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Sample records for facility ldef materials

  1. The preliminary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) materials data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funk, J.G.; Strickland, J.W.; Davis, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    A preliminary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Materials Data Base was developed by the LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG). The LDEF Materials Data Base is envisioned to eventually contain the wide variety and vast quantity of materials data generated for LDEF. The data is searchable by optical, thermal, and mechanical properties, exposure parameters (such as atomic oxygen flux), and author(s) or principal investigator(s). The LDEF Materials Data Base was incorporated into the Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS). MAPTIS is a collection of materials data which was computerized and is available to engineers, designers, and researchers in the aerospace community involved in the design and development of spacecraft and related hardware. This paper describes the LDEF Materials Data Base and includes step-by-step example searches using the data base. Information on how to become an authorized user of the system is included

  2. The preliminary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) materials data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Joan G.; Strickland, John W.; Davis, John M.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Materials Data Base was developed by the LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG). The LDEF Materials Data Base is envisioned to eventually contain the wide variety and vast quantity of materials data generated for LDEF. The data is searchable by optical, thermal, and mechanical properties, exposure parameters (such as atomic oxygen flux), and author(s) or principal investigator(s). The LDEF Materials Data Base was incorporated into the Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS). MAPTIS is a collection of materials data which was computerized and is available to engineers, designers, and researchers in the aerospace community involved in the design and development of spacecraft and related hardware. This paper describes the LDEF Materials Data Base and includes step-by-step example searches using the data base. Information on how to become an authorized user of the system is included.

  3. LDEF materials data bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Joan G.; Strickland, John W.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the accompanying experiments were composed of and contained a wide variety of materials representing the largest collection of materials flown in low Earth orbit (LEO) and retrieved for ground based analysis to date. The results and implications of the mechanical, thermal, optical, and electrical data from these materials are the foundation on which future LEO space missions will be built. The LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) has been charged with establishing and developing data bases to document these materials and their performance to assure not only that the data are archived for future generations but also that the data are available to the spacecraft user community in an easily accessed, user-friendly form. This paper discusses the format and content of the three data bases developed or being developed to accomplish this task. The hardware and software requirements for each of these three data bases are discussed along with current availability of the data bases. This paper also serves as a user's guide to the MAPTIS LDEF Materials Data Base.

  4. Radioactivities of Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) materials: Baggage and bonanzas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.R.; Hurley, D.L.

    1991-08-01

    Radioactivities in materials onboard the returned Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite have been studied by a variety of techniques. Among the most powerful is low-background Ge-semiconductor detector gamma-ray spectrometry, illustrated here by results obtained at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) Low Bakground Facilities, in a multi-laboratory collaboration coordinated by Dr. Thomas Parnell's team at the Marshall Spacecraft Center, Huntsville, Alabama

  5. LDEF materials: An overview of the interim findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    The flight and retrieval of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) provided an opportunity for the study of the low-Earth orbit (LEO) environment and long-duration space environmental effect (SEE) on materials that are unparalleled in the history of the U.S. space program. The 5.8-year flight of LDEF greatly enhanced the potential value of materials data from LDEF to the international SEE community, compared to that of the original 1-year flight plan. The remarkable flight attitude stability of LDEF enables specific analyses of various individual and combined effects of LEO environmental parameters on identical materials of the same space vehicle. NASA recognized the potential by forming the LDEF Space Environmental Effects on Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) to address the greatly expanded materials and LEO space environment parameter analysis opportunities available in the LDEF structure, experiment trays, and corollary measurements, so that the combined value of all LDEF materials data to current and future space missions will be assessed and documented. This paper provides an overview of the interim LDEF materials findings of the Principal Investigators and the Materials Special Investigation Group. These revelations are based on observations of LEO environmental effects on materials made in-space during LDEF retrieval and during LDEF tray deintegration at the Kennedy Space Center, and on findings of approximately 1.5 years of laboratory analyses of LDEF materials by the LDEF materials scientists. These findings were extensively reviewed and discussed at the MSIG-sponsored LDEF Materials Workshop '91. The results are presented in a format which categorizes the revelations as clear findings or confusing/unexplained findings and resultant needs for new space materials developments and ground simulation testing/analytical modeling

  6. LDEF materials special investigation group's data bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, John W.; Funk, Joan G.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was composed of and contained a wide array of materials, representing the largest collection of materials flown for space exposure and returned for ground-based analyses to date. The results and implications of the data from these materials are the foundation on which future space missions will be built. The LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) has been tasked with establishing and developing data bases to document these materials and their performance to assure not only that the data are archived for future generations but also that the data are available to the space user community in an easily accessed, user-friendly form. The format and content of the data bases developed or being developed to accomplish this task are discussed. The hardware and software requirements for each of the three data bases are discussed along with current availability of the data bases.

