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Sample records for facility management descriptions

  1. Management control system description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bence, P. J.

    1990-10-01

    This Management Control System (MCS) description describes the processes used to manage the cost and schedule of work performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Richland, Washington. Westinghouse Hanford will maintain and use formal cost and schedule management control systems, as presented in this document, in performing work for the DOE-RL. This MCS description is a controlled document and will be modified or updated as required. This document must be approved by the DOE-RL; thereafter, any significant change will require DOE-RL concurrence. Westinghouse Hanford is the DOE-RL operations and engineering contractor at the Hanford Site. Activities associated with this contract (DE-AC06-87RL10930) include operating existing plant facilities, managing defined projects and programs, and planning future enhancements. This document is designed to comply with Section I-13 of the contract by providing a description of Westinghouse Hanford's cost and schedule control systems used in managing the above activities. 5 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Subsurface Facility System Description Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-31

    The Subsurface Facility System encompasses the location, arrangement, size, and spacing of the underground openings. This subsurface system includes accesses, alcoves, and drifts. This system provides access to the underground, provides for the emplacement of waste packages, provides openings to allow safe and secure work conditions, and interfaces with the natural barrier. This system includes what is now the Exploratory Studies Facility. The Subsurface Facility System physical location and general arrangement help support the long-term waste isolation objectives of the repository. The Subsurface Facility System locates the repository openings away from main traces of major faults, away from exposure to erosion, above the probable maximum flood elevation, and above the water table. The general arrangement, size, and spacing of the emplacement drifts support disposal of the entire inventory of waste packages based on the emplacement strategy. The Subsurface Facility System provides access ramps to safely facilitate development and emplacement operations. The Subsurface Facility System supports the development and emplacement operations by providing subsurface space for such systems as ventilation, utilities, safety, monitoring, and transportation.

  3. High Exposure Facility Technical Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Gregory L.; Stithem, Arthur R.; Murphy, Mark K.; Smith, Alex K.

    2008-02-12

    The High Exposure Facility is a collimated high-level gamma irradiator that is located in the basement of the 318 building. It was custom developed by PNNL back in 1982 to meet the needs for high range radiological instrument calibrations and dosimeter irradiations. At the time no commercially available product existed that could create exposure rates up to 20,000 R/h. This document is intended to pass on the design criteria that was employed to create this unique facility, while maintaining compliance with ANSI N543-1974, "General Safety Standard for Installations Using Non-Medical X-Ray and Sealed Gamma-Ray Sources, Energies up to 10 MeV."

  4. Facility Environmental Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is the Web site of the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) facility Environmental Management System (EMS)....

  5. Samarbejdsformer og Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Kresten

    Resultater fra en surveyundersøgelse om fordele og ulemper ved forskellige samarbejdsformer indenfor Facilities Management fremlægges.......Resultater fra en surveyundersøgelse om fordele og ulemper ved forskellige samarbejdsformer indenfor Facilities Management fremlægges....

  6. Samarbejdsformer og Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Kresten

    Resultater fra en surveyundersøgelse om fordele og ulemper ved forskellige samarbejdsformer indenfor Facilities Management fremlægges.......Resultater fra en surveyundersøgelse om fordele og ulemper ved forskellige samarbejdsformer indenfor Facilities Management fremlægges....

  7. Sustainable Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Elle, Morten; Hoffmann, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    The Danish public housing sector has more than 20 years of experience with sustainable facilities management based on user involvement. The paper outlines this development in a historical perspective and gives an analysis of different approaches to sustainable facilities management. The focus...... is on the housing departments and strateies for the management of the use of resources. The research methods used are case studies based on interviews in addition to literature studies. The paper explores lessons to be learned about sustainable facilities management in general, and points to a need for new...

  8. FACILITIES MANAGEMENT AT CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Recently we have been confronted with difficulties concerning services which are part of a new contract for facilities management. Please see below for some information about this contract. Following competitive tendering and the Finance Committee decision, the contract was awarded to the Swiss firm 'Facilities Management Network (FMN)'. The owners of FMN are two companies 'M+W Zander' and 'Avireal', both very experienced in this field of facilities management. The contract entered into force on 1st July 2002. CERN has grouped together around 20 different activities into this one contract, which was previously covered by separate contracts. The new contract includes the management and execution of many activities, in particular: Guards and access control; cleaning; operation and maintenance of heating plants, cooling and ventilation equipment for buildings not related to the tunnel or the LHC; plumbing; sanitation; lifts; green areas and roads; waste disposal; and includes a centralised helpdesk for these act...

  9. World Class Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Ole Emil; Jensen, Per Anker

    2013-01-01

    Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet.......Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet....

  10. World Class Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmstrøm, Ole Emil; Jensen, Per Anker

    2013-01-01

    Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet.......Alle der med entusiasme arbejder med Facilities Management drømmer om at levere World Class. DFM drømmer om at skabe rammer og baggrund for, at vi i Danmark kan bryste os at være blandt de førende på verdensplan. Her samles op på, hvor tæt vi er på at nå drømmemålet....

  11. St. James marine terminal facility description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns and operates a marine terminal on the west bank of the Mississippi River at St. James, Louisiana. The St. James facility was constructed by the Department to provide marine services associated with the fill and drawdown of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) crude oil storage facilities located at Bayou Choctaw and Weeks Island, Louisiana. Although strategic to the mission of the SPR in the event of a national emergency, the St. James terminal is situated such that it has a high potential to also serve the commercial industry`s needs for crude oil terminalling and storage. The St. James terminal is located approximately 45 miles west of New Orleans and 30 miles southeast of Baton Rouge, and approximately 160 miles upstream from the mouth of the Mississippi River. Construction of the St. James terminal was initiated in 1978 and was completed in 1980. Since then, the terminal has received and transferred over 125 million barrels of crude oil to the SPR sites for storage. For crude oil distribution, the St. James terminal was connected to the neighboring LOCAP terminal by a 0.1 mile 36-inch pipeline in 1981 and to the Capline terminal by a 0.5 mile 30-inch pipeline in 1988. The terminal also has a 30-inch pipeline connection to the Koch oil terminal which was used for initial fill purposes; however, this pipeline has been disconnected and is currently inactive. A complete description of the St. James terminal facilities, operational capabilities, operational certifications, and future Government requirements are presented in Sections 2, 3, 4, and 5 respectively.

  12. GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

    2002-05-31

    THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

  13. 48 CFR 970.3770 - Facilities management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facilities management. 970... REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Facilities Management Contracting 970.3770 Facilities management....

  14. 1993 baseline solid waste management system description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armacost, L.L.; Fowler, R.A.; Konynenbelt, H.S.

    1994-02-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has prepared this report under the direction of Westinghouse Hanford Company. The report provides an integrated description of the system planned for managing Hanford`s solid low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, transuranic waste, and transuranic mixed waste. The primary purpose of this document is to illustrate a collective view of the key functions planned at the Hanford Site to handle existing waste inventories, as well as solid wastes that will be generated in the future. By viewing this system as a whole rather than as individual projects, key facility interactions and requirements are identified and a better understanding of the overall system may be gained. The system is described so as to form a basis for modeling the system at various levels of detail. Model results provide insight into issues such as facility capacity requirements, alternative system operating strategies, and impacts of system changes (ie., startup dates). This description of the planned Hanford solid waste processing system: defines a baseline system configuration; identifies the entering waste streams to be managed within the system; identifies basic system functions and waste flows; and highlights system constraints. This system description will evolve and be revised as issues are resolved, planning decisions are made, additional data are collected, and assumptions are tested and changed. Out of necessity, this document will also be revised and updated so that a documented system description, which reflects current system planning, is always available for use by engineers and managers. It does not provide any results generated from the many alternatives that will be modeled in the course of analyzing solid waste disposal options; such results will be provided in separate documents.

  15. CHARM Facility Test Area Radiation Field Description

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Specification document summarising the radiation field of the CHARM facility test area. This will act as a guide to any potential users of the facility as to what they can expect in terms of radiation, given in the form of radiation spectra information and fluence for each test position, along with general radiation maps for the test area and Montrac test location.

  16. Data Management Facility Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, Nicole N

    2014-06-30

    The Data Management Facility (DMF) is the data center that houses several critical Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility services, including first-level data processing for the ARM Mobile Facilities (AMFs), Eastern North Atlantic (ENA), North Slope of Alaska (NSA), Southern Great Plains (SGP), and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites, as well as Value-Added Product (VAP) processing, development systems, and other network services.

  17. Knowledge Map of Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nenonen, Suvi; Jensen, Per Anker; Lindahl, Göran

    2014-01-01

    in creating an inventory of knowledge (i.e. the knowledge base) and developing/improving the processes of knowledge sharing in research, education and practice. Theory Knowledge mapping is discussed in terms of knowledge management. The research is connected to knowledge mapping in the facilities management......Purpose This paper aims to draft a knowledge map of the fragmented and multidisciplinary research of and relevant to FM. Facilities management knowledge map is a tool for presenting what relevant data and knowledge, a.k.a. knowledge, resides in different disciplines. Knowledge mapping is a step...... profession, research and education. The knowledge map aims to contrast perspectives on how to map interdisciplinary research. Design/methodology/approach The Knowledge map is based on classification of 83 articles, including volume 2013 of Facilities (40 articles) and of Journal of Facilities Management (21...

  18. CLAIMS OF SUSTAINABLE FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to provide an overview of current practices within the emergent management discipline: Sustainable Facilities Management (SFM). Background: To develop a sustainable society, facilities managers must become change agents for sustainability in the built...... environment. Facilities Management (FM) is contributing to the environmental, social and economical problems, but can at the same time also be a part of the solution. However, to integrate sustainability in FM is still an emergent niche within FM, and the examples of SFM so far seems to come out of very...... understandings of SFM are identified which have different strategic approaches: • The incremental: Limit environmental impact from organisation activities • The radical: Towards a vision of a sustainable future • The transformative: Going beyond the organisation to establish new partnerships for co...

  19. CLAIMS OF SUSTAINABLE FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    FM strategy and with the organisations general integration of sustainability as a value in core business. The general FM strategy and the role of sustainability in core business seem to be the most dominating factors for the possibilities for even starting to realise an SFM strategy. Three......Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to provide an overview of current practices within the emergent management discipline: Sustainable Facilities Management (SFM). Background: To develop a sustainable society, facilities managers must become change agents for sustainability in the built...... environment. Facilities Management (FM) is contributing to the environmental, social and economical problems, but can at the same time also be a part of the solution. However, to integrate sustainability in FM is still an emergent niche within FM, and the examples of SFM so far seems to come out of very...

  20. Preconceptual Design Description for Caustic Recycle Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2008-04-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify both high-level and low-activity waste at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. One aspect of the planning includes a need for a caustic recycle process to separate sodium hydroxide for recycle. Sodium is already a major limitation to the waste-oxide loading in the low-activity waste glass to be vitrified at the Waste Treatment Plant, and additional sodium hydroxide will be added to remove aluminum and to control precipitation in the process equipment. Aluminum is being removed from the high level sludge to reduce the number of high level waste canisters produced. A sodium recycle process would reduce the volume of low-activity waste glass produced and minimize the need to purchase new sodium hydroxide, so there is a renewed interest in investigating sodium recycle. This document describes an electrochemical facility for recycling sodium for the WTP.

  1. Facility management in German hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudat, H

    2000-04-01

    Facility management and optimum building management offer for hospitals a chance to reduce costs and to increase quality, process sequences, employee motivation and customer satisfaction. Some years ago simple services such as cleaning, catering or laundry were outsourced. Now, German hospitals progress to more complex fields such as building and medical technology, clinical support processes such as pharmacy, central laboratory and sterilization, goods and logistics services.

  2. Managing EMC within healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    High, Damon

    2011-01-01

    Damon High, a consultant at international testing, certification, qualification, training, and consultancy services provider TUV Product Service, examines the issue of electromagnetic interference in hospitals, highlighting the areas that equipment suppliers and estates and facilities managers/healthcare engineers need to consider to ensure both the continuing safe, reliable operation of equipment, and compliance with the latest legislation.

  3. Facility Management's Role in Organizational Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Gregory K.

    2013-01-01

    Facility managers have questions about sustainability. How do an organization's physical facilities--its built environment--and the management of them, influence the sustainability of the organization or institution as a whole? How important is Facility Management (FM) to the overall sustainability profile of an organization? Facility managers…

  4. Facility Management's Role in Organizational Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Gregory K.

    2013-01-01

    Facility managers have questions about sustainability. How do an organization's physical facilities--its built environment--and the management of them, influence the sustainability of the organization or institution as a whole? How important is Facility Management (FM) to the overall sustainability profile of an organization? Facility managers…

  5. DKIST facility management system integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Charles R.; Phelps, LeEllen

    2016-07-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) Observatory is under construction at Haleakalā, Maui, Hawai'i. When complete, the DKIST will be the largest solar telescope in the world. The Facility Management System (FMS) is a subsystem of the high-level Facility Control System (FCS) and directly controls the Facility Thermal System (FTS). The FMS receives operational mode information from the FCS while making process data available to the FCS and includes hardware and software to integrate and control all aspects of the FTS including the Carousel Cooling System, the Telescope Chamber Environmental Control Systems, and the Temperature Monitoring System. In addition it will integrate the Power Energy Management System and several service systems such as heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), the Domestic Water Distribution System, and the Vacuum System. All of these subsystems must operate in coordination to provide the best possible observing conditions and overall building management. Further, the FMS must actively react to varying weather conditions and observational requirements. The physical impact of the facility must not interfere with neighboring installations while operating in a very environmentally and culturally sensitive area. The FMS system will be comprised of five Programmable Automation Controllers (PACs). We present a pre-build overview of the functional plan to integrate all of the FMS subsystems.

  6. 7 CFR 210.13 - Facilities management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facilities management. 210.13 Section 210.13... Participation § 210.13 Facilities management. Link to an amendment published at 74 FR 66216, Dec. 15, 2009. (a..., the added text is set forth as follows: § 210.13 Facilities management. (c) Food safety program....

  7. Facilities Management and Added Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This paper aims to present different models of the concept of the added value of Facilities Management (FM), including the FM Value Map, which forms the basis of research group in EuroFM, and to present some of the results of this research collaboration. Approach and methodology: The paper...... on the aimed output) and the internal resource based view (with a focus on the input from FM and RE). Good relationship management and building on trust shows to be equally important as delivering the agreed services. In order to measure the multi-dimensional components of adding value both qualitative...... is based on literature reviews of the most influential journals within the academic fields of FM, Corporate Real Estate Management and Business to Business Marketing and discussions between participants of the research group working on a further exploration and testing of the FM Value Map. Conclusions...

  8. Potential of Computerized Maintenance Management System in Facilities Management

    OpenAIRE

    Noor Farisya Azahar; Md Azree Othuman Mydin

    2014-01-01

    For some time it has been clear that managing buildings or estates has been carried out in the context of what has become known as facilities management. British Institute of Facilities Management defined facilities management is the integration of multi-disciplinary activities within the built environment and the management of their impact upon people and the workplace. Effective facilities management is vital to the success of an organisation by contributing to the deliver...

  9. Analytical methodology and facility description spent fuel policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    Three generic environmental impact statements (GEISs) on domestic fuels, foreign fuels, and storage charges are being prepared to provide environmental input into decisions on whether, and if so how the 1977 Presidential policy on spent fuel storage should be implmented. This report provides background information for two of these environmental impact statements: Storage of U.S. Spent Power Reactor Fuel and Storage of Foreign Spent Power Reactor Fuel. It includes the analytical methodology used in GEISs to assess the environmental effects and a description of the facilities used in the two GEISs.

  10. Design Integration of Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2009-01-01

    . The paper identifies the aspects of FM that should be considered during the different stages of design. A typology of knowledge transfer from building operation to building design is presented based on a combination of knowledge push from building operation and knowledge pull from building design....... Strategies, methods and barriers for the transfer and integration of operational knowledge into the design process are discussed. Multiple strategies are needed to improve the integration of FM in design. Building clients must take on a leading role in defining and setting up requirements and procedures....... Involvement of professional facilities managers in the design process is an obvious strategy, but increased competences are needed among building clients, designers and the operational staff. More codification of operational knowledge is also needed, for instance in IT systems. The paper is based...

  11. Does PDC Belong in Facilities Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoff, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Whether planning, design, and construction (PDC) of buildings should be part of facilities management, with its traditional operations and maintenance functions, or separated from it, has been a divisive question on many campuses for a long time. Now, although it is not happening everywhere, facilities managers at a number of institutions, public…

  12. Retrievable surface storage facility conceptual system design description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-03-01

    The studies evaluated several potentially attractive methods for processing and retrievably storing high-level radioactive waste after delivery to the Federal repository. These studies indicated that several systems could be engineered to safely store the waste, but that the simplest and most attractive concept from a technical standpoint would be to store the waste in a sealed stainless steel canister enclosed in a 2 in. thick carbon steel cask which in turn would be inserted into a reinforced concrete gamma-neutron shield, which would also provide the necessary air-cooling through an air annulus between the cask and the shield. This concept best satisfies the requirements for safety, long-term exposure to natural phenomena, low capital and operating costs, retrievability, amenability to incremental development, and acceptably small environmental impact. This document assumes that the reference site would be on ERDA's Hanford reservation. This document is a Conceptual System Design Description of the facilities which could satisfy all of the functional requirements within the established basic design criteria. The Retrievable Surface Storage Facility (RSSF) is planned with the capacity to process and store the waste received in either a calcine or glass/ceramic form. The RSSF planning is based on a modular development program in which the modular increments are constructed at rates matching projected waste receipts.

  13. Description of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) cryogenic and hot-hydrogen test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.A.; Riffle, G.K.; Merdich, J.A. (Allied-Signal Aerospace Company, Garrett Fluid Systems Division, 1300 W. Warner Rd. P.O. Box 22200, Tempe, Arizona 85282 (United States))

    1993-01-15

    Cryogenic and high-temperature and high-pressure hydrogen test capabilities are required for component development and qualification for the U.S. Air Force Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. To effectively support the non-nuclear test needs of the SNTP program, as well as other specialized programs that utilize hydrogen as a working fluid, Allied-Signal Aerospace Company, Garrett Fluid Systems Division (GFSD) is currently developing a hydrogen test facility at our remote San Tan test site. The facility is specifically designed to support turbopump, propellant management valves, instrumentation and general materials evaluation testing with hydrogen at pressures and temperatures representative of actual SNTP engine operating conditions. This paper presents a general description of the SNTP hot-hydrogen test facility including test capabilities, technical approach, and technical status.

  14. Description of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) cryogenic and hot-hydrogen test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David A.; Riffle, George K.; Merdich, Jeff A.

    1993-01-01

    Cryogenic and high-temperature and high-pressure hydrogen test capabilities are required for component development and qualification for the U.S. Air Force Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. To effectively support the non-nuclear test needs of the SNTP program, as well as other specialized programs that utilize hydrogen as a working fluid, Allied-Signal Aerospace Company, Garrett Fluid Systems Division (GFSD) is currently developing a hydrogen test facility at our remote San Tan test site. The facility is specifically designed to support turbopump, propellant management valves, instrumentation and general materials evaluation testing with hydrogen at pressures and temperatures representative of actual SNTP engine operating conditions. This paper presents a general description of the SNTP hot-hydrogen test facility including test capabilities, technical approach, and technical status.

  15. Landfill gas management facilities design guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-03-15

    In British Columbia, municipal solid waste landfills generate over 1000 tonnes of methane per year; landfill gas management facilities are required to improve the environmental performance of solid waste landfills. The aim of this document, developed by the British Columbia Ministry of the Environment, is to provide guidance for the design, installation, and operation of landfill gas management facilities to address odor and pollutant emissions issues and also address health and safety issues. A review of technical experience and best practices in landfill gas management facilities was carried out, as was as a review of existing regulations related to landfill gas management all over the world. This paper provides useful information to landfill owners, operators, and other professionals for the design of landfill gas management facilities which meet the requirements of landfill gas management regulations.

  16. Facilities Management Practices in Malaysia: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Nordiana Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facilities management in Malaysia has been practiced for decades. The development of its formal practice parallels the improvement of the built environment in the nation. Involvement of the public and private sectors teaming up in arranging the National Asset and Facilities Management (NAFAM in demonstrates the vital collaboration in the facilities management area in Malaysia. Facilities management is seen distinctively as indicated by diverse geographical locations, interests and schools of thought. Facilities management is delegated a service-based industry which gives proficient counsel and administration of clients’ building facilities including residential, commercial, industrial, airports terminals and offices. The aim of this paper is to review the gaps that exist, especially on how FM is being practice in comparison with the published FM body of knowledge. Very relying upon literature, this paper discovered a gap that is an unclear description of current FM applications. This research aims to give new bits of knowledge to upgrade comprehension of FM execution in Malaysia.

  17. Integrated Project Management System description. [UMTRAP Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is a Department of Energy (DOE) designated Major System Acquisition (MSA). To execute and manage the Project mission successfully and to comply with the MSA requirements, the UMTRA Project Office ( Project Office'') has implemented and operates an Integrated Project Management System (IPMS). The Project Office is assisted by the Technical Assistance Contractor's (TAC) Project Integration and Control (PIC) Group in system operation. Each participant, in turn, provides critical input to system operation and reporting requirements. The IPMS provides a uniform structured approach for integrating the work of Project participants. It serves as a tool for planning and control, workload management, performance measurement, and specialized reporting within a standardized format. This system description presents the guidance for its operation. Appendices 1 and 2 contain definitions of commonly used terms and abbreviations and acronyms, respectively. 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Service quality for facilities management in hospitals

    CERN Document Server

    Sui Pheng, Low

    2016-01-01

    This book examines the Facilities Management (FM) of hospitals and healthcare facilities, which are among the most complex, costly and challenging kind of buildings to manage. It presents and evaluates the FM service quality standards in Singapore’s hospitals from the patient’s perspective, and provides recommendations on how to successfully improve FM service quality and achieve higher patient satisfaction. The book also features valuable supplementary materials, including a checklist of 32 key factors for successful facilities management and another checklist of 24 service attributes for hospitals to achieve desirable service quality in connection with facilities management. The book adopts a unique approach of combining service quality and quality theory to provide a more holistic view of how FM service quality can be achieved in hospitals. It also integrates three instruments, namely the SERVQUAL model, the Kano model and the QFD model to yield empirical results from surveys for implementation in hosp...

  19. Location - Managed Facility - St. Paul District (MVP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — St. Paul District - US Army Corps of Engineers Managed Facility locations. District headquarters, Natural Resource, Recreation, Lock and Dam, and Regulatory offices...

  20. Mixed Waste Management Facility Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. Chapters 1 to 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This document provides information on waste management practices, occupational safety, and a site characterization of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A facility description, safety engineering analysis, mixed waste processing techniques, and auxiliary support systems are included.

  1. Legal regime of water management facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Jožef

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the legal regime of water management facilities in the light of Serbian, foreign and European law. Different divisions of water management facilities are carried out (to public and private ones, natural and artificial ones, etc., with determination of their legal relevance. Account is taken of the issue of protection from harmful effects of waters to such facilities, as well. The paper points also to rules on the water management facilities, from acts of planning, to individual administrative acts and measures for maintenance of required qualitative and quantitative condition of waters, depending on their purpose (general use or special, commercial use o waters. Albeit special rules on water management facilities exist, due to the natural interlocking between all the components of the environment (water, air and soil, a comprehensive approach is required. A reference is made to other basic principles of protection of water management facilities as well, such as the principle of prevention, principle of sustainable development and the principle "polluter pays". The last one represents the achievement of contemporary law, which deviates from the idea accepted in the second half of 20th century that supported the socialization of risk from harmful effects of waters.

  2. Guidelines for operator competence - Optimising facility management processes; Leitfaden Betreiberkompetenz. Schritt fuer Schritt Facility Management Prozesse optimieren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, R.

    2005-06-15

    This brochure issued by IFMA (International Facility Management Association) Switzerland and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents interactive guidelines for energy management in the area of facility management. These guidelines are based on the results of a project carried out by the International Energy Agency's Annex 40 'Operator competence'. The guidelines provide a step-by-step guide from initial analysis through to successful project completion and answer many questions that may crop up during the process. The focus is placed on energy aspects. Tools and 14 sample process descriptions are provided along with practical examples. Theoretical aspects are also presented and discussed, including models for operator roles and the processes involved. Also, change, risk and knowledge management are examined. Notes and information on possibilities for further education are presented.

  3. How can facility managers add value?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; van der Voordt, Theo

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the concept of added value of facilities management (FM) and corporate real estate management (CREM), and how to attain and measure it. There is a wide variety of definitions in use, and recognition of different types of added value, such as user value......, customer value, financial value, environmental value and relationship value....

  4. Daily storage management of hydroelectric facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chappin, E.J.L.; Ferrero, M.; Lazzeroni, P.; Lukszo, Z.; Olivero, M.; Repetto, M.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a management procedure for hydroelectric facilities with daily storage. The water storage gives an additional degree of freedom allowing to shift in time power production when it is more convenient and to work at the maximum efficiency of hydraulic turbine. The management is optim

  5. The strategic facilities management organisation in housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Jensen, Per Anker; Jensen, Jesper Ole

    2012-01-01

    Two houses in the same street can be built in the same year, they can look the same, and still they might provide very different support for sustainable living. This article points to the Strategic Facilities Management Organisation (SFMO) as the most important concept, to understand and manage...... literature on sustainable facilities management, where it fills a gap as it deals with housing and strategic FM. Intended readers are those interested in housing administration and especially the transition of existing housing into more sustainable housing. Intended readers include building owners, policy...

  6. XML Based Scientific Data Management Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, P.; Zubair, M.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The World Wide Web consortium has developed an Extensible Markup Language (XML) to support the building of better information management infrastructures. The scientific computing community realizing the benefits of XML has designed markup languages for scientific data. In this paper, we propose a XML based scientific data management ,facility, XDMF. The project is motivated by the fact that even though a lot of scientific data is being generated, it is not being shared because of lack of standards and infrastructure support for discovering and transforming the data. The proposed data management facility can be used to discover the scientific data itself, the transformation functions, and also for applying the required transformations. We have built a prototype system of the proposed data management facility that can work on different platforms. We have implemented the system using Java, and Apache XSLT engine Xalan. To support remote data and transformation functions, we had to extend the XSLT specification and the Xalan package.

  7. The strategic facilities management organisation in housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Jensen, Per Anker; Jensen, Jesper Ole

    2012-01-01

    Two houses in the same street can be built in the same year, they can look the same, and still they might provide very different support for sustainable living. This article points to the Strategic Facilities Management Organisation (SFMO) as the most important concept, to understand and manage...... implementation of sustainable facilities management in housing administration. The concept provides a frame for understanding the roles and relations of tenants, owners, administrators and operators. The paper is based on a Danish research project on environmentally sound building operation including literature...... literature on sustainable facilities management, where it fills a gap as it deals with housing and strategic FM. Intended readers are those interested in housing administration and especially the transition of existing housing into more sustainable housing. Intended readers include building owners, policy...

  8. Conceptual modular description of the high-level waste management system for system studies model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, R.W.; Young, J.R.; Konzek, G.J.

    1992-08-01

    This document presents modular descriptions of possible alternative components of the federal high-level radioactive waste management system and the procedures for combining these modules to obtain descriptions for alternative configurations of that system. The 20 separate system component modules presented here can be combined to obtain a description of any of the 17 alternative system configurations (i.e., scenarios) that were evaluated in the MRS Systems Studies program (DOE 1989a). First-approximation descriptions of other yet-undefined system configurations could also be developed for system study purposes from this database. The descriptions include, in a modular format, both functional descriptions of the processes in the waste management system, plus physical descriptions of the equipment and facilities necessary for performance of those functions.

  9. Configuration Management Maturity in Scientific Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Niknam

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the effectiveness of the development and operation of scientific facilities (especially those presenting specific hazards, such as ionizing radiations relies heavily on state of the art practices, such as systems engineering and product lifecycle management, configuration management (CM is becoming a key management process. However, while some maturity models exist to assess the degree of the implementation and effectiveness of many management processes, such as project management or systems engineering, there is no specific framework available to assess the degree of maturity of an organization towards CM. This paper focuses on revealing the important maturity dimensions and levels for CM as a means towards developing a CM maturity model.

  10. Potential of Computerized Maintenance Management System in Facilities Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Farisya Azahar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available For some time it has been clear that managing buildings or estates has been carried out in the context of what has become known as facilities management. British Institute of Facilities Management defined facilities management is the integration of multi-disciplinary activities within the built environment and the management of their impact upon people and the workplace. Effective facilities management is vital to the success of an organisation by contributing to the delivery of its strategic and operational objectives. Maintenance of buildings should be given serious attention before (stage design, during and after a building is completed. But total involvement in building maintenance is after the building is completed and during its operations. Residents of and property owners require their building to look attractive, durable and have a peaceful indoor environment and efficient. The objective of the maintenance management system is to stream line the vast maintenance information system to improve the productivity of an industrial plant. a good maintenance management system makes equipment and facilities available. This paper will discuss the fundamental steps of maintenance management program and Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS

  11. Cold Vacuum Drying facility civil structural system design description (SYS 06)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PITKOFF, C.C.

    1999-07-06

    This document describes the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility civil - structural system. This system consists of the facility structure, including the administrative and process areas. The system's primary purpose is to provide for a facility to house the CVD process and personnel and to provide a tertiary level of containment. The document provides a description of the facility and demonstrates how the design meets the various requirements imposed by the safety analysis report and the design requirements document.

  12. Facility management and energy efficiency -- analysis and recommendations; Facility Management und Energieeffizienz: Analyse und Handlungsempfehlungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staub, P.; Weibel, K.; Zaugg, T. [Pom and Consulting Ltd., Zuerich (Switzerland); Lang, R. [Gruenberg and Partner Ltd., Zuerich (Switzerland); Frei, Ch. [Herzog Kull Group, Aarau (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    This final report presents the results of a study made on how facility management (FM) is positioned in enterprises and on how energy management can be integrated into the facility management process. Also, recommendations are made on the actions that are considered necessary to improve the understanding of facility management and energy management. The findings of an analysis made of the results of a survey among 200 enterprises, 20 interviews and 5 case studies are presented. The authors state that, in spite of the relatively small sample taken - mostly larger enterprises - trends in facility management and energy management could be shown. The findings of the survey, such as the relative importance of the integration of energy topics in facility management and the need for standardised indicators and benchmarking, are discussed in detail. Also, it is noted that the success of FM is in part due to delegation of responsibility to smaller business units or even to individual employees. The market potential for FM services is examined, with yearly growth rates of up to 20%. The importance of anchoring FM strategies at the top level of management is stressed, as is the need for promotion of the idea of facility management and training concepts for those responsible for its implementation.

  13. Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.

    1982-09-01

    The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

  14. Description and Operation of the A3 Subscale Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, G. P.; Varner, D. G.; Grover, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the general design and operation of the A3 Subscale test facility. The goal is to provide the reader with a general understanding of what the major facility systems are, where they are located, and how they are used to meet the objectives supporting the design of the A3 altitude rocket test facility. This paper also provides the reader with the background information prior to reading the subsequent papers detailing the design and test results of the various systems described herein.

  15. Description and Results: Antenna Measurement Facility Comparisons [Measurements Corner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberica Saporetti, Maria; Foged, Lars; Sierra Castañer, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, formalized facility comparison activities have become important for the documentation and validation of laboratory proficiency and competence and mandatory for achieving accreditation such as that of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 17025 or similar...

  16. Summary description of the Fast Flux Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabell, C.P. (comp.)

    1980-12-01

    This document has been compiled and issued to provide an illustrated engineering summary description of the FFTF. The document is limited to a description of the plant and its functions, and does not cover the extensive associated programs that have been carried out in the fields of design, design analysis, safety analysis, fuels development, equipment development and testing, quality assurance, equipment fabrication, plant construction, acceptance testing, operations planning and training, and the like.

  17. Usability: managing facilities for social outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Keith; Blakstad, Siri; Hansen, Geir

    2013-01-01

    they used to understand, as well as to design and manage the relationship between activities and places. The paper describes and reviews the development of the field of research on usability. It concludes that the action and use of facilities is strongly related to experiences of the users and thus......111 on Usability has been exploring concepts, methods and tools, developed in the evaluation of all kinds of consumer products, applied to the built environment. In the most recent phase of this work, conducted over the past three years, an international network of partners has collaborated to focus...... properties of a workplace, they could better manage and design the facilities for improved social outcomes. Interpretation and analysis of the built environment (and support services) based on how it is socially constructed will enable integration of organisational use and the facilities provided to arrive...

  18. Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

    1992-10-01

    The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

  19. Waste Management Facilities Cost Information Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

    1992-10-01

    The Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) Report, commissioned by the US Department of Energy (DOE), develops planning life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. This report contains PLCC estimates versus capacity for 26 different facility cost modules. A procedure to guide DOE and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also provided. Estimates in the report apply to five distinctive waste streams: low-level waste, low-level mixed waste, alpha contaminated low-level waste, alpha contaminated low-level mixed waste, and transuranic waste. The report addresses five different treatment types: incineration, metal/melting and recovery, shredder/compaction, solidification, and vitrification. Data in this report allows the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options.

  20. Managing Inventory At A Transitional Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Henry A.

    1993-01-01

    Kennedy Inventory Management System, KIMS, geared to needs of facility in transition from research and development to manufacturing. Operated jointly by several contractors at Kennedy Space Center, KIMS designed to reduce cost and increase efficiency of fabrication and maintenance of spaceflight hardware.

  1. Perspectives on Leadership in Facilities Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Charles W. Ed.

    This collection of papers examines issues concerning leadership in facilities management in higher education. Chapters include: (1) "Catch the Spirit of Leadership" (Jack Hug); (2) "Visionary Leadership: Creating a New Tomorrow" (Burt Nanus); (3) "Some Thoughts on Leadership" (Charles W. Jenkins); (4) "Educational Leadership: The Role of…

  2. Physics Detector Simulation Facility Phase II system software description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scipioni, B.; Allen, J.; Chang, C.; Huang, J.; Liu, J.; Mestad, S.; Pan, J.; Marquez, M.; Estep, P.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the Physics Detector Simulation Facility (PDSF) Phase II system software. A key element in the design of a distributed computing environment for the PDSF has been the separation and distribution of the major functions. The facility has been designed to support batch and interactive processing, and to incorporate the file and tape storage systems. By distributing these functions, it is often possible to provide higher throughput and resource availability. Similarly, the design is intended to exploit event-level parallelism in an open distributed environment.

  3. Logistic description of investment and construction management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sborshchikov Sergey Borisovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the questions of defining dynamic behavior of investment and construction activity as a technical and economic system and its formalized description. It is offered to use the term "condition vector" as one of the main characteristics while describing investment and construction activity. Logistic interpretation of a sustainable development of investment and construction defines the concept of optimum trajectory, which considers various dependencies of its components (construction operations, their preparation, design, material, technique, personnel, information, investment, etc.. It is necessary to point out that this state is homeostatic, which means, the managing system must provide continuous monitoring of each system component of investment and construction activities in accordance with the sustainable development pathway. The concept of dynamic balance used in logistics is identical to the concept of homeostatic balance, which is accepted in system engineering. It is defined as a property of technical and economic system, which implies that its deviations from the development pathway lie within admissible values.

  4. Managing facilities in a Scandinavian manner:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elle, Morten; Engelmark, Jesper; Jørgensen, Bo

    2004-01-01

    Presents the aims and needs of research in facilities management (FM) at the section of Planning and Management of Building Processes at BYG*DTU. As the building stock in Denmark is rapidly increasing, socio-demographic developments implies profound changes in both the needs of inhabitants...... infrastructure within the mainstream FM field. There is an urgent need to address how society can best manage the growing (and decaying) building stock, to develop life-cycle rooted infrastructure and building design, and finally allow buildings to be appropriated by their current and future users....

  5. 47 CFR 2.948 - Description of measurement facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... supporting structures, and all structures within 5 times the distance between the measuring antenna and the device being measured. (4) Description of structures used to support the device being measured and the... for Standardization/International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC) Standard 17025, “General...

  6. Design and Management of a Transgenic Facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bob Springsteen

    2001-01-01

    @@ In 1965, I was given the opportunity to manage a research animal colony. At that time, the animal colony consisted of numerous species, such as primates, dogs, cats, rab bits, guinea pigs, hamsters, rats, mice, and some farm animals as well. Over the years,this menagerie was reduced to mice and rab bits. The animal facility now houses 8 000mice, of which 80% are transgenics. In approximately six years, transgenic mice have become the mainstay of the Berkeley Lab animal facility, and this population continues to grow.

  7. ICT Adoption in Facilities Management Supply Chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada

    2012-01-01

    This article involves a qualitative study of factors impacting the adoption of ICT solutions in the Danish facility management supply chain. The results show that there are a number of drivers and barriers that influence the adoption of ICT solutions in this service sector. These have been grouped...... under three major categories: organizational factors including strategic and operational factors; external environmental factors including supplier interdependence and industry characteristics; and technological factors including compatibility and complexity. The study is relevant to researchers...

  8. Facilities Management and Health Care at Home

    OpenAIRE

    Lundberg, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the new requirements that will be put upon the facilities management when the elderly are living longer in their own homes, in spite of illness, impairment and old age. For many reasons, especially demographic ones, this issue has come to the fore and since it has substantial political impact and considerably affects our living conditions, it will most certainly appear on the agenda of most Swedish housing companies in the near future. The growing number of inhabit...

  9. Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1998-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1997, eleven constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from upgradient monitoring wells. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  10. Information resource description creating and managing metadata

    CERN Document Server

    Hider, Philip

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the field of information organization that examines resource description as both a product and process of the contemporary digital environment.This timely book employs the unifying mechanism of the semantic web and the resource description framework to integrate the various traditions and practices of information and knowledge organization. Uniquely, it covers both the domain-specific traditions and practices and the practices of the ?metadata movement' through a single lens ? that of resource description in the broadest, semantic web sense.This approach more readily accommodate

  11. Håndbog i Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    Facilities Management (FM) er et nyt nøgleord som mange nu anvender i forskellige forbindelser og sammenhænge. Dette hænger i høj grad sammen med manglen på en fælles dansk referenceramme for FM, der har givet frit spillerum for de mange forskellige definitioner af det engelske ord. Dansk...... Facilities Management netværk (DFM netværk) har i mange år arbejdet for en fælles definition af begrebet sammen med arbejdet for udbredelsen af kendskabet til FM, herunder uddannelse, erfaringsudveksling m.v. DFM netværk har udgivet en Håndbog i Facilities Management i samarbejde med bogens forfatter Per...... gennemgår alle aspekter af FM. Bogen gennemgår således en række mere traditionelle begreber, men kommer også igennem nyere begreber som out-sourcing, sale- and leaseback, benchmarking og mange andre. Forfatteren gennemgår i 10 kapitler så forskellige elementer som ledelse og organisation, økonomistyring...

  12. Supervision of Waste Management and Environmental Protection at the Swedish Nuclear Facilities 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Persson, M

    2003-01-01

    The report summarizes the supervision of waste management and environmental protection at the nuclear facilities that was carried out by the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority in 2001. A summary of the inspections and a description of important issues connected with the supervision of the nuclear facilities are given.The inspections during 2001 have focused on theme inspections of waste management, environmental inspections considering the environmental monitoring at the Swedish nuclear facilities and review safety analysis and research programs from the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co.The Swedish Radiation Protection Authority finds that the operations are mainly performed according to current regulations

  13. Federal facilities compliance act waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, J; Gates-Anderson, D; Hollister, R; Painter, S

    1999-07-06

    Site Treatment Plans (STPs) developed through the Federal Facilities Compliance Act pose many technical and administrative challenges. Legacy wastes managed under these plans require Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) compliance through treatment and ultimate disposal. Although capacity has been defined for most of the Department of Energy wastes, many waste streams require further characterization and many need additional treatment and handling beyond LDR criteria to be able to dispose of the waste. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Hazardous Waste Management Division has developed a comprehensive Legacy Waste Program. The program directs work to manage low level and mixed wastes to ensure compliance with nuclear facility rules and its STP. This paper provides a survey of work conducted on these wastes at LLNL. They include commercial waste treatment and disposal, diverse forms of characterization, inventory maintenance and reporting, on-site treatment, and treatability studies. These activities are conducted in an integrated fashion to meet schedules defined in the STP. The processes managing wastes are dynamic due to required integration of administrative, regulatory, and technical concerns spanning the gamut to insure safe proper disposal.

  14. Innovative Procurement and Partnerships in Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2010-01-01

    cases from the Nordic countries in Europe shows, that the most outstanding examples of innovation in FM are initiated from the demand side and involves new forms of procurement with long term contracts. This paper considers in-depth two differing examples of such innovative procurement approaches from......Aim: The aim of the paper is to present, analyse and identify learning from two case studies of innovative procurement in Facilities Management (FM) concerning the establishments of partnerships between clients and providers. Approach and methodology: A major study of FM best practice covering 36...... municipal buildings and sports facilities in parts of the city of Copenhagen. Each of the case studies has involved both the client and the provider side of the collaboration. The paper presents, compare and analyze the two cases regarding intentions, procurement methods, forms of collaborations...

  15. Innovative Procurement and Partnerships in Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2011-01-01

    A major study of facilities management best practice covering 36 cases from the Nordic countries in Europe shows, that the most outstanding examples of innovation in FM are initiated from the demand side and involves new forms of procurement with long term contracts. This paper considers in depth...... two differing examples of such innovative procurement approaches. The first example is from a private pharmaceutical corporation, which has used so-called function based procurement in relation to office buildings. The second example is from a public organization, which has entered into so......-called operational partnerships with private providers concerning all municipal buildings and sports facilities in parts of a city. Each of the case studies has involved both the client and the provider side of the collaboration. The cases show that an essential element in a successful procurement and partnership...

  16. WRAP Module 1 data management system (DMS) software design description (SDD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidert, J.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-13

    Revision 2 of the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS) Preliminary Software Design Description (PSDD) provides a high-level design description of the system. The WRAP 1 DMS is required to collect, store, and report data related to certification, tracking, packaging, repackaging, processing, and shipment of waste processed or stored at the WRAP 1 facility. The WRAP 1 DMS SDD is used as the primary medium for communication software design information. This release provides design descriptions for the following process modules produced under Phase 1 of the development effort: Receiving Drum or Box Containers Process Routing and Picklists; Waste Inventory by Location and/or Container Relationships; LLW Process Glovebox Facility Radiologic Material Inventory Check (partial); Shipping (partial production); Drum or Box NDE Operations; and Drum or Box NDA Operations Data Review (partial production). In addition, design descriptions are included for the following process modules scheduled for development under Phases 2 and 3: Activity Comment; LLW RWM Glovebox Sample Management; TRU Process Glovebox; TRU RWM Glovebox; and TRUPACT Processing. Detailed design descriptions for Reports and Facility Metrics have also been provided for in Revision 2 of this document.

  17. The facilities management market in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2010-01-01

    for researching the market but particular the definition of space including acquisition as well as development, administration, operation, maintenance and utilities in the same main product is problematic. Research limitations/implications: The market research is limited to the Danish market, but the results......Purpose: To present the results of market surveys in Denmark, which have been based on and used to test a proposal for a new European standard for a taxonomy of Facilities Management (FM). Design/methodology: The market research included surveys of both the client side and the provider side...

  18. Innovative Procurement and Partnerships in Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2011-01-01

    A major study of facilities management best practice covering 36 cases from the Nordic countries in Europe shows, that the most outstanding examples of innovation in FM are initiated from the demand side and involves new forms of procurement with long term contracts. This paper considers in depth...... is that the client allows the providers freedom to plan their activities. Thereby the providers can optimize the use of their productive capacity and utilize their competences with incentives to profit from such improvements. A major challenge is to balance the risks between the client and provider and to create...

  19. Trends in Facility Management Technology: The Emergence of the Internet, GIS, and Facility Assessment Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teicholz, Eric

    1997-01-01

    Reports research on trends in computer-aided facilities management using the Internet and geographic information system (GIS) technology for space utilization research. Proposes that facility assessment software holds promise for supporting facility management decision making, and outlines four areas for its use: inventory; evaluation; reporting;…

  20. The notion of strategy in facility management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzweber, Markus

    2013-01-01

    and components of strategy in Facility Management (FM). Since strategy refers to a complex network of thoughts, insights, experiences, expertise, and expectations that provide general guidance for management action, organizations must keep pace with the changing environment to increase market shares and business...... success. Based on a literature review, the findings of the study report a service-strategy classification grid. Such a service-strategy grid provides for a better understanding of the business environment. The study findings are intended to enhance business managers’ understandings of the issues behind FM......Strategy implementation is critical for any type of organization. Strategy implementation is complex despite previous research describing mechanisms related to the construction of strategy and strategy use of organizations. In this article I attempt to fill this vacuity by examining strategy...

  1. The facilities management market in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2010-01-01

    for researching the market but particular the definition of space including acquisition as well as development, administration, operation, maintenance and utilities in the same main product is problematic. Research limitations/implications: The market research is limited to the Danish market, but the results......Purpose: To present the results of market surveys in Denmark, which have been based on and used to test a proposal for a new European standard for a taxonomy of Facilities Management (FM). Design/methodology: The market research included surveys of both the client side and the provider side...... and was carried out by a management consultant company by telephone interviews based on definitions developed from drafts for the European FM taxonomy standard by a university researcher, who is a member of the standardisation work group. Findings: The proposed taxonomy for FM is in general a good basis...

  2. Value Adding Management: A New Facilities Management Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; Katchamart, Akarapong

    2011-01-01

    theories on added value of FM and real estate and the related concept of Value Management from building projects. The study is related to the EuroFM research group on The Added Value of FM. Design/methodology/approach: The study outlines a preliminary theoretical based management concept, which...... the relevance of the basic concept and provides an important example of how Value Adding Management can be implemented and added value measured. Originality/value: The study develops a concept of Value Adding Management, which is new in FM literature. It is expected to increase the awareness of the impacts...... and strategic importance of FM for organisations and can be a practical tool for facilities managers in implementing value adding strategies and practices....

  3. Risk management activities at the DOE Class A reactor facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, D.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Hill, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Linn, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Atkinson, S.A. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hu, J.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management group of the Association for Excellence in Reactor Operation (AERO) develops risk management initiatives and standards to improve operation and increase safety of the DOE Class A reactor facilities. Principal risk management applications that have been implemented at each facility are reviewed. The status of a program to develop guidelines for risk management programs at reactor facilities is presented.

  4. Risk management activities at the DOE Class A reactor facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, D.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Hill, D.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Linn, M.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Atkinson, S.A. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Hu, J.P. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management group of the Association for Excellence in Reactor Operation (AERO) develops risk management initiatives and standards to improve operation and increase safety of the DOE Class A reactor facilities. Principal risk management applications that have been implemented at each facility are reviewed. The status of a program to develop guidelines for risk management programs at reactor facilities is presented.

  5. DOE-RL Integrated Safety Management System Description

    CERN Document Server

    Shoop, D S

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Integrated Safety Management System Description (ISMSD) is to describe the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) ISMS as implemented through the RL Integrated Management System (RIMS). This ISMSD does not impose additional requirements but rather provides an overview describing how various parts of the ISMS fit together. Specific requirements for each of the core functions and guiding principles are established in other implementing processes, procedures, and program descriptions that comprise RIMS. RL is organized to conduct work through operating contracts; therefore, it is extremely difficult to provide an adequate ISMS description that only addresses RL functions. Of necessity, this ISMSD contains some information on contractor processes and procedures which then require RL approval or oversight. This ISMSD does not purport to contain a full description of the contractors' ISM System Descriptions.

  6. Operating manual for the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Volume I. Description of the facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    This volume contains a comprehensive description of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Facility. Its primary purpose is to supplement the detailed operating procedures, providing the reactor operators with background information on the various HFIR systems. The detailed operating procdures are presented in another report.

