles and tor- pedoes , and the nature of the physical environment. Here again, combat be- tween modern naval forces

  20. Air Quality Management Using Pollution Prevention: A Joint Service Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    sites to promote polymerization. High solids coatings may be one or two component systems based on acrylic , alkyd , epoxy, polyester, or urethane...formulation to form high molecular weight polymers. Examples include acrylic , epoxy/polyester hybrid , functional epoxy, thin film epoxy, and urethane...Air Human System Center (HSC/OEBQ) Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 9

  1. An Analysis of Naval Officer Accession Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lehner, William D

    2008-01-01

    This thesis conducts an extensive literature review of prior studies on the three major commissioning programs for United States naval officers the United States Naval Academy, Naval Reserve Officers...

  2. Storage of LWR spent fuel in air: Volume 1: Design and operation of a spent fuel oxidation test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornhill, C.K.; Campbell, T.K.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the design and operation and technical accomplishments of a spent-fuel oxidation test facility at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the experiments conducted in this facility was to develop a data base for determining spent-fuel dry storage temperature limits by characterizing the oxidation behavior of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuels in air. These data are needed to support licensing of dry storage in air as an alternative to spent-fuel storage in water pools. They are to be used to develop and validate predictive models of spent-fuel behavior during dry air storage in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The present licensed alternative to pool storage of spent fuel is dry storage in an inert gas environment, which is called inerted dry storage (IDS). Licensed air storage, however, would not require monitoring for maintenance of an inert-gas environment (which IDS requires) but does require the development of allowable temperature limits below which UO 2 oxidation in breached fuel rods would not become a problem. Scoping tests at PNL with nonirradiated UO 2 pellets and spent-fuel fragment specimens identified the need for a statistically designed test matrix with test temperatures bounding anticipated maximum acceptable air-storage temperatures. This facility was designed and operated to satisfy that need. 7 refs

  3. Naval Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Used for astrometry and astronomical imaging, the Naval Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI) is a distributed aperture optical telescope. It is operated...

  4. Monitoring of air toxics through air pathways in support of a No-Migration permit at a refinery land treatment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wineberry, W.T. Jr.; McReynolds, J.

    1991-01-01

    As part of Exxon's petition of the EPA for No-Migration variances, ambient concentrations of toxicants and carcinogens are required to be verified through onsite monitoring for comparison to the appropriate health based limits as well as for calibration of previously used atmospheric dispersion models. Ambient air around land treatment facilities us a very complex, dynamic system of interacting chemicals. Pollutants can be found in the gas phase, in the particulate phase, or in the aerosol phase. The complex nature of the dynamic air system around these facilities contributes to the complexity of the sampling and analytical selection for the identification and quantification for these chemicals. The selection of the proper sampling and analysis methods for a pollutant depends on many important interrelated factors, including compounds of interest, the level of detection required, the degree of specificity needed, and the purpose of the data collected. Other factors which may be as important as the above are cost, the accuracy and precision required, need for real-time versus long-term data, and the need for on-site or off-site analysis. Sampling time, sampling rate, the volume of air to be sampled and the acceptable risk level are also factors which must be considered when choosing a sampling method. The purpose of the ambient air monitoring program is to obtain a comparison of predicted concentration to those measured. This paper will focus on the ambient air monitoring program at Exxon's land treatment facility as part of a No-Migration variance to EPA's Land Ban Regulations. Ambient Air Monitoring data involving volatile, semi-volatile and metals/particulate matter less than ten microns (PM-10) will be presented

  5. A calibration facility to provide traceable calibration to upper air humidity measuring sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccaro, Rugiada; Rosso, Lucia; Smorgon, Denis; Beltramino, Giulio; Fernicola, Vito

    2017-04-01

    Accurate knowledge and high quality measurement of the upper air humidity and of its profile in atmosphere is essential in many areas of the atmospheric research, for example in weather forecasting, environmental pollution studies and research in meteorology and climatology. Moving from the troposphere to the stratosphere, the water vapour amount varies between some percent to few part per million. For this reason, through the years, several methods and instruments have been developed for the measurement of the humidity in atmosphere. Among the instruments used for atmospheric sounding, radiosondes, airborne and balloon-borne chilled mirror hygrometer (CMH) and tunable diode laser absorption spectrometers (TDLAS) play a key role. To avoid the presence of unknown biases and systematic errors and to obtain accurate and reliable humidity measurements, these instruments need a SI-traceable calibration, preferably carried out in conditions similar to those expected in the field. To satisfy such a need, a new calibration facility has been developed at INRIM. The facility is based on a thermodynamic-based frost-point generator designed to achieve a complete saturation of the carrier gas with a single passage through an isothermal saturator. The humidity generator covers the frost point temperature range between -98 °C and -20 °C and is able to work at any controlled pressure between 200 hPa and 1000 hPa (corresponding to a barometric altitude between ground level and approximately 12000 m). The paper reports the work carried out to test the generator performances, discusses the results and presents the evaluation of the measurement uncertainty. The present work was carried out within the European Joint Research Project "MeteoMet 2 - Metrology for Essential Climate Variables" co-funded by the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP). The EMRP is jointly funded by the EMRP participating countries within EURAMET and the European Union.

  6. Measurement of radioactivity in air at the linear accelerator of Kyoto University reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikebe, Yukimasa; Shimo, Michikuni

    1976-01-01

    It is well-known that the induced activities from a number of nuclides are generated in air during the operation of high energy accelerators. Of these, measurements were performed with the linear accelerator of Kyoto University reactor facility for the purpose of the clarification of the production mechanism and behavior of radioactive aerosols. The concentration in air and the size distribution of 13 N aerosols which have aerosols as the carrier among 13 N produced by the γ-n reaction of 14 N were measured with filter packs and by diffusion method, respectively. The density of number and size distribution of non-radioactive aerosols were measured to understand the production mechanism and behavior of 13 N aerosols. For the aerosol number density, Aitken nucleus number was measured with a Pollak counter. The results obtained show that (1) under the operating condition of the linear accelerator at that measurement time, 13 N aerosol concentration was (2 to 50) x 10 -13 Ci/cm 3 while 13 N gas component concentration was (1 to 25) x 10 -12 Ci/cm 3 , i.e. the ratio was approximately 1 : 10 (2) the average size of 13 N aerosols was 0.01 to 0.04 μm, and it was found that there was positive correlation to relative humidity; (3) during the operation of the accelerator, the generation of aerosols 10 to 100 times as much as the background level was observed. The size distribution of aerosols showed a peak around 0.01 μm; and others. Examination was carried out regarding a 13 N aerosol production model based on the sticking of aerosol-free 13 N to aerosols. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Environmental Assessment for Building 88 Interior Demolition, Pearl Harbor Naval Complex, O'ahu, Hawaii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2005-01-01

    ...) and ancillary equipment from the interior of Building 88, a former lubricating oil storage facility, and the related exposed piping underneath Mike wharves M3 and M4 at Merry Point, Pearl Harbor Naval Complex...

  8. Evaluating cryostat performance for naval applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, David; Willen, Dag; Fesmire, James; Johnson, Wesley; Smith, Jonathan; Meneghelli, Barry; Demko, Jonathan; George, Daniel; Fowler, Brian; Huber, Patti

    2012-06-01

    The Navy intends to use High Temperature Superconducting Degaussing (HTSDG) coil systems on future Navy platforms. The Navy Metalworking Center (NMC) is leading a team that is addressing cryostat configuration and manufacturing issues associated with fabricating long lengths of flexible, vacuum-jacketed cryostats that meet Navy shipboard performance requirements. The project includes provisions to evaluate the reliability performance, as well as proofing of fabrication techniques. Navy cryostat performance specifications include less than 1 Wm-1 heat loss, 2 MPa working pressure, and a 25-year vacuum life. Cryostat multilayer insulation (MLI) systems developed on the project have been validated using a standardized cryogenic test facility and implemented on 5-meterlong test samples. Performance data from these test samples, which were characterized using both LN2 boiloff and flow-through measurement techniques, will be presented. NMC is working with an Integrated Project Team consisting of Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Surface Warfare Center-Carderock Division, Southwire Company, nkt cables, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), ASRC Aerospace, and NASA Kennedy Space Center (NASA-KSC) to complete these efforts. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This material is submitted with the understanding that right of reproduction for governmental purposes is reserved for the Office of Naval Research, Arlington, Virginia 22203-1995.

  9. Location and repair of air leaks in the ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenterly, S.W.; Gabbard, W.A.; Schaich, C.R.; Yarber, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of partial pressure rate-of-rise and base pressure measurements, it was determined that the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) vacuum vessel had an air leak in the low 10 -4 mbar-ell/s range. Pinpointing this leak by conventional helium leak-checking procedures was not possible, because large portions of the outside of the vessel are covered by the helcial field coils and a structural shell. Various alternative leak-detection schemes that were considered are summarized and their advantages and disadvantages noted. In the method ultimately employed, gun-rubber patches of various sizes ranging from 12.7 by 12.7 cm to 20.3 by 30.5 cm were positioned on the inside surfaces of the vessel and evacuated by the leak detector (LD). After roughly 5% of the surface was inspected in this way, a leak of > 10 -5 mbar-ell/s was discovered and localized to an area of 5 by 5 cm. Dye penetrant applied to this area disclosed three pinholes. Two small slag pockets were discovered while these points were being ground out. After these were rewelded, no furthered leakage could be found in the repaired area. Global leak rates measured after the machine was reevacuated indicated that this leak was about 30% of the overall leak rate. 1 ref., 5 figs., 1 tab

  10. 78 FR 16259 - Subcommittee Meeting of the Board of Advisors to the President, Naval Postgraduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... Naval War College (NPS). This meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The meeting will be held on... Postgraduate Education Program and the collaborative exchange and partnership between NPS and the Air Force...

  11. The presence and partitioning behavior of flame retardants in waste, leachate, and air particles from Norwegian waste-handling facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicolas A.O.Morin; Patrik L.Andersson; Sarah E.Hale; Hans Peter H.Arp

    2017-01-01

    Flame retardants in commercial products eventually make their way into the waste stream.Herein the presence of flame retardants in Norwegian landfills,incineration facilities and recycling sorting/defragmenting facilities is investigated.These facilities handled waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE),vehicles,digestate,glass,combustibles,bottom ash and fly ash.The flame retardants considered included polybrominated diphenyl ethers (∑BDE-10) as well as dechlorane plus,polybrominated biphenyls,hexabromobenzene,pentabromotoluene and pentabromoethylbenzene (collectively referred to as ∑FR-7).Plastic,WEEE and vehicles contained the largest amount of flame retardants (∑BDE-10:45,000-210,000 μg/kg;∑FR-7:300-13,000 μg/kg).It was hypothesized leachate and air concentrations from facilities that sort/defragment WEEE and vehicles would be the highest.This was supported for total air phase concenttations (∑BDE-10:9000-195,000 pg/m3 WEEE/vehicle facilities,80-900 pg/m3 in incineration/sorting and landfill sites),but not for water leachate concentrations (e.g.,ΣBDE-10:15-3500 ng/L in WEEE/Vehicle facilities and 1-250 ng/L in landfill sites).Landfill leachate exhibited similar concentrations as WEEE/vehicle sorting and defragmenting facility leachate.To better account for concentrations in leachates at the different facilities,waste-water partitioning coefficients,Kwaste were measured (for the first time to our knowledge for flame retardants).WEEE and plastic waste had elevated Kwaste compared to other wastes,likely because flame retardants are directly added to these materials.The results of this study have implications for the development of strategies to reduce exposure and environmental emissions of flame retardants in waste and recycled products through improved waste management practices.

  12. The presence and partitioning behavior of flame retardants in waste, leachate, and air particles from Norwegian waste-handling facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Nicolas A O; Andersson, Patrik L; Hale, Sarah E; Arp, Hans Peter H

    2017-12-01

    Flame retardants in commercial products eventually make their way into the waste stream. Herein the presence of flame retardants in Norwegian landfills, incineration facilities and recycling sorting/defragmenting facilities is investigated. These facilities handled waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), vehicles, digestate, glass, combustibles, bottom ash and fly ash. The flame retardants considered included polybrominated diphenyl ethers (∑BDE-10) as well as dechlorane plus, polybrominated biphenyls, hexabromobenzene, pentabromotoluene and pentabromoethylbenzene (collectively referred to as ∑FR-7). Plastic, WEEE and vehicles contained the largest amount of flame retardants (∑BDE-10: 45,000-210,000μg/kg; ∑FR-7: 300-13,000μg/kg). It was hypothesized leachate and air concentrations from facilities that sort/defragment WEEE and vehicles would be the highest. This was supported for total air phase concentrations (∑BDE-10: 9000-195,000pg/m 3 WEEE/vehicle facilities, 80-900pg/m 3 in incineration/sorting and landfill sites), but not for water leachate concentrations (e.g., ∑BDE-10: 15-3500ng/L in WEEE/Vehicle facilities and 1-250ng/L in landfill sites). Landfill leachate exhibited similar concentrations as WEEE/vehicle sorting and defragmenting facility leachate. To better account for concentrations in leachates at the different facilities, waste-water partitioning coefficients, K waste were measured (for the first time to our knowledge for flame retardants). WEEE and plastic waste had elevated K waste compared to other wastes, likely because flame retardants are directly added to these materials. The results of this study have implications for the development of strategies to reduce exposure and environmental emissions of flame retardants in waste and recycled products through improved waste management practices. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Factors determining the concentration and chemical composition of particulate matter in the air of selected service facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogula-Kopiec, Patrycja; Pastuszka, Józef; Mathews, Barbara; Widziewicz, Kamila

    2018-01-01

    The link between increased morbidity and mortality and increasing concentrations of particulate matter (PM) resulted in great attention being paid to the presence and physicochemical properties of PM in closed rooms, where people spends most of their time. The least recognized group of such indoor environments are small service facilities. The aim of this study was to identify factors which determine the concentration, chemical composition and sources of PM in the air of different service facilities: restaurant kitchen, printing office and beauty salon. The average PM concentration measured in the kitchen was 5-fold (PM4, particle fraction ≥ 4 μm) and 5.3-fold (TSP, total PM) greater than the average concentration of these PM fractions over the same period. During the same measurement period in the printing office and in the beauty salon, the mean PM concentration was 10- and 4-fold (PM4) and 8- and 3-fold (TSP) respectively greater than the mean concentration of these PM fractions in outdoor air. In both facilities the main source of PM macro-components, especially organic carbon, were chemicals, which are normally used in such places - solvents, varnishes, paints, etc. The influence of some metals inflow from the outdoor air into indoor environment of those facilities was also recognized.

  14. Sulfur hexafluoride purification from mixtures with air: a process feasibility study for the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perona, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary feasibility study was made for the purification of SF 6 vapor contaminated with air for application at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. Liquefaction appears to be a good way to recover about 90% of the SF 6 if it is badly contaminated (15% air), and even greater recovery will be possible for mixtures containing less air. Where liquefaction is insufficient alone, adsorption of SF 6 on activated carbon at -50 0 F looks promising. Two carbon beds each containing about 500 lb of carbon should be sufficient. The refrigeration system for liquefaction and adsorption would have a capacity of about 2 tons. As alternatives, the use of molecular sieves to trap out the air was investigated, but such a bed would require at least 15,000 lb of molecular sieves and very long cycle times. A large-scale desublimer was investigated and appears workable but would require some development work to permit design work to proceed with confidence

  15. Recent Naval Postgraduate School Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    School,, (IPS-.531071O1)p 1W7. 3* Conhri Aceofthecna taraW 8to ncoen 0 mnkionai goostrophic adibxamat with. f1 itt 1 oh1 maduate School, (BPS-531h77041...Nor h Holand , 1977. 267 p. MorAn techniques of 3.A. - dynamic programming (Ch. 141) IN Naval operations analysis, 2nd ed. Naval lust. Press, 1977, p

  16. Caffeine Consumption Among Naval Aviation Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sather, Thomas E; Williams, Ronald D; Delorey, Donald R; Woolsey, Conrad L

    2017-04-01

    Education frequently dictates students need to study for prolonged periods of time to adequately prepare for examinations. This is especially true with aviation preflight indoctrination (API) candidates who have to assimilate large volumes of information in a limited amount of time during API training. The purpose of this study was to assess caffeine consumption patterns (frequency, type, and volume) among naval aviation candidates attending API to determine the most frequently consumed caffeinated beverage and to examine if the consumption of a nonenergy drink caffeinated beverage was related to energy drink consumption. Data were collected by means of an anonymous 44-item survey administered and completed by 302 students enrolled in API at Naval Air Station Pensacola, FL. Results indicated the most frequently consumed caffeinated beverage consumed by API students was coffee (86.4%), with daily coffee consumption being approximately 28% and the most frequent pattern of consumption being 2 cups per day (85%). The least frequently consumed caffeinated beverages reported were energy drinks (52%) and energy shots (29.1%). The present study also found that the consumption patterns (weekly and daily) of caffeinated beverages (coffee and cola) were positively correlated to energy drink consumption patterns. Naval aviation candidates' consumption of caffeinated beverages is comparable to other college and high school cohorts. This study found that coffee and colas were the beverages of choice, with energy drinks and energy shots being the least frequently reported caffeinated beverages used. Additionally, a relationship between the consumption of caffeinated beverages and energy drinks was identified.Sather TE, Williams RD, Delorey DR, Woolsey CL. Caffeine consumption among naval aviation candidates. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(4):399-405.

  17. Background information on sources of low-level radionuclide emissions to air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbit, C.D.; Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Stout, L.A.; Corley, J.P.

    1983-09-01

    This report provides a general description and reported emissions for eight low-level radioactive source categories, including facilties that are licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Agreement States, and non-Department of Energy (DOE) federal facilities. The eight categories of low-level radioactive source facilities covered by this report are: research and test reactors, accelerators, the radiopharmaceutical industry, source manufacturers, medical facilities, laboratories, naval shipyards, and low-level commercial waste disposal sites. Under each category five elements are addressed: a general description, a facility and process description, the emission control systems, a site description, and the radionuclides released to air (from routine operations)

  18. Background information on sources of low-level radionuclide emissions to air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbit, C.D.; Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Stout, L.A.; Corley, J.P.

    1983-09-01

    This report provides a general description and reported emissions for eight low-level radioactive source categories, including facilties that are licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Agreement States, and non-Department of Energy (DOE) federal facilities. The eight categories of low-level radioactive source facilities covered by this report are: research and test reactors, accelerators, the radiopharmaceutical industry, source manufacturers, medical facilities, laboratories, naval shipyards, and low-level commercial waste disposal sites. Under each category five elements are addressed: a general description, a facility and process description, the emission control systems, a site description, and the radionuclides released to air (from routine operations).

  19. Air Dispersion Modeling for the INL Application for a Synthetic Minor Sitewide Air Quality Permit to Construct with a Facility Emission Cap Component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sondrup, Andrus Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is applying for a synthetic minor, Sitewide, air quality permit to construct (PTC) with a facility emission cap (FEC) component from the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) for Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to limit its potential to emit to less than major facility limits for criteria air pollutants (CAPs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) regulated under the Clean Air Act. This document is supplied as an appendix to the application, Idaho National Laboratory Application for a Synthetic Minor Sitewide Air Quality Permit to Construct with a Facility Emissions Cap Component, hereafter referred to as “permit application” (DOE-ID 2015). Air dispersion modeling was performed as part of the permit application process to demonstrate pollutant emissions from the INL will not cause a violation of any ambient air quality standards. This report documents the modeling methodology and results for the air dispersion impact analysis. All CAPs regulated under Section 109 of the Clean Air Act were modeled with the exception of lead (Pb) and ozone, which are not required to be modeled by DEQ. Modeling was not performed for toxic air pollutants (TAPs) as uncontrolled emissions did not exceed screening emission levels for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic TAPs. Modeling for CAPs was performed with the EPA approved AERMOD dispersion modeling system (Version 14134) (EPA 2004a) and five years (2000-2004) of meteorological data. The meteorological data set was produced with the companion AERMET model (Version 14134) (EPA 2004b) using surface data from the Idaho Falls airport, and upper-air data from Boise International Airport supplied by DEQ. Onsite meteorological data from the Grid 3 Mesonet tower located near the center of the INL (north of INTEC) and supplied by the local National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) office was used for surface wind directions and wind speeds. Surface data (i

  20. Technical and economic assessment for asbestos abatement within Facility 20470, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, S.M.; Ogle, R.B.

    1988-03-01

    This report presents the results of a technical and economic assessment of available alternatives for asbestos abatement within Facility 20470 at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio. Each alternative was screened on the basis of technical feasibility, environmental impact, economics, and fulfillment of the IRP goals. Four alternatives for study are: establishing a special operations and maintenance program; enclosure; encapsulation with sealants; and removal, disposal, and replacement. Each of these alternatives was assessed for capability to control the release of asbestos fibers within Facility 20470. Alternatives 1 and 4 were determined to be acceptable, while Alternatives 2 and 3 were found to be unacceptable. 2 refs., 6 figs

  1. Calculation methods for air supply design in industrial facilities. Literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagstroem, K; Siren, K; Zhivov, A M

    1999-09-01

    The objectives of air distribution systems for warm air heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning are to create the proper thermal environment conditions in the occupied zone (combination of temperature, humidity, and air movement), and to control vapor and air born particle concentration within the target levels set by the process requirements and/or threshold limit values based on health effects, fire and explosion prevention, or other considerations. HVAC systems designs are constrained by existing codes, standards, and guidelines, which specify some minimum requirements for the HVAC system elements, occupant`s and process environmental quality and safety. There is a variety of different methods consulting engineers use to design room air diffusion and to select and size air diffusers, such as assumption of perfect mixing, design methods employing the empirical relations determined through research, such as the air diffusion performance index (ADPI), air jet theory and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. Air supplied into the room through the various types of outlets (grills, ceiling mounted air diffusers, perforated panels etc.), is distributed by turbulent air jets. In mixing type air distribution systems, these air jets are the primary factor affecting room air motion. Numerous theoretical and experimental studies that developed a solid base for turbulent air jets theory were conducted concurrently in different countries (Germany, Sweden, Russia, U.K., USA) from the 1930`s through the 1980`s. Design methods based on air jet theory allows for the prediction of extreme values of air velocities and air temperatures in the occupied zone of empty spaces. Current air jet theory techniques account for the effects of buoyancy, confinement, jets interaction. For many conditions of jet discharge, it is possible to analyze jet performance and determine: the angle of divergence of the jet boundary; the velocity patterns along heated or chilled the jet axis; the

  2. Building Air Quality Guide: A Guide for Building Owners and Facility Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Building Air Quality, developed by the EPA and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, provides practical suggestions on preventing, identifying, and resolving indoor air quality (IAQ) problems in public and commercial buildings.

  3. Building air quality: A guide for building owners and facility managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The guide was intended to help those individuals responsible for air quality control in buildings to prevent indoor air quality problems from developing and resolving such problems quickly should they develop. Background information and guidance on dealing with indoor air quality problems were provided. Specific topics included: factors which affect indoor air quality; sources of indoor air contaminants; heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems; the role of building occupants; effective communication between managers and others involved; developing an indoor air quality (IAQ) profile; managing a building for good IAQ; diagnosing IAQ problems; mitigating IAQ problems, hiring professional assistance to solve an IAQ problem; common IAQ measurements; HVAC systems and IAQ; moisture with resultant mold and mildew conditions; asbestos (1332214); radon (10043922); and resources through which additional information can be obtained. Indoor air quality forms were included which can be modified to meet individual needs

  4. An analysis of heating, ventilation and air conditioning system for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Byung Tae; Park, Seong Won; Cho, Soo Haeng; Lee, Yong Rae; Lee, Kyung Ku; Park, Seung Hyub; Hwang, Jeong Ki; Kim, Jeong Mook; Oh, Haeng Yoeb

    1988-12-01

    An analysis of HVAC system was made on various nuclear facilities such as the existing nuclear power plants in Korea, Post Irradiation Examination Facility at KAERI and Midwest Fuel Recovery Plant in USA, to get basic data and information for the design of the spent fuel interim storage facility to be implemented as one of the radwaste management projects. With the results of this study, the HVAC system to be applied to the spent fuel interim storage facility was selected and the major design considerations of the facility were suggested. (Author)

  5. Environmental Assessment for Taxiway Whiskey Supplemental Projects at Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, Prince George’s County, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    are made of unconsolidated sand, gravel, silt, clay , and organic materials that overlay bedrock. The surficial geologic deposits range in thickness from...10 to 20 feet and include irregularly bedded cobbles, gravel, and fine sand that are mixed with silt and clay . Surface formations at JBA have largely...systems on JBA (e.g., natural gas, sanitary sewer, potable water) would be unaffected by the proposed action. 3.6.2 Environmental Consequences

  6. Environmental Assessment for the Expansion and Consolidation of the Base Exchange at Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, Prince George’s County, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    has provided quality merchandise and services at competitive prices and has generated millions of dollars annually in dividends for the Directorate of...following order: 1. Construction of a food court retail space and portions of the merchandise processing area (MPA); 2. Construction of the...303(d) list. The Project is situated in the Piscataway Creek watershed, identified by the MD 8- digit code 02140203 which is currently impaired by

  7. Tiger Team Assessment of the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) which consists of Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1 (NPR-1), referred to as the Elk Hills oil field and Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 2 (NPR-2), referred to as the Buena Vista oil field, each located near Bakersfield, California. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted from November 12 to December 13, 1991, under the auspices of DOE's Office of Special Projects (OSP) under the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environmental, safety, and health (ES ampersand H), and quality assurance (OA) disciplines; site remediation; facilities management; and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, State of California, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal NPRC requirements was assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE/NPRC, CUSA, and BPOI management of the ES ampersand H/QA programs was conducted

  8. Smart Air Sampling Instruments Have the Ability to Improve the Accuracy of Air Monitoring Data Comparisons Among Nuclear Industry Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavila, F. M.

    2008-01-01

    Valid inter-comparisons of operating performance parameters among all members of the nuclear industry are essential for the implementation of continuous improvement and for obtaining credibility among regulators and the general public. It is imperative that the comparison of performances among different industry facilities be as accurate as possible and normalized to industry-accepted reference standards

  9. An early modern factory between state and market: labor and management at the Amsterdam naval shipyard (1660-1795)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandon, P.; de Jong, A.; Wubs, B.