  7. Materials And Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) LDEF materials data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Joan G.; Strickland, John W.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Materials Data Base was developed by the LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG). The LDEF Materials Data Base is envisioned to eventually contain the wide variety and vast quantity of materials data generated from LDEF. The data is searchable by optical, thermal, and mechanical properties, exposure parameters (such as atomic oxygen flux) and author(s) or principal investigator(s). Tne LDEF Materials Data Base was incorporated into the Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS). MAPTIS is a collection of materials data which has been computerized and is available to engineers, designers, and researchers in the aerospace community involved in the design and development of spacecraft and related hardware. The LDEF Materials Data Base is described and step-by-step example searches using the data base are included. Information on how to become an authorized user of the system is included.

  8. LDEF materials results for spacecraft applications: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Dooling, D.

    1995-03-01

    To address the challenges of space environmental effects, NASA designed the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for an 18-month mission to expose thousands of samples of candidate materials that might be used on a space station or other orbital spacecraft. LDEF was launched in April 1984 and was to have been returned to Earth in 1985. Changes in mission schedules postponed retrieval until January 1990, after 69 months in orbit. Analyses of the samples recovered from LDEF have provided spacecraft designers and managers with the most extensive data base on space materials phenomena. Many LDEF samples were greatly changed by extended space exposure. Among even the most radially altered samples, NASA and its science teams are finding a wealth of surprising conclusions and tantalizing clues about the effects of space on materials. Many were discussed at the first two LDEF results conferences and subsequent professional papers. The LDEF Materials Results for Spacecraft Applications Conference was convened in Huntsville to discuss implications for spacecraft design. Already, paint and thermal blanket selections for space station and other spacecraft have been affected by LDEF data. This volume synopsizes those results.

  9. LDEF Materials Workshop 1991, part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, B.A.; Young, P.R.

    1992-09-01

    The workshop comprised a series of technical sessions on materials themes, followed by theme panel meetings. Themes included materials, environmental parameters, and data bases; contamination; thermal control and protective coatings and surface treatments; polymers and films; polymer matrix composites; metals, ceramics, and optical materials; lubricants adhesives, seals, fasteners, solar cells, and batteries. This report contains most of the papers presented at the technical sessions. It also contains theme panel reports and visual aids. This document continues the LDEF Space Environmental Effects on Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) pursuit of its charter to investigate the effects of LEO exposure on materials which where not originally planned to be test specimens and to integrate this information with data generated by principal investigators into an LDEF materials data base. Separate abstract have been prepared for papers in this report

  10. Analysis of materials from MSFC LDEF experiments. Final report, February 1990-July 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.B.

    1991-07-01

    In preparation for the arrival of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) samples, a material testing and handling approach was developed for the evaluation of the materials. A configured lab was made ready for the de-integration of the LDEF experiments. The lab was prepared to clean room specifications and arranged with the appropriate clean benches, tables, lab benches, clean room tools, particulate counter, and calibrated and characterized analytical instrumentation. Clean room procedures were followed. Clean room attire and shoe cleaning equipment were selected and installed for those entering. Upon arrival of the shipping crates they were taken to the lab, logged in, and opened for examination. The sample trays were then opened for inspection and test measurements. The control sample measurements were made prior to placement into handling and transport containers for the flight sample measurements and analysis. Both LDEF flight samples and LDEF type materials were analyzed and tested for future flight candidate material evaluation. Both existing and newly purchased equipment was used for the testing and evaluation. Existing Space Simulation Systems had to be upgraded to incorporate revised test objectives and approaches. Fixtures such as special configured sample holders, water, power and LN2 feed-throughs, temperature measurement and control, front surface mirrors for reflectance and deposition, and UV grade windows had to be designed, fabricated, and installed into systems to achieve the revised requirements. New equipment purchased for LDEF analysis was incorporated into and/or used with existing components and systems. A partial list of this equipment includes a portable monochromator, enhanced UV System, portable helium leak detector for porosity and leak measurements, new turbo pumping system, vacuum coaster assembly, cryopumps, and analytical and data acquisition equipment

  11. Data bases for LDEF results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnhoff-Hlavacek, Gail

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried 57 experiments and 10,000 specimens for some 200 LDEF experiment investigators. The external surface of LDEF had a large variety of materials exposed to the space environment which were tested preflight, during flight, and post flight. Thermal blankets, optical materials, thermal control paints, aluminum, and composites are among the materials flown. The investigations have produced an abundance of analysis results. One of the responsibilities of the Boeing Support Contract, Materials and Systems Special Investigation Group, is to collate and compile that information into an organized fashion. The databases developed at Boeing to accomplish this task is described.