  7. Waste management project technical baseline description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederburg, J.P.

    1997-08-13

    A systems engineering approach has been taken to describe the technical baseline under which the Waste Management Project is currently operating. The document contains a mission analysis, function analysis, requirement analysis, interface definitions, alternative analysis, system definition, documentation requirements, implementation definitions, and discussion of uncertainties facing the Project.

  8. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility process water conditioning system design description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1998-11-30

    This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Process Water Conditioning (PWC) System. The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-O02, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the PWC equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SDD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  9. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility vacuum and purge system design description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1998-11-30

    This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Vacuum and Purge System (VPS) . The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-O02, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the VPS equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SDD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  10. Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

    1994-10-01

    This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

  11. Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

    1994-10-01

    This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

  12. The landmine foot: its description and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, L G

    1991-11-01

    The injuries of 54 patients involved in landmine explosions are described. In 72 per cent the injuries affected the mid- and hindfoot. Of these injuries, 67 per cent were open fractures involving the calcaneus. The injury resulted in the 'landmine foot', an entity not previously described. Its clinical features and orthotic management are described. The prognosis of 'landmine foot' was generally favourable in this Third World setting, with adequate rehabilitation provided by a customized surgical boot.

  13. Wall finish selection in hospital design: a survey of facility managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavy, Sarel; Dixit, Manish K

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to analyze healthcare facility managers' perceptions regarding the materials used for interior wall finishes and the criteria used to select them. It also examines differences in wall finish materials and the selection process in three major hospital spaces: emergency, surgery, and in-patient units. These findings are compared with healthcare designers' perceptions on similar issues, as currently documented in the literature. Hospital design and the materials used for hospital construction have a considerable effect on the environment and health of patients. A 2002 survey revealed which characteristics healthcare facility designers consider when selecting materials for healthcare facilities; however, no similar study has examined the views of facility managers on building finish selection. A 22-question survey questionnaire was distributed to 210 facility managers of metropolitan, for-profit hospitals in Texas; IRB approval was obtained. Respondents were asked to rank 10 interior wall finish materials and 11 selection criteria for wall finishes. Data from 48 complete questionnaires were analyzed using descriptive statistics and nonparametric statistical analysis methods. The study found no statistically significant differences in terms of wall finish materials or the characteristics for material selection in the three major spaces studied. It identified facility managers' four most-preferred wall finish materials and the five-most preferred characteristics, with a statistical confidence level of greater than 95%. The paper underscores the importance of incorporating all perspectives: facility designers and facility managers should work together toward achieving common organizational goals.

  14. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Crane and Hoist System Design Description (SYS 14)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TRAN, Y.S.

    2000-06-07

    This system design description (SDD) is for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility overhead crane and hoist system. The overhead crane and hoist system is a general service system. It is located in the process bays of the CVD Facility, supports the processes required to drain the water and dry the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in the multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) after they have been removed from the K-Basins. The location of the system in the process bay is shown.

  15. Feasibility study for a numerical aerodynamic simulation facility. Volume 2: Hardware specifications/descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, F. M.; Resnick, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    An FMP (Flow Model Processor) was designed for use in the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility (NASF). The NASF was developed to simulate fluid flow over three-dimensional bodies in wind tunnel environments and in free space. The facility is applicable to studying aerodynamic and aircraft body designs. The following general topics are discussed in this volume: (1) FMP functional computer specifications; (2) FMP instruction specification; (3) standard product system components; (4) loosely coupled network (LCN) specifications/description; and (5) three appendices: performance of trunk allocation contention elimination (trace) method, LCN channel protocol and proposed LCN unified second level protocol.

  16. Descriptions of selected accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertini, H.W.

    1980-04-01

    This report was prepared at the request of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island to provide the members of the Commission with some insight into the nature and significance of accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities in the past. Toward that end, this report presents a brief description of 44 accidents which have occurred throughout the world and which meet at least one of the severity criteria that were established.

  17. Insect pest management decisions in food processing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pest management decision making in food processing facilities such as flour mills, rice mills, human and pet food manufacturing facilities, distribution centers and warehouses, and retail stores is a challenging undertaking. Insect pest management programs require an understanding of the food facili...

  18. Mental health case management in Canada: job description analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forchuk, Cheryl; Ouwerkerk, Alice; Yamashita, Mineko; Martin, Mary-Lou

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine case managers' (CM) job position descriptions through content analysis. There were 29 case manager job position descriptions examined. The job descriptions could be grouped into four categories: (1) what the individuals should bring to the position, (2) what they did as CM, (3) to whom they were accountable, and (4) what was valued. Themes included focus on client as individual, focus on the external/system, or outer-directed work, and the articulation point between the individual and broader system. The CM works directly and indirectly in the system and community through education, organizing, planning, and networking, as well as through provision of direct care to the individual client. The expectations of the positions are extensive.

  19. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase task description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, M.; Nakamura, H.; Sugimoto, M.; Yutani, T.; Takeuchi, H. [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai Research Establishment, Fusion Neutron Laboratory, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has been initiated to reduce the key technology risk factors needed to achieve continuous wave (CW) beam with the desired current and energy and to reach the corresponding power handling capabilities in the liquid lithium target system. In the KEP, the IFMIF team (EU, Japan, Russian Federation, US) will perform required tasks. The contents of the tasks are described in the task description sheet. As the KEP tasks, the IFMIF team have proposed 27 tasks for Test Facilities, 12 tasks for Target, 26 tasks for Accelerator and 18 tasks for Design Integration. The task description by RF is not yet available. The task items and task descriptions may be added or revised with the progress of KEP activities. These task description sheets have been compiled in this report. After 3 years KEP, the results of the KEP tasks will be reviewed. Following the KEP, 3 years Engineering Validation Phase (EVP) will continue for IFMIF construction. (author)

  20. Cold Vacuum Dryer (CVD) Facility Fire Protection System Design Description (SYS 24)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SINGH, G.

    2000-10-17

    This system design description (SDD) addresses the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility fire protection system (FPS). The primary features of the FPS for the CVD are a fire alarm and detection system, automatic sprinklers, and fire hydrants. The FPS also includes fire extinguishers located throughout the facility and fire hydrants to assist in manual firefighting efforts. In addition, a fire barrier separates the operations support (administrative) area from the process bays and process bay support areas. Administrative controls to limit combustible materials have been established and are a part of the overall fire protection program. The FPS is augmented by assistance from the Hanford Fire Department (HED) and by interface systems including service water, electrical power, drains, instrumentation and controls. This SDD, when used in conjunction with the other elements of the definitive design package, provides a complete picture of the FPS for the CVD Facility.

  1. A randomized trial of heart failure disease management in skilled nursing facilities (SNF Connect): Lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daddato, Andrea; Wald, Heidi L; Horney, Carolyn; Fairclough, Diane L; Leister, Erin C; Coors, Marilyn; Capell, Warren H; Boxer, Rebecca S

    2017-06-01

    Conducting clinical trials in skilled nursing facilities is particularly challenging. This manuscript describes facility and patient recruitment challenges and solutions for clinical research in skilled nursing facilities. Lessons learned from the SNF Connect Trial, a randomized trial of a heart failure disease management versus usual care for patients with heart failure receiving post-acute care in skilled nursing facilities, are discussed. Description of the trial design and barriers to facility and patient recruitment along with regulatory issues are presented. The recruitment of Denver-metro skilled nursing facilities was facilitated by key stakeholders of the skilled nursing facilities community. However, there were still a number of barriers to facility recruitment including leadership turnover, varying policies regarding research, fear of litigation and of an increased workload. Engagement of facilities was facilitated by their strong interest in reducing hospital readmissions, marketing potential to hospitals, and heart failure management education for their staff. Recruitment of patients proved difficult and there were few facilitators. Identified patient recruitment challenges included patients being unaware of their heart failure diagnosis, patients overwhelmed with their illness and care, and frequently there was no available proxy for cognitively impaired patients. Flexibility in changing the recruitment approach and targeting skilled nursing facilities with higher rates of admissions helped to overcome some barriers. Recruitment of skilled nursing facilities and patients in skilled nursing facilities for clinical trials is challenging. Strategies to attract both facilities and patients are warranted. These include aligning study goals with facility incentives and flexible recruitment protocols to work with patients in "transition crisis."

  2. High-risk facilities. Emergency management in nuclear, chemical and hazardous waste facilities; Hochrisikoanlagen. Notfallschutz bei Kernkraft-, Chemie- und Sondermuellanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloepfer, Michael (ed.) [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The book on emergency management in high-risk facilities covers the following topics: Change in the nuclear policy, risk management of high-risk facilities as a constitutional problem - emergency management in nuclear facilities, operational mechanisms of risk control in nuclear facilities, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for nuclear facilities, operational mechanism of the risk control in chemical plants, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for chemical facilities, operational mechanisms of the risk control in hazardous waste facilities, regulatory surveillance responsibilities for hazardous waste facilities, civil law consequences in case of accidents in high-risk facilities, criminal prosecution in case of accidents in high-risk facilities, safety margins as site risk for emission protection facilities, national emergency management - strategic emergency management structures, warning and self-protection of the public in case of CBRN hazards including aspects of the psych-social emergency management.

  3. Environmental conditions in beef deep-bedded monoslope facilities: a descriptive study

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been increased interest in feeding cattle in enclosed beef deep-bedded mono-slope facilities (BDMF). Characterization of environmental factors impacting odor and gas emissions, nutrient excretion, and pathogens is needed to develop recommendations for management of BDMF. The objectives of...

  4. WRAP Module 1 data management system (DMS) software design description (SDD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmage, P.A.

    1995-03-17

    The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS) System Design Description (SDD) describes the logical and physical architecture of the system. The WRAP 1 DMS SDD formally partitions the elements of the system described in the WRAP 1 DMS Software requirements specification into design objects and describes the key properties and relationships among the design objects and interfaces with external systems such as the WRAP Plant Control System (PCS). The WRAP 1 DMS SDD can be thought of as a detailed blueprint for implementation activities. The design descriptions contained within this document will describe, in detail, the software products that will be developed to assist the Project W-026, Waste Receiving and Processing Module 1, in their management functions. The WRAP 1 DMS is required to collect, store, and report data related to certification, tracking, packaging, repackaging, processing, and shipment of waste processed or stored at the WRAP 1 facility.

  5. Public Facilities Management and Action Research for Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galamba, Kirsten Ramskov

    practice inspired by the principles of FM. The bottom up change process had an employee perspective, and the work provides answers to the challenges of creating a culture allowing for critical reflections in relation to the impact of FM practice on societal sustainability.......Current work is the main product of a PhD study with the initial working title ‘Sustainable Facilities Management’ at Centre for Facilities Management – Realdania Research, DTU Management 1. December 2008 – 30. November 2011. Here the notion of Public Sustainable Facilities Management (FM...

  6. State Wildlife Management Area Public Facilities - points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This point theme contains facilities and features for WMAs that are best represented as points. WMAs are part of the Minnesota state recreation system created to...

  7. State Wildlife Management Area Public Facilities - lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This line theme contains facilities and features for WMAs that are best represented as lines. WMAs are part of the Minnesota state recreation system created to...

  8. An Application of Business Process Management to Health Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohsen M D

    The purpose of this article is to help health care facility managers and personnel identify significant elements of their facilities to address, and steps and actions to follow, when applying business process management to them. The ABPMP (Association of Business Process Management Professionals) life-cycle model of business process management is adopted, and steps from Lean, business process reengineering, and Six Sigma, and actions from operations management are presented to implement it. Managers of health care facilities can find in business process management a more comprehensive approach to improving their facilities than Lean, Six Sigma, business process reengineering, and ad hoc approaches that does not conflict with them because many of their elements can be included under its umbrella. Furthermore, the suggested application of business process management can guide and relieve them from selecting among these approaches, as well as provide them with specific steps and actions that they can follow. This article fills a gap in the literature by presenting a much needed comprehensive application of business process management to health care facilities that has specific steps and actions for implementation.

  9. Exploring Space Management Goals in Institutional Care Facilities in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiankun

    2017-01-01

    Space management has been widely examined in commercial facilities, educational facilities, and hospitals but not in China's institutional care facilities. Poor spatial arrangements, such as wasted space, dysfunctionality, and environment mismanagement, are increasing; in turn, the occupancy rate is decreasing due to residential dissatisfaction. To address these problems, this paper's objective is to explore the space management goals (SMGs) in institutional care facilities in China. Systematic literature analysis was adopted to set SMGs' principles, to identify nine theoretical SMGs, and to develop the conceptual model of SMGs for institutional care facilities. A total of 19 intensive interviews were conducted with stakeholders in seven institutional care facilities to collect data for qualitative analysis. The qualitative evidence was analyzed through open coding, axial coding, and selective coding. As a result, six major categories as well as their interrelationships were put forward to visualize the path diagram for exploring SMGs in China's institutional care facilities. Furthermore, seven expected SMGs that were explored from qualitative evidence were confirmed as China's SMGs in institutional care facilities by a validation test. Finally, a gap analysis among theoretical SMGs and China's SMGs provided recommendations for implementing space management in China's institutional care facilities.

  10. Institutional management of core facilities during challenging financial times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Rand

    2011-12-01

    The economic downturn is likely to have lasting effects on institutions of higher education, prioritizing proactive institutional leadership and planning. Although by design, core research facilities are more efficient and effective than supporting individual pieces of research equipment, cores can have significant underlying financial requirements and challenges. This paper explores several possible institutional approaches to managing core facilities during challenging financial times.

  11. Information security management system planning for CBRN facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenaeu, Joseph D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); O' Neil, Lori Ross [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leitch, Rosalyn M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Glantz, Clifford S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Landine, Guy P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bryant, Janet L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lewis, John [National Nuclear Lab., Workington (United Kingdom); Mathers, Gemma [National Nuclear Lab., Workington (United Kingdom); Rodger, Robert [National Nuclear Lab., Workington (United Kingdom); Johnson, Christopher [National Nuclear Lab., Workington (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-01

    The focus of this document is to provide guidance for the development of information security management system planning documents at chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) facilities. It describes a risk-based approach for planning information security programs based on the sensitivity of the data developed, processed, communicated, and stored on facility information systems.

  12. Management Information Control Systems for Educational Facility Construction Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Walter S.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a computerized management information control system for an educational facility construction program that allows access to more than 50 major system applications, using over 5,000 programs. (MLF)

  13. Facilities of management magnetoresistive transformer of active power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Val. S. Vuntesmeri

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Management facilities are considered, spectral composition is certain and the form of коммутируемого signal of magnetoresistive transformer of active power is rotined.

  14. Guidelines for Management Information Systems in Canadian Health Care Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Larry E.

    1987-01-01

    The MIS Guidelines are a comprehensive set of standards for health care facilities for the recording of staffing, financial, workload, patient care and other management information. The Guidelines enable health care facilities to develop management information systems which identify resources, costs and products to more effectively forecast and control costs and utilize resources to their maximum potential as well as provide improved comparability of operations.

  15. A review of sustainable facilities management knowledge and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baaki Timothy Kurannen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is seen as a far-reaching issue now, and one which the facilities management [FM] profession cannot overlook. This paper explores current sustainable facilities management [SFM] knowledge and practice with specific focus on performance as part of a research focus toward proposing a sustainable FM performance management framework for sustainable healthcare waste management in Malaysia. This paper utilized a review of extant literature on the subject of SFM, FM performance and FM development in Malaysia as source of information. Findings reflect the increasing recognition of the need for the strategic FM function, and how facilities managers are best positioned to drive organizations’ sustainability agendas. In Malaysian context, this recognition is barely evident as findings show FM practice is still immature and predominantly operational. Unlike developed FM markets, FM relevance in Malaysia is being driven by the public sector. Also findings show a disharmony between organizations’ sustainability priority areas and the responsibilities for facilities managers to execute them where the sustainability policy of organizations prioritize one FM service and the facilities managers’ responsibilities prioritize another. As most of SFM implementation is driven by legislation this seems to strengthen the position that, organizations continue to view support services as non-value-adding, as unavoidable liabilities. The implication of this is the pressure on the FM function to continually express its strategic relevance to organizations by tangible value-adding performance output. This creates a new perspective to measuring and managing facilities performance. This paper therefore elevates the importance of FM performance management in SFM context taking into account the peculiar position of the facilities manager. This is seen as a way forward for FM to better express its value to the organization

  16. Interactive Facility Management, Design and Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mobach, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Societal developments show that future demands for visualization can be expected to grow. In many areas of organized human activities organizations may turn away from textual and numerical flatlands, and rely on the convenient and multidimensional digital worlds. Virtual worlds for facility

  17. Interactive facility management, design and planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Mark P. Mobach

    2012-01-01

    Societal developments show that future demands for visualization can be expected to grow. In many areas of organized human activities organizations may turn away from textual and numerical flatlands, and rely on the convenient and multidimensional digital worlds. Virtual worlds for facility

  18. Managing Educational Facilities and Students' Enrolment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR Nneka

    The basic focus in any higher institution is on Educational Facilities and its ... Adesina (1981) reviewed that many abandoned and uncompleted school plant .... Correlation Co-efficient and Multiple Regression was used for the data. ... structure of the school building structure could interpret the large extent of students'.

  19. Interactive facility management, design and planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Mark P. Mobach

    2012-01-01

    Societal developments show that future demands for visualization can be expected to grow. In many areas of organized human activities organizations may turn away from textual and numerical flatlands, and rely on the convenient and multidimensional digital worlds. Virtual worlds for facility manageme

  20. Interactive Facility Management, Design and Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mobach, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Societal developments show that future demands for visualization can be expected to grow. In many areas of organized human activities organizations may turn away from textual and numerical flatlands, and rely on the convenient and multidimensional digital worlds. Virtual worlds for facility manageme

  1. The Langley thermal protection system test facility: A description including design operating boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klich, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    A description of the Langley thermal protection system test facility is presented. This facility was designed to provide realistic environments and times for testing thermal protection systems proposed for use on high speed vehicles such as the space shuttle. Products from the combustion of methane-air-oxygen mixtures, having a maximum total enthalpy of 10.3 MJ/kg, are used as a test medium. Test panels with maximum dimensions of 61 cm x 91.4 cm are mounted in the side wall of the test region. Static pressures in the test region can range from .005 to .1 atm and calculated equilibrium temperatures of test panels range from 700 K to 1700 K. Test times can be as long as 1800 sec. Some experimental data obtained while using combustion products of methane-air mixtures are compared with theory, and calibration of the facility is being continued to verify calculated values of parameters which are within the design operating boundaries.

  2. Public involvement in adaptive phased management of nuclear waste facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartrand, D. [Royal Roads Univ., Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Donev, J. [Univ. of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    If a community is going to host a waste facility that community must be informed about nuclear waste disposal and willing to house the facility permanently. This talk will discuss the process for distributing information to primary and secondary stakeholders; investigate the accessibility and transparency of public information and assess the ability to dialogue between stakeholders when issues are raised in the context of adaptive phased management? We will also examine transparency in the process of managing conflict by looking at some of the issues at hand and how those issues are currently being managed through stakeholder engagement.

  3. Facility information management system; Shisetsu joho kanri system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-10

    A facility management system (FMS) was developed as a tool for efficiently operating and managing building facilities and related equipment. The maintenance management data is designed to be collected through automatic formation of data base by using a work flow function and releasing the daily business from paper work. The data base thus formed can be retrieved and displayed by utilizing a network system. The plan view for construction facilities is made a minute plan comparable to the ground plan by taking in DXF type drawing data such as a completion drawing, making it a colored display for example to create an intuitive expression understandable at first sight. The plan is controlled by the level including equipment classification and is capable of superimposed display. Detailed management data is displayed by mouse clicking of registered icons, allowing required information to be readily taken out. (translated by NEDO)

  4. Descriptions of reference LWR facilities for analysis of nuclear fuel cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Kabele, T.J.

    1979-09-01

    To contribute to the Department of Energy's identification of needs for improved environmental controls in nuclear fuel cycles, a study was made of a light water reactor system. A reference LWR fuel cycle was defined, and each step in this cycle was characterized by facility description and mainline and effluent treatment process performance. The reference fuel cycle uses fresh uranium in light water reactors. Final treatment and ultimate disposition of waste from the fuel cycle steps were not included, and the waste is assumed to be disposed of by approved but currently undefined means. The characterization of the reference fuel cycle system is intended as basic information for further evaluation of alternative effluent control systems.

  5. Descriptions of reference LWR facilities for analysis of nuclear fuel cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Kabele, T.J.

    1979-09-01

    To contribute to the Department of Energy's identification of needs for improved environmental controls in nuclear fuel cycles, a study was made of a light water reactor system. A reference LWR fuel cycle was defined, and each step in this cycle was characterized by facility description and mainline and effluent treatment process performance. The reference fuel cycle uses fresh uranium in light water reactors. Final treatment and ultimate disposition of waste from the fuel cycle steps were not included, and the waste is assumed to be disposed of by approved but currently undefined means. The characterization of the reference fuel cycle system is intended as basic information for further evaluation of alternative effluent control systems.

  6. Knowledge management and information tools for building maintenance and facility management

    CERN Document Server

    Talamo, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    This book describes the latest methods and tools for the management of information within facility management services and explains how it is possible to collect, organize, and use information over the life cycle of a building in order to optimize the integration of these services and improve the efficiency of processes. The coverage includes presentation and analysis of basic concepts, procedures, and international standards in the development and management of real estate inventories, building registries, and information systems for facility management. Models of strategic management are discussed and the functions and roles of the strategic management center, explained.  Detailed attention is also devoted to building information modeling (BIM) for facility management and potential interactions between information systems and BIM applications. Criteria for evaluating information system performance are identified, and guidelines of value in developing technical specifications for facility management service...

  7. The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Preliminary design review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document presents information about the Mixed Waste Management Facility. Topics discussed include: cost and schedule baseline for the completion of the project; evaluation of alternative options; transportation of radioactive wastes to the facility; capital risk associated with incineration; radioactive waste processing; scaling of the pilot-scale system; waste streams to be processed; molten salt oxidation; feed preparation; initial operation to demonstrate selected technologies; floorplans; baseline revisions; preliminary design baseline; cost reduction; and project mission and milestones.

  8. The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Preliminary design review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document presents information about the Mixed Waste Management Facility. Topics discussed include: cost and schedule baseline for the completion of the project; evaluation of alternative options; transportation of radioactive wastes to the facility; capital risk associated with incineration; radioactive waste processing; scaling of the pilot-scale system; waste streams to be processed; molten salt oxidation; feed preparation; initial operation to demonstrate selected technologies; floorplans; baseline revisions; preliminary design baseline; cost reduction; and project mission and milestones.

  9. Facilities Management and Value Adding - The LEGO case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; Katchamart, Akarapong

    on the management model for FM included in the European FM standards, recent theories on added value of FM and real estate and the related concept of Value Management from building projects. The paper outlines a preliminary theoretical based management concept, which is investigated, tested and discussed based...... on a case study of LEGO. Results: The study shows that the management model for FM creates a relevant starting point but also that stakeholder and relationship management is an essential aspect of Value Adding Management. The case study confirms the relevance of the basic concept and provides an important...... example of how Value Adding Management can be implemented and added value measured. Practical Implications: The concept of Value Adding Management is expected to increase the awareness of the impacts and strategic importance of FM for organisations and can be a practical tool for facilities managers...

  10. STORMWATER BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES TEST FACILITY - SWALES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NRMRL swale evaluation is part of a larger collection of long-term research projects that evaluates many Best Management Practices. EPA has ongoing research examining the performance of constructed wet lands, and detention and retention ponds. Other projects will evaluate ra...

  11. Central Facilities Area Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Central Facilities Area facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facilityspecific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  12. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville vicinity, Butte County, Idaho -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data. Historical American engineering record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This report describes the history of the Old Waste Calcining Facility. It begins with introductory material on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the Materials Testing Reactor fuel cycle, and the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The report then describes management of the wastes from the processing plant in the following chapters: Converting liquid to solid wastes; Fluidized bed waste calcining process and the Waste Calcining Facility; Waste calcining campaigns; WCF gets a new source of heat; New Waste Calcining Facility; Last campaign; Deactivation and the RCRA cap; Significance/context of the old WCF. Appendices contain a photo key map for HAER photos, a vicinity map and neighborhood of the WCF, detailed description of the calcining process, and chronology of WCF campaigns.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, James [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Mission and Vision Statements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Mission The ARM Climate Research Facility, a DOE scientific user facility, provides the climate research community with strategically located in situ and remote-sensing observatories designed to improve the understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their interactions and coupling with the Earth’s surface. Vision To provide a detailed and accurate description of the Earth atmosphere in diverse climate regimes to resolve the uncertainties in climate and Earth system models toward the development of sustainable solutions for the nation's energy and environmental challenges.

  14. Længerevarende samarbejder inden for Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Kresten; Friis, Freja

    Længerevarende strategiske samarbejde er interessant, fordi det anses for en måde at fremme produktivitet og forretning for både kunder og leverandører. I rapportenfremlægges resultaterne fra en caseanalyse blandt leverandører og købere af Facilities Management.......Længerevarende strategiske samarbejde er interessant, fordi det anses for en måde at fremme produktivitet og forretning for både kunder og leverandører. I rapportenfremlægges resultaterne fra en caseanalyse blandt leverandører og købere af Facilities Management....

  15. Længerevarende samarbejder inden for Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Kresten; Friis, Freja

    Længerevarende strategiske samarbejde er interessant, fordi det anses for en måde at fremme produktivitet og forretning for både kunder og leverandører. I rapportenfremlægges resultaterne fra en caseanalyse blandt leverandører og købere af Facilities Management.......Længerevarende strategiske samarbejde er interessant, fordi det anses for en måde at fremme produktivitet og forretning for både kunder og leverandører. I rapportenfremlægges resultaterne fra en caseanalyse blandt leverandører og købere af Facilities Management....

  16. Deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. Facility description - Layout E. Spiral ramp with one operational area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Stig [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Forsgren, Ebbe [SwedPower AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Lange, Fritz [Lange Art AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-04-01

    below ground. The proposal is based on a hypothetical inland location with a rail link. The report describes a layout with a spiral ramp as access to the deposition area and with a single operational area above ground. The ramp will be used as a transport route for heavy and bulky transports. A shaft, that connects the operational area with the central area of the deposition area, is used for utility systems and for staff transports between the surface and the deposition area. It has been assumed that the deposition areas and the central area are on the same level. The appendix, describing a two level alternative, shows how the underground area could be arranged if the deposition area for regular operation were to be divided into two levels. The facility description concentrates on the situation during regular operation. It also describes the gradual expansion programme, including land requirements and connections to existing infrastructure. The report concludes with some perspective sketches, which give a vision of how the repository might look when ready for operation. This facility description is a translation of the Swedish SKB report R-02-18. It is important to note that the report gives an example of one possible design for the deep repository. Many issues concerning system design, functional solutions, layout and design ought to be investigated further before deciding on the final design.

  17. Managerial issues in facilities management: The impact of facilities service on student productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzweber, Markus

    2017-01-01

    The study examines key issues and effects of managerial capability management in higher education premises at the University of Glasgow. A study was undertaken on the library’s ‘Learning Cafe’ area. This unique learning space provides complex process-oriented facilities- and IT services to students...

  18. Cold chain management practices of health care workers in primary health care facilities in Southern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogboghodo, Esohe Olivia; Omuemu, Vivian Ossaidiom; Odijie, Oisedebame; Odaman, Ofure Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Vaccination has caused a dramatic reduction in the threat of diseases that were once widespread and often times fatal. The efficient practice of cold chain management is therefore key to ensuring that the benefits of vaccination are sustained. The objective of this study is to assess the practice of cold chain management among health workers in primary health care facilities in Benin City, Edo State. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study design was employed in this study. The study population consisted of registered nurses, auxiliary nurses and community health extension workers in primary health care facilities in Benin City, Edo State. The tool for data collection was pre-tested, structured self-administered questionnaire. Bivariate analysis between socio-demographic variables and practice of cold chain management was done. Binary logistic regression was also done to determine significant predictors of practice of cold chain management. The level of significance was set at p cold chain management. Significant determinants of practice of cold chain management were cold chain management training (p = 0.004), presence of functional refrigerators (p = 0.016), NPI supervision (p cold chain management among respondents was fair. All stakeholders should ensure they work collectively towards ensuring that favorable environments which would improve the practice among health workers are put in place. PMID:28761610

  19. Management of Excess Material in the Navys Real Time Reutilization Asset Management Facilities Needs Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-23

    also own material in the RRAM facilities. NAVSUP procures and supplies the parts, components , and assemblies that keep Navy forces mission ready. In...No. DODIG-2017-043 J A N U A R Y 2 3 , 2 0 1 7 Management of Excess Material in the Navy’s Real-Time Reutilization Asset Management Facilities...Management of Excess Material in the Navy’s Real‑Time Reutilization Asset Management Facilities Needs Improvement Visit us at www.dodig.mil January 23, 2017

  20. Facilities Management a new strategy at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Nonis, M; CERN. Geneva. ST Division

    2002-01-01

    Starting from 2002, the management of all the tertiary infrastructure of CERN in charge of ST Division shall be carried out through a single Contractor; this includes both maintenance activities on the buildings and their technical installations, and general services such as security, cleaning, gardening, and waste disposal. At present, all these activities are carried out by external contractors via several different contracts. The major purposes of the unification in one single contract is to transfer the coordination tasks of the contracts thus reducing the direct control operation costs, release internal resources in order to be better focused on the core business of the Division and the reduction of the costs of each activity by taking profit of the synergies among the different services. The authors will thoroughly report on the main aspects related to this new contract, focusing their attention in particular to the result oriented strategy through a Service Level Agreement, the key performance indicato...

  1. Implementation of Security Facilities in Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is the most widely used network management protocol on TCP/IP-based networks. However, the lack of security features, notably authentication and privacy, is its weakness. To rectify this deficiency, a new version of SNMP, known as SNMPv3, is presented. The principal security facilities defined in SNMPv3 which include timeliness mechanism, authentication, privacy and access control are outlined, and a example on how to implement security features in a practical software system is given.

  2. INFRASTRUCTURE FACILITIES FOR MONITORING AND INTELLECTUAL ROAD TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Belov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Review of automatic management of road traffic technologies in major cities of Ukraine is carried out in the given article. Priority directions of studies are determined for producing modern and perspective technologies in the given area. The facilities for monitoring and intelligence management of the road traffic on the basis of the programmed logical controller, using the device of fuzzy logic are considered.

  3. YALINA facility a sub-critical Accelerator- Driven System (ADS) for nuclear energy research facility description and an overview of the research program (1997-2008).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-04-28

    The YALINA facility is a zero-power, sub-critical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was conceived, constructed, and put into operation at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus located in Minsk-Sosny, Belarus. This facility was conceived for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems, and to serve as a neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinide nuclei. This report provides a detailed description of this facility and documents the progress of research carried out there during a period of approximately a decade since the facility was conceived and built until the end of 2008. During its history of development and operation to date (1997-2008), the YALINA facility has hosted several foreign groups that worked with the resident staff as collaborators. The participation of Argonne National Laboratory in the YALINA research programs commenced in 2005. For obvious reasons, special emphasis is placed in this report on the work at YALINA facility that has involved Argonne's participation. Attention is given here to the experimental program at YALINA facility as well as to analytical investigations aimed at validating codes and computational procedures and at providing a better understanding of the physics and operational behavior of the YALINA facility in particular, and ADS systems in general, during the period 1997-2008.

  4. Managing Evolving Business Workflows through the Capture of Descriptive Information

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspard, S; Dindeleux, R; McClatchey, R; Gaspard, Sebastien; Estrella, Florida

    2003-01-01

    Business systems these days need to be agile to address the needs of a changing world. In particular the discipline of Enterprise Application Integration requires business process management to be highly reconfigurable with the ability to support dynamic workflows, inter-application integration and process reconfiguration. Basing EAI systems on model-resident or on a so-called description-driven approach enables aspects of flexibility, distribution, system evolution and integration to be addressed in a domain-independent manner. Such a system called CRISTAL is described in this paper with particular emphasis on its application to EAI problem domains. A practical example of the CRISTAL technology in the domain of manufacturing systems, called Agilium, is described to demonstrate the principles of model-driven system evolution and integration. The approach is compared to other model-driven development approaches such as the Model-Driven Architecture of the OMG and so-called Adaptive Object Models.

  5. Standard Guide for Preparing Waste Management Plans for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide addresses the development of waste management plans for potential waste streams resulting from decommissioning activities at nuclear facilities, including identifying, categorizing, and handling the waste from generation to final disposal. 1.2 This guide is applicable to potential waste streams anticipated from decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities whose operations were governed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or Agreement State license, under Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, or Department of Defense (DoD) regulations. 1.3 This guide provides a description of the key elements of waste management plans that if followed will successfully allow for the characterization, packaging, transportation, and off-site treatment or disposal, or both, of conventional, hazardous, and radioactive waste streams. 1.4 This guide does not address the on-site treatment, long term storage, or on-site disposal of these potential waste streams. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address ...

  6. Dismantlement and Radioactive Waste Management of DPRK Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jooho, W.; Baldwin, G. T.

    2005-04-01

    One critical aspect of any denuclearization of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) involves dismantlement of its nuclear facilities and management of their associated radioactive wastes. The decommissioning problem for its two principal operational plutonium facilities at Yongbyun, the 5MWe nuclear reactor and the Radiochemical Laboratory reprocessing facility, alone present a formidable challenge. Dismantling those facilities will create radioactive waste in addition to existing inventories of spent fuel and reprocessing wastes. Negotiations with the DPRK, such as the Six Party Talks, need to appreciate the enormous scale of the radioactive waste management problem resulting from dismantlement. The two operating plutonium facilities, along with their legacy wastes, will result in anywhere from 50 to 100 metric tons of uranium spent fuel, as much as 500,000 liters of liquid high-level waste, as well as miscellaneous high-level waste sources from the Radiochemical Laboratory. A substantial quantity of intermediate-level waste will result from disposing 600 metric tons of graphite from the reactor, an undetermined quantity of chemical decladding liquid waste from reprocessing, and hundreds of tons of contaminated concrete and metal from facility dismantlement. Various facilities for dismantlement, decontamination, waste treatment and packaging, and storage will be needed. The shipment of spent fuel and liquid high level waste out of the DPRK is also likely to be required. Nuclear facility dismantlement and radioactive waste management in the DPRK are all the more difficult because of nuclear nonproliferation constraints, including the call by the United States for “complete, verifiable and irreversible dismantlement,” or “CVID.” It is desirable to accomplish dismantlement quickly, but many aspects of the radioactive waste management cannot be achieved without careful assessment, planning and preparation, sustained commitment, and long

  7. Dismantlement and radioactive waste management of North Korean nuclear facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whang, Jooho (Kyung Hee University, South Korea); Baldwin, George Thomas

    2004-07-01

    One critical aspect of any denuclearization of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) involves dismantlement of its nuclear facilities and management of their associated radioactive wastes. The decommissioning problem for its two principal operational plutonium facilities at Yongbyun, the 5MWe nuclear reactor and the Radiochemical Laboratory reprocessing facility, alone present a formidable challenge. Dismantling those facilities will create radioactive waste in addition to existing inventories of spent fuel and reprocessing wastes. Negotiations with the DPRK, such as the Six Party Talks, need to appreciate the enormous scale of the radioactive waste management problem resulting from dismantlement. The two operating plutonium facilities, along with their legacy wastes, will result in anywhere from 50 to 100 metric tons of uranium spent fuel, as much as 500,000 liters of liquid high-level waste, as well as miscellaneous high-level waste sources from the Radiochemical Laboratory. A substantial quantity of intermediate-level waste will result from disposing 600 metric tons of graphite from the reactor, an undetermined quantity of chemical decladding liquid waste from reprocessing, and hundreds of tons of contaminated concrete and metal from facility dismantlement. Various facilities for dismantlement, decontamination, waste treatment and packaging, and storage will be needed. The shipment of spent fuel and liquid high level waste out of the DPRK is also likely to be required. Nuclear facility dismantlement and radioactive waste management in the DPRK are all the more difficult because of nuclear nonproliferation constraints, including the call by the United States for 'complete, verifiable and irreversible dismantlement', or 'CVID'. It is desirable to accomplish dismantlement quickly, but many aspects of the radioactive waste management cannot be achieved without careful assessment, planning and preparation, sustained commitment, and

  8. Project Hanford management contract quality assurance program implementation plan for nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibb, E.K.

    1997-10-15

    During transition from the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Management and Operations (M and O) contract to the Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) Management and Integration (M and I) contract, existing WHC policies, procedures, and manuals were reviewed to determine which to adopt on an interim basis. Both WHC-SP-1131,Hanford Quality Assurance Program and Implementation Plan, and WHC-CM-4-2, Quality Assurance Manual, were adopted; however, it was recognized that revisions were required to address the functions and responsibilities of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC). This Quality Assurance Program Implementation Plan for Nuclear Facilities (HNF-SP-1228) supersedes the implementation portion of WHC-SP-1 13 1, Rev. 1. The revised Quality Assurance (QA) Program is documented in the Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD), HNF-MP-599. That document replaces the QA Program in WHC-SP-1131, Rev. 1. The scope of this document is limited to documenting the nuclear facilities managed by FDH and its Major Subcontractors (MSCS) and the status of the implementation of 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance Requirements, at those facilities. Since the QA Program for the nuclear facilities is now documented in the QAPD, future updates of the information provided in this plan will be by letter. The layout of this plan is similar to that of WHC-SP-1 13 1, Rev. 1. Sections 2.0 and 3.0 provide an overview of the Project Hanford QA Program. A list of Project Hanford nuclear facilities is provided in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 provides the status of facility compliance to 10 CFR 830.120. Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0 provide requested exemptions, status of open items, and references, respectively. The four appendices correspond to the four projects that comprise Project Hanford.

  9. Innovation process and innovativeness of facility management organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mudrak, T.; Wagenberg, van A.F.; Wubben, E.F.M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - The innovation patterns and processes in facility management (FM) organizations are crucial for the development of FM as a discipline, but they are not yet fully explored and understood. This paper aims to clarify FM innovation from the perspective of innovation processes and the

  10. The mixed waste management facility, FY95 plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streit, R.

    1994-12-01

    This document contains the Fiscal Year 1995 Plan for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Major objectives to be completed during FY 1995 for the MWMF project are listed and described. This report also contains a budget plan, project task summaries, a milestone control log, and a responsibility assignment matrix for the MWMF project.

  11. Innovation process and innovativeness of facility management organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mudrak, T.; Wagenberg, van A.F.; Wubben, E.F.M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose - The innovation patterns and processes in facility management (FM) organizations are crucial for the development of FM as a discipline, but they are not yet fully explored and understood. This paper aims to clarify FM innovation from the perspective of innovation processes and the innovativ

  12. Strategies for healthcare facilities, construction, and real estate management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James G

    2012-05-01

    Adventist HealthCare offers the following lessons learned in improving the value of healthcare facilities, construction, and real estate management: Use an integrated approach. Ensure that the objectives of the approach align the hospital or health system's mission and values. Embrace innovation. Develop a plan that applies to the whole organization, rather than specific business units. Ensure commitment of senior leaders.

  13. Information Technology in Facilities Management - A Literature Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : The aim of this paper is to present the state of the art of research in Information Technology (IT) in Facilities Management (FM). Background : Initial studies indicate that investments into IT in FM often do not add the expected value, neither to the FM department itself nor...

  14. Organisation of facilities management in relation to core business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to clarify the organisational relationships between Facilities Management (FM) and core business and how these relationships vary for strategic and operational support functions. Approach: The research takes a starting point in Michael Porter’s theory...

  15. Adding Value to Facilities Management with Information Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Poul

    2016-01-01

    This PhD project investigates implementation and use of Information Systems (IS) and Information Technologies (IT) in the Facilities management (FM) business domain. This investigation is relevant because implementation and use of IS/IT in FM has potentials for improvements which can provide...

  16. Building a GIS Database for Space and Facilities Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcik, Nicolas A.; Huesca-Dorantes, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Growth and technology have driven the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) to build a geographic information system (GIS) database for its facilities and space management. This chapter reviews several issues concerning this implementation: (1) the challenges involved in implementing the system; (2) the lack of efficiency and accuracy that existed…

  17. 7 CFR 205.271 - Facility pest management practice standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Facility pest management practice standard. 205.271 Section 205.271 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS...

  18. Nye udbudsformer og partnerskaber inden for Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2010-01-01

    I de senere år er der sket en stærk udvikling af nye udbuds- og samarbejdsformer inden for Facilities Management (FM). Velkendte eksempler er Offentlig-Private Partnerskaber (OPP ), hvor der sammen med FM-ydelser over typisk 30 år også indgår levering og finansiering af en bygning og ESCO (Energy...

  19. Facility management progettare, misurare, gestire e remunerare i servizi

    CERN Document Server

    Tronconi, Oliviero

    2014-01-01

    Il valore aggiunto del Facility Management consiste in una nuova dimensione e importanza dell'organizzazione: quella del fornitore che si affianca all'azienda/cliente per supportarla e risolvere qualsiasi problema inerente ai suoi diversi servizi/bisogni. Questo valore deriva da una maggior capacità di coordinamento e gestione del fornitore/partner e da una più elevata motivazione e qualità professionale delle risorse impiegate. Ma il contributo più significativo risiede della capacità di incrementare la qualità delle informazioni e, quindi, la conoscenza sui processi attuati e sui risultati raggiunti. Il Facility Management è, nella sua accezione più evoluta, il passaggio dal "fare artigianale" alla "gestione delle informazioni che sono causa ed effetto del fare". Una gestione sistematica che deve originare un più alto livello di conoscenza dei processi e che costituisce l'essenza, il nucleo fondamentale del Facility Management. Nella chiave di lettura proposta dal volume, il Facility Management è ...

  20. Adaptive management: a paradigm for remediation of public facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janecky, David R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doerr, Ted B [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    Public facility restoration planning traditionally focused on response to natural disasters and hazardous materials accidental releases. These plans now need to integrate response to terrorist actions. Therefore, plans must address a wide range of potential vulnerabilities. Similar types of broad remediation planning are needed for restoration of waste and hazardous material handling areas and facilities. There are strong similarities in damage results and remediation activities between unintentional and terrorist actions; however, the uncertainties associated with terrorist actions result in a re-evaluation of approaches to planning. Restoration of public facilities following a release of a hazardous material is inherently far more complex than in confined industrial settings and has many unique technical, economic, social, and political challenges. Therefore, they arguably involve a superset of drivers, concerns and public agencies compared to other restoration efforts. This superset of conditions increases complexity of interactions, reduces our knowledge of the initial conditions, and even condenses the timeline for restoration response. Therefore, evaluations of alternative restoration management approaches developed for responding to terrorist actions provide useful knowledge for large, complex waste management projects. Whereas present planning documents have substantial linearity in their organization, the 'adaptive management' paradigm provides a constructive parallel operations paradigm for restoration of facilities that anticipates and plans for uncertainty, multiple/simUltaneous public agency actions, and stakeholder participation. Adaptive management grew out of the need to manage and restore natural resources in highly complex and changing environments with limited knowledge about causal relationships and responses to restoration actions. Similarities between natural resource management and restoration of a facility and surrounding area

  1. Management support and perceived consumer satisfaction in skilled nursing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metlen, Scott; Eveleth, Daniel; Bailey, Jeffrey J

    2005-08-01

    How managers 'manage' employees influences important firm outcomes. Heskett, Sasser, and Schlesinger contend that the level of internal support for service workers will influence consumer satisfaction. This study empirically explores how skilled nursing facility (SNF) managers affect consumer satisfaction by encouraging employee effectiveness and listening to employees to determine how to improve employee effectiveness. We extend previous research by proposing management as a form of internal support and demonstrating its relationship to service process integration, as a distinct form of internal support. The results of our individual-level investigation of 630 nursing assistants from 45 SNFs provide support for our two-part hypothesis. First, active management support and process integration, as elements of internal support, do lead to increased employee satisfaction and employee effectiveness. Second, the increased employee satisfaction and effectiveness was positively related to consumer satisfaction, as evaluated by the service workers. Thus, there is a positive influence of management's internal support of nursing assistants on perceived consumer satisfaction.

  2. Material control in nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. Part I. Fuel descriptions and fabrication processes, P. O. 1236909 Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgonovi, G.M.; McCartin, T.J.; Miller, C.L.

    1978-12-01

    The report presents information on foreign nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. Fuel descriptions and fuel fabrication information for three basic reactor types are presented: The information presented for LWRs assumes that Pu--U Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) will be used as fuel.

  3. Deadline rush: a time management phenomenon and its mathematical description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Cornelius J; Kleinmann, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A typical time management phenomenon is the rush before a deadline. Behavioral decision making research can be used to predict how behavior changes before a deadline. People are likely not to work on a project with a deadline in the far future because they generally discount future outcomes. Only when the deadline is close are people likely to work. On the basis of recent intertemporal choice experiments, the authors argue that a hyperbolic function should provide a more accurate description of the deadline rush than an exponential function predicted by an economic model of discounted utility. To show this, the fit of the hyperbolic and the exponential function were compared with data sets that describe when students study for exams. As predicted, the hyperbolic function fit the data significantly better than the exponential function. The implication for time management decisions is that they are most likely to be inconsistent over time (i.e., people make a plan how to use their time but do not follow it).

  4. The Added Value of Facilities Management: Concepts, Findings and Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    expertise, the involvement in the process leading to this the book including a number of workshops, and a literature review of the development of their disciplinary fields: Facilities Management (FM), Corporate Real Estate Management (CREM) and Business to Business (B2B) Marketing. Findings: The difference...... by their particular theories and conceptual analyses, data, tools, and best practices, with a focus on respectively costs and benefits of facilities and services, alignment of corporate and public real estate to organizational objectives and organisational performance, and relationship management in market...... background information to understand the following chapters in this book. Research limitations: The chapter is mainly based on the experience and knowledge of the editors. It does not include original research but provides an introductory overview of the book. Originality/value: This chapter takes a look...

  5. Development of Experimental Facilities for Advanced Spent Fuel Management Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, G. S.; Jung, W. M.; Ku, J. H. [and others

    2004-07-01

    The advanced spent fuel management process(ACP), proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel, is under research and development. This technology convert spent fuels into pure metal-base uranium with removing the highly heat generating materials(Cs, Sr) efficiently and reducing of the decay heat, volume, and radioactivity from spent fuel by 1/4. In the next phase(2004{approx}2006), the demonstration of this technology will be carried out for verification of the ACP in a laboratory scale. For this demonstration, the hot cell facilities of {alpha}-{gamma} type and auxiliary facilities are required essentially for safe handling of high radioactive materials. As the hot cell facilities for demonstration of the ACP, a existing hot cell of {beta}-{gamma} type will be refurbished to minimize construction expenditures of hot cell facility. In this study, the design requirements are established, and the process detail work flow was analysed for the optimum arrangement to ensure effective process operation in hot cell. And also, the basic and detail design of hot cell facility and process, and safety analysis was performed to secure conservative safety of hot cell facility and process.

  6. The exploratory studies facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain - Description and status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simecka, W.B.; Replogle, J.M. [Department of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Mckenzie, D.G. [Morrison Knudsen Corporation, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada will be a 25 kilometer underground network of inclined ramps, tunnels, and test alcoves. It will serve as an underground laboratory for the execution of a testing program conceived to assess the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a site to host a potential high level nuclear waste repository. This paper contains a description of the ESF, a summary of the major types of tests currently planned, and a report on the current status of the ongoing design and construction activities. The ESF is being designed and constructed in phases. Currently, the Detailed Design, or {open_quotes}Title II Design{close_quotes} is centered on the second of ten major design packages. Construction has begun on excavation of the {open_quotes}starter tunnel{close_quotes} for a Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) expected to begin operation in late FY 1994. The EFS program will provide information critical to the evaluation of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository site, and will house a suite of state-of-the-art tests designed to gather this information. The ESF is a one of a kind opportunity to examine, in minute detail, all facets of a sites` geology; its thermal, mechanical, and hydrologic properties; and to study the linkages between these properties.