    2012-01-01

    Naval shipyards were among the largest production facilities of the pre-industrial world. The Venetian Arsenal and the British Royal Dockyards therefore play a prominent role in the historiography of early modern labor relations. However, labor relations at the Dutch naval shipyards remain

  10. Impact of emissions from natural gas production facilities on ambient air quality in the Barnett Shale area: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinska, Barbara; Campbell, Dave; Samburova, Vera

    2014-12-01

    Rapid and extensive development of shale gas resources in the Barnett Shale region of Texas in recent years has created concerns about potential environmental impacts on water and air quality. The purpose of this study was to provide a better understanding of the potential contributions of emissions from gas production operations to population exposure to air toxics in the Barnett Shale region. This goal was approached using a combination of chemical characterization of the volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from active wells, saturation monitoring for gaseous and particulate pollutants in a residential community located near active gas/oil extraction and processing facilities, source apportionment of VOCs measured in the community using the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor model, and direct measurements of the pollutant gradient downwind of a gas well with high VOC emissions. Overall, the study results indicate that air quality impacts due to individual gas wells and compressor stations are not likely to be discernible beyond a distance of approximately 100 m in the downwind direction. However, source apportionment results indicate a significant contribution to regional VOCs from gas production sources, particularly for lower-molecular-weight alkanes (gas production. Implications: Rapid and extensive development of shale gas resources in recent years has created concerns about potential environmental impacts on water and air quality. This study focused on directly measuring the ambient air pollutant levels occurring at residential properties located near natural gas extraction and processing facilities, and estimating the relative contributions from gas production and motor vehicle emissions to ambient VOC concentrations. Although only a small-scale case study, the results may be useful for guidance in planning future ambient air quality studies and human exposure estimates in areas of intensive shale gas production.

  11. Environmental Assessment (EA): Proposed Aircraft Power Systems Repair Transformation Facility, Hill Air Force Base, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-16

    and silicon carbide; spent elastic abrasive media; rags and wipes from the NDI process ; and unused scraps of TIG welding wire. Dust from the thermal...used, which would not be expected to produce regulated air emissions. For this process , no air quality permit updates are anticipated. • Welding ...The electron beam welding equipment would not be expected to produce regulated air emissions. The tungsten inert gas ( TIG ) welding equipment would

  12. Evaluating the Effects of Air Pollution from a Plastic Recycling Facility on the Health of Nearby Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zhao; Tsuda, Toshihide; Doi, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    We evaluated how exposure to airborne volatile organic compounds emitted from a plastic recycling facility affected nearby residents, in a cross-sectional study. Individuals>10 years old were randomly sampled from 50 households at five sites and given questionnaires to complete. We categorized the subjects by distance from the recycling facility and used this as a proxy measure for pollutant exposure. We sought to improve on a preceding study by generating new findings, improving methods for questionnaire distribution and collection, and refining site selection. We calculated the odds of residents living 500 or 900 m away from the facility reporting mucocutaneous and respiratory symptoms using a reference group of residents 2,800 m away. Self-reported nasal congestion (odds ratio=3.0, 95% confidence interval=1.02-8.8), eczema (5.1, 1.1-22.9), and sore throat (3.9, 1.1-14.1) were significantly higher among residents 500 m from the facility. Those 900 m away were also considerably more likely to report experiencing eczema (4.6, 1.4-14.9). Air pollution was found responsible for significantly increased reports of mucocutaneous and respiratory symptoms among nearby residents. Our findings confirm the effects of pollutants emitted from recycling facilities on residents' health and clarify that study design differences did not affect the results.

  13. Determination of the radioiodine species in the exhaust air of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.

    1977-01-01

    Using the selective I 2 sorption materials DSM 10 and DSM 11 measurements were performed with radioiodine species samplers in the exhaust air of a research reactor and of several nuclear power stations (BWR, PWR). The radioiodine species samplers were used upstream and downstream of iodine filters (containment exhaust air stand-by filter, shutoff room exhaust air filter) as well as in the exhaust air of the stack. The results obtained by use of DSM 10 and DSM 11 generally agreed. The percentage of aerosol iodine was low in all cases ( [de

  14. Air conditioning device for pool facilities in nuclear power plant buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taruishi, Yoshiaki; Ishida, Seiji.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the temperature and humidity conditions for the working circumstance, prevent condensations on the wall surface and enable the reduction in the irradiation exposure to workers. Constitution: Air intake ports are provided on the side wall of a fuel storage pool or an equipment installation pool above the water level and connected by way of their exhaust ducts to the exhaust ducts of an air ventilation system. While on the other hand, air feed ducts having horizontally opened blowing ports and air exhaust ducts having horizontally opened exhaust ports above and in adjacent to the air feed ducts are provided on the side walls of the pool buildings at the height near the floor level. With this structure, fresh outdoor airs blown out horizontally from the blowing ports provided near the floor level can improve the temperature and humidity conditions of the working circumstance for the workers working on the floor. Further, an air clean up device is provided to the feed and exhaust systems for clean up the feed and exhaust airs. (Furukawa, Y.)

  15. Studies on the tritium contamination of the ambient air near nuclear facilities with large tritium inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, W.; Knieper, J.; Printz, H.; Sauermann, P.F.

    1976-01-01

    A part of gaseous T is converted to HTO with the humidity in the air. Since HTO has considerably more radiotoxicity than T-gas it is very important to know the extent of this conversion. This question was studied on a 14-MeV-neutron generator with open target system in which, as we know, a major part of the gaseous T originally contained in the T-target is released into the waste air via the vacuum system. The exchange rates in the breathing air in working rooms, in the waste air duct and in the free atmosphere under different meteorological conditions were measured. Furthermore the exchange rate in closed test-circulations was tested in dependence on air humidity, temperature, T-concentration, and time. The T-test instruments were calibrated with gaseous T. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Nonradioactive air emissions notice of construction for the Waste Receiving And Processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The mission of the Waste Receiving And Processing (WRAP) Module 1 facility (also referred to as WRAP 1) is to examine assay, characterize, treat, and repackage solid radioactive and mixed waste to enable permanent disposal of the wastes in accordance with all applicable regulations. WRAP 1 will contain equipment and facilities necessary for non-destructive examination (NDE) of wastes and to perform a non-destructive examination assay (NDA) of the total radionuclide content of the wastes, without opening the outer container (e.g., 55-gal drum). WRAP 1 will also be equipped to open drums which do not meet waste acceptance and shipping criteria, and to perform limited physical treatment of the wastes to ensure that storage, shipping, and disposal criteria are met. The solid wastes to be handled in the WRAP 1 facility include low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU) waste, and transuranic and low level mixed wastes (LLMW). The WRAP 1 facility will only accept contact handler (CH) waste containers. A Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (TBACT) assessment has been completed for the WRAP 1 facility (WHC 1993). Because toxic emissions from the WRAP 1 facility are sufficiently low and do not pose any health or safety concerns to the public, no controls for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and installation of HEPA filters for particulates satisfy TBACT for the facility

  17. Retrofitting Inefficient Rooftop Air-Conditioning Units Reduces U.S. Navy Energy Use (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-04-01

    As part of the U.S. Navy's overall energy strategy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) partnered with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) to demonstrate market-ready energy efficiency measures, renewable energy generation, and energy systems integration. One such technology - retrofitting rooftop air-conditioning units with an advanced rooftop control system - was identified as a promising source for reducing energy use and costs, and can contribute to increasing energy security.

  18. Ambient air sampling for radioactive air contaminants at Los Alamos National Laboratory: A large research and development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhart, C.F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the ambient air sampling program for collection, analysis, and reporting of radioactive air contaminants in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Particulate matter and water vapor are sampled continuously at more than 50 sites. These samples are collected every two weeks and then analyzed for tritium, and gross alpha, gross beta, and gamma ray radiation. The alpha, beta, and gamma measurements are used to detect unexpected radionuclide releases. Quarterly composites are analyzed for isotopes of uranium ( 234 U, 235 U, 238 U), plutonium ( 238 Pu, 239/249 Pu), and americium ( 241 Am). All of the data is stored in a relational database with hard copies as the official records. Data used to determine environmental concentrations are validated and verified before being used in any calculations. This evaluation demonstrates that the sampling and analysis process can detect tritium, uranium, plutonium, and americium at levels much less than one percent of the public dose limit of 10 millirems. The isotopic results also indicate that, except for tritium, off-site concentrations of radionuclides potentially released from LANL are similar to typical background measurements

  19. Fort Laurdale Branch, Naval Surface Warfare Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    ...) facility located on the Eastern Seaboard. Here, NSWC and other research and development activities conduct full-scale trials of air, surface, and underwater weapon systems under a variety of oceanographic conditions...

  20. Final work plan : indoor air and ambient air sampling near the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Everest, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

    2010-05-24

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at the western edge of Everest, Kansas, from the early 1950s to the early 1970s. Sampling by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in 1997 resulted in the detection of carbon tetrachloride in one domestic well (the Nigh well) northwest of the former facility. On behalf of the CCC/USDA, Argonne National Laboratory subsequently conducted a series of investigations to characterize the contamination (Argonne 2003, 2006a,b,c). Automatic, continuous monitoring of groundwater levels began in 2002 and is ongoing at six locations. The results have consistently indicated groundwater flow toward the north-northwest from the former CCC/USDA property to the Nigh property, then west-southwest from the Nigh property to the intermittent creek. Sitewide periodic groundwater and surface water sampling with analysis for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) began in 2008. Argonne's combined data indicate no significant downgradient extension of contamination since 2000. At present, the sampling is annual, as approved by the KDHE (2009) in response to a plan developed for the CCC/USDA (Argonne 2009). This document presents a plan for collecting indoor air samples in homes located along and adjacent to the defined extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination. The plan was requested by the KDHE. Ambient air samples to represent the conditions along this pathway will also be taken. The purpose of the proposed work is to satisfy KDHE requirements and to collect additional data for assessing the risk to human health due to the potential upward migration of carbon tetrachloride and its primary degradation product (chloroform) into homes located in close proximity to the former grain storage facility, as well as along and within 100 ft laterally from the currently defined plume emanating from the former Everest facility. Investigation of the indoor air

  1. Aerospace Manufacturing and Rework Facilities: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find regulatory information regarding the NESHAP for Aerospace manufacturing and rework facilities. This page contains the rule summary, rule history, and related rules and additional resources for this standard.

  2. Ethylene Oxide Emissions Standards for Sterilization Facilities: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the NESHAP for ethylene oxide emissions for sterilization facilities. Find the rule history information, federal register citations, legal authority, and related rules as well as a rule summary.

  3. Cold Vacuum Drying facility heating, ventilation, and Air Conditioning system design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SINGH, G.

    2000-01-01

    This System Design Description (SDD) addresses the HVAC system for the CVDF. The CVDF HVAC system consists of five subsystems: (1) Administration building HVAC system; (2) Process bay recirculation HVAC system; (3) Process bay local exhaust HVAC and process vent system; (4) Process general supply/exhaust HVAC system; and (5) Reference air system. The HVAC and reference air systems interface with the following systems: the fire protection control system, Monitoring and Control System (MCS), electrical power distribution system (including standby power), compressed air system, Chilled Water (CHW) system, drainage system, and other Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) control systems not addressed in this SDD

  4. Use of information systems in Air Force medical treatment facilities in strategic planning and decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Glenn A; Platonova, Elena A; Musa, Philip F

    2006-02-01

    An exploratory study used Ansoff's strategic planning model as a framework to assess perceived effectiveness of information systems in supporting strategic business plan development at Air Force medical treatment facilities (MTFs). Results showed information systems were most effective in supporting historical trend analysis, strategic business plans appeared to be a balance of operational and strategic plans, and facilities perceived a greater need for new clinical, vice administrative, information systems to support strategic planning processes. Administrators believed information systems should not be developed at the local level and perceived information systems have the greatest impact on improving clinical quality outcomes, followed by ability to deliver cost effective care and finally, ability to increase market share.

  5. Environmental Assessment for Proposed Security Forces Operations Facility, Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meyer, Elizabeth; Myklebust, Jessica; Denier, James; Christner, Jennifer; Fontaine, Kathyrn

    2006-01-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) has prepared this EA in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act to evaluate the potential environmental and social impacts from the construction and operation of the proposed SFOF...

  6. CAPSULE REPORT: SOURCES AND AIR EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES AT WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemicals processed during waste management operations can volatilize into the atmosphere and cause carcinogenic or other toxic effects or contribute to ozone formation. Regulations have been developed to control air emissions from these operations. The EPA has promulgated st...

  7. Design Evaluation of Thermal-hydraulic Test Facility for a Finned-tube Sodium-to-Air Heat Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyungmo; Kim, Byeong-Yeon; Ko, Yung Joo; Cho, Youngil; Kim, Jong-Man; Son, Seok-Kwon; Jo, Youngchul; Kang, Byeong Su; Jung, Minhwan; Eoh, Jaehyuk; Lee, Hyeong-Yeon; Jeong, Ji-Young [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This paper introduces the recent progress of overall design phase for the SELFA facility and deals with basic thermal-hydraulic design parameters and its design validation as well. For more reliable design of the safety-grade decay heat removal system (DHRS) in PGSFR (Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor), two kinds of sodium-to-air heat exchangers have been employed in the system as an ultimate heat sink. One is a natural draft sodium-to-air heat exchanger (AHX) with helically-coiled sodium tubes, and the other is a forced draft sodium-to-air heat exchanger (FHX) with finned tubes with a straight-type arranged. Since the FHX is normally operated in an active mode with a forced air draft conditions, its performance should be verified for any anticipated operating conditions. To validate the test section design, evaluations of both thermal-hydraulic and mechanical design have been carried out, and some new concepts or devices were newly employed to replicate the prototypic conditions as closely as possible.

  8. Design for an MHD power plant as a prime mover for a Naval Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paluszek, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    A Magnetohydrodynamic Power Plant, designed to be the prime mover for a Naval Vessel, is presented. The system is an open cycle, fossil fueled, subsonic MHD Faraday generator with directly fired air preheaters. A superconducting electric transmission drives the propellers and a standard naval steam plant is used as a bottoming cycle. The increased overall efficiency achievable with this plant allows a lighter, smaller volume ship to accommodate the same payload and reduces the overall fuel cost of the vessel

  9. Air pollutant emissions and their control with the focus on waste incineration facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeschau, Margit [Wandschneider + Gutjahr, Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-07-01

    This text and practical handbook thoroughly presents the control of air pollutant emissions from combustion processes focusing on waste incinerators. Special characteristics are emphasised and the differences to emission control from combustion processes with other fuels are explained. The author illustrates the origin and effects of air pollutants from incineration processes, the mechanics of their appearance in the incineration process, primary and secondary measures for their reduction, processes of measuring the emissions as well as the methods of disposing the residues. In particular, the pros and cons of procedural steps and their appropriate combination under various conditions are emphasised. Moreover, the book contains information and analyses of the emissions situation, the consumption of operating materials and of backlog quantities as well as of the cost structure of waste incinerators with regard to their applied control system. Furthermore, the author explicates the contemporary legal, scientific and technological developments and their influence on air pollutant emission control. An evaluation of the status quo of air pollutant control at waste incinerators in Germany, practical examples about possible combinations and typical performance data complete the content. Accordingly, this book is a guideline for planing a reasonable overall concept of an air pollutant control that takes the location and the segregation tasks into consideration.

  10. Keeping the Edge. Air Force Materiel Command Cold War Context (1945-1991). Volume 2: Installations and Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Acronyms Azon B BART BDR BEEF BEET BEMI-AA BGM BLC BMEWS BMW Bomarc BRAC BRL BUIC BW C C-4 C4I CA CAA CANEL CAT CBS CDS CEBMCO...adaptation of the Naval Hospital in Corona , California. The board’s decision implied that General Armstrong still leaned toward the Naval research hospital...parallel to ones found at the Army’s Fort Detrick in Maryland and at the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta. The segregated area contained a virus and

  11. Renewable Energy and Storage Implementation in Naval Station Pearl Harbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    can also be powered by liquefied petroleum gas, sour gas, manufactured gas, industrial waste gas, and biogas . Microturbines are comprised of a...Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Pacific, 2015) 32 1. PV Generation Model PV generation estimates were obtained utilizing the National...Honolulu International Airport Typical Meteorological Year 3 (TMY3) weather file obtained within the SAM software database. The NREL TMY3 User Manual

  12. Users view of the reliability of air cleaning systems in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovach, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    The state of the art of air cleaning systems has advanced, but a wealth of knowledge did not result in a commensurate increase in the improvement of the design, manufacture, and operation of air cleaning systems. Often the developed data is not available or known to the designer, equipment supplier or operator. There are still systems installed where the equipment will operate under the specified criteria only when it is new and little thought is given to the subsequent maintainance and operating problems. The dissemination of available information to all of those concerned with the design, construction, installation, and operation of air cleaning systems through relevant standards, guides, etc. is unsatisfactory at the present time. (U.S.)

  13. Evaluation of the air quality in pig housing facilities equipped with a liquid-solid separation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoie, J.; Beaudet, Y.; Letourneau, C.; Godbout, S.; Lemay, S.; Belzile, M.; Lachance, I.; Pouliot, F.

    2006-01-01

    A new regulation regarding agricultural operations in Quebec was passed in June 2002. It stated the new standards for managing phosphorous generated from animal livestock. The regulation is intended to protect the environment, more specifically, water, soil and air quality. This new regulation stipulates that agricultural producers acquire a balanced phosphorous assessment by 2010. In order to achieve this, a system is needed to separate solid and liquid pig manure on a daily basis. Producers must also comply with environmental requirements on odour elimination and atmospheric control. The proposed solid-liquid separation system would improve the indoor and outdoor air quality at pig housing facilities by reducing toxic gas and bioaerosol formation. In addition, it would contribute to stream purification. The solid-liquid separation technique was successfully tested in a pilot project at a mini pig housing facility. It was concluded that type of separation equipment system could readily used for other types of animal farming, such as cattle raising. 41 refs., 13 tabs., 12 figs

  14. Methods of Dust Air Flows Reduction at Ore Transfer Facilities of Mining and Processing Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulmira K. Saparova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the most typical schemes of ore stationary transfers. Aspirate units, depending on dust intensity are divided into three groups. Typical schemes of stationary transfers were presented. On the ground of the research, the classification of ore transfer facilities types at mining and processing plants was offered

  15. Analysis of Naval Ammunition Stock Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    not manipulated to be in favor of any system based on the assumption that stock positioned closer to demand would result in more favorable delivery...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT ANALYSIS OF NAVAL AMMUNITION STOCK POSITIONING...professional report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ANALYSIS OF NAVAL AMMUNITION STOCK POSITIONING 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) David Sharp and Eric

  16. A Calibration Facility for Dew Point in Air up to 1 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, P. A.; Bell, S. A.; Stevens, M.

    2015-12-01

    The provision of primary dew-point standards for humidified air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure is well established, and measurement traceability to these standards provides confidence in a vast number of air humidity measurements. However, hygrometers are used industrially at a wide range of pressures. Both the performance of hygrometers and the properties of humid gases are known to vary with gas pressure. The pressure-dependence of gas non-ideality for air-water mixtures (water-vapor enhancement factor) is well enough known at moderate pressures, but there remains a need to characterize hygrometers at the pressure of use. To address this, a humidity calibration capability of wider scope is under development at the UK National Physical Laboratory (NPL). As an initial stage in the development of this capability, a humidity standard generating air or nitrogen in the dew-point range from -60° C to +10° C, at pressures up to 1 MPa (10 bar) has been validated for the calibration of hygrometers. The expanded uncertainty of the dew-point generator in this range with a coverage factor k= 2 is ± 0.07° C.

  17. 32 CFR 901.12 - Honor military and honor Naval schools-AFROTC and AFJROTC category.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for nomination in this category applies to the administrative authority of the school involved. (b... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Honor military and honor Naval schools-AFROTC...) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY TRAINING AND SCHOOLS APPOINTMENT TO THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ACADEMY...

  18. Radioactive Air Emmission Notice of Construction (NOC) for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MENARD, N.M.

    2000-12-01

    This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC) pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to modify pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07 for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility. The rewrite of this NOC incorporates all the approved revisions (Sections 5.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 9.0), a revised potential to emit (PTE) based on the revised maximally exposed individual (MEI) (Sections 8.0, 10.0, 11.0, 12.0, 13.0, 14.0, and 15.0), the results of a study on fugitive emissions (Sections 6.0, 10.0, and 15.0), and reflects the current operating conditions at the WRAP Facility (Section 5.0). This NOC replaces DOE/RL-93-15 and DOE/RL-93-16 in their entirety. The primary function of the WRAP Facility is to examine, assay, characterize, treat, verify, and repackage radioactive material and mixed waste. There are two sources of emissions from the WRAP Facility: stack emissions and fugitive emissions. The stack emissions have an unabated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) estimate to the hypothetical offsite MEI of 1.13 E+02 millirem per year. The abated TEDE for the stack emissions is estimated at 5.63 E-02 millirem per year to the MEI. The fugitive emissions have an unabated TEDE estimate to the hypothetical offsite MEI of 5.87 E-04. There is no abatement for the fugitive emissions.

  19. Radioactive Air Emmission Notice of Construction (NOC) Application for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MENARD, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC) pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to modify pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07 for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility. The rewrite of this NOC incorporates all the approved revisions (Sections 5.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 9.0), a revised potential to emit (PTE) based on the revised maximally exposed individual (MEI) (Sections 8.0, 10.0, 11.0, 12.0, 13.0, 14.0, and 15.0), the results of a study on fugitive emissions (Sections 6.0, 10.0, and 15.0), and reflects the current operating conditions at the WRAP Facility (Section 5.0). This NOC replaces DOE/RL-93-15 and DOE/RL-93-16 in their entirety. The primary function of the WRAP Facility is to examine, assay, characterize, treat, verify, and repackage radioactive material and mixed waste. There are two sources of emissions from the WRAP Facility: stack emissions and fugitive emissions. The stack emissions have an unabated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) estimate to the hypothetical offsite MEI of 1.13 E+02 millirem per year. The abated TEDE for the stack emissions is estimated at 5.63 E-02 millirem per year to the MEI. The fugitive emissions have an unabated TEDE estimate to the hypothetical offsite MEI of 5.87 E-04. There is no abatement for the fugitive emissions

  20. Environmental Assessment for the Indoor Training Facility, U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Cadet Area. Aluminum would be 35 used on all columns , beam cladding, and window frame trim to provide a visual connection 36 FINAL EA – USAFA INDOOR...and intramural sports played at the Academy. 17 The facility exterior would be white precast concrete, blue polycarbonate, aluminum and 18 glass. The...present there provide a high degree of connectivity between habitat types and 11 maintain migration corridors. Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), elk

  1. Clearing the air : with 87 recommendations now implemented for reducing sulphur emissions from conventional facilities, clean air strategists in Alberta are setting their sights on the oilsands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collison, M.

    2008-11-15

    Clean air strategists in Alberta are now preparing to implement recommendations for reducing sulfur emissions in oil sands facilities. The oil and gas industry in Alberta has made significant reductions in emissions over the last few decades. Sulfur emissions at acid gas flaring plants have decreased by 73 per cent, and emissions from sulfur recovery plants have decreased by 40 per cent. Complaints about emissions have also dropped as industry regulations and practices have been refined and improved. The impacts of sour gas on human and animal health have not been proven despite the fact that many Alberta residents claim that the emissions have harmed their health. An independent public safety sour gas advisory committee was formed in the province in 1999 in order to identify and communicate with major stakeholder groups in the province. Recommendations made by the committee after consultation with public stakeholders included more direct involvement with disputes over sour gas. In 2007, the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) toughened sour gas regulations and assisted in researching the health effects of sour gas exposure. Regulations for the inspection and testing of sour gas pipelines were also implemented. It was concluded that maintaining and improving air quality in Alberta will require comprehensive strategies that involve governments, industry, and individual stakeholders. 2 figs.

  2. Facility Reliability and Maintainability: An Investigation of the Air Force Civil Engineering Recurring Work Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    18:2). A recent survey by the Strategic Air Command (SAC) Mechanical Fquipment Management Evaluation Team ( MEMET ) determined that equipment was...identified by MEMET included Maintenance Action Sheets (MAS) that reported work which was not completed, and other MAS which annotated recurring work...readily apparent. Problem Military. The Deputy Chief of Staff for Engineering and Services, HQ SAC, established the MEMET in 1984 in response to a

  3. Air quality in swine growing and finishing facilities with different building typologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Cecchin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the concentration of gases in three swine growing and finishing facilities with different building typologies, regarding floor and dividers. The experiment compared three treatments: pen with water depth, pen with partially slotted floor on the sides, and pen with partially slotted floor on sides and in the center. Measurements of instantaneous concentrations of ammonia (NH3 ppm and carbon dioxide (CO2 ppm were taken at animal level. The levels of sound pressure (dB at animal level and at 1.50 m from the floor were also recorded. It was observed that the pen with water depth was the one with the highest average concentration of NH3. Although there was a significant difference in CO2 concentrations, the observed values are within the limits allowed by the Brazilian standards; thus, it is assumed that the facilities do not cause discomfort in relation to CO2 levels. The pen with water depth possibly caused discomfort to the animals, since the NH3 concentration was above the values that can cause problems to the animals, according to the recommendation of the literature. There was no influence of the type of pen on the sound pressure at any time.

  4. Routine organic air emissions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facilities fiscal year 1995 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galloway, K.J.; Jolley, J.G.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents the data and results of the routine organic air emissions monitoring performed in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facility, WMF-628, from January 4, 1995 to September 3, 1995. The task objectives were to systematically identify and measure volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations within WMF-628 that could be emitted into the environment. These routine measurements implemented a dual method approach using Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) monitoring and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical method TO-14, Summa reg-sign Canister sampling. The data collected from the routine monitoring of WNF-628 will assist in estimating the total VOC emissions from WMF-628

  5. The Challenges of Field Testing the Traffic Management Advisor (TMA) in an Operational Air Traffic Control Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Ty; Swenson, Harry N.

    1997-01-01

    The Traffic Management Advisor (TMA), the sequence and schedule tool of the Center/TRACON Automation System (CTAS), was evaluated at the Fort Worth Center (ZFW) in the summer of 1996. This paper describes the challenges encountered during the various phases of the TMA field evaluation, which included system (hardware and software) installation, personnel training, and data collection. Operational procedures were developed and applied to the evaluation process that would ensure air safety. The five weeks of field evaluation imposed minimal impact on the hosting facility and provided valuable engineering and human factors data. The collection of data was very much an opportunistic affair, due to dynamic traffic conditions. One measure of the success of the TMA evaluation is that, rather than remove TMA after the evaluation until it could be fully implemented, the prototype TMA is in continual use at ZFW as the fully operational version is readied for implementation.

  6. Determination of the radioiodine species in the exhaust air of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birke, G.; Deuber, H.

    1977-01-01

    In the stack exhaust air of the nuclear power stations the portion of inorganic 131 I was, apart from 2 sampling periods, less than 50%. In the stack exhaust air of the research reactor the inorganic 131 I prevailed. The removal efficiency of the I 2 sorption materials DSM 11 and DSM 17 for 131 I in the form of CH 3 I and C 6 H 5 I was very low. 131 I in the form of C 6 H 5 I was removed by AC 6120 and LMS 13 X-Ag (Linde molecular sieve in the Ag form) to a very small extent too, by activated charcoal impregnated with KI or TEDA however to a very high extent. In the experiments concerning the preparation and removal of 131 I in the form of HIO an iodine species that was difficult to remove with AC 6120 was found which could be HIO. Its maximum portion in the carrier gas was 50%. (orig./RW) [de

  7. A guide for determining compliance with the Clean Air Act Standards for radionuclide emissions from NRC-licensed and non-DOE federal facilities (Rev. 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-10-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued standards under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act of February 6, 1985 that limit airborne emissions of radionuclides to the atmosphere. In February 1989 these standards were re proposed , and in November 1989 final standards may be promulgated. This document provides guidance for determining compliance with one of the National Emissions for Hazardous Air Pollutants covering facilities that are licensed by NRC, and federal facilities not operated by the DOE, that could emit radionuclides to the ai00.