  12. Ionizing radiation exposure of LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. V. (Editor); Heinrich, W. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was launched into orbit by the Space Shuttle 'Challenger' mission 41C on 6 April 1984 and was deployed on 8 April 1984. The original altitude of the circular orbit was 258.5 nautical miles (479 km) with the orbital inclination being 28.5 degrees. The 21,500 lb NASA Langley Research Center satellite, having dimensions of some 30x14 ft was one of the largest payloads ever deployed by the Space Shuttle. LDEF carried 57 major experiments and remained in orbit five years and nine months (completing 32,422 orbits). It was retrieved by the Shuttle 'Columbia' on January 11, 1990. By that time, the LDEF orbit had decayed to the altitude of 175 nm (324 km). The experiments were mounted around the periphery of the LDEF on 86 trays and involved the representation of more than 200 investigators, 33 private companies, 21 universities, seven NASA centers, nine Department of Defense laboratories and eight foreign countries. The experiments covered a wide range of disciplines including basic science, electronics, optics, materials, structures, power and propulsion. The data contained in the LDEF mission represents an invaluable asset and one which is not likely to be duplicated in the foreseeable future. The data and the subsequent knowledge which will evolve from the analysis of the LDEF experiments will have a very important bearing on the design and construction of the Space Station Freedom and indeed on other long-term, near-earth orbital space missions. A list of the LDEF experiments according to experiment category and sponsor is given, as well as a list of experiments containing radiation detectors on LDEF including the LDEF experiment number, the title of the experiment, the principal investigator, and the type of radiation detectors carried by the specific experiment.

  13. Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) optical systems SIG summary and database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnhoff-Hlavacek, Gail

    1992-01-01

    The main objectives of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Optical Systems Special Investigative Group (SIG) Discipline are to develop a database of experimental findings on LDEF optical systems and elements hardware, and provide an optical system overview. Unlike the electrical and mechanical disciplines, the optics effort relies primarily on the testing of hardware at the various principal investigator's laboratories, since minimal testing of optical hardware was done at Boeing. This is because all space-exposed optics hardware are part of other individual experiments. At this time, all optical systems and elements testing by experiment investigator teams is not complete, and in some cases has hardly begun. Most experiment results to date, document observations and measurements that 'show what happened'. Still to come from many principal investigators is a critical analysis to explain 'why it happened' and future design implications. The original optical system related concerns and the lessons learned at a preliminary stage in the Optical Systems Investigations are summarized. The design of the Optical Experiments Database and how to acquire and use the database to review the LDEF results are described.

  14. Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) optical systems SIG summary and database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnhoff-Hlavacek, Gail

    1992-09-01

    The main objectives of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Optical Systems Special Investigative Group (SIG) Discipline are to develop a database of experimental findings on LDEF optical systems and elements hardware, and provide an optical system overview. Unlike the electrical and mechanical disciplines, the optics effort relies primarily on the testing of hardware at the various principal investigator's laboratories, since minimal testing of optical hardware was done at Boeing. This is because all space-exposed optics hardware are part of other individual experiments. At this time, all optical systems and elements testing by experiment investigator teams is not complete, and in some cases has hardly begun. Most experiment results to date, document observations and measurements that 'show what happened'. Still to come from many principal investigators is a critical analysis to explain 'why it happened' and future design implications. The original optical system related concerns and the lessons learned at a preliminary stage in the Optical Systems Investigations are summarized. The design of the Optical Experiments Database and how to acquire and use the database to review the LDEF results are described.

  15. Durability evaluation of photovoltaic blanket materials exposed on LDEF tray S1003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutledge, S.K.; Olle, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Several candidate protective coatings on Kapton and uncoated Kapton were exposed to the low Earth orbital (LEO) environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) to determine if the coatings could be used to protect polymeric substrates from degradation in the LEO environment. The coatings that were evaluated were 700 A of aluminum oxide, 650 A of silicon dioxide, and 650 A of a 4 percent polytetrafluoroethylene-96 percent silicon dioxide mixed coating. All of the coatings evaluated were ion beam sputter deposited. These materials were exposed to a very low atomic oxygen fluence (4.8 x 10 exp 19 atoms/sq. cm) as a result of the experiment tray being located 98 degrees from the ram direction. As a result of the low atomic oxygen fluence, determination of a change in mass was not possible for any of the samples including the uncoated Kapton. There was no evidence of spalling of any of the coatings after the approximately 33,600 thermal cycles recorded for LDEF. The surface of the uncoated Kapton, however, did show evidence of grazing incidence texturing. There was a 7-8 percent increase in solar absorptance for the silicon dioxide and aluminum oxide coated Kapton and only a 4 percent increase for the mixed coating. It appears that the addition of a small amount of fluoropolymer may reduce the magnitude of absorptance increase due to environmental exposure. Thermal emittance did not change significantly for any of the exposed samples. Scanning electron microscopy revealed few micrometeoroid or debris impacts, but the impact sites found indicated that the extent of damage or cracking of the coating around the defect site did not extend beyond a factor of three of the impact crater diameter. This limiting of impact damage is of great significance for the durability of thin film coatings used for protection against the LEO environment

  16. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is being carried out in order to gather information about the low earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on materials. The large mass of the LDEF spacecraft, its stabilized configuration, and long mission duration have presented an opportunity to determine space radiation-induced radioactivities with a precision not possible before. Data presented include preliminary activities for steel and aluminum structural samples, and activation subexperiment foils. Effects seen in the data show a clear indication of the trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly and suggest contributions from different sources of external radiation fluxes.