  7. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility tempered water and tempered water cooling system design description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1998-11-30

    This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Tempered Water (TW) and Tempered Water Cooling (TWC) System . The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-O02, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the TW and TWC equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SOD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  8. Facilities management added value in closing the energy performance gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaw Min

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Existing non-domestic buildings tend to use more energy than expected. This paper investigates how the operational strategies of facilities management can contribute to reducing building energy use. A longitudinal case study of a higher education (HE campus which was conceptualised with the objective of being environmentally friendly and energy efficient is presented. The paper reflects on the energy performance of the campus since its operation in 2001, based on 14 years of energy data and a detailed record of all initiatives undertaken by the campus’s facilities management (FM team in order to optimise energy performance. The integrated FM strategy composed of low- and no-cost strategies, continuous improvements, ongoing commissioning and retrofits succeeded in reducing campus energy intensity from 174 to 87 kWh/(m2*yr, now outperforming most relevant benchmarks. This finding highlights the importance of operations and maintenance in reducing the energy usage of existing buildings. This presented findings draw on a single case only, which excels through a very detailed longitudinal dataset. Going forwards, the analysis of further cases is recommended to corroborate the findings. The presented results suggest that proactive operations and maintenance strategies in existing buildings can contribute towards significantly improving energy performance. The profile and competency level of facilities management personnel should consequently be raised strategically at the organisational and national/industrial policy level, whilst integrated design processes should be further expanded to include FM’s operational control and management in a holistically fashion.

  9. A Supply Chain Design Problem Integrated Facility Unavailabilities Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouad Maliki

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A supply chain is a set of facilities connected together in order to provide products to customers. The supply chain is subject to random failures caused by different factors which cause the unavailability of some sites. Given the current economic context, the management of these unavailabilities is becoming a strategic choice to ensure the desired reliability and availability levels of the different supply chain facilities. In this work, we treat two problems related to the field of supply chain, namely the design and unavailabilities management of logistics facilities. Specifically, we consider a stochastic distribution network with consideration of suppliers' selection, distribution centres location (DCs decisions and DCs’ unavailabilities management. Two resolution approaches are proposed. The first approach called non-integrated consists on define the optimal supply chain structure using an optimization approach based on genetic algorithms (GA, then to simulate the supply chain performance with the presence of DCs failures. The second approach called integrated approach is to consider the design of the supply chain problem and unavailabilities management of DCs in the same model. Note that, we replace each unavailable DC by performing a reallocation using GA in the two approaches. The obtained results of the two approaches are detailed and compared showing their effectiveness.

  10. The grand challenge of managing the petascale facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiken, R. J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2007-02-28

    This report is the result of a study of networks and how they may need to evolve to support petascale leadership computing and science. As Dr. Ray Orbach, director of the Department of Energy's Office of Science, says in the spring 2006 issue of SciDAC Review, 'One remarkable example of growth in unexpected directions has been in high-end computation'. In the same article Dr. Michael Strayer states, 'Moore's law suggests that before the end of the next cycle of SciDAC, we shall see petaflop computers'. Given the Office of Science's strong leadership and support for petascale computing and facilities, we should expect to see petaflop computers in operation in support of science before the end of the decade, and DOE/SC Advanced Scientific Computing Research programs are focused on making this a reality. This study took its lead from this strong focus on petascale computing and the networks required to support such facilities, but it grew to include almost all aspects of the DOE/SC petascale computational and experimental science facilities, all of which will face daunting challenges in managing and analyzing the voluminous amounts of data expected. In addition, trends indicate the increased coupling of unique experimental facilities with computational facilities, along with the integration of multidisciplinary datasets and high-end computing with data-intensive computing; and we can expect these trends to continue at the petascale level and beyond. Coupled with recent technology trends, they clearly indicate the need for including capability petascale storage, networks, and experiments, as well as collaboration tools and programming environments, as integral components of the Office of Science's petascale capability metafacility. The objective of this report is to recommend a new cross-cutting program to support the management of petascale science and infrastructure. The appendices of the report document current and projected

  11. Supervision of waste management and environmental protection at the Swedish nuclear facilities 1999; Avfall och miljoe vid de kaerntekniska anlaeggningarna. - Tillsynsrapport 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The report summarizes the supervision of waste management and environmental protection at the nuclear facilities that was carried out by the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute in 1999. A summary of the inspections during 1999 and a description of important issues connected with the supervision of the nuclear facilities are given. The inspections during 1999 have focused on the management of liquid discharges and components containing induced activity at some of the nuclear facilities. Also, routines for filing environmental samples, discharge water samples and documents were inspected at all the different nuclear facilities. The Swedish Radiation Protection Institute finds that the operations are mainly performed according to current regulations.

  12. Integrated management of facility, process, and output: data model perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEE Seunghoon; HAN Soonhung; MUN Duhwan

    2012-01-01

    As the manufacturing industry matures,vast amounts of data related to products are created by many kinds of engineering systems during the manufacturing phase.These include data for a variety of facilities,manufacturing processes,and the input and output of each process (input material,by-products,and intermediate and final products). Effective operation and maintenance of manufacturing facilities and eco-friendly products are gradually becoming important issues due to increased environmental regulations and changes in the enterprise business model.For this reason,increased efficiency in data management is necessary in the manufacturing industry. In this paper,existing data models for the integration of lifecycle data are analyzed according to their application domains.After the analysis,information requirements for the integrated management of facility,process,and output data are developed.According to these requirements,a data model appropriate for this integration is proposed.As an application case study,the use of the proposed data model for the effective operation and maintenance of manufacturing facilities is presented.Finally,benefit,limitation,and improvement of the proposed data model are discussed.

  13. OPP og indkøb af Facilities Management ydelser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian

    Dette er den 3. og sidste rapport i forskningsprojektet om OPP og indkøb af Facilities Management ydelser. Fokus er denne gang rettet mod bestræbelserne på at skabe større integration i byggeprocessen. Det vil blive undersøgt, hvorvidt sådanne bestræbelser – som der kan findes eksempler på både i...... UK og i Danmark – vil kunne fremme en inddragelse af Facilities Management viden i planlægning, projektering og udførelse. Denne problemstilling skal ses i forlængelse af det forudgående arbejde i forskningsprojektet....

  14. Delivering Sustainable Facilities Management in Danish Housing Estates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Jensen, Jesper Ole; Jensen, Per Anker

    2009-01-01

    management is supporting social, economical and environmental sustainable development. Sustainable facility management (SFM) is as an 'umbrella' for various ways of reducing flows of energy, water and waste in the daily operation of the buildings, for instance by regular monitoring the consumption, by using......Housing is an area, which ay a central role in sustainable development due to large resource consumption and as transition agent towards sustainable lifestyles. The aim is to evaluate current practice of housing administration in Denmark in order to evaluate if and how sustainable facilities......, but the entire FM‐setting including the ownership of the building, the organisation of daily operation, the roles and relation between stakeholders are equally important in order to utilise the monitoring as a mean for transformation towards sustainable buildings and lifestyles....

  15. Delivering Sustainable Facilities Management in Danish Housing Estates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Jensen, Jesper Ole; Jensen, Per Anker

    2009-01-01

    Housing plays a central role in sustainable development due to large resource consumption and as transition agent towards sustainable lifestyles. The aim is to evaluate current practice of housing administration in Denmark in order to evaluate if and how sustainable facilities management...... is supporting social, economical and environmental sustainable development. Sustainable facility management (SFM) is as an 'umbrella' for various ways of reducing flows of energy, water and waste in the daily operation of the buildings, for instance by regular monitoring the consumption, by using 'green......-setting including the ownership of the building, the organisation of daily operation, the roles and relation between stakeholders are equally important in order to utilise the monitoring as a mean for transformation towards sustainable buildings and lifestyles....

  16. Management of radioactive material safety programs at medical facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camper, L.W.; Schlueter, J.; Woods, S. [and others

    1997-05-01

    A Task Force, comprising eight US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and two Agreement State program staff members, developed the guidance contained in this report. This report describes a systematic approach for effectively managing radiation safety programs at medical facilities. This is accomplished by defining and emphasizing the roles of an institution`s executive management, radiation safety committee, and radiation safety officer. Various aspects of program management are discussed and guidance is offered on selecting the radiation safety officer, determining adequate resources for the program, using such contractual services as consultants and service companies, conducting audits, and establishing the roles of authorized users and supervised individuals; NRC`s reporting and notification requirements are discussed, and a general description is given of how NRC`s licensing, inspection and enforcement programs work.

  17. Management concepts and safety applications for nuclear fuel facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisner, H.; Scotti, R.S. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Science; Delicate, W.S. [KEVRIC Co., Inc., Silver Spring, MD (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This report presents an overview of effectiveness of management control of safety. It reviews several modern management control theories as well as the general functions of management and relates them to safety issues at the corporate and at the process safety management (PSM) program level. Following these discussions, structured technique for assessing management of the safety function is suggested. Seven modern management control theories are summarized, including business process reengineering, the learning organization, capability maturity, total quality management, quality assurance and control, reliability centered maintenance, and industrial process safety. Each of these theories is examined for-its principal characteristics and implications for safety management. The five general management functions of planning, organizing, directing, monitoring, and integrating, which together provide control over all company operations, are discussed. Under the broad categories of Safety Culture, Leadership and Commitment, and Operating Excellence, key corporate safety elements and their subelements are examined. The three categories under which PSM program-level safety issues are described are Technology, Personnel, and Facilities.

  18. Strategic sourcing and procurement of facilities management services

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose it to provide insights into strategic sourcing concerning Facilities Management (FM) and how it can contribute to a sourcing decision that combines the benefits of internal and external provision with consideration of business risk and cost. Design/methodology/approach: The paper investigates a strategic sourcing and procurement process in a large public organisation in Denmark based on participating in internal meetings, a workshop, document studies and interviews. The p...

  19. The management of radioactive waste. A description of ten countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidskog, Rolf; Andersson, Ann-Catrin [Oerebro Univ. (Sweden). Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this report is to provide a description of how the responsible authorities/companies in ten EDRAM countries (International Association for Environmentally Safe Disposal of Radioactive Materials) deal with the management of radioactive waste. The focus is on how the responsible organisation currently handles this issue, including technical, economic and socio-political aspects. The material used was primarily produced by the companies/authorities themselves. The report describes the development and situation in each country up to the end of 2001, or later if noted as such in the country report. The scope of this report does not permit an evaluation of how successful and effective the companies and authorities have been in implementing their plans and ambitions. The report does not include the views of other national stakeholders concerning radwaste management, or their opinions of the way that the authorities/companies handle the issue of radwaste. The description is based on a series of questions that were drawn up and discussed at the initial stage of the EDRAM co-operation. Technological aspects: 1. What technology is used? How is research and development promoted and executed? 2. Where is the waste to be put? What criteria does each country search for? 3. How is security to be maintained? Who can obtain a license for handling nuclear waste? Economic aspects: 1. In what way do the countries in question discuss the time aspects as regards delays and similar? 2. How are the economic and financial aspects of the process dealt with? Where does the money come from? Socio-political aspects: 4. What role do politicians play and to what extent is social acceptance a part of the process? What part does public opinion play? 5. How flexible is the decision-making process and can decisions be revised? 6. Does the public have confidence in the industry and the decision-makers? 7. What kind of institutional problems arise? With regard to public involvement in

  20. The management of radioactive waste. A description of ten countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidskog, Rolf; Andersson, Ann-Catrin [Oerebro Univ. (Sweden). Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this report is to provide a description of how the responsible authorities/companies in ten EDRAM countries (International Association for Environmentally Safe Disposal of Radioactive Materials) deal with the management of radioactive waste. The focus is on how the responsible organisation currently handles this issue, including technical, economic and socio-political aspects. The material used was primarily produced by the companies/authorities themselves. The report describes the development and situation in each country up to the end of 2001, or later if noted as such in the country report. The scope of this report does not permit an evaluation of how successful and effective the companies and authorities have been in implementing their plans and ambitions. The report does not include the views of other national stakeholders concerning radwaste management, or their opinions of the way that the authorities/companies handle the issue of radwaste. The description is based on a series of questions that were drawn up and discussed at the initial stage of the EDRAM co-operation. Technological aspects: 1. What technology is used? How is research and development promoted and executed? 2. Where is the waste to be put? What criteria does each country search for? 3. How is security to be maintained? Who can obtain a license for handling nuclear waste? Economic aspects: 1. In what way do the countries in question discuss the time aspects as regards delays and similar? 2. How are the economic and financial aspects of the process dealt with? Where does the money come from? Socio-political aspects: 4. What role do politicians play and to what extent is social acceptance a part of the process? What part does public opinion play? 5. How flexible is the decision-making process and can decisions be revised? 6. Does the public have confidence in the industry and the decision-makers? 7. What kind of institutional problems arise? With regard to public involvement in

  1. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2001-02-25

    This 2001 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a), and incorporates comments from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2001 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. The permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the newest guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, the permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility’s Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit.

  2. Representing and managing Real Estate: BIM for Facility Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Lo Turco

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is intended to explore the potential of the Building Information Modelling (BIM methodologies to be applied to the various stages of the construction process, particularly as far as international guidelines and best practices supporting virtuous operating flows are concerned: the IT component, mostly graphic during the design phase, is mainly integrated and renewed in an alphanumeric format, and becomes an integrating part of the management and maintenance of the artefacts. The case studies developed in collaboration with the Building and Logistics Service of the Polytechnic of Turin substantiate such procedures, which, even if they are not widely spread as of yet, reach interoperability targets: integrated approaches to information sharing processes aimed at defining adequate intervention schedules on both large and small scales, through the definition of strategies aimed at restricting the enforcement of incorrect solutions.

  3. Solid Waste Management Facilities with Permits by the Iowa DNR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — All types of facilities that handle solid waste, including: sanitary landfills, appliance demanufacturing facilities, transfer stations, land application sites,...

  4. Waste Management facilities fault tree databank 1995 status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minnick, W.V.; Wellmaker, K.A.

    1995-08-16

    The Safety Information Management and Analysis Group (SIMA) of the Safety Engineering Department (SED) maintains compilations of incidents that have occurred in the Separations and Process Control, Waste Management, Fuel Fabrication, Tritium and SRTC facilities. This report records the status of the Waste Management (WM) Databank at the end of CY-1994. The WM Databank contains more than 35,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with significant potential for injury or contamination of personnel. This report documents the status of the WM Databank including the availability, training, sources of data, search options, Quality Assurance, and usage to which these data have been applied. Periodic updates to this memorandum are planned as additional data or applications are acquired.

  5. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, lead, antimony, I,I-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, gross alpha, mercury, nickel, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226) exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents; 57 (49%) of the 116 monitored wells contained elevated tritium activities, and 21 (18%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations Sixty-one downgradient wells screened in Aquifer Zone IIB2 (Water Table), Aquifer Zone IIB[sub 2] (Barnwell/McBean), and Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) contained constituents that exceeded the PDWS during first quarter 1992. Upgradient wells BGO 1D and HSB 85A, BC, and 85C did not contain any constituents that exceeded the PDWS. Upgradient well BGO 2D contained elevated tritium.

  6. CHANGE OF CONTRACTOR FOR THE FACILITIES MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES AT CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Facilities Management contract at CERN, under the responsibility of ST Division, Group FM, is in charge of the maintenance and minor works on tertiary installations (i.e. all structures and installations that have no direct relation to the running of the accelerators) for the following trades: - Technical: heating, ventilation, air conditioning, plumbing, electricity, civil engineering (painting, roofing, glazing, blinds, fencing, masonry etc.), cleansing, passenger and goods lifts, automatic and powered doors, kitchen equipment, roads, signs, keys and locks, office furniture, - Services: waste collection, security, green areas, cleaning and sanitary supplies, disinfection, rodent control and insect control. Starting from the 1st June the present contractor will stop some activities that will be taken under its responsibility by the new one, INGEST Facility. Others activities will be moved on the 1st July. Minor perturbation in the service might occur. The contact number will not change and will be opera...

  7. CHANGE OF CONTRACTOR FOR THE FACILITIES MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES AT CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Facilities Management contract at CERN, under the responsibility of ST Division, Group FM, is in charge of the maintenance and minor works on tertiary installations (i.e. all structures and installations that have no direct relation to the running of the accelerators) for the following trades: - Technical: heating, ventilation, air conditioning, plumbing, electricity, civil engineering (painting, roofing, glazing, blinds, fencing, masonry etc.), cleansing, passenger and goods lifts, automatic and powered doors, kitchen equipment, roads, signs, keys and locks, office furniture, - Services: waste collection, security, green areas, cleaning and sanitary supplies, disinfection, rodent control and insect control. Starting from the 1st June the present contractor will stop some activities that will be taken under its responsibility by the new one, INGEST Facility. The remaining activities (including cleaning) will be moved on the 1st July. Minor perturbation in the service might occur. The contact number will ...

  8. Automated management of life cycle for future network experiment based on description language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Hongxia; Liang, Junxue; Lin, Zhaowen; Ma, Yan

    2016-12-01

    Future network is a complex resources pool including multiple physical resources and virtual resources. Establishing experiment on future network is complicate and tedious. That achieving the automated management of future network experiments is so important. This paper brings forward the way for researching and managing the life cycle of experiment based on the description language. The description language uses the framework, which couples with a low hierarchical structure and a complete description of the network experiment. In this way, the experiment description template can be generated by this description framework accurately and completely. In reality, we can also customize and reuse network experiment by modifying the description template. The results show that this method can achieve the aim for managing the life cycle of network experiment effectively and automatically, which greatly saves time, reduces the difficulty, and implements the reusability of services.

  9. Uplatnění metody benchmarking v rámci Facility management

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This bachelor study dissertates about the possibilities of benchmarking application in the field of Facility Management. Theoretical part describes basic characteristics and elementary terms and methods of benchmarking process in Facility Management. In the practical part ten companies providing facility services are compared on the basis of a number of indices. Every company is briefly described. On the results of performed analysis the evolution of the Facility Management in Czech Republic ...

  10. Sectoral innovation system foresight in practice: Nordic facilities management foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Dannemand; Dahl Andersen, Allan; Jensen, Per Anker

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies have explored the interconnection between the foresight literature and the innovation system literature. This paper adds to these studies by investigating how theoretical elements of the innovation system approach can contribute to the design and practice of foresight processes...... a proposal for a common Nordic facilities management research agenda. The paper finds that three elements of the innovation system literature are of particular interest for the practice of foresight: innovation systems and context dependency, learning and user-producer interactions, and the role of knowledge...... and knowledge production. These elements are embedded into a simple sectoral innovation system model (including actors, knowledge flows, and the strategic environment)....

  11. Innovation in Services and Stakeholder Interactions: Cases from Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia

    services are a set of support services. They are meant to ensure that the employees of an organisation can carry out the tasks and activities related to the core business, without having to worry about, for example, the management of the workplace, catering and cleaning, security and safety. Facilities...... research approach (inductive, abductive and deductive), which includes a literature review and four empirical papers. The empirical work for this dissertation includes an explorative study, three mini case studies and an in-depth longitudinal case study. The collected data range from interviews to archive...

  12. Tritium and ignition target management at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draggoo, Vaughn

    2013-06-01

    Isotopic mixtures of hydrogen constitute the basic fuel for fusion targets of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A typical NIF fusion target shot requires approximately 0.5 mmoles of hydrogen gas and as much as 750 GBq (20 Ci) of 3H. Isotopic mix ratios are specified according to the experimental shot/test plan and the associated test objectives. The hydrogen isotopic concentrations, absolute amounts, gas purity, configuration of the target, and the physical configuration of the NIF facility are all parameters and conditions that must be managed to ensure the quality and safety of operations. An essential and key step in the preparation of an ignition target is the formation of a ~60 μm thick hydrogen "ice" layer on the inner surface of the target capsule. The Cryogenic Target Positioning System (Cryo-Tarpos) provides gas handling, cyro-cooling, x-ray imaging systems, and related instrumentation to control the volumes and temperatures of the multiphase (solid, liquid, and gas) hydrogen as the gas is condensed to liquid, admitted to the capsule, and frozen as a single spherical crystal of hydrogen in the capsule. The hydrogen fuel gas is prepared in discrete 1.7 cc aliquots in the LLNL Tritium Facility for each ignition shot. Post-shot hydrogen gas is recovered in the NIF Tritium Processing System (TPS). Gas handling systems, instrumentation and analytic equipment, material accounting information systems, and the shot planning systems must work together to ensure that operational and safety requirements are met.

  13. Tools for Stakeholder Involvement in Facility Management Service Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia; Scupola, Ada

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the tools that Facility Management (FM) companies use to involve different stakeholders, and more precisely the ones on the demand side, in the FM service design process. Stakeholder involvement may contribute to FM service innovations...... that are more in line with the stakeholder needs and expectations, and may thus result in increased customer satisfaction, better services and, at the very end, an increased competitive advantage for the organization. Background: The background of this study lies in user involvement in service design...... in combination with empirical evidence and research from the FM field. The differentiation between clients, customers and end-users (Coenen et al. 2013) is taken as the ground to explore the peculiarities of stakeholder management within FM service design, and deepen the discussion on user involvement, which can...

  14. Sustainability in facilities management: an overview of current research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Sarasoja, Anna-Liisa; Ramskov Galamba, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    the emerging sub-discipline of sustainable facilities management (SFM) on research, an overview of current studies is needed. The purpose of this literature review is to provide exactly this overview. Design/methodology/approach: This article identifies and examines current research studies on SFM through...... indicated that the current research varies in focus, methodology and application of theory, and it was concluded that the current research primary addresses environmental sustainability, whereas the current research which takes an integrated strategic approach to SFM is limited. The article includes lists...... of reviewed journals and articles to support the further development of SFM in research and practice. Research limitations/implications: The literature review includes literature from 2007 to 2012, to manage the analytical process within the project period. However, with the current categorisation...

  15. The Added Value of Facilities Management: Concepts, Findings and Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    background information to understand the following chapters in this book. Research limitations: The chapter is mainly based on the experience and knowledge of the editors. It does not include original research but provides an introductory overview of the book. Originality/value: This chapter takes a look......Purpose: To explain the purpose and background of this book and introduce the three basic perspectives behind the research presented as well as the structure and editing process of the book. Methodology: The editors shared and discussed individual contributions to this chapter, based on their own...... expertise, the involvement in the process leading to this the book including a number of workshops, and a literature review of the development of their disciplinary fields: Facilities Management (FM), Corporate Real Estate Management (CREM) and Business to Business (B2B) Marketing. Findings: The difference...

  16. ESCO as Innovative Facilities Management in Danish Municipalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole; Oesten, Pimmie; Balslev Nielsen, Susanne

     Purpose:  Increasing energy efficiency of existing buildings is high on the Facility Management (FM) agenda, therefore building owners and FM Managers need insight into a variety of organizational possibilities for energy renovation projects. This paper explores how ESCO can foster innovative...... changes in the municipal FM-function, including dissemination of their ESCO-competence to local building owners. Theory:  Theory of Public Innovation is used to see the new roles of local authorities in promoting energy renovations to building owners with a relatively limited FM-competence. Design....../methodology/approach: Since ESCO is relatively new in a Danish context; international experience is investigated through literature review to establish a conceptual frame. The study is based on recent Danish and international surveys, literature studies on ESCO and a case study of Kalundborg municipality combined...

  17. Impacts of building information modeling on facility maintenance management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahamed, Shafee; Neelamkavil, Joseph; Canas, Roberto [Centre for Computer-assisted Construction Technologies, National Research Council of Canada, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Building information modeling (BIM) is a digital representation of the physical and functional properties of a building; it has been used by construction professionals for a long time and stakeholders are now using it in different aspects of the building lifecycle. This paper intends to present how BIM impacts the construction industry and how it can be used for facility maintenance management. The maintenance and operations of buildings are in most cases still managed through the use of drawings and spreadsheets although life cycle costs of a building are significantly higher than initial investment costs; thus, the use of BIM could help in achieving a higher efficiency and so important benefits. This study is part of an ongoing research project, the nD modeling project, which aims at predicting building energy consumption with better accuracy.

  18. Technological options for management of hazardous wastes from US Department of Energy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, S.; Newsom, D.; Barisas, S.; Humphrey, J.; Fradkin, L.; Surles, T.

    1982-08-01

    This report provides comprehensive information on the technological options for management of hazardous wastes generated at facilities owned or operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE). These facilities annually generate a large quantity of wastes that could be deemed hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Included in these wastes are liquids or solids containing polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, heavy metals, waste oils, spent solvents, acids, bases, carcinogens, and numerous other pollutants. Some of these wastes consist of nonnuclear hazardous chemicals; others are mixed wastes containing radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. Nearly 20 unit processes and disposal methods are presented in this report. They were selected on the basis of their proven utility in waste management and potential applicability at DOE sites. These technological options fall into five categories: physical processes, chemical processes, waste exchange, fixation, and ultimate disposal. The options can be employed for either resource recovery, waste detoxification, volume reduction, or perpetual storage. Detailed descriptions of each technological option are presented, including information on process performance, cost, energy and environmental considerations, waste management of applications, and potential applications at DOE sites. 131 references, 25 figures, 23 tables.

  19. The neutron Time-Of-Flight facility, n_TOF, at CERN (I): Technical Description

    CERN Document Server

    n_TOF, Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The n_TOF facility is a spallation neutron source operating at CERN from 2001. It produces, thanks to the characteristics of the proton driver and of the massive Pb target, a wide energy, very high instantaneous neutron flux, which is employed for neutron-induced reactions measurement. The n TOF facility resumed operation in November 2008, after a 4 years stop due to radioprotection issues connected with the operation of the spallation target. It features a new lead spallation target with a more robust design a more efficient cooling, separate moderator circuit and a target area ventilation system. In this contribution technical details about this facility and its operation will be given, together with future perspective for the performances of the facility.

  20. Cold Vacuum Drying facility deionized water system design description (SYS 25)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PITKOFF, C.C.

    1999-07-02

    This document describes the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) de-ionized water system. The de-ionized water system is used to provide clean, conditioned water, free from contaminants, chlorides and iron for the CVD Facility. Potable water is supplied to the deionized water system, isolated by a backflow prevention device. After the de-ionization process is complete, via a packaged de-ionization unit, de-ionized water is supplied to the process deionization unit.

  1. Readiness of health facilities to deliver safe male circumcision services in Tanzania: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Felix Mosha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the readiness of health facilities to deliver safe male circumcision services is more important in sub-Saharan Africa because of the inadequacy state of health facilities in many ways. The World Health Organization recommends that only facilities equipped with available trained staff, capable to perform at least minor surgery, able to offer minimum MC package and appropriate equipment for resuscitation, and compliant with requirements for sterilization and infection control should be allowed to deliver safe circumcision services. A cross-sectional study using quantitative data collection technique was conducted to assess the readiness of the health facilities to deliver safe circumcision services in selected districts of Tanzania. All hospitals, health centres and 30% of all dispensaries in these districts were selected to participate in the study. Face-toface questionnaires were administered to the heads of the health facilities and to health practitioners. Overall, 49/69 (59% of the facilities visited provided circumcision services and only 46/203 (24% of the health practitioners performed circumcision procedures. These were mainly assistant medical officers and clinical officers. The vast majority – 190/203 (95% – of the health practitioners require additional training prior to providing circumcision services. Most facilities – 63/69 (91% – had all basic supplies (gloves, basin, chlorine and waste disposal necessary for infection prevention, 44/69 (65% provided condoms, HIV counselling and testing, and sexuallytransmitted infections services, while 62/69 (90% had the capability to perform at least minor surgery. However, only 25/69 (36% and 15/69 (22% of the facilities had functioning sterilization equipment and appropriate resuscitation equipment, respectively. There is readiness for roll out of circumcision services; however, more practitioners need to be trained on circumcision procedures, demand forecasting

  2. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.806 What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is an IRR Transportation Facilities...

  3. Analysis of fuel management in the KIPT neutron source facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong Zhaopeng, E-mail: zzhong@anl.gov [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: > Fuel management of KIPT ADS was analyzed. > Core arrangement was shuffled in stage wise. > New fuel assemblies was added into core periodically. > Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life. - Abstract: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility consisting of an electron accelerator driven sub-critical assembly. The neutron source driving the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The sub-critical assembly surrounding the target is fueled with low enriched WWR-M2 type hexagonal fuel assemblies. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel material is <20%. The facility will be utilized for basic and applied research, producing medical isotopes, and training young specialists. With the 100 KW electron beam power, the total thermal power of the facility is {approx}360 kW including the fission power of {approx}260 kW. The burnup of the fissile materials and the buildup of fission products continuously reduce the system reactivity during the operation, decrease the neutron flux level, and consequently impact the facility performance. To preserve the neutron flux level during the operation, the fuel assemblies should be added and shuffled for compensating the lost reactivity caused by burnup. Beryllium reflector could also be utilized to increase the fuel life time in the sub-critical core. This paper studies the fuel cycles and shuffling schemes of the fuel assemblies of the sub-critical assembly to preserve the system reactivity and the neutron flux level during the operation.

  4. Management plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J.M.; Pratt, D.R.

    1991-08-01

    The DOE/RL 89-19, United States Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (1989), requires the Hanford Site to prepare an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) by November 9, 1991. The DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (1991), provides additional guidance and requires implementation of the EMP within 36 months of the effective data of the rule. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each US Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials to prepare an EMP. This EMP is to identify and discuss two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. At the Hanford Site, the site-wide EMP will consist of the following elements: (1) A conceptual plan addressing effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance; (2) Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) site-wide environmental surveillance program; (3) Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) effluent monitoring program consisting of the near-field operations environmental monitoring activities and abstracts of each Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP). This management plan addresses the third of these three elements of the EMP, the FEMPs.

  5. Strategic sourcing and procurement of facilities management services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose it to provide insights into strategic sourcing concerning Facilities Management (FM) and how it can contribute to a sourcing decision that combines the benefits of internal and external provision with consideration of business risk and cost. Design/methodology/approach: The p......Purpose: The purpose it to provide insights into strategic sourcing concerning Facilities Management (FM) and how it can contribute to a sourcing decision that combines the benefits of internal and external provision with consideration of business risk and cost. Design....../methodology/approach: The paper investigates a strategic sourcing and procurement process in a large public organisation in Denmark based on participating in internal meetings, a workshop, document studies and interviews. The process is compared to a new ISO standard with guidance on strategic sourcing and development of FM....../implications: The research is based on a study of one public organisation, which limits the possibility to generalise the results. However, it provides detailed insights into the strategic sourcing process in FM, which can give inspiration for practitioners and further research. Originality/value: The paper throws light...

  6. National Ignition Facility Risk Management Plan, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brereton, S J

    2002-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Risk Management Plan (LLNL, 1997a) was originally prepared in 1997 in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) Life Cycle Asset Management Good Practice Guide (DOE, 1996a) and supported NIF Critical Decision 3, approval to initiate construction (DOE, 1997a). The plan was updated in 1998 to reflect realized risks such as the finding and successful clean up of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-filled electrical capacitors at the NIF excavation during initial construction and the litigation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship (DOE, 1996b) by a group of non-governmental organizations led by the Natural Resources Defense Council. The current update of the Risk Management Plan brings it into compliance with the applicable DOE Orders and Standards and addresses new risks, such as assuring safety during the period when construction, special equipment installation, and commissioning are occurring simultaneously at the NIF site, and the extensive use of models to manage technical performance risk. The objectives of the updated plan are to: (1) Identify the risks to the completion of the Project in terms of meeting performance and regulatory requirements, ES&H, cost, and schedule; (2) Assess or the risks in terms of likelihood of occurrence and their impact potential relative to technical performance, ES&H, costs, and schedule; and (3) Address suitable risk mitigation measures for each identified risk.

  7. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2000-02-25

    This Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII,Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a). This work plan describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility’s Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to NMED’s guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit. The scope of work for the RFI Work Plan or SAP is being developed by the Permittees. The final content of the RFI Work Plan or SAP will be coordinated with the NMED for submittal on May 24, 2000. Specific project-related planning information will be included in the RFI Work Plan or SAP. The SWMU program at WIPP began in 1994 under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulatory authority. NMED subsequently received regulatory authority from EPA

  8. Health facility committees and facility management - exploring the nature and depth of their roles in Coast Province, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Catherine; Opwora, Antony; Kabare, Margaret; Molyneux, Sassy

    2011-09-22

    Community participation has been emphasized internationally as a way of enhancing accountability, as well as a means to enhance health goals in terms of coverage, access and effective utilization. In rural health facilities in Kenya, initiatives to increase community accountability have focused on Health Facility Committees (HFCs). In Coast Province the role of HFCs has been expanded with the introduction of direct funding of rural facilities. We explored the nature and depth of managerial engagement of HFCs at the facility level in two rural districts in this Coastal setting, and how this has contributed to community accountability We conducted structured interviews with the health worker in-charge and with patients in 30 health centres and dispensaries. These data were supplemented with in-depth interviews with district managers, and with health workers and HFC members in 12 health centres and dispensaries. In-depth interviews with health workers and HFC members included a participatory exercise to stimulate discussion of the nature and depth of their roles in facility management. HFCs were generally functioning well and played an important role in facility operations. The breadth and depth of engagement had reportedly increased after the introduction of direct funding of health facilities which allowed HFCs to manage their own budgets. Although relations with facility staff were generally good, some mistrust was expressed between HFC members and health workers, and between HFC members and the broader community, partially reflecting a lack of clarity in HFC roles. Moreover, over half of exit interviewees were not aware of the HFC's existence. Women and less well-educated respondents were particularly unlikely to know about the HFC. There is potential for HFCs to play an active and important role in health facility management, particularly where they have control over some facility level resources. However, to optimise their contribution, efforts are needed to

  9. Health facility committees and facility management - exploring the nature and depth of their roles in Coast Province, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabare Margaret

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community participation has been emphasized internationally as a way of enhancing accountability, as well as a means to enhance health goals in terms of coverage, access and effective utilization. In rural health facilities in Kenya, initiatives to increase community accountability have focused on Health Facility Committees (HFCs. In Coast Province the role of HFCs has been expanded with the introduction of direct funding of rural facilities. We explored the nature and depth of managerial engagement of HFCs at the facility level in two rural districts in this Coastal setting, and how this has contributed to community accountability Methods We conducted structured interviews with the health worker in-charge and with patients in 30 health centres and dispensaries. These data were supplemented with in-depth interviews with district managers, and with health workers and HFC members in 12 health centres and dispensaries. In-depth interviews with health workers and HFC members included a participatory exercise to stimulate discussion of the nature and depth of their roles in facility management. Results HFCs were generally functioning well and played an important role in facility operations. The breadth and depth of engagement had reportedly increased after the introduction of direct funding of health facilities which allowed HFCs to manage their own budgets. Although relations with facility staff were generally good, some mistrust was expressed between HFC members and health workers, and between HFC members and the broader community, partially reflecting a lack of clarity in HFC roles. Moreover, over half of exit interviewees were not aware of the HFC's existence. Women and less well-educated respondents were particularly unlikely to know about the HFC. Conclusions There is potential for HFCs to play an active and important role in health facility management, particularly where they have control over some facility level resources

  10. The gravitational plant physiology facility-Description of equipment developed for biological research in spacelab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, D. G.; Chapman, D. K.; Brown, A. H.; Lewis, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    In January 1992, the NASA Suttle mission STS 42 carried a facility designed to perform experiments on plant gravi- and photo-tropic responses. This equipment, the Gravitational Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) was made up of a number of interconnected units mounted within a Spacelab double rack. The details of these units and the plant growth containers designed for use in GPPF are described. The equipment functioned well during the mission and returned a substantial body of time-lapse video data on plant responses to tropistic stimuli under conditions of orbital microgravity. GPPF is maintained by NASA Ames Research Center, and is flight qualifiable for future spacelab missions.

  11. A descriptive survey of management and operations at selected sports medicine centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, D

    1996-11-01

    No uniform guidelines for operations or accreditation standards for sports medicine center were available and, at the time of this study, little information on the management and operation of sports medicine centers was available in the literature. The purpose of the study was to determine the management structure and function of selected sports medicine centers in the United States. Questionnaires were mailed to 200 randomly selected centers throughout the United State from a directory of sports medicine centers published in Physician and Sportsmedicine (1992) to gather descriptive information on eight areas, including 1) general background, 2) staffing, 3) services, facilities, and equipment, 4) billing, collections, and revenue, 5) clientele, caseloads, and referrals, 6) ownership and financing, 7) school and club outreach contracts, and 8) marketing strategies and future trends. A total of 71 surveys (35.5%) were returned in the allotted time frame. Data were analyzed using ranges, means, medians, modes, and percentages. Results yielded several conclusions about sports medicine centers. Nearly all (93%) of the centers employed physical therapists; physical therapists were clinical directors at 70.2% of centers; orthopaedists were most often medical directors; rehabilitation was the most frequently offered service (93%); physical therapy produced the highest revenue; sports injuries accounted for a mean 34.5% of patients, who were mostly recreational or high school athletes between 13-60 years of age; primary shareholders were most often physical therapists or physicians; most were involved in outreach services for schools; marketing strategies primarily involved communication with referral sources; and managed care was identified most frequently as a trend affecting the future of sports medicine centers. Findings identified common aspects of sports medicine centers and may assist in establishing guidelines for operations or accreditation of sports medicine

  12. High Temperature Test Facility Preliminary RELAP5-3D Input Model Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-12-01

    A RELAP5-3D input model is being developed for the High Temperature Test Facility at Oregon State University. The current model is described in detail. Further refinements will be made to the model as final as-built drawings are released and when system characterization data are available for benchmarking the input model.

  13. A distributed data base management facility for the CAD/CAM environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balza, R. M.; Beaudet, R. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    Current/PAD research in the area of distributed data base management considers facilities for supporting CAD/CAM data management in a heterogeneous network of computers encompassing multiple data base managers supporting a variety of data models. These facilities include coordinated execution of multiple DBMSs to provide for administration of and access to data distributed across them.

  14. A distributed data base management facility for the CAD/CAM environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balza, R. M.; Beaudet, R. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    Current/PAD research in the area of distributed data base management considers facilities for supporting CAD/CAM data management in a heterogeneous network of computers encompassing multiple data base managers supporting a variety of data models. These facilities include coordinated execution of multiple DBMSs to provide for administration of and access to data distributed across them.

  15. The nature of innovation processes in Facility Management services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia

    Purpose: This work investigates the dynamics of interaction between stakeholders of Facilities Management (FM) innovation and improvement processes. The aim is to understand how the complex value chain of FM services influences innovation processes within this field. Theory: This study combines...... theories on innovation in services with research focused on the empirical field of FM. More specifically, the analytical framework for this study applies the differentiation between reactive and proactive innovation processes by Toivonen and Tuominen (2009) to the value chain identified by Coenen...... has a threefold impact on the nature of innovation processes within this field. Firstly, end-users of FM services are usually not involved in innovation processes, although they might sometimes play a role as initial drivers. Secondly, FM services are intangible but more easily reproducible than other...

  16. Mixed Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report, First quarter 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    During first quarter 1994, nine constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults, and the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. Chloroethene (vinyl chloride), copper, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, mercury, nonvolatile beta, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. Elevated constituents were found in numerous Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells and in one Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) well. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  17. Realising the potential of shared space in facilities management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkø, Rikke

    of shared space, building towards a new method for efficient and sustainable facilities management operation of buildings and properties. The practical part is focused on connecting this new knowledge to practical applications and developing tools that can be used to work with shared spaces in a practice...... in general, as well as the work having gone in to the development of the typology, and combines it with a number of practical steps to be taken co-created with practitioners. Through this combination it presents a complete guide to working with shared space in a municipal real-estate portfolio, from...... identifying potential on a portfolio level to evaluating the final result after the space has been taken into use. Through the process of identifying these key aspects of shared space and the study of the intricate processes involved, three themes, territoriality, involvement and practicalities, were...

  18. Green Facility Management in a Shanghai Office Building : A Case Study of the "Asia Building"

    OpenAIRE

    Yunqing, Liang

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to explore how well green facility management has performed in Shanghai office building and finds the possible way to improve the situation. Together with two interviews, questionnaire based on benchmarking approach is conducted in a case study of the Asia Building, which lead to the conclusion that green facility management has done a fair work in Asia Building, and suggestions that laws and regulations related to green facility management should be established; governmental ...

  19. System Design Description and Requirements for Modeling the Off-Gas Systems for Fuel Recycling Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daryl R. Haefner; Jack D. Law; Troy J. Tranter

    2010-08-01

    This document provides descriptions of the off-gases evolved during spent nuclear fuel processing and the systems used to capture the gases of concern. Two reprocessing techniques are discussed, namely aqueous separations and electrochemical (pyrochemical) processing. The unit operations associated with each process are described in enough detail so that computer models to mimic their behavior can be developed. The document also lists the general requirements for the desired computer models.

  20. Application of an Optimized Entropy-TOPSIS Multicriteria Decision Making Model to Facilities Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhao-hong; ZHAN Wei; QIU Wan-hua

    2006-01-01

    Performance evaluation of facilities management plays a key role in the facilities management process. This paper proposes an optimized multicriteria decision making model to evaluate the performance of facilities management in schools in Hong Kong. In this model, entropy weights acted as weight coefficients for evaluated criteria in order to avoid uncertainty and randomicity of subjective judgments. Besides, the TOPSIS method was incorporated in this model. Then this model was employed to evaluate the performance of facilities management in classrooms, offices and laboratories and satisfying results were obtained. Moreover, findings indicated that one of the schools could be rehabilitated rather than removed.

  1. A digital computer propulsion control facility: Description of capabilities and summary of experimental program results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, J. R.; Arpasi, D. J.; Lehtinen, B.

    1976-01-01

    Flight weight digital computers are being used today to carry out many of the propulsion system control functions previously delegated exclusively to hydromechanical controllers. An operational digital computer facility for propulsion control mode studies has been used successfully in several experimental programs. This paper describes the system and some of the results concerned with engine control, inlet control, and inlet engine integrated control. Analytical designs for the digital propulsion control modes include both classical and modern/optimal techniques.

  2. Planning and managing future space facility projects. [management by objectives and group dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, J. E.; Wilhelm, J. A.; Tanner, T. A.; Helmreich, R. L.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    To learn how ground-based personnel of a space project plan and organize their work and how such planning and organizing relate to work outcomes, longitudinal study of the management and execution of the Space Lab Mission Development Test 3 (SMD 3) was performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A view of the problems likely to arise in organizations and some methods of coping with these problems are presented as well as the conclusions and recommendations that pertain strictly to SMD 3 management. Emphasis is placed on the broader context of future space facility projects and additional problems that may be anticipated. A model of management that may be used to facilitate problem solving and communication - management by objectives (MBO) is presented. Some problems of communication and emotion management that MBO does not address directly are considered. Models for promoting mature, constructive and satisfying emotional relationships among group members are discussed.

  3. College Management System Improvement: Overall Description of the Review Phase. Working Paper. College Management System Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Roger G.

    The Resource Allocations and Management Program grant funds a project aimed at facilitating the use of management science and information systems techniques by developing, documenting, and testing a methodology that small postsecondary units can use in considering the application of these tools. This document provides a description and an overview…

  4. Assessment Of The Availability, Utilization And Management Of ICT Facilities In Teaching English Language In Secondary Schools In Kaduna State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Onyi Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the availability, utilization and management of ICT facilities in teaching English language in secondary schools in Kaduna State, Nigeria. The study adopted a descriptive survey research design. A questionnaire titled “Availability, Utilization and Management of Information and Communication Technology in teaching English Language in Secondary Schools” (AUMICTSS was used for data collection. Twenty randomly selected secondary schools from Kaduna metropolis were used for the study. A total of 100 teachers participated by responding to the items on the questionnaire. The data collected was analysed using frequencies and percentages. The findings of the study revealed that there is a dearth of ICT facilities in secondary schools in Kaduna as there are only very few of such facilities available in most of the schools visited. It also revealed that most teachers were not competent in the use of these facilities as the management of these facilities requires training and re-training. It was recommended as a matter of urgency that government should provide more ICT facilities in schools and ensure the provision of electricity in every secondary school for optimal utilization of these facilities. Teachers should equally be trained and re-trained regularly in the use and management of ICT facilities for effective English Language curriculum delivery.

  5. Management Innovations in Higher Education: A Descriptive Study of Information Technology Managers' Perceptions Regarding the Use and Value of Project Management in Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the perspectives of IT managers working in colleges and universities regarding their use of and value for project management. Descriptive and inferential analyses were used to understand individual innovativeness, innovation characteristics of project management, and the perceived use of and value for project management best…

  6. Management Innovations in Higher Education: A Descriptive Study of Information Technology Managers' Perceptions Regarding the Use and Value of Project Management in Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the perspectives of IT managers working in colleges and universities regarding their use of and value for project management. Descriptive and inferential analyses were used to understand individual innovativeness, innovation characteristics of project management, and the perceived use of and value for project management best…

  7. Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risø National Laboratory. Descriptions and cost assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, K.

    2001-01-01

    The report is the result of a project initiated by Risø National Laboratory in June 2000 on request from the Minister of Research and Information Technology. It describes the nuclear facilities at Risø National Laboratory to be decommissioned and gives anassessment of the work to be done and the ......The report is the result of a project initiated by Risø National Laboratory in June 2000 on request from the Minister of Research and Information Technology. It describes the nuclear facilities at Risø National Laboratory to be decommissioned and gives anassessment of the work to be done...... and the costs incurred. Three decommissioning scenarios were considered with decay times of 10, 25 and 40 years for the DR 3 reactor. The assessments conclude, however, that there will not be much to gain by allowing forthe longer decay periods; some operations still will need to be performed remotely....... Furthermore, the report describes some of the legal and licensing framework for the decommissioning and gives an assessment of the amounts of radioactive waste to betransferred to a Danish repository. For a revision of the cost estimate for the decommissioning of the research Reactor DR 3 please consult...

  8. The LLNL Heavy Element Facility -- Facility Management, Authorization Basis, and Readiness Assessment Lessons Learned in the Heavy Element Facility (B251) Transition from Category II Nuclear Facility to Radiological Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M; Anderson, B; Brown, E; Gray, L

    2006-04-10

    This paper presents Facility Management, Readiness Assessment, and Authorization Basis experience gained and lessons learned during the Heavy Element Facility Risk Reduction Program (RRP). The RRP was tasked with removing contaminated glove boxes, radioactive inventory, and contaminated ventilation systems from the Heavy Element Facility (B251) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The RRP was successful in its goal in April 2005 with the successful downgrade of B251 from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. The expertise gained and the lessons learned during the planning and conduct of the RRP included development of unique approaches in work planning/work control (''Expect the unexpected and confirm the expected'') and facility management. These approaches minimized worker dose and resulted in significant safety improvements and operational efficiencies. These lessons learned can help similar operational and management activities at other sites, including facilities restarting operations or new facility startup. B251 was constructed at LLNL to provide research areas for conducting experiments in radiochemistry using transuranic elements. Activities at B251 once included the preparation of tracer sets associated with the underground testing of nuclear devices and basic research devoted to a better understanding of the chemical and nuclear behavior of the transuranic elements. Due to the age of the facility, even with preventative maintenance, facility safety and experimental systems were deteriorating. A variety of seismic standards were used in the facility design and construction, which encompassed eight building increments constructed over a period of 26 years. The cost to bring the facility into compliance with the current seismic and other requirements was prohibitive, and simply maintaining B251 as a Category II nuclear facility posed serious cost considerations under a changing regulatory environment

  9. Development techniques of computerized maintenance management system for nuclear fuel cycle examination facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Yon Woo; Kim, S. D.; Soong, W. S.; Kim, G. H.; Oh, W. H.; Kim, Y. G

    2000-12-01

    Normal operation of the facility is one of the key factors in the accomplishments of research goals. As confirmed by a case study of the influence of the facility operation condition on the research results, emphasis should be put on the facility preserve management. Facilities should be maintained in solid operational condition and their malfunctions should be repaired as soon as possible. The purpose of this project is to make propositions on the development of the facility Preserve management system which is to maximize the efficiency of the budget execution, manpower organization and maintenance planning, and is to minimize the duration of the operational pause due to malfunctions with the least disbursement.