  8. The Foulness multi-ton air blast simulator. Part 2. Recent developments - the linear charge driven facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clare, P.M.

    1978-02-01

    The gun-driven facility for simulating nuclear air blast has been described in Part 1 (AWRE Report 031/74). It was, however, subject to certain limitations in providing the requisite blast parameters for nuclear hardening. The efficiency of the simulator has been improved beyond that of the gun-driven facility to produce blast waves of higher peak overpressure, longer positive duration and greater equivalent yield. This has been done by firing in the 1.8 m (6 ft) diameter section of the tunnel instead of in the guns. Various line charge arrangements were investigated and the pressures and strains developed in the 1.8 m (6 ft) diameter section were measured. The shock loading on the tube walls was less than that produced by firing in the guns and consisted of a short duration shock decaying to a lower amplitude pressure pulse of longer duration (1 ms), followed by a few reflected shocks which the tube walls were well able to withstand. The equipment is described and results discussed. (author)

  9. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Facility Registry Service (FRS) provides an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities across EPA,...

  10. Air water loop - an experimental facility to study thermal hydraulics of AHWR steam drum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagul, R.K.; Pilkhwal, D.S.; Jain, V.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2014-05-01

    In the proposed Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) the coolant recirculation in the primary system is achieved by two-phase natural circulation. The two-phase steam-water mixture from the reactor core is separated in steam drum by gravity. Gravity separation of phases may lead to undesirable phenomena - carryover and carryunder. Carryover is the entrainment of liquid droplets in the vapor phase.Carryover needs to be minimized to avoid erosion corrosion of turbine blades. Carryunder is the entrainment of vapor bubbles with liquid flowing back to reactor core. Significant carryunder may in turn lead to reduced flow resulting in reduced CHF margin and stability in the coolant channel. An Air-Water Loop (AWL) has been designed to carry out the experiments relevant to AHWR steam drum. The design features and scaling philosophy is described in this report. (author)

  11. Marine Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment for Domestic Army, Air Force, and Coast Guard Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robichaud, Robi J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ingram, Michael [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-04-24

    NREL/DOE undertook a study for the US Army, Coast Guard and Air Force to investigate the potential for marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices to meet the energy load at coastal bases in the future as MHK technology evolves. A wide range of data from tidal and wave, environmental, shipping, etc. databases were used to screen the DOD bases. A series of scoring algorithms were developed to facilitate site review to lead to eventual down select for more detailed, site specific bathymetric tidal resource evaluation. The Army's Camp Edwards, MA and the Coast Guard's Training Center Cape May, NJ (TRACEN Cape May) were selected and the Georgia Institute of Technology performed the analyses. An NREL/DOE MHK team visited the bases to further discuss with the base personnel MHK technology's potential for providing power to the bases in the future and frame the potential impact to existing power systems.

  12. Preliminary Assessment of Potential Avian Interactions at Four Proposed Wind Energy Facilities on Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-08-01

    The United States Air Force (USAF) is investigating whether to install wind turbines to provide a supplemental source of electricity at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) near Lompoc, California. As part of that investigation, VAFB sought assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to provide a preliminary characterization of the potential risk to wildlife resources (mainly birds and bats) from wind turbine installations. With wind power development expanding throughout North America and Europe, concerns have surfaced over the number of bird fatalities associated with wind turbines. Guidelines developed for the wind industry by the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC) recommend assessing potential impacts to birds, bats, and other potentially sensitive resources before construction. The primary purpose of an assessment is to identify potential conflicts with sensitive resources, to assist developers with identifying their permitting needs, and to develop strategies to avoid impacts or to mitigate their effects. This report provides a preliminary (Phase I) biological assessment of potential impacts to birds and bats that might result from construction and operation of the proposed wind energy facilities on VAFB.

  13. Understanding Soviet Naval Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    submarine noise reduction technology. A single-unit experimental, deep diving SSN. SSBN in a process that converted the unit to dubbed the MIKE class, was...is second only to that of Ja- ties. When the Soviet MIKE SSN suffered a pan in total catch tonnage each year. fire in the Norwegian Sea in April of... sharpl \\ tapered nose providing better o~er-the-nose visibil- ity: this change ’. as miade possible by the absence of’ the MIiG-23’s air intercept radar

  14. Industrial Processes to Reduce Generation of Hazardous Waste at DoD Facilities. Phase III Report. Appendix B. Workshop Manual Innovative Hard Chrome Plating, Pensacola Naval Air Rework Facility, Pensacola, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    recovery, regional hazardous waste treatment, hazardous waste storage construction criteria, environmental audits, and low-level radioactive waste...Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, May 1983. Campbell, M. and W.M. Glenn. Profit from Polution Prevention, A Guide to Industrial Waste Reduction and...otherwise managed. For the purposes of this memorandum, hazardous materials do not include those radioactive materials that the Nuclear Regulatory

  15. Design Report for the ½ Scale Air-Cooled RCCS Tests in the Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisowski, D. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Farmer, M. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lomperski, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kilsdonk, D. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bremer, N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Aeschlimann, R. W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) is a large scale thermal hydraulics test facility that has been built at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The facility was constructed in order to carry out highly instrumented experiments that can be used to validate the performance of passive safety systems for advanced reactor designs. The facility has principally been designed for testing of Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) concepts that rely on natural convection cooling for either air or water-based systems. Standing 25-m in height, the facility is able to supply up to 220 kW at 21 kW/m2 to accurately simulate the heat fluxes at the walls of a reactor pressure vessel. A suite of nearly 400 data acquisition channels, including a sophisticated fiber optic system for high density temperature measurements, guides test operations and provides data to support scaling analysis and modeling efforts. Measurements of system mass flow rate, air and surface temperatures, heat flux, humidity, and pressure differentials, among others; are part of this total generated data set. The following report provides an introduction to the top level-objectives of the program related to passively safe decay heat removal, a detailed description of the engineering specifications, design features, and dimensions of the test facility at Argonne. Specifications of the sensors and their placement on the test facility will be provided, along with a complete channel listing of the data acquisition system.

  16. 76 FR 45235 - Meeting of the Board of Advisors to the Presidents of the Naval Postgraduate School and the Naval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... the Naval Postgraduate School and the Naval War College AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION...) to the Presidents of the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) and the Naval War College (NWC) and its... elicit the advice of the Board on the Naval Service's Postgraduate Education Program and the...

  17. 75 FR 53958 - Meeting of the Board of Advisors to the Presidents of the Naval Postgraduate School and the Naval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    ... the Naval Postgraduate School and the Naval War College AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION... of Advisors (BOA) to the Presidents of the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) and the Naval War College... elicit the advice of the Board on the Naval Service's Postgraduate Education Program and the...

  18. Dose factors to calculate the radiation exposure due to radioactive waste air from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenk, H.D.; Vogt, K.J.

    1977-01-01

    An evaluation of the environmental impact of nuclear plants according to paragraph 45 of the Radiation Protection Directive of the Federal Republic of Germany requires the calculation of dose conversion factors indicating the correlation between the contaminated medium and individual radiation exposure. The present study is to be conceived as a contribution to discussion on this subject. For the determination of radiation exposure caused by the waste air of nuclear plants, models are being specified for computing the dose conversion factors for the external exposure pathways of β-submersion, γ-submersion and γ-radiation from contaminated ground as well as the internal exposure pathways of inhalation and ingestion, which further elaborate and improve the models previously applied, especially as far as the ingestion pathway is concerned, which distinguishes between 6 major food categories. The computer models are applied to those radionuclides which are significan for nuclear emitters, in particular nuclear light-water power stations. The results obtained for the individual exposure pathways and affected organs are specified in the form of tables. For this purpose, calculations were first of all carried out for the so-called 'reference man'. The results can be transferred to population groups with different consumption habits (e.g. vegetarians) by the application of correction factors. The models are capable of being extended with a view to covering other age groups. (orig.) [de

  19. Facile SILAR approach to air-stable naked silver and gold nanoparticles supported by alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamplecoskie, Kevin G; Manser, Joseph S

    2014-10-22

    A synthetically convenient and scalable SILAR (successive ion layer adsorption and reaction) method is used to make air-stable films of silver and gold nanoparticles supported on alumina scaffolds. This solution-based deposition technique yields particles devoid of insulating capping agents or ligands. The optical properties of the nanoparticle films were investigated using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. A linear absorption arising from intraband excitation (775 nm laser pulse) is seen only for Au nanoparticles at low intensity. However, both Au and Ag particles exhibit plasmon resonance responses at high excitation intensity via two photon absorption of the 775 nm pump pulse. The difference in optical response to near-IR laser excitation is rationalized based on the known density of states for each metal. To demonstrate the potential applications of these films, alumina-supported Ag nanoparticles were utilized as substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, resulting in a 65-fold enhancement in the Raman signal of the probe molecule rhodamine 6G. The exceptional stability and scalability of these SILAR films opens the door for further optical and photocatalytic studies and applications, particularly with ligand-free Ag nanoparticles that typically oxidize under ambient conditions. Additionally, isolating plasmonic and interband electronic excitations in stable AgNP under visible light irradiation could enable elucidation of the mechanisms that drive noble metal-assisted photocatalytic processes.

  20. Air Force Research Laboratory Spacecraft Cryocooler Endurance Evaluation Facility Closing Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J.; Martin, K. W.; Fraser, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Spacecraft Component Thermal Research Group has been devoted to evaluating lifetime performance of space cryocooler technology for over twenty years. Long-life data is essential for confirming design lifetimes for space cryocoolers. Continuous operation in a simulated space environment is the only accepted method to test for degradation. AFRL has provided raw data and detailed evaluations to cryocooler developers for advancing the technology, correcting discovered deficiencies, and improving cryocooler designs. At AFRL, units of varying design and refrigeration cycles were instrumented in state-of-the-art experiment stands to provide spacelike conditions and were equipped with software data acquisition to track critical cryocooler operating parameters. This data allowed an assessment of the technology's ability to meet the desired lifetime and documented any long-term changes in performance. This paper will outline a final report of the various flight cryocoolers tested in our laboratory. The data summarized includes the seven cryocoolers tested during 2014-2015. These seven coolers have a combined total of 433,326 hours (49.5 years) of operation.

  1. Air Pathway Dose Modeling for the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, K. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Minter, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2017-09-06

    Dose-release factors (DRFs) were calculated for potential atmospheric releases of several radionuclides from the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF). The ELLWF receives solid low-level radioactive waste from across the Savannah River Site (SRS) and offsite for disposal. These factors represent the maximum dose a receptor would receive if standing at either 100 m or 11,410 m (Site Boundary) from the edge of an ELLWF disposal unit which are points of assessment (POA) for Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 performance assessments (PA). The DRFs were calculated for 1 Ci of the specified radionuclide being released from the ground surface to the atmosphere (mrem per curie released). The calculation conservatively represented the ELLWF as a point source, and conservatively assumed the receptor was positioned at the center of the contaminant plume and continuously exposed for a period of one year. These DRFs can be refined to take into consideration disposal unit size, proximity and timing of peak dose to establish less conservative radionuclide specific disposal limits. DRFs were calculated for H-3 and C-14 in Revision 0 of this report. H-3 as HTO and C-14 as CO2 were identified as volatile radionuclides of potential concern in earlier radionuclide screening studies. In Revision 1, DRFs were calculated for eight additional radionuclides identified by an updated screening analysis as potentially important volatile radionuclides. These include Ar-37, Ar-39, Ar-42, Hg-194, Hg- 203, Kr-81, Kr-85, and Xe-127.

  2. Evaluation of the Induced Activity in Air by the External Proton Beam in the Target Room of the Proton Accelerator Facility of Proton Engineering Frontier Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Woo; Lee, Young Ouk; Cho, Young Sik; Ahn, So Hyun

    2007-01-01

    One of the radiological concerns is the worker's exposure level and the concentration of the radionuclides in the air after shutdown, for the safety analysis on the proton accelerator facility. Although, the primary radiation source is the protons accelerated up to design value, all of the radio-nuclide is produced from the secondary neutron and photon induced reaction in air. Because, the protons don't penetrate the acceleration equipment like the DTL tank wall or BTL wall, secondary neutrons or photons are only in the air in the accelerator tunnel building because of the short range of the proton in the materials. But, for the case of the target rooms, external proton beams are occasionally used in the various experiments. When these external proton beams travel through air from the end of the beam transport line to the target, they interact directly with air and produce activation products from the proton induced reaction. The external proton beam will be used in the target rooms in the accelerator facility of the Proton Accelerator Frontier Project (PEFP). In this study, interaction characteristics of the external proton beam with air and induced activity in air from the direct interaction of the proton beam were evaluated

  3. Chemical Risk Evaluation: A Case Study in an Automotive Air Conditioner Production Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengku Hanidza T.I.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been limited knowledge on worker’s exposure to chemicals used in the automotive industries. The purpose of this study is to assess chemical risk and to determine the adequacy of the existing control measures to reduce chemical exposure. A cross sectional survey was conducted in a factory involving installation and servicing of automotive air conditioner units. Qualitative exposure assessment was carried out following the Malaysian Chemical Health Risk Assessment Manual (CHRA. There were 180 employees, 156 workers worked in the production line, which constitutes six work units Tube fin pressed, Brazing, Welding, Final assembly, Piping and Kit II. From the chemical risk evaluation for each work unit, 26 chemical compounds were used. Most of the chemicals were irritants (eye and skin and some were asphyxiants and sensitizers. Based on the work assignment, 93 out of 180 (51.67% of the workers were exposed to chemicals. The highest numbers of workers exposed to chemicals were from the Brazing section (22.22% while the Final Assembly section was the lowest (1.67%. Health survey among the workers showed occurrence of eye irritation, skin irritation, and respiratory irritation, symptoms usually associated with chemical exposure. Using a risk rating matrix, several work process were identified as having ‘significant risk’. For these areas, the workers are at risk of adverse health effects since chemical exposure is not adequately controlled. This study recommends corrective actions be taken in order to control the level of exposure and to provide a safe work environment for workers.

  4. Measurements and calculations of air activation in the NuMI neutrino production facility at Fermilab with the 120-GeV proton beam on target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhno, I. L.; Hylen, J.; Kasper, P.; Mokhov, N. V.; Quinn, M.; Striganov, S. I.; Vaziri, K.

    2018-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of the air activation at a high-energy proton accelerator are described. The quantity of radionuclides released outdoors depends on operation scenarios including details of the air exchange inside the facility. To improve the prediction of the air activation levels, the MARS15 Monte Carlo code radionuclide production model was modified to be used for these studies. Measurements were done to benchmark the new model and verify its use in optimization studies for the new DUNE experiment at the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) at Fermilab. The measured production rates for the most important radionuclides – 11C, 13N, 15O and 41Ar – are in a good agreement with those calculated with the improved MARS15 code.

  5. Measurements and calculations of air activation in the NuMI neutrino production facility at Fermilab with the 120-GeV proton beam on target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhno, I. L.; Hylen, J.; Kasper, P.; Mokhov, N. V.; Quinn, M.; Striganov, S. I.; Vaziri, K.

    2018-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of the air activation at a high-energy proton accelerator are described. The quantity of radionuclides released outdoors depends on operation scenarios including details of the air exchange inside the facility. To improve the prediction of the air activation levels, the MARS15 Monte Carlo code radionuclide production model was modified to be used for these studies. Measurements were done to benchmark the new model and verify its use in optimization studies for the new DUNE experiment at the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) at Fermilab. The measured production rates for the most important radionuclides - 11C, 13N, 15O and 41Ar - are in a good agreement with those calculated with the improved MARS15 code.

  6. Environmental Assessment for the Construction and Operation of a Battalion Headquarters for the U.S. Army Priority Air Transport at Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, Prince George’s County, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    parcels. The utility components discussed in this section are water supply, sanitary sewer and wastewater system , storm water drainage , electricity...evaluate technologies and features such as green or reflective roofs; rainwater harvesting; alternative HVAC systems ; and alternative lighting...and draft FONSI was available for review at the Upper Marlboro Branch Library of the Prince George’s County Memorial Library System at 14730 Main

  7. An alpha particle detector based on a GPS mosaic scintillator plate for continuous air monitoring in plutonium handling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Junichi H.; Izaki, Kenji; Toui, Kouhei; Shimaoka, Takehiro; Morishita, Yuki; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    An alpha particle detector was developed for continuous air monitoring of radioactive contamination in working chambers at plutonium handling facilities. A 5-cm-square Gd 2 Si 2 O 7 :Ce (cerium-doped gadolinium pyro-silicate, GPS:Ce) mosaic scintillator plate for alpha particle measurements was fabricated from GPS single-crystal grains of around 550 μm diameter; the GPS grains were made of a GPS polycrystalline body grown using a top seeded solution method. The scintillator layer thickness was approximately 100 μm. The surface filling rate of the GPS grains was ca. 62%. To suppress the influence of non-uniformity of pulse heights of a photomultiplier tube, a central part of ∅ 40 mm of a 76-mm-diameter photomultiplier tube was used. In addition, 3 mm thick high-transmission glass was used as a substrate of the scintillator plate. The detector achieved energy resolution of 13% for 5.5 MeV alpha particles, detection efficiency of 61% and a radon progeny nuclide reduction ratio of 64.5%. A new alpha particle detector was developed to achieve a high radon progeny nuclide reduction ratio approaching that of a silicon semiconductor detector, with high resistance to electromagnetic noise and corrosion. - Highlights: • An alpha particle detector was developed for continuous air monitoring. • The detector comprises a mosaic scintillator plate and a photomultiplier tube. • A 5-cm-square GPS mosaic scintillator plate was fabricated. • Its respective energy resolution and detection efficiency were 13 and 61%. • The radon progeny nuclide reduction ratio of the developed detector was 64.5%.

  8. Naval Postgraduate School Research. Volume 13, Number 3, October 2003

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2003-01-01

    NPS Research contains articles on the Naval Postgraduate School, naval research, academic source network, information operations planning, joint task forces, planning and analysis laboratory at NPS...

  9. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs, Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D: Part A, Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    Volume 1 to the Department of Energy`s Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement evaluates a range of alternatives for managing naval spent nuclear fuel expected to be removed from US Navy nuclear-powered vessels and prototype reactors through the year 2035. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) considers a range of alternatives for examining and storing naval spent nuclear fuel, including alternatives that terminate examination and involve storage close to the refueling or defueling site. The EIS covers the potential environmental impacts of each alternative, as well as cost impacts and impacts to the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program mission. This Appendix covers aspects of the alternatives that involve managing naval spent nuclear fuel at four naval shipyards and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. This Appendix also covers the impacts of alternatives that involve examining naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility in Idaho and the potential impacts of constructing and operating an inspection facility at any of the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities considered in the EIS. This Appendix also considers the impacts of the alternative involving limited spent nuclear fuel examinations at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. This Appendix does not address the impacts associated with storing naval spent nuclear fuel after it has been inspected and transferred to DOE facilities. These impacts are addressed in separate appendices for each DOE site.

  10. Radiological survey of the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and Environs, Honolulu, Hawaii. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callis, R.S.

    1987-06-01

    This report presents results of the survey conducted by the Eastern Environmental Radiation Facility personnel to assess levels of environmental radioactivity resulting from maintenance and operation of nuclear-powered warships at the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard and Environs on the Hawaiian Island of Oahu

  11. Intelligent autonomy for unmanned naval systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Marc

    2006-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the development and demonstration of intelligent autonomy technologies for control of heterogeneous unmanned naval air and sea vehicles and describes some of the current limitations of such technologies. The focus is on modular technologies that support highly automated retasking and fully autonomous dynamic replanning for up to ten heterogeneous unmanned systems based on high-level mission objectives, priorities, constraints, and Rules-of-Engagement. A key aspect of the demonstrations is incorporating frequent naval operator evaluations in order to gain better understanding of the integrated man/machine system and its tactical utility. These evaluations help ensure that the automation can provide information to the user in a meaningful way and that the user has a sufficient level of control and situation awareness to task the system as needed to complete complex mission tasks. Another important aspect of the program is examination of the interactions of higher-level autonomy algorithms with other relevant components that would be needed within the decision-making and control loops. Examples of these are vision and other sensor processing algorithms, sensor fusion, obstacle avoidance, and other lower level vehicle autonomous navigation, guidance, and control functions. Initial experiments have been completed using medium and high-fidelity vehicle simulations in a virtual warfare environment and inexpensive surrogate vehicles in flight and in-water demonstrations. Simulation experiments included integration of multi-vehicle task allocation, dynamic replanning under constraints, lower level autonomous vehicle control, automatic assessment of the impact of contingencies on plans, management of situation awareness data, operator alert management, and a mixed-initiative operator interface. In-water demonstrations of a maritime situation awareness capability were completed in both a river and a harbor environment using unmanned surface

  12. Performance evaluation on air pollution reducing facilities and mechanism research on the third-party governance on environmental pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingsheng, Xu; Ling, Lin; Jin, Huang; Geng, Wang; Jianhua, Chen; Shuo, Yang; Huiting, Guo

    2017-11-01

    The paper focuses on developing the operational efficiency of air pollution reducing facilities and the treatment effect of the third-party governance on environmental pollution. Comprehensive analysis method and influence factor analysis are employed to build an evaluation index system by means of discussing major pollution control factors derived from the performance of pollution control equipment operation, environmental protection, technological economy, recourse consumption and manufacturing management. Based on the pattern of environmental pollution control offered by the third-party company, the static games model is further established between the government and the pollution emission firm by considering the whole process of the pollution abatement including investment, construction and operation of the treatment project, which focuses on establishing the policy condition and consequence by discussing the cost and benefit in a short and a long time, respectively. The research results can improve the market access requests of the pollution control equipment and normalize the environmental protection service offered by the third-party company. Moreover, the establishment of the evaluation index system for pollution control equipment and the evaluation mechanism for the third-party governance on environmental pollution has guiding significance on leading environmental protection industry and promoting market-oriented development

  13. Naval Medical Research and Development Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    the strategic planning program for action. The pros and cons of the current NMR&D organization structure, management support funding, and officer...Distribution List D-4 Naval Medical Research and Development Strategic Plan March 2008 SWE Naval Surface Warfare Enterprise SWOT Strengths

  14. 38 CFR 3.803 - Naval pension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Naval pension. 3.803 Section 3.803 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Pension, Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Special Benefits § 3.803 Naval pension. (a) Payment of...

  15. Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    During fiscal year 1992, the reserves generated $473 million in revenues, a $181 million decrease from the fiscal year 1991 revenues, primarily due to significant decreases in oil and natural gas prices. Total costs were $200 million, resulting in net cash flow of $273 million, compared with $454 million in fiscal year 1991. From 1976 through fiscal year 1992, the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves generated more than $15 billion in revenues and a net operating income after costs of $12.5 billion. In fiscal year 1992, production at the Naval Petroleum Reserves at maximum efficient rates yielded 26 million barrels of crude oil, 119 billion cubic feet of natural gas, and 164 million gallons of natural gas liquids. From April to November 1992, senior managers from the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves held a series of three workshops in Boulder, Colorado, in order to build a comprehensive Strategic Plan as required by Secretary of Energy Notice 25A-91. Other highlights are presented for the following: Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1--production achievements, crude oil shipments to the strategic petroleum reserve, horizontal drilling, shallow oil zone gas injection project, environment and safety, and vanpool program; Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2--new management and operating contractor and exploration drilling; Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3--steamflood; Naval Oil Shale Reserves--protection program; and Tiger Team environmental assessment of the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming

  16. Atmospheric dispersion modeling of hazardous air pollutant emissions from USDOE Oak Ridge Reservation Facilities. Volume 1, Independent Assessment conducted from April 1994 to December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, M.P.

    1995-01-01

    Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments addresses the emissions of 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and mandates that EPA develop technology-based [Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT)] standards for the control of these pollutants from approximately 174 source categories. After implementation of technology-based standards, EPA is required to further evaluate ''residual risk'' from HAP emissions, and, if required, develop more stringent standards to protect human health and the environment with an ''adequate margin of safety''. Recognizing that EPA will be issuing risk-based regulations after MACT standards have been implemented, the US Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) has conducted an evaluation of ambient air impacts of HAP emissions from its installations located on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This report provides results of atmospheric dispersion modeling conducted to determine ambient air impacts of HAP emissions from facilities located on the ORR

  17. 77 FR 16718 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School Training Operations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... bottlenose dolphins, by Level B harassment, incidental to Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School (NEODS... School Training Operations at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service... Harassment Authorizations (IHAs) pursuant to section 101(a)(5)(D) of the MMPA for similar specified...

  18. The Evolution of Cost/Schedule Control (Direct Labor) in Naval Shipyards

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gessis, Scott N

    1992-01-01

    The evolution of a Cost/Schedule Control System (C/SCS), for direct labor, in naval shipyards can be traced from the cost/schedule control concept used in the Air Force in the 1960s, as an initiative toward more reliable data...

  19. Naval EarthMap Observer (NEMO) science and naval products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Curtiss O.; Kappus, Mary E.; Gao, Bo-Cai; Bissett, W. Paul; Snyder, William A.

    1998-11-01

    A wide variety of applications of imaging spectrometry have been demonstrated using data from aircraft systems. Based on this experience the Navy is pursuing the Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Technology (HRST) Program to use hyperspectral imagery to characterize the littoral environment, for scientific and environmental studies and to meet Naval needs. To obtain the required space based hyperspectral imagery the Navy has joined in a partnership with industry to build and fly the Naval EarthMap Observer (NEMO). The NEMO spacecraft has the Coastal Ocean Imaging Spectrometer (COIS) a hyperspectral imager with adequate spectral and spatial resolution and a high signal-to- noise ratio to provide long term monitoring and real-time characterization of the coastal environment. It includes on- board processing for rapid data analysis and data compression, a large volume recorder, and high speed downlink to handle the required large volumes of data. This paper describes the algorithms for processing the COIS data to provide at-launch ocean data products and the research and modeling that are planned to use COIS data to advance our understanding of the dynamics of the coastal ocean.