  17. Effects of the LDEF orbital environment on the reflectance of optical mirror materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, Howard; Fleetwood, Charles, Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Specimens of eight different optical mirror materials were flown in low earth orbit as part of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) manifest to determine their ability to withstand exposure to the residual atomic oxygen and other environmental effects at those altitudes. Optical thin films of aluminum, gold, iridium, osmium, platinum, magnesium fluoride-overcoated aluminum and reactively deposited, silicon monoxide-protected aluminum, all of which were vacuum deposited on polished fused silica substrates, were included as part of Experiment S0010, Exposure of Spacecraft Coatings. Two specimens of polished, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide were installed in sites available in Experiment A0114, Interaction of Atomic Oxygen with Solid Surfaces at Orbital Altitudes, which included trays in two of the spacecraft bays, one on the leading edge and the other on the trailing edge. One of the silicon carbide samples was located in each of these trays. This paper will compare specular reflectance data from the preflight and postflight measurements made on each of these samples and attempt to explain the changes in light of the specific environments to which the experiments were exposed.

  18. Characterization of selected LDEF polymer matrix resin composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Philip R.; Slemp, Wayne S.; Witte, William G., Jr.; Shen, James Y.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of selected graphite fiber reinforced epoxy (934 and 5208) and polysulfone (P1700) matrix resin composite materials which received 5 years and 10 months of exposure to the LEO environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility is reported. Resin loss and a decrease in mechanical performance as well as dramatic visual effects were observed. However, chemical characterization including infrared, thermal, and selected solution property measurements showed that the molecular structure of the polymeric matrix had not changed significantly in response to this exposure. The potential effect of a silicon-containing molecular contamination of these specimens is addressed.

  19. Ionizing radiation exposure of LDEF (pre-recovery estimates)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. V.; Heinrich, W.; Parnell, T. A.; Armstrong, T. W.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fishman, G. J.; Frank, A. L.; Watts, J. W. Jr; Wiegel, B.

    1992-01-01

    The long duration exposure facility (LDEF), launched into a 258 nautical mile orbit with an inclination of 28.5 degrees, remained in space for nearly 6 yr. The 21,500 lb NASA satellite was one of the largest payloads ever deployed by the Space Shuttle. LDEF completed 32,422 orbits and carried 57 major experiments representing more than 200 investigators from 33 private companies, 21 universities and nine countries. The experiments covered a wide range of disciplines including basic science, electronics, optics, materials, structures and power and propulsion. A number of the experiments were specifically designed to measure the radiation environment. These experiments are of specific interest, since the LDEF orbit is essentially the same as that of the Space Station Freedom. Consequently, the radiation measurements on LDEF will play a significant role in the design of radiation shielding of the space station. The contributions of the various authors presented here attempt to predict the major aspects of the radiation exposure received by the various LDEF experiments and therefore should be helpful to investigators who are in the process of analyzing experiments which may have been affected by exposure to ionizing radiation. The paper discusses the various types and sources of ionizing radiation including cosmic rays, trapped particles (both protons and electrons) and secondary particles (including neutrons, spallation products and high-LET recoils), as well as doses and LET spectra as a function of shielding. Projections of the induced radioactivity of LDEF are also discussed.

  20. LDEF data: Comparisons with existing models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.; Watts, Alan J.; Wagner, John D.; Atkinson, Dale R.

    1993-04-01

    The relationship between the observed cratering impact damage on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) versus the existing models for both the natural environment of micrometeoroids and the man-made debris was investigated. Experimental data was provided by several LDEF Principal Investigators, Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) members, and by the Kennedy Space Center Analysis Team (KSC A-Team) members. These data were collected from various aluminum materials around the LDEF satellite. A PC (personal computer) computer program, SPENV, was written which incorporates the existing models of the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. This program calculates the expected number of impacts per unit area as functions of altitude, orbital inclination, time in orbit, and direction of the spacecraft surface relative to the velocity vector, for both micrometeoroids and man-made debris. Since both particle models are couched in terms of impact fluxes versus impactor particle size, and much of the LDEF data is in the form of crater production rates, scaling laws have been used to relate the two. Also many hydrodynamic impact computer simulations were conducted, using CTH, of various impact events, that identified certain modes of response, including simple metallic target cratering, perforations and delamination effects of coatings.

  1. Space environment durability of beta cloth in LDEF thermal blankets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Roger C.; Whitaker, Ann F.; Finckenor, Miria M.