  10. Swedish ambulance managers' descriptions of crisis support for ambulance staff after potentially traumatic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugelius, Karin; Berg, Sara; Westerberg, Elin; Gifford, Mervyn; Adolfsson, Annofie

    2014-12-01

    Ambulance staff face complex and sometimes stressful or potentially traumatic situations, not only in disasters but also in their routine daily work. The aim of this study was to survey ambulance managers' descriptions of crisis support interventions for ambulance staff after potential traumatic events (PTEs). Semistructured interviews with a qualitative descriptive design were conducted with six ambulance managers in a health care region in central Sweden. The data was analyzed using content analysis. Five categories were found in the result: (1) description of a PTE; (2) description and performance of crisis support interventions; (3) impact of working in potentially traumatic situations; (4) the ambulance managers' role in crisis support interventions; and (5) the ambulance managers' suggestions for improvement. Ambulance managers described crisis support interventions after a PTE as a single, mandatory group meeting with a structure reminiscent of debriefing. The ambulance managers also expressed doubts about the present structures for crisis support and mentioned an alternative approach which is more in line with present evidence-based recommendations. The results indicated a need for increased understanding of the importance of the managers' attitudes for ambulance staff; a need for further implementation of evidence-based recommendations for crisis support interventions was also highlighted.

  11. Facilities Management and Corporate Real Estate Management as Value Drivers: How to Manage and Measure Adding Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    a variety of different fields with practical experience. It also includes 12 interviews with practitioners, shedding light as to how they manage adding value in practice. This is a much needed resource for practitioners, researchers and teachers from the field of FM and CREM, as well as students at both......Facilities Management (FM) and Corporate Real Estate Management (CREM) are two closely related and relatively new management disciplines with developing international professions and increasing academic attention. Both disciplines have from the outset a strong focus on controlling and reducing cost...... for real estate, facilities and related services. In recent years there has been a change towards putting more focus on how FM/CREM can add value to the organisation. The book is research based with a focus on guidance to practice. It offers a transdisciplinary approach, integrating academic knowledge from...

  12. Physics Division Argonne National Laboratory description of the programs and facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K.J. [ed.

    1999-05-24

    The ANL Physics Division traces its roots to nuclear physics research at the University of Chicago around the time of the second world war. Following the move from the University of Chicago out to the present Argonne site and the formation of Argonne National Laboratory: the Physics Division has had a tradition of research into fundamental aspects of nuclear and atomic physics. Initially, the emphasis was on areas such as neutron physics, mass spectrometry, and theoretical studies of the nuclear shell model. Maria Goeppert Maier was an employee in the Physics Division during the time she did her Nobel-Prize-winning work on the nuclear shell model. These interests diversified and at the present time the research addresses a wide range of current problems in nuclear and atomic physics. The major emphasis of the current experimental nuclear physics research is in heavy-ion physics, centered around the ATLAS facility (Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System) with its new injector providing intense, energetic ion beams over the fill mass range up to uranium. ATLAS is a designated National User Facility and is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology developed in the Physics Division. A small program continues in accelerator development. In addition, the Division has a strong program in medium-energy nuclear physics carried out at a variety of major national and international facilities. The nuclear theory research in the Division spans a wide range of interests including nuclear dynamics with subnucleonic degrees of freedom, dynamics of many-nucleon systems, nuclear structure, and heavy-ion interactions. This research makes contact with experimental research programs in intermediate-energy and heavy-ion physics, both within the Division and on the national and international scale. The Physics Division traditionally has strong connections with the nation's universities. We have many visiting faculty members and we encourage students to participate in our

  13. Erythrosis Pigmentosa Peribuccalis in an Adolescent: Dermoscopic Description and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Paula Carolina; Abad, María Eugenia; González, Virginia M; Vigovich, Felix; Casas, José Gabriel; Larralde, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Erythrosis pigmentosa peribuccalis is an infrequent condition, with fewer than 35 cases reported in the literature, that affects mainly women. It presents as small papules that form a hyperpigmented plaque around the mouth and nose. Little is known about the etiology of this condition, its dermoscopic characteristics have not been described, and no effective treatment has been reported. We report a 15-year-old girl with this rare dermatosis who was successfully managed with daily calcipotriol, weekly topical ivermectin, and strict photoprotection. We also describe for the first time the dermoscopic findings of this entity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory. Descriptions and cost assessment[Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauridsen, Kurt [ed.

    2001-02-01

    The report is the result of a project initiated by Risoe National Laboratory in June 2000 on request from the Minister of Research and Information Technology. It describes the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory to be decommissioned and gives an assessment of the work to be done and the costs incurred. Three decommissioning scenarios were considered with decay times of 10, 25 and 40 years for the DR 3 reactor. The assessments conclude, however, that there will not be much to gain by allowing for the longer decay periods; some operations still will need to be performed remotely. Furthermore, the report describes some of the legal and licensing framework for the decommissioning and gives an assessment of the amounts of radioactive waste to be transferred to a Danish repository. (au)

  15. Professional Development through Organizational Assessment: Using APPA's Facilities Management Evaluation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlin, E. Lander; Judd, R. Holly

    2013-01-01

    APPA's Facilities Management Evaluation Program (FMEP) provides an integrated system to optimize organizational performance. The criteria for evaluation not only provide a tool for organizational continuous improvement, they serve as a compelling leadership development tool essential for today's facilities management professional. The senior…

  16. Knowledge Management tools integration within DLR's concurrent engineering facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, R. P.; Soragavi, G.; Deshmukh, M.; Ludtke, D.

    The complexity of space endeavors has increased the need for Knowledge Management (KM) tools. The concept of KM involves not only the electronic storage of knowledge, but also the process of making this knowledge available, reusable and traceable. Establishing a KM concept within the Concurrent Engineering Facility (CEF) has been a research topic of the German Aerospace Centre (DLR). This paper presents the current KM tools of the CEF: the Software Platform for Organizing and Capturing Knowledge (S.P.O.C.K.), the data model Virtual Satellite (VirSat), and the Simulation Model Library (SimMoLib), and how their usage improved the Concurrent Engineering (CE) process. This paper also exposes the lessons learned from the introduction of KM practices into the CEF and elaborates a roadmap for the further development of KM in CE activities at DLR. The results of the application of the Knowledge Management tools have shown the potential of merging the three software platforms with their functionalities, as the next step towards the fully integration of KM practices into the CE process. VirSat will stay as the main software platform used within a CE study, and S.P.O.C.K. and SimMoLib will be integrated into VirSat. These tools will support the data model as a reference and documentation source, and as an access to simulation and calculation models. The use of KM tools in the CEF aims to become a basic practice during the CE process. The settlement of this practice will result in a much more extended knowledge and experience exchange within the Concurrent Engineering environment and, consequently, the outcome of the studies will comprise higher quality in the design of space systems.

  17. Management aspects of Gemini's base facility operations project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriagada, Gustavo; Nitta, Atsuko; Adamson, A. J.; Nunez, Arturo; Serio, Andrew; Cordova, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Gemini's Base Facilities Operations (BFO) Project provided the capabilities to perform routine nighttime operations without anyone on the summit. The expected benefits were to achieve money savings and to become an enabler of the future development of remote operations. The project was executed using a tailored version of Prince2 project management methodology. It was schedule driven and managing it demanded flexibility and creativity to produce what was needed, taking into consideration all the constraints present at the time: Time available to implement BFO at Gemini North (GN), two years. The project had to be done in a matrix resources environment. There were only three resources assigned exclusively to BFO. The implementation of new capabilities had to be done without disrupting operations. And we needed to succeed, introducing the new operational model that implied Telescope and instrumentation Operators (Science Operations Specialists - SOS) relying on technology to assess summit conditions. To meet schedule we created a large number of concurrent smaller projects called Work Packages (WP). To be reassured that we would successfully implement BFO, we initially spent a good portion of time and effort, collecting and learning about user's needs. This was done through close interaction with SOSs, Observers, Engineers and Technicians. Once we had a clear understanding of the requirements, we took the approach of implementing the "bare minimum" necessary technology that would meet them and that would be maintainable in the long term. Another key element was the introduction of the "gradual descent" concept. In this, we increasingly provided tools to the SOSs and Observers to prevent them from going outside the control room during nighttime operations, giving them the opportunity of familiarizing themselves with the new tools over a time span of several months. Also, by using these tools at an early stage, Engineers and Technicians had more time for debugging

  18. Factors associated with utilization of dental services in a long-term care facility: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scannapieco, Frank A; Amin, Summar; Salme, Marc; Tezal, Mine

    2017-03-01

    To describe factors associated with the utilization of dental services in a long-term care facility (LTCF) in Western New York. A descriptive cross-sectional study reviewed the dental and medical records of residents of an LTCF discharged between January 1, 2008 and December 30, 2012. Information on demographic and health variables at admission was extracted from electronic health records. Information on oral health variables was extracted from patient charts. A total of 2,516 residents were discharged between 2008 and 2012. From those, 259 (10.3%) utilized dental services at least once during their stay. Those who utilized dental services were significantly older at admission (78.5 vs. 82.0 years, p dental services. Dental services appear to be underutilized by residents of LTCF. Significant differences exist in demographic and health variables between residents who utilize these services compared to those who do not. © 2016 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Computerised sepsis protocol management. Description of an early warning system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dios, Begoña; Borges, Marcio; Smith, Timothy D; Del Castillo, Alberto; Socias, Antonia; Gutiérrez, Leticia; Nicolás, Jordi; Lladó, Bartolomé; Roche, Jose A; Díaz, Maria P; Lladó, Yolanda

    2017-01-10

    New strategies need to be developed for the early recognition and rapid response for the management of sepsis. To achieve this purpose, the Multidisciplinary Sepsis Team (MST) developed the Computerised Sepsis Protocol Management (PIMIS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the convenience of using PIMIS, as well as the activity of the MST. An analysis was performed on the data collected from solicited MST consultations (direct activation of PIMIS by attending physician or telephone request) and unsolicited ones (by referral from the microbiology laboratory or an automatic referral via the hospital vital signs recording software [SIDCV]), as well as the hospital department, source of infection, treatment recommendation, and acceptance of this. Of the 1,581 first consultations, 65.1% were solicited consultations (84.1% activation of PIMIS and 15.9% by telephone). The majority of unsolicited consultations were generated by the microbiology laboratory (95.2%), and 4.8% from the SIDCV. Referral from solicited consultations were generated sooner (5.63days vs 8.47days; Pclinical specialties rather than from the surgical ward (73.0% vs 39.1%; P<.001). A recommendation was made for antimicrobial prescription change in 32% of first consultations. The treating physician accepted 78.1% of recommendations. The high rate of solicited consultations and acceptance of recommended prescription changes suggest that a MST is seen as a helpful resource, and that PIMIS software is perceived to be useful and convenient to use, as it is the main source of referral. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  20. Coupling and quantifying resilience and sustainability in facilities management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Rimante Andrasiunaite; Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Rode, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to consider how to couple and quantify resilience and sustainability, where sustainability refers to not only environmental impact, but also economic and social impacts. The way a particular function of a building is provisioned may have significant repercus......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to consider how to couple and quantify resilience and sustainability, where sustainability refers to not only environmental impact, but also economic and social impacts. The way a particular function of a building is provisioned may have significant...... repercussions beyond just resilience. The goal is to develop a decision support tool for facilities managers. Design/methodology/approach – A risk framework is used to quantify both resilience and sustainability in monetary terms. The risk framework allows to couple resilience and sustainability, so...... that the provisioning of a particular building can be investigated with consideration of functional, environmental, economic and, possibly, social dimensions. Findings – The method of coupling and quantifying resilience and sustainability (CQRS) is illustrated with a simple example that highlights how very different...

  1. Mixed Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    Currently, 125 wells monitor groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River Site. Samples from the wells are analyzed for selected heavy metals, herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents during third quarter 1994. Sixty-four (51%) of the 125 monitoring wells contained elevated tritium activities. Trichloroethylene concentrations exceeded the final PDWS in 22 (18%) wells. Chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene, elevated in one or more wells during third quarter 1994, also occurred in elevated levels during second quarter 1994. These constituents generally were elevated in the same wells during both quarters. Gross alpha, which was elevated in only one well during second quarter 1994, was elevated again during third quarter. Mercury, which was elevated during first quarter 1994, was elevated again in one well. Dichloromethane was elevated in two wells for the first time in several quarters.

  2. Mixed Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, 125 wells monitor groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River Site. Samples from the wells are analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. During second quarter 1994, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, gross alpha, lead, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, or tritium exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in approximately half of the downgradient wells at the MWMF. Consistent with historical trends, elevated constituent levels were found primarily in Aquifer Zone. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents during second quarter 1994. Sixty-two of the 125 monitoring wells contained elevated tritium activities. Trichloroethylene concentrations exceeded the final PDWS in 23 wells. Chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, and tetrachloroethylene, elevated in one or more wells during second quarter 1994, also occurred in elevated levels during first quarter 1994. These constituents generally were elevated in the same wells during both quarters. Gross alpha, which was not elevated in any well during first quarter 1994, was elevated in one well during second quarter. Copper, mercury, and nonvolatile beta were elevated during first quarter 1994 but not during second quarter.

  3. Coupling and quantifying resilience and sustainability in facilities management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Rimante Andrasiunaite; Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Rode, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to consider how to couple and quantify resilience and sustainability, where sustainability refers to not only environmental impact, but also economic and social impacts. The way a particular function of a building is provisioned may have significant repercus......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to consider how to couple and quantify resilience and sustainability, where sustainability refers to not only environmental impact, but also economic and social impacts. The way a particular function of a building is provisioned may have significant...... repercussions beyond just resilience. The goal is to develop a decision support tool for facilities managers. Design/methodology/approach – A risk framework is used to quantify both resilience and sustainability in monetary terms. The risk framework allows to couple resilience and sustainability, so...... that the provisioning of a particular building can be investigated with consideration of functional, environmental, economic and, possibly, social dimensions. Findings – The method of coupling and quantifying resilience and sustainability (CQRS) is illustrated with a simple example that highlights how very different...

  4. Office of River Protection Integrated Safety Management System Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CLARK, D.L.

    1999-08-09

    Revision O was never issued. Finding safe and environmentally sound methods of storage and disposal of 54 million gallons of highly radioactive waste contained in 177 underground tanks is the largest challenge of Hanford cleanup. TWRS was established in 1991 and continues to integrate all aspects of the treatment and management of the high-level radioactive waste tanks. In fiscal Year 1997, program objectives were advanced in a number of areas. RL TWRS refocused the program toward retrieving, treating, and immobilizing the tank wastes, while maintaining safety as first priority. Moving from a mode of storing the wastes to getting the waste out of the tanks will provide the greatest cleanup return on the investment and eliminate costly mortgage continuance. There were a number of safety-related achievements in FY1997. The first high priority safety issue was resolved with the removal of 16 tanks from the ''Wyden Watch List''. The list, brought forward by Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon, identified various Hanford safety issues needing attention. One of these issues was ferrocyanide, a chemical present in 24 tanks. Although ferrocyanide can ignite at high temperature, analysis found that the chemical has decomposed into harmless compounds and is no longer a concern.

  5. Office of River Protection Integrated Safety Management System Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CLARK, D.L.

    1999-08-09

    Revision O was never issued. Finding safe and environmentally sound methods of storage and disposal of 54 million gallons of highly radioactive waste contained in 177 underground tanks is the largest challenge of Hanford cleanup. TWRS was established in 1991 and continues to integrate all aspects of the treatment and management of the high-level radioactive waste tanks. In fiscal Year 1997, program objectives were advanced in a number of areas. RL TWRS refocused the program toward retrieving, treating, and immobilizing the tank wastes, while maintaining safety as first priority. Moving from a mode of storing the wastes to getting the waste out of the tanks will provide the greatest cleanup return on the investment and eliminate costly mortgage continuance. There were a number of safety-related achievements in FY1997. The first high priority safety issue was resolved with the removal of 16 tanks from the ''Wyden Watch List''. The list, brought forward by Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon, identified various Hanford safety issues needing attention. One of these issues was ferrocyanide, a chemical present in 24 tanks. Although ferrocyanide can ignite at high temperature, analysis found that the chemical has decomposed into harmless compounds and is no longer a concern.

  6. SBGNViz: A Tool for Visualization and Complexity Management of SBGN Process Description Maps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mecit Sari

    Full Text Available Information about cellular processes and pathways is becoming increasingly available in detailed, computable standard formats such as BioPAX and SBGN. Effective visualization of this information is a key recurring requirement for biological data analysis, especially for -omic data. Biological data analysis is rapidly migrating to web based platforms; thus there is a substantial need for sophisticated web based pathway viewers that support these platforms and other use cases.Towards this goal, we developed a web based viewer named SBGNViz for process description maps in SBGN (SBGN-PD. SBGNViz can visualize both BioPAX and SBGN formats. Unique features of SBGNViz include the ability to nest nodes to arbitrary depths to represent molecular complexes and cellular locations, automatic pathway layout, editing and highlighting facilities to enable focus on sub-maps, and the ability to inspect pathway members for detailed information from EntrezGene. SBGNViz can be used within a web browser without any installation and can be readily embedded into web pages. SBGNViz has two editions built with ActionScript and JavaScript. The JavaScript edition, which also works on touch enabled devices, introduces novel methods for managing and reducing complexity of large SBGN-PD maps for more effective analysis.SBGNViz fills an important gap by making the large and fast-growing corpus of rich pathway information accessible to web based platforms. SBGNViz can be used in a variety of contexts and in multiple scenarios ranging from visualization of the results of a single study in a web page to building data analysis platforms.

  7. Nuclear Storage Facility Inventory and Information Management using the GraFIC Software.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickerson, T.W.

    1999-05-04

    Oak Ridge has developed an intelligent facility and information management system to provide near real time, verifiable status of safeguarded materials in a nuclear storage facility. The Graphical Facility Information System (GraFIC{trademark}) is a versatile software package designed to operate in a distributed computing environment. GraFIC{trademark} is integrated with a suite of rugged, low-cost sensors that remotely monitor the physical and/or assigned attributes associated with stored nuclear materials and reports item and facility activity to an unlimited number of authorized clients. The software also contains facility management tools to assist with space planning, record management, item location, and a variety of other facilities needs.

  8. A Study on Governance and Human Resources for Cooperative Road Facilities Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Sachiko; Takagi, Akiyoshi; Kurauchi, Fumitaka; Demura, Yoshifumi

    Within today's infrastructure management, Asset Management systems are becoming a mainstream feature. For region where the risk is low, it is necessary to create a "cooperative road facilities management system". This research both examined and suggested what kind of cooperative road facilities management system should be promoted by the regional society. Concretely, this study defines the operational realities of a previous case. It discusses the problem of the road facilities management as a governance. Furthermore, its realization depends on "the cooperation between municipalities", "the private-sector initiative", and "residents participation" .Also, it discusses the problem of human resources for governance. Its realization depends on "the engineers' promotion", and "creation of a voluntary activity of the resident" as a human resources. Moreover, it defines that the intermediary is important because the human resources tied to the governance. As a result, the prospect of the road facilities management is shown by the role of the player and the relation among player.

  9. Facility management - from internal conditioner to successful business sector; Facility Management - vom internen Fitmacher zum erfolgreichen Geschaeftsfeld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenberg, I. [Mannheimer Versorgungs- und Verkehrsgesellschaft mbH (MVV), Mannheim (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    The deregulation of the energy markets has given rise to sustained motion in the prevailing structures and market conditions of the supply industry. Dramatic declines in profits in the electricity sector have, in many companies, prompted reflex-like cost reduction programs which, however, frequently prejudice long-term growth prospects and viable future structures in favour of the results of the next fiscal year. The danger of sacrificing all flexibility and therefore market perspectives by corporate anorexia nervosa is immense. The MVV Energie AG, Mannheim, has reacted speedily to this situation and is pursuing a growth-oriented strategy which regards the challenges of competition as opportunity for on-going development. (orig.) [Deutsch] Kapitaldienst oder Miete, Energie, Wartung und Instandsetzung technischer Anlagen, Gebaeudeunterhalt-, -reinigung, Sicherheitsdienste, Versicherungen und vieles mehr uebersteigen ueber Jahre hinweg kumuliert die Baukosten um ein vielfaches und erhoehen bei Immobilieneigentuemern und -nutzern den Kostendruck. Beim Facility Management (FM) stehen nicht mehr nur die Investitionskosten fuer ein Gebaeude im Vordergrund, sondern sein gesamter Lebenszyklus, beginnend mit Idee, Konzeption und Investitionsentscheidung ueber Planung und Errichtung. Nutzung inklusive spaeterer Umbauten und Sanierungen bis hin zu Abriss und Neubau. Mit ihrer Dienstleistung FM bietet die MVV Energie AG ihren Kunden Gesamtkonzeption von der Beratung ueber die Planung und Umsetzung bis hin zur Uebernahme des FM an. (orig.)

  10. An integrated model to measure service management and physical constraints' effect on food consumption in assisted-living facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui-Chun; Shanklin, Carol W

    2008-05-01

    The United States is experiencing remarkable growth in the elderly population, which provides both opportunities and challenges for assisted-living facilities. The objective of this study was to explore how service management influences residents' actual food consumption in assisted-living facilities. Physical factors influencing residents' service evaluation and food consumption also were investigated. A total of 394 questionnaires were distributed to assisted-living residents in seven randomly selected facilities. The questionnaire was developed based on an in-depth literature review and pilot study. Residents' perceived quality evaluations, satisfaction, and physical constraints were measured. Residents' actual food consumption was measured using a plate waste technique. A total of 118 residents in five facilities completed both questionnaires and food consumption assessments. Descriptive, multivariate analyses and structural equation modeling techniques were employed. Service management, including food and service quality and customer satisfaction, was found to significantly influence residents' food consumption. Physical constraints associated with aging, including a decline in health status, chewing problems, sensory loss, and functional disability, also significantly influenced residents' food consumption. A significant relationship was found between physical constraints and customer satisfaction. Foodservice that provides good food and service quality increases customer satisfaction and affects residents' actual food consumption. Physical constraints also influence residents' food consumption directly, or indirectly through satisfaction. The findings suggest that food and nutrition professionals in assisted-living should consider the physical profiles of their residents to enhance residents' satisfaction and nutrient intake. Recommendations for exploring residents' perspectives are discussed.

  11. Description of Defense Waste Processing Facility reference waste form and canister. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, R.G.

    1983-08-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be located at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, SC, and is scheduled for construction authorization during FY-1984. The reference waste form is borosilicate glass containing approx. 28 wt % sludge oxides, with the balance glass frit. Borosilicate glass was chosen because of its high resistance to leaching by water, its relatively high solubility for nuclides found in the sludge, and its reasonably low melting temperature. The glass frit contains about 58% SiO/sub 2/ and 15% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Leachabilities of SRP waste glasses are expected to approach 10/sup -8/ g/m/sup 2/-day based upon 1000-day tests using glasses containing SRP radioactive waste. Tests were performed under a wide variety of conditions simulating repository environments. The canister is filled with 3260 lb of glass which occupies about 85% of the free canister volume. The filled canister will generate approx. 470 watts when filled with oxides from 5-year-old sludge and 15-year-old supernate from the sludge and supernate processes. The radionuclide content of the canister is about 177,000 ci, with a radiation level of 5500 rem/h at canister surface contact. The reference canister is fabricated of standard 24-in.-OD, Schedule 20, 304L stainless steel pipe with a dished bottom, domed head, and a combined lifting and welding flange on the head neck. The overall canister length is 9 ft 10 in. with a 3/8-in. wall thickness. The 3-m canister length was selected to reduce equipment cell height in the DWPF to a practical size. The canister diameter was selected as an optimum size from glass quality considerations, a logical size for repository handling and to ensure that a filled canister with its double containment shipping cask could be accommodated on a legal-weight truck. The overall dimensions and weight appear to be compatible with preliminary assessments of repository requirements. 10 references.

  12. Advanced neutron source reactor thermal-hydraulic test loop facility description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felde, D.K.; Farquharson, G.; Hardy, J.H.; King, J.F.; McFee, M.T.; Montgomery, B.H.; Pawel, R.E.; Power, B.H.; Shourbaji, A.A.; Siman-Tov, M.; Wood, R.J.; Yoder, G.L.

    1994-02-01

    The Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) is a facility for experiments constructed to support the development of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ANSR is both cooled and moderated by heavy water and uses uranium silicide fuel. The core is composed of two coaxial fuel-element annuli, each of different diameter. There are 684 parallel aluminum-clad fuel plates (252 in the inner-lower core and 432 in the outer-upper core) arranged in an involute geometry that effectively creates an array of thin rectangular flow channels. Both the fuel plates and the coolant channels are 1.27 mm thick, with a span of 87 mm (lower core), 70 mm (upper core), and 507-mm heated length. The coolant flows vertically upwards at a mass flux of 27 Mg/m{sup 2}s (inlet velocity of 25 m/s) with an inlet temperature of 45{degrees}C and inlet pressure of 3.2 MPa. The average and peak heat fluxes are approximately 6 and 12 MW/m{sup 2}, respectively. The availability of experimental data for both flow excursion (FE) and true critical heat flux (CHF) at the conditions applicable to the ANSR is very limited. The THTL was designed and built to simulate a full-length coolant subchannel of the core, allowing experimental determination of thermal limits under the expected ANSR thermal-hydraulic conditions. For these experimental studies, the involute-shaped fuel plates of the ANSR core with the narrow 1.27-mm flow gap are represented by a narrow rectangular channel. Tests in the THTL will provide both single- and two-phase thermal-hydraulic information. The specific phenomena that are to be examined are (1) single-phase heat-transfer coefficients and friction factors, (2) the point of incipient boiling, (3) nucleate boiling heat-transfer coefficients, (4) two-phase pressure-drop characteristics in the nucleate boiling regime, (5) flow instability limits, and (6) CHF limits.

  13. Field Research Facility Data Integration Framework Data Management Plan: Survey Lines Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    clearinghouse tool using the Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri) Geoportal technology . Once the XML metadata is loaded into the Metadata Manager ...ER D C/ CH L SR -1 6- 4 Coastal Ocean Data Systems Program Field Research Facility Data Integration Framework Data Management Plan...Systems Program ERDC/CHL SR-16-4 August 2016 Field Research Facility Data Integration Framework Data Management Plan Survey Lines Dataset Michael F

  14. Educational Facilities: Planning, Modernization, and Management. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldi, Basil

    Written for both students and practitioners, this book is a comprehensive treatise on the planning, remodeling, and maintenance of educational facilities. The subject matter is organized to blend theory and practice. Part I deals primarily with theory, principles, and techniques of educational facilities planning, covering school building history,…

  15. Knowledge Management at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2013-06-01

    One of the goals of the Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy, initiated under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) and continued under the Advanced Reactor Concepts Program (ARC) is to preserve the knowledge that has been gained in the United States on Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs) that could support the development of an environmentally and economically sound nuclear fuel cycle. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is the most recent LMR to operate in the United States, from 1982 to 1992, and was designed as a fully instrumented test reactor with on-line, real time test control and performance monitoring of components and tests installed in the reactor. The 10 years of operation of the FFTF provided a very useful framework for testing the advances in LMR safety technology based on passive safety features that may be of increased importance to new designs after the events at Fukushima. Knowledge preservation at the FFTF is focused on the areas of design, construction, and startup of the reactor, as well as on preserving information obtained from 10 years of successful operating history and extensive irradiation testing of fuels and materials. In order to ensure protection of information at risk, the program to date has sequestered reports, files, tapes, and drawings to allow for secure retrieval. The FFTF knowledge management program includes a disciplined and orderly approach to respond to client’s requests for documents and data in order to minimize the search effort and ensure that future requests for this information can be readily accommodated.

  16. Application of the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model to Ecological Site Descriptions and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    The utility of Ecological Site Descriptions (ESDs) and State-and-Transition Models (STMs) concepts in guiding rangeland management hinges on their ability to accurately describe and predict community dynamics and the associated consequences. For many rangeland ecosystems, plant community dynamics ar...

  17. Environmental Survey Report for the ETTP: Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Haul Road Corridor, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, M.J.

    2005-12-20

    This report summarizes the results of environmental surveys conducted within the corridor of a temporary haul road (''Haul Road'') to be constructed from East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) to the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) located just west of the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). Environmental surveys were conducted by natural resource experts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory who routinely assess the significance of various project activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). ORNL assistance to the Haul Road Project included environmental assessments necessary to determine the best route for minimizing impacts to sensitive resources such as wetlands or rare plants. Once the final route was chosen, environmental surveys were conducted within the corridor to evaluate the impacts to sensitive resources that could not be avoided. The final Haul Road route follows established roads and a power-line corridor to the extent possible (Fig. 1). Detailed explanation regarding the purpose of the Haul Road and the regulatory context associated with its construction is provided in at least two major documents and consequently is not presented here: (1) Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for the Disposal of Oak Ridge Reservation Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 Waste, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (January 2005, DOE/OR/01-2194&D2), and (2) Environmental Monitoring Plan for The ETTP to EMWMF Haul Road for the Disposal of Oak Ridge Reservation Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 Waste, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (April 2005, BJC/OR-2152). The focus of this report is a description of the sensitive resources to be impacted by Haul Road construction. Following a short description of the methods used for the environmental surveys, results and observations are presented in the following subsections: (1) General description

  18. The Core Services of the Facilities Management Based Company in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zawawi Zuraihana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many questions rose on defining the implementation of Facilities Management (FM in Malaysia. To date, the FM player only provided services sufficiently without the desires to enhance their services by taking into account the standard of practice which should form the basis. The extent of the services in Facilities Management based companies in Malaysia is not known and this paper aimed to identify within the context. The scope of study is limited to respondents in Klang Valley area. Literature review is used as a basis and questionnaires survey distributed to 20 companies, representing 56% of the total FM companies in Klang Valley are used to capture the data. The senior management level is assessed to represent. The results revealed that the implementation of facilities management services is limited, but still evolving. The majority of the FM based companies provides facilities services under the category of building operation and maintenance as their core business and procured them by in-house. The core services comprise of Electrical System, Cleaning, mechanical, HVAC system, plumbing & Sewerage , Fire Protection, Landscape, Lifts and Escalator, Security & Safety, Parking Management, Consultancy & Advisory Services, Waste Management, ICT System, Pest Control, Energy Management & Conservation, Building Audit Services, Customer Care Management, Transition Management, Catering &Vending Services. Based on what FM can offer, there is the necessity to reinforce the awareness to ensure continuously improve the management of national assets and facilities.

  19. Annual Report for 2008 - 2009 Detection Monitoring at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker J.R.

    2010-03-01

    This annual Environmental Monitoring Report (EMR) presents results of environmental monitoring performed during fiscal year (FY) 2009 (October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2009) at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The EMWMF is an operating state-of-the-art hazardous waste landfill located in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Appendix A, Fig. A.1). Opened in 2002 and operated by a DOE prime contractor, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC), the EMWMF was built specifically to accommodate disposal of acceptable solid wastes generated from Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) remedial actions for former waste sites and buildings that have been impacted by past DOE operations on the ORR and at DOE sites off the ORR within the state of Tennessee. Environmental monitoring at the EMWMF is performed to detect and monitor the impact of facility operations on groundwater, surface water, stormwater, and air quality and to determine compliance with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) specified in governing CERCLA decision documents. Annually, the EMR presents an evaluation of the groundwater, surface water, stormwater, and air monitoring data with respect to the applicable EMWMF performance standards. The purpose of the evaluation is to: (1) identify monitoring results that indicate evidence of a contaminant release from the EMWMF to groundwater, surface water, stormwater, or air, and (2) recommend appropriate changes to the associated sampling and analysis requirements, including sampling locations, methods, and frequencies; field measurements; or laboratory analytes that may be warranted in response to the monitoring data. Sect. 2 of this annual EMR provides background information relevant to environmental monitoring at the landfill, including

  20. Risk management technique for liquefied natural gas facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, O. H.; Parsons, W. N.

    1975-01-01

    Checklists have been compiled for planning, design, construction, startup and debugging, and operation of liquefied natural gas facilities. Lists include references to pertinent safety regulations. Methods described are applicable to handling of other hazardous materials.

  1. Environmental assessment: Proposed construction of Refuge operational facilities, water management facilities, wildlife oriented interpretation/recreation development, road and water management facilities rehabilitation, and implementation of a vegetation control plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The proposed action consists of the construction of facilities for refuge operation, water management, and wildlife-oriented interpretation and recreation; the...

  2. 41 CFR 102-74.155 - What energy conservation policy must Federal agencies follow in the management of facilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What energy conservation... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy Conservation § 102-74.155 What energy conservation policy must Federal agencies follow in the management of...

  3. The CCMC's national study of case manager job descriptions: an understanding of the activities, role relationships, knowledges, skills, and abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahan, Hussein A; Huber, Diane L

    2006-01-01

    Defining the roles and functions of case managers is crucial in today's healthcare environment and necessary for the case management field. One way to address this issue is through the examination of case managers' job descriptions used in various healthcare organizations. The study reported herein used qualitative analysis procedures and the latent class cluster analysis method to examine a national sample of 1028 job descriptions of case managers. The study identified the activities, role relationships, knowledge, skills, and abilities of case managers working in varied settings. It also described the changes that occurred in the practice of case management, based on these job descriptions, over 5 years: from the mid-1990s until the early 2000s. One benefit of this study was a change in one eligibility criterion of the CCM credential. Another was the development of a taxonomy of case managers' roles and functions that can be used as a step toward standardization of case managers' job descriptions.

  4. Integrated water management system - Description and test results. [for Space Station waste water processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elden, N. C.; Winkler, H. E.; Price, D. F.; Reysa, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    Water recovery subsystems are being tested at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center for Space Station use to process waste water generated from urine and wash water collection facilities. These subsystems are being integrated into a water management system that will incorporate wash water and urine processing through the use of hyperfiltration and vapor compression distillation subsystems. Other hardware in the water management system includes a whole body shower, a clothes washing facility, a urine collection and pretreatment unit, a recovered water post-treatment system, and a water quality monitor. This paper describes the integrated test configuration, pertinent performance data, and feasibility and design compatibility conclusions of the integrated water management system.

  5. Integrated water management system - Description and test results. [for Space Station waste water processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elden, N. C.; Winkler, H. E.; Price, D. F.; Reysa, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    Water recovery subsystems are being tested at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center for Space Station use to process waste water generated from urine and wash water collection facilities. These subsystems are being integrated into a water management system that will incorporate wash water and urine processing through the use of hyperfiltration and vapor compression distillation subsystems. Other hardware in the water management system includes a whole body shower, a clothes washing facility, a urine collection and pretreatment unit, a recovered water post-treatment system, and a water quality monitor. This paper describes the integrated test configuration, pertinent performance data, and feasibility and design compatibility conclusions of the integrated water management system.

  6. Assessment of screening practices for gestational hyperglycaemia in public health facilities: a descriptive study in Bangalore, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giridhara R. Babu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Screening and timely treatment of gestational hyperglycaemia (GH is proved to be beneficial and improves maternal and foetal health outcomes. To understand screening practices, we explored the knowledge and perceptions of doctors working in public health facilities in Bangalore, India. We also studied participation factors by examining whether undergoing glucose estimation tests affects morning sickness in pregnant women. Design and Methods. We aimed to understand the screening practices and knowledge of doctors. A semi-structured questionnaire was self-administered by the 50 participant doctors, selected from the sampling frame comprising of all the doctors working in public health facilities. We included 105 pregnant women for baseline assessment, in whom a well-structured questionnaire was used. Results. We reported that gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM screening was done in nearly all the health centres (96%. However, only 12% of the doctors could provide all components of GDM diagnosis and management correctly and 46% would diagnose by using a random blood glucose test. A majority (92% of the doctors had poor knowledge (68% about the cut-off values of glucose tests. More than 80% of pregnant women experienced some discomfort mostly due to rapid ingestion glucose in short span of time. Conclusions. Our study established that screening for GH is done in most public health facilities. Nonetheless, knowledge of doctors on the glucose tests and their interpretation needs improvement. Re-orientation trainings of the doctors can improve their knowledge and thereby can efficiently screen for GH. Further, adequate planning prior to the tests can aid successful completion of them.

  7. Stress and Coping among Owners and Managers of Residential Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Hollie; And Others

    Stress and burnout are common in the caregiving professions. Stress negatively affects both the caregivers and patients. In order to help caregivers deal with stress effectively and to improve the care in residential care facilities, it is essential to learn more about the particular stressors that managers of such facilities experience. In this…

  8. Risk management study for the Hanford Site facilities: Risk reduction cost comparison for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, G.A.; Egge, R.G.; Senger, E.; Shultz, M.W.; Taylor, W.E.

    1994-02-01

    This document provides a cost-comparison evaluation for implementing certain risk-reduction measures and their effect on the overall risk of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities. The evaluation is based on conditions that existed at the time the risk evaluation team performed facility investigations, and does not acknowledge risk-reduction measures that occurred soon after risk identification. This evaluation is one part of an overall risk management study for these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1450-km{sup 2} Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30 km southeast of the 200 Area. This cost-comparison evaluation (1) determines relative costs for reducing risk to acceptable levels; (2) compares the cost of reducing risk using different risk-reduction options; and (3) compares the cost of reducing risks at different facilities. The result is an identification of the cost effective risk-reduction measures. Supporting information required to develop costs of the various risk-reduction options also is included.

  9. ROSA-V large scale test facility (LSTF) system description for the third and fourth simulated fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hideo; Ohtsu, Iwao [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    The Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) is a full-height and 1/48 volumetrically scaled test facility of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) for system integral experiments simulating the thermal-hydraulic responses at full-pressure conditions of a 1100 MWe-class pressurized water reactor (PWR) during small break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) and other transients. The LSTF can also simulate well a next-generation type PWR such as the AP600 reactor. In the fifth phase of the Rig-of-Safety Assessment (ROSA-V) Program, eighty nine experiments have been conducted at the LSTF with the third simulated fuel assembly until June 2001, and five experiments have been conducted with the newly-installed fourth simulated fuel assembly until December 2002. In the ROSA-V program, various system integral experiments have been conducted to certify effectiveness of both accident management (AM) measures in beyond design basis accidents (BDBAs) and improved safety systems in the next-generation reactors. In addition, various separate-effect tests have been conducted to verify and develop computer codes and analytical models to predict non-homogeneous and multi-dimensional phenomena such as heat transfer across the steam generator U-tubes under the presence of non-condensable gases in both current and next-generation reactors. This report presents detailed information of the LSTF system with the third and fourth simulated fuel assemblies for the aid of experiment planning and analyses of experiment results. (author)

  10. Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities, Sections 15-19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.

    1982-09-01

    Information is presented under the following section headings: fuel reprocessing; spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste storage; spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal; low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal; and, transportation of radioactive materials in the nuclear fuel cycle. In each of the first three sections a description is given on the mainline process, effluent processing and waste management systems, plant layout, and alternative process schemes. Safety information and a summary are also included in each. The section on transport of radioactive materials includes information on the transportation of uranium ore, uranium ore concentrate, UF/sub 6/, PuO/sub 2/ powder, unirradiated uranium and mixed-oxide fuel assemblies, spent fuel, solidified high-level waste, contact-handled transuranic waste, remote-handled transuranic waste, and low and intermediate level nontransuranic waste. A glossary is included. (JGB)

  11. 77 FR 55843 - Office of Facilities Management and Program Services; Submission for OMB Review; Background...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Office of Facilities Management and Program Services; Submission for OMB Review; Background...: Please submit comments only and cite Information Collection 3090-0287, Background Investigations for... the new information collection requirement regarding the collection of personal data for background...

  12. 77 FR 31017 - Office of Facilities Management and Program Services; Information Collection; Background...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ...; Sequence 7] Office of Facilities Management and Program Services; Information Collection; Background....johnson@gsa.gov . ADDRESSES: Submit comments identified by Information Collection 3090- 0287, Background... the link ``Submit a Comment'' that corresponds with ``Information Collection 3090-0287, Background...

  13. Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report, Fourth Quarter 1998 and 1998 Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1999-04-29

    During fourth quarter 1998, ten constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells.

  14. SNL/CA Facilities Management Design Standards Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabb, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Clark, Eva [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    At Sandia National Laboratories in California (SNL/CA), the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities is guided by industry standards, a graded approach, and the systematic analysis of life cycle benefits received for costs incurred. The design of the physical plant must ensure that the facilities are "fit for use," and provide conditions that effectively, efficiently, and safely support current and future mission needs. In addition, SNL/CA applies sustainable design principles, using an integrated whole-building design approach, from site planning to facility design, construction, and operation to ensure building resource efficiency and the health and productivity of occupants. The safety and health of the workforce and the public, any possible effects on the environment, and compliance with building codes take precedence over project issues, such as performance, cost, and schedule.

  15. Governance Change In Facilities Management: An Institutional Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kaleem Zahirul Hassan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Governance of a specific field is shaped by not only the instrumental rationality but also the institutional rationality. In this research the instrumental rationality was manifested by the service providers and consultants who played a pivotal role in the construction of new governance in the field of facilities services in the Netherlands. Further, the role of institutional rationality was investigated wherein it was found that the logic of rationalization shaped the governance in the field of facilities services. Moreover, the implication for the explanation of practice variation by institutional theory is discussed.

  16. Science facilities and stakeholder management: how a pan-European research facility ended up in a small Swedish university town

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomasson, Anna; Carlile, Colin

    2017-06-01

    This is the story of how a large research facility of broad European and global interest, the European Spallation Source (ESS), ended up in the small university town of Lund in Sweden. This happened in spite of the fact that a number of influential European countries were at one time or another competitors to host the facility. It is also a story about politics which attempts to illustrate how closely intertwined politics and science are, and how the interplay between those interests affects scientific progress. ESS became an arena for individual ambitions and political manoeuvring. The different stakeholders, in their striving to ensure that their own interests were realised, in various ways and with different degrees of success over the years, have influenced the key decisions that, during the already 30 year history of ESS, have driven the course that this project has taken. What emerges is that the interests of the stakeholders and the interests of the project itself are frequently not in harmony. This imposes challenges on the management of large research facilities as they have to not only navigate in the scientific landscape, which they often are more familiar with, but also in the political landscape. This story is therefore an attempt to shed light on the role of managers of large research facilities and the often delicate balancing act they have to perform when trying to comply with the different and often conflicting stakeholder interests. What is especially worthwhile examining, as we do in this paper, is the role that individuals, and the interaction between individuals, have played in the process. This shows that the focus of stakeholder theory on organisations, rather than the people in the organisations, needs to be redirected on to the individuals representing those organisations and their inter-relationships. At the same time it is clear that the developing field of stakeholder management theory has not emerged into the consciousness of science

  17. A Facilities Manager's Guide to Green Building Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Walter

    2001-01-01

    Explains how the "green building" approach to educational facilities design creates healthy, naturally lit, attractive buildings with lower operating and life cycle costs. Tips on getting started on a green design and overcoming the barriers to the green design concept are discussed. (GR)

  18. Centralization and Decentralization of Schools' Physical Facilities Management in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoya, Peter O.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to examine the difference in the availability, adequacy and functionality of physical facilities in centralized and decentralized schools districts, with a view to making appropriate recommendations to stakeholders on the reform programmes in the Nigerian education sector. Design/methodology/approach: Principals,…

  19. Environmental surveillance for Waste Management Facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, K.C.; Wilhelmsen, R.N.; Borsella, B.W.; Miles, M.

    1995-08-01

    This report describes calendar year 1994 environmental surveillance activities of Environmental Monitoring of Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, performed at Waste Management Facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The major facilities monitored include the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility, the Mixed Waste Storage Facility, and two surplus facilities. Included are results of the sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance Program, INEL Environmental Surveillance Program, and the United States Geological Survey. The primary purposes of monitoring are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to ensure compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1994 environmental surveillance data with US Department of Energy derived concentration guides and with data from previous years.

  20. Predictive Analytics to Support Real-Time Management in Pathology Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Lysanne; Michalowski, Wojtek; Chen Li, Wei; Amyot, Daniel; Halwani, Fawaz; Banerjee, Diponkar

    2016-01-01

    Predictive analytics can provide valuable support to the effective management of pathology facilities. The introduction of new tests and technologies in anatomical pathology will increase the volume of specimens to be processed, as well as the complexity of pathology processes. In order for predictive analytics to address managerial challenges associated with the volume and complexity increases, it is important to pinpoint the areas where pathology managers would most benefit from predictive capabilities. We illustrate common issues in managing pathology facilities with an analysis of the surgical specimen process at the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (DPLM) at The Ottawa Hospital, which processes all surgical specimens for the Eastern Ontario Regional Laboratory Association. We then show how predictive analytics could be used to support management. Our proposed approach can be generalized beyond the DPLM, contributing to a more effective management of pathology facilities and in turn to quicker clinical diagnoses.

  1. Operation And Maintenance In Facilities Management Practices: A Gap Analysis In Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zawawi Zuraihana Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facilities management in Malaysia has started as early as 1990s during the development of mega projects such as Putrajaya in 1999 [8, 9]. During this period, Malaysia was introduced to an integrated property management and maintenance services known as facilities management. However, its implementation according to the standard practice is still being disputed. The purpose of facilities management standard practices is to provide the facility management profession with a leading reference on facilities management activities and standards. Therefore, the determination of how far the gap in FM current practice is essential to help our FM industry. Thus, the aim of this study is to establish the gap between the current practices and the standard practices and also how far the gap should be satisfied. A set of questionnaire was designed upon literature and previous research done to gather the required information. The study is subjected to FM organizations in private sectors and only the personnel at management level are assessed. There were certified that most of the practices that assessed by means of gap analysis had an acceptable result which the gap between the current practices and the standard practices are not too far.

  2. The Proposal of Key Performance Indicators in Facility Management and Determination the Weights of Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbalová, Jarmila; Vilčeková, Silvia

    2013-11-01

    The practice of facilities management is rapidly evolving with the increasing interest in the discourse of sustainable development. The industry and its market are forecasted to develop to include non-core functions, activities traditionally not associated with this profession, but which are increasingly being addressed by facilities managers. The scale of growth in the built environment and the consequential growth of the facility management sector is anticipated to be enormous. Key Performance Indicators (KPI) are measure that provides essential information about performance of facility services delivery. In selecting KPI, it is critical to limit them to those factors that are essential to the organization reaching its goals. It is also important to keep the number of KPI small just to keep everyone's attention focused on achieving the same KPIs. This paper deals with the determination of weights of KPI of FM in terms of the design and use of sustainable buildings.

  3. Predicament and Countermeasures for the Management and Maintenance of Rural Water Conservancy Facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The major problem of rural water conservancy facilities during its management and maintenance is in the "been used, under no control" state. And the main reasons of this state are the public belonging property, investment by a single subject, and lack of effective supervision and management mechanism. Since rural water conservancy facilities is used in small scale and has the features of rural "acquaintances community", a balanced long-term interest mechanism for the management and maintenance of rural water conservancy facilities is established for interest-related parties. On short-term view, the most effective measure is to bring the operational status of rural water conservancy facilities into the evaluation indicators of the local government.