  20. Recent Naval Postgraduate School Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    SCIENCE TECHNICAL REPORTS AND NOTES (cont’d) McCoy, E E, Carey, B J Desirable properties of a network taxonomy Naval Postgraduate School, (NPS-52-80-007...Postgraduate School, (NPS-53-81-002), Mar., 1981. Franker R H; ]ay achandran, T A slu-y o’fth properties of a new goodness-of-fit test Sponsored by Foundation...of the Psycometric Soc. Mcftaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, Aug., i§76. Weitzman 111 A Test bias: one of those partial correlations is the

  1. Recent Naval Postgraduate School Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    U.S. Army Training & Doctrine Ccmmand, Fort Monroe, Va. Naval Postgraduate School, (NPS-55-80-023), June, 1980. 42 p. Hartman, J K Grcund movement ... movement Elmsford, N.Y., Pergamon, 1980. 300 p. Amos, J W Deception and the Middle East war IN D. C. Daniel and K. L. Herbig, eds.: Strategic military...Service, (NOAA), i6 p., (1980). * Moose, P B The qradient maqnetC- telluric method at the sea floor IEE Trans. Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 19, no. 1

  2. Scaling and design analyses of a scaled-down, high-temperature test facility for experimental investigation of the initial stages of a VHTR air-ingress accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcilesi, David J.; Ham, Tae Kyu; Kim, In Hun; Sun, Xiaodong; Christensen, Richard N.; Oh, Chang H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A 1/8th geometric-scale test facility that models the VHTR hot plenum is proposed. • Geometric scaling analysis is introduced for VHTR to analyze air-ingress accident. • Design calculations are performed to show that accident phenomenology is preserved. • Some analyses include time scale, hydraulic similarity and power scaling analysis. • Test facility has been constructed and shake-down tests are currently being carried out. - Abstract: A critical event in the safety analysis of the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is an air-ingress accident. This accident is initiated, in its worst case scenario, by a double-ended guillotine break of the coaxial cross vessel, which leads to a rapid reactor vessel depressurization. In a VHTR, the reactor vessel is located within a reactor cavity that is filled with air during normal operating conditions. Following the vessel depressurization, the dominant mode of ingress of an air–helium mixture into the reactor vessel will either be molecular diffusion or density-driven stratified flow. The mode of ingress is hypothesized to depend largely on the break conditions of the cross vessel. Since the time scales of these two ingress phenomena differ by orders of magnitude, it is imperative to understand under which conditions each of these mechanisms will dominate in the air ingress process. Computer models have been developed to analyze this type of accident scenario. There are, however, limited experimental data available to understand the phenomenology of the air-ingress accident and to validate these models. Therefore, there is a need to design and construct a scaled-down experimental test facility to simulate the air-ingress accident scenarios and to collect experimental data. The current paper focuses on the analyses performed for the design and operation of a 1/8th geometric scale (by height and diameter), high-temperature test facility. A geometric scaling analysis for the VHTR, a time

  3. Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugele, B.; Scheider, J.; Spangl, W.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years several regulations and standards for air quality and limits for air pollution were issued or are in preparation by the European Union, which have severe influence on the environmental monitoring and legislation in Austria. This chapter of the environmental control report of Austria gives an overview about the legal situation of air pollution control in the European Union and in specific the legal situation in Austria. It gives a comprehensive inventory of air pollution measurements for the whole area of Austria of total suspended particulates, ozone, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, heavy metals, benzene, dioxin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and eutrophication. For each of these pollutants the measured emission values throughout Austria are given in tables and geographical charts, the environmental impact is discussed, statistical data and time series of the emission sources are given and legal regulations and measures for an effective environmental pollution control are discussed. In particular the impact of fossil-fuel power plants on the air pollution is analyzed. (a.n.)

  4. Naval Waste Package Design Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.M. Lewis

    2004-01-01

    A design methodology for the waste packages and ancillary components, viz., the emplacement pallets and drip shields, has been developed to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational requirements of the Yucca Mountain Project. This methodology is described in the ''Waste Package Design Methodology Report'' Mecham 2004 [DIRS 166168]. To demonstrate the practicability of this design methodology, four waste package design configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology. These four design configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor (PWR) Absorber Plate waste package, the 44-boiling water reactor (BWR) waste package, the 5-defense high-level waste (DHLW)/United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) Co-disposal Short waste package, and the Naval Canistered SNF Long waste package. Also included in this demonstration is the emplacement pallet and continuous drip shield. The purpose of this report is to document how that design methodology has been applied to the waste package design configurations intended to accommodate naval canistered SNF. This demonstrates that the design methodology can be applied successfully to this waste package design configuration and support the License Application for construction of the repository

  5. Analysis of recently enacted national energy legislation and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 as related to Decontamination and Decommissioning at Federal, State, and private facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report is a summary of an analysis of recently enacted national energy legislation and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 as related to Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) at Federal, State and private facilities. It is submitted pursuant to Appendix A of subcontract 9-X62-0785E-1, dated July 27, 1992, between the Regents of the University of California and Van Ness, Feldman ampersand Curtis

  6. Water spray interaction with air-steam mixtures under containment spray conditions: experimental study in the TOSQAN facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcheron, E.; Lemaitre, P.; Malet, J.; Nuboer, A.; Brun, P.; Bouilloux, L.; Vendel, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Direction de la Surete des Usines, des laboratoires, des transports et des dechets, Saclay, BP 68 - 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: During the course of an hypothetical severe accident in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), hydrogen can be produced by the reactor core oxidation and distributed into the reactor containment according to convection flows and steam wall condensation. In order to assess the risk of detonation generated by a high local hydrogen concentration, hydrogen distribution in the containment has to be known. The TOSQAN experimental program has been created to simulate typical accidental thermal hydraulic flow conditions in the reactor containment. The present work is devoted to study the interaction of a water spray injection used as a mitigation mean in order to reduce containment pressure and to produce a mixing of air, steam and hydrogen induced by spray entrainment and condensation on droplet. In order to have a better understanding of physical phenomena, we need to make a detailed characterization of the spray and the gas. The TOSQAN facility that is highly instrumented with non-intrusive diagnostics consists in a closed cylindrical vessel (7 m{sup 3} volume, 4 m high, 1.5 m i.d.) into which steam is injected. Water droplets size is measured in the vessel by the Interferometric Laser Imaging for Droplet Sizing technique. Droplet velocity is obtained by Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Doppler Velocimetry, and droplet temperature is measured by global rainbow refractometry. Gas concentration measurements are performed by Spontaneous Raman Scattering. The walls of the vessel are thermostatically controlled by heated oil circulation. Inner spray system that is located on the top of the enclosure on the vertical axis, is composed of a single nozzle producing a full cone water spray. Spray test scenario consists of water spray injection in TOSQAN that is first pressurized with a steam injection (steam injection is stopped before spray injection). Water spray falling into the sump is removed to avoid accumulation and evaporation

  7. Removal of particulate matter (PM10) by air scrubbers at livestock facilities: results of an on-farm monitoring program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melse, R.W.; Hofschreuder, P.; Ogink, N.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    Air scrubbers are commonly used for removal of ammonia and odor from exhaust air of animal houses in the Netherlands. In addition, air scrubbers remove a part of the particulate matter. In this article, the results of an on-farm monitoring are presented in which PM10 removal was monitored at 24

  8. Chemical mass balance modeling for air quality analysis near a waste-to-energy facility in a complex urban area: Program design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, R.; Watson, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an ambient monitoring and receptor modeling study to evaluate air quality impacts from a state-of-the-art municipal waste management facility in a major urban area. The Robbins Resource Recovery Facility (RRRF), located in the Chicago metropolitan area, processes municipal solid waste (MSW) to recover recyclables, process the residual waste to create refuse-derived fuel (RDF), and burns the RDF to reduce the residual waste volume and recover energy. The RRRF is cooperating with the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) and the Illinois Office of the Attorney General (OAG) to analyze air quality and facility impacts in the plant vicinity. An ambient monitoring program began one year before plant operation and will continue for five years after startup. Because the impacts of the RRRF are projected to be very low, and because the Chicago area includes a complex mix of existing industrial, commercial, and residential activity, the ambient data will be analyzed using Version 7.0 of the USEPA s Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) model to estimate the extent of the RRRF's impact on air quality in the area. The first year of pre-operational ambient data is currently under analysis. This paper describes the study design considerations, ambient monitoring program, emission data acquisition, background source data needs, and data analysis procedures developed to conduct CMB modeling in a complex industrialized area

  9. The Maintenance of Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning Systems and Indoor Air Quality in Schools: A Guide for School Facility Managers. Technical Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Arthur E.

    To help maintain good indoor air quality (IAQ) in schools, guidance for the development and implementation of an effective program for maintenance and operation of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are discussed. Frequently, a building's occupants will complain about IAQ when the temperature or humidity are at uncomfortable…

  10. 33 CFR 334.155 - Severn River, Naval Station Annapolis, Small Boat Basin, Annapolis, MD; naval restricted area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Annapolis, Small Boat Basin, Annapolis, MD; naval restricted area. 334.155 Section 334.155 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.155 Severn River, Naval Station Annapolis, Small Boat Basin, Annapolis, MD; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within the Naval Station Annapolis small boat basin and...

  11. 33 CFR 334.300 - Hampton Roads and Willoughby Bay, Norfolk Naval Base, naval restricted area, Norfolk, Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hampton Roads and Willoughby Bay, Norfolk Naval Base, naval restricted area, Norfolk, Virginia. 334.300 Section 334.300 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.300 Hampton Roads and Willoughby Bay, Norfolk Naval Base, naval restricted...

  12. Measuring Air Force Contracting Customer Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT MEASURING AIR FORCE CONTRACTING CUSTOMER SATISFACTION ...... satisfaction elements should be included in a standardized tool that measures the level of customer satisfaction for AF Contracting’s external and

  13. Technical Note: A proposal of air ventilation system design criteria for a clinical room in a heavy-ion medical facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, Oyeon

    2018-04-16

    An optimized air ventilation system design for a treatment room in Heavy-ion Medical Facility is an important issue in the aspects of nuclear safety because the activated air produced in a treatment room can directly affect the medical staff and the general public in the radiation-free area. Optimized design criteria of air ventilation system for a clinical room in 430 MeV/u carbon ion beam medical accelerator facility was performed by using a combination of MCNPX2.7.0 and CINDER'90 codes. Effective dose rate and its accumulated effective dose by inhalation and residual gamma were calculated for a normal treatment scenario (2 min irradiation for one fraction) as a function of decay time. Natural doses around the site were measured before construction and used as reference data. With no air ventilation system, the maximum effective dose rate was about 3 μSv/h (total dose of 90 mSv/y) and minimum 0.2 μSv/h (total dose of 6 mSv/y), which are over the legal limits for medical staff and for the general public. Although inhalation dose contribution was relatively small, it was considered seriously because of its long-lasting effects in the body. The integrated dose per year was 1.8 mSv/y in the radiation-free area with the 20-min rate of air ventilation system. An optimal air ventilation rate of 20 min is proposed for a clinical room, which also agrees with the best mechanical design value. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. FY1999 Meeting of The Society of Heating, Air-Conditioning and Sanitary Engineering of Japan. Air conditioning systems for various facilities; 1999 nendo gakujutsu koenkai gaiyo. Kakushu shisetsu kucho system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamoto, K. [Takenaka Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1999-12-05

    B-49 reported the outline of an artificial weather room composed of one inner room and two outer rooms, and its temperature change and temperature profiles during air conditioning. The room is scheduled to be used for evaluation of air conditioning systems, thermal performance evaluation of building materials and study on ventilation efficiency. B-50 reported the seasonal measurement results on thermal environment, and cooling and heating use patterns of living rooms and common spaces of 4 welfare homes for aged persons, and showed that room temperature difference in winter should be considered. Measurement data on facilities with floor heating were required. B-51 reported the experiment and numerical analysis results on thermal environment, draft sensation, condensation and radiation effect of patient bedrooms by using a full-scale 4-bed room model with a specific outlet developed for patient bedroom air conditioning. B-52 reported the outline of an air conditioning system for vegetable factories, and its performance evaluation result during cooling. The effect of blackout curtains and local air conditioning was reported. B-53 reported the comparison study result on air conditioning for animal breeding rooms by full-scale model experiment and numerical analysis. The line outlet + hanging wall + rack back exhaust system was most favorable from the viewpoint of temperature profile and prevention of pollutants from diffusion. (translated by NEDO)

  15. Hazardous Air Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Main menu Environmental Topics Air Bed Bugs Chemicals and Toxics Environmental Information by Location Greener Living Health Land, ... regulate toxic air pollutants, also known as air toxics, from categories of industrial facilities in two phases . About Hazardous Air Pollutants ...

  16. Environmental Assessment For the Proposed Construction of A Hazardous Materials Issue Facility and a Hazardous Wastes Storage Facility at Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    hazardous materials in accordance with the Occupational Health and Safety Administration ( OSHA ) storage standards. This facility would make the...subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia , Pakistan, or the Philippine Islands; and • Native Hawaiian and Other...regulated by the USEPA and the OSHA . The state of Colorado also has regulations pertaining to ACM abatement. Emissions of asbestos fibers into the

  17. Evaluation of the Virtual Naval Hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stoloff, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The Virtual Naval Hospital (VNH) is a digital medical library administered over the Internet by the Electronic Differential Multimedia Laboratory, University of Iowa College of Medicine in collaboration with the U.S...

  18. Demand Response at the Naval Postgraduate School

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stouffer, Dean; Wilson, Daryl

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this MBA project is to assist the Naval Postgraduate School's Public Works department to assimilate into a Demand Response program that will not only benefit the school but also the community...

  19. Software Reuse in the Naval Open Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greathouse, Carlus A

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes a web-based continuous learning module (CLM) for use in introducing members of the Department of the Navy s acquisition community to software reuse in the context of Naval Open Architecture...

  20. Naval Law Review, Volume 51, 2005

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Romero, Joseph; Belliss, Richard D; Tideswell, Tammy P; Antolin-Jenkins, Vida M; O'Neil, Kevin R; Wildhack, III, William A; McLaughlin, Rob; Gonzalez, Jason A; Sarnoski, Stephen R

    2005-01-01

    .... This issue of "Naval Law Review" contains the following articles: "Of War and Punishment: 'Time of War' In Military Jurisprudence and a Call for Congress to Define Its Meaning," by LCDR Joseph Romero, JAGC, USN...

  1. The Mental Representations Underlying Naval Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boudreau, Ginette

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study is to review relevant theories and research pertaining to the fundamental mental representations that are common to humans in general and, in particular, to naval operations...

  2. Dynamic Escape Routes for Naval Ships

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Villalonga, Francisco J

    2005-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of optimal evacuation of a naval ship. We propose the use of a dynamic escape-route system which employs a signaling system to adapt the emergency egress process to the instigating contingency...

  3. A simple method to determine Tr concentrations in the moisture of the exhaust air of nuclear facilities and in the ambient air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.W.; Schuettelkopf, H.

    1983-04-01

    In the course of nuclear power plant operation radioactive tritium is generated which is released to the environment as HTO via the exhaust air and the liquid effluents. Measurement and balancing of the tritium emissions are required in order to be able to evaluate the resulting radiation exposure of the population. For determination of the HTO emission the humidity of the measured air is absorbed at a rod shaped molecular sieve of 1/16'' mesh size. The desiccant is contacted with T-free water and the T activity concentration of the water is determined after 3 H/ 1 H isotope exchange. The rod shaped molecular sieves are suited for use under this method on account of their drying capacity largely independent of temperature and air humidity and the good handling capability. The detection limit is at 19 Bq HTO/m 3 air. The exhaust air from several 3 H-emitters of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center was monitored by this method for its HTO content and the results were compared with the values measured at existing points of measurement. The good results have been the reason for the application of such collectors in the routine T-measurement performed within the framework of exhaust air monitoring on the site of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Final Rule to Reduce Toxic Air Emissions from Asphalt Processing and Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing Facilities Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains a February 2003 fact sheet with information regarding the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Asphalt Processing and Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing.

  5. Pilot study investigating ambient air toxics emissions near a Canadian kraft pulp and paper facility in Pictou County, Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Emma; Guernsey, Judith R; Walker, Tony R; Kim, Jong Sung; Sherren, Kate; Andreou, Pantelis

    2017-09-01

    Air toxics are airborne pollutants known or suspected to cause cancer or other serious health effects, including certain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), prioritized by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). While several EPA-designated air toxics are monitored at a subset of Canadian National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) sites, Canada has no specific "air toxics" control priorities. Although pulp and paper (P&P) mills are major industrial emitters of air pollutants, few studies quantified the spectrum of air quality exposures. Moreover, most NAPS monitoring sites are in urban centers; in contrast, rural NAPS sites are sparse with few exposure risk records. The objective of this pilot study was to investigate prioritized air toxic ambient VOC concentrations using NAPS hourly emissions data from a rural Pictou, Nova Scotia Kraft P&P town to document concentration levels, and to determine whether these concentrations correlated with wind direction at the NAPS site (located southwest of the mill). Publicly accessible Environment and Climate Change Canada data (VOC concentrations [Granton NAPS ID: 31201] and local meteorological conditions [Caribou Point]) were examined using temporal (2006-2013) and spatial analytic methods. Results revealed several VOCs (1,3-butadiene, benzene, and carbon tetrachloride) routinely exceeded EPA air toxics-associated cancer risk thresholds. 1,3-Butadiene and tetrachloroethylene were significantly higher (p towns and contribute to poor health in nearby communities.

  6. Element composition and mineralogical characterisation of air pollution control residue from UK energy-from-waste facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogush, Anna [Centre for Resource Efficiency & the Environment (CREE), Department of Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering (CEGE), University College London UCL, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Stegemann, Julia A., E-mail: j.stegemann@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Resource Efficiency & the Environment (CREE), Department of Civil, Environmental & Geomatic Engineering (CEGE), University College London UCL, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Wood, Ian [Department of Earth Sciences, University College London UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Roy, Amitava [J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures & Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Hwy, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • 66 elements, including “critical strategic elements” were determined in UK EfW APC residues. • Metal pollutants (Zn, Pb, As, Cd, Cu, Mo, Sb, Sn, Se, Ag and In) are enriched in APC residues. • Metal pollutants were widely associated with fine deposits of highly soluble CaCl{sub x}OH{sub 2−x}. • Specific metal (Zn, Pb, Cu)-bearing minerals were also detected in APC residues. - Abstract: Air pollution control (APC) residues from energy-from-waste (EfW) are alkaline (corrosive) and contain high concentrations of metals, such as zinc and lead, and soluble salts, such as chlorides and sulphates. The EPA 3050B-extractable concentrations of 66 elements, including critical elements of strategic importance for advanced electronics and energy technologies, were determined in eight APC residues from six UK EfW facilities. The concentrations of Ag (6–15 mg/kg) and In (1–13 mg/kg), as well as potential pollutants, especially Zn (0.26–0.73 wt.%), Pb (0.05–0.2 wt.%), As, Cd, Cu, Mo, Sb, Sn and Se were found to be enriched in all APC residues compared to average crustal abundances. Results from a combination of scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and also powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy give an exceptionally full understanding of the mineralogy of these residues, which is discussed in the context of other results in the literature. The present work has shown that the bulk of the crystalline phases present in the investigated APC residues include Ca-based phases, such as CaCl{sub x}OH{sub 2−x}, CaCO{sub 3}, Ca(OH){sub 2}, CaSO{sub 4}, and CaO, as well as soluble salts, such as NaCl and KCl. Poorly-crystalline aragonite was identified by FTIR. Sulphur appears to have complex redox speciation, presenting as both anhydrite and hannebachite in some UK EfW APC residues. Hazardous elements (Zn and Pb) were widely associated with soluble Ca- and Cl-bearing phases

  7. Radioactivity around naval nuclear bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    Between 12th July and 2nd August 1988, Greenpeace took sediment samples from around four Royal Navy bases in the United Kingdom. Faslane, where nuclear powered submarines are berthed; Devonport and Rosyth where refit work is carried out and Portsmouth where US and UK nuclear submarines often visit. Samples were also taken from the US Navy base at Holy Loch, Scotland, where nuclear powered ballistic missile submarines are based. The samples were analysed at St Bartholomew Hospital Medical School, London. Identical samples were provided to the MoD personnel at Faslane and Devonport on the date taken. The purpose of carrying out the sampling programme was to highlight the fact that publicly available statistics from Ministry of Agriculture Fisheries and Food (MAFF) are too limited in range, concentrating as they do merely on radioactive levels found between tides. The findings point to the necessity of monitoring subtidal as well as intertidal areas since levels of radioactivity found in the samples at Faslane and Holy Loch were four to nine times the figures published by MAFF. Until such time as nuclear power is no longer used at sea, it is the contention of Greenpeace that a more independent and comprehensive picture of the nature of radioactive contamination from around UK naval establishments must be obtained, than that presently available from MAFF. (author)

  8. Decommissioning of naval nuclear ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelgaard, P.L.

    1993-10-01

    During the next decade the two major nuclear powers will each have to decommission more than 100 naval nuclear vessels, in particular submarines. The problems connected with this task is considered in this report. Firstly the size of the task is considered, i.e. the number of nuclear vessels that has to be decommissioned. Secondly the reactors of these vessels, their fuel elements, their power level, the number of reactors per vessel and the amount of radioactivity to be handled are discussed. Thirdly the decommissioning procedures, i.e. The removal of fuel from the vessels, the temporary storage of the reactor fuel near the base, and the cleaning and disposal of the reactor and the primary circuit components are reviewed. Finally alternative uses of the newer submarines are briefly considered. It should be emphasizes that much of the detailed information on which this report is based, may be of dubious nature, and that may to some extent affect the validity of the conclusions of the report. (au)

  9. Testing of Air Pulse Agitators to Support Design of Savannah River Site Highly Radioactive Processing at the Salt Waste Processing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallego, R.M.; Stephens, A.B.; Wilkinson, R.H.; Dev, H.; Suggs, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is intended to concentrate the highly radioactive constituents from waste salt solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Air Pulse Agitators (APAs) were selected for process mixing in high-radiation locations at the SWPF. This technology has the advantage of no moving parts within the hot cell, eliminating potential failure modes and the need for maintenance within the high-radiation environment. This paper describes the results of APA tests performed to gain operational and performance data for the SWPF design. (authors)

  10. 75 FR 36023 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Designation of Areas for Air Quality Planning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... and Coso mountain ranges. The China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station (China Lake NAWS) covers most of... Stationary Sources: --California Lightweight Pumice 167 --China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station 84 [[Page... emissions. The largest stationary source contributor is Coso Operating Company, a geothermal, wind and solar...

  11. Engine Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center's Engine Test Facility (ETF) test cells are used for development and evaluation testing of propulsion systems for...

  12. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) for Naval Medical Treatment Facilities (MTF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    education and develop my technical knowledge in the field of Information Technology Management. The skills and understanding I gained from my...place, preventing the need for manipulation. The passes can also be used to locate skiers in case of injuries or for the location of children. RFID...created and backed by the leaders of the industry [24]. Intellectual property, patents, 42 intimate technical knowledge and publicity are all

  13. Sustainable Acquisition Process Improvement for Naval Facilities Engineering Command

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanders, Erin

    2003-01-01

    .... While this guidance is intended to create an open and competitive process to achieve lowest cost or best value, conflicts among traditional acquisition processes and new law requirements are emerging...

  14. The Eichleay Formula in Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFACENGCOM) Contracting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    overhead is quite simple and straight forward [Carpenter/Cushman, 1990]. However, there is much litigation over whether the Eichleay formula accurately...amun uotility Ouiy is a given hactio and the -ura. of tdo would be allowed bed te contrato purchased tds function can be detwirmied -ehoo~a NHomay be

  15. Development of a Naval C2 Capability Evaluation Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    function. All participants are fitted with individual MP3 format recording devices to provide individual non-communications audio records. The MP3 ...players are cheap, durable, and eliminate the security issues with wireless devices. Figure 6 shows one of the commercial MP3 players used in VCEL...Figure 5: Commercial MP3 player used for voice recording. These systems provide good coverage of console operators and communications. However, as

  16. Acquisition Quality Improvement Within Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    support, encouragement, prayers, and the endless cups of coffee you surprised me with. I treasure you and have a lifetime to show you my gratitude. To...Peterson for not allowing me to stop when it seemed like the whole world was caving in on me and for providing the guidance to start this project. Marlene...Arizona, 2 Utah, Colorado and New Mexico . NAVFAC SW provides public works, planning, engineering / design, construction, real estate, environmental

  17. Angular glint effects generation for false naval target verisimility requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostis, Theodoros G; Galanis, Konstantinos G; Katsikas, Sokratis K

    2009-01-01

    A stimulating problem in the generation of coherent countermeasures for high range resolution radar systems is the inclusion of angular glint effects in the preparation of the false target mask. Since angular glint is representative of extended naval targets, this inclusion increases the credibility factor of the decoy playback signal at the adversary radar-operator station. In this paper, the ability of an interferometric inverse synthetic aperture radar (InISAR) simulator to provide a proof of concept towards the clarification of this challenging task is ascertained. The solution consists of three novel vector representations of the generated data, which are proven to behave according to the laws of physics governing the glint phenomenon. The first depiction is the angular glint injection at the target which is followed by the representation of the wavefront distortion at the radar. A value-added time procession integration of the target in pure roll motion provides an expected by ISAR theory side-view image of the naval extended false target. The effectiveness of the proposed approach through verification and validation of the results by using the method of pictorial evidence is established. A final argument is raised on the usage of this software tool for actual obfuscation and deception actions for air defence at sea applications

  18. CSI flight experiment projects of the Naval Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Shalom

    1993-02-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is involved in an active program of CSI flight experiments. The first CSI flight experiment of the Naval Research Laboratory, the Low Power Atmospheric Compensation Experiment (LACE) dynamics experiment, has successfully measured vibrations of an orbiting satellite with a ground-based laser radar. The observations, made on January 7, 8 and 10, 1991, represent the first ever measurements of this type. In the tests, a narrowband heterodyne CO2 laser radar, operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, detected vibration induced differential-Doppler signatures of the LACE satellite. Power spectral densities of forced oscillations and modal frequencies and damping rates of free-damped vibrations were obtained and compared with finite element structural models of the LACE system. Another manifested flight experiment is the Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX) designed to demonstrate active and passive damping with piezo-electric (PZT) sensors and actuators. This experiment was developed under the management of the Air Force Phillips Laboratory with integration of the experiment at NRL. It is to ride as a secondary, or 'piggyback,' experiment on a future Navy satellite.

  19. Estimating the Economic Benefits of Forward-Engaged Naval Forces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Looney, Robert E; Schrady, David A; Brown, Ronald L

    2001-01-01

    In preparing for the 1997 quadrennial defense review, U.S. Navy leaders asked the Naval Postgraduate School to study the economic benefits of forward-engaged naval forces and communicate them to policy makers and the public...

  20. The Calculation of Self-Disposal Date by Analyzing the Radioactive Contamination of Air Filters Disused in Radioisotope Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Bu Hyung; Kwon, Soo Il

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to decrease the diffusion of air contamination which occurred in radiation work places handle radioisotope under the permissible level. Accordingly, we replaced used air filter with a new one at the appropriate time , and computed disposal dates for disposing used air filters by calculate radioactive contamination. Air filter contaminated by radioactivity is possible to be self-disposed on condition that all detected nuclides is below permissible level according to Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC) notification No. 2014-003. Radioisotope, produced by 30, 50 MeV cyclotron and carried from other institutions, is used to treat patients, diagnose diseases, and research technology in Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS). With unsealed sources generate radioactive contamination in air, it is important to use fume hood or hot cell. The accurate date needs to be calculated by the equation for calculation of self disposal date. If disposal date is in 1000 days, disposal for external institution is required. With increasing the number of medical institute which was related to use the radioisotopes, the importance of radioactive safety management was increased. As disposing radioactive waste, in particular, is the procedure of inspecting for releasing radioactive waste to outside, appropriate action and continuous research are required at a radioactive safety management.