    1993-01-01

    Beta cloth performance for use on long-term space vehicles such as Space Station Freedom (S.S. Freedom) requires resistance to the degrading effects of the space environment. The major issues are retention of thermal insulating properties through maintaining optical properties, preserving mechanical integrity, and generating minimal particulates for contamination-sensitive spacecraft surfaces and payloads. The longest in-flight test of beta cloth's durability was on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), where it was exposed to the space environment for 68 months. The LDEF contained 57 experiments which further defined the space environment and its effects on spacecraft materials. It was deployed into low-Earth orbit (LEO) in Apr. 1984 and retrieved Jan. 1990 by the space shuttle. Among the 10,000 plus material constituents and samples onboard were thermal control blankets of multilayer insulation with a beta cloth outer cover and Velcro attachments. These blankets were exposed to hard vacuum, thermal cycling, charged particles, meteoroid/debris impacts, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and atomic oxygen (AO). Of these space environmental exposure elements, AO appears to have had the greatest effect on the beta cloth. The beta cloth analyzed in this report came from the MSFC Experiment S1005 (Transverse Flat-Plate Heat Pipe) tray oriented approximately 22 deg from the leading edge vector of the LDEF satellite. The location of the tray on LDEF and the placement of the beta cloth thermal blankets are shown. The specific space environment exposure conditions for this material are listed.

  2. Anodized aluminum on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1993-01-01

    A compilation of reported analyses and results obtained for anodized aluminum flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was prepared. Chromic acid, sulfuric acid, and dyed sulfuric acid anodized surfaces were exposed to the space environment. The vast majority of the anodized surface on LDEF was chromic acid anodize because of its selection as a thermal control coating for use on the spacecraft primary structure, trays, tray clamps, and space end thermal covers. Reports indicate that the chromic acid anodize was stable in solar absorptance and thermal emittance, but that contamination effects caused increases in absorptance on surfaces exposed to low atomic oxygen fluences. There were some discrepancies, however, in that some chromic acid anodized specimens exhibited significant increases in absorptance. Sulfuric acid anodized surfaces also appeared stable, although very little surface area was available for evaluation. One type of dyed sulfuric acid anodize was assessed as an optical baffle coating and was observed to have improved infrared absorptance characteristics with exposure on LDEF.

  3. The performance of thermal control coatings on LDEF and implications to future spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Donald R.; Miller, Edgar R.; Mell, Richard J.; Lemaster, Paul S.; Zwiener, James M.

    1993-01-01

    The stability of thermal control coatings over the lifetime of a satellite or space platform is crucial to the success of the mission. With the increasing size, complexity, and duration of future missions, the stability of these materials becomes even more important. The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) offered an excellent testbed to study the stability and interaction of thermal control coatings in the low-Earth orbit (LEO) space environment. Several experiments on LDEF exposed thermal control coatings to the space environment. This paper provides an overview of the different materials flown and their stability during the extended LDEF mission. The exposure conditions, exposure environment, and measurements of materials properties (both in-space and postflight) are described. The relevance of the results and the implications to the design and operation of future space vehicles are also discussed.

  4. Materials Characterization Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Materials Characterization Facility enables detailed measurements of the properties of ceramics, polymers, glasses, and composites. It features instrumentation...

  5. Effects of long-term exposure on LDEF fastener assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Steve; Dursch, Harry

    1992-09-01

    This presentation summarizes the Systems Special Investigations Group (SIG) findings from testing and analysis of fastener assemblies used on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) structure, the tray mounting clamps, and by the various experimenters. The LDEF deintegration team and several experimenters noted severe fastener damage and hardware removal difficulties during post-flight activities. The System SIG has investigated all reported instances, and in all cases examined to date, the difficulties were attributed to galling during installation or post-flight removal. To date, no evidence of coldwelding was found. Correct selection of materials and lubricants as well as proper mechanical procedures is essential to ensure successful on-orbit or post-flight installation and removal of hardware.

  6. Effects of LDEF flight exposure on selected polymer matrix resin composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemp, Wayne S.; Young, Philip R.; Witte, William G., Jr.; Shen, James Y.

    1992-01-01

    The characterization of selected graphite fiber reinforced epoxy (934 and 5208) and polysulfone (P1700) matrix resin composites materials which received over five years and nine months of exposure to the low earth orbit (LEO) environment in experiment AO134 on the Long Duration Exposure Facility is reported. The changes in mechanical properties of ultimate tensile strength and tensile modulus for exposed flight specimens are compared to the three sets of control specimens. Marked changes in surface appearance are discussed, and resin loss is reported. The chemical characterization including infrared, thermal, and selected solution property measurements showed that the molecular structure of the polymetric matrix had not changed significantly in response to this exposure.

  7. Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF) enables engineers to develop manufacturing processes for producing advanced battery materials in sufficient...