  4. Management strategies for controlling endemic and seasonal mouse parvovirus infection in a barrier facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Jon D; Livingston, Robert; Leblanc, Mathias

    2011-05-01

    Despite improved diagnostic and rederivation capabilities, research facilities still struggle to manage parvovirus infections (e.g., mouse parvovirus (MPV) and minute virus of mice) in mouse colonies. Multi-faceted approaches are needed to prevent adventitious organisms such as MPV from breaching a barrier facility. In this article, the authors document recent changes to the Salk Institute's animal care program that were intended to help manage mouse parvovirus in the barrier facility. Specifically, the Institute started to use a new disinfectant and to give mice irradiated feed. The authors found an association between these modifications and a reduction in MPV incidence and prevalence in endemically infected colonies. These data suggest that using irradiated feed and appropriate disinfectants with contemporary management practices can be an effective plan for eradicating or controlling MPV infection in a research facility. The authors recommend further study of the environmental risk factors for parvovirus infection and of potential biological interactions associated with the use of irradiated feed.

  5. System requirements and design description for the environmental requirements management interface (ERMI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biebesheimer, E.

    1997-09-30

    This document describes system requirements and the design description for the Environmental Requirements Management Interface (ERMI). The ERMI database assists Tank Farm personnel with scheduling, planning, and documenting procedure compliance, performance verification, and selected corrective action tracking activities for Tank Farm S/RID requirements. The ERMI database was developed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). This document was prepared by SAIC and edited by LMHC.

  6. Does identity shape leadership and management practice? Experiences of PHC facility managers in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daire, Judith; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-09-01

    In South Africa, as elsewhere, Primary Health Care (PHC) facilities are managed by professional nurses. Little is known about the dimensions and challenges of their job, or what influences their managerial practice. Drawing on leadership and organizational theory, this study explored what the job of being a PHC manager entails, and what factors influence their managerial practice. We specifically considered whether the appointment of professional nurses as facility managers leads to an identity transition, from nurse to manager. The overall intention was to generate ideas about how to support leadership development among PHC facility managers. Adopting case study methodology, the primary researcher facilitated in-depth discussions (about their personal history and managerial experiences) with eight participating facility managers from one geographical area. Other data were collected through in-depth interviews with key informants, document review and researcher field notes/journaling. Analysis involved data triangulation, respondent and peer review and cross-case analysis. The experiences show that the PHC facility manager's job is dominated by a range of tasks and procedures focused on clinical service management, but is expected to encompass action to address the population and public health needs of the surrounding community. Managing with and through others, and in a complex system, requiring self-management, are critical aspects of the job. A range of personal, professional and contextual factors influence managerial practice, including professional identity. The current largely facility-focused management practice reflects the strong nursing identity of managers and broader organizational influences. However, three of the eight managers appear to self-identify an emerging leadership identity and demonstrate related managerial practices. Nonetheless, there is currently limited support for an identity transition towards leadership in this context. Better

  7. Pinellas Plant contingency plan for the hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-04-01

    Subpart D of Part 264 (264.50 through .56) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations require that each facility maintain a contingency plan detailing procedures to {open_quotes}minimize hazards to human health or the environment from fires, explosions, or any unplanned sudden or non-sudden release of hazardous waste or hazardous waste constituents to air, soil, or surface water.{close_quotes}

  8. A Change Management Approach to Enhance Facility Maintenance Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    preventive maintenance, condition-based maintenance, and reliability-centered maintenance (Dotzlaf, 2009; Sapp , 2013; Sullivan et al., 2010; Bevilacqua...versus corrective) maintenance” ( Sapp , 2013:1). A 12 common understanding of PM exists with personal vehicle maintenance where the manufacturer...Technique. Principles of forecasting, (pp. 125-144). Springer US. Sapp , D. (2013, 10 4). Facilities Operations & Maintenance. Retrieved January 3, 2014

  9. Rainier Biogas Manure Management and Renewable Energy Generation Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, John [King County, WA (United States)

    2017-06-06

    The Rainier Biogas project is a community manure processing and renewable energy generation facility. Construction was completed and operation initiated in 2012. It is owned and operated by Rainier Biogas, LLC in collaboration with local dairy farmers, Washington State University, and the King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks. The project receives manure from three to four partner dairy farms mostly by underground pipe. The project is located at 43218 208th Ave SE; Enumclaw, WA 98022.

  10. Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model: Technical Description. 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etheridge, Melvin; Plugge, Joana; Retina, Nusrat

    1998-01-01

    The Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model, Version 2.0 (FAM 2.0), is a discrete event simulation model designed to support analysis of alternative concepts in air traffic management and control. FAM 2.0 was developed by the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) under a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) contract. This document provides a technical description of FAM 2.0 and its computer files to enable the modeler and programmer to make enhancements or modifications to the model. Those interested in a guide for using the model in analysis should consult the companion document, Aircraft/Air Traffic Management Functional Analysis Model, Version 2.0 Users Manual.

  11. Materials and Security Consolidation Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Not Listed

    2011-09-01

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Security Consolidation Center facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  12. Materials and Fuels Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-09-01

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Fuels Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  13. Research and Education Campus Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01

    U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory Research and Education Campus facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool to develop the radioactive waste management basis.

  14. Research and Education Campus Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01

    U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory Research and Education Campus facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool to develop the radioactive waste management basis.

  15. Construction of BIM-based SMART-ITL Facility Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Woo-Jin; Yi, Sung-Jae; Park, Hyun-Sik; Ryu, Sung-Uk; Bae, Hwang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sang-Chul; Min, Byung-Eui [DDRsoft Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The flow area and volume are scaled down to 1/49. The ratio of the hydraulic diameter is 1/7. Therefore, SMART-ITL is a large-scale thermalhydraulic test facility with about 45 m height, which is consisted of 10 m underground and 35 m from the ground level. Until now, the management of design data and maintenance of large scale test facilities have been managed based on hard-copy information. Recently, Thermal Hydraulics Safety Research Division (THSRD) at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed Facility Management System (FMS) based Building Information Modeling (BIM) to manage its design data more effectively for these large scale test facilities of SMART-ITL and ATLAS, and this BIM technology has been applied to SMART-ITL at the first. This study proposed a method of effective management and maintenance of design data applied to the SMART-ITL. That is, a FMS was developed based on the BIM technology for SMART-ITL. Figure 2 shows an overview of FMS development process based on BIM technology. SMART-ITL FMS facilitates its management and maintenance more effectively and accurately by 3- dimensional visualization. It enables the shape information of large scale test facilities to be visualized intuitively in a virtual space, and the efficient maintenance of data and instruments is possible by linking 3D shape information.

  16. Fuzzy-AHP-Based Comprehensive Evaluation on Facility Management System of High-Rise Office Buildings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Peihong; WANG Kan; WAN Huanhuan; MA Zhongjiao

    2011-01-01

    The present building facility management status in China resulted in many problems such as highenergy consumption, failure of automation control, services failure and poor indoor air quality. Based onquestionnaires and interviews to professional engineers and building users, a comprehensive evaluation index system was established on facility management of high-rise office buildings. A Fuzzy AHP based upon hierarchy criteria system was established. A Fuzzy AHP Evaluation Model on Facility Management System was set up ;α-cut analysis was introduced and incorporated with expert knowledge together, which made up the optimism index λ. The fuzzy optimum crisp weight of each criterion was resulted from data-mining. Case investigations were processed in high-rise office buildings in Shenyang. The results illustrated that indoor air quality, thermal comfort and life cycle cost were the most important indexes in the evaluation of Facility Management System of high rise office buildings. Residents in high-rise buildings in Shenyang pay less attention to maintenance management and environment protection. By comparison with the analysis result of Export Choice, Fuzzy AHP-based evaluation model could act as a scientific reference for the establishment of governmental standards in facility management area in building.

  17. Facilities management innovation in public-private collaborations: Danish ESCO projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia; Jensen, Jesper Ole; Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to investigate how Facilities Management (FM) units navigate Energy Service Company (ESCO) collaborations, here defined as examples of public collaborative innovation within the context of FM. The driving motivation is to inform and inspire internal FM units of local...... institutions on how to navigate and manage collaboration of different, intra- and inter-organisational actors throughout ESCO projects....

  18. Native American Technical Assistance and Training for Renewable Energy Resource Development and Electrical Generation Facilities Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. David Lester

    2008-10-17

    The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) will facilitate technical expertise and training of Native Americans in renewable energy resource development for electrical generation facilities, and distributed generation options contributing to feasibility studies, strategic planning and visioning. CERT will also provide information to Tribes on energy efficiency and energy management techniques.This project will provide facilitation and coordination of expertise from government agencies and private industries to interact with Native Americans in ways that will result in renewable energy resource development, energy efficiency program development, and electrical generation facilities management by Tribal entities. The intent of this cooperative agreement is to help build capacity within the Tribes to manage these important resources.

  19. Native American Technical Assistance and Training for Renewable Energy Resource Development and Electrical Generation Facilities Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. David Lester

    2008-10-17

    The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) will facilitate technical expertise and training of Native Americans in renewable energy resource development for electrical generation facilities, and distributed generation options contributing to feasibility studies, strategic planning and visioning. CERT will also provide information to Tribes on energy efficiency and energy management techniques.This project will provide facilitation and coordination of expertise from government agencies and private industries to interact with Native Americans in ways that will result in renewable energy resource development, energy efficiency program development, and electrical generation facilities management by Tribal entities. The intent of this cooperative agreement is to help build capacity within the Tribes to manage these important resources.

  20. [Implementation of quality management in medical rehabilitation--current challenges for rehabilitation facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enge, M; Koch, A; Müller, T; Vorländer, T

    2010-12-01

    The legal responsibilities imposed upon rehabilitation facilities under section 20 (2a) SGB IX, necessitate fundamental decisions to be taken regarding the development of quality management systems over and above the existing framework. This article is intended to provide ideas and suggestions to assist rehabilitation facilities in implementing a quality management system, which is required in addition to participation in the quality assurance programmes stipulated by the rehabilitation carriers. In this context, the additional internal benefit a functioning quality management system can provide for ensuring a high level of quality and for maintaining the competitiveness of the rehabilitation facility should be taken into account. The core element of these observations, hence, is a list of requirements which enables assessment of the quality of consultants' performance in setting up a quality management system.

  1. Implementation of a quality management system at the PHOENIX facility (CryoMaK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbach, Elisabeth, E-mail: elisabeth.urbach@kit.edu; Bagrets, Nadezda; Weiss, Klaus-Peter

    2013-10-15

    Within a variety of mechanical tests in the Cryogenic Material Test Facility Karlsruhe (CryoMaK) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) the PHOENIX facility was prepared for multiple standard tensile tests in liquid helium, liquid nitrogen and at room temperature. With the multiple specimens holder 10 specimens can be tested within one cool down one after another. A quality management system is needed for ensuring reproducible preconditions. For the guarantee of the competence of the laboratory and the measurement equipment, a quality management system was implemented and prepared for accreditation according to DIN EN ISO/IEC 17025 (ISO 17025). The implementation of a quality management system allows high precision test results included the estimation of measurement uncertainty. This paper gives an overview of the management and technical requirements for the accreditation of the PHOENIX testing facility.

  2. Challenges Associated With Managing Suicide Risk in Long-Term Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Riley, Alisa; Nadorff, Michael R.; Conwell, Yeates; Edelstein, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Little information about suicidal ideation and behavior in long-term care (LTC) facilities is available. Nonetheless, the implementation of the Minimum Data Set 3.0 requires that LTC facilities screen their residents for suicide risk and have protocols in place to effectively manage residents’ responses. In this article, the authors briefly discuss the risk factors of suicide in the elderly and the problems that suicidal ideation and behavior pose in the LTC environment. The authors explain issues that arise when trying to manage suicide risk in the elderly LTC population with general, traditional approaches. These inherent issues make it difficult to develop an effective protocol for managing suicide risk in LTC facilities, leading the authors to propose their own framework for assessing and managing suicide risk in the LTC setting. PMID:27610048

  3. Screensaver: an open source lab information management system (LIMS for high throughput screening facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nale Jennifer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared-usage high throughput screening (HTS facilities are becoming more common in academe as large-scale small molecule and genome-scale RNAi screening strategies are adopted for basic research purposes. These shared facilities require a unique informatics infrastructure that must not only provide access to and analysis of screening data, but must also manage the administrative and technical challenges associated with conducting numerous, interleaved screening efforts run by multiple independent research groups. Results We have developed Screensaver, a free, open source, web-based lab information management system (LIMS, to address the informatics needs of our small molecule and RNAi screening facility. Screensaver supports the storage and comparison of screening data sets, as well as the management of information about screens, screeners, libraries, and laboratory work requests. To our knowledge, Screensaver is one of the first applications to support the storage and analysis of data from both genome-scale RNAi screening projects and small molecule screening projects. Conclusions The informatics and administrative needs of an HTS facility may be best managed by a single, integrated, web-accessible application such as Screensaver. Screensaver has proven useful in meeting the requirements of the ICCB-Longwood/NSRB Screening Facility at Harvard Medical School, and has provided similar benefits to other HTS facilities.

  4. Screensaver: an open source lab information management system (LIMS) for high throughput screening facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Shared-usage high throughput screening (HTS) facilities are becoming more common in academe as large-scale small molecule and genome-scale RNAi screening strategies are adopted for basic research purposes. These shared facilities require a unique informatics infrastructure that must not only provide access to and analysis of screening data, but must also manage the administrative and technical challenges associated with conducting numerous, interleaved screening efforts run by multiple independent research groups. Results We have developed Screensaver, a free, open source, web-based lab information management system (LIMS), to address the informatics needs of our small molecule and RNAi screening facility. Screensaver supports the storage and comparison of screening data sets, as well as the management of information about screens, screeners, libraries, and laboratory work requests. To our knowledge, Screensaver is one of the first applications to support the storage and analysis of data from both genome-scale RNAi screening projects and small molecule screening projects. Conclusions The informatics and administrative needs of an HTS facility may be best managed by a single, integrated, web-accessible application such as Screensaver. Screensaver has proven useful in meeting the requirements of the ICCB-Longwood/NSRB Screening Facility at Harvard Medical School, and has provided similar benefits to other HTS facilities. PMID:20482787

  5. Waste Management Facilities cost information for low-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biadgi, C.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing low-level waste. The report`s information on treatment, storage, and disposal modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the US Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report.

  6. The management competencies of the directors of youth centres and indoor facilities in the municipalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOUNTAKIS KOSTAS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to construct a valid and reliable instrument to determine the competencies needed to manage the health & fitness clubs and indoor facilities of Youth & Sport Organizations in the Greek Municipalities. For the purposes of the study we used (with permission the competencies of sport managers instrument constructed by Dr KL Toh. This questionnaire comprised 96 competency statements translated into Greek with reverse translation.Following standard procedures and with the help of five academic experts from Greece, six directors of the health & fitness clubs and indoor facilities of Youth & Sport Organizations of the municipalities constructed the final version of the questionnaire, comprising 72 questions. The instrument was then administered to a sample of 101 managers. Results analysis of the internal validity revealed that the Cronbach’salpha was 0.95. Exploratory factor analysis revealed eight factors comprising 69 competency statements: management techniques (15 items, sport science, (13 items, event management (10 items, public relations (8 items, computer skills/research (8 items, facilities management (5 items,governance (5 items, and safety/injury prevention (5 items. Further internal consistency of each factor revealed Cronbach’s alpha coefficients from 0.76 to 0.97. It is concluded that the questionnaire developed in this study is a reliable and valid instrument to measure the competencies of the managers of health & fitness clubs and indoor facilities.

  7. Model for estimation of enterprise management system potential: description and study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G. Kalyuzhna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The main purpose of the article is the description of the model for estimation of enterprise management system potential, based on fuzzy logic, and studying its behavior at critical points. The results of the analysis. In the article it is proved that the enterprise management system potential is a strategic basis for the formation of the overall enterprise potential. In this context, the importance of solving the problem of quantitative evaluation of enterprise management system potential obviously increases. In the article, the existence of a number of approaches to evaluating enterprise management system potential is demonstrated. Most of these approaches meet the author's conception of the nature of such instruments. Specifically, these approaches involve the estimating both subjective and objective component of management processes and based on the calculation of the indicators, reflecting the actual performance of management. However, most of the investigated approaches are not reflect the correspondence between components of management system potential and elements of management systems. In the article, the components of management system potential are ordered into the units according to the same nature (objective, subjective and combined components. The enterprise management system potential is considered as a function of the potentials of its constituent units. As these units is proposed to consider: the informative and technical potential (objective component, the structural and functional potential (objective component, the management personnel potential (subjective component, the potential of preparing, adoption and implementation of management decisions (combined component. According to the fact that the enterprise management system potential is not quantifiable variable, it is advisable the feasibility of fuzzy logic for its evaluation. In order to quantify the enterprise management system potential as a

  8. XPLanner: A knowledge-based decision support system for facility management and planning

    OpenAIRE

    S-Y Han; Kim, T. J.; I Adiguzel

    1991-01-01

    A case study is reported of the design, implementation, and evaluation of a knowledge-based decision support system, XPLanner. XPLanner integrates an expert system with optimization modeling technique, database management system, and interactive user interface to create a comprehensive decision aid for facility management and planning by the US Army. It is believed that integrating the expert system with the modeling and data management capabilities of decision support systems can create a co...

  9. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-04-21

    The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable

  10. Fast Flux Test Facility Performance Monitoring Management Information August 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newland, D J

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide management with performance data on key performance indicators selected from the FFTF Early Warning System performance indicators. This report contains the results for key performance indicators divided into two categories of ``overall`` and ``other``. The ``overall`` performance indicators, when considered in the aggregate provide one means of monitoring overall plant performance. Overall performance indicators are listed in Table 1. The ``other`` performance indicators, listed in Table 2, are considered useful management tools for assessing the specific areas they address. The data should be used in conjunction with the results of other management assessment activities to focus improvement efforts. Use of these key performance indicators as a group is stressed, since focusing on a single indicator or a narrow set of indicators can be counterproductive both to safety and to long-term performance improvement. 27 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Fast Flux Test Facility Performance Monitoring Management Information April 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newland, D. J.

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide management with performance data on key performance indicators selected from the FFTF Early Warning System performance indicators. This report contains the result for key performance indicators divided into two categories of ``overall`` and ``other``. The ``overall`` performance indicators, when considered in the aggregate, provide one means of monitoring overall plant performance. Overall performance indicators are listed. The ``other`` performance indicators, are considered useful management tools for assessing the specific areas they address. The data should be used in conjunction with the results of other management assessment activities to focus improvement efforts. Use of these key performance indicators as a group is stressed, since focusing on a single indicator or a narrow set of indicators can be counterproductive both to safety and to long-term performance improvement. 26 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Conceptual design report for the spent fuel management technology research and test (SMATER) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.W.; Ro, S.G.; Lee, J.S.; Min, D.K.; Shin, Y.J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-10-01

    This study was intended to develop concept for a pilot-scale remote operation facility for longer term management of spent fuel and therefrom to provide technical requirement for later basic design of the facility. Main scope of work for the study was to revise the past (1990) conceptual design in functions, scale, hot cell layout etc. based on user requirements. Technical reference was made to the PKA facility in Germany, through collaboration with appropriate partner, to elaborate the design and requirements. The study was focused on establishing design criteria and conceptual design of the SMATER facility. The results of this study should be an essential and useful basis upon optimization for further work to basic design of the facility. (author). 17 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. PIMS sequencing extension: a laboratory information management system for DNA sequencing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Facilities that provide a service for DNA sequencing typically support large numbers of users and experiment types. The cost of services is often reduced by the use of liquid handling robots but the efficiency of such facilities is hampered because the software for such robots does not usually integrate well with the systems that run the sequencing machines. Accordingly, there is a need for software systems capable of integrating different robotic systems and managing sample information for DNA sequencing services. In this paper, we describe an extension to the Protein Information Management System (PIMS) that is designed for DNA sequencing facilities. The new version of PIMS has a user-friendly web interface and integrates all aspects of the sequencing process, including sample submission, handling and tracking, together with capture and management of the data. Results The PIMS sequencing extension has been in production since July 2009 at the University of Leeds DNA Sequencing Facility. It has completely replaced manual data handling and simplified the tasks of data management and user communication. Samples from 45 groups have been processed with an average throughput of 10000 samples per month. The current version of the PIMS sequencing extension works with Applied Biosystems 3130XL 96-well plate sequencer and MWG 4204 or Aviso Theonyx liquid handling robots, but is readily adaptable for use with other combinations of robots. Conclusions PIMS has been extended to provide a user-friendly and integrated data management solution for DNA sequencing facilities that is accessed through a normal web browser and allows simultaneous access by multiple users as well as facility managers. The system integrates sequencing and liquid handling robots, manages the data flow, and provides remote access to the sequencing results. The software is freely available, for academic users, from http://www.pims-lims.org/. PMID:21385349

  14. PIMS sequencing extension: a laboratory information management system for DNA sequencing facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin Stephen A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facilities that provide a service for DNA sequencing typically support large numbers of users and experiment types. The cost of services is often reduced by the use of liquid handling robots but the efficiency of such facilities is hampered because the software for such robots does not usually integrate well with the systems that run the sequencing machines. Accordingly, there is a need for software systems capable of integrating different robotic systems and managing sample information for DNA sequencing services. In this paper, we describe an extension to the Protein Information Management System (PIMS that is designed for DNA sequencing facilities. The new version of PIMS has a user-friendly web interface and integrates all aspects of the sequencing process, including sample submission, handling and tracking, together with capture and management of the data. Results The PIMS sequencing extension has been in production since July 2009 at the University of Leeds DNA Sequencing Facility. It has completely replaced manual data handling and simplified the tasks of data management and user communication. Samples from 45 groups have been processed with an average throughput of 10000 samples per month. The current version of the PIMS sequencing extension works with Applied Biosystems 3130XL 96-well plate sequencer and MWG 4204 or Aviso Theonyx liquid handling robots, but is readily adaptable for use with other combinations of robots. Conclusions PIMS has been extended to provide a user-friendly and integrated data management solution for DNA sequencing facilities that is accessed through a normal web browser and allows simultaneous access by multiple users as well as facility managers. The system integrates sequencing and liquid handling robots, manages the data flow, and provides remote access to the sequencing results. The software is freely available, for academic users, from http://www.pims-lims.org/.

  15. Description of the cryogenic and hot-hydrogen test facility being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. A.; Riffle, G. K.; Merdich, Jeff A.

    1993-06-01

    The cryogenic and hot-hydrogen test facility being developed for the USAF Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program is described along with the test capabilities, technical approach, and technical status. Particular attention is given to the hydrogen test facility control and data acquisition and the hot hydrogen gas generator (HHGG). The hydrogen test facility will be be ready for operation in conjunction with cryogenic test capability by late 1994.

  16. Psychiatric Disorders in Drop out from Educational Attainment Attending Mental Health Facilities: A Descriptive Cross Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M S; Rashid, M H; Uddin, M N; Singha, R K; Rahman, M A; Haque, M A; Saha, C K; Abedin, M F

    2017-07-01

    Studies of the impact of mental disorders on educational attainment are rare. Mental disorders, those beginning in childhood or adolescence may increase the risk of early drop out from education. The latter has been shown to have adverse life-course consequences on individuals such as greater demand on social welfare entitlements. A descriptive cross sectional study was carried out at the department of Psychiatry, Comilla Medical College, Comilla, Bangladesh. All cases were selected from patients attending at Comilla Medical College Hospital and Private Mental Health Facilities in Comilla City from March 2015 to February 2016. We found out the psychiatric disorders and socio-demographic status of patients with educational drop out over the early life course. A total of 50 dropout patients aged 10 to 30 years who fullfiled the enrolment criteria included in the study. Sociodemographic questionnaires, diagnostic information (DSM-5 and ICD-10) as well as an account of a various level of education were used as research instruments. The Frequency tables, summary tables and appropriate graphs were prepared to describe the population characteristics and study finding. The most of the psychiatric morbidity presents in male (62%) and age group of 18-24 years (54%). In this study, anxiety disorders was 8%, behaviour/ impulse control disorders was 8%, mood disorders was 16%, substance use disorders was 24%, schizophrenia spectrum disorders was 12% and composite psychiatric disorders was 32%. Among drop out patient's non- completion of primary education was 14%, non-completion of secondary education was 20%, non- completion of higher secondary education was 24%, not entry to tertiary education was 12% and non-completion of tertiary education was 30%. Among behaviour/impulse control disorders non-completion of primary education was 6%, substance use disorders non-completion of higher secondary education was 10%, mood disorder both non-completion of higher secondary education

  17. Simulation Modeling of a Facility Layout in Operations Management Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Hulya Julie

    2006-01-01

    Teaching quantitative courses can be challenging. Similarly, layout modeling and lean production concepts can be difficult to grasp in an introductory OM (operations management) class. This article describes a simulation model developed in PROMODEL to facilitate the learning of layout modeling and lean manufacturing. Simulation allows for the…

  18. Recommendations for Emergency Management Planning for School Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Numerous events, such as hurricanes, floods, and tornadoes, constitute a natural disaster for public schools. Human-caused disasters include hazardous-material emergencies, civil riots, fires, and nuclear accidents. This document contains emergency-management planning guidelines, developed by the Texas Education Agency, to help local school…

  19. Simulation Modeling of a Facility Layout in Operations Management Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Hulya Julie

    2006-01-01

    Teaching quantitative courses can be challenging. Similarly, layout modeling and lean production concepts can be difficult to grasp in an introductory OM (operations management) class. This article describes a simulation model developed in PROMODEL to facilitate the learning of layout modeling and lean manufacturing. Simulation allows for the…

  20. Fast Flux Test Facility performance monitoring management information, October 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newland, D J

    1988-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide management with performance data on key performance indicators selected from the FFTF Early Warning System performance indicators. This report contains the results for key performance indicators divided into two categories of ``overall`` and ``other``. The ``overall`` performance indicators, when considered in the aggregate, provide one means of monitoring overall plant performance. Overall performance indicators are listed in Table 1. The ``other`` performance indicators, listed in Table 2, are considered useful management tools for assessing the specific areas they address. The data should be used in conjunction with the the results of other management assessment activities to focus improvement efforts. Use of these key performance indicators as a group is stressed, since focusing on a single indicator or a narrow set of indicators can be counterproductive both to safety and to long-term performance improvement. Any concerns regarding the accuracy or analysis of the specific indicator should be addressed to the responsible manager identified on the figure. This report must be reviewed with the understanding that both the design and the mission are different for FFTF compared to commercial power reactors. 26 figs.

  1. Development of a spent fuel management technology research and test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S. W.; Noh, S. K.; Lee, J. S. and others

    1997-12-01

    This study was intended to develop concept for a pilot-scale remote operation facility for longer term management of spent fuel and therefrom to provide technical requirement for later basic design of the facility. Main scope of work for the study was to revise the past (1990) conceptual design in functions, scale, hot cell layout, etc. based on user requirements. Technical reference was made to the PKA facility in Germany, through collaboration with appropriate partner, to elaborate the design and requirements. A simulator of the conceptual design was also developed by use of virtual reality technique by 3-D computer graphics for equipment and building. (author). 18 tabs., 39 figs

  2. Adaptive management: a paradigm for remediation of public facilities following a terrorist attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Janecky, David R; Doerr, Ted B

    2008-10-01

    Terrorist actions are aimed at maximizing harm (health, psychological, economical, and political) through the combined physical impacts of the act and fear. Immediate and effective response to a terrorist act is critical to limit human and environmental harm, effectively restore facility function, and maintain public confidence. Though there have been terrorist attacks in public facilities that we have learned from, overall our experiences in restoration of public facilities following a terrorist attack are limited. Restoration of public facilities following a release of a hazardous material is inherently far more complex than in industrial settings and has many unique technical, economic, social, and political challenges. For example, there may be a great need to quickly restore the facility to full operation and allow public access even though it was not designed for easy or rapid restoration, and critical information is needed for quantitative risk assessment and effective restoration must be anticipated to be incomplete and uncertain. Whereas present planning documents have substantial linearity in their organization, the "adaptive management" paradigm provides a constructive parallel paradigm for restoration of public facilities that anticipates and plans for uncertainty, inefficiencies, and stakeholder participation. Adaptive management grew out of the need to manage and restore natural resources in highly complex and changing environments with limited knowledge about causal relationships and responses to restoration actions. Similarities between natural resource management and restoration of a public facility after a terrorist attack suggest that integration of adaptive management principles explicitly into restoration processes will result in substantially enhanced and flexible responses necessary to meet the uncertainties of potential terrorist attacks.

  3. Quality of Malaria Case Management in Malawi: Results from a Nationally Representative Health Facility Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhardt, Laura C.; Chinkhumba, Jobiba; Wolkon, Adam; Luka, Madalitso; Luhanga, Misheck; Sande, John; Oyugi, Jessica; Ali, Doreen; Mathanga, Don; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Background Malaria is endemic throughout Malawi, but little is known about quality of malaria case management at publicly-funded health facilities, which are the major source of care for febrile patients. Methods In April–May 2011, we conducted a nationwide, geographically-stratified health facility survey to assess the quality of outpatient malaria diagnosis and treatment. We enrolled patients presenting for care and conducted exit interviews and re-examinations, including reference blood smears. Moreover, we assessed health worker readiness (e.g., training, supervision) and health facility capacity (e.g. availability of diagnostics and antimalarials) to provide malaria case management. All analyses accounted for clustering and unequal selection probabilities. We also used survey weights to produce estimates of national caseloads. Results At the 107 facilities surveyed, most of the 136 health workers interviewed (83%) had received training on malaria case management. However, only 24% of facilities had functional microscopy, 15% lacked a thermometer, and 19% did not have the first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), artemether-lumefantrine, in stock. Of 2,019 participating patients, 34% had clinical malaria (measured fever or self-reported history of fever plus a positive reference blood smear). Only 67% (95% confidence interval (CI): 59%, 76%) of patients with malaria were correctly prescribed an ACT, primarily due to missed malaria diagnosis. Among patients without clinical malaria, 31% (95% CI: 24%, 39%) were prescribed an ACT. By our estimates, 1.5 million of the 4.4 million malaria patients seen in public facilities annually did not receive correct treatment, and 2.7 million patients without clinical malaria were inappropriately given an ACT. Conclusions Malawi has a high burden of uncomplicated malaria but nearly one-third of all patients receive incorrect malaria treatment, including under- and over-treatment. To improve malaria case

  4. Quality of malaria case management in Malawi: results from a nationally representative health facility survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Steinhardt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria is endemic throughout Malawi, but little is known about quality of malaria case management at publicly-funded health facilities, which are the major source of care for febrile patients. METHODS: In April-May 2011, we conducted a nationwide, geographically-stratified health facility survey to assess the quality of outpatient malaria diagnosis and treatment. We enrolled patients presenting for care and conducted exit interviews and re-examinations, including reference blood smears. Moreover, we assessed health worker readiness (e.g., training, supervision and health facility capacity (e.g. availability of diagnostics and antimalarials to provide malaria case management. All analyses accounted for clustering and unequal selection probabilities. We also used survey weights to produce estimates of national caseloads. RESULTS: At the 107 facilities surveyed, most of the 136 health workers interviewed (83% had received training on malaria case management. However, only 24% of facilities had functional microscopy, 15% lacked a thermometer, and 19% did not have the first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT, artemether-lumefantrine, in stock. Of 2,019 participating patients, 34% had clinical malaria (measured fever or self-reported history of fever plus a positive reference blood smear. Only 67% (95% confidence interval (CI: 59%, 76% of patients with malaria were correctly prescribed an ACT, primarily due to missed malaria diagnosis. Among patients without clinical malaria, 31% (95% CI: 24%, 39% were prescribed an ACT. By our estimates, 1.5 million of the 4.4 million malaria patients seen in public facilities annually did not receive correct treatment, and 2.7 million patients without clinical malaria were inappropriately given an ACT. CONCLUSIONS: Malawi has a high burden of uncomplicated malaria but nearly one-third of all patients receive incorrect malaria treatment, including under- and over-treatment. To improve

  5. The Practice of Sustainable Facilities Management: Design Sentiments and the Knowledge Chasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Elmualim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction industry with its nature of project delivery is very fragmented in terms of the various processes that encompass design, construction, facilities and assets management. Facilities managers are in the forefront of delivering sustainable assets management and hence further the venture for mitigation and adaptation to climate change. A questionnaire survey was conducted to establish perceptions, level of commitment and knowledge chasm in practising sustainable facilities management (FM. This has significant implications for sustainable design management, especially in a fragmented industry. The majority of questionnaire respondents indicated the importance of sustainability for their organization. Many of them stated that they reported on sustainability as part of their organization annual reporting with energy efficiency, recycling and waste reduction as the main concern for them. The overwhelming barrier for implementing sound, sustainable FM is the lack of consensual understanding and focus of individuals and organizations about sustainability. There is a knowledge chasm regarding practical information on delivering sustainable FM. Sustainability information asymmetry in design, construction and FM processes render any sustainable design as a sentiment and mere design aspiration. Skills and training provision, traditionally offered separately to designers and facilities managers, needs to be re-evaluated. Sustainability education and training should be developed to provide effective structures and processes to apply sustainability throughout the construction and FM industries coherently and as common practice. Published in the Journal AEDM - Volume 5, Numbers 1-2, 2009 , pp. 91-102(12

  6. Benefits and Barriers of Information and Communication Technologies Adoption in Facilities Management Services Supply Chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada

    of ICT systems in the supply chain of facilities management services? By taking the starting point in the literature of supply chain, supply chain management, facilities management and ICT adoption a semi-structured interview guide has been developed and 12 in depth interviews have been conducted.  The...

  7. M-area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report, First quarter 1995, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    This report, in three volumes, describes the ground water monitoring and c corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the fourth quarter 1994 and first quarter 1995. Concise description of the program and considerable data documenting the monitoring and remedial activities are included in the document. This is Volume 1 covering the following topics: sampling and results; hydrogeologic assessment; water quality assessment; effectiveness of the corrective-action program; corrective-action system operation and performance; monitoring and corrective-action program assessment; proposed monitoring and corrective-action program modifications. Also included are the following appendicies: A-standards; B-flagging criteria; C-figures; D-monitoring results tables; E-data quality/usability assessment.

  8. Insight into implementation of facility-based integrated management of childhood illness strategy in a rural district of Sindh, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nousheen Akber Pradhan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Integrated management of childhood illnesses (IMCI strategy has been proven to improve health outcomes in children under 5 years of age. Pakistan, despite being in the late implementation phase of the strategy, continues to report high under-five mortality due to pneumonia, diarrhea, measles, and malnutrition – the main targets of the strategy. Objective: The study determines the factors influencing IMCI implementation at public-sector primary health care (PHC facilities in Matiari district, Sindh, Pakistan. Design: An exploratory qualitative study with an embedded quantitative strand was conducted. The qualitative part included 16 in-depth interviews (IDIs with stakeholders which included planners and policy makers at a provincial level (n=5, implementers and managers at a district level (n=3, and IMCI-trained physicians posted at PHC facilities (n=8. Quantitative part included PHC facility survey (n=16 utilizing WHO health facility assessment tool to assess availability of IMCI essential drugs, supplies, and equipments. Qualitative content analysis was used to interpret the textual information, whereas descriptive frequencies were calculated for health facility survey data. Results: The major factors reported to enhance IMCI implementation were knowledge and perception about the strategy and need for separate clinic for children aged under 5 years as potential support factors. The latter can facilitate in strategy implementation through allocated workforce and required equipments and supplies. Constraint factors mainly included lack of clear understanding of the strategy, poor planning for IMCI implementation, ambiguity in defined roles and responsibilities among stakeholders, and insufficient essential supplies and drugs at PHC centers. The latter was further substantiated through health facilities’ survey findings, which indicated that none of the facilities had 100% stock of essential supplies and drugs. Only one out of all

  9. Fast flux test facility performance monitoring management information; June 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newland, D J

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide management with performance data on key performance indicators selected from the FFTF Early Warning System performance indicators. This report contains the results for key performance indicators divided into two categories of ``overall`` and ``other``. The ``overall`` performance indicators, when considered in the aggregate, provide one means of monitoring overall plant performance. The data should be used in conjunction with the results of other management assessment activities to focus improvement efforts. Use of these key performance indicators as a group is stressed, since focusing on a single indicator or a narrow set of indicators can be counterproductive both to safety and to long-term performance improvement.

  10. Fast Flux Test Facility Performance Monitoring Management Information March 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newland, D. J.

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide management with performance data on key performance indicators selected from the FFTF Early Warning System performance indicators. This report contains the results for key performance indicators divided into two categories of ``overall`` and ``other.`` The ``overall`` performance indicators, when considered in the aggregate, provide one means of monitoring overall plant performance. The data should be used in conjunction with the results of other management assessment activities to focus improvement efforts. Use of these key performance indicators as a group is stressed, since focusing on a single indicator or a narrow set of indicators can be counterproductive both to safety and to long-term performance improvement. This report must be reviewed with the understanding that both the design and the mission are different for FFTF compared to commercial power reactors.

  11. Practical considerations for disaster preparedness and continuity management in research facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortell, Norman; Nicholls, Sam

    2013-10-01

    Many research facility managers, veterinarians and directors are familiar with the principles of Good Laboratory Practice, requirements of the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International, tenets of biosecurity and standards of animal welfare and housing but may be less familiar with the ideas of business continuity. But business continuity considerations are as applicable to research facilities as they are to other institutions. The authors discuss how business continuity principles can be applied in the research context and propose that such application, or 'research continuity management,' enables a focused but wide-reaching approach to disaster preparedness.

  12. Benefits and Barriers of Information and Communication Technologies Adoption in Facilities Management Services Supply Chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada

      This paper presents the results of a study of factors impacting information and communication technology (ICT) adoption in the supply chain of facilities management services. The research questions addressed in this study are: What are the key factors that influence adoption and assimilation...... results show that there are a number of factors that influence adoption and assimilation of ICT in the supply chain of facilities management services, which have been grouped into organizational, technology and environmental factors. The study is relevant to researchers of ICT adoption, supply chain...

  13. The GraFIC TM Facility Management Software [TM = Trademark Symbol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younkin, J.R.; Dunigan, J.J.; Gaby, J.E.; Hickerson, T.W.; Pickett, C.A.

    2002-06-01

    The Graphical Facility Information System{trademark} (GraFIC{trademark}) is an intelligent facility and information management system that provides near real time, verifiable status of safeguarded materials in a nuclear storage facility. GraFIC{trademark} is a versatile software package that is designed to operate in a distributed computing environment and to provide item and facility activity information to an unlimited number of authorized clients. Recent extensions to GraFIC{trademark} include the ability to link graphical entities to multimedia documents, interfaces to multiple material control and accountability systems, and alternate data entry and operator interaction mechanisms. Relevant multimedia documents such as still images and iPIX{trademark} immersive images can be summoned on demand from their icons on floor plans. An iPIX{trademark} image server, equipped with the appropriate sensors can signal GraFIC{trademark} that an event that warrants the review of a series of saved iPIX{trademark} images has occurred. GraFIC{trademark} provides mechanisms for presenting information obtained from sensor-based monitoring systems and/or other information systems in a common, easy-to-use graphical format. GraFIC{trademark} was initially integrated with the Continuous Automated Vault Inventory System's (CAVIS{trademark} ) suite of rugged, low-cost sensors that remotely monitor the physical and/or assigned attributes associated with stored nuclear materials. GraFIC{trademark} can now interface with the ReflectoActive Seals{trademark} (RASeals) System. The framework designed for the RASeals interface is suitable for integrating with other systems, such as SmartShelf{trademark} . GraFIC{trademark} can import existing data for stored material from other information systems. By retrieving existing information from other information systems, the expense, effort, and possible inaccuracies associated with manual entry are eliminated. Another data entry method involves

  14. CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denney, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    The CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) has been constructed to describe the activities required for the relocation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the CPP-603 facility. These activities are the only Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) actions identified in the Implementation Plan developed to meet the requirements of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 to the Secretary of Energy regarding an improved schedule for remediation in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Complex. As described in the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan, issued February 28, 1995, an INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan is currently under development to direct the placement of SNF currently in existing INEL facilities into interim storage, and to address the coordination of intrasite SNF movements with new receipts and intersite transfers that were identified in the DOE SNF Programmatic and INEL Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Record, of Decision. This SISMP will be a subset of the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and the activities described are being coordinated with other INEL SNF management activities. The CPP-603 relocation activities have been assigned a high priority so that established milestones will be meet, but there will be some cases where other activities will take precedence in utilization of available resources. The Draft INEL Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), INEL-94/0279, Draft Rev. 2, dated March 10, 1995, is being superseded by the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and this CPP-603 specific SISMP.

  15. Conjunctive operation of river facilities for integrated water resources management in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwirin; Jang, Cheolhee; Kim, Sung

    2016-10-01

    With the increasing trend of water-related disasters such as floods and droughts resulting from climate change, the integrated management of water resources is gaining importance recently. Korea has worked towards preventing disasters caused by floods and droughts, managing water resources efficiently through the coordinated operation of river facilities such as dams, weirs, and agricultural reservoirs. This has been pursued to enable everyone to enjoy the benefits inherent to the utilization of water resources, by preserving functional rivers, improving their utility and reducing the degradation of water quality caused by floods and droughts. At the same time, coordinated activities are being conducted in multi-purpose dams, hydro-power dams, weirs, agricultural reservoirs and water use facilities (featuring a daily water intake of over 100 000 m3 day-1) with the purpose of monitoring the management of such facilities. This is being done to ensure the protection of public interest without acting as an obstacle to sound water management practices. During Flood Season, each facilities contain flood control capacity by limited operating level which determined by the Regulation Council in advance. Dam flood discharge decisions are approved through the flood forecasting and management of Flood Control Office due to minimize flood damage for both upstream and downstream. The operational plan is implemented through the council's predetermination while dry season for adequate quantity and distribution of water.

  16. Conjunctive operation of river facilities for integrated water resources management in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing trend of water-related disasters such as floods and droughts resulting from climate change, the integrated management of water resources is gaining importance recently. Korea has worked towards preventing disasters caused by floods and droughts, managing water resources efficiently through the coordinated operation of river facilities such as dams, weirs, and agricultural reservoirs. This has been pursued to enable everyone to enjoy the benefits inherent to the utilization of water resources, by preserving functional rivers, improving their utility and reducing the degradation of water quality caused by floods and droughts. At the same time, coordinated activities are being conducted in multi-purpose dams, hydro-power dams, weirs, agricultural reservoirs and water use facilities (featuring a daily water intake of over 100 000 m3 day−1 with the purpose of monitoring the management of such facilities. This is being done to ensure the protection of public interest without acting as an obstacle to sound water management practices. During Flood Season, each facilities contain flood control capacity by limited operating level which determined by the Regulation Council in advance. Dam flood discharge decisions are approved through the flood forecasting and management of Flood Control Office due to minimize flood damage for both upstream and downstream. The operational plan is implemented through the council's predetermination while dry season for adequate quantity and distribution of water.

  17. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) software description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, David A.; Dickson, Richard W.; Clinedinst, Winston C.; Slominski, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    The flight software developed for the Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) MicroVAX computer used on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle for Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) research is described. The FM/FC software computes navigation position estimates, guidance commands, and those commands issued to the control surfaces to direct the aircraft in flight. Various modes of flight are provided for, ranging from computer assisted manual modes to fully automatic modes including automatic landing. A high-level system overview as well as a description of each software module comprising the system is provided. Digital systems diagrams are included for each major flight control component and selected flight management functions.

  18. 105-K Basin Material Design Basis Feed Description for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities VOL 1 Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PACKER, M.J.

    1999-11-04

    Metallic uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) is currently stored within two water filled pools, 105-KE Basin (KE Basin) and 105-KW Basin (KW Basin), at the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) is responsible to DOE for operation of these fuel storage pools and for the 2100 metric tons of SNF materials that they contain. The SNF Project mission includes safe removal and transportation of all SNF from these storage basins to a new storage facility in the 200 East Area. To accomplish this mission, the SNF Project modifies the existing KE Basin and KW Basin facilities and constructs two new facilities: the 100 K Area Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF), which drains and dries the SNF; and the 200 East Area Canister Storage Building (CSB), which stores the SNF. The purpose of this document is to describe the design basis feed compositions for materials stored or processed by SNF Project facilities and activities. This document is not intended to replace the Hanford Spent Fuel Inventory Baseline (WHC 1994b), but only to supplement it by providing more detail on the chemical and radiological inventories in the fuel (this volume) and sludge. A variety of feed definitions is required to support evaluation of specific facility and process considerations during the development of these new facilities. Six separate feed types have been identified for development of new storage or processing facilities. The approach for using each feed during design evaluations is to calculate the proposed facility flowsheet assuming each feed. The process flowsheet would then provide a basis for material compositions and quantities which are used in follow-on calculations.

  19. Optimization of the Operation of Green Buildings applying the Facility Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somorová, Viera

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, in the field of civil engineering there exists an upward trend towards environmental sustainability. It relates mainly to the achievement of energy efficiency and also to the emission reduction throughout the whole life cycle of the building, i.e. in the course of its implementation, use and liquidation. These requirements are fulfilled, to a large extent, by green buildings. The characteristic feature of green buildings are primarily highly-sophisticated technical and technological equipments which are installed therein. The sophisticated systems of technological equipments need also the sophisticated management. From this point of view the facility management has all prerequisites to meet this requirement. The paper is aimed to define the facility management as an effective method which enables the optimization of the management of supporting activities by creating conditions for the optimum operation of green buildings viewed from the aspect of the environmental conditions

  20. Using Tools of Strategic Management in Medical Facilities of Lublin Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworzynska Magdalena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to evaluate the use of tools of strategic management in hospitals in Lublin region. The study was conducted among 14 medical entities from the area of Lublin Voivodeship. The survey was addressed to economic directors or chief accountants of health care facilities and sent by post. The questionnaire was also helpful in conducting an in-depth interview as it provided a required structure. As part of the interviews with managers of health care facilities, information beyond the questionnaire was acquired, e.g. about the mission. According to studies, most health care facilities develop strategic plans (71.4%. For 21.4% of the studied facilities, the strategic plan is known mainly to management. In contrast, 28.6% of entities do not have a strategic plan. The presented results of the research can increase the effectiveness of activities in each area of the health care facility, continuous process improvement and rapid response to changes in the environment.

  1. Tools for Stakeholder Involvement in Facility Management Service Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia; Scupola, Ada

    that are more in line with the stakeholder needs and expectations, and may thus result in increased customer satisfaction, better services and, at the very end, an increased competitive advantage for the organization. Background: The background of this study lies in user involvement in service design...... in combination with empirical evidence and research from the FM field. The differentiation between clients, customers and end-users (Coenen et al. 2013) is taken as the ground to explore the peculiarities of stakeholder management within FM service design, and deepen the discussion on user involvement, which can...... an overview of the specific tools that are used to involve different stakeholders on the demand side in FM service design and innovation process. These tools have been categorized as: (1) direct methods that allow stakeholders (clients, customers and end-users) to actively participate in the FM service design...

  2. Innovation Insights in the Danish Facility Management Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada

    Management (FM) has established itself as a key service sector, with a diverse and highly competitive market of FM contractors, in-house FM teams, FM suppliers, FM consultants, and professional FM institutions. Traditionally, innovation processes in service firms have often been characterised as being....... Results: The results show that for big service providers, innovation is a strategic activity and is conducted as a planned and systematic process. For FM service customer with their own FM department, the results are mixed: some of the FM departments have innovation as a strategic priority and clear...... innovation strategies while other FM departments do innovate without being aware that innovation is taking place. The “ICT Supplier/Consultants” are found to be innovative and their innovations are both driven by the user needs and by the desire to improve their competitiveness. Practical Implications...