  1. Characterization of Viral Load, Viability and Persistence of Influenza A Virus in Air and on Surfaces of Swine Production Facilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Neira

    Full Text Available Indirect transmission of influenza A virus (IAV in swine is poorly understood and information is lacking on levels of environmental exposure encountered by swine and people during outbreaks of IAV in swine barns. We characterized viral load, viability and persistence of IAV in air and on surfaces during outbreaks in swine barns. IAV was detected in pigs, air and surfaces from five confirmed outbreaks with 48% (47/98 of oral fluid, 38% (32/84 of pen railing and 43% (35/82 of indoor air samples testing positive by IAV RT-PCR. IAV was isolated from air and oral fluids yielding a mixture of subtypes (H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2. Detection of IAV RNA from air was sustained during the outbreaks with maximum levels estimated between 7 and 11 days from reported onset. Our results indicate that during outbreaks of IAV in swine, aerosols and surfaces in barns contain significant levels of IAV potentially representing an exposure hazard to both swine and people.

  2. Implementation of the Clean Air Act, Title III, Section 112(r) Prevention of Accidental Release Rule requirements at U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Reservation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    Title III, Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990 requires the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to promulgate regulations to prevent accidental releases of regulated substances and to reduce the severity of those releases that do occur. The final EPA rule for Risk Management Programs under Section 112(r)(7) of the CAA, promulgated June 20, 1996, applies to all stationary sources with processes that contain more than a threshold quantity of any of 139 regulated substances listed under 40 CFR 68.130. All affected sources will be required to prepare a risk management plan which must be submitted to EPA and be made available to state and local governments and to the public. This paper will provide details of initiatives underway at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of the Prevention of Accidental Release Rule. The ORR encompasses three DOE Facilities: the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the K-25 Site. The Y-12 Plant manufactures component parts for the national nuclear weapons program; the ORNL is responsible for research and development activities including nuclear engineering, engineering technologies, and the environmental sciences; and the K-25 Site conducts a variety of research and development activities and is the home of a mixed waste incinerator. ORR activities underway and soon to be undertaken toward implementation of the Prevention of Accidental Release Rule include: compilation of inventories of regulated substances at all processes at each of the three ORR Facilities for determination of affected processes and facilities; plans for inventory reduction to levels below threshold quantities, where necessary and feasible; determination of the overlap of processes subject to the OSHA PSM Standard and determination of parallel requirements; preparation of Risk Management Plans and Programs for affected processes and facilities including detailed requirements

  3. Teaching of Naval Architecture and Ship Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    1998-01-01

    At the Technical University of Denmark naval architecture has been taught for students of Master of Science in more than 100 years. This teaching has of course seen many changes as has the science. During the last 20 years the university has used a modular system of courses where students can quite...... freely select their courses. In the paper this system is briefly outlined and the teaching of naval achitecture and offshore engineering within this system described. In contrast to many other universities ship design is taught for students relatively early in their study. This course and the advantages...... and disadvantages of it will be discussed. Finally, a few reflections on teaching naval architecture in the future will be made, including subjects likedecision support and reliability....

  4. 32 CFR 700.1054 - Command of a naval base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Command of a naval base. 700.1054 Section 700.1054 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY... Command Detail to Duty § 700.1054 Command of a naval base. The officer detailed to command a naval base...

  5. Detonation cell size measurements in high-temperature hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at the BNL high-temperature combustion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.L.

    1997-11-01

    The High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) was designed and constructed with the objective of studying detonation phenomena in mixtures of hydrogen-air-steam at initially high temperatures. The central element of the HTCF is a 27-cm inner-diameter, 21.3-m long cylindrical test vessel capable of being heating to 700K ± 14K. A unique feature of the HTCF is the 'diaphragmless' acetylene-oxygen gas driver which is used to initiate the detonation in the test gas. Cell size measurements have shown that for any hydrogen-air-steam mixture, increasing the initial mixture temperature, in the range of 300K to 650K, while maintaining the initial pressure of 0.1 MPa, decreases the cell size and thus makes the mixture more detonable. The effect of steam dilution on cell size was tested in stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric (e.g., equivalence ratio of 0.5) hydrogen-air mixtures. Increasing the steam dilution in hydrogen-air mixtures at 0.1 MPa initial pressure increases the cell size, irrespective of initial temperature. It is also observed that the desensitizing effect of steam diminished with increased initial temperature. A 1-dimensional, steady-state Zel'dovich, von Neumann, Doring (ZND) model, with full chemical kinetics, has been used to predict cell size for hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at different initial conditions. Qualitatively the model predicts the overall trends observed in the measured cell size versus mixture composition and initial temperature and pressure. It was found that the proportionality constant used to predict detonation cell size from the calculated ZND model reaction zone varies between 10 and 100 depending on the mixture composition and initial temperature. 32 refs., 35 figs

  6. Air separation of heavy metal contaminants from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, M.E.; Harper, M.J.; Buckon, A.D.

    1995-01-01

    Several heavy metal separation techniques are currently being developed for soil remediation at various Department of Defense and Department of Energy (DOE) Facilities. The majority of these techniques involve a wet process using water, pH modifiers or other compounds. The US Naval Academy (USNA) has developed a dry process for heavy metal separation. The process uses air classification technology to concentrate the metal contaminant into a fraction of the soil. The advantages of this dry process are that it creates no contaminated byproduct and uses commercially available technology. The USNA process is based on using a Gayco-Reliance air classifier. Tests have been conducted with the system at the Naval Academy and the University of Nevada-Reno (UNR). The USNA tests used soil from the Nevada Test Site mixed with bismuth at a concentration of 500--1,000 ppm. The UNR tests used soil from four DOE sites mixed with uranium oxides and plutonium at an activity level of 100--700 pCi per gram. Concentration of activities and volume reduction percentages are presented for the various soils and contaminants tested

  7. Modeled effectiveness of ventilation with contaminant control devices on indoor air quality in a swine farrowing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, T Renée; Altmaier, Ralph; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Because adverse health effects experienced by swine farm workers in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have been associated with exposure to dust and gases, efforts to reduce exposures are warranted, particularly in winter seasons when exposures increase due to decreased ventilation. Simulation of air quality and operating costs for ventilating swine CAFO, including treating and recirculating air through a farrowing room, was performed using mass and energy balance equations over a 90-day winter season. System operation required controlling heater operation to achieve room temperatures optimal to ensure animal health (20 to 22.5 °C). Five air pollution control devices, four room ventilation rates, and five recirculation patterns were examined. Inhalable dust concentrations were easily reduced using standard industrial air pollution control devices, including a cyclone, filtration, and electrostatic precipitator. Operating ventilation systems at 0.94 m3 s(-1) (2000 cfm) with 75 to 100% recirculation of treated air from cyclone, electrostatic precipitator, and shaker dust filtration system achieves adequate particle control with operating costs under $1.00 per pig produced ($0.22 to 0.54), although carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations approach 2000 ppm using in-room ventilated gas fired heaters. In no simulation were CO2 concentrations below industry recommended concentrations (1540 ppm), but alternative heating devices could reduce CO2 to acceptable concentrations. While this investigation does not represent all production swine farrowing barns, which differ in characteristics including room dimensions and swine occupancy, the simulation model and ventilation optimization methods can be applied to other production sites. This work shows that ventilation may be a cost-effective control option in the swine industry to reduce exposures.

  8. The characterization of HG10MNN and an evaluation of suitability for use in naval applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawxhurst, K.L.; Westerberg, J.M., E-mail: m166918@usna.edu; Woertz, J.C., E-mail: woertz@usna.edu

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • HG10MNN alloy showed good strength, hardness and ductility compared to NAB. • In air, four point bending fatigue tests suggest an endurance limit between 8 and 10 ksi. • As compared to NAB, HG10MNN has excellent casting and corrosion behavior. - Abstract: An initial mechanical evaluation and standard material characterization were conducted for the stainless steel alloy HG10MNN in order to evaluate its use in naval and marine applications. HG10MNN is a newly developed stainless steel designed for improved resistance to mechanical and thermal fatigue. This material could eventually replace the Nickel–Aluminum–Bronze (NAB) currently used in many naval propulsion systems, however, additional testing is required to validate the alloy's performance characteristics. Although stainless steels are commonly used in marine applications, there is insufficient HG10MNN documentation to permit its use in naval ship design. This investigation also involved an evaluation of castability and machinability to determine whether the material could be formed into the complex shapes required in a modern naval construction. Initial results showed that the alloy exhibits a fully austenitic microstructure in the as-cast condition, while maintaining acceptable mechanical properties and superior castability as compared to NAB.

  9. The characterization of HG10MNN and an evaluation of suitability for use in naval applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawxhurst, K.L.; Westerberg, J.M.; Woertz, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • HG10MNN alloy showed good strength, hardness and ductility compared to NAB. • In air, four point bending fatigue tests suggest an endurance limit between 8 and 10 ksi. • As compared to NAB, HG10MNN has excellent casting and corrosion behavior. - Abstract: An initial mechanical evaluation and standard material characterization were conducted for the stainless steel alloy HG10MNN in order to evaluate its use in naval and marine applications. HG10MNN is a newly developed stainless steel designed for improved resistance to mechanical and thermal fatigue. This material could eventually replace the Nickel–Aluminum–Bronze (NAB) currently used in many naval propulsion systems, however, additional testing is required to validate the alloy's performance characteristics. Although stainless steels are commonly used in marine applications, there is insufficient HG10MNN documentation to permit its use in naval ship design. This investigation also involved an evaluation of castability and machinability to determine whether the material could be formed into the complex shapes required in a modern naval construction. Initial results showed that the alloy exhibits a fully austenitic microstructure in the as-cast condition, while maintaining acceptable mechanical properties and superior castability as compared to NAB.

  10. Charged particle beam propagation studies at the Naval Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meger, R.A.; Hubbard, R.F.; Antoniades, J.A.; Fernsler, R.F.; Lampe, M.; Murphy, D.P.; Myers, M.C.; Pechacek, R.E.; Peyser, T.A.; Santos, J.; Slinker, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Plasma Physics Division of the Naval Research Laboratory has been performing research into the propagation of high current electron beams for 20 years. Recent efforts have focused on the stabilization of the resistive hose instability. Experiments have utilized the SuperIBEX e-beam generator (5-MeV, 100-kA, 40-ns pulse) and a 2-m diameter, 5-m long propagation chamber. Full density air propagation experiments have successfully demonstrated techniques to control the hose instability allowing stable 5-m transport of 1-2 cm radius, 10-20 kA total current beams. Analytic theory and particle simulations have been used to both guide and interpret the experimental results. This paper will provide background on the program and summarize the achievements of the NRL propagation program up to this point. Further details can be found in other papers presented in this conference

  11. 78 FR 21349 - Meeting of the Board of Advisors to the Presidents of the Naval Postgraduate School and Naval War...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Navy Meeting of the Board of Advisors to the Presidents of the Naval Postgraduate School and Naval War College, Naval Postgraduate School Subcommittee AGENCY... War College report on progress to the Secretary of the Navy. The Board will meet in closed executive...

  12. Risk of Cyberterrorism to Naval Ships Inport Naval Station Everett: A Model Based Project Utilizing SIAM

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tester, Rodrick A

    2007-01-01

    Based on numerous high level concerns that the cyber threat is expected to increase, as well as the already documented uses of cyber warfare, it is necessary to ensure our naval ships are hardened against such attacks...

  13. Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed PROMETHEUS Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Kokkinos

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory

  14. Environmental Assessment for Replacement of the Main Gate Facility at New Boston Air Force Station, New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    rural with interspersed forests and residential areas. Land cover on the station is consistent with the surrounding area, and much of the habitat ...deciduous and mixed forest habitat types. The environmental assessment evaluates the potential impacts of two configurations (A and B) of the proposed...with air quality, topography, vegetation, soils, surface waters, and listed and non-listed wildlife and habitat resources. Demolition of Building 102

  15. Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS)/Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR). Otis Air National Guard Base, Wastewater Treatment Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    and G.E. Ness, 1982, Survival of Vibrio cholerae and Escherichia coli in Estuarine Water and Sediments, Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 43...and publications in areas of water and wastewater treatment. David Tomasko, Ph.D., 1985. University of New Mexico . Staff Hydrogeologist. Research...Reserve in California. We are working on EIS’s for the U.S. Air Force Base Closings in realignment in California, New Mexico and Washington, and a very

  16. Environmental Assessment for Replacement of Taxiway Sierra, Taxiway Whiskey, Pad 12, and Pad 13 at Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, Prince George’s County, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    runway edge lights that were recently installed as part of the West Runway rehabilitation would be removed and reinstalled. Whiskey. New taxiway edge...disposal of infectious and pathological wastes. No active landfills are on JBA, and most solid waste from the Base is transported to off-base landfills ...location lights, and runway edge lights that were recently installed as part of the West Runway rehabilitation would be removed and reinstalled. Whiskey

  17. Finding of No Significant Impact and Finding of No Practicable Aleternative for the Environmental Assessment for the 21 Point Enclosed Firing Range at Joint-Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-02

    would be established. An existing parking lot located at the Leroy’s Lane LandfillS (LF-05) site would be utilized for staff parking and overflow... rehabilitation (reconstruction) and upgrades for this ~ stormwater pond will result in a temporary change to this manmade surface water. The proposed...will be required, as the work associated with the stormwater pond rehabilitation would exceed 5,000 square feet. The proposed work will require an

  18. The future of naval ocean science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John A.; Brink, Kenneth

    The Ocean Studies Board (OSB) of the National Research Council reviewed the changing role of basic ocean science research in the Navy at a recent board meeting. The OSB was joined by Gerald Cann, assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development, and acquisition; Geoffrey Chesbrough, oceanographer of the Navy; Arthur Bisson, deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for antisubmarine warfare; Robert Winokur, technical director of the Office of the Oceanographer of the Navy; Bruce Robinson, director of the new science directorate at the Office of Naval Research (ONR); and Paul Gaffney, commanding officer of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The past 2-3 years have brought great changes to the Navy's mission with the dissolution of the former Soviet Union and challenges presented by conflicts in newly independent states and developing nations. The new mission was recently enunciated in a white paper, “From the Sea: A New Direction for the Naval Service,” which is signed by the secretary of the Navy, the chief of naval operations, and the commandant of the Marine Corps. It departs from previous plans by proposing a heavier emphasis on amphibious operations and makes few statements about the traditional Navy mission of sea-lane control.

  19. Naval Health Research Center 1985 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    strengthening programs for the entire crew. Aerobic programs for select populations (e.g., overweight personnel), however, were found on 20% of the...Institute, Lima Detachment, Peru (Command) 25-26 UCOR R. Kallal, CUP W. J. Lambert, & M. Nave, Naval Data Services Center, Bethesda, Maryland (Dr

  20. Naval War College Review. Autumn 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    Almanacco Navale 1988. Genoa, Italy: Institute Idrografico Della Marina, 1988. 1092pp. $59 These two large volumes are awesome compilations of data and...surging west to escape the Russians. This is a story of war eloquently told. Semmlec, Kenneth, ed. The War Despatches of Kenneth Slessor. St. Lucia

  1. Rio Branco, grand strategy and naval power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Alsina Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses Baron of Rio Branco's grand strategy and the role played by the naval reorganization program (1904-1910 in this context. The ensuing case study determined the domestic and international constraints that affected the program, as well as the worldview of the patron of Brazilian diplomacy regarding military power's instrumentality to foreign policy.

  2. Understanding Human Error in Naval Aviation Mishaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Andrew T

    2018-04-01

    To better understand the external factors that influence the performance and decisions of aviators involved in Naval aviation mishaps. Mishaps in complex activities, ranging from aviation to nuclear power operations, are often the result of interactions between multiple components within an organization. The Naval aviation mishap database contains relevant information, both in quantitative statistics and qualitative reports, that permits analysis of such interactions to identify how the working atmosphere influences aviator performance and judgment. Results from 95 severe Naval aviation mishaps that occurred from 2011 through 2016 were analyzed using Bayes' theorem probability formula. Then a content analysis was performed on a subset of relevant mishap reports. Out of the 14 latent factors analyzed, the Bayes' application identified 6 that impacted specific aspects of aviator behavior during mishaps. Technological environment, misperceptions, and mental awareness impacted basic aviation skills. The remaining 3 factors were used to inform a content analysis of the contextual information within mishap reports. Teamwork failures were the result of plan continuation aggravated by diffused responsibility. Resource limitations and risk management deficiencies impacted judgments made by squadron commanders. The application of Bayes' theorem to historical mishap data revealed the role of latent factors within Naval aviation mishaps. Teamwork failures were seen to be considerably damaging to both aviator skill and judgment. Both the methods and findings have direct application for organizations interested in understanding the relationships between external factors and human error. It presents real-world evidence to promote effective safety decisions.

  3. Naval power, endogeneity, and long-distance disputes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian B. Crisher

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Does an increase in naval power increase the likelihood of interstate disputes? While volumes have been written on the importance of naval power, we are left with little more than intuition and anecdotal evidence to provide potential answers to this question. Endogeneity issues in particular make it difficult to untangle the links between developing naval power and interstate conflict. Here I present a new instrument for naval power. Utilizing a new dataset of naval power and employing an instrumental variable analysis, I present one of the first large cross-national studies showing a significant link between naval power and a specific type of interstate conflict - non-contiguous disputes. The findings have implications for the future actions of states whose naval strength is growing.

  4. Naval Research Laboratory 1983 Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    recreation club which provides swimming, sauna, whirlpool bath, gymnasium, and weight room facilities. The recreation club also offers classes in karate ...charities. Past karate , aerobics exercise, swimming, and swim- productions have included "Fiddler on the Roof," nastics; and specialized sports clubs...SPIE Vol. 380 Gathman and B. Ulfers, in Ninth Conference Worker Injuries : The Effects of Workers’ Com- on Aerospace and Aeronautical Meteorology

  5. Description of NORMTRI: a computer program for assessing the off-site consequences from air-borne releases of tritium during normal operation of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.

    1994-10-01

    The computer program NORMTRI has been developed to calculate the behaviour of tritium in the environment released into the atmosphere under normal operation of nuclear facilities. It is possible to investigate the two chemical forms tritium gas and tritiated water vapour. The conversion of tritium gas into tritiated water followed by its reemission back to the atmosphere as well as the conversion into organically bound tritium is considered. NORMTRI is based on the statistical Gaussian dispersion model ISOLA, which calculates the activity concentration in air near the ground contamination due to dry and wet deposition at specified locations in a polar grid system. ISOLA requires a four-parametric meteorological statistics derived from one or more years synoptic recordings of 1-hour-averages of wind speed, wind direction, stability class and precipitation intensity. Additional features of NORMTRI are the possibility to choose several dose calculation procedures, ranging from the equations of the German regulatory guidelines to a pure specific equilibrium approach. (orig.)

  6. Implementation of a spark plasma sintering facility in a hermetic glovebox for compaction of toxic, radiotoxic, and air sensitive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyrpekl, V., E-mail: vaclav.tyrpekl@ec.europa.eu, E-mail: vaclav.tyrpekl@gmail.com; Berkmann, C.; Holzhäuser, M.; Köpp, F.; Cologna, M.; Somers, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Wangle, T. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, Praha 1, 115 19 (Czech Republic)

    2015-02-15

    Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is a rapidly developing method for densification of powders into compacts. It belongs to the so-called “field assisted sintering techniques” that enable rapid sintering at much lower temperatures than the classical approaches of pressureless sintering of green pellets or hot isostatic pressing. In this paper, we report the successful integration of a SPS device into a hermetic glovebox for the handling of highly radioactive material containing radioisotopes of U, Th, Pu, Np, and Am. The glovebox implantation has been facilitated by the replacement of the hydraulic system to apply pressure with a compact electromechanical unit. The facility has been successfully tested using UO{sub 2} powder. Pellets with 97% of the theoretical density were obtained at 1000 °C for 5 min, significantly lower than the ∼1600 °C for 5-10 h used in conventional pellet sintering.

  7. Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel No. 9 Mach 7 Thermal Structural Facility Verification and Calibration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lafferty, John

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the verification and calibration of the new Mach 7 Thermal Structural Facility located at the White Oak, Maryland, site of the Dahlgren Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center...

  8. Testing and Development of a Shrouded Gas Turbine Engine in a Freejet Facility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garcia, Hector

    2000-01-01

    .... The combined cycle engine (CCE) could be incorporated into a variety of applications. The building of a new freejet facility and engine test rig at the Naval Postgraduate School enabled dynamic testing of the ongoing development of a turboramjet...

  9. Use of historical uranium air sampling data to estimate worker exposure potential to airborne radioactive particulate in a uranium processing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methner, M M; Feng, H A; Utterback, D F

    2001-12-01

    Historical industrial hygiene monitoring records from a uranium processing plant were collected and analyzed to characterize exposure potential to airborne radioactive particulate. More than 2,100 samples were collected during the period of 1954-1968. The data was organized by job title, plant number, and year of measurement. Laboratory analysis of air samples indicated a wide range of potential exposures to the alpha-emitting particulate. Logarithmic transformation of the data was necessary to approximate Gaussian distributions. Geometric Mean (GM) values were used as the measure of central tendency within years. GM values ranged from 23-49 disintegrations per minute per cubic meter of air sampled (dpm/m3) with the years 1963 and 1964 being significantly higher than other years (ANOVA: p exposure potential across plants, GM ranged from 20-68 dpm/m3, with plants 5 and 8 being significantly higher than the others (ANOVA: p Exposure potential for specific job titles across the plants varied widely. GM for clerks was the lowest (11 dpm/m3) while furnace operators were the highest (235 dpm/m3). Other job titles with potentially high exposures were chemical operators, forklift operators, machine operators, and furnace operators. This analysis indicates the magnitude and distributions of worker exposure to alpha-emitting airborne particulate. Additional analysis and epidemiologic studies are planned for this facility.

  10. Combustion of stratified hydrogen-air mixtures in the 10.7 m3 Combustion Test Facility cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehouse, D.R.; Greig, D.R.; Koroll, G.W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results from hydrogen concentration gradient combustion experiments in a 10.7 m 3 cylinder. These gradients, also referred to as stratified mixtures, were formed from dry mixtures of hydrogen and air at atmospheric temperature. Combustion pressures, burn fractions and flame speeds in concentration gradients were compared with combustion of well-mixed gases containing equivalent amounts of hydrogen. The studied variables included the quantity of hydrogen in the vessel, the steepness of the concentration gradient, the igniter location, and the initial concentration of hydrogen at the bottom of the vessel. Gradients of hydrogen and air with average concentrations of hydrogen below the downward propagation limit produced significantly greater combustion pressures when ignited at the top of the vessel than well-mixed gases with the same quantity of hydrogen. This was the result of considerably higher burn fractions in the gradients than in the well-mixed gas tests. Above the downward propagation limit, gradients of hydrogen ignited at the top of the vessel produced nearly the same combustion pressures as under well-mixed conditions; both gradients and well-mixed gases had high burn fractions. Much higher flame speeds were observed in the gradients than the well-mixed gases. Gradients and well-mixed gases containing up to 14% hydrogen ignited at the bottom of the vessel produced nearly the same combustion pressures. Above 14% hydrogen, gradients produced lower combustion pressures than well-mixed gases having the same quantity of hydrogen. This can be attributed to lower burn fractions of fuel from the gradients compared with well-mixed gases with similar quantities of hydrogen. When ignited at the bottom of the vessel, 90% of a gradient's gases remained unburned until several seconds after ignition. The remaining gases were then consumed at a very fast rate. (orig.)

  11. Compliance with the Clean Air Act Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program requirements at U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Reservation Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, M.P.; Atkins, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program of the Clean Air Act (CAA) requires promulgation of regulations to reduce and prevent damage to the earth's protective ozone layer. Regulations pursuant to Title VI of the CAA are promulgated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at Title 40 CFR, Part 822. The regulations include ambitious production phaseout schedules for ozone depleting substances (ODS) including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), halons, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform under 40 CFR 82, Subpart A. The regulations also include requirements for recycling and emissions reduction during the servicing of refrigeration equipment and technician certification requirements under Subpart F; provisions for servicing of motor vehicle air conditioners under Subpart B; a ban on nonessential products containing Class 1 ODS under Subpart C; restrictions on Federal procurement of ODS under Subpart D; labeling of products using ODS under Subpart E; and the Significant New Alternatives Policy Program under Subpart G. This paper will provide details of initiatives undertaken at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of requirements under the Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program. The Stratospheric Ozone Protection Plans include internal DOE requirements for: (1) maintenance of ODS inventories; (2) ODS procurement practices; (3) servicing of refrigeration and air conditioning equipment; (4) required equipment modifications or replacement; (5) technician certification training; (6) labeling of products containing ODS; (7) substitution of chlorinated solvents; and (8) replacement of halon fire protection systems. The plans also require establishment of administrative control systems which assure that compliance is achieved and maintained as the regulations continue to develop and become effective

  12. Radiological engineering evaluation of the delay time line air scrubber located at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huneycutt, S.E.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the addition of an air scrubber to an already existing delay line and whether it would scrub 11 CO 2 . There were three main objectives of this study. The first objective was to determine the scrubbing efficiency of the scrubber. The scrubbing efficiency was then used to predict the dose rates in the scrubber area and compare those values with measurements from radiological surveys. The third objective was to determine if the shield blocks were effective in reducing the dose rates in the scrubber area. The activities were measured before and during scrubber operation and this information was used to calculate the scrubbing efficiency and the efficiency of 11 CO 2 removal was determined to be around 50%. Microshield was then used to predict dose rates and compared those values with measurements from radiological surveys. This was also used to determine the that the shield blocks around the scrubber were effective in reducing the dose rates from the radiation field produced by the radionuclides in the scrubber

  13. Russian naval bases due commercial development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Tecnogrid Group, New York, has signed a joint venture with the Russian Navy for commercial development of a wide range of sea dn land based assets owned by the former Soviet Navy. This paper reports that among other things, the venture aims for projects that will allow greater volumes of oil exports by revamping several naval bases. Tecnogrid's partner in the joint venture is AO Navicon, A Russian stock holding company that is the commercial arm of the Navy. Navicon has the sole right to commercially develop and deploy the Navy's assets. The Navy can no longer depend on the state for support, and Adm. Ig. Malhonin. With that in mind, the Navy is looking to become the leading force in moving toward a free market economy. Mahonin is Russia's second ranking naval official

  14. Naval Maritime Physician : Roles and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Roles and challenges: Good maritime medicalpractice involves meeting numerous challenges of clinical, occupational, emergency, trauma and psychiatric medicine, in addition on board physicians must also have, in depth knowledge of pschycosomatic conditions due to stress andfatigue of crew and special conditions such as diving accidents and accidents involving aquatic animals. The situation on board requires extraordinary skills as interventions are difficult, both physically and technically, because the conditions at sea are often acrobatic and at certain times evacuation is also not possible due to weather and operational constraints. Thus the role naval doctor on board ships is truly of an all round physicians, a team mate and a good leader. Conclusion: In conclusion, responsibilities of Naval Maritime Physician is not limited to clinical activities but is multifaceted and objective training about the specifics of warships′ environment and related health problems is the key to achieve professional excellence in every sphere.