  8. Contaminant interferences with SIMS analyses of microparticle impactor residues on LDEF surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, C.G.; Batchelor, D.; Griffis, D.P.; Hunter, J.L.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D.A.; Wortman, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    Elemental analyses of impactor residues on high purity surface exposed to the low earth orbit (LEO) environment for 5.8 years on Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has revealed several probable sources for microparticles at this altitude, including natural micrometeorites and manmade debris ranging from paint pigments to bits of stainless steel. A myriad of contamination interferences were identified and their effects on impactor debris identification mitigated during the course of this study. These interferences included pre-, post-, and in-flight deposited particulate surface contaminants, as well as indigenous heterogeneous material contaminants. Non-flight contaminants traced to human origins, including spittle and skin oils, contributed significant levels of alkali-rich carbonaceous interferences. A ubiquitous layer of in-flight deposited silicaceous contamination varied in thickness with location on LDEF and proximity to active electrical fields. In-flight deposited (low velocity) contaminants included urine droplets and bits of metal film from eroded thermal blankets

  9. Surface analysis of anodized aluminum clamps from NASA-LDEF satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, H. L.; Wightman, J. P.; Young, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Surface analysis results of selected anodized aluminum clamps containing black (Z306) and white (A276) paints which received nearly six years of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) exposure on the Long Duration Exposure Facility are reported. Surface analytical techniques, including x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive analysis by x-ray (SEM/EDAX), showed significant differences in the surface composition of these materials depending upon the position on the LDEF. Differences in the surface composition are attributed to varying amounts of atomic oxygen and vacuum ultraviolet radiation (VUV). Silicon containing compounds were the primary contaminant detected on the materials.

  10. Fuel conditioning facility material accountancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yacout, A.M.; Bucher, R.G.; Orechwa, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The operation of the Fuel conditioning Facility (FCF) is based on the electrometallurgical processing of spent metallic reactor fuel. It differs significantly, therefore, from traditional PUREX process facilities in both processing technology and safeguards implications. For example, the fissile material is processed in FCF only in batches and is transferred within the facility only as solid, well-characterized items; there are no liquid steams containing fissile material within the facility, nor entering or leaving the facility. The analysis of a single batch lends itself also to an analytical relationship between the safeguards criteria, such as alarm limit, detection probability, and maximum significant amount of fissile material, and the accounting system's performance, as it is reflected in the variance associated with the estimate of the inventory difference. This relation, together with the sensitivity of the inventory difference to the uncertainties in the measurements, allows a thorough evaluation of the power of the accounting system. The system for the accountancy of the fissile material in the FCF has two main components: a system to gather and store information during the operation of the facility, and a system to interpret this information with regard to meeting safeguards criteria. These are described and the precision of the inventory closure over one batch evaluated

  11. LDEF fiber-optic exposure experiment No. S-0109

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, A.R.; Bergman, L.A.; Hartmayer, R.

    1992-01-01

    Ten fiber optic cable samples of different types were exposed in low-earth orbit for over 5.5 years on the Long-Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Four of the samples were mounted externally, and the remaining six were internal, under approximately 0.5 g cm(exp -2) of aluminum. The experiment was recovered in Jan. 1990, and laboratory evaluation of the effects of the exposure has continued since. An increase in fiber loss, presumed to be from radiation darkening, aging effects on polymer materials used in cabling, unique contamination effects on connector terminations, and micrometeoroid impacts were observed. In addition, the sample loss was measured for each sample as a function of temperature before and after the flight. All cable samples were functional, and the best exhibited no measurable change in performance, indicating that conventional fiber optic cables can perform satisfactorily in spacecraft. Experimental results obtained to date are presented and discussed

  12. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, E.L.; Trego, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    A Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility is being designed to be constructed at Hanford, Washington, The system is designed to produce about 10 15 n/cm-s in a volume of approx. 10 cc and 10 14 n/cm-s in a volume of 500 cc. The lithium and target systems are being developed and designed by HEDL while the 35-MeV, 100-mA cw accelerator is being designed by LASL. The accelerator components will be fabricated by US industry. The total estimated cost of the FMIT is $105 million. The facility is scheduled to begin operation in September 1984

  13. Applicability of Long Duration Exposure Facility environmental effects data to the design of Space Station Freedom electrical power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Robert J.; Lu, Cheng-Yi; Aronoff, Irene

    1992-01-01

    Data defining space environmental effects on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) are examined in terms of the design of the electrical power system (EPS) of the Space Station Freedom (SSF). The significant effects of long-term exposure to space are identified with respect to the performance of the LDEF's materials, components, and systems. A total of 57 experiments were conducted on the LDEF yielding information regarding coatings, thermal systems, electronics, optics, and power systems. The resulting database is analyzed in terms of the specifications of the SSF EPS materials and subsystems and is found to be valuable in the design of control and protection features. Specific applications are listed for findings regarding the thermal environment, atomic oxygen, UV and ionizing radiation, debris, and contamination. The LDEF data are shown to have a considerable number of applications to the design and planning of the SSF and its EPS.

  14. Nuclear materials facility safety initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peddicord, K.L.; Nelson, P.; Roundhill, M.; Jardine, L.J.; Lazarev, L.; Moshkov, M.; Khromov, V.V.; Kruchkov, E.; Bolyatko, V.; Kazanskij, Yu.; Vorobeva, I.; Lash, T.R.; Newton, D.; Harris, B.