  3. Fast flux test facility performance monitoring management information, July 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newland, D J

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide management with performance data on key performance indicators selected from the FFTF Early Warning System performance indicators. Very good performance for the month of July was highlighted by continuos full power operation for the entire month and by extremely low plant personnel radiation exposure during the second quarter of 1989. In spite of increased effort this month, the corrective maintenance work off rate continued to rise. Increased FFTF resource efforts will continue on this indicator as well as Other Performance Indicators which reflect undesirable trends. Increased Westinghouse Hanford Company emphasis continues to be placed on improving the Operations staffing levels. Extensive use of overtime and support shift personnel is still being required to support extra work loads imposed by non-routine evolutions.

  4. Innovation Insights in the Danish Facility Management Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada

    Management (FM) has established itself as a key service sector, with a diverse and highly competitive market of FM contractors, in-house FM teams, FM suppliers, FM consultants, and professional FM institutions. Traditionally, innovation processes in service firms have often been characterised as being....... Results: The results show that for big service providers, innovation is a strategic activity and is conducted as a planned and systematic process. For FM service customer with their own FM department, the results are mixed: some of the FM departments have innovation as a strategic priority and clear...... innovation strategies while other FM departments do innovate without being aware that innovation is taking place. The “ICT Supplier/Consultants” are found to be innovative and their innovations are both driven by the user needs and by the desire to improve their competitiveness. Practical Implications...

  5. Case management for the subacute patient in a skilled nursing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, D D

    2000-01-01

    The goal of case management has always been to manage care, cost, and outcomes. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 and the subsequent implementation of managed care and the prospective payment system have introduced many challenges to the postacute care delivery system. The implementation of sound clinical, fiscal, and operational strategies is critical to the continued delivery of quality services and the maximization of revenue. The implementation of case management principles provides an opportunity to balance care with cost. This article focuses on the development and implementation of a case management program at a skilled nursing facility that specifically addresses the needs of a subacute population. The program's purpose is to promote efficiency, efficacy, and effectiveness of services for short-term subacute patients who will eventually return to the community. The long-term goal of the program is to classify all patients into case management categories and assign them to RN case managers or social workers, based on acuity and need.

  6. Anaesthetist-provided pre-hospital advanced airway management in children: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpgaard, Mona; Hansen, Troels Martin; Rognås, Leif

    2015-08-27

    Pre-hospital advanced airway management has been named one of the top-five research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care. Few studies have been made on paediatric pre-hospital advanced airway management. The aim of this study was to investigate pre-hospital endotracheal intubation success rate in children, first-pass success rates and complications related to pre-hospital advanced airway management in patients younger than 16 years of age treated by pre-hospital critical care teams in the Central Denmark Region (1.3 million inhabitants). A prospective descriptive study based on data collected from eight anaesthetist-staffed pre-hospital critical care teams between February 1st 2011 and November 1st 2012. Primary endpoints were 1) pre-hospital endotracheal intubation success rate in children 2) pre-hospital endotracheal intubation first-pass success rate in children and 3) complications related to prehospital advanced airway management in children. The pre-hospital critical care anaesthetists attempted endotracheal intubation in 25 children, 13 of which were less than 2 years old. In one patient, a neonate (600 g birth weight), endotracheal intubation failed. The patient was managed by uneventful bag-mask ventilation. All other 24 children had their tracheas successfully intubated by the pre-hospital critical care anaesthetists resulting in a pre-hospital endotracheal intubation success rate of 96 %. Overall first pass success-rate was 75 %. In the group of patients younger than 2 years old, first pass success-rate was 54 %. The total rate of airway management related complications such as vomiting, aspiration, accidental intubation of the oesophagus or right main stem bronchus, hypoxia (oxygen saturation advanced airway management. Compared with the total population of patients receiving pre-hospital advanced airway management in our system, the overall success rate following pre-hospital endotracheal intubations in children is acceptable but

  7. An important aspect of TQM. Facility Management in der Haustechnik: Wichtiger Teilaspekt von TQM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollmann, E.

    1994-01-15

    The term Total Quality Management is understood to mean a uniform quality policy that is implemented throughout a company and within a short time leads to a remarkable optimisation of competitivity. A new aspect of TQM is Facility Management which deals directly with the building. It is applied above all in the areas of domestic engineering, administration and domestic techniques. The central medium is informatics, which offers a wide range of tools that facilitate the execution of such services. (BWI)

  8. Evaluating malaria case management at public health facilities in two provinces in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucinski, Mateusz M; Ferreira, Manzambi; Ferreira, Carolina Miguel; Burns, Jordan; Gaparayi, Patrick; João, Lubaki; da Costa, Olinda; Gill, Parambir; Samutondo, Claudete; Quivinja, Joltim; Mbounga, Eliane; de León, Gabriel Ponce; Halsey, Eric S; Dimbu, Pedro Rafael; Fortes, Filomeno

    2017-05-03

    Malaria accounts for the largest portion of healthcare demand in Angola. A pillar of malaria control in Angola is the appropriate management of malaria illness, including testing of suspect cases with rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and treatment of confirmed cases with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). Periodic systematic evaluations of malaria case management are recommended to measure health facility readiness and adherence to national case management guidelines. Cross-sectional health facility surveys were performed in low-transmission Huambo and high-transmission Uíge Provinces in early 2016. In each province, 45 health facilities were randomly selected from among all public health facilities stratified by level of care. Survey teams performed inventories of malaria commodities and conducted exit interviews and re-examinations, including RDT testing, of a random selection of all patients completing outpatient consultations. Key health facility readiness and case management indicators were calculated adjusting for the cluster sampling design and utilization. Availability of RDTs or microscopy on the day of the survey was 71% (54-83) in Huambo and 85% (67-94) in Uíge. At least one unit dose pack of one formulation of an ACT (usually artemether-lumefantrine) was available in 83% (66-92) of health facilities in Huambo and 79% (61-90) of health facilities in Uíge. Testing rates of suspect malaria cases in Huambo were 30% (23-38) versus 69% (53-81) in Uíge. Overall, 28% (13-49) of patients with uncomplicated malaria, as determined during the re-examination, were appropriately treated with an ACT with the correct dose in Huambo, compared to 60% (42-75) in Uíge. Incorrect case management of suspect malaria cases was associated with lack of healthcare worker training in Huambo and ACT stock-outs in Uíge. The results reveal important differences between provinces. Despite similar availability of testing and ACT, testing and treatment rates were lower in

  9. Assessment of laboratory logistics management information system practice for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in selected public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desale, Adino; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Nigatu, Alemayehu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Logistics management information system for health commodities remained poorly implemented in most of developing countries. To assess the status of laboratory logistics management information system for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2010-January 2011 at selected public health facilities. A stratified random sampling method was used to include a total of 43 facilities which, were investigated through quantitative methods using structured questionnaires interviews. Focus group discussion with the designated supply chain managers and key informant interviews were conducted for the qualitative method. Results There exists a well-designed logistics system for laboratory commodities with trained pharmacy personnel, distributed standard LMIS formats and established inventory control procedures. However, majority of laboratory professionals were not trained in LMIS. Majority of the facilities (60.5%) were stocked out for at least one ART monitoring and TB laboratory reagents and the highest stock out rate was for chemistry reagents. Expired ART monitoring laboratory commodities were found in 25 (73.5%) of facilities. Fifty percent (50%) of the assessed hospitals and 54% of health centers were currently using stock/bin cards for all HIV/AIDS and TB laboratory commodities in main pharmacy store, among these only 25% and 20.8% of them were updated with accurate information matching with the physical count done at the time of visit for hospitals and health centers respectively. Conclusion Even though there exists a well designed laboratory LMIS, keeping quality stock/bin cards and LMIS reports were very low. Key ART monitoring laboratory commodities were stock out at many facilities at the day of visit and during the past six months. Based on findings, training of laboratory personnel's managing laboratory commodities and keeping

  10. Assessment of laboratory logistics management information system practice for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in selected public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desale, Adino; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Nigatu, Alemayehu

    2013-01-01

    Logistics management information system for health commodities remained poorly implemented in most of developing countries. To assess the status of laboratory logistics management information system for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2010-January 2011 at selected public health facilities. A stratified random sampling method was used to include a total of 43 facilities which, were investigated through quantitative methods using structured questionnaires interviews. Focus group discussion with the designated supply chain managers and key informant interviews were conducted for the qualitative method. There exists a well-designed logistics system for laboratory commodities with trained pharmacy personnel, distributed standard LMIS formats and established inventory control procedures. However, majority of laboratory professionals were not trained in LMIS. Majority of the facilities (60.5%) were stocked out for at least one ART monitoring and TB laboratory reagents and the highest stock out rate was for chemistry reagents. Expired ART monitoring laboratory commodities were found in 25 (73.5%) of facilities. Fifty percent (50%) of the assessed hospitals and 54% of health centers were currently using stock/bin cards for all HIV/AIDS and TB laboratory commodities in main pharmacy store, among these only 25% and 20.8% of them were updated with accurate information matching with the physical count done at the time of visit for hospitals and health centers respectively. Even though there exists a well designed laboratory LMIS, keeping quality stock/bin cards and LMIS reports were very low. Key ART monitoring laboratory commodities were stock out at many facilities at the day of visit and during the past six months. Based on findings, training of laboratory personnel's managing laboratory commodities and keeping accurate inventory control procedures

  11. Forum Guide to Facilities Information Management: A Resource for State and Local Education Agencies. NFES 2012-808

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Forum on Education Statistics, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Safe and secure facilities that foster learning are crucial to providing quality education services, and developing and maintaining these facilities requires considerable resources and organization. Facility information systems allow education organizations to collect and manage data that can be used to inform and guide decisionmaking about the…

  12. 76 FR 9815 - Grain Handling Facilities; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) Approval of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Grain Handling Facilities; Extension of the Office of Management... requirements specified in its Standard on Grain Handling Facilities (29 CFR 1910.272). DATES: Comments must be... working in grain handling facilities. Paragraph (d) of the Standard requires the employer to develop and...

  13. VEHIL: test facility for fault management testing of advanced driver assistance systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietelink, O.J.; Ploeg, J.; Schutter, B. de; Verhaegen, M.A.H.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the latest developments of the VEHIL facility, which aims to make the development process of intelligent vehicles safer, cheaper and more manageable. The main feature of VEHIL is that a complete intelligent vehicle can be tested in a hardware-in-the-loop simulation environment. T

  14. Knowledge transfer from facilities management to building projects: A typology of transfer mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a typology of mechanisms for knowledge transfer from Facilities Management (FM) to building projects. One of the problems in the building industry is a limited degree of learning. The development of professional FM can be the missing link to bridge the ga...

  15. How Can Facilities Management Add Value To Organisations As Well As To Society?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, P.A.; Sarasoja, A.L.; Van der Voordt, D.J.M.; Coenen, C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learnt from a 3 year collaborative research project on the added value of Facilities Management (FM) involving institutions in five European countries. The starting point was the so-called FM Value Map developed earlier by the leader of the research gr

  16. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Correction Action Report, Vol. I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1999-11-18

    The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site is routinely monitored for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

  17. Innovation-system foresight in practice: A Nordic facilities management foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Dannemand; Andersen, Allan Dahl; Jensen, Per Anker;

    2012-01-01

    foresight processes. The paper originates in a practical foresight project in the Nordic fa-cilities management (FM) industry. The goal of the foresight project was to identify possible futures of the FM sector in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden) and, based on the findings...

  18. Wireless Occupancy Sensors for Lighting Controls: An Applications Guide for Federal Facility Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-03-15

    This guide provides federal facility managers with an overview of the energy savings potential of wireless lighting occupancy sensors for various room types, cost considerations, key steps to successful installation of wireless sensors, pros and cons of various technology options, light source considerations, and codes and standards.

  19. How Can Facilities Management Add Value To Organisations As Well As To Society?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, P.A.; Sarasoja, A.L.; Van der Voordt, D.J.M.; Coenen, C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learnt from a 3 year collaborative research project on the added value of Facilities Management (FM) involving institutions in five European countries. The starting point was the so-called FM Value Map developed earlier by the leader of the research

  20. BIM Guidelines Inform Facilities Management Databases: A Case Study over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Kensek

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A building information model (BIM contains data that can be accessed and exported for other uses during the lifetime of the building especially for facilities management (FM and operations. Working under the guidance of well-designed BIM guidelines to insure completeness and compatibility with FM software, architects and contractors can deliver an information rich data model that is valuable to the client. Large owners such as universities often provide these detailed guidelines and deliverable requirements to their building teams. Investigation of the University of Southern California (USC Facilities Management Service’s (FMS website showed a detailed plan including standards, file names, parameter lists, and other requirements of BIM data, which were specifically designated for facilities management use, as deliverables on new construction projects. Three critical details were also unearthed in the reading of these documents: Revit was the default BIM software; COBie was adapted to help meet facilities management goals; and EcoDomus provided a display of the collected data viewed through Navisworks. Published accounts about the Cinema Arts Complex developed with and under these guidelines reported positive results. Further examination with new projects underway reveal the rapidly changing relational database landscape evident in the new USC “Project Record Revit Requirement Execution Plan (PRxP”.

  1. Cost Implications of an Interim Storage Facility in the Waste Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarrell, Joshua J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Joseph, III, Robert Anthony [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Rob L [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petersen, Gordon M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nutt, Mark [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Carter, Joe [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Cotton, Thomas [Complex Systems Group, Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report provides an evaluation of the cost implications of incorporating a consolidated interim storage facility (ISF) into the waste management system (WMS). Specifically, the impacts of the timing of opening an ISF relative to opening a repository were analyzed to understand the potential effects on total system costs.

  2. Leadership, management and teamwork learning through an extra-curricular project for medical students: descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Maria Lucia da Silva Germano; Coelho, Izabel Cristina Meister; Paraizo, Mariana Martins; Paciornik, Ester Fogel

    2014-01-01

    Professionalism in medicine requires preparation for the globalized world. Our objective was to describe a project that introduces medical students to the community, hospital and laboratory activities, thereby allowing them to gain experience in people management, leadership and teamwork. Descriptive study of the process applied at a philanthropic medical school in Curitiba, Paraná. Inclusion of management and leadership practices as part of the medical degree program. The study groups consisted of fifteen students. After six months, any of the participants could be elected as a subcoordinator, with responsibility for managing tasks and representing the team in hospital departments and the community. The activities required increasing levels of responsibility. In medical schools, students' involvement in practical activities is often limited to observation. They are not required to take responsibilities or to interact with other students and stakeholders. However, they will become accountable, which thus has an adverse effect on all involved. The learning space described here aims to fill this gap by bringing students closer to the daily lives and experiences of healthcare professionals. Being a physician requires not only management and leadership, but also transferrable competencies, communication and critical thinking. These attributes can be acquired through experience of teamwork, under qualified supervision from teaching staff. Students are thus expected to develop skills to deal with and resolve conflicts, learn to share leadership, prepare others to help and replace them, adopt an approach based on mutual responsibility and discuss their performance.

  3. Facilities management: Structuring a body of knowledge for continuing and tertiary education in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Hauptfleisch

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Globally the development of property and infrastructure, being part of the creation of  fixed investment and wealth, is taking place unabated. In support of this process is a multitude of highly skilled built environment professionals such as engineers, architects, quantity surveyors, construction managers, town and regional planners, land surveyors, etc. The absence of a universally acknowledged profession of the same standing, designated to manage and optimise the utilisation of the ever-compounding  fixed investments in the products of the collective built environment (buildings, engineering structures and infrastructure, is observed. In practice it manifests itself in the attempts, by the previously mentioned professionals and others, to cast themselves into the role of facilities managers. Of concern is the resultant diverse group of “facilities management” practitioners, sometimes without basic built environment education, often lacking any noteworthy specialised education or experience. For obvious reasons, the more developed a country, the more evident it becomes that a specific facilities management profession is taking root and is practised at various managerial levels. The term “facilities management” reportedly came into use in the United States of America during the 1970’s when a Facility Management Institute was founded in the USA and the first known formal symposium was held in Washington DC in 1989. Although perhaps lacking some of the prestige associated with other professions, there are reasons to believe that facilities management is in the process of becoming a driving force, not only in the scientific management and optimisation of fixed assets, but as a knowledge-based initiator of development in the built environment. The lack of a highly developed facilities management profession manifests itself in the alarming rate at which infrastructure and buildings are deteriorating in South Africa. This situation

  4. Spare parts management for nuclear power generation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Natalie Michele

    With deregulation, utilities in the power sector face a much more urgent imperative to emphasize cost efficiencies as compared to the days of regulation. One major opportunity for cost savings is through reductions in spare parts inventories. Most utilities are accustomed to carrying large volumes of expensive, relatively slow-moving parts because of a high degree of risk-averseness. This attitude towards risk is rooted in the days of regulation. Under regulation, companies recovered capital inventory costs by incorporating them into the base rate charged to their customers. In a deregulated environment, cost recovery is no longer guaranteed. Companies must therefore reexamine their risk profile and develop policies for spare parts inventory that are appropriate for a competitive business environment. This research studies the spare parts inventory management problem in the context of electric utilities, with a focus on nuclear power. It addresses three issues related to this problem: criticality, risk, and policy. With respect to criticality and risk, a methodology is presented that incorporates the use of influence diagrams and the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). A new method is developed for group aggregation in the AHP when Saaty and Vargas' (2007) dispersion test fails and decision makers are unwilling or unable to revise their judgments. With respect to policy, a quantitative model that ranks the importance of keeping a part in inventory and recommends a corresponding stocking policy through the use of numerical simulation is developed. This methodology and its corresponding models will enable utilities that have transitioned from a regulated to a deregulated environment become more competitive in their operations while maintaining safety and reliability standards. Furthermore, the methodology developed is general enough so that other utility plants, especially those in the nuclear sector, will be able to use this approach. In addition to regulated

  5. Classification of High-Rise Residential Building Facilities: A Descriptive Survey on 170 Housing Scheme in Klang Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Wahab Siti Rashidah Hanum

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-rise residential building is a type of housing that has multi-dwelling units built on the same land. This type of housing has become popular each year in urban area due to the increasing cost of land. There are several common facilities provided in high-rise residential building. For example playground, swimming pool, gymnasium, 24 hours security system such as CCTV, access card and so on. Thus, maintenance works of the common facilities must be well organised. The purpose of this paper is to identify the classification of facilities provided at high rise residential building. The survey was done on 170 high-rise residential schemes by using stratified random sampling technique. The scope of this research is within Klang Valley area. This area is rapidly developed with high-rise residential building. The objective of this survey is to list down all the facilities provided in each sample of the schemes. The result, there are nine classification of facilities provided for high-rise residential building.

  6. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.807 What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

  7. Fuel Performance Characterisation under Various PWR Conditions: Description of the Annealing Test Facilities available at the LECA-STAR laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontillon, Y.; Cornu, B.; Clement, S.; Ferroud-Plattet, M.P.; Malgouyres, P.P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA/DEN/DEC/SA3C - Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2008-07-01

    The aim to improve LWR fuel behaviour has led Cea to improve its post-irradiation examination capacities in term of test facilities and characterization techniques in the shielded hot cells of the LECA-STAR facility, located in Cadarache Cea center. as far as the annealing test facilities are concerned, fuel qualification and improvement of knowledge require a set of furnaces which are already used or will be used. The main characteristics of these furnaces strongly depend on the experimental objectives. The aim of this paper is to review the main aspects of these specific experiments concerning: (i) fission gas release from high burn up fuel, (ii) global fission product release in severe-accident conditions and (iii) fuel microstructural changes, potential cladding failure, radionuclide source terms... under conditions representative of long term dry storage and geological disposal. (authors)

  8. Realizing Sustainability in Facilities Management: a pilot study at the Technical University of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Møller, Jacob Steen; Jäschke, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    shared value. The paper presents a pilot case study on sustainability in facilities management and is intended for a mixed audience of practitioners and researchers. It draws upon the case study findings to establish a baseline of performance and presents practical management implications of integrating...... sustainability in facilities management (FM). Design, methodology and approach: The approach uses an action-oriented research methodology as a means of co-generation of knowledge on realization of sustainability in FM. Case studies take a phased, multi-method approach including organizational profiling...... and value: The paper is based on action research to establish a collaborative framework in late 2011 and the findings of the pilot study, and have not been published before....

  9. Radiation management during restoration works after fire and explosion accident of Asphalt Solidification Facility (ASP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyabe, Kenjiro; Ninomiya, Kazushige; Imakuma, Yoshikazu (and others)

    1999-04-01

    A fire broke out at 10:06 a.m. March 11 in 1997 in asphalt filling up room of Asphalt Solidification Processing Facility (ASP) in Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), and an explosion occurred at 8:04 p.m. on the same day. A large number of installations and equipment in the facility were damaged by the accident. As the containment function of the facility were lost, radioactive materials were released to outside of the facility. Thirty seven workers (thirty four workers inside the ASP building at fire, and three workers near the ASP at explosion) suffered internal exposures. Effective dose equivalent for each worker which was estimated based on the intake of radioactive materials, was below the record level for internal exposure management (2msv). Restoration works of the ASP including repairs of broken windows, shutters, doors, ventilation exhaust systems, radiation control and management equipment, and decontamination, were completed on July 31 in 1998. The radiation management during the restoration are described in this report. (Suetake, M.)

  10. Developing mobile BIM/2D barcode-based automated facility management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Su, Yu-Chih; Chen, Yen-Pei

    2014-01-01

    Facility management (FM) has become an important topic in research on the operation and maintenance phase. Managing the work of FM effectively is extremely difficult owing to the variety of environments. One of the difficulties is the performance of two-dimensional (2D) graphics when depicting facilities. Building information modeling (BIM) uses precise geometry and relevant data to support the facilities depicted in three-dimensional (3D) object-oriented computer-aided design (CAD). This paper proposes a new and practical methodology with application to FM that uses an integrated 2D barcode and the BIM approach. Using 2D barcode and BIM technologies, this study proposes a mobile automated BIM-based facility management (BIMFM) system for FM staff in the operation and maintenance phase. The mobile automated BIMFM system is then applied in a selected case study of a commercial building project in Taiwan to verify the proposed methodology and demonstrate its effectiveness in FM practice. The combined results demonstrate that a BIMFM-like system can be an effective mobile automated FM tool. The advantage of the mobile automated BIMFM system lies not only in improving FM work efficiency for the FM staff but also in facilitating FM updates and transfers in the BIM environment.

  11. Developing Mobile BIM/2D Barcode-Based Automated Facility Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cheng Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Facility management (FM has become an important topic in research on the operation and maintenance phase. Managing the work of FM effectively is extremely difficult owing to the variety of environments. One of the difficulties is the performance of two-dimensional (2D graphics when depicting facilities. Building information modeling (BIM uses precise geometry and relevant data to support the facilities depicted in three-dimensional (3D object-oriented computer-aided design (CAD. This paper proposes a new and practical methodology with application to FM that uses an integrated 2D barcode and the BIM approach. Using 2D barcode and BIM technologies, this study proposes a mobile automated BIM-based facility management (BIMFM system for FM staff in the operation and maintenance phase. The mobile automated BIMFM system is then applied in a selected case study of a commercial building project in Taiwan to verify the proposed methodology and demonstrate its effectiveness in FM practice. The combined results demonstrate that a BIMFM-like system can be an effective mobile automated FM tool. The advantage of the mobile automated BIMFM system lies not only in improving FM work efficiency for the FM staff but also in facilitating FM updates and transfers in the BIM environment.

  12. [Security Management in Clinical Laboratory Departments and Facilities: Current Status and Issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Haku; Nakamura, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Koike, Masaru; Inoue, Yuji

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey regarding the current activities for protecting patients' privacy and the security of information systems (IS) related to the clinical laboratory departments of university hospitals, certified training facilities for clinical laboratories, and general hospitals in Yamaguchi Prefecture. The response rate was 47% from 215 medical institutions, including three commercial clinical laboratory centers. The results showed that there were some differences in management activities among facilities with respect to continuing education, the documentation or regulation of operational management for paper records, electronic information, remaining samples, genetic testing, and laboratory information for secondary use. They were suggested to be caused by differences in functions between university and general hospitals, differences in the scale of hospitals, or whether or not hospitals have received accreditation or ISO 15189. Regarding the IS, although the majority of facilities had sufficiently employed the access control to IS, there was some room for improvement in the management of special cases such as VIPs and patients with HIV infection. Furthermore, there were issues regarding the login method for computers shared by multiple staff, the showing of the names of personnel in charge of reports, and the risks associated with direct connections to systems and the Internet and the use of portable media such as USB memory sticks. These results indicated that further efforts are necessary for each facility to continue self-assessment and make improvements.

  13. Management of The Government for Public Facilities in The New Rural Communities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张中平

    2016-01-01

    The new rural community is the product of the process of urbanization that farmers turned to the public to realize the important field. However, the government start to manage the he new rural community from the most closely facilities of public services of residents' daily life,.this article include three aspects, first is that public service facilities of government have many issues for the new rural community,second is that reasons for these problems,third is that some measures can address these problems , hoping to make the new rural community public services have been further developed.

  14. Human resource capacity for information management in selected public healthcare facilities in Meru County, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiilu, Elizabeth Mueke; Okero, Dominic Charles; Muiruri, Lillian; Owuondo, Pacific Akinyi

    2015-01-01

    Reliable health information is essential for decision making in the healthcare system. Information management in Kenya was considered the weakest area under the Health Information System pillar mainly due to inadequate health workers capacity. The study therefore aimed at assessing health workers skills and current training needs for information management in the selected healthcare facilities. Cross-section research design was adopted and both purposive sampling technique and censuses were used to establish the study participants. Analysis was done using SPSS version 20 and results were presented in tables, charts and graphs. It was established that capacity building was usually undertaken through on-job trainings i.e. 85.1% (103) health workers had on-job training on filling of data collection tools and only 10% (13) had received formal classroom training on the same. Further, only 9.1% (11) health workers had received information management training while 90.9% (110) had not received such training. Health workers demonstrated below average skills on information management i.e. only 17.4% (21) could check for data accuracy, only 16.5% (20) could compute trends from bar charts and only 16.5% (20) could transform the data they collected into meaningful information for use. The researcher recommended that healthcare facilities management teams develop a competency based framework for defining the desired skill mix for information management and have a yearly Training Needs Assessment for assessing training needs for information management among the health workers.

  15. A descriptive study on evaluation of bio-medical waste management in a tertiary care public hospital of North India

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Rajiv; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Aggarwal, Arun Kumar; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Background Proper management of Biomedical waste (BMW) generated in a healthcare facility is one of the most important functions of a healthcare worker (HCW) as its improper management not only poses risk to human beings and environment, but may also invite legal action against HCW as well as hospital administration. This study was carried out to evaluate quality of BMW management in 1100-bedded hospital attached to a tertiary care public institute in North India. Methods A checklist, includi...

  16. Long-term care facilities in Utah: a description of human and information technology resources applied to infection control practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Makoto; Samore, Matthew H; Carter, Marjorie; Rubin, Michael A

    2012-06-01

    Little is known about the implementation of infection control (IC) programs and information technology (IT) infrastructure in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). We assessed the IC human resources, IT infrastructure, and IC scope of practice at LTCFs in Utah. All LTCFs throughout Utah (n = 80) were invited to complete a written survey in 2005 regarding IC staffing, policies and practices, and IT infrastructure and capacity. Responses were received from 62 facilities (77.5%). Most infection preventionists (IPs) were registered nurses (71%) with on-the-job training (81.7%). Most had other duties besides their IC work (93.5%), which took up the majority of their time. Most facilities provided desktop computers (96.8%) and all provided Internet access, but some of the infrastructure was not current. A minority (14.5%) used sophisticated software packages to support their IC activities. Less than 20% of the facilities had integrated radiology, diagnostic laboratory, or microbiology data with their facility computer system. The Internet was used primarily as a reference tool (77.4%). Most IPs reported taking responsibility for routine surveillance and monitoring tasks, but a substantial number did not perform all queried tasks. They may have difficulty with feedback of specific unit and physician infection rates (43.2% and 67.7%, respectively). Our findings underscore what has previously been reported about LTCFs' IC human resources and IP scope of practice. We also found that some IT infrastructure was outdated, and that existing resources were underutilized for IC purposes. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  17. A Descriptive Study to Determine the Level of Crisis Preparedness Frontline Leaders Are Trained to Perform during an Exploding Crisis in Los Angeles County Healthcare Facilities, Providing Emergency Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbaley, Salomay Rose

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the level of crisis leadership preparedness facility administrators report frontline healthcare leaders are trained to perform during an exploding crisis in Los Angeles County healthcare facilities, providing emergency services. Methodology: This was a mixed method descriptive study. The…

  18. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Facility Registry Service (FRS) Emergency Response (ER) Risk Management Plan (RMP) Facilities - Oil and Hazardous Materials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The purpose of this web feature service is to provide users with access to integrated facility information from FRS, limited to the subset of facilities that link to...

  19. Leadership, management and teamwork learning through an extra-curricular project for medical students: descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lucia da Silva Germano Jorge

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Professionalism in medicine requires preparation for the globalized world. Our objective was to describe a project that introduces medical students to the community, hospital and laboratory activities, thereby allowing them to gain experience in people management, leadership and teamwork.DESIGN AND SETTING: Descriptive study of the process applied at a philanthropic medical school in Curitiba, Paraná.METHOD: Inclusion of management and leadership practices as part of the medical degree program.RESULTS: The study groups consisted of fifteen students. After six months, any of the participants could be elected as a subcoordinator, with responsibility for managing tasks and representing the team in hospital departments and the community. The activities required increasing levels of responsibility. In medical schools, students' involvement in practical activities is often limited to observation. They are not required to take responsibilities or to interact with other students and stakeholders. However, they will become accountable, which thus has an adverse effect on all involved. The learning space described here aims to fill this gap by bringing students closer to the daily lives and experiences of healthcare professionals.CONCLUSION: Being a physician requires not only management and leadership, but also transferrable competencies, communication and critical thinking. These attributes can be acquired through experience of teamwork, under qualified supervision from teaching staff. Students are thus expected to develop skills to deal with and resolve conflicts, learn to share leadership, prepare others to help and replace them, adopt an approach based on mutual responsibility and discuss their performance.

  20. Construction and commissioning of the PETRA pilot plant facility for waste management studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dworschak, H.; Girardi, F.; Grossi, G.

    1989-10-01

    This paper describes the PETRA hot cell facility currently undergoing commissioning test at the Joint Research Centre-Ispra Establishment (Italy) and illustrated the possibilities and objectives of experimental work that can be carried out in the field of radioactive waste management. The facility includes the typical HA-processing steps of nuclear fuel reprocessing, i.e. dissolution, filtration, co-decontamination with on-line solvent regeneration for the production of significant quantities of medium and high-level solid and liquid wastes. These wastes will be used primarily for optimization, verification and demonstration studies at full radioactivity levels in relation to the safety and reliability of waste confinement and disposal concepts. The facility operates on fuel batches of 6 kg low enriched U equivalent, in a sequential processing mode. The waste streams can be treated by further extraction, concentration, precipitation, denitration and vitrification either as a whole or as separate fractions.

  1. Antimalarial drug prescribing practice in private and public health facilities in South-east Nigeria: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okebe Joseph

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nigeria's national standard has recently moved to artemisinin combination treatments for malaria. As clinicians in the private sector are responsible for attending a large proportion of the population ill with malaria, this study compared prescribing in the private and public sector in one State in Nigeria prior to promoting ACTs. Objective To assess prescribing for uncomplicated malaria in government and private health facilities in Cross River State. Method Audit of 665 patient records at six private and seven government health facilities in 2003. Results Clinicians in the private sector were less likely to record history or physical examination than those in public facilities, but otherwise practice and prescribing were similar. Overall, 45% of patients had a diagnostic blood slides; 77% were prescribed monotherapy, either chloroquine (30.2%, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (22.7% or artemisinin derivatives alone (15.8%. Some 20.8% were prescribed combination therapy; the commonest was chloroquine with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. A few patients (3.5% were prescribed sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine-mefloquine in the private sector, and only 3.0% patients were prescribed artemisinin combination treatments. Conclusion Malaria treatments were varied, but there were not large differences between the public and private sector. Very few are following current WHO guidelines. Monotherapy with artemisinin derivatives is relatively common.

  2. NOMINATION FOR THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE (PMI) PROJECT OF THE YEAR AWARD INTEGRATED DISPOSAL FACILITY (IDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCLELLAN, G.W.

    2007-02-07

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is pleased to nominate the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) project for the Project Management Institute's consideration as 2007 Project of the Year, Built for the U.S, Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) at the Hanford Site, the IDF is the site's first Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant disposal facility. The IDF is important to DOE's waste management strategy for the site. Effective management of the IDF project contributed to the project's success. The project was carefully managed to meet three Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones. The completed facility fully satisfied the needs and expectations of the client, regulators and stakeholders. Ultimately, the project, initially estimated to require 48 months and $33.9 million to build, was completed four months ahead of schedule and $11.1 million under budget. DOE directed construction of the IDF to provide additional capacity for disposing of low-level radioactive and mixed (i.e., radioactive and hazardous) solid waste. The facility needed to comply with federal and Washington State environmental laws and meet TPA milestones. The facility had to accommodate over one million cubic yards of the waste material, including immobilized low-activity waste packages from the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), low-level and mixed low-level waste from WTP failed melters, and alternative immobilized low-activity waste forms, such as bulk-vitrified waste. CH2M HILL designed and constructed a disposal facility with a redundant system of containment barriers and a sophisticated leak-detection system. Built on a 168-area, the facility's construction met all regulatory requirements. The facility's containment system actually exceeds the state's environmental requirements for a hazardous waste landfill. Effective management of the IDF construction project required working through highly political and legal

  3. Monitoring plan for routine organic air emissions at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex Waste Storage Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloway, K.J.; Jolley, J.G.

    1994-06-01

    This monitoring plan provides the information necessary to perform routine organic air emissions monitoring at the Waste Storage Facilities located at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Waste Storage Facilities include both the Type I and II Waste Storage Modules. The plan implements a dual method approach where two dissimilar analytical methodologies, Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) and ancillary SUMMA{reg_sign} canister sampling, following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analytical method TO-14, will be used to provide qualitative and quantitative volatile organic concentration data. The Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy will provide in situ, real time monitoring of volatile organic compound concentrations in the ambient air of the Waste Storage Facilities. To supplement the OP-FTIR data, air samples will be collected using SUMMA{reg_sign}, passivated, stainless steel canisters, following the EPA Method TO-14. These samples will be analyzed for volatile organic compounds with gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry analysis. The sampling strategy, procedures, and schedules are included in this monitoring plan. The development of this monitoring plan is driven by regulatory compliance to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, State of Idaho Toxic Air Pollutant increments, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The various state and federal regulations address the characterization of the volatile organic compounds and the resultant ambient air emissions that may originate from facilities involved in industrial production and/or waste management activities.

  4. The evolution of facility management business models in supplier–client relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardelli, Giulia; Rajala, Risto

    2018-01-01

    Purpose – The study improves the current understanding of business model innovation by outlining how business models unfold over time within supplier–client relationships in facilities management (FM) services. Design/methodology/approach – This study of FM services in Denmark consists...... of an explorative case study and three case studies of facilities management clients. Both phases, related and overlapping, involved collection and analysis of in-depth, semi-structured interviews and archive data. Findings – Findings shows that business model innovation entails interorganisational collaboration...... across different phases of the innovation process. The research demonstrates that external orientation within FM service ecosystems involves both a reaction to changes in the external environment and the proactive involvement of stakeholders throughout business model innovation. Research limitations...

  5. Closure of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste management units at DOE facilities. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This is document addresses the Federal regulations governing the closure of hazardous and mixed waste units subject to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. It provides a brief overview of the RCRA permitting program and the extensive RCRA facility design and operating standards. It provides detailed guidance on the procedural requirements for closure and post-closure care of hazardous and mixed waste management units, including guidance on the preparation of closure and post-closure plans that must be submitted with facility permit applications. This document also provides guidance on technical activities that must be conducted both during and after closure of each of the following hazardous waste management units regulated under RCRA.

  6. The new Facilities Management contract at CERN from 1st July 2002

    CERN Document Server

    Mauro Nonis

    2002-01-01

    Within the ST Division, all the Facilities Management activities have been under the ST/TFM group responsibility until the 30th June 2002, who has performed them using around 20 industrial support contracts. Starting from the 1st July 2002 a new unit, ST/FM, will take over these activities that will be unified into one single contract that has been adjudicated to the company Facilities Management Network SA. This contract will be in charge of the maintenance and minor works on tertiary installations (i.e. all structures and installations that have no direct relation to the running of the accelerators) for the following trades: - Technical: heating, ventilation, air conditioning, plumbing, electricity, civil engineering (painting, roofing, glazing, blinds, fencing, masonry etc.), passenger and goods lifts, automatic and powered doors, kitchen equipment, roads, signs, keys and locks, office furniture, - Services: waste collection, security, green areas, cleaning and sanitary supplies, disinfection, rodent cont...

  7. THE NEW FACILITIES MANAGEMENT CONTRACT AT CERN FROM 1st JULY 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    Mauro Nonis

    2002-01-01

    Within the ST Division, all the Facilities Management activities have been under the ST/TFM group responsibility until the 30th June 2002, who has performed them using around 20 industrial support contracts. Starting from the 1st July 2002 a new unit, ST/FM, will take over these activities that will be unified into one single contract that has been adjudicated to the company Facilities Management Network SA. This contract will be in charge of the maintenance and minor works on tertiary installations (i.e. all structures and installations that have no direct relation to the running of the accelerators) for the following trades: Technical: heating, ventilation, air conditioning, plumbing, electricity, civil engineering (painting, roofing, glazing, blinds, fencing, masonry etc.), passenger and goods lifts, automatic and powered doors, kitchen equipment, roads, signs, keys and locks, office furniture, Services: waste collection, security, green areas, cleaning and sanitary supplies, disinfection, rodent contro...

  8. Investigation of development and management of treatment planning systems for BNCT at foreign facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    A new computational dosimetry system for BNCT: JCDS is developed by JAERI in order to carry out BNCT with epithermal neutron beam at present. The development and management situation of computational dosimetry system, which are developed and are used in BNCT facilities in foreign countries, were investigated in order to accurately grasp functions necessary for preparation of the treatment planning and its future subjects. In present state, 'SERA', which are developed by Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is used in many BNCT facilities. Followings are necessary for development and management of the treatment planning system. (1) Reliability confirmation of system performance by verification as comparison examination of calculated value with actual experimental measured value. (2) Confirmation systems such as periodic maintenance for retention of the system quality. (3) The improvement system, which always considered relative merits and demerits with other computational dosimetry system. (4) The development of integrated system with patient setting. (author)

  9. Evaporation Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Effluent Management Facility Core Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Mcclane, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation, and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator, in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF), and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter, and new evaporator so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of the LMOGC stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would reduce the need for closely integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Long-term implementation of this option after WTP start-up would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste, amongst the other operational complexities such a recycle stream presents. In order to accurately plan for the disposition path, it is key to experimentally determine the fate of contaminants. To do this, testing is needed to accurately account for the buffering chemistry of the components, determine the achievable evaporation end point, identify insoluble solids that form, and determine the distribution of key regulatory-impacting constituents.

  10. A methodology for assessing computer software applicability to inventory and facility management

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Debashis

    1989-01-01

    Computer applications have become popular and widespread in architecture and other related fields. While the architect uses a computer for design and construction of a building, the user takes the advantage of computer for maintenance of the building. Inventory and facility management are two such fields where computer applications have become predominant. The project has investigated the use and application of different commercially available computer software in the above men...

  11. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System software requirements specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosnick, C.K.

    1996-04-19

    This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-0126). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

  12. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-02-26

    This report contains appendix 2 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, Laboratory permeability, and compaction characteristics representative of Kaolin clays from the aiken, South Carolina vicinity. Included in this report are daily field reports Nos. 1 to 54. (KJD)

  13. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 Data Management System Software Requirements Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brann, E.C. II

    1994-09-09

    This document provides the software requirements for Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is one of the plant computer systems for the new WRAP 1 facility (Project W-026). The DMS will collect, store and report data required to certify the low level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste items processed at WRAP 1 as acceptable for shipment, storage, or disposal.

  14. Mixed Waste Management Facility FSS Well Data Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1994 and 1994 summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1994, ten constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults, and the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. No constituent exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  15. An information management system for a spent nuclear fuel interim storage facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, Robert J.; Chiu, Hsien-Lang (Taiwan Power Co., Taipei, 10016 Taiwan); Giles, Todd; Horak, Karl Emanuel; Jow, Hong-Nian (Jow International, Kirkland, WA)

    2010-12-01

    We describe an integrated information management system for an independent spent fuel dry-storage installation (ISFSI) that can provide for (1) secure and authenticated data collection, (2) data analysis, (3) dissemination of information to appropriate stakeholders via a secure network, and (4) increased public confidence and support of the facility licensing and operation through increased transparency. This information management system is part of a collaborative project between Sandia National Laboratories, Taiwan Power Co., and the Fuel Cycle Materials Administration of Taiwan's Atomic Energy Council, which is investigating how to implement this concept.

  16. Developing Mobile- and BIM-Based Integrated Visual Facility Maintenance Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cheng Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Facility maintenance management (FMM has become an important topic for research on the operation phase of the construction life cycle. Managing FMM effectively is extremely difficult owing to various factors and environments. One of the difficulties is the performance of 2D graphics when depicting maintenance service. Building information modeling (BIM uses precise geometry and relevant data to support the maintenance service of facilities depicted in 3D object-oriented CAD. This paper proposes a new and practical methodology with application to FMM using BIM technology. Using BIM technology, this study proposes a BIM-based facility maintenance management (BIMFMM system for maintenance staff in the operation and maintenance phase. The BIMFMM system is then applied in selected case study of a commercial building project in Taiwan to verify the proposed methodology and demonstrate its effectiveness in FMM practice. Using the BIMFMM system, maintenance staff can access and review 3D BIM models for updating related maintenance records in a digital format. Moreover, this study presents a generic system architecture and its implementation. The combined results demonstrate that a BIMFMM-like system can be an effective visual FMM tool.

  17. Developing mobile- and BIM-based integrated visual facility maintenance management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Su, Yu-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Facility maintenance management (FMM) has become an important topic for research on the operation phase of the construction life cycle. Managing FMM effectively is extremely difficult owing to various factors and environments. One of the difficulties is the performance of 2D graphics when depicting maintenance service. Building information modeling (BIM) uses precise geometry and relevant data to support the maintenance service of facilities depicted in 3D object-oriented CAD. This paper proposes a new and practical methodology with application to FMM using BIM technology. Using BIM technology, this study proposes a BIM-based facility maintenance management (BIMFMM) system for maintenance staff in the operation and maintenance phase. The BIMFMM system is then applied in selected case study of a commercial building project in Taiwan to verify the proposed methodology and demonstrate its effectiveness in FMM practice. Using the BIMFMM system, maintenance staff can access and review 3D BIM models for updating related maintenance records in a digital format. Moreover, this study presents a generic system architecture and its implementation. The combined results demonstrate that a BIMFMM-like system can be an effective visual FMM tool.

  18. Report: transboundary hazardous waste management. part II: performance auditing of treatment facilities in importing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tien-Chin; Ni, Shih-Piao; Fan, Kuo-Shuh; Lee, Ching-Hwa

    2006-06-01

    Before implementing the self-monitoring model programme of the Basel Convention in the Asia, Taiwan has conducted a comprehensive 4-year follow-up project to visit the governmental authorities and waste-disposal facilities in the countries that import waste from Taiwan. A total of nine treatment facilities, six of which are reported in this paper, and the five countries where the plants are located were visited in 2001-2002. France, Belgium and Finland primarily handled polychlorinated biphenyl capacitors, steel mill dust and metal waste. The United States accepted metal sludge, mainly electroplating sludge, from Taiwan. Waste printed circuit boards, waste wires and cables, and a mixture of waste metals and electronics were the major items exported to China. Relatively speaking, most treatment plants for hazardous waste paid close attention to environmental management, such as pollution control and monitoring, site zoning, system management regarding occupational safety and hygiene, data management, permits application, and image promotion. Under the tight restrictions formulated by the central environment agency, waste treatment plants in China managed the environmental issues seriously. For example, one of the treatment plants had ISO 14001 certification. It is believed that with continuous implementation of regulations, more improvement is foreseeable. Meanwhile, Taiwan and China should also continuously enhance their collaboration regarding the transboundary management of hazardous waste.

  19. Key Drivers of an Effective Facilities Management Practice for Malaysia State Mosque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapri Maimunah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discuss on the importance of facilities management (FM in supporting mosque function and propose the key drivers for an effective FM practice for mosque. Qualitative research design was adopted in this study. Data were collected using focus group consists of seven (7 participants who have been selected among mosque management committee, FM practitioner and academician. Transcript of focus group discussion was analysed using content analysis. Coding system was applied in order to describe the interpretation of data. The results show that there is an agreement among participants on the importance of FM in supporting mosque function. Although practice of FM in mosque is not widely recognised, but its potential in uplifting and prospering mosque function could not be denied. Therefore, an effective of FM practice in mosque is seen vital. This paper discovered that team working is the most significant drivers to an effective FM practice for mosque. Other key drivers are organisational structure design; appoint knowledgeable and skilled facilities manager; sharing FM knowledge and its benefits; and strong change management. The discovered FM drivers are important for all stakeholders that directly or indirectly involve in mosque management.

  20. The keys to CERN conference rooms - Managing local collaboration facilities in large organisations

    CERN Multimedia

    Baron, T; Duran, G; Correia Fernandes, J; Ferreira, P; Gonzalez Lopez, J B; Jouberjean, F; Lavrut, L; Tarocco, N

    2013-01-01

    For a long time HEP has been ahead of the curve in its usage of remote collaboration tools, like videoconference and webcast, while the local CERN collaboration facilities were somewhat behind the expected quality standards for various reasons. This time is now over with the creation by the CERN IT department in 2012 of an integrated conference room service which provides guidance and installation services for new rooms (either equipped for video-conference or not), as well as maintenance and local support. Managing now nearly half of the 250 meeting rooms available on the CERN sites, this service has been built to cope with the management of all CERN rooms with limited human resources. This has been made possible by the intensive use of professional software to manage and monitor all the room equipment, maintenance and activity. This paper will focus on presenting these packages, either off-the-shelf commercial products (asset and maintenance management tool, remote audiovisual equipment monitoring systems, ...

  1. Assessing the Added Value of information systems supporting facilities management business processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Poul; Jensen, Per Anker

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To present a method for assessing the added value of Information Systems (IS), which are implemented to support the business processes in Facilities Management (FM). Theory: The method is based on a supply chain management model of FM, general value dimensions such as efficiency...... and effectiveness and the concepts of Value Adding Management (VAM) and Functional Affordances of IS. Design/methodology/approach: From case studies of IS implementation processes in FM in different countries, a general picture of the expressed added value of IS in FM was established. Based on this insight a method...... for assessing the added value of IS in FM was developed. The proposed method is applied to one of the cases. Findings: The paper analyses how a specific IS supports the management of a specific operational process – cleaning in an airport. The assessment shows that the IS definitely adds value to the cleaning...

  2. Characterization of 618-11 solid waste burial ground, disposed waste, and description of the waste generating facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hladek, K.L.