  15. Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division Patent Portfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    2.0 parts of an oil soluble antioxidant , from 0.0 to 5.0 parts of a water-displacing compound, an effective amount of a mildew-inhibiting compound...effective amount of an oil soluble alkyl phosphate, from 0.1 to 2.0 parts of an oil soluble antioxidant , from 0.1 to 5.0 parts of a water-displacing...Market Opportunities: • Exercise, recreational, or motor sports • Fire Fighters and First Responders for rescue missions • Hazmat teams or specialist

  16. Anti-Air Warfare Research for Naval Forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, A.A.F.; Witberg, R.

    2000-01-01

    AAW is a warfare area with wide-spread spectrum. Command and Control Systems, sensors, effectors and electronic warfare are integrated to a system, they influence each other and must eventually be effective in coordinated action. This complexity asks for Operations Research methods to measure

  17. A Data Analysis of Naval Air Systems Command Funding Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    influence trend lines over time. 4. What should be the benchmarks of performance related to the purchase request process within NAVAIR program offices...Distribution is unlimited. THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704–0188 Public reporting burden...able to determine that the number of line items on a purchase request grows by 39% for intergovernmental transactions when requiring amendments

  18. Recovery Act Hospital Alteration Project at Naval Air Station Jacksonville

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    QMAD Quantitative Methods and Analysis Division RLF Rogers Lovelock & Fritz, Incorporated SE Southeast SF Square Feet SOW Statement of Work TMA TRICARE...Finally, the contractor, Rogers Lovelock & Fritz, Incorporated, reported the recipient information required by the Recovery Act. What We Recommend...contractor, Rogers Lovelock & Fritz, Incorporated (RLF), reported the recipient information required by the Recovery Act. Planning: Initially, Project

  19. Redmedial Action Plan for the Risk-Based Remediation of Site ST14 (SWMU 68), LPSTID 104819; the Former Base Refueling Area (A0C7); the French Underdrain System (SWMU 64); and the North Oil/Water Separator (SWMU 67), Carswell Air Force Base, Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Texas. Volume 1: Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    ...) to prepare a remedial action plan (RAP) in support of a risk-based remediation decision for soil and groundwater contaminated with fuel hydrocarbons at Site ST14 at Carswell Air Force Base (AFB), Texas...

  20. Naval Law Review. Volume 63, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Id. at 97. 17 Id. at 99. 18 Jonathan G. Odom, Beyond Arm Bands and Arms Banned : Chaplains, Armed Conflict, and the Law, 49 NAVAL L. REV. 1, 7... filming him and suggesting that he was leading regular prayer groups.174   In light of these inconsistencies it is possible that chaplains at Guantanamo...located in Southeast Asia formed on August 8, 1967 by Indonesia, Malaysia , the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. Amitav Acharya, ASEAN at 40: Mid

  1. Naval Science & Technology: Enabling the Future Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    corn for disruptive technologies Laser Cooling Spintronics Bz 1st U.S. Intel satellite GRAB Semiconductors GaAs, GaN, SiC GPS...Payoff • Innovative and game-changing • Approved by Corporate Board • Delivers prototype Innovative Naval Prototypes (5-10 Year) Disruptive ... Technologies Free Electron Laser Integrated Topside EM Railgun Sea Base Enablers Tactical Satellite Large Displacement UUV AACUS Directed

  2. NRL Review, 1994. (Naval Research Lab)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    global atmospheric and oceano - wine, Maryland, has a 4.6-m diameter turntable graphic databases for research on-site and at in the center of a 305-i...capability has been recently Research Efforts: NRL’s Remote Sensing transitioned into operation at the Naval Oceano - Applications Branch has been designated...P.G. Wilhelm AND REQUIREMENTS SPACE SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT Code 8100 R.E. Eisenhauer• Sol office * Mission Oeirelopment * Advancedi Systems

  3. Naval War College Review. Winter 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    great many Americans to see as the culprits in the latest series of White House shenanigans two distinguished military officers on active duty...ination of Atlas and Titan missiles (ICBMs) from the SAC inventory for financial reasons. This completely ignores the military’s cognizance of...connection to financial , comn1crcial. and mari- time interest<. Mostimportantly, the 162 Naval War College Review authors, by examining the early stages of

  4. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit entrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    StenniSphere at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., invites visitors to discover why America comes to Stennis Space Center before going into space. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center.

  5. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  6. DESIGN ANALYSIS FOR THE NAVAL SNF WASTE PACKAGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T.L. Mitchell

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to demonstrate the design of the naval spent nuclear fuel (SNF) waste package (WP) using the Waste Package Department's (WPD) design methodologies and processes described in the ''Waste Package Design Methodology Report'' (CRWMS MandO [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor] 2000b). The calculations that support the design of the naval SNF WP will be discussed; however, only a sub-set of such analyses will be presented and shall be limited to those identified in the ''Waste Package Design Sensitivity Report'' (CRWMS MandO 2000c). The objective of this analysis is to describe the naval SNF WP design method and to show that the design of the naval SNF WP complies with the ''Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container System Description Document'' (CRWMS MandO 1999a) and Interface Control Document (ICD) criteria for Site Recommendation. Additional criteria for the design of the naval SNF WP have been outlined in Section 6.2 of the ''Waste Package Design Sensitivity Report'' (CRWMS MandO 2000c). The scope of this analysis is restricted to the design of the naval long WP containing one naval long SNF canister. This WP is representative of the WPs that will contain both naval short SNF and naval long SNF canisters. The following items are included in the scope of this analysis: (1) Providing a general description of the applicable design criteria; (2) Describing the design methodology to be used; (3) Presenting the design of the naval SNF waste package; and (4) Showing compliance with all applicable design criteria. The intended use of this analysis is to support Site Recommendation reports and assist in the development of WPD drawings. Activities described in this analysis were conducted in accordance with the technical product development plan (TPDP) ''Design Analysis for the Naval SNF Waste Package (CRWMS MandO 2000a)

  7. Medical rescue of naval combat: challenges and future

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Hai; Hou, Li-Jun; Fu, Xiao-Bing

    2015-01-01

    There has been no large-scale naval combat in the last 30?years. With the rapid development of battleships, weapons manufacturing and electronic technology, naval combat will present some new characteristics. Additionally, naval combat is facing unprecedented challenges. In this paper, we discuss the topic of medical rescue at sea: what challenges we face and what we could do. The contents discussed in this paper contain battlefield self-aid buddy care, clinical skills, organized health servi...

  8. The Joint Modular Intermodal Container, is this the Future of Naval Logistics?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Mark E

    2005-01-01

    .... One mission area that is prime for manpower reduction is naval logistics. JMIC, the Joint Military Intermodal Container is a combined Naval Sea Systems Command/ Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (NAVSEA/OPNAV...

  9. Environmental planning and the siting of nuclear facilities: the integration of water, air, coastal, and comprehensive planning into the nuclear siting process. Improving regulatory effectiveness in federal/state siting actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, J.B.; Epting, J.T.; Blumm, M.C.; Ackerman, S.; Laist, D.W.

    1977-02-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act, the Coastal Zone Management Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the Clean Air Act Amendments, and the Housing and Urban 701 Comprehensive Planning Assistance Program are discussed in relation to the planning and siting of nuclear facilities

  10. Department of the Navy final environmental impact statement for a container system for the management of naval spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) addresses six general alternative systems for the loading, storage, transport, and possible disposal of naval spent nuclear fuel following examination. This EIS describes environmental impacts of (1) producing and implementing the container systems (including those impacts resulting from the addition of the capability to load the containers covered in this EIS in dry fuel handling facilities at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)); (2) loading of naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility or at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant with subsequent storage at INEL; (3) construction of a storage facility (such as a paved area) at alternative locations at INEL; and (4) loading of containers and their shipment to a geologic repository or to a centralized interim storage site outside the State of Idaho once one becomes available. As indicated in the EIS, the systems and facilities might also be used for handling low-level radiological waste categorized as special case waste. The Navy's preferred alternative for a container system for the management of naval spent fuel is a dual-purpose canister system. The primary benefits of a dual-purpose canister system are efficiencies in container manufacturing and fuel reloading operations, and potential reductions in radiation exposure

  11. Risk Assessment of the Naval Postgraduate School Gigabit Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rowlands, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    This research thoroughly examines the current Naval Postgraduate School Gigabit Network security posture, identifies any possible threats or vulnerabilities, and recommends any appropriate safeguards...

  12. Factors Affecting Productivity in the United States Naval Construction Force

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morton, Darren

    1997-01-01

    By using a craftsman questionnaire, this thesis identifies and ranks the most important factors impairing Petty Officer productivity and morale in the United States Naval Construction Force (Seabees...

  13. Medical rescue of naval combat: challenges and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hai; Hou, Li-Jun; Fu, Xiao-Bing

    2015-01-01

    There has been no large-scale naval combat in the last 30 years. With the rapid development of battleships, weapons manufacturing and electronic technology, naval combat will present some new characteristics. Additionally, naval combat is facing unprecedented challenges. In this paper, we discuss the topic of medical rescue at sea: what challenges we face and what we could do. The contents discussed in this paper contain battlefield self-aid buddy care, clinical skills, organized health services, medical training and future medical research programs. We also discuss the characteristics of modern naval combat, medical rescue challenges, medical treatment highlights and future developments of medical rescue at sea.

  14. A Simulated Annealing Approach for the Composite Facility Location and Resource Allocation Problem: A Study of Strategic Positioning of US Air Force Munitions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bell, John

    2003-01-01

    .... This model is a combination facility location model and inventory allocation model which is aimed at simultaneously determining where to locate facilities and how to position inventory quantities...

  15. Geologic and hydrologic data for the municipal solid waste landfill facility, U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyta, Cynthia G.; Frenzel, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    Geologic and hydrologic data for the Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Facility on the U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss in El Paso County, Texas, were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army. The 106.03-acre landfill has been in operation since January 1974. The landfill contains household refuse, Post solid wastes, bulky items, grass and tree trimmings from family housing, refuse from litter cans, construction debris, classified waste (dry), dead animals, asbestos, and empty oil cans. The depth of the filled areas is about 30 feet and the cover, consisting of locally derived material, is 2 to 3 feet thick. Geologic and hydrologic data were collected at or adjacent to the landfill during (1) drilling of 10 30- to 31-foot boreholes that were completed with gas-monitoring probes, (2) drilling of a 59-foot borehole, (3) drilling of a 355-foot borehole that was completed as a ground-water monitoring well, and (4) in situ measurements made on the landfill cover. After completion, the gas- monitoring probes were monitored on a quarterly basis (1 year total) for gases generated by the landfill. Water samples were collected from the ground-water monitoring well for chemical analysis. Data collection is divided into two elements: geologic data and hydrologic data. Geologic data include lithologic descriptions of cores and cuttings, geophysical logs, soil- gas and ambient-air analyses, and chemical analyses of soil. Hydrologic data include physical properties, total organic carbon, and pH of soil and sediment samples; soil-water chloride and soil-moisture analyses; physical properties of the landfill cover; measurements of depth to ground water; and ground-water chemical analyses. Interpretation of data is not included in this report.

  16. Naval Reserve Force: Cost and Benefit Analysis of Reducing the Number of Naval Surface Reserve Force Operating Budget Holders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young, Eric

    1997-01-01

    .... This thesis examines one of Commander Naval Surface Reserve Force's initiatives for reducing the current number of Operating Budget holder's Comptroller Departments without sacrificing efficiency...

  17. Project Overview of the Naval Postgraduate School Spacecraft Architecture and Technology Demonstration Experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reuer, Charles

    2001-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School's current attempt at getting another spacecraft into orbit is focusing on Naval Postgraduate School Spacecraft Architecture and Technology Demonstration Experiment (NPSAT1...

  18. Implementation of gas concentration measurement systems using mass spectrometry in containment thermal-hydraulics test facilities: different approaches for calibration and measurement with steam/air/helium mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auban, O.; Malet, J.; Brun, P.; Brinster, J.; Quillico, J. J.; Studer, E.

    2003-01-01

    . This work concerns measurement of steam-air-helium mixtures of any composition distributed in pressurized vessels. The developed systems provide concentration point measurements at typically a few tens of different locations in the facility vessels. This paper will give an overview of the three different measurement systems and will address the main difficulties encountered to develop these systems such as those related to the sample pressure reduction or to the presence of water vapor. The paper focuses on different attempts and approaches to generate the calibration gas mixtures containing water vapor and calibrate the QMS. Even if the calibration procedures still have to be improved, some recently acquired data are here to prove the promising achievements of the technique

  19. State of Washington Department of Health Radioactive air emissions notice of construction phase 1 for spent nuclear fuel project - cold vacuum drying facility, project W-441

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnbaugh, J.E.

    1996-08-15

    This notice of construction (NOC) provides information regarding the source and the estimated annual possession quantity resulting from operation of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). Additional details on emissions generated by the operation of the CVDF will be discussed again in the Phase 11 NOC. This document serves as a NOC pursuant to the requirements of WAC 246-247-060 for the completion of Phase I NOC, defined as the pouring of concrete for the foundation flooring, construction of external walls, and construction of the building excluding the installation of CVDF process equipment. A Phase 11 NOC will be submitted for approval prior to installing and is defined as the completion of the CVDF, which consisted installation of process equipment, air emissions control, and emission monitoring equipment. About 80 percent of the U.S. Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory is stored under water in the Hanford Site K Basins. Spent nuclear fuel in the K West Basin is contained in closed canisters while the SNF in the K East Basin is in open canisters, which allow free release of corrosion products to the K East Basin water.

  20. Facile and Scalable Fabrication of Highly Efficient Lead Iodide Perovskite Thin-Film Solar Cells in Air Using Gas Pump Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bin; Gao, Lili; Liang, Lusheng; Chu, Qianqian; Song, Xiaoxuan; Li, Yan; Yang, Guanjun; Fan, Bin; Wang, Mingkui; Li, Chengxin; Li, Changjiu

    2016-08-10

    Control of the perovskite film formation process to produce high-quality organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite thin films with uniform morphology, high surface coverage, and minimum pinholes is of great importance to highly efficient solar cells. Herein, we report on large-area light-absorbing perovskite films fabrication with a new facile and scalable gas pump method. By decreasing the total pressure in the evaporation environment, the gas pump method can significantly enhance the solvent evaporation rate by 8 times faster and thereby produce an extremely dense, uniform, and full-coverage perovskite thin film. The resulting planar perovskite solar cells can achieve an impressive power conversion efficiency up to 19.00% with an average efficiency of 17.38 ± 0.70% for 32 devices with an area of 5 × 2 mm, 13.91% for devices with a large area up to 1.13 cm(2). The perovskite films can be easily fabricated in air conditions with a relative humidity of 45-55%, which definitely has a promising prospect in industrial application of large-area perovskite solar panels.

  1. Analysis of Civilian Employee Attrition at the Naval Postgraduate School and Naval Support Activity - Monterey Bay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valverde, Xavier

    1997-01-01

    ...) and Naval Support Activity-Monterey Bay (NSA-MB) to determine what civilian non-faculty employee jobs are likely to be left vacant in the next three years due to attrition and to identify what training and skills will be needed by personnel whose...

  2. The Importance of Submarine Tenders to a Modern Naval War: Naval Combat Logistics and Seabasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-28

    concern of political risk or consequences of sovereignty . 15. SUBJECT TERMS TENDER, SEABASING, SUBMARINE MAINTENANCE, NAVAL COMBAT LOGISTICS...anywhere in the world’s oceans, with minimal concern of political risk or consequences of sovereignty . 1 INTRODUCTION...logistics beyond the basic peacetime considerations of food and fuel. If a maritime conflict occurs in a distant theatre, the Navy will find that it

  3. 32 CFR 724.406 - Commander, Naval Medical Command.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Commander, Naval Medical Command. 724.406 Section 724.406 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NAVAL DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARD Principal Elements of the Navy Department Discharge Review System § 724.406 Commander...

  4. Web-Based Naval Fleet Logistics Information System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Yanfeng

    2007-01-01

    ... and execution, and as an information system for corporate knowledge management. The capability of a Web-based system will optimize Naval supply chain operations, significantly reduce man-hours, provide a mechanism for continuous process improvement, and enable the Naval supply system to become a learning organization.

  5. Doing Business with the Office of Naval Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    DOING BUSINESS WITH THE OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Ms. Vera M. Carroll Acquisition Branch Head ONR BD 251 1 Report Documentation Page Form...COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Doing Business with the Office of Naval Research 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  6. Naval Blockade and the Humanitarian Crisis in Yemen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fink, M.D.

    A Saudi Arabia-led coalition is supporting the Yemeni Government with military means against the Houthis in Yemen. Part of those military operations are naval operations off the coast of Yemen that aim to stop the influx of weapons meant for the Houthis. It is viewed that these naval enforcement

  7. U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps 2009 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    for the Naval Sea Cadet Corps. I salute your service to our Nation in developing future leaders. Bravo Zulu and keep charging! ttr’"-- U.S...Minutemen, NLCC, sponsored by Channel Isles Council, NLUS, CA. The NSCC Hall of Fame Award: Awarded to a founder or volunteer U.S. Naval Sea Cadet

  8. Naval S and T Strategy: Innovations for the Future Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-20

    collectively paint a picture of the future naval force that today’s initiatives will help build. Scientists and engineers at the Naval Research...breakthrough solutions that shape the future force (e.g., Global Positioning System (GPS), radar, autonomous systems, graphene , QuikClot and many more

  9. Airborne Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — AFRL's Airborne Evaluation Facility (AEF) utilizes Air Force Aero Club resources to conduct test and evaluation of a variety of equipment and concepts. Twin engine...

  10. Mass Properties Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is used to acquire accurate weight, 3 axis center of gravity and 3 axis moment of inertia measurements for air launched munitions and armament equipment.

  11. Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) is a blow-down, non-vitiated (clean air) free-jet wind tunnel capable of testing large-scale, propulsion systems at Mach 5, 6,...

  12. Un chantier naval à Hochiminh-Ville

    OpenAIRE

    Bogani, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Cet article s’intéresse à trois types de bateaux au Vietnam qui naviguaient sur les fleuves et les eaux du Delta et servaient principalement au transport. Leur description, associée à L’étude d’un chantier naval, permet de dégager les constantes et les innovations concernant les bateaux en bois. La description de la filière économique et technique menant à la réalisation d’un bateau permet de comprendre le rôle des différents acteurs impliqués (propriétaires, architectes, ouvriers et parmi eu...

  13. Clinical Evaluation of an Adhesive Sealant for Controlling Dental Caries in Naval Personnel: One-Year Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-20

    safeguards were employed in that a voltage monitoring strip chart recorder was employed during sealant placement to ensure continuous delivery of...adequate voltage to the ultraviolet light source (Nuva- Lite)* used for sealant polymerization. Also, a new air compressor** with suitable...ment effect in young Naval personnel. 2. The very low occlusal attack rate for untreated control teeth 3. Dirks, O. B., Houwink, B. and Kwant , G. W

  14. The Sundown of the United States Marine Corps Naval Flight Officer Military Occupational Specialties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    EIA-6B Electronics Warfare Officer (EWO) will complete their training in FY2015 and FY2017, respectively, with the last Fl A-18D and El A-6B squadrons...Capability (IOC) of the F-4 Phantom, A-6 Intruder, and the OV -10 Bronco introduced the requirement for Naval Flight Officers and Aerial Observers (AO...Officer (ECMO) to target Surface to Air Radars during the Vietnam War and was subsequently replaced by the four-seat E/A-6B. The OV-10 Bronco , roc in

  15. 32 CFR 700.406 - Naval Vessel Register, classification of naval craft, and status of ships and service craft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... craft, and status of ships and service craft. 700.406 Section 700.406 National Defense Department of... Register, classification of naval craft, and status of ships and service craft. (a) The Chief of Naval... craft and the designation of status for each ship and service craft. (b) Commissioned vessels and craft...

  16. 33 CFR 165.1302 - Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bangor Naval Submarine Base... Bangor Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, WA. (a) Location. The following is a security zone: The waters of... States Naval vessels. (ii) Vessels that are performing work at Naval Submarine Base Bangor pursuant to a...

  17. FLAME facility: The effect of obstacles and transverse venting on flame acceleration and transition on detonation for hydrogen-air mixtures at large scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, M.P.; Tieszen, S.R.; Benedick, W.B.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes research on flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) for hydrogen-air mixtures carried out in the FLAME facility, and describes its relevance to nuclear reactor safety. Flame acceleration and DDT can generate high peak pressures that may cause failure of containment. FLAME is a large rectangular channel 30.5 m long, 2.44 m high, and 1.83 m wide. It is closed on the ignition end and open on the far end. The three test variables were hydrogen mole fraction (12--30%), degree of transverse venting (by moving steel top plates---0%, 13%, and 50%), and the absence or presence of certain obstacles in the channel (zero or 33% blockage ratio). The most important variable was the hydrogen mole fraction. The presence of the obstacles tested greatly increased the flame speeds, overpressures, and tendency for DDT compared to similar tests without obstacles. Different obstacle configurations could have greater or lesser effects on flame acceleration and DDT. Large degrees of transverse venting reduced the flame speeds, overpressures, and possibility of DDT. For small degrees of transverse venting (13% top venting), the flame speeds and overpressures were higher than for no transverse venting with reactive mixtures (>18% H 2 ), but they were lower with leaner mixtures. The effect of the turbulence generated by the flow out the vents on increasing flame speed can be larger than the effect of venting gas out of the channel and hence reducing the overpressure. With no obstacles and 50% top venting, the flame speeds and overpressures were low, and there was no DDT. For all other cases, DDT was observed above some threshold hydrogen concentration. DDT was obtained at 15% H 2 with obstacles and no transverse venting. 67 refs., 62 figs

  18. Final sitewide environmental assessment for continued development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), Natrona County, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Secretary of Energy is required by law to explore, prospect, conserve, develop, use, and operate the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. The Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-258), requires that the Naval Petroleum Reserves be produced at their maximum efficient rate (MER), consistent with sound engineering practices, for a period of six years. To fulfill this mission, DOE is proposing continued development activities which would include the drilling of approximately 250 oil production and injection (gas, water, and steam) wells, the construction of between 25 and 30 miles of associated gas, water, and steam pipelines, the installation of several production and support facilities, and the construction of between 15 and 20 miles of access roads. These drilling and construction estimates include any necessary activities related to the operation of the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). The purpose of RMOTC will be to provide facilities and necessary support to government and private industry for testing and evaluating new oilfield and environmental technologies, and to transfer these results to the petroleum industry through seminars and publications. Continued development activities either have no potential to result in adverse environmental impacts or would only result in adverse impacts that could be readily mitigated. The small amounts of disturbed surface area will be reclaimed to its original natural state when production operations terminate. The preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and the DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 73 refs.

  19. Final sitewide environmental assessment for continued development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), Natrona County, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The Secretary of Energy is required by law to explore, prospect, conserve, develop, use, and operate the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves. The Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-258), requires that the Naval Petroleum Reserves be produced at their maximum efficient rate (MER), consistent with sound engineering practices, for a period of six years. To fulfill this mission, DOE is proposing continued development activities which would include the drilling of approximately 250 oil production and injection (gas, water, and steam) wells, the construction of between 25 and 30 miles of associated gas, water, and steam pipelines, the installation of several production and support facilities, and the construction of between 15 and 20 miles of access roads. These drilling and construction estimates include any necessary activities related to the operation of the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC). The purpose of RMOTC will be to provide facilities and necessary support to government and private industry for testing and evaluating new oilfield and environmental technologies, and to transfer these results to the petroleum industry through seminars and publications. Continued development activities either have no potential to result in adverse environmental impacts or would only result in adverse impacts that could be readily mitigated. The small amounts of disturbed surface area will be reclaimed to its original natural state when production operations terminate. The preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and the DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). 73 refs

  20. Physics Research at the Naval Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Timothy

    2001-03-01

    The United States Naval Research Laboratory conducts a broad program of research into the physical properties of matter. Studies range from low temperature physics, such as that associated with superconducting systems to high temperature systems such as laser produced or astrophysical plasmas. Substantial studies are underway on surface science and nanoscience. Studies are underway on the electronic and optical properties of materials. Studies of the physical properties of the ocean and the earth’s atmosphere are of considerable importance. Studies of the earth’s sun particularly as it effects the earth’s ionosphere and magnetosphere are underway. The entire program involves a balance of laboratory experiments, field experiments and supporting theoretical and computational studies. This talk will address NRL’s funding of physics, its employment of physicists and will illustrate the nature of NRL’s physics program with several examples of recent accomplishments.

  1. LCEs for Naval Reactor Benchmark Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W.J. Anderson

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this engineering calculation is to document the MCNP4B2LV evaluations of Laboratory Critical Experiments (LCEs) performed as part of the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology program. LCE evaluations documented in this report were performed for 22 different cases with varied design parameters. Some of these LCEs (10) are documented in existing references (Ref. 7.1 and 7.2), but were re-run for this calculation file using more neutron histories. The objective of this analysis is to quantify the MCNP4B2LV code system's ability to accurately calculate the effective neutron multiplication factor (k eff ) for various critical configurations. These LCE evaluations support the development and validation of the neutronics methodology used for criticality analyses involving Naval reactor spent nuclear fuel in a geologic repository

  2. Web-Based Naval Fleet Logistics Information System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Yanfeng

    2007-01-01

    .... This project proposes the implementation of a Web-Based Logistics Information System to act as a single platform for Naval supply chain and shipboard customers for effective logistics planning...

  3. U.S. Employment of Naval Mines: A Chronology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edlow, Sabrina

    1997-01-01

    .... Naval mines first evolved as a weapon during the Revolutionary War. The United States employed them during both World Wars, most notably the North Sea Barrage in WWI and Operations Starvation in WWII...

  4. Study of Naval Officers' Attitudes Toward Homosexuals in the Military

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hicknell, John

    2000-01-01

    This study examines the attitudes of Naval officers concerning homosexuals in the military, including trends in attitudes over the past six years and understanding of the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy...

  5. Integration of Commercial Mobile Satellite Services into Naval Communications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stone, Cary

    1997-01-01

    Mobile Satellite Services (MSS) need to be integrated into Naval Communications. DoD SATCOM military owned systems fall well short of meeting DoD SATCOM requirements in general and mobile SATCOM specifically...