    2000-01-01

    Safety in any facility in the nuclear fuel cycle is a fundamental goal. However, it is recognized that, for example, should an accident occur in either the U.S. or Russia, the results could seriously delay joint activities to store and disposition weapons fissile materials in both countries. To address this, plans are underway jointly to develop a nuclear materials facility safety initiative. The focus of the initiative would be to share expertise which would lead in improvements in safety and safe practices in the nuclear fuel cycle.The program has two components. The first is a lab-to-lab initiative. The second involves university-to-university collaboration.The lab-to-lab and university-to-university programs will contribute to increased safety in facilities dealing with nuclear materials and related processes. These programs will support important bilateral initiatives, develop the next generation of scientists and engineers which will deal with these challenges, and foster the development of a safety culture

  15. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues on LDEF tray clamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    To better understand the nature of particulates in low-Earth orbit (LEO), and their effects on spacecraft hardware, we are analyzing residues found in impacts on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) tray clamps. LDEF experiment trays were held in place by 6 to 8 chromic-anodized aluminum (6061-T6) clamps that were fastened to the spacecraft frame using three stainless steel hex bolts. Each clamp exposed an area of approximately 58 sq cm (4.8 cm x 12.7 cm x .45 cm, minus the bolt coverage). Some 337 out of 774 LDEF tray clamps were archived at JSC and are available through the Meteoroid & Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG). Optical scanning of clamps, starting with Bay/Row A01 and working toward H25, is being conducted at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns. These impacts are then inspected by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (SEM/EDXA) to select those features which contain appreciable impact residue material. Based upon the composition of projectile remnants, and using criteria developed at JSC, we have made a preliminary discrimination between micrometeoroid and space debris residue-containing impact features. Presently, 13 impacts containing significant amounts of unmelted and semi-melted micrometeoritic residues were forwarded to Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) in France. At the CNES facilities, the upgraded impacts were analyzed using a JEOL T330A SEM equipped with a NORAN Instruments, Voyager X-ray Analyzer. All residues were quantitatively characterized by composition (including oxygen and carbon) to help understand interplanetary dust as possibly being derived from comets and asteroids.

  16. Materials division facilities and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biest, O. v.d.

    1984-01-01

    The research activities of the Division at the Petten Establishment have the aims of characterising the properties of high temperature materials in industrial process environments and of understanding the structures involved in order to gain an insight into behavioural mechanisms. Metallic materials fall within the scope of the programme; the activities are, at present, almost entirely concerned with austenitic steels and nickel based alloys. Starting in 1984, advanced ceramic materials will be studied as well. The equipment available permits the study of mechanical properties in controlled gaseous environments, of the rates and mechanisms of corrosive reactions between materials and those environments, and of the surface and bulk structures by advanced physical techniques. Special preparation and treatment techniques are available. The Division has developed a Data Bank on high temperature alloys. It also operates an information Centre, the activities of which include the organisation of scientific meetings, the commissioning of ''state of the art'' studies on topics in the field of high temperature materials and their applications and the development of a inventory of current research activities in the field in Europe. This booklet is intended to present the facilities and services of the Division to the organizations which are interested in its programmes of work

  17. The ionizing radiation environment of LDEF prerecovery predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, John W., Jr.; Derrickson, James H.; Parnell, T. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Harmon, A.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Heinrich, Wolfgang

    1991-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was exposed to several sources of ionizing radiation while in orbit. The principal ones were trapped belt protons and electrons, galactic cosmic rays, and albedo particles (protons and neutrons) from the atmosphere. Large solar flares in 1989 may have caused a small contribution. Prior to the recovery of the spacecraft, a number of calculations and estimates were made to predict the radiation exposure of the spacecraft and experiments. These were made to assess whether measurable radiation effects might exist, and to plan the analysis of the large number of radiation measurements available on the LDEF. Calculations and estimates of total dose, particle fluences, linear energy transfer spectra, and induced radioactivity were made. The principal sources of radiation is described, and the preflight predictions are summarized.

  18. Material science experiments on the Atlas Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keinigs, Rhonald K.; Atchison, Walter L.; Faehl, Rickey J.; Lindemuth, Irvin R.; Anderson, Wallace E.; Bartsch, Robert Richard; Flower-Maudlin, Elane C.; Hammerberg, James E.; Holtkamp, David B.; Jones, Michael E.; Kyrala, George A.; Oro, David M.; Parker, Jerald V.; Preston, Dean L.; Reinovsky, Robert E.; Scudder, David W.; Sheehey, Peter T.; Shlacter, Jack S.; Stokes, John L.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Tonks, Davis L.; Turchi, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    Three material properties experiments that are to be performed on the Atlas pulsed power facility are described; friction at sliding metal interfaces, spallation and damage in convergent geomety, and plastic flow at high strain and high strain rate. Construction of this facility has been completed and experiments in high energy density hydrodynamics and material dynamics will begin in 2001.