    1997-10-07

    The 618-11 (Wye or 318-11) burial ground received transuranic (TRTJ) and mixed fission solid waste from March 9, 1962, through October 2, 1962. It was then closed for 11 months so additional burial facilities could be added. The burial ground was reopened on September 16, 1963, and continued operating until it was closed permanently on December 31, 1967. The burial ground received wastes from all of the 300 Area radioactive material handling facilities. The purpose of this document is to characterize the 618-11 solid waste burial ground by describing the site, burial practices, the disposed wastes, and the waste generating facilities. This document provides information showing that kilogram quantities of plutonium were disposed to the drum storage units and caissons, making them transuranic (TRU). Also, kilogram quantities of plutonium and other TRU wastes were disposed to the three trenches, which were previously thought to contain non-TRU wastes. The site burial facilities (trenches, caissons, and drum storage units) should be classified as TRU and the site plutonium inventory maintained at five kilograms. Other fissile wastes were also disposed to the site. Additionally, thousands of curies of mixed fission products were also disposed to the trenches, caissons, and drum storage units. Most of the fission products have decayed over several half-lives, and are at more tolerable levels. Of greater concern, because of their release potential, are TRU radionuclides, Pu-238, Pu-240, and Np-237. TRU radionuclides also included slightly enriched 0.95 and 1.25% U-231 from N-Reactor fuel, which add to the fissile content. The 618-11 burial ground is located approximately 100 meters due west of Washington Nuclear Plant No. 2. The burial ground consists of three trenches, approximately 900 feet long, 25 feet deep, and 50 feet wide, running east-west. The trenches constitute 75% of the site area. There are 50 drum storage units (five 55-gallon steel drums welded together

  3. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Site-Specific Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. [Appendix contains accromyms list and maps of waste management facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to achieving and maintaining environmental regulatory compliance at its waste sites and facilities, while responding to public concerns and emphasizing waste minimization. DOE publishes the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) annually to document its progress towards these goals. The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe the activities, planned and completed, undertaken to implement these FYP goals at the DOE Field Office-Oak Ridge (DOE/OR) installations and programs; specifically, for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), and Hazardous Waste Remedial Action Program (HAZWRAP). Activities described in this SSP address hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and sanitary wastes, along with treatment, storage, and disposal of current production waste and legacy waste from past operation. The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Corrective Activities (A), Environmental Restoration (ER), Waste Management (WM), Technology Development (TD), and Transportation; and includes descriptions of activities, resources, and milestones by installation or program. 87 tabs.

  4. MicroArray Facility: a laboratory information management system with extended support for Nylon based technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaudoing Emmanuel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput gene expression profiling (GEP is becoming a routine technique in life science laboratories. With experimental designs that repeatedly span thousands of genes and hundreds of samples, relying on a dedicated database infrastructure is no longer an option. GEP technology is a fast moving target, with new approaches constantly broadening the field diversity. This technology heterogeneity, compounded by the informatics complexity of GEP databases, means that software developments have so far focused on mainstream techniques, leaving less typical yet established techniques such as Nylon microarrays at best partially supported. Results MAF (MicroArray Facility is the laboratory database system we have developed for managing the design, production and hybridization of spotted microarrays. Although it can support the widely used glass microarrays and oligo-chips, MAF was designed with the specific idiosyncrasies of Nylon based microarrays in mind. Notably single channel radioactive probes, microarray stripping and reuse, vector control hybridizations and spike-in controls are all natively supported by the software suite. MicroArray Facility is MIAME supportive and dynamically provides feedback on missing annotations to help users estimate effective MIAME compliance. Genomic data such as clone identifiers and gene symbols are also directly annotated by MAF software using standard public resources. The MAGE-ML data format is implemented for full data export. Journalized database operations (audit tracking, data anonymization, material traceability and user/project level confidentiality policies are also managed by MAF. Conclusion MicroArray Facility is a complete data management system for microarray producers and end-users. Particular care has been devoted to adequately model Nylon based microarrays. The MAF system, developed and implemented in both private and academic environments, has proved a robust solution for

  5. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility, Permit Number NEV HW0101, Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Patrick [NSTec

    2014-02-14

    This report summarizes the EPA identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

  6. Risk management in facility transition and management decision making: Needs and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillwell, W.; Seaver, D.; Keller, J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Smith, D. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Weaver, D.; Sanders, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thullen, P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-02-01

    An overall approach to risk management is described in this paper. Many of these concepts have been developed and applied as part of Hanford Mission Planning (HMP) (Hanford Mission Plan, 1992). At Hanford, HMP provides a mechanism for integrating planning across all the missions and programs of the site. This paper discusses the decision context within which EM must make and defend decisions, the types of decisions that are being and will need to be made in order to progress with the cleanup of the DOE complex, and the resulting need for risk management. Risk management, in turn, requires quality health and ecological risk information to make these decisions. Other types of information are also needed, but the risk information is typically the most important and the most difficult to obtain. The paper then describes a general technical approach to risk management, including particular methods for developing the high quality of human health and ecological risk information that will be needed to support risk management. We next turn to several special issues that make risk management more complex than many other decisions. We discuss these issues and offer some practical suggestions with respect to addressing them in the risk management framework. Finally, we conclude with some discussion of other opportunities for applying risk management.

  7. A description of nurses' decision-making in managing electrocardiographic monitor alarms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazarian, Priscilla K; Carrier, Natalie; Cohen, Rachel; Schram, Haley; Shiromani, Samara

    2015-01-01

    To describe the cues and factors that nurses use in their decision-making when responding to clinical alarms. Alarms are designed to be very sensitive, and as a result, they are not very specific. Lack of adherence to the practice standards for electrocardiographic monitoring in hospital settings has been observed, resulting in overuse of the electrocardiographic monitoring. Monitoring without consideration of clinical indicators uses scarce healthcare resources and may even produce untoward circumstances because of alarm fatigue. With so many false alarms, alarm fatigue represents a symptom of a larger problem. It cannot be fixed until all of the factors that contribute to its existence have been examined. This was a qualitative descriptive study. This study was conducted at an academic medical centre located in the Northeast United States. Eight participants were enrolled using purposive sampling. Nurses were observed for two three-hour periods. Following each observation, the nurse was interviewed using the critical decision method to describe the cognitive processes related to the alarm activities. Qualitative data from the conducted interviews were analysed via an a priori framework founded in the critical decision method. This study reveals information, experience, guidance and decision-making as the four prominent categories contributing to nurses' decision-making in relation to alarm management. Managing technology was a category not identified a priori that emerged in the data analysis. Nurses revealed a breadth of information needed to adequately identify and interpret monitor alarms, and how they used that information to put the alarms into the particular context of an individual patient's situations. Understanding the cues and factors nurses use when responding to cardiac alarms will guide the development of learning experiences and inform policies to guide practice. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Dairy calving management: description and assessment of a training program for dairy personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuenemann, G M; Bas, S; Gordon, E; Workman, J D

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a comprehensive calving management program designed to enhance the flow of applied, research-based, calving information to dairy personnel. Calving personnel (n=70), serving an estimated 18,100 cows from 18 Ohio dairies, attended the calving management program (∼1h of training and ∼2h of demonstration). Description of the birth canal, behavioral signs of normal parturition (stages I to III), dystocia (presentations, positions, and postures), hygiene practices during the assistance procedure, strategies for intervention (when and how to intervene), record-keeping, communication (when to call for help), and newborn care were discussed. Posttraining follow-ups (2/yr) were available for participating personnel. Educational materials were delivered through lectures followed by group discussions and hands-on demonstrations. Attendees were assessed using pre- and posttests of knowledge to determine the level of knowledge gained during the training program. Participants evaluated the program and provided feedback at the conclusion of the program. Dairy personnel reported that the overall program, presentations, and discussions were useful. The presented materials and demonstrations substantially increased the knowledge level of the attendees by 20.9 percentage points from pre- to posttest scores. Importance of open communication within the farm team, recognizing the landmarks for parturition, signs of calving progress, reference times for intervention, hygiene practices at calving, and strategies to correct abnormal presentation, position, or posture were listed as learned concepts with immediate field application. The follow-up assessment with participant personnel revealed that they were able to implement and apply their learned skills, communicate calving records with the farm team, and follow written calving protocols. Results indicated that the workshop was relevant and effective, offering information

  9. Development of decommissioning management system for nuclear fuel cycle facilities (DECMAN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Ryuichirou; Ishijima, Noboru; Tanimoto, Ken-ichi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-04-01

    In making a plan of decommissioning of nuclear fuel facilities, it is important to optimize the plan on the standpoint of a few viewpoints, that is, the amount of working days, workers, radioactive waste, exposure dose of worker, and cost (they are called evaluation indexes). In the midst of decommissioning, the decommissioning plan would be modified suitably to optimize the evaluation indexes adjusting to progress of the decommissioning. The decommissioning management code (DECMAN), that is support system on computer, has been developed to assist the decommissioning planning. The system calculates the evaluation indexes quantitatively. The system consists of three fundamental codes, facility information database code, technical know-how database code and index evaluation code, they are composed using Oracle' database and 'G2' expert system. The functions of the system are as follows. (1) Facility information database code. Information of decommissioning facility and its rooms, machines and pipes in the code. (2) Technical know-how database code. Technical Information of tools to use in decommissioning work, cutting, dose measure, and decontamination are there. (3) Index evaluation code. User build decommissioning program using above two database codes. The code evaluates five indexes, the amount of working days, workers, radioactive waste, exposure dose of worker, and cost, on planning decommissioning program. Results of calculation are shown in table, chart, and etc. (author)

  10. Strategy for introduction of rainwater management facility considering rainfall event applied on new apartment complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, H.; Lee, D. K.; Yoo, S.

    2014-12-01

    As regional torrential rains become frequent due to climate change, urban flooding happens very often. That is why it is necessary to prepare for integrated measures against a wide range of rainfall. This study proposes introduction of effective rainwater management facilities to maximize the rainwater runoff reductions and recover natural water circulation for unpredictable extreme rainfall in apartment complex scale. The study site is new apartment complex in Hanam located in east of Seoul, Korea. It has an area of 7.28ha and is analysed using the EPA-SWMM and STORM model. First, it is analyzed that green infrastructure(GI) had efficiency of flood reduction at the various rainfall events and soil characteristics, and then the most effective value of variables are derived. In case of rainfall event, Last 10 years data of 15 minutes were used for analysis. A comparison between A(686mm rainfall during 22days) and B(661mm/4days) knew that soil infiltration of A is 17.08% and B is 5.48% of the rainfall. Reduction of runoff after introduction of the GI of A is 24.76% and B is 6.56%. These results mean that GI is effective to small rainfall intensity, and artificial rainwater retarding reservoir is needed at extreme rainfall. Second, set of target year is conducted for the recovery of hydrological cycle at the predevelopment. And an amount of infiltration, evaporation, surface runoff of the target year and now is analysed on the basis of land coverage, and an arrangement of LID facilities. Third, rainwater management scenarios are established and simulated by the SWMM-LID. Rainwater management facilities include GI(green roof, porous pavement, vegetative swale, ecological pond, and raingarden), and artificial rainwater. Design scenarios are categorized five type: 1)no GI, 2)conventional GI design(current design), 3)intensive GI design, 4)GI design+rainwater retarding reservoir 5)maximized rainwater retarding reservoir. Intensive GI design is to have attribute value to

  11. Legionella and risk management in hospitals-A bibliographic research methodology for people responsible for built environment and facility management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiblein, Thomas W; Tucker, Matthew; Ashall, Mal; Lee, Susanne B; Gollnisch, Carsten; Hofer, Susanne

    2016-11-01

    An ongoing research project investigates the roles and duties of persons responsible for the built environment with respect to risk management of water systems and Legionella prevention from a facility management's perspective. Our literature review provides an approach for selecting and analysing abstracts of initially 177 journal articles, subjected to certain topic-specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. Different decision strategies of either logic 'yes/no', Boolean operators 'OR' or 'AND' and decisions for single counts or cumulative counts of the identified three principal keywords 'Legionella', 'hospital' and 'water', were completed. A final list of ten principal reference articles from 29 journals was compiled. It suggests that the interconnected perspective of water systems, Legionella and hospitals seems to be underrepresented in the field of the built environment and facility management. The term 'stakeholder', which would refer to decision-makers, was not found more than once. Our result is a useful summary of established sources of information on environmental Legionella research. The results can be helpful for those new to the topic.

  12. Quality of malaria case management at outpatient health facilities in Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santelli Ana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angola's malaria case-management policy recommends treatment with artemether-lumefantrine (AL. In 2006, AL implementation began in Huambo Province, which involved training health workers (HWs, supervision, delivering AL to health facilities, and improving malaria testing with microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs. Implementation was complicated by a policy that was sometimes ambiguous. Methods Fourteen months after implementation began, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in 33 outpatient facilities in Huambo Province to assess their readiness to manage malaria and the quality of malaria case-management for patients of all ages. Consultations were observed, patients were interviewed and re-examined, and HWs were interviewed. Results Ninety-three HWs and 177 consultations were evaluated, although many sampled consultations were missed. All facilities had AL in-stock and at least one HW trained to use AL and RDTs. However, anti-malarial stock-outs in the previous three months were common, clinical supervision was infrequent, and HWs had important knowledge gaps. Except for fever history, clinical assessments were often incomplete. Although testing was recommended for all patients with suspected malaria, only 30.7% of such patients were tested. Correct testing was significantly associated with caseloads Conclusion By late-2007, substantial progress had been made to implement the malaria case-management policy in a setting with weak infrastructure. However, policy ambiguities, under-use of malaria testing, and distrust of negative test results led to many incorrect malaria diagnoses and treatments. In 2009, Angola published a policy that clarified many issues. As problems identified in this survey are not unique to Angola, better strategies for improving HW performance are urgently needed.

  13. High-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy eenvironmental management programmatic environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folga, S.M.; Conzelmann, G.; Gillette, J.L.; Kier, P.H.; Poch, L.A.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides data and information needed to support the risk and impact assessments of high-level waste (HLW) management alternatives in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Available data on the physical form, chemical and isotopic composition, storage locations, and other waste characteristics of interest are presented. High-level waste management follows six implementation phases: current storage, retrieval, pretreatment, treatment, interim canister storage, and geologic repository disposal; pretreatment, treatment, and repository disposal are outside the scope of the WM PEIS. Brief descriptions of current and planned HLW management facilities are provided, including information on the type of waste managed in the facility, costs, product form, resource requirements, emissions, and current and future status. Data sources and technical and regulatory assumptions are identified. The range of HLW management alternatives (including decentralized, regionalized, and centralized approaches) is described. The required waste management facilities include expanded interim storage facilities under the various alternatives. Resource requirements for construction (e.g., land and materials) and operation (e.g., energy and process chemicals), work force, costs, effluents, design capacities, and emissions are presented for each alternative.

  14. High-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy eenvironmental management programmatic environmental impact statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folga, S.M.; Conzelmann, G.; Gillette, J.L.; Kier, P.H.; Poch, L.A.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides data and information needed to support the risk and impact assessments of high-level waste (HLW) management alternatives in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Available data on the physical form, chemical and isotopic composition, storage locations, and other waste characteristics of interest are presented. High-level waste management follows six implementation phases: current storage, retrieval, pretreatment, treatment, interim canister storage, and geologic repository disposal; pretreatment, treatment, and repository disposal are outside the scope of the WM PEIS. Brief descriptions of current and planned HLW management facilities are provided, including information on the type of waste managed in the facility, costs, product form, resource requirements, emissions, and current and future status. Data sources and technical and regulatory assumptions are identified. The range of HLW management alternatives (including decentralized, regionalized, and centralized approaches) is described. The required waste management facilities include expanded interim storage facilities under the various alternatives. Resource requirements for construction (e.g., land and materials) and operation (e.g., energy and process chemicals), work force, costs, effluents, design capacities, and emissions are presented for each alternative.

  15. Toxicity of Water and Sediment Samples Collected in the Vicinity of the Mixed Waste Management Facility, 1995 and 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, W.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Three rounds of toxicity tests were conducted on water collected from eleven locations in the vicinity of the Mixed Waste Management Facility and four reference locations between January 1995 and April 1996.

  16. An intrinsically safe facility for forefront research and training on nuclear technologies — General description of the system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansani, L.; Bruzzone, M.; Frambati, S.; Reale, M.

    2014-04-01

    In the framework of research on generation-IV reactors, it is very important to have infrastructures specifically dedicated to the study of fundamental parameters in dynamics and kinetics of future fast-neutron reactors. Among various options pursued by international groups, Italy focused on lead-cooled reactors, which guarantee minimal neutron slowdown and capture and efficient cooling. In this paper it is described the design of a the low-power prototype generator, LEADS, that could be used within research facilities such as the National Laboratory of Legnaro of the INFN. The LEADS has a high safety standard in order to be used as a training facility, but it has also a good flexibility so as to allow a wide range of measurements and experiments. A high safety standard is achieved by limiting the reactor power to less than few hundred kW and the neutron multiplication factor k eff to less than 0.95 (a limiting value for spent fuel pool), by using a pure-uranium fuel (no plutonium) and by using solid lead as a diffuser. The proposed core is therefore intrinsically subcritical and has to be driven by an external neutron source generated by a proton beam impinging in a target. Preliminary simulations, performed with the MCNPX code indicated, for a 0.75mA continuous proton beam current at 70MeV proton energy, a reactor power of about 190kW when using a beryllium converter. The enriched-uranium fuel elements are immersed in a solid-lead matrix and contained within a steel vessel. The system is cooled by helium gas, which is transparent to neutrons and does not undergo activation. The gas is pumped by a compressor through specific holes at the entrance of the active volume with a temperature which varies according to the operating conditions and a pressure of about 1.1MPa. The hot gas coming out of the vessel is cooled by an external helium-water heat exchanger. The beryllium converter is cooled by its dedicated helium gas cooling system. After shutdown, the decay is

  17. The Mixed Waste Management Facility: Technology selection and implementation plan, Part 2, Support processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streit, R.D.; Couture, S.A.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to establish the foundation for the selection and implementation of technologies to be demonstrated in the Mixed Waste Management Facility, and to select the technologies for initial pilot-scale demonstration. Criteria are defined for judging demonstration technologies, and the framework for future technology selection is established. On the basis of these criteria, an initial suite of technologies was chosen, and the demonstration implementation scheme was developed. Part 1, previously released, addresses the selection of the primary processes. Part II addresses process support systems that are considered ``demonstration technologies.`` Other support technologies, e.g., facility off-gas, receiving and shipping, and water treatment, while part of the integrated demonstration, use best available commercial equipment and are not selected against the demonstration technology criteria.

  18. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-06-01

    During first quarter 1992, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, lead, antimony, I,I-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, gross alpha, mercury, nickel, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and total alpha-emitting radium (radium-224 and radium-226) exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents; 57 (49%) of the 116 monitored wells contained elevated tritium activities, and 21 (18%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations Sixty-one downgradient wells screened in Aquifer Zone IIB2 (Water Table), Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Barnwell/McBean), and Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) contained constituents that exceeded the PDWS during first quarter 1992. Upgradient wells BGO 1D and HSB 85A, BC, and 85C did not contain any constituents that exceeded the PDWS. Upgradient well BGO 2D contained elevated tritium.

  19. Accident Management & Risk-Based Compliance With 40 CFR 68 for Chemical Process Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Kula, K.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Taylor, R.P. Jr.; Ashbaugh, S.G. [Innovative Technology Solutions, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-23

    A risk-based logic model is suggested as an appropriate basis for better predicting accident progression and ensuing source terms to the environment from process upset conditions in complex chemical process facilities. Under emergency conditions, decision-makers may use the Accident Progression Event Tree approach to identify the best countermeasure for minimizing deleterious consequences to receptor groups before the atmospheric release has initiated. It is concluded that the chemical process industry may use this methodology as a supplemental information provider to better comply with the Environmental Protection Agency`s proposed 40 CFR 68 Risk Management Program rule. An illustration using a benzene-nitric acid potential interaction demonstrates the value of the logic process. The identification of worst-case releases and planning for emergency response are improved through these methods, at minimum. It also provides a systematic basis for prioritizing facility modifications to correct vulnerabilities.

  20. The mixed waste management facility. Project baseline revision 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streit, R.D.; Throop, A.L.

    1995-04-01

    Revision 1.2 to the Project Baseline (PB) for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is in response to DOE directives and verbal guidance to (1) Collocate the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) and MWMF into a single complex, integrate certain and overlapping functions as a cost-saving measure; (2) Meet certain fiscal year (FY) new-BA funding objectives ($15.3M in FY95) with lower and roughly balanced funding for out years; (3) Reduce Total Project Cost (TPC) for the MWMF Project; (4) Include costs for all appropriate permitting activities in the project TPC. This baseline revision also incorporates revisions in the technical baseline design for Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) and Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO). Changes in the WBS dictionary that are necessary as a result of this rebaseline, as well as minor title changes, at WBS Level 3 or above (DOE control level) are approved as a separate document. For completeness, the WBS dictionary that reflects these changes is contained in Appendix B. The PB, with revisions as described in this document, were also the basis for the FY97 Validation Process, presented to DOE and their reviewers on March 21-22, 1995. Appendix C lists information related to prior revisions to the PB. Several key changes relate to the integration of functions and sharing of facilities between the portion of the DWTF that will house the MWMF and those portions that are used by the Hazardous Waste Management (HWM) Division at LLNL. This collocation has been directed by DOE as a cost-saving measure and has been implemented in a manner that maintains separate operational elements from a safety and permitting viewpoint. Appendix D provides background information on the decision and implications of collocating the two facilities.

  1. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

  2. Execution of Computerized Management Systems in Facility Maintenance Services of Government Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othuman Mydin Md Azree

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance management of a hospital is the most important element in determining the ability of a hospital to provide its services successfully. On 28th October 1996, the Ministry of Health (MOH privatized five Hospital Support Services (HSS, one of them being Facility and Engineering Maintenance Services (FEMS. Currently, the Ministry has granted concessions for the privatized services to three contractors where they have established and are maintaining their own basic Management Information System (MIS to manage the entire project and track the work performed for all of their services. These MISs consist of a variety of modules which help maintenance strategies adopted in a building run smoothly. The purpose of this paper is to study the utilization of computerized management system modules in the MISs of those three HSS providers and to investigate problems that have occurred during the utilization of these systems. This study was conducted in the form of case studies at three different hospitals that subscribed to three different concession companies. Targeting maintenance staff and users of computerized management systems, 60 sets of questionnaires were distributed and interview sessions were conducted. This study will also highlight the challenges of using computerized management systems and propose suitable recommendations to improve the utilization of such systems.

  3. Understanding the application of knowledge management to the safety critical facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilina, Elena

    2010-07-01

    Challenges to the operating nuclear power plants and transport infrastructures are outlined. It is concluded that most aggravating factors are related to knowledge. Thus, of necessity, effective knowledge management is required. Knowledge management theories are reviewed in their historical perspective as a natural extension and unification of information theories and theories about learning. The first line is identified with names as Wiener, Ashby, Shannon, Jaynes, Dretske, Harkevich. The second line - with Vygotsky, Engestroem, Carayannis. The recent developments of knowledge management theorists as Davenport, Prusak, Drew, Wiig, Zack are considered stressing learning, retaining of knowledge, approaching the state awareness of awareness, and alignment of knowledge management with the strategy of the concerned organizations. Further, some of the details and results are presented of what is achieved so far. More specifically, knowledge management tools are applied to the practical work activities as event reporting, data collection, condition assessment, verification of safety functions and incident investigation. Obstacles are identified and improvements are proposed. Finally, it is advised to continue to implement and further develop knowledge management tools in the organizations involved in various aspects of safety critical facilities

  4. Phase 1 Testing Results of Immobilization of WTP Effluent Management Facility Evaporator Bottoms Core Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, Alex D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-05

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF) and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Alternate disposition would also eliminate this stream from recycling within WTP when it begins operations and would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form, such as halides and sulfate, along with entrained, volatile, and semi-volatile metals, such as Hg, As, and Se. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components accumulate in the Melter Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfate that get recycled to the melter and is a key objective of this work. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of this stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of earlier tasks was to formulate and prepare a

  5. A facility location model for municipal solid waste management system under uncertain environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vinay; Bhurjee, A K; Karmakar, Subhankar; Dikshit, A K

    2017-12-15

    In municipal solid waste management system, decision makers have to develop an insight into the processes namely, waste generation, collection, transportation, processing, and disposal methods. Many parameters (e.g., waste generation rate, functioning costs of facilities, transportation cost, and revenues) in this system are associated with uncertainties. Often, these uncertainties of parameters need to be modeled under a situation of data scarcity for generating probability distribution function or membership function for stochastic mathematical programming or fuzzy mathematical programming respectively, with only information of extreme variations. Moreover, if uncertainties are ignored, then the problems like insufficient capacities of waste management facilities or improper utilization of available funds may be raised. To tackle uncertainties of these parameters in a more efficient manner an algorithm, based on interval analysis, has been developed. This algorithm is applied to find optimal solutions for a facility location model, which is formulated to select economically best locations of transfer stations in a hypothetical urban center. Transfer stations are an integral part of contemporary municipal solid waste management systems, and economic siting of transfer stations ensures financial sustainability of this system. The model is written in a mathematical programming language AMPL with KNITRO as a solver. The developed model selects five economically best locations out of ten potential locations with an optimum overall cost of [394,836, 757,440] Rs.(1) /day ([5906, 11,331] USD/day) approximately. Further, the requirement of uncertainty modeling is explained based on the results of sensitivity analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Structure of pain management facilities in Germany : Classification of medical and psychological pain treatment services-Consensus of the Joint Commission of the Professional Societies and Organizations for Quality in Pain Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Schwefe, G H H; Nadstawek, J; Tölle, T; Nilges, P; Überall, M A; Laubenthal, H J; Bock, F; Arnold, B; Casser, H R; Cegla, T H; Emrich, O M D; Graf-Baumann, T; Henning, J; Horlemann, J; Kayser, H; Kletzko, H; Koppert, W; Längler, K H; Locher, H; Ludwig, J; Maurer, S; Pfingsten, M; Schäfer, M; Schenk, M; Willweber-Strumpf, A

    2016-06-01

    On behalf of the Medical/Psychological Pain Associations, Pain Patients Alliance and the Professional Association of Pain Physicians and Psychologists, the Joint Commission of Professional Societies and Organizations for Quality in Pain Medicine, working in close collaboration with the respective presidents, has developed verifiable structural and process-related criteria for the classification of medical and psychological pain treatment facilities in Germany. Based on the established system of graded care in Germany and on existing qualifications, these criteria also argue for the introduction of a basic qualification in pain medicine. In addition to the first-ever comprehensive description of psychological pain facilities, the criteria presented can be used to classify five different levels of pain facilities, from basic pain management facilities, to specialized institutions, to the Centre for Interdisciplinary Pain Medicine. The recommendations offer binding and verifiable criteria for quality assurance in pain medicine and improved pain treatment.

  7. Environmental surveillance for EG&G Idaho Waste Management facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. 1993 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmsen, R.N.; Wright, K.C.; McBride, D.W.; Borsella, B.W.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes calendar year 1993 environmental surveillance activities of Environmental Monitoring of EG&G Idaho, Inc., performed at EG&G Idaho operated Waste Management facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The major facilities monitored include the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility, the Mixed Waste Storage Facility, and two surplus facilities. Included are results of the sampling performed by the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory and the United States Geological Survey. The primary purposes of monitoring are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to ensure compliance with applicable regulations or standards, and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1993 environmental surveillance data with US Department of Energy derived concentration guides and with data from previous years.

  8. Management considerations in the care of elderly heart failure patients in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, George A; Boscart, Veronique M; McKelvie, Robert S

    2014-07-01

    Heart failure, a condition that affects up to 20% of older persons residing in long-term care facilities, is an important cause of morbidity, health service utilization and death. Effective and interprofessional heart failure care processes could potentially improve care, outcomes and quality of life and delay decline or hospital admission. This article reviews the clinical aspects of heart failure, and the challenges to the diagnosis and management of this condition in long-term care residents who are frail and are affected by multiple comorbidities.

  9. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    During third quarter 1993, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for certain heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Eight parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards; and aluminum, iron, lead, manganese, pH, and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water-table unit were similar to previous quarters.

  10. The Development of a Quality Management Framework for Evaluating Medical Device Reprocessing Practice in Healthcare Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorv, Bailey; Horodyski, Robin; Welton, Cynthia; Vail, John; Simonetto, Luca; Jokanovic, Danilo; Sharma, Richa; Mahoney, Angela Rea; Savoy-Bird, Shay; Bains, Shalu

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the importance of medical device reprocessing (MDR) for the provision of safe patient care. Although industry service standards are available to guide MDR practices, there remains a lack of published key performance indicators (KPIs) and targets that are necessary to evaluate MDR quality for feedback and improvement. This article outlines the development of an initial framework that builds on established guidelines and includes service standards, KPIs and targets for evaluating MDR operations. This framework can support healthcare facilities in strengthening existing practices and enables a platform for collaboration towards better MDR performance management.

  11. Zebrafish Database: Customizable, Free, and Open-Source Solution for Facility Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakulov, Toma Antonov; Walz, Gerd

    2015-12-01

    Zebrafish Database is a web-based customizable database solution, which can be easily adapted to serve both single laboratories and facilities housing thousands of zebrafish lines. The database allows the users to keep track of details regarding the various genomic features, zebrafish lines, zebrafish batches, and their respective locations. Advanced search and reporting options are available. Unique features are the ability to upload files and images that are associated with the respective records and an integrated calendar component that supports multiple calendars and categories. Built on the basis of the Joomla content management system, the Zebrafish Database is easily extendable without the need for advanced programming skills.

  12. [MANAGEMENT STANDARDS FOR QUALIFIED PHYSICIANS AND MEDICAL FACILITIES FOR ENDOVENOUS ABLATION OF VARICOSE VEINS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Tomohiro

    2015-05-01

    Endovenous ablation of saphenous veins using laser energy was approved by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in 2011 as a more effective, less-invasive method than classical treatment for varicose veins. New medical laser and radiofrequency devices for this purpose were also approved in 2014. A requirement for the treatment of varicose veins with health insurance reimbursement using these devices is a physician with sufficient knowledge of endovenous ablation. The management standards for endovenous ablation set by varicose vein specialist medical societies are used to accredit qualified physicians who have basic clinical experience in the treatment of varicose veins, qualified instructors, and safe, effective medical facilities.

  13. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1993-09-01

    This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

  14. Building capacity in health facility management: guiding principles for skills transfer in Liberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahn Bernice T

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Management training is fundamental to developing human resources for health. Particularly as Liberia revives its health delivery system, facility and county health team managers are central to progress. Nevertheless, such management skills are rarely prioritized in health training, and sustained capacity building in this area is limited. We describe a health management delivery program in which a north and south institution collaborated to integrate classroom and field-based training in health management and to transfer the capacity for sustained management development in Liberia. Methods We developed and implemented a 6-month training program in health management skills (i.e. strategic problem solving, financial management, human resource management and leadership delivered by Yale University and Mother Patern College from Liberia, with support from the Clinton HIV/AIDS Initiative. Over three 6-month cycles, responsibility for course instruction was transferred from the north institution to the south institution. A self-administered survey was conducted of all participants completing the course to measure changes in self-rated management skills, the degree to which the course was helpful and met its stated objectives, and faculty members' responsiveness to participant needs as the transfer process occurred. Results Respondents (n = 93, response rate 95.9% reported substantial improvement in self-reported management skills, and rated the helpfulness of the course and the degree to which the course met its objectives highly. Levels of improvement and course ratings were similar over the three cohorts as the course was transferred to the south institution. We suggest a framework of five elements for implementing successful management training programs that can be transferred and sustained in resource-limited settings, including: 1 use a short-course format focusing on four key skill areas with practical tools; 2 include

  15. Beyond Metaphors of Management: The Case for Metaphoric Re-Description in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Eric; Wallace, Mike

    2007-01-01

    In the UK and elsewhere management has become a root metaphor. Educational practitioners must now acquire competence in management discourse. Yet education and management are different social processes. They interpenetrate since much education occurs in schools, which have to be managed. But teaching is not management. This paper identifies how…

  16. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Groundwater Monitoring Report: Fourth quarter 1991 and 1991 summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1991, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), total radium, mercury, and lead exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread contaminants; 55 (49%) wells exhibited elevated tritium activities, and 24 (21%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations. Tritium and trichloroethylene levels exceeding the PDWS also occurred in several wells in Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree). Levels of manganese, total organic halogens, nickel, iron, 1,1-dichloroethane, aluminum, nonvolatile beta, and trichlorofluoromethane that exceeded Flag 2 criteria were found in one or more wells beneath the MWMF. Downgradient wells in the three hydrostratigraphic units at the MWMF contained elevated levels of tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, total radium, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), lead, mercury, manganese, total organic halogens, nickel, iron, 1,1-dichloroethane, aluminum, nonvolatile beta, or trichlorofluoromethane. Groundwater samples from 81 (72%) of the monitoring wells at the MWMF and adjacent facilities contained elevated levels of several contaminants.

  17. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1992, nine constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in one or more groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread constituents. Fifty-seven (48%) of the 120 monitoring wells, contained elevated tritium activities, and 23 (19%) contained elevated trichloroethylene concentrations. Total alpha-emitting radium, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene, cadmium, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, or nonvolatile beta levels exceeded standards in one or more wells. During 1992, elevated levels of 13 constituents were found in one or more of 80 of the 120 groundwater monitoring wells (67%) at the MWMF and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene exceeded their final PDWS more frequently and more consistently than did other constituents. Tritium activity exceeded its final PDWS m 67 wells and trichloroethylene was. elevated in 28 wells. Lead, tetrachloroethylene, total alpha-emitting radium, gross alpha, cadmium, chloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethylene 1,2-dichloroethane, mercury, or nitrate exceeded standards in one or more wells during the year. Nonvolatile beta exceeded its drinking water screening level in 3 wells during the year.

  18. How can Facilities Management Add Value to Organisations as well as to Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker; Sarasoja, Anna-Liisa; van der Voordt, Theo

    2013-01-01

    group. The project applied three basic theoretical perspectives: FM, Corporate Real Estate Management (CREM) and Business to Business (B2B) marketing and started with a major literature review on added value based on each of these perspectives. The collaboration included a series of workshops......The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learnt from a 3 year collaborative research project on the added value of Facilities Management (FM) involving institutions in five European countries. The starting point was the so-called FM Value Map developed earlier by the leader of the research...... in the paper offers a new state of the art, which can give inspiration and guidance for cutting edge FM organisations and professionals as well as for advanced teaching and future research....

  19. A Randomized Trial of Heart Failure Disease Management in Skilled Nursing Facilities: Design and Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxer, Rebecca S.; Dolansky, Mary A.; Bodnar, Christine A.; Singer, Mendel E.; Albert, Jeffery M.; Gravenstein, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background Heart failure disease management can improve health outcomes for older community dwelling patients with heart failure. Heart failure disease management has not been studied in skilled nursing facilities, a major site of transitional care for older adults. Methods and Anticipated Results The objective of this trial is to investigate if a heart failure disease management program (HF-DMP) in skilled nursing facilities (SNF) will decrease all-cause rehospitalizations for the first 60 days post SNF admission. The trial is a randomized cluster trial to be conducted in 12 for-profit SNF in the greater Cleveland area. The study population is inclusive of patients with heart failure regardless of ejection fraction but excludes those patients on dialysis and with a life expectancy of 6 months or less. The HF-DMP includes 7 elements considered standard of care for patients with heart failure: documentation of left ventricular function, tracking of weight and symptoms, medication titration, discharge instructions, 7 day follow up appointment post SNF discharge, patient education. The HF-DMP is conducted by a research nurse tasked with adhering to each element of the program and regularly audited to maintain fidelity of the program. Additional outcomes include health status, self-care management, and discharge destination. Conclusion The SNF-Connect Trial is the first trial of its kind to assess if a HF-DMP will improve outcomes for patients in SNFs. This trial will provide evidence on the effectiveness of HF-DMP to improve outcomes for older frail heart failure patients undergoing post-acute rehabilitation. PMID:23871475

  20. Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination of ERDF viability has followed both RCRA and CERCLA decision making processes. Typically, determination of the viability of a unit, such as the ERDF, would occur as part of record of decision (ROD) or permit modification for each remediation site before construction of the ERDF. However, because construction of the ERDF may take a significant amount of time, it is necessary to begin design and construction of the ERDF before final RODs/permit modifications for the remediation sites. This will allow movement of waste to occur quickly once the final remediation strategy for the RCRA and CERCLA past-practice units is determined. Construction of the ERDF is a unique situation relative to Hanford Facility cleanup, requiring a Hanford Facility specific process be developed for implementing the ERDF that would satisfy both RCRA and CERCLA requirements. While the ERDF will play a significant role in the remediation process, initiation of the ERDF does not preclude the evaluation of remedial alternatives at each remediation site. To facilitate this, the January 1994 amendment to the Tri-Party Agreement recognizes the necessity for the ERDF, and the Tri-Party Agreement states: ``Ecology, EPA, and DOE agree to proceed with the steps necessary to design, approve, construct, and operate such a ... facility.`` The Tri-Party Agreement requires the DOE-RL to prepare a comprehensive ``package`` for the EPA and Ecology to consider in evaluating the ERDF. The package is to address the criteria listed in 40 CFR 264.552(c) for corrective action management unit (CAMU) designation and a CERCLA ROD. This CAMU application is submitted as part of the Tri-Party Agreement-required information package.

  1. Analyzing Impact of Intermodal Facilities on Design and Management of Biofuel Supply Chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eksioglu, Sandra D [ORNL; Li, Song [ORNL; Zhang, Shu [Mississippi State University (MSU); Petrolia, Daniel [Mississippi State University (MSU); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    The impact of an intermodal facility on location and transportation decisions for biofuel production plants is analyzed. Location decisions affect the management of the inbound and outbound logistics of a plant. This supply chain design and management problem is modeled as a mixed integer program. Input data for this model are location of intermodal facilities and available transportation modes, cost and cargo capacity for each transportation mode, geographical distribution of biomass feedstock and production yields, and biomass processing and inventory costs. Outputs from this model are the number, location, and capacity of biofuel production plants. For each plant, the transportation mode used, timing of shipments, shipment size, inventory size, and production schedule that minimize the delivery cost of biofuel are determined. The model proposed in this research can be used as a decision-making tool for investors in the biofuels industry since it estimates the real cost of the business. The state of Mississippi is considered as the testing grounds for the model.

  2. Risk-based investment trade-off related to building facility management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taillandier, F. [Departement TIDS, Centre Scientifique et Technique du Batiment, 06904 Sophia Antipolis (France); Laboratoire Optimisation de la conception et Ingenierie de l' environnement, Polytech' Savoie, Universite de Savoie, 73376 Le Bourget du lac (France)], E-mail: franck.taillandier@univ-savoie.fr; Sauce, G. [Laboratoire Optimisation de la conception et Ingenierie de l' environnement, Polytech' Savoie, Universite de Savoie, 73376 Le Bourget du lac (France); Bonetto, R. [Departement TIDS, Centre Scientifique et Technique du Batiment, 06904 Sophia Antipolis (France)

    2009-04-15

    Due to his or her profession, any building facility manager has to face many decision-making situations. One of the most important to be mentioned is the arbitration of a multi-year maintenance plan for buildings. Deciding between proposed maintenance actions, according to several constraints, so as to aim at satisfying corporate strategy is a complex choice. Risk approaches can be particularly effective because of their ability to handle complexity and uncertainties. The problem is then to be able to propose a method considering risks, adapted to the specific context of building facility management. Our method, regarded as a traditional approach, includes needed resources (i.e. costs) according to constraints (i.e. budget), but it also considers several risk domains (safety, technical preservation, client satisfaction, etc.), through the consequences (gain and loss). It proposes an ergonomic arbitration system based on filters following two complementary approaches: a selection of the fundamental actions and then an optimization of the plan (in a global view). The aim, for decision-makers, is to build their own solution by testing multiple angles of vision in simulation logic. This article presents the principles of the method, illustrated by an example of a real case conducted for a leading French company.

  3. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1993 and 1993 summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The AMB wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) are monitored for selected constituents to comply with the Natural Resources Defense council et al. Consent Decree of May 1988 that identifies the Met Lab HWMF as subject to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. In addition, the wells are monitored, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During the fourth quarter 1993, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), tetrachloroethylene, and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards; pH, specific conductance, and total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water-table unit were similar to previous quarters.

  4. Wastewater Facilities Operation and Management. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, David A.

    Local communities must be willing to spend funds to assure the proper operation and management of wastewater treatment facilities. Designed for citizen advisory groups, the one-hour learning session described in this instructor's manual covers problem areas, federal requirements, and responsibilities for wastewater plant operations and management.…

  5. Replacing natural wetlands with stormwater management facilities: Biophysical and perceived social values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, R C; Foote, L; Krogman, N; Pattison, J K; Wilson, M J; Bayley, S E

    2015-04-15

    Urban expansion replaces wetlands of natural origin with artificial stormwater management facilities. The literature suggests that efforts to mimic natural wetlands in the design of stormwater facilities can expand the provision of ecosystem services. Policy developments seek to capitalize on these improvements, encouraging developers to build stormwater wetlands in place of stormwater ponds; however, few have compared the biophysical values and social perceptions of these created wetlands to those of the natural wetlands they are replacing. We compared four types of wetlands: natural references sites, natural wetlands impacted by agriculture, created stormwater wetlands, and created stormwater ponds. We anticipated that they would exhibit a gradient in biodiversity, ecological integrity, chemical and hydrologic stress. We further anticipated that perceived values would mirror measured biophysical values. We found higher biophysical values associated with wetlands of natural origin (both reference and agriculturally impacted). The biophysical values of stormwater wetlands and stormwater ponds were lower and indistinguishable from one another. The perceived wetland values assessed by the public differed from the observed biophysical values. This has important policy implications, as the public are not likely to perceive the loss of values associated with the replacement of natural wetlands with created stormwater management facilities. We conclude that 1) agriculturally impacted wetlands provide biophysical values equivalent to those of natural wetlands, meaning that land use alone is not a great predictor of wetland value; 2) stormwater wetlands are not a substantive improvement over stormwater ponds, relative to wetlands of natural origin; 3) stormwater wetlands are poor mimics of natural wetlands, likely due to fundamental distinctions in terms of basin morphology, temporal variation in hydrology, ground water connectivity, and landscape position; 4) these

  6. Management trends in stage I testicular seminoma: Impact of race, insurance status, and treatment facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Phillip J; Lin, Chun Chieh; Sineshaw, Helmneh; Paly, Jonathan J; Jemal, Ahmedin; Efstathiou, Jason A

    2015-03-01

    The management of stage I testicular seminoma is evolving rapidly. This study examined modern trends in the management of stage I testicular seminoma and the effects of sociodemographic factors on therapy choice. Data from the National Cancer Data Base on 34,067 patients with stage I testicular seminoma who were treated between 1998 and 2011 were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess factors associated with adjuvant management strategies. For patients with stage IA/B testicular seminoma, rates of observation after orchiectomy increased from 23.7% to 54.0%, the receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy increased from 1.5% to 16.0%, and the receipt of radiotherapy decreased from 70.8% to 28.8%. A similar pattern was seen in stage IS testicular seminoma, although these patients were more likely to receive adjuvant radiotherapy/chemotherapy (60.7% vs 44.8% for stage IA/B in 2011, P seminoma, observation after orchiectomy was more common in racial minorities (odds ratio [OR] for blacks vs whites, 1.31, P seminoma who received adjuvant radiotherapy/chemotherapy, the receipt of chemotherapy was more common at academic centers and for patients with nonprivate insurance. Postorchiectomy observation in stage I testicular seminoma has increased significantly in recent years, as has the receipt of chemotherapy, whereas the receipt of radiotherapy has declined, particularly at academic centers. Race, insurance status, and facility type are strongly associated with the choice of adjuvant management. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories Facilities Management and Operations Center Design Standards Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Timothy L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    At Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico (SNL/NM), the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities is guided by industry standards, a graded approach, and the systematic analysis of life cycle benefits received for costs incurred. The design of the physical plant must ensure that the facilities are "fit for use," and provide conditions that effectively, efficiently, and safely support current and future mission needs. In addition, SNL/NM applies sustainable design principles, using an integrated whole-building design approach, from site planning to facility design, construction, and operation to ensure building resource efficiency and the health and productivity of occupants. The safety and health of the workforce and the public, any possible effects on the environment, and compliance with building codes take precedence over project issues, such as performance, cost, and schedule. These design standards generally apply to all disciplines on all SNL/NM projects. Architectural and engineering design must be both functional and cost-effective. Facility design must be tailored to fit its intended function, while emphasizing low-maintenance, energy-efficient, and energy-conscious design. Design facilities that can be maintained easily, with readily accessible equipment areas, low maintenance, and quality systems. To promote an orderly and efficient appearance, architectural features of new facilities must complement and enhance the existing architecture at the site. As an Architectural and Engineering (A/E) professional, you must advise the Project Manager when this approach is prohibitively expensive. You are encouraged to use professional judgment and ingenuity to produce a coordinated interdisciplinary design that is cost-effective, easily contractible or buildable, high-performing, aesthetically pleasing, and compliant with applicable building codes. Close coordination and development of civil, landscape, structural, architectural, fire

  8. Stakeholder opinions on the use of the added value approach in siting radioactive waste management facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojo, Matti [University of Tampere, School of ManagementTampere (Finland); Richardson, Phil [Galson Sciences Ltd, Oakham (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    In some countries nuclear waste facility siting programs include social and economic benefits, compensation, local empowerment and motivation measures and other incentives for the potential host community. This can generally be referred to as an 'added value approach'. Demonstration of the safety of a repository is seen as a precondition of an added value approach. Recently much focus has been placed on studying and developing public participation approaches but less on the use of such incentive and community benefit packages, although they are becoming a more common element in many site selection strategies for nuclear waste management facilities. The primary objective of this paper is to report on an ongoing study of stakeholders' opinions of the use of an added value approach in siting a radioactive waste facility in the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovenia. The paper argues that an added value approach should adapt to the interests and needs of stakeholders during different stages of a siting process. The main question posed in the study is as follows: What are the measures which should be included in 'added value approach' according to the stakeholders? The research data consists of stakeholders' responses to a survey focusing on the use of added value (community benefits) and incentives in siting nuclear waste management facilities. The survey involved use of a questionnaire developed as part of the EU-funded IPPA* project in three countries: the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovenia. (* Implementing Public Participation Approaches in Radioactive Waste Disposal, FP7 Contract Number: 269849). The target audiences for the questionnaires were the stakeholders represented in the national stakeholder groups established to discuss site selection for a nuclear waste repository in their country. A total of 105 questionnaires were sent to the stakeholders between November 2011 and January 2012. 44 questionnaires were returned, resulting in a

  9. Capacity of Health Facilities to Manage Hypertension in Mukono and Buikwe Districts in Uganda: Challenges and Recommendations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geofrey Musinguzi

    Full Text Available The burden of chronic diseases is increasing in both low- and middle-income countries. However, healthcare systems in low-income countries are inadequately equipped to deal with the growing disease burden, which requires chronic care for patients. The aim of this study was to assess the capacity of health facilities to manage hypertension in two districts in Uganda.In a cross-sectional study conducted between June and October 2012, we surveyed 126 health facilities (6 hospitals, 4 Health Center IV (HCIV, 23 Health Center III (HCIII, 41 Health Center II (HCII and 52 private clinics/dispensaries in Mukono and Buikwe districts in Uganda. We assessed records, conducted structured interviews with heads of facilities, and administered questionnaires to 271 health workers. The study assessed service provision for hypertension, availability of supplies such as medicines, guidelines and equipment, in-service training for hypertension, knowledge of hypertension management, challenges and recommendations.Of the 126 health facilities, 92.9% reported managing (diagnosing/treating patients with hypertension, and most (80.2% were run by non-medical doctors or non-physician health workers (NPHW. Less than half (46% of the facilities had guidelines for managing hypertension. A 10th of the facilities lacked functioning blood pressure devices and 28% did not have stethoscopes. No facilities ever calibrated their BP devices except one. About a half of the facilities had anti-hypertensive medicines in stock; mainly thiazide diuretics (46%, beta blockers (56% and calcium channel blockers (48.4%. Alpha blockers, mixed alpha & beta blockers and angiotensin II receptor antagonists were only stocked by private clinics/dispensaries. Most HCIIs lacked anti-hypertensive medicines, including the first line thiazide diuretics. Significant knowledge gaps in classification of patients as hypertensive were noted among respondents. All health workers (except 5, 1.9% indicated

  10. A hot-cell facility for waste management studies at the J. R. C. Ispra establishment (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, B.A.; Dworschak, H.; Bertelli, S.; Magni, G.; Girardi, F.; Nannicini, R.