  6. Sea Basing: Evolutionary Naval Doctrine and Military Transformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gentry, Robin

    2004-01-01

    .... Sea Basing through a combination of naval platforms provides the bridge for the American military forces between the advance force operations needed to prepare the battlespace and the war-winning...

  7. Efficient Academic Scheduling at the U.S. Naval Academy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zane, David

    2003-01-01

    This research project examined academic scheduling problems at the U.S. Naval Academy. The focus was on devising methods to construct good final exam schedules and improve existing course schedules by facilitation course changes...

  8. Supply and Demand for Business Education in Naval Aviation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gray, Obra L

    2005-01-01

    .... As pilots and Naval Flight Officers evolve from Mission Commander to Commanding Officer, they must be equipped with the requisite business skill sets to engage the challenge of balancing aircraft...

  9. Supply and Demand for Business Education in Naval Aviation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gray, Obra L

    2005-01-01

    ... modernization with current readiness. This project analyzes the supply and demand for postgraduate business education to determine how prepared Naval Aviation is to achieve long-term transformation objectives...

  10. Military Construction: Renovation Plans at the Portsmouth Naval Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    The Portsmouth Naval Medical Center is a teaching hospital that provides comprehensive health care services to active duty forces and, when space is available, provides medical services to other DOD beneficiaries (i.e...

  11. Structuring Naval Special Warfare junior officer professional military education

    OpenAIRE

    Donovan, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    Naval Special Warfare does not currently have a designated career path for an officer that requires professional military education (PME) for SEAL junior officers after the rank of Ensign (O-1) and before the rank of Lieutenant Commander (O-4). There currently is interest in this subject matter at the Naval Special Warfare Command and Center. SEAL officers increasingly hold key leadership positions and influence critical decisions in the execution of national strategy. This growing respo...

  12. Writing to Think: The Intellectual Journey of a Naval Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    a new system of alliances and economic structures to avoid another Great Depression and to inoculate as much of the world as possible against the...POPULAR IN NAVAL AVIATION As we approach 2011, the centennial year of aviation in the U.S. Navy, the jet engine and jet-powered aircraft have become...put into fast, gas-guzzling jets. It was a lethal combination. As the centennial of naval aviation approaches, it is interesting to observe that it has

  13. A Summary of the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-30

    Objective: To provide statistical analysis support to the Naval Analysis Programs to assess the impact of OSHA on Navy Programs. The primary task is to...the total in estimating efficiently the amount of asbestiform in Naval installations. Also participated in two workshops to assess the impact of OSHA on... Malaysia Since 1965, Capt. Ronald Toms, USA. "Arms Transfer to The Korean Peninsula, 1945-1979: Impact and Implications, Capt. Richard P. Cassidy, USA

  14. Patient Workload Profile: National Naval Medical Center (NNMC), Bethesda, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    AD-A09a 729 WESTEC SERVICES NC SAN DIEGOCA0S / PATIENT WORKLOAD PROFILE: NATIONAL NAVAL MEDICAL CENTER NNMC),- ETC(U) JUN 80 W T RASMUSSEN, H W...provides site workload data for the National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) within the following functional support areas: Patient Appointment...on managing medical and patient data, thereby offering the health care provider and administrator more powerful capabilities in dealing with and

  15. Naval Arctic Research Laboratory (NARL) Subsurface Containment Berm Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Degree-Days CRREL Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory ERDC U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center FWENC Foster Wheeler ...contract with the Navy, Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation (FWENC) constructed a subsurface containment berm at the airfield of the Naval...659J91.61 ncURE 3- 3 NAVAl.. AACnC R(Sf.ARCH l,.ASORATORY POINT 9ARROW. AlASKA AS-BUILT CONTAINMENT BERM EXTENSION AND MONITORING WELLS FOSTER W

  16. Dosimetry intercomparisons between fast neutron radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almond, P.R.; Smith, A.R.; Smathers, J.B.; Otte, V.A.

    1975-01-01

    Neutron dosimetry intercomparisons have been made between M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Naval Research Laboratory, University of Washington Hospital, and Hammersmith Hospital. The parameters that are measured during these visits are: tissue kerma in air, tissue dose at depth of dose maximum, depth dose, beam profiles, neutron/gamma ratios and photon calibrations of ionization chambers. A preliminary report of these intercomparisons will be given including a comparison of the calculation and statement of tumor doses for each institution

  17. Results from a portable Adaptive Optics system on the 1 meter telescope at the Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restaino, Sergio R.; Gilbreath, G. Charmaine; Payne, Don M.; Baker, Jeffrey T.; Martinez, Ty; DiVittorio, Michael; Mozurkewich, David; Friedman, Jeffrey

    2003-02-01

    In this paper we present results using a compact, portable adaptive optics system. The system was developed as a joint venture between the Naval Research Laboratory, Air Force Research Laboratory, and two small, New Mexico based-businesses. The system has a footprint of 18x24x18 inches and weighs less than 100 lbs. Key hardware design characteristics enable portability, easy mounting, and stable alignment. The system also enables quick calibration procedures, stable performance, and automatic adaptability to various pupil configurations. The system was tested during an engineering run in late July 2002 at the Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station one-meter telescope. Weather prevented extensive testing and the seeing during the run was marginal but a sufficient opportunity was provided for proof-of-concept, initial characterization of closed loop performance, and to start addressing some of the most pressing engineering and scientific issues.

  18. ENSEMBLE and AMET: Two Systems and Approaches to a Harmonized, Simplified and Efficient Facility for Air Quality Models Development and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complexity of air quality modeling systems, air quality monitoring data make ad-hoc systems for model evaluation important aids to the modeling community. Among those are the ENSEMBLE system developed by the EC-Joint Research Center, and the AMET software developed by the US-...

  19. Compressed Air System Renovation Project Improves Production at a Food Processing Facility: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) BestPractices Technical Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wogsland, J.

    2001-01-01

    This case study is one in a series on industrial firms who are implementing energy efficient technologies and system improvements into their manufacturing processes. This case study documents the activities, savings, and lessons learned on the food processing facility project

  20. La Enseñanza Naval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieto Manso, Emilio J.

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Not available

    La situación mundial en los albores del siglo XXI presenta un escenario de drásticos y rápidos cambios que, naturalmente, afectan también a los ámbitos de Seguridad y Defensa. La Armada, consciente de que su centro de gravedad reside en la calidad humana y competencia profesional de los hombres y mujeres que la componen, se enfrenta al futuro con el decidido propósito de potenciar su enseñanza y formación. El Director de Enseñanza Naval, tras una breve descripción de los diferentes niveles de enseñanza y centros docentes con que cuenta actualmente la Armada, centra su artículo en un acertado análisis de los factores determinantes que han conducido a un proceso de reestructuración para racionalizar los medios disponibles y mejorar la calidad de la enseñanza, finalizando su presentación con una síntesis sobre las principales líneas de actuación a corto y medio plazo, y la implantación progresiva de un ambicioso Plan de Innovación Tecnológica de la Enseñanza en la Armada.

  1. Statistical Analysis and Time Series Modeling of Air Traffic Operations Data From Flight Service Stations and Terminal Radar Approach Control Facilities : Two Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    Two statistical procedures have been developed to estimate hourly or daily aircraft counts. These counts can then be transformed into estimates of instantaneous air counts. The first procedure estimates the stable (deterministic) mean level of hourly...

  2. Demonstrating practical application of soil and groundwater clean-up and recovery technologies at natural gas processing facilities: Bioventing, air sparging and wetlands remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, B.

    1996-01-01

    This issue of the project newsletter described the nature of bioventing, air sparging and wetland remediation. It reviewed their effectiveness in remediating hydrocarbon contaminated soil above the groundwater surface. Bioventing was described as an effective, low cost treatment in which air is pumped below ground to stimulate indigenous bacteria. The bacteria then use the oxygen to consume the hydrocarbons, converting them to CO 2 and water. Air sparging involves the injection of air below the groundwater surface. As the air rises, hydrocarbons are stripped from the contaminated soil and water. The advantage of air sparging is that it cleans contaminated soil and water from below the groundwater surface. Hydrocarbon contamination of wetlands was described as fairly common. Conventional remediation methods of excavation, trenching, and bellholes to remove contamination often cause extreme harm to the ecosystem. Recent experimental evidence suggests that wetlands may be capable of attenuating contaminated water through natural processes. Four hydrocarbon contaminated wetlands in Alberta are currently under study. Results to date show that peat's high organic content promotes sorption and biodegradation and that some crude oil spills can been resolved by natural processes. It was suggested that assuming peat is present, a good clean-up approach may be to contain the contaminant source, monitor the lateral and vertical extent of contamination, and wait for natural processes to resolve the problem. 3 figs

  3. Petroleum production at Maximum Efficient Rate Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This document provides an analysis of the potential impacts associated with the proposed action, which is continued operation of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. I (NPR-1) at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER) as authorized by Public law 94-258, the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (Act). The document also provides a similar analysis of alternatives to the proposed action, which also involve continued operations, but under lower development scenarios and lower rates of production. NPR-1 is a large oil and gas field jointly owned and operated by the federal government and Chevron U.SA Inc. (CUSA) pursuant to a Unit Plan Contract that became effective in 1944; the government's interest is approximately 78% and CUSA's interest is approximately 22%. The government's interest is under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The facility is approximately 17,409 acres (74 square miles), and it is located in Kern County, California, about 25 miles southwest of Bakersfield and 100 miles north of Los Angeles in the south central portion of the state. The environmental analysis presented herein is a supplement to the NPR-1 Final Environmental Impact Statement of that was issued by DOE in 1979 (1979 EIS). As such, this document is a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)

  4. Changing the surface properties on naval steel as result of non-thermal plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatiuc, B.; Sabău, A.; Dumitrache, C. L.; Hnatiuc, M.; Crețu, M.; Astanei, D.

    2016-08-01

    The problem of corrosion, related to Biofouling formation, is an issue with very high importance in the maritime domain. According to new rules, the paints and all the technologies for the conditioning of naval materials must fulfil more restrictive environmental conditions. In order to solve this issue, different new clean technologies have been proposed. Among them, the use of non-thermal plasmas produced at atmospheric pressure plays a very important role. This study concerns the opportunity of plasma treatment for preparation or conditioning of naval steel OL36 type. The plasma reactors chosen for the experiments can operate at atmospheric pressure and are easy to use in industrial conditions. They are based on electrical discharges GlidArc and Spark, which already proved their efficiency for the surface activation or even for coatings of the surface. The non-thermal character of the plasma is ensured by a gas flow blown through the electrical discharges. One power supply has been used for reactors that provide a 5 kV voltage and a maximum current of 100 mA. The modifications of the surface properties and composition have been studied by XPS technique (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy). There were taken into consideration 5 samples: 4 of them undergoing a Mini-torch plasma, a Gliding Spark, a GlidArc with dry air and a GlidArc with CO2, respectively the fifth sample which is the untreated witness. Before the plasma treatment, samples of naval steel were processed in order to obtain mechanical gloss. The time of treatment was chosen to 12 minutes. In the spectroscopic analysis, done on a ULVAC-PHI, Inc. PHI 5000 Versa Probe scanning XPS microprobe, a monocromated Al Kα X-ray source with a spot size of 100 μm2 was used to scan each sample while the photoelectrons were collected at a 45-degree take-off angle. Differences were found between atomic concentrations in each individual case, which proves that the active species produced by each type of plasma affects

  5. Environmental assessments on schools located on or near former industrial facilities: Feedback on attenuation factors for the prediction of indoor air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derycke, Virginie; Coftier, Aline; Zornig, Clément; Léprond, Hubert; Scamps, Mathilde; Gilbert, Dominique

    2018-06-01

    One of the goals of the French national campaign called "Etablissements Sensibles (Sensitive Establishments)" is to evaluate indoor air degradation in schools because of vapor intrusion of volatile compounds from soil gases towards the indoor air, related to the presence of former industrial sites on or near the establishment. During this campaign, as recommended by the United States of Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), indoor air quality was evaluated from soil gas concentrations using generic attenuation factors, and extra investigations into soil gases and indoor air were performed when the estimated values exceeded target indoor air concentrations. This study exploits matched data on subsurface soil gases and indoor air that came from the "Sensitive Establishments" campaign. It aims to consolidate and refine the use of attenuation factors as a function of environmental variables acquired routinely during environmental assessments. We have been able to select the measured environmental variables that have the most influence on vapor intrusion using Principal Components Analysis and hypotheses tests. Since the collected data are mainly related to weak sources (only 15% schools required risk management measures related to vapor intrusion), halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOC) were selected as tracer compounds for vapor intrusion for this study. This choice enables the exclusion or minimization of background sources contributions. From the results we have calculated the descriptive statistics of the attenuation factors distribution for the subslab-to-indoor air pathway and refined the attenuation factors for this pathway through an easily obtained parameter, building age. Qualitative comparison of attenuation factors according to the building age shows that attenuation factors observed for building less than 50 years are lower than attenuation factors for buildings 50 years old and above. These results show the utility of creating databases for

  6. An Exploratory Assessment of the United States Naval Academy Ethical Decision Making Instrument

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beyer, Jr, Wayne R

    2007-01-01

    ...). The study answered two questions regarding moral development at the Naval Academy. The first question involved determining if there is a difference in moral thinking between year groups at the Naval Academy...

  7. The Role of the Company Officer at the United States Naval Academy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moxey, Tyrel

    2001-01-01

    ... contributing or not contributing to the mission of the United States Naval Academy. The author conducted 30 questionnaires on the 30 Company Officers stationed at the Naval Academy during this period...

  8. Analysis of the Retention and Affiliation Factors Affecting the Active and Reserve Naval Nurse Corps

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Messmer, Scott J; Pizanti, Kimberly A

    2007-01-01

    ...) an empirical analysis to analyze characteristics of those who are retained in the active Naval Nurse Corps and those who affiliate with the reserve Naval Nurse Corps using multivariate logit regressions...

  9. Improving Leadership Training at the United States Naval Academy by Utilizing Interactive Multimedia Instruction (IMI)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kawane, Shannon

    1999-01-01

    ... a program consistent with the Naval Academy's leadership training philosophy. The results suggest that an IMI program can be developed that is consistent with the Naval Academy's leadership development program...

  10. 75 FR 2490 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School Training Operations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... Importing Marine Mammals; Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School Training Operations Activities at Eglin...) for authorization to take marine mammals, by harassment, incidental to Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal School (NEODS) training operations, military readiness activities, at Eglin AFB, FL from...

  11. 76 FR 14379 - Subcommittee Meeting of the Board of Advisors to the President, Naval Postgraduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    ... on the Naval Service's Postgraduate Education Program and the collaborative exchange and partnership... of the NPS and the Naval War College Committee will follow at a later date. Individuals without a DoD...

  12. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Clear Air Act notice of construction for the spent nuclear fuel project - Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, project W-441

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbaugh, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    This document provides information regarding the source and the estimated quantity of potential airborne radionuclide emissions resulting from the operation of the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility. The construction of the CVD Facility is scheduled to commence on or about December 1996, and will be completed when the process begins operation. This document serves as a Notice of Construction (NOC) pursuant to the requirements of 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61 for the CVD Facility. About 80 percent of the U.S. Department of Energy's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) inventory is stored under water in the Hanford Site K Basins. Spent nuclear fuel in the K West Basin is contained in closed canisters, while the SNF in the K East Basin is in open canisters, which allow release of corrosion products to the K East Basin water. Storage of the current inventory in the K Basins was originally intended to be on an as-needed basis to sustain operation of the N Reactor while the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant was refurbished and restarted. The decision in December 1992 to deactivate the PURF-X Plant left approximately 2,100 MT (2,300 tons) of uranium as part of the N Reactor SNF in the K Basins with no means for near-term removal and processing. The CVD Facility will be constructed in the 100 Area northwest of the 190 K West Building, which is in close proximity to the K East and K West Basins (Figures 1 and 08572). The CVD Facility will consist of five processing bays, with four of the bays fully equipped with processing equipment and the fifth bay configured as an open spare bay. The CVD Facility will have a support area consisting of a control room, change rooms, and other functions required to support operations

  13. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  14. Indoor Air Quality in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    This web site will educate the public about indoor environmental issues specific to educational facilities and the importance of developing and sustaining comprehensive indoor air quality management programs.

  15. 9 CFR 3.102 - Facilities, indoor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facilities, indoor. 3.102 Section 3... Marine Mammals Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.102 Facilities, indoor. (a) Ambient temperature. The air and water temperatures in indoor facilities shall be sufficiently regulated by heating or...

  16. Endangered Species Program Naval Petroleum Reserves in California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    The Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) are operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Construction and development activities, which are conducted by DOE at Naval Petroleum Reserve number-sign 1 (NPR-1) to comply with the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-258), potentially threaten the continued existence of four federally-listed endangered species: the San Joaquin kit fox, (Vulpes macrotis mutica), blunt-nosed leopard lizard (Gambelia silus), giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens), and Tipton kangaroo rat (Dipodomys nitratoides nitratoides). All four are protected under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The major objective of the Endangered Species Program on NPR-1 and NPR-2 is to provide DOE with the scientific expertise and continuity of programs necessary for continued compliance with the Endangered Species Act. The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress and results of the Endangered Species Program made during Fiscal Year 1990 (FY90)

  17. Mystery of the First Russian Rifle Naval Guns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas W. Mitiukov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In 1859 France completed the first ocean-going ironclad warship, «La Gloire», and changed the definition of naval power completely. Russia, as all the other Powers, found that her most powerful naval gun, the 60-pdr, was insufficient for modern warfare, and realized the future naval armament relied on heavy rifled artillery. Both the Army and Navy began purchasing such cannon from foreign providers until a suitable domestic weapon could be produced. The relationship between the Russian military and Krupp is well known. But there was another provided, the Blakely Ordnance Company in England sold many guns to the Army and Navy, beginning with 8-inch MLR in early 1863 to a large number of 9- and 11-inch guns. Deliveries began in November 1863 and continued until mid-1866. But no sources on the armament of Russian ships and fortresses mentions these guns. What happened to them is a mystery.

  18. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Naval Base Kitsap, Bremerton, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joseph L.; Johnson, Kenneth H.; Frans, Lonna M.

    2016-08-18

    Information about groundwater-flow paths and locations where groundwater discharges at and near Puget Sound Naval Shipyard is necessary for understanding the potential migration of subsurface contaminants by groundwater at the shipyard. The design of some remediation alternatives would be aided by knowledge of whether groundwater flowing at specific locations beneath the shipyard will eventually discharge directly to Sinclair Inlet of Puget Sound, or if it will discharge to the drainage system of one of the six dry docks located in the shipyard. A 1997 numerical (finite difference) groundwater-flow model of the shipyard and surrounding area was constructed to help evaluate the potential for groundwater discharge to Puget Sound. That steady-state, multilayer numerical model with homogeneous hydraulic characteristics indicated that groundwater flowing beneath nearly all of the shipyard discharges to the dry-dock drainage systems, and only shallow groundwater flowing beneath the western end of the shipyard discharges directly to Sinclair Inlet.Updated information from a 2016 regional groundwater-flow model constructed for the greater Kitsap Peninsula was used to update the 1997 groundwater model of the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. That information included a new interpretation of the hydrogeologic units underlying the area, as well as improved recharge estimates. Other updates to the 1997 model included finer discretization of the finite-difference model grid into more layers, rows, and columns, all with reduced dimensions. This updated Puget Sound Naval Shipyard model was calibrated to 2001–2005 measured water levels, and hydraulic characteristics of the model layers representing different hydrogeologic units were estimated with the aid of state-of-the-art parameter optimization techniques.The flow directions and discharge locations predicted by this updated model generally match the 1997 model despite refinements and other changes. In the updated model, most

  19. 76 FR 1386 - Safety Zone; Centennial of Naval Aviation Kickoff, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Centennial of Naval Aviation Kickoff, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA AGENCY: Coast... zone on the navigable waters of San Diego Bay in San Diego, CA in support of the Centennial of Naval... February 12, 2010, the Centennial of Naval Aviation Kickoff will take place in San Diego Bay. In support of...

  20. Operational Maneuver and Fires: A Role for Naval Forces in Land Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-15

    34 Military Review, (February 1983), 13-34. Drury , M.T., "Naval Strike Warfare and the Outer Battle." Naval Forces, Vol.VII, (1986), 46-49. Fedyszn...Fort Leavenworth, KS., June 1987. Martin, Cormander Colin L., "Tomahawk Technology and the Maritime Strategy." Paper, Naval War College, Newport, RI

  1. 30 CFR 218.101 - Royalty and rental remittance (naval petroleum reserves).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Royalty and rental remittance (naval petroleum... INCENTIVES Oil and Gas, Onshore § 218.101 Royalty and rental remittance (naval petroleum reserves). Remittance covering payments of royalty or rental on naval petroleum reserves must be accomplished by...

  2. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  3. The Maritime Strategy Debates: A Guide to the Renaissance of U.S. Naval Strategic in the 1980s. Revision 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-30

    1986, there’s always 10 percent who don’t get the word. ** Drury , F., "Naval Strike Warfare and the Outer Air Battle," Naya1 Forces IV/1986, pp 46-52...debate. * Gray, Colin S., "Keeping the Soviets Landlocked: Geostrategy for a Maritime America," The National Interest, Summer 1986, pp 24-36. Masterful...discussion of the relationships between geopolitics and the Maritime Strategy. ** Gray, Colin S., Maritime Strategy, Geopolitics, and the Defense of the

  4. Exposição ocupacional a compostos orgânicos voláteis na indústria naval Occupational exposure to volatile organic compounds in the naval industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima Barrozo da Costa

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this study involved the evaluation of the concentration of some volatile organic compounds in the internal environmental air of a naval shipyard in the State of Rio de Janeiro, during painting activities in enclosed, semi-enclosed and open areas. Xylene was the volatile compound found in greatest abundance (25.20 to 191.66 ppm in the locations researched. Benzene in the air, which is a carcinogenic substance, attained levels of 3.34 ppm in semi-enclosed environments and the highest levels of toluene, xylene and n-butanol were found in the enclosed space of the ship. Results obtained highlight the need to establish air quality control programs in these internal areas, in order to safeguard the health of the workers.

  5. Non-Federal Facilities National Application -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Navigation and Administrative tool to monitor Air Traffic Facilities from inception to commissioning. Ability to track field inspections and analysis. It influences...

  6. Geohydrologic site characterization of the municipal solid waste landfill facility, US Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyta, Cynthia G.

    1996-01-01

    Geohydrologic conditions of the Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Facility (MSWLF) on the U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery Center and Fort Bliss, El Paso County, Texas, were evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army. The 106.03-acre MSWLF has been in operation since January 1974. The landfill contains household refuse, Post solid wastes, bulky items, grass and tree trimmings from family housing, refuse from litter cans, construction debris, classified waste (dry), dead animals, asbestos, and empty oil cans. The MSWLF, located about 1,200 feet east of the nearest occupied structure, is estimated to receive an average of approximately 56 tons of municipal solid waste per day and, at a fill rate of 1-4 acres per year, is expected to reach its capacity by the year 2004. The MSWLF is located in the Hueco Bolson, 4 miles east of the Franklin Mountains. Elevations at the MSWLF range from 3,907 to 3,937 feet above sea level. The climate at the MSWLF and vicinity is arid continental, characterized by an abundance of sunny days, high summer temperatures, relatively cool winters typical of arid areas, scanty rainfall, and very low humidity throughout the year. Average annual temperature near the MSWLF and vicinity is 63.3 degrees Fahrenheit and annual precipitation is 7.8 inches. Potential evaporation in the El Paso area was estimated to be 65 inches per year. Soils at and adjacent to the MSWLF are nearly level to gently sloping, have a fine sandy loam subsoil, and are moderately deep over caliche. The MSWLF is underlain by Hueco Bolson deposits of Tertiary age and typically are composed of unconsolidated to slightly consolidated interbedded sands, clay, silt, gravel, and caliche. Individual beds are not well defined and range in thickness from a fraction of an inch to about 100 feet. The primary source of ground water in the MSWLF area is in the deposits of the Hueco Bolson. A relatively thick vadose zone of approximately 300 feet overlies the

  7. Training in radiological protection at the Institute of Naval Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, P.E.; Robb, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Training Division at the Institute of Naval Medicine, Alverstoke, UK, provides courses in radiological protection for government and military personnel who are radiation protection supervisors, radiation safety officers, members of naval emergency monitoring teams and senior medical officers. The course programmes provide formal lectures, practical exercises and tabletop exercises. The compliance of the Ministry of Defence with the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 and the implementation of Ministry of Defence instructions for radiological protection rely to a large extent on its radiation protection supervisors understanding of the training he receives. Quality assurance techniques are therefore applied to the training. (author)

  8. Forward Deployed Naval Forces in the Republic of the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    French prior to World War II. The United States has also stationed naval forces in areas that were previously colonized such as the Philippines after the...Forward Deployed Naval Forces is not a new concept or strategy. In fact, it was utilized by other nations such as the British and French prior to World...the west, to the Cook Islands in the east, and from Russia in the north, to New Zealand in the south The region covers an area from Mongolia in the

  9. Aircraft Horizontal Thrust Measurement Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility is designed to support the DoD mission by providing unique air vehicle installed engine performance (thrust output) measurements. This system consists...

  10. Region 7 Title V facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This web map shows the Region 7 Title V facilities (Clean Air Act major sources), any Class I areas within 300 km of R7 States, and any Tribal areas within 50 miles...

  11. Automated radiological monitoring at a Russian Ministry of Defence Naval Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Pomerville, J.; Gavrilov, S.; Kisselev, V.; Daniylan, V.; Belikov, A.; Egorkin, A.; Sokolovski, Y.; Endregard, M.; Krosshavn, M.; Sundling, C.V.; Yokstad, H.