  19. Mechanical Treatment: Material Recovery Facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bilitewski, B.

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of mechanical treatment unit processes, including manual sorting, is described in Chapter 7.1. These unit processes may be used as a single separate operation (e.g. baling of recyclable cardboard) or as a single operation before or after biological and thermal treatment processes (e.......g. shredding prior to incineration or screening after composting). The mechanical treatment unit process is in the latter case an integrated part of the overall treatment usually with the purpose of improving the quality of the input material, or the efficiency or stability of the biological or thermal process......, or improving the quality of the output material. Examples hereof appear in the chapters on biological and thermal treatment. Mechanical treatment unit processes may also appear at industries using recycled material as part of their feedstock, for example, for removing impurities and homogenizing the material...

  20. Advanced Materials Growth and Processing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This most extensive of U.S. Army materials growth and processing facilities houses seven dedicated, state-of-the-art, molecular beam epitaxy and three metal organic...

  1. The construction of irradiated material examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Lee, Key Soon; Herr, Young Hoi

    1990-03-01

    A detail design of the examination process, the hot cell facility and the annexed facility of the irradiated material examination facility (IMEF) which will be utilized to examine and evaluate physical and mechanical properties of neutron-irradiated materials, has been performed. Also a start-up work of the underground structure construction has been launched out. The project management and tasks required for the license application were duly carried out. The resultant detail design data will be used for the next step. (author)

  2. Repetitively pulsed material testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.; Bostick, W.; Gullickson, R; Long, J.; Luce, J.; Sahlin, H.

    1975-01-01

    A continuously operated, 1 pps, dense-plasma-focus device capable of delivering a minimum of 10 15 neutrons per pulse for material testing purposes is described. Moderate scaling from existing results is sufficient to provide 2 x 10 13 n/cm 2 .s to a suitable target. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue as a result of the energy crisis, is analyzed with respect to other plasma devices and is shown to be highly favorable. A novel approach to the capacitor bank and switch design allowing repetitive operation is discussed. (U.S.)

  3. Repetitively pulsed material testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.; Bostick, W.; Gullickson, R.; Long, J.; Luce, J.; Sahlin, H.

    1975-01-01

    A continuously operated, 1 pps, dense-plasma-focus device capable of delivering a minimum of 10 15 neutrons per pulse for material testing purposes is described. Moderate scaling from existing results is sufficient to provide 2 x 10 13 n/cm 2 . s to a suitable target. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue as a result of the energy crisis, is analyzed with respect to other plasma devices and is shown to be highly favorable. A novel approach to the capacitor bank and switch design allowing repetitive operation is discussed

  4. Material Processing Facility - Skylab Experiment M512

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    This chart details Skylab's Materials Processing Facility experiment (M512). This facility, located in the Multiple Docking Adapter, was developed for Skylab and accommodated 14 different experiments that were carried out during the three marned missions. The abilities to melt and mix without the contaminating effects of containers, to suppress thermal convection and buoyancy in fluids, and to take advantage of electrostatic and magnetic forces and otherwise masked by gravitation opened the way to new knowledge of material properties and processes. This beginning would ultimately lead to the production of valuable new materials for use on Earth.

  5. Thermal control surfaces on the MSFC LDEF experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkes, D.R.; Whitaker, A.F.; Zwiener, J.M.; Linton, R.C.; Shular, D.; Peters, P.N.; Gregory, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    There were five Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) experiments on the LDEF. Each of those experiments carried thermal control surfaces either as test samples or as operational surfaces. These materials experienced varying degrees of mechanical and optical damage. Some materials were virtually unchanged by the extended exposure while others suffered extensive degradation. The synergistic effects due to the constituents of the space environment are evident in the diversity of these material changes. The sample complement for the MSFC experiments is described along with results of the continuing analyses efforts

  6. Plasma-Materials Interactions Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, T.

    1986-11-01

    The Plasma-Materials Interactions Test Facility (PMITF), recently designed and constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is an electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma system with densities around 10 11 cm -3 and electron temperatures of 10-20 eV. The device consists of a mirror cell with high-field-side microwave injection and a heating power of up to 0.8 kW(cw) at 2.45 GHz. The facility will be used for studies of plasma-materials interactions and of particle physics in pump limiters and for development and testing of plasma edge diagnostics

  7. Decommissioning strategies for facilities using radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The planning for the decommissioning of facilities that have used radioactive material is similar in many respects to other typical engineering projects. However, decommissioning differs because it involves equipment and materials that are radioactive and therefore have to be handled and controlled appropriately. The project management principles are the same. As with all engineering projects, the desired end state of the project must be known before the work begins and there are a number of strategies that can be used to reach this end state. The selection of the appropriate strategy to be used to decommission a facility can vary depending on a number of factors. No two facilities are exactly the same and their locations and conditions can result in different strategies being considered acceptable. The factors that are considered cover a wide range of topics from purely technical issues to social and economic issues. Each factor alone may not have a substantial impact on which strategy to select, but their combination could lead to the selection of the preferred or best strategy for a particular facility. This Safety Report identifies the factors that are normally considered when