    1989-06-01

    The hot-cell facility, constructed and commissioned at the Joint Research Centre of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy), will be utilised for research on radioactive waste management with emphasis on verification, demonstration and optimization of concepts already under study. The facility will produce various types of fully active waste in order to verify potentially suitable process modes to minimize waste production and improve waste quality in function of both effectiveness and safety of final disposal.

  11. A novel microgrid demand-side management system for manufacturing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Terance J.

    Thirty-one percent of annual energy consumption in the United States occurs within the industrial sector, where manufacturing processes account for the largest amount of energy consumption and carbon emissions. For this reason, energy efficiency in manufacturing facilities is increasingly important for reducing operating costs and improving profits. Using microgrids to generate local sustainable power should reduce energy consumption from the main utility grid along with energy costs and carbon emissions. Also, microgrids have the potential to serve as reliable energy generators in international locations where the utility grid is often unstable. For this research, a manufacturing process that had approximately 20 kW of peak demand was matched with a solar photovoltaic array that had a peak output of approximately 3 KW. An innovative Demand-Side Management (DSM) strategy was developed to manage the process loads as part of this smart microgrid system. The DSM algorithm managed the intermittent nature of the microgrid and the instantaneous demand of the manufacturing process. The control algorithm required three input signals; one from the microgrid indicating the availability of renewable energy, another from the manufacturing process indicating energy use as a percent of peak production, and historical data for renewable sources and facility demand. Based on these inputs the algorithm had three modes of operation: normal (business as usual), curtailment (shutting off non-critical loads), and energy storage. The results show that a real-time management of a manufacturing process with a microgrid will reduce electrical consumption and peak demand. The renewable energy system for this research was rated to provide up to 13% of the total manufacturing capacity. With actively managing the process loads with the DSM program alone, electrical consumption from the utility grid was reduced by 17% on average. An additional 24% reduction was accomplished when the microgrid

  12. Novel GIS approaches to watershed science and management: Description, prediction, and integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatial data and geographic information systems (GIS) are playing an increasingly important role in watershed science and management, particularly in the face of increasing climate uncertainty and demand for water resources. Concomitantly, scientists and managers are presented wi...

  13. Referenced-site environmental document for a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility: backup waste management option for handling 1800 MTU per year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silviera, D.J.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cushing, C.E.; Marshall, A.; Scott, M.J.; Sewart, G.H.; Strenge, D.L.

    1985-06-01

    This environmental document includes a discussion of the purpose of a monitored retrievable storage facility, a description of two facility design concepts (sealed storage cask and field drywell), a description of three reference sites (arid, warm-wet, and cold-wet), and a discussion and comparison of the impacts associated with each of the six site/concept combinations. This analysis is based on a 15,000-MTU storage capacity and a throughput rate of up to 1800 MTU per year.

  14. Migrating the facility profile information management system into the world wide web

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kero, R.E.; Swietlik, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy - Office of Special Projects and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), along with the Department of Energy - office of Scientific and Technical Information have previously designed and implemented the Environment, Safety and Health Facility Profile Information Management System (FPIMS) to facilitate greater efficiency in searching, analyzing and disseminating information found within environment, safety and health oversight documents. This information retrieval based system serves as a central repository for full-text electronic oversight documents, as well as a management planning and decision making tool that can assist in trend and root cause analyses. Continuous improvement of environment, safety and health programs are currently aided through this personal computer-based system by providing a means for the open communication of lessons learned across the department. Overall benefits have included reductions in costs and improvements in past information management capabilities. Access to the FPIMS has been possible historically through a headquarters-based local area network equipped with modems. Continued demand for greater accessibility of the system by remote DOE field offices and sites, in conjunction with the Secretary of Energy` s call for greater public accessibility to Department of Energy (DOE) information resources, has been the impetus to expand access through the use of Internet technologies. Therefore, the following paper will discuss reasons for migrating the FPIMS system into the World Wide Web (Web), various lessons learned from the FPIMS migration effort, as well as future plans for enhancing the Web-based FPIMS.

  15. Velo and REXAN - Integrated Data Management and High Speed Analysis for Experimental Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Carson, James P.; Corrigan, Abigail L.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Guillen, Zoe C.; Heath, Brandi S.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Lansing, Carina S.; Laskin, Julia; Li, Dongsheng; Liu, Yan; Marshall, Matthew J.; Miller, Erin A.; Orr, Galya; Pinheiro da Silva, Paulo; Ryu, Seun; Szymanski, Craig J.; Thomas, Mathew

    2013-01-10

    The Chemical Imaging Initiative at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is creating a ‘Rapid Experimental Analysis’ (REXAN) Framework, based on the concept of reusable component libraries. REXAN allows developers to quickly compose and customize high throughput analysis pipelines for a range of experiments, as well as supporting the creation of multi-modal analysis pipelines. In addition, PNNL has coupled REXAN with its collaborative data management and analysis environment Velo to create an easy to use data management and analysis environments for experimental facilities. This paper will discuss the benefits of Velo and REXAN in the context of three examples: PNNL High Resolution Mass Spectrometry - reducing analysis times from hours to seconds, and enabling the analysis of much larger data samples (100KB to 40GB) at the same time · ALS X-Ray tomography - reducing analysis times of combined STXM and EM data collected at the ALS from weeks to minutes, decreasing manual work and increasing data volumes that can be analysed in a single step ·Multi-modal nano-scale analysis of STXM and TEM data - providing a semi automated process for particle detection The creation of REXAN has significantly shortened the development time for these analysis pipelines. The integration of Velo and REXAN has significantly increased the scientific productivity of the instruments and their users by creating easy to use data management and analysis environments with greatly reduced analysis times and improved analysis capabilities.

  16. Waste Management Facilities Cost Information report for Greater-Than-Class C and DOE equivalent special case waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.

    1993-07-01

    This Waste Management Facility Cost Information (WMFCI) report for Greater-Than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW) and DOE equivalent special case waste contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost (PLCC) estimates for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities needed for management of GTCC LLW and DOE equivalent waste. The report contains information on 16 facilities (referred to as cost modules). These facilities are treatment facility front-end and back-end support functions (administration support, and receiving, preparation, and shipping cost modules); seven treatment concepts (incineration, metal melting, shredding/compaction, solidification, vitrification, metal sizing and decontamination, and wet/air oxidation cost modules); two storage concepts (enclosed vault and silo); disposal facility front-end functions (disposal receiving and inspection cost module); and four disposal concepts (shallow-land, engineered shallow-land, intermediate depth, and deep geological cost modules). Data in this report allow the user to develop PLCC estimates for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor personnel in the use of estimating data is also included in this report.

  17. The influence of facility design and human resource management on health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadatsafavi, Hessam; Walewski, John; Shepley, Mardelle M

    2015-01-01

    Cost control of health care services is a strategic concern for organizations. To lower costs, some organizations reduce staffing levels. However, this may not be worth the trade-off, as the quality of services will likely be reduced, morale among health care providers tends to suffer, and patient satisfaction is likely to decline. The potential synergy between human resource management and facility design and operation was investigated to achieve the goal of providing cost containment strategies without sacrificing the quality of services and the commitment of employees. About 700 health care professionals from 10 acute-care hospitals participated in this cross-sectional study. The authors used structural equation modeling to test whether employees' evaluations of their physical work environment and human resource practices were significantly associated with lower job-related anxiety, higher job satisfaction, and higher organizational commitment. The analysis found that employees' evaluations of their physical work environment and human resource practices influenced their job-related feelings and attitudes. Perceived organizational support mediated this relationship. The study also found a small but positive interaction effect between the physical work environment and human resource practices. The influence of physical work environment was small, mainly because of the high predictive value of human resource practices and strong confounding variables included in the analysis. This study specifically showed the role of facility design in reducing job-related anxiety among caregivers. Preliminary evidence is provided that facility design can be used as a managerial tool for improving job-related attitudes and feelings of employees and earning their commitment. Providing a healthy and safe work environment can be perceived by employees as an indication that the organization respects them and cares about their well-being, which might be reciprocated with higher levels

  18. Knowledge and practices of supervisors on the performance management and development system at rural primary health care facilities in the Limpopo Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashego, Rosemary H; Skaal, Linda

    2016-12-02

    The South African government has introduced Performance Management and Development System (PMDS) as a tool to monitor and manage the performances of health institutions, in order to improve service delivery within primary health care settings. The aim of the study was to determine the knowledge and practices of supervisors regarding PMDS in primary health institutions of the Limpopo Province. A cross-sectional, descriptive, quantitative study was used. A total of 117 participants were sampled using stratified random sampling technique and a questionnaire was used to collect data. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 22.0 was used to analyse both descriptive and inferential statistics. Generally all the respondents had an average (65.8%) understanding of the PMDS processes including the purpose and their roles as supervisors. However, a gap exists between the theoretical knowledge and the actual ability to practise PMDS which was found to be at 52%. There are areas of weakness that still need attention, such as unavailability of PMDS guidelines and lack of training of both supervisors and employees on PMDS. This study highlights the problem of lack of knowledge and skills, unavailability of PMDS policy and poor induction into PMDS. To improve the knowledge and ability to supervise PMDS, proper induction of all PMDS supervisors and periodic in-service training should be done; reference materials, the PMDS policy manuals, are to be made available in the facility and all supervisors be orientated on how to use these manuals.

  19. Strategy of Construction and Demolition Waste Management after Chemical Industry Facilities Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashkinova, I. N.; Batrakova, G. M.; Vaisman, Ya I.

    2017-06-01

    Mixed waste products are generated in the process of irrelevant industrial projects’ removal if conventional techniques of their demolition and dismantling are applied. In Russia the number of unused chemical industry facilities including structures with high rate of wear is growing. In removing industrial buildings and production shops it is used conventional techniques of demolition and dismantling in the process of which mixed waste products are generated. The presence of hazardous chemicals in these wastes makes difficulties for their use and leads to the increasing volume of unutilized residues. In the process of chemical industry facilities’ removal this fact takes on special significance as a high level of hazardous chemicals in the waste composition demands for the realization of unprofitable measures aimed at ensuring environmental and industrial safety. The proposed strategy of managing waste originated from the demolition and dismantling of chemical industry facilities is based on the methodology of industrial metabolism which allows identifying separate material flows of recycled, harmful and ballast components, performing separate collection of components during removal and taking necessary preventive measures. This strategy has been tested on the aniline synthesis plant being in the process of removal. As a result, a flow of 10 wt. %, subjected to decontamination, was isolated from the total volume of construction and demolition waste (C&D waste). The considered approach allowed using the resource potential of more than 80wt. % of waste and minimizing the disposed waste volume.

  20. Automatic Management Systems for the Operation of the Cryogenic Test Facilities for LHC Series Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Tovar-Gonzalez, A; Herblin, L; Lamboy, J P; Vullierme, B

    2006-01-01

    Prior to their final preparation before installation in the tunnel, the ~1800 series superconducting magnets of the LHC machine shall be entirely tested at reception on modular test facilities. The operation 24 hours per day of the cryogenic test facilities is conducted in turn by 3-operator teams, assisted in real time by the use of the Test Bench Priorities Handling System, a process control application enforcing the optimum use of cryogenic utilities and of the "Tasks Tracking System", a web-based e-traveller application handling 12 parallel 38-task test sequences. This paper describes how such computer-based management systems can be used to optimize operation of concurrent test benches within technical boundary conditions given by the cryogenic capacity, and how they can be used to study the efficiency of the automatic steering of all individual cryogenic sub-systems. Finally, this paper presents the overall performance of the cryomagnet test station for the first complete year of operation at high produ...

  1. Effluent Management Facility Evaporator Bottom-Waste Streams Formulation and Waste Form Qualification Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saslow, Sarah A.; Um, Wooyong; Russell, Renee L.

    2017-08-02

    This report describes the results from grout formulation and cementitious waste form qualification testing performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS). These results are part of a screening test that investigates three grout formulations proposed for wide-range treatment of different waste stream compositions expected for the Hanford Effluent Management Facility (EMF) evaporator bottom waste. This work supports the technical development need for alternative disposition paths for the EMF evaporator bottom wastes and future direct feed low-activity waste (DFLAW) operations at the Hanford Site. High-priority activities included simulant production, grout formulation, and cementitious waste form qualification testing. The work contained within this report relates to waste form development and testing, and does not directly support the 2017 Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). However, this work contains valuable information for use in PA maintenance past FY 2017 and future waste form development efforts. The provided results and data should be used by (1) cementitious waste form scientists to further the understanding of cementitious leach behavior of contaminants of concern (COCs), (2) decision makers interested in off-site waste form disposal, and (3) the U.S. Department of Energy, their Hanford Site contractors and stakeholders as they assess the IDF PA program at the Hanford Site. The results reported help fill existing data gaps, support final selection of a cementitious waste form for the EMF evaporator bottom waste, and improve the technical defensibility of long-term waste form risk estimates.

  2. Veterinary biobank facility: development and management for diagnostic and research purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Tina; Dotti, Silvia; Villa, Riccardo; Cinotti, Stefano; Ferrari, Maura

    2015-01-01

    Biobanking is an essential tool for ensuring easy availability of high-quality biomaterial collections that combine essential samples and epidemiological, clinical, and research data for the scientific community. Specimen collection is an integral part of clinical research. Indeed, every year throughout the world, millions of biological samples are stored for diagnostics and research, but in many fields the lack of biological material and models is a major hindrance for ongoing research. A biobank facility provides suitable samples for large-scale screening studies and database repositories. Software dedicated to biological banks simplify sample registration and identification, the cataloging of sample properties (type of sample/specimen, associated diseases and/or therapeutic protocols, environmental information, etc.), sample tracking, quality assurance, and specimen availability characterized by well-defined features. Biobank facilities must adopt good laboratory practices (GLPs) and a stringent quality control system and also comply with ethical issues, when required. The creation of a veterinary network can be useful under different aspects: the first one is related to the importance of animal sciences itself to improve research and strategies in the different branches of the veterinary area, and the second aspect is related to the possibility of data management harmonization to improve scientific cooperation.

  3. Semantic Catalog of Things, Services, and Data to Support a Wind Data Management Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan, E. G.; Elsethagen, T. O.; Berg, L. K.; Macduff, M. C.; Paulson, P. R.; Shaw, W. J.; Sivaraman, C.; Smith, W. P.; Wynne, A.

    2016-08-25

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss how community vocabularies and linked open data best practices are being used to seamlessly link things, data, and off the shelf services to support scientific offshore wind energy research for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Wind and Water Power Program. This is largely made possible by leveraging collaborative advances in the Internet of Things (IoT), Semantic Web, Linked Services, Linked Open Data (LOD), and RDF vocabulary communities, which provide the foundation for our design. By adapting these linked community best practices, we designed a wind characterization data management facility capable of continually collecting, processing, and preservation of in situ and remote sensing instrume

  4. Identifying concepts for studying implementation of information technology in facilities management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Poul; Bonke, Sten

    2014-01-01

    of taking into account organizational and value adding perspectives. Research limitations: The theoretical concepts discussed in this paper are mainly generic and non-technical, and the list is not complete. Finally the concepts discussed have no direct link to the concept of added value. Originality......Purpose: To contribute to identifying a conceptual framework for describing and understanding the processes involved when implementing and using Information Technology (IT) in Facilities Management (FM). This paper discusses how basic concepts from different theories can be applied in parallel when...... from exciting research on IT implementation a range of more generic theoretical concepts applicable to the typical setting or situation of IT implementation in FM has been found. These theoretical concepts all clarify and describe different aspects of the implementation process and they may all...

  5. Mixed waste management facility groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1995 and 1995 summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1995, seven constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. Chloroethene, gross alpha, lead, mercury, and tetrachloroethylene also exceeded final PDWS in one or more wells. Elevated constituents were found in numerous Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1} (Barnwell/McBean) wells and in three Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  6. The Implementation of Performance Measurement System (PMS: Malaysian Facilities Management (FM Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeda N.E.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance Measurement System (PMS is an effective performance measurement tool and technique that is being widely implemented in the global industries. Literature has suggested the significant contributions of its implementation in enhancing the strategic service delivery and performance. However, there is little study undertaken to explore the PMS implementation in Facilities Management (FM industry, particularly focusing on Malaysia. This study explores the PMS practice among FM practitioners and their knowledge in Performance Measurement (PM generally. Findings from this study also proposed the 20 contributing factors that the FM practitioners believed are the barriers in implementing PMS. This research also suggests the future research opportunities in developing a PMS framework that can be used as guidance for FM service delivery in Malaysia.

  7. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    During second quarter 1994, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility were analyzed for selected heavy metals, indicator parameters, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Three parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards. Total organic halogens exceeded the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria in two of the wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters. Conditions affecting determination of groundwater flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, and the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the Crouch Branch Confining Unit were also similar to previous quarters. During second quarter 1994, SRS received SCDHEC approval for five point-of-compliance wells and two plume definition wells near the Met Lab HWMF. Field work has begun on this project.

  8. Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    During first quarter 1995, samples from AMB groundwater monitoring wells at the Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facility (Met Lab HWMF) were analyzed for selected heavy metals, field measurements, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Six parameters exceeded standards during the quarter. As in previous quarters, tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS). Total organic halogens exceeded its Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criterion during first quarter 1995 as in fourth quarter 1994. Aluminum, iron, and manganese, which were not analyzed for during fourth quarter 1994, exceeded the Flag 2 criteria in at least two wells each during first quarter 1995. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the M-Area Aquifer Zone were similar to previous quarters. Conditions affecting the determination of groundwater flow directions and rates in the Upper Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone, and the Middle Sand Aquifer Zone of the Crouch Branch Confining Unit were also similar to previous quarters.

  9. Clinico-therapeutic management of Dimethoate-30% (Rogor poisoning in a non-descript bullock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Dhonde

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A non-descript bullock suffering from dimethoate-30%(Rogor poisoning was treated using Inj. Dexamethasone, Inj. 2-PAM, Inj. B-complex and Sodium Bicarbonate alongwith fluid therapy, the bullock responded well to the therapy and survived. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(6.000: 178-179

  10. The integration of geology, geophysics, petrophysics and petroleum engineering in reservoir delineation, description and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This book covers the proceedings of the first Archie Conference. Topics covered include: reservoir characterization: petrophysical formation evaluation; reservoir properties prediction; origin, description and evaluation of fractured reservoirs; 2-D and 3-D in seismic reservoir delineation and development, and the utilization of geoscience and engineering technology to increase hydrocarbon recovery.

  11. Preliminary assessment of radiological doses in alternative waste management systems without an MRS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Pelto, P.J.; Daling, P.M.; Lavender, J.C.; Fecht, B.A.

    1986-06-01

    This report presents generic analyses of radiological dose impacts of nine hypothetical changes in the operation of a waste management system without a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The waste management activities examined in this study include those for handling commercial spent fuel at nuclear power reactors and at the surface facilities of a deep geologic repository, and the transportation of spent fuel by rail and truck between the reactors and the repository. In the reference study system, the radiological doses to the public and to the occupational workers are low, about 170 person-rem/1000 metric ton of uranium (MTU) handled with 70% of the fuel transported by rail and 30% by truck. The radiological doses to the public are almost entirely from transportation, whereas the doses to the occupational workers are highest at the reactors and the repository. Operating alternatives examined included using larger transportation casks, marshaling rail cars into multicar dedicated trains, consolidating spent fuel at the reactors, and wet or dry transfer options of spent fuel from dry storage casks. The largest contribution to radiological doses per unit of spent fuel for both the public and occupational workers would result from use of truck transportation casks, which are smaller than rail casks. Thus, reducing the number of shipments by increasing cask sizes and capacities (which also would reduce the number of casks to be handled at the terminals) would reduce the radiological doses in all cases. Consolidating spent fuel at the reactors would reduce the radiological doses to the public but would increase the doses to the occupational workers at the reactors.

  12. Principles of Emergency Department facility design for optimal management of mass-casualty incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Pinchas; Goldberg, Scott A; Keng, Jimmy G; Koenig, Kristi L

    2012-04-01

    The Emergency Department (ED) is the triage, stabilization and disposition unit of the hospital during a mass-casualty incident (MCI). With most EDs already functioning at or over capacity, efficient management of an MCI requires optimization of all ED components. While the operational aspects of MCI management have been well described, the architectural/structural principles have not. Further, there are limited reports of the testing of ED design components in actual MCI events. The objective of this study is to outline the important infrastructural design components for optimization of ED response to an MCI, as developed, implemented, and repeatedly tested in one urban medical center. In the authors' experience, the most important aspects of ED design for MCI have included external infrastructure and promoting rapid lockdown of the facility for security purposes; an ambulance bay permitting efficient vehicle flow and casualty discharge; strategic placement of the triage location; patient tracking techniques; planning adequate surge capacity for both patients and staff; sufficient command, control, communications, computers, and information; well-positioned and functional decontamination facilities; adequate, well-located and easily distributed medical supplies; and appropriately built and functioning essential services. Designing the ED to cope well with a large casualty surge during a disaster is not easy, and it may not be feasible for all EDs to implement all the necessary components. However, many of the components of an appropriate infrastructural design add minimal cost to the normal expenditures of building an ED. This study highlights the role of design and infrastructure in MCI preparedness in order to assist planners in improving their ED capabilities. Structural optimization calls for a paradigm shift in the concept of structural and operational ED design, but may be necessary in order to maximize surge capacity, department resilience, and patient and

  13. 1999 Annual Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Correction - Action Report (Volumes I, II, and III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    2000-06-14

    This Corrective Action Report (CAR) for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) is being prepared to comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit Number SC1 890 008 989, dated October 31, 1999. This CAR compiles and presents all groundwater sampling and monitoring activities that are conducted at the MWMF. As set forth in previous agreements with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), all groundwater associated with the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) (comprised of the MWMF, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility, and Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground) will be addressed under this RCRA Permit. This CAR is the first to be written for the MWMF and presents monitoring activities and results as an outcome of Interim Status and limited Permitted Status activities. All 1999 groundwater monitoring activities were conducted while the MWMF was operated during Interim Status. Changes to the groundwater monitoring program were made upon receipt of the RCRA Permit, where feasible. During 1999, 152 single-screened and six multi-screened groundwater monitoring wells at the BGC monitored groundwater quality in the uppermost aquifer as required by the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR), settlement agreements 87-52-SW and 91-51-SW, and RCRA Permit SC1 890 008 989. However, overall compliance with the recently issued RCRA Permit could not be implemented until the year 2000 due to the effective date of the RCRA Permit and scheduling of groundwater monitoring activities. Changes have been made to the groundwater monitoring network to meet Permit requirements for all 2000 sampling events.

  14. West Valley transfer cart control system design description. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, E.C.; Crutcher, R.I.; Halliwell, J.W.; Hileman, M.S.; Moore, M.R.; Nodine, R.N.; Ruppel, F.R.; Vandermolen, R.I.

    1993-01-01

    Detail design of the control system for the West Valley Nuclear Services Vitrification Facility transfer cart has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report documents the requirements and describes the detail design of that equipment and control software. Copies of significant design documents including analysis and testing reports and design drawings are included in the Appendixes.

  15. Rapid assessment of infrastructure of primary health care facilities - a relevant instrument for health care systems management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Stefan; Ngoli, Baltazar; Flessa, Steffen

    2015-05-01

    Health care infrastructure constitutes a major component of the structural quality of a health system. Infrastructural deficiencies of health services are reported in literature and research. A number of instruments exist for the assessment of infrastructure. However, no easy-to-use instruments to assess health facility infrastructure in developing countries are available. Present tools are not applicable for a rapid assessment by health facility staff. Therefore, health information systems lack data on facility infrastructure. A rapid assessment tool for the infrastructure of primary health care facilities was developed by the authors and pilot-tested in Tanzania. The tool measures the quality of all infrastructural components comprehensively and with high standardization. Ratings use a 2-1-0 scheme which is frequently used in Tanzanian health care services. Infrastructural indicators and indices are obtained from the assessment and serve for reporting and tracing of interventions. The tool was pilot-tested in Tanga Region (Tanzania). The pilot test covered seven primary care facilities in the range between dispensary and district hospital. The assessment encompassed the facilities as entities as well as 42 facility buildings and 80 pieces of technical medical equipment. A full assessment of facility infrastructure was undertaken by health care professionals while the rapid assessment was performed by facility staff. Serious infrastructural deficiencies were revealed. The rapid assessment tool proved a reliable instrument of routine data collection by health facility staff. The authors recommend integrating the rapid assessment tool in the health information systems of developing countries. Health authorities in a decentralized health system are thus enabled to detect infrastructural deficiencies and trace the effects of interventions. The tool can lay the data foundation for district facility infrastructure management.

  16. A quarter of a century of electrical engineering and facility management. Academic Centre Rotterdam-Dijkzigt; Een kwart eeuw elektrotechniek en faciliteiten management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Blaricum, W.

    1999-12-01

    The 1975/1976 Annual Report of what was then called the Academisch Ziekenhuis Dijkzigt (Dijkzigt University Hospital) states: 'As the name indicates, the business services (nowadays called facility management) work on a 'commercial' footing: based on the use of modern techniques and methods, they seek to ensure that the business is run economically and smoothly'. In this article attention is paid to the importance of the emergence of digital microelectronics, the modern branch of electrical engineering, for facilities management. The ever more powerful and cheaper computers, PCs and microprocessors have made it possible over the years to manage facilities increasingly effectively and clearly. This has made possible an economical, reliable and smooth business operation. 5 refs.

  17. A platform for population-based weight management: description of a health plan-based integrated systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Nicolaas P; Boucher, Jackie L; Gehling, Eve; Boyle, Raymond G; Jeffery, Robert W

    2002-10-01

    To describe an integrated, operational platform from which mail- and telephone-based health promotion programs are implemented and to specifically relate this approach to weight management programming in a managed care setting. In-depth description of essential systems structures, including people, computer technology, and decision-support protocols. The roles of support staff, counselors, a librarian, and a manager in delivering a weight management program are described. Information availability using computer technology is a critical component in making this system effective and is presented according to its architectural layout and design. Protocols support counselors and administrative support staff in decision making, and a detailed flowchart presents the layout of this part of the system. This platform is described in the context of a weight management program, and we present baseline characteristics of 1801 participants, their behaviors, self-reported medical conditions, and initial pattern of enrollment in the various treatment options. Considering the prevalence and upward trend of overweight and obesity in the United States, a need exists for robust intervention platforms that can systematically support multiple types of programs. Weight management interventions implemented using this platform are scalable to the population level and are sustainable over time despite the limits of defined resources and budgets. The present article describes an innovative approach to reaching a large population with effective programs in an integrated, coordinated, and systematic manner. This comprehensive, robust platform represents an example of how obesity prevention and treatment research may be translated into the applied setting.

  18. Improvement of the management of residual waste in areas without thermal treatment facilities: A life cycle analysis of an Italian management district

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Maria, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.dimaria@unipg.it [LAR Laboratory, Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Via G. Duranti 93, Perugia (Italy); Micale, Caterina; Morettini, Emanuela [LAR Laboratory, Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Via G. Duranti 93, Perugia (Italy); Sisani, Luciano [TSA spa, Via Case Sparse 107, Magione (Italy); Damiano, Roberto [GESENU spa, Via della Molinella 7, Perugia (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • LCA analysis of two option for residual waste management. • Exploitation of mechanical physical sorting facility for extracting recyclable from RMSW. • Processing the mechanically sorted organic fraction in bioreactor landfill. • Sensitivity analysis demonstrate high influence for impact assessment of substitution ratio for recycle materials. - Abstract: Starting from an existing waste management district without thermal treatment facilities, two different management scenarios for residual waste were compared by life cycle assessment (LCA). The adoption of a bioreactor landfill for managing the mechanically sorted organic fraction instead of bio-stabilization led to reduction of global warming and fresh water eutrophication by 50% and 10%, respectively. Extraction of recyclables from residual waste led to avoided emissions for particulate matter, acidification and resource depletion impact categories. Marginal energy and the amount of energy recovered from landfill gas marginally affected the LCA results. On the contrary the quality of the recyclables extracted can significantly modify the eco profile of the management schemes.

  19. Characteristics and treatment outcomes of tuberculosis patients who “transfer-in” to health facilities in Harare City, Zimbabwe: a descriptive cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takarinda Kudakwashe C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zimbabwe is among the 22 Tuberculosis (TB high burden countries worldwide and runs a well-established, standardized recording and reporting system on case finding and treatment outcomes. During TB treatment, patients transfer-out and transfer-in to different health facilities, but there are few data from any national TB programmes about whether this process happens and if so to what extent. The aim of this study therefore was to describe the characteristics and outcomes of TB patients that transferred into Harare City health department clinics under the national TB programme. Specific objectives were to determine i the proportion of a cohort of TB patients registered as transfer-in, ii the characteristics and treatment outcomes of these transfer-in patients and iii whether their treatment outcomes had been communicated back to their respective referral districts after completion of TB treatment. Methods Data were abstracted from patient files and district TB registers for all transfer-in TB patients registered from January to December 2010 within Harare City. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results Of the 7,742 registered TB patients in 2010, 263 (3.5% had transferred-in: 148 (56% were males and overall median age was 33 years (IQR, 26–40. Most transfer-in patients (74% came during the intensive phase of TB treatment, and 58% were from rural health-facilities. Of 176 patients with complete data on the time period between transfer-in and transfer-out, only 85 (48% arrived for registration in Harare from referral districts within 1 week of being transferred-out. Transfer-in patients had 69% treatment success, but in 21% treatment outcome status was not evaluated. Overall, 3/212 (1.4% transfer-in TB patients had their TB treatment outcomes reported back to their referral districts. Conclusion There is need to devise better strategies of following up TB patients to their referral Directly Observed Treatment (DOT centres

  20. Tracheostomy management in acute care facilities--a matter of teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Vicki; Giles, Michelle; Shylan, Gai; Austin, Nicole; Smith, Kelvin; Morison, Jane; Archer, Wendy

    2010-05-01

    Implement and evaluate an inter-disciplinary team approach to tracheostomy management in non-critical care. Trends towards early tracheostomy in intensive care units (ICU) have led to increased numbers of tracheostomy patients. Together with the push for earlier discharge from ICU, this poses challenges across disciplines and wards. Even though tracheostomy is performed across a range of patient groups, tracheostomy care is seen as the domain of specialist clinicians in critical care. It is crucial to ensure quality care regardless of the patient's destination after ICU. A mixed method evaluation incorporating quantitative and qualitative approaches. Data collection included pre-implementation and postimplementation clinical audits and staff surveys and a postimplementation tracheostomy team focus group. Descriptive and inferential analysis was used to identify changes in clinical indicators and staff experiences. Focus group data were analysed using iterative processes of thematic analysis. Findings revealed significant reductions in mean hospital length of stay (LOS) for survivors from 50-27 days (p importance of inter-disciplinary teamwork in achieving effective patient outcomes and efficiencies. It offers a model of inter-disciplinary practice, supported by communication and data management that can be replicated across other patient groups.

  1. Subsurface Conditions Description of the B and BX and BY Waste Management Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WOOD, M.I.

    2000-03-13

    This document provides a discussion of the subsurface conditions relevant to the occurrence and migration of contaminants in the vadose zone and groundwater underlying the 241-B, -BX, and -BY tank farms. This document provides a concise summary of existing information in support of characterization planning. This document includes a description of the available environmental contamination data and a limited, qualitative interpretation of these data.

  2. Using a contingent valuation approach for improved solid waste management facility: evidence from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afroz, Rafia; Masud, Muhammad Mehedi

    2011-04-01

    This study employed contingent valuation method to estimate the willingness to pay (WTP) of the households to improve the waste collection system in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The objective of this study is to evaluate how household WTP changes when recycling and waste separation at source is made mandatory. The methodology consisted of asking people directly about their WTP for an additional waste collection service charge to cover the costs of a new waste management project. The new waste management project consisted of two versions: version A (recycling and waste separation is mandatory) and version B (recycling and waste separation is not mandatory). The households declined their WTP for version A when they were asked to separate the waste at source although all the facilities would be given to them for waste separation. The result of this study indicates that the households were not conscious about the benefits of recycling and waste separation. Concerted efforts should be taken to raise environmental consciousness of the households through education and more publicity regarding waste separation, reducing and recycling.

  3. Integrated, long term, sustainable, cost effective biosolids management at a large Canadian wastewater treatment facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBlance, R.J.; Allain, C.J.; Laughton, P.J.; Henry, J.G.

    2003-07-01

    The Greater Moncton Sewerage Commission's 115 000 m{sup 3}/d advanced, chemically assisted primary wastewater treatment facility located in New Brunswick, Canada, has developed an integrated, long term, sustainable, cost effective programme for the management and beneficial utilization of biosolids from lime stabilized raw sludge. The paper overviews biosolids production, lime stabilization, conveyance, and odour control followed by an indepth discussion of the wastewater sludge as a resource programme, namely: composting, mine site reclamation, landfill cover, land application for agricultural use, tree farming, sod farm base as a soil enrichment, topsoil manufacturing. The paper also addresses the issues of metals, pathogens, organic compounds, the quality control program along with the regulatory requirements. Biosolids capital and operating costs are presented. Research results on removal of metals from primary sludge using a unique biological process known as BIOSOL as developed by the University of Toronto, Canada to remove metals and destroy pathogens are presented. The paper also discusses an ongoing cooperative research project with the Universite de Moncton where various mixtures of plant biosolids are composted with low quality soil. Integration, approach to sustainability and ''cumulative effects'' as part of the overall biosolids management strategy is also discussed. (author)

  4. Response to cotrimoxazole in the management of childhood pneumonia in first-level health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorani, Q A; Qazi, S A; Rasmussen, Z A; Rehman, G N; Khan, S S; Muhammadullah, I; Mohammad, Y K; Sher, G A; Munir, N H

    2006-08-01

    Reports of high levels of antimicrobial resistance to cotrimoxazole in children with non-severe pneumonia (NSP) have prompted calls for a change to amoxicillin in the therapeutic guidelines at the first-level health care facility (FLHF). FLHFs lack data about the use of World Health Organization (WHO) acute respiratory infection (ARI) standard case management (SCM). To apply ARI SCM guidelines at the FLHF, assess clinical outcome of NSP with oral cotrimoxazole and determine the risk factors influencing treatment outcome. Health care workers (HCWs) at 14 health centres managed children aged 2-59 months with NSP according to ARI SCM guidelines. The primary outcome was treatment failure, including change of antibiotic therapy and loss to follow-up. Of 949 children enrolled, 110 (11.6%) failed therapy with oral cotrimoxazole. Clinical failure was significantly higher among children presenting with a fast respiratory rate of > or = 15 breaths/min above normal for age and wheezing on examination. To treat children with NSP at the FLHF, oral cotrimoxazole is an acceptable treatment choice in view of the efficacy, cost and ease of use. In children with wheezing and signs of pneumonia, the decision to use antibiotic therapy should be made after a trial of bronchodilator therapy.

  5. Financial Management of New York's Charter Schools: A Normative, Descriptive, and Prescriptive Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Brian O.; Finnigan, Kara S.

    2009-01-01

    Surprisingly little is known about the financial management practices of charter schools. The literature offer policymakers only anecdotal answers to the following important questions: Who manages charter school finances and what educational and previous employment experiences do they bring to their positions? What do audited financial statements…

  6. Financial Management of New York's Charter Schools: A Normative, Descriptive, and Prescriptive Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Brian O.; Finnigan, Kara S.

    2009-01-01

    Surprisingly little is known about the financial management practices of charter schools. The literature offer policymakers only anecdotal answers to the following important questions: Who manages charter school finances and what educational and previous employment experiences do they bring to their positions? What do audited financial statements…

  7. A descriptive analysis of the institutional frameworks for disaster management in Uganda: structures, functions and gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayega, R W; Wafula, M R; Woboya, V; Musenero, M; Omale, A; Orach, G C; Kiguli, J; Kabagambe, G; Bazeyo, W

    2013-06-01

    There is insufficient documentation of the institutional frameworks for disaster management and resilience at different levels in sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of this study was to describe the institutional framework for disaster management in Uganda, and to identify actionable gaps at the different levels. This was part of a multi-country assessment in which 6 countries in Eastern Africa developed and applied a common tool. The assessment was qualitative in nature employing a mixed methods approach including review of documents, interviews with key informants from agencies involved in disaster management in Uganda, group discussions with stakeholder and synthesis meetings of the assessment team. The Office of the Prime Minister is the lead agency for disaster management, but management of disasters of a technical nature is devolved to line ministries (e.g. epidemics by the Health Ministry and Epizootics by the Agriculture Ministry). A new policy spells out disaster management structures at national, district, sub-county, and village levels. Key challenges included coordination, more focus on prevention than risk reduction, differences in capacity between sectors and inadequate inter-sectoral collaboration. The new policy and structures have not yet been rolled out to districts and sub-district levels, and districts lack a line item budget for disaster capacity building. The institutional framework for disaster management in Uganda needs to be strengthened at all levels through initiation of the relevant structures, training, and resource allocation so that they develop disaster management plans.

  8. Proceedings of the tenth annual DOE low-level waste management conference: Session 3: Disposal technology and facility development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-12-01

    This document contains ten papers on various aspects of low-level radioactive waste management. Topics include: design and construction of a facility; alternatives to shallow land burial; the fate of tritium and carbon 14 released to the environment; defense waste management; engineered sorbent barriers; remedial action status report; and the disposal of mixed waste in Texas. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

  9. Practice on Application of TPM Facility Management Mode%TPM设备管理模式导入实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹玉芬

    2014-01-01

    介绍TPM管理模式的内容,具体分析导入过程及取得成效,指出TPM管理模式导入有利于企业综合竞争力的提升。%The paper describes what TPM management is and How it is applied specifically as well as what effect it brings. The application of TPM facility management mode can improve the comprehensive competitiveness of an enterprise.

  10. From Revolution to Evolution: 21 Years of the IRIS Data Management Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, R. B.; Ahern, T. K.; Trabant, C. M.; Casey, R.

    2009-12-01

    A revolution is defined as a "drastic and far-reaching change in the way of thinking and behaving", and this describes the effect that the IRIS Data Management System (DMS) has had in the framework of seismological research. The IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) prototype began operation at theUniversity of Texas at Austin in 1988 and has evolved to to a fully functioning facility at the University of Washington in Seattle. The focus of this submission is to share an historical timeline of events related to the DMC, a bit of scrap-booking perhaps, centered around the business of waveform data management conducted by IRIS and it's partners. We hope to illustrate how the successful philosophy of sharing unrestricted data, openly collaborating with a global network of networks, and partnering with computer and software industry vendors that have supported our community's academic research, has enabled generations of seismologists to both curate and continually "mine" the ever-growing 45 years of digital data currently stored in the perpetual archive located in Seattle, WA. At the time that the Loma Prieta Earthquake shook and burned San Francisco on October 17, 1989, there were only 3 stations which had dial-up modems enabling what then was considered "fast access" to waveform data delivery from them back to the DMC. This was considered the first test of the DMC, since waveform data were collected and distributed within days of this event. But this was only a foretelling of things to come, since the rates of archiving and distribution have continually grown to a current 1900+ stations and a 17,000+ channel count of real-time data streaming in and out of the DMC daily, totaling 50 Terabytes of data shipped in 2009 alone. We will attempt to summarize the important technological challenges, solutions, and growth of the DMC with the goal of illustrating that "if you build it, they will come", and how this could be useful to other organizations.

  11. Evaporation Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Effluent Management Facility Core Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Mcclane, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation, and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator, in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF), and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator, so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of the LMOGC stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would reduce the need for closely integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Long-term implementation of this option after WTP start-up would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste, amongst the other operational complexities such a recycle stream presents. In order to accurately plan for the disposition path, it is key to experimentally determine the fate of contaminants. To do this, testing is needed to accurately account for the buffering chemistry of the components, determine the achievable evaporation end point, identify insoluble solids that form, and determine the distribution of key regulatory-impacting constituents. The LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures, have limited solubility in the glass waste form, and represent a materials corrosion concern, such as halides and sulfate. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components will accumulate in the Melter Condensate

  12. Piloting laboratory quality system management in six health facilities in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Mbah

    Full Text Available Achieving accreditation in laboratories is a challenge in Nigeria like in most African countries. Nigeria adopted the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa Stepwise Laboratory (Quality Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (WHO/AFRO- SLIPTA in 2010. We report on FHI360 effort and progress in piloting WHO-AFRO recognition and accreditation preparedness in six health facility laboratories in five different states of Nigeria.Laboratory assessments were conducted at baseline, follow up and exit using the WHO/AFRO- SLIPTA checklist. From the total percentage score obtained, the quality status of laboratories were classified using a zero to five star rating, based on the WHO/AFRO quality improvement stepwise approach. Major interventions include advocacy, capacity building, mentorship and quality improvement projects.At baseline audit, two of the laboratories attained 1- star while the remaining four were at 0- star. At follow up audit one lab was at 1- star, two at 3-star and three at 4-star. At exit audit, four labs were at 4- star, one at 3-star and one at 2-star rating. One laboratory dropped a 'star' at exit audit, while others consistently improved. The two weakest elements at baseline; internal audit (4% and occurrence/incidence management (15% improved significantly, with an exit score of 76% and 81% respectively. The elements facility and safety was the major strength across board throughout the audit exercise.This effort resulted in measurable and positive impact on the laboratories. We recommend further improvement towards a formal international accreditation status and scale up of WHO/AFRO- SLIPTA implementation in Nigeria.

  13. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Correction Action Report, Third and Fourth Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1999-04-23

    The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the F-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

  14. H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report, Third and Fourth Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1999-04-23

    The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the H-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

  15. Radiation management at the occurrence of accident and restoration works. Fire and explosion of asphalt solidification processing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyabe, Kenjiro; Jin, K.; Namiki, A.; Mizutani, K.; Horiuchi, N.; Saruta, J. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Health and Safety Division, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ninomiya, Kazushige [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tsuruga, Fukui (Japan). Monju Construction Office

    1998-06-01

    Fire and explosion accident in the cell of Asphalt Solidification Processing Facility(ASP) in PNC took placed at March 11 in 1997. Following to the alarm of many radiation monitoring system in the facility, some of workers inhale radioactive materials in their bodies. Indication values of an exhaust monitor installed in the first auxiliary exhaust stack increased suddenly. A large number of windows, doors, and shutters in the facility were raptured by the explosion. A lot of radioactive materials blew up and were released to the outside of the facility. Reinforcement of radiation surveillance function, nose smearing test for the workers and confirmation of contamination situation were implemented on the fire. Investigation of radiation situation, radiation management on the site, exposure management for the workers, surveillance of exhaustion, and restoration works of the damaged radiation management monitoring system were carried out after the explosion. The detailed data of radiation management measures taken during three months after the accident are described in the paper. (M. Suetake)

  16. Sandia National Laboratories Facilities Management and Operations Center Design Standards Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattor, Steven [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The manual contains general requirements that apply to nonnuclear and nonexplosive facilities. For design and construction requirements for modifications to nuclear or explosive facilities, see the project-specific design requirements noted in the Design Criteria.

  17. Experiences of registered nurses as managers and leaders in residential aged care facilities: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Drew

    2011-12-01

    The phenomenon of an ageing population is being experienced globally, as countries struggle to change and improve residential models of care and provide services to the elderly. The role of the registered nurse (RN) is considered crucial to the clinical governance and management of care given. To date, however, no systematic review has examined the RN's experience in leadership and management. The objective of this review is to critically appraise, synthesise and present best available evidence on the experiences of RNs as clinical leaders and managers in residential aged care facilities. This review considered qualitative research papers that addressed the experiences of RNs as clinical leaders and managers in residential aged care facilities. Participants of interest were RNs, nurse leaders, nurses holding registration and or regulation under a board of nursing, nurses working in residential aged care and long-term care facilities. The diversity and use of language to describe nurses' roles and models of care for the elderly care environment were considered in the review. The search strategy sought to find both published studies and papers, limited to the English language and published between January 1997 and February 2011. An initial limited search was done in Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases to identify the key words contained in the title or abstract and index terms used to describe the relevant terms in the article. A second extensive search was undertaken and extended to other relevant databases using all identified keywords and index terms. The third step involved searching reference lists and bibliographies of chosen articles for additional studies. Each paper was assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological quality prior to inclusion in the review using an appropriate critical appraisal instrument from the System for the Unified Management

  18. Improving data management and dissemination in web based information systems by semantic enrichment of descriptive data aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Steffen; Wehrmann, Thilo; Klinger, Verena; Schettler, Ingo; Huth, Juliane; Künzer, Claudia; Dech, Stefan

    2010-10-01

    The German-Vietnamese water-related information system for the Mekong Delta (WISDOM) project supports business processes in Integrated Water Resources Management in Vietnam. Multiple disciplines bring together earth and ground based observation themes, such as environmental monitoring, water management, demographics, economy, information technology, and infrastructural systems. This paper introduces the components of the web-based WISDOM system including data, logic and presentation tier. It focuses on the data models upon which the database management system is built, including techniques for tagging or linking metadata with the stored information. The model also uses ordered groupings of spatial, thematic and temporal reference objects to semantically tag datasets to enable fast data retrieval, such as finding all data in a specific administrative unit belonging to a specific theme. A spatial database extension is employed by the PostgreSQL database. This object-oriented database was chosen over a relational database to tag spatial objects to tabular data, improving the retrieval of census and observational data at regional, provincial, and local areas. While the spatial database hinders processing raster data, a "work-around" was built into WISDOM to permit efficient management of both raster and vector data. The data model also incorporates styling aspects of the spatial datasets through styled layer descriptions (SLD) and web mapping service (WMS) layer specifications, allowing retrieval of rendered maps. Metadata elements of the spatial data are based on the ISO19115 standard. XML structured information of the SLD and metadata are stored in an XML database. The data models and the data management system are robust for managing the large quantity of spatial objects, sensor observations, census and document data. The operational WISDOM information system prototype contains modules for data management, automatic data integration, and web services for data

  19. Calculation Package for the Analysis of Performance of Cells 1-6, with Underdrain, of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales D.

    2010-03-30

    This calculation package presents the results of an assessment of the performance of the 6 cell design of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The calculations show that the new cell 6 design at the EMWMF meets the current WAC requirement. QA/QC steps were taken to verify the input/output data for the risk model and data transfer from modeling output files to tables and calculation.

  20. Challenges in Type 1 diabetes management in South East Asia: Descriptive situational assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jothydev Kesavadev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of type 1 diabetes is a challenging issue in South East Asia. Unlike in the developed countries, patients have to procure insulin, glucometer strips and other treatment facilities from their own pockets. Coupled with poor resources are the difficulties with diagnosis, insulin initiation, insulin storage, marital and emotional challenges. Being a disease affecting only a minority of people, it is largely ignored by the governments and policy makers. Comprehensive diagnostic, treatment and team based educational facilities are available only in the speciality diabetes centers in the private sector whereas majority of the subjects with type 1 diabetes are from a poor socio-economic background. Unlike in the Western world, being known as a diabetes patient is a social sigma and poses huge emotional burden living with the disease and getting married. Even with best of the resources, long-term treatment of type 1 diabetes still remains a huge challenge across the globe. In this review, authors from India, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Myanmar and Bangladesh detail the country-specific challenges and discuss the possible solutions.