    2001-01-01

    The Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) Program is a cooperative effort between the military establishments of the Kingdom of Norway, the Russian Federation, and the US. This paper discusses joint activities conducted over the past year among Norwegian, Russian, and US technical experts on a project to develop, demonstrate and implement automated radiological monitoring at Russian Navy facilities engaged in the dismantlement of nuclear-powered strategic ballistic missile launching submarines. Radiological monitoring is needed at these facilities to help protect workers engaged in the dismantlement program and the public living within the footprint of routine and accidental radiation exposure areas. By providing remote stand-alone monitoring, the Russian Navy will achieve added protection due to the defense-in-depth strategy afforded by local (at the site), regional (Kola) and national-level (Moscow) oversight. The system being implemented at the Polyaminsky Russian Naval Shipyard was developed from a working model tested at the Russian Institute for Nuclear Safety, Moscow, Russia. It includes Russian manufactured terrestrial and underwater gamma detectors, smart controllers for graded sampling, radio-modems for offsite transmission of the data, and a data fusion/display system: The data fusion/display system is derived from the Norwegian Picasso AMEC Environmental Monitoring software package. This computer package allows monitoring personnel to review the real-time and historical status of monitoring at specific sites and objects and to establish new monitoring protocols as required, for example, in an off-normal accident situation. Plans are being developed to implement the use of this system at most RF Naval sites handling spent nuclear fuel

  12. Assessment and remediation of odor emissions from a complex industrial facility (Ambient air odor regulations in Canada and the United States)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boose, T.; Reusing, G.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the findings of a review and presents examples of ambient air odor regulations in Canada and the United States. State and provincial odor regulations were reviewed and other metropolitan cities or counties (regions) that have separate odor regulations were also included. The key topics addressed in this paper include an assessment of the methods used for odor regulation and the methods used to evaluate the odor impact to determine compliance with the regulation. Three types of ambient air odor regulations were identified: 1. 28 States, Provinces and regions (jurisdictions) have specific odor regulations. These regulations generally define what constitutes an odor impact and typically provide requirements for remedial measures; 2. 25 jurisdictions regulate odors by a general prohibition regulation. These regulations define odor in ambient air as a condition of air pollution, nuisance or objectionable odor that would typically prevent persons from the enjoyment of life and property; and 3. 13 jurisdictions do not have specific or general prohibition regulations regarding odors. For the jurisdictions that have specific or general prohibition odor regulations, there are a number of different techniques used to define what constitutes an odor impact. Odor impacts are typically defined in a regulation by one (or more) of the following techniques: dilution to threshold, or odor unit limit; determination of odor emission rates; odor concentration limits for selected chemicals (ppm); comparison with the n-butanol intensity scale (1 to 8); and investigation by an agency investigator. Compliance with odor regulations is typically determined using one (or more) of the following field methods: odor stack testing and dispersion modelling; odor panel analysis of stack or ambient air samples; chemical monitoring (ppm); odor school certified / agency investigator; and scentometer. (author)

  13. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talarico, M.A., E-mail: talaricomarco@hotmail.com [Marinha do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao do Porgrama de Submarino com Propulsao Nuclear; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  14. Considerations about the licensing process of special nuclear industrial facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talarico, M.A.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e

    2015-01-01

    This paper brings a discussion about the challenges involved in the development of a new kind of nuclear facility in Brazil, a naval base for nuclear submarines, with attention to the licensing process and considerations about the risk-informed decision making application to the licensing process. Initially, a model of such a naval base, called in this work, special industrial facility, is proposed, with its systems and respective sets of basic requirements, in order to make it possible the accomplishment of the special industrial facility support function to the nuclear submarine. A discussion about current challenges to overcome in this project is presented: the challenges due to the new characteristics of this type of nuclear facility; existence of several interfaces between the special industrial facilities systems and nuclear submarine systems in design activities; lack of specific regulation in Brazil to allow the licensing process of special industrial facilities by the nuclear safety authority; and comments about the lack of information from reference nuclear facilities, as is the case with nuclear power reactors (for example, the German Grafenrheinfeld nuclear plant is the reference plant for the Brazilian Angra 2 nuclear plant). Finally, in view of these challenges, an analysis method of special industrial facility operational scenarios to assist the licensing process is proposed. Also, considerations about the application of risk-informed decision making to the special industrial facility activity and licensing process in Brazil are presented. (author)

  15. Grassland birds wintering at U.S. Navy facilities in southern Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodin, Marc C.; Skoruppa, Mary Kay; Bryan, Pearce D.; Ruddy, Amanda J.; Hickman, Graham C.

    2010-01-01

    Grassland birds have undergone widespread decline throughout North America during the past several decades. Causes of this decline include habitat loss and fragmentation because of conversion of grasslands to cropland, afforestation in the East, brush and shrub invasion in the Southwest and western United States, and planting of exotic grass species to enhance forage production. A large number of exotic plant species, including grasses, have been introduced in North America, but most research on the effects of these invasions on birds has been limited to breeding birds, primarily those in northern latitudes. Research on the effects of exotic grasses on birds in winter has been extremely limited.This is the first study in southern Texas to examine and compare winter bird responses to native and exotic grasslands. This study was conducted during a period of six years (2003–2009) on United States Navy facilities in southern Texas including Naval Air Station–Corpus Christi, Naval Air Station–Kingsville, Naval Auxiliary Landing Field Waldron, Naval Auxiliary Landing Field Orange Grove, and Escondido Ranch, all of which contained examples of native grasslands, exotic grasslands, or both. Data from native and exotic grasslands were collected and compared for bird abundance and diversity; ground cover, vegetation density, and floristic diversity; bird and vegetation relationships; diversity of insects and arachnids; and seed abundance and diversity. Effects of management treatments in exotic grasslands were evaluated by comparing numbers and diversity of birds and small mammals in mowed, burned, and control areas.To determine bird abundance and bird species richness, birds were surveyed monthly (December–February) during the winters of 2003–2008 in transects (100 meter × 20 meter) located in native and exotic grasslands distributed at all five U.S. Navy facilities. To compare vegetation in native and exotic grasslands, vegetation characteristics were measured

  16. The Integration of the Naval Unmanned Combat Aerial System (N-UCAS) into the Future Naval Air Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    5 Table 1. Aircraft Combat Radius from World War II (WWII) Through 1990s6 Period  Airframe  Distance  WW2   F6F  400nm     TBF  400nm     SB2C...override the computers, take control, and guide his two bombs to target by infrared video imagery. Otherwise, our auto piloted computer was programmed

  17. Dance Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Dudley, Ed.; Irey, Charlotte, Ed.

    This booklet represents an effort to assist teachers and administrators in the professional planning of dance facilities and equipment. Three chapters present the history of dance facilities, provide recommended dance facilities and equipment, and offer some adaptations of dance facilities and equipment, for elementary, secondary and college level…

  18. Exploration of Logistics Information Technology (IT) Solutions for the Royal Saudi Naval Force Within the Saudi Naval Expansion Program II (SNEP II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT EXPLORATION OF LOGISTICS INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT) SOLUTIONS FOR THE...INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT) SOLUTIONS FOR THE ROYAL SAUDI NAVAL FORCE WITHIN THE SAUDI NAVAL EXPANSION PROGRAM II (SNEP II) 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S...Expansion Program II (SNEP II). A part of this program includes upgrading and rebuilding its information technology (IT) infrastructure. The United

  19. LIGA 2. An improved computer code for the calculation of the local individual submersion dose in off-air plumes from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohloff, F.; Brunen, E.

    1981-08-01

    A model is presented to calculate the γ-submersion dose of persons which are exposed to off-air plumes. This model integrates the dose contributions of the spacial volume elements, taking into account the wheather dependent extension of the plume as well as γ-absorption and scattering in air. For data evaluation an essentially improved code LIGA II has been developed, leading to a higher accuracy due to an adequate application of Gauss integrations in MACRO-technique. The short-term propagation factors are calculated for a grid distance of 10-160 km with a logarithmic scale and for a 5 degree angular grid. As is shown by a sensitivity analysis, the mean values of the short-term propagation factors within a sector can be obtained by a simple Simpson-integration. These calculations have been performed explicitly for 10 degree and 30 degree sectors. (orig.) [de

  20. The Naval Ocean Vertical Aerosol Model : Progress Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, G. de; Gathman, S.G.; Davidson, K.L.; Jensen, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Naval Oceanic Vertical Aerosol Model (NOVAM) has been formulated to estimate the vertical structure of the optical and infrared extinction coefficients in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). NOVAM was designed to predict the non-uniform and non-logarithmic extinction profiles which are

  1. Verification of the Naval Oceanic Vertical Aerosol Model During Fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, K.L.; Leeuw, G. de; Gathman, S.G.; Jensen, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Naval Oceanic Vertical Aerosol Model (NOVAM) has been formulated to estimate the vertical structure of the optical and infrared extinction coefficients in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL), for waverengths between 0,2 and 40 um. NOVAM was designed to predict, utilizing a set of

  2. south african naval personnel seconded to the royal navy during

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cdr H. R. Gordon-Cumming has written that in the early days of the Second World War large drafts of RNVR (SA) officers and ratings were taken by the few British Warships which called at. Simonstown and Durban to make up their war complements and that later on 'Union nationals took part in nearly every major naval ...

  3. Human factors in operational maintenance on future naval vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, W.M.; Schreurs, J.C.; Rakhorst-Oudendijk, M.L.W.; Badon Ghijben, N.A.; Diggelen, J. van

    2014-01-01

    The increasing complexity of operational maintenance on naval platforms and the need to sustain this also in battle conditions are in conflict with the requirement for crew reduction. This asks for a new approach. The Netherlands MoD knows how to develop technical solutions for operational

  4. Noa laev Armastuse tänaval / Anneli Sihvart

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sihvart, Anneli, 1964-

    2010-01-01

    Tallinnas Laboratooriumi tänaval asuva Ukraina Kultuurikeskuse juht ja ukraina kreeka-katoliku kiriku Tallinna koguduse vanem, kunstnik Anatoli Ljutjuk ootab meistreid ja lapsi voolima Noa laeva loomakujukesi. Grusbeke torni tuleb Tallinna Noa laev ohustatud liikidele. Noa laeva loomisele eelnenud projektidest, pühapäevakoolist, Laboratooriumi tänavast

  5. ABOUT THE STUDY OF THE THERMAL STRESS FOR NAVAL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANASASE PRUIU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are presented and analyzed the effects of thermal expansion on gas evacuation piping from naval power plants an d technical protection possibilities to prevent structures from deformations; also are analyzed the possibilities for the use of thermal expansion for tightening the main screws for power plant propulsion.

  6. Office of Naval Research: Solid and Structural Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belytschenko, T.; Murphy, W.P.; Bernitsas, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this report is to pursue a new paradigm for basic research in Solid and Structural Mechanics in order to serve the needs of the Navy of the 21st century. The framework for the report was established through meetings of the committee with Navy engineers and Office of Naval Research...

  7. TACOP : A cognitive agent for a naval training simulation environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doesburg, W.A. van; Heuvelink, A.; Broek, E.L. van den

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes how cognitive modeling can be exploited in the design of software agents that support naval training sessions. The architecture, specifications, and embedding of the cognitive agent in a simulation environment are described. Subsequently, the agent's functioning was evaluated in

  8. Acoustic Signature Monitoring and Management of Naval Platforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basten, T.G.H.; Jong, C.A.F. de; Graafland, F.; Hof, J. van 't

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic signatures make naval platforms susceptible to detection by threat sensors. The variable operational conditions and lifespan of a platform cause variations in the acoustic signature. To deal with these variations, a real time signature monitoring capability is being developed, with advisory

  9. Demonstration of Sensor Data Integration Across Naval Aviation Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    Concepts, Programs and Processes; Maintenance Unit Department, Division Organization; Manpower Management ; and Aviation Officers.” http...Naval Aviation Maintenance Alejandra Jolodosky and Adi Zolotov February 2018 This work was performed under Federal Government Contract...underutilized sensor data. CNA proposed a pilot program that integrated sensor data across maintenance levels to expedite repairs of aviation parts

  10. Naval Aviation Integrated Logistics: Technical users guide version 1. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLozier, R.C.; Holder, D.A.

    1987-06-01

    This document summarizes the operational and analytical functions of version 1.0 of the Naval Aviation Integrated Logistic (NAIL) package. NAIL, a logistics management and analysis system, creates standardized reports and performs several categories of statistical operations in support of NAVAIR logistic analytic functions.

  11. An Autonomous Distributed Control System for Naval Platforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.A.A.J.; Logtmeijer, R.A.; Bodegraven, K.S. van

    2009-01-01

    The success of the missions of naval ships depends highly on the availability of sensor, weapon, and command systems. These systems depend on support systems such as chilled water systems and electrical power systems. Disturbances caused by technical problems or battle damage may result in

  12. TACOP: A Cognitive Agent for a Naval Training Simulation Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doesburg, W.A.; Verbeeck, K.; Heuvelink, A.; Tuyls, K.; Nowé, A.; van den Broek, Egon; Manderick, B.; Kuijpers, B.

    2005-01-01

    The full version of this paper appeared in: Doesburg, W. A. van, Heuvelink, A., and Broek, E. L. van den (2005). TACOP: A cognitive agent for a naval training simulation environment. In M. Pechoucek, D. Steiner, and S. Thompson (Eds.), Proceedings of the Industry Track of the Fourth International

  13. Re-engineering production systems: the Royal Netherlands Naval Dockyard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijm, Willem H.M.

    1996-01-01

    Reengineering production systems in an attempt to meet tight cost, quality and leadtime standards has received considerable attention in the last decade. In this paper, we discuss the reengineering process at the Royal Netherlands Naval Dockyard. The process starts with a characterisation and a

  14. Naval War College Review. Volume 62, Number 2, Spring 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    India, Japan, the United States, Indonesia, Malaysia , and Australia would almost certainly bolster their own naval forces and would also likely seek to...formulated by Capt. Sir Basil H. Lid- dell Hart (who corresponded with Eccles from the early 1950s until shortly before Lid- dell Hart’s death in 1970

  15. Undergraduate Astronautics at the United States Naval Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagaria, William J.

    1991-01-01

    The aerospace engineering curriculum at the U.S. Naval Academy which includes an astronautical and an aeronautical track is described. The objective of the program is to give students the necessary astronautical engineering background to perform a preliminary spacecraft design during the last semester of the program. (KR)

  16. A Summary of the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program, 1982

    OpenAIRE

    Faculty of the Naval Postgraduate School

    1982-01-01

    Approved For Public Release; Distribution Unlimited This report contains 224 summaries on research projects which were carried out under funding to the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program. This research was carried out in the areas of Computer Science, Mathematics, Administrative Sciences, Operations Research, National Security Affairs, Physics and Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, Meterology, Aeronautics, Oceanography and Mechanical Engineering. The Table of Content...

  17. A Summary of the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program, 1981

    OpenAIRE

    Faculty of the Naval Postgraduate School

    1981-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. This report contains 230 summaries on research projects which were carried out under funding to the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program. This research was carried out in the areas of Computer Science, Mathematics, Administrative Sciences, Defense Resources Management, Operations Resear-h, National Security Affairs, Physics and Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, Meterology, Aeronautics, Oceanography and Mechanical...

  18. A Summary of the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program, 1983

    OpenAIRE

    Faculty of the Naval Postgraduate School

    1983-01-01

    Approved For Public Release; Distribution Unlimited This report contains 249 summaries on research projects which were carried out under funding to the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program. This research was carried out in the areas of Computer Science, Mathematics, Administrative Sciences, Operations Research, National Security Affairs, Physics, Electrical Engineering, Meterology, Aeronautics, Oceanography and Mechanical Engineering. The Table of Contents identifies t...

  19. A Summary of the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program, 1984

    OpenAIRE

    Faculty of the Naval Postgraduate School

    1984-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. This report contains 221 summaries on research projects which were carried out under funding to the Naval Postgraduate School Research Program. This research was carried out in the areas of Computer Science, Mathematics, Administrative Sciences, Operations Research, National Security Affairs, Physics, Electrical Engineering, Meterology, Aeronautics, Oceanography and Mechanical Engineering. The Table of Contents identifies ...

  20. Naval Sea Systems Command > Home > Warfare Centers > NSWC Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    . Richard A. Braunbeck III Capt. Stephen H. Murray, left, salutes his relief, Capt. Richard A. Braunbeck III -321 NORCO, Calif. (Dec. 7, 2016) Capt. Stephen H. Murray, commanding officer of Naval Surface... https ): Dewin Andujar (Virtual Reality); Nicholas Manning (Maritime Capture the Flag); Stephen O'Grady

  1. Naval S&T Strategy: Innovations For The Future Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    promote fundamental knowledge expansion to collectively paint a picture of the future naval force that today’s initiatives will help build. Scientists and... graphene , QuikClot and many more). In fiscally austere times like today, there is great pressure to tie S&T more closely to R&D technology

  2. Index of Oral Histories Relating to Naval Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Navy research and development that are available in major U. S. repositories. In a sense, it is a companion to the broader U. S. Naval History Sources...Director, his work with the FAA, and his hobbies, including old cars and a penchant for Shakespeare . Repositories: NWC, DTNSRDC, NHC Individuals

  3. Naval War College Review. Volume 63, Number 1, Winter 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Impeccable Incident. Summer 2009:101–11 Raymond, Catherine Zara . Piracy and Armed Robbery in the Malacca Strait: A Problem Solved? Summer 2009:31–42...an Old Problem: Report of the Naval War College Workshop on Countering Maritime Piracy. Autumn 2009:141–54 Raymond, Catherine Zara . Piracy and Armed

  4. Examination of Sandwich Materials Using Air-Coupled Ultrasonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borum, K.K.; Berggreen, Carl Christian

    2004-01-01

    The air-coupled ultrasonic techniques have been improved drastically in recent years. Better equipment has made this technique much more useful. This paper focuses on the examination of sandwich materials used in naval ships. It is more convenient to be able to make the measurements directly...

  5. Sumatera Air Asia Training Center (Arsitektur Metafora)

    OpenAIRE

    Susanto, William

    2015-01-01

    Sumatera Air Asia Training Center as Air Asia training facility’s construction have a propose to train the Air Asia air craft crew who will be the employee of the Air Asia Airlines.Beside the main function;training facility for the Air Asia Crew; the other airline’s crew can be train by a cooperation with Air Asia.The aircraft crew that can be train in this facility is pilot initial, pilot type-rating, pilot recurrent, ATPL, Flight attendant initial and recurrent..This facility ha...

  6. HISTORY OF NAVAL ARMOUR CALCULATION IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUMBETLIAN Garabet

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article below describes the history of thick plate calculation in Romania and its impact and recognition by the Department of Defense-“DoD” (Executive Department of the Government of the United States of America. The DoD has three subordinated departments: Army, Navy and Air Force. In addition, there are many Defense Agencies, such as the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and schools, including the National Defense University [1].

  7. An application-oriented concept for calculating environmental impacts through exhaust air emissions from nuclear facilities for sites in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenk, H.D.

    1978-02-01

    For the purposes of this study, the ecological area affected in connection with the radiation exposure of man has been subdivided into a number of major sub-areas (dispersion in air, migration in soil and in vegetation as well as transfer into the food chain, activity distribution in the human organism), enabling an independent analysis, and a relatively synoptic description of the individual sub-areas by means of specific transfer functions. This method permits a largely independent approach to the great variety of individual problems, and a successive adaption to the respective state of scientific knowledge. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Permitting Considerations for Installation of Inlet Air Foggers on Simple Cycle Combustion Turbines at the Duke Power Lincoln Combustion Turbine Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  9. Characterization of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K, and {sup 226}Ra in NORM and Air Particulate Occurring from Phosphate Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yoon Hee; Lim, Jong Myoung; Ji, Young Yong; Kim, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Chang Jong; Park, Ji Yong; Chung, Kun Ho; Kang, Mun Ja [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, radio-activities of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K, and {sup 226}Ra occurring in raw materials and by-products at phosphate processing facility were complementally determined using ED-XRF, γ-spectrometry and ICP-MS method. Although the degree of immersion in the human body varies depending on the particle size and density, the particle size is especially used as a key factor in assessing dose. Thus, size distribution characteristics of {sup 238}U concentrations in airborne particulates collected at the phosphate processing facility were also evaluated. The naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are widely spread throughout the environment, it occupies the largest part of public radioactivity exposure. According to report of the US National Academy of Sciences, 82% of the human radiation dose received annually comes from the natural radionuclides. Radiation exposure doses from natural radionuclides is not significantly concerned level compared to those from artificial radionuclides which could be released into the environment by nuclear tests and power plant accident. It could make a serious risk problem to unspecific public when exposed to the natural radionuclides during long-term period at high activity concentration levels. Therefore, it is essential to make a professional and systematic approach for the proper handling and diminution.

  10. An Agent-Based Model for Analyzing Control Policies and the Dynamic Service-Time Performance of a Capacity-Constrained Air Traffic Management Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Sheila R.

    2006-01-01

    Simple agent-based models may be useful for investigating air traffic control strategies as a precursory screening for more costly, higher fidelity simulation. Of concern is the ability of the models to capture the essence of the system and provide insight into system behavior in a timely manner and without breaking the bank. The method is put to the test with the development of a model to address situations where capacity is overburdened and potential for propagation of the resultant delay though later flights is possible via flight dependencies. The resultant model includes primitive representations of principal air traffic system attributes, namely system capacity, demand, airline schedules and strategy, and aircraft capability. It affords a venue to explore their interdependence in a time-dependent, dynamic system simulation. The scope of the research question and the carefully-chosen modeling fidelity did allow for the development of an agent-based model in short order. The model predicted non-linear behavior given certain initial conditions and system control strategies. Additionally, a combination of the model and dimensionless techniques borrowed from fluid systems was demonstrated that can predict the system s dynamic behavior across a wide range of parametric settings.

  11. Facile Synthesis of Defect-Rich and S/N Co-Doped Graphene-Like Carbon Nanosheets as an Efficient Electrocatalyst for Primary and All-Solid-State Zn-Air Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Huang; Zhu, Jiawei; Hu, Pei; Hang, Chao; Yang, Jinlong; Peng, Tao; Mu, Shichun; Huang, Yunhui

    2017-07-26

    Developing facile and low-cost porous graphene-based catalysts for highly efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) remains an important matter for fuel cells. Here, a defect-enriched and dual heteroatom (S and N) doped hierarchically porous graphene-like carbon nanomaterial (D-S/N-GLC) was prepared by a simple and scalable strategy, and exhibits an outperformed ORR activity and stability as compared to commercial Pt/C catalyst in an alkaline condition (its half-wave potential is nearly 24 mV more positive than Pt/C). The excellent ORR performance of the catalyst can be attributed to the synergistic effect, which integrates the novel graphene-like architectures, 3D hierarchically porous structure, superhigh surface area, high content of active dopants, and abundant defective sites in D-S/N-GLC. As a result, the developed catalysts are used as the air electrode for primary and all-solid-state Zn-air batteries. The primary batteries demonstrate a higher peak power density of 252 mW cm -2 and high voltage of 1.32 and 1.24 V at discharge current densities of 5 and 20 mA cm -2 , respectively. Remarkably, the all-solid-state battery also exhibits a high peak power density of 81 mW cm -2 with good discharge performance. Moreover, such catalyst possesses a comparable ORR activity and higher stability than Pt/C in acidic condition. The present work not only provides a facile but cost-efficient strategy toward preparation of graphene-based materials, but also inspires an idea for promoting the electrocatalytic activity of carbon-based materials.

  12. Logistics Supply of the Distributed Air Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Event Graph The Consumption Process first instantiates the variables . The model follows a conveyor belt pattern, whereby after processing an event...the following problem statement: Design a system of systems and the concept of operations to employ naval air assets in a range of missions to augment...airbases are designed to be set up within three days, utilizing highways as short runways for the Short Take Off Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft F

  13. Waste Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset was developed from the Vermont DEC's list of certified solid waste facilities. It includes facility name, contact information, and the materials...

  14. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  15. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  16. Technical Feasibility Study for Deployment of Ground-Source Heat Pump Systems: Portsmouth Naval Shipyard -- Kittery, Maine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillesheim, M.; Mosey, G.

    2014-11-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Lands initiative, engaged the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct feasibility studies to assess the viability of developing renewable energy generating facilities on contaminated sites. Portsmouth Naval Shipyard (PNSY) is a United States Navy facility located on a series of conjoined islands in the Piscataqua River between Kittery, ME and Portsmouth, NH. EPA engaged NREL to conduct a study to determine technical feasibility of deploying ground-source heat pump systems to help PNSY achieve energy reduction goals.

  17. Contamination movement around a permeable reactive barrier at Solid Waste Management Unit 12, Naval Weapons Station Charleston, North Charleston, South Carolina, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Petkewich, Matthew D.; Conlon, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast investigated natural and engineered remediation of chlorinated volatile organic compound groundwater contamination at Solid Waste Management Unit 12 at the Naval Weapons Station Charleston, North Charleston, South Carolina, beginning in 2000. In early 2004, groundwater contaminants began moving around the southern end of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) installed by a consultant in December 2002. The PRB is a 130-foot-long and 3-foot-wide barrier consisting of varying amounts of zero-valent iron with or without sand mixture. Contamination moving around the PRB probably has been transported at least 75 feet downgradient from the PRB at a rate of about 15 to 29 feet per year.

  18. Outline of NUCEF facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, Isao

    1996-01-01

    NUCEF is a multipurpose research facility in the field of safety and advanced technology of nuclear fuel cycle back-end. Various experiment facilities and its supporting installations, in which nuclear fuel materials, radio isotopes and TRU elements can be handled, are arranged in more than one hundred rooms of two experiment buildings. Its construction was completed in middle of 1994 and hot experiments have been started since then. NUCEF is located on the site (30,000 m 2 ) of southeastern part in the Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI facing to the Pacific Ocean. The base of Experiment Buildings A and B was directly founded on the rock existing at 10-15 m below ground level taking the aseismatic design into consideration. Each building is almost same sized and composed of one basement and three floors of which area is 17,500 m 2 in total. In the basement, there are exhaust facilities of ventilation system, treatment system of solution fuel and radioactive waste solution and storage tanks of them. Major experiment facilities are located on the first or the second floors in each building. An air-inlet facility of ventilation system for each building is equipped on the third floor. Most of experiment facilities for criticality safety research including two critical facilities: Static Experiment Critical Facility (STACY) and Transient Experiment Critical Facility (TRACY) are installed in Experiment Building A. Experiment equipments for research on advanced fuel reprocessing process and on TRU waste management, which are named BECKY (Back End Fuel Cycle Key Elements Research Facility), are installed in laboratories and a-g cells in Experiment Building B. (J.P.N.)

  19. Method and device for the containment of air-smoke-mixtures contaminated radioactively or with poisonous material in case of fires in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morlock, G.; Wiesemes, J.; Bachner, D.

    1977-01-01

    The devices of this method prevent the emission of radioactive or poisonous polutants to the environment, e.g. of a nuclear power plant, even then if the filters normally designed for this purpose become in effective through the influence of the fire. Smoke alarms and/or temperature sensors guide the contaminated air-smoke mixture through rooms with frothing agents by means of controlled valves and additional ventilators; the foam to be produced absorbes the polutants. The ventilators generate the required flow direction as well as sufficient flow rate. Water pools arranged between the valves and the foam tanks totally or pastly ret din water-soluble or not volatile substances before the foam is applied and/or extinguish glowing particles. (HP) [de

  20. Data recovery program to mitigate the effects of the construction of space transportation system facilities on seven archaeological sites on Vandenberg Air Force Base, Santa Barbara County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glassow, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    A plan is proposed for the recovery of data from three prehistoric habitation sites, 4-SBa-539, 670, and 931, which will be adversely affected by the Space Transportation System Project, Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. Phase II testing suggests that SBa-539 and 670, fall within the Late Period, AD 1000 to European contact, with a possible Middle-Period component at 670, while SBa-931, radiocarbon-dated to BC 6000, represents the Early Period, or Millingstone Horizon, of Southern California prehistory. Excavation will utilize conventional fine scale techniques and specialized sample collection. Data analysis will provide information on prehistoric subsistence and settlement patterns, inter-regional trade, and functions of distinctive artifact types. Cultural change will be identified and comparisons made between cultural developments of Vandenberg and neighboring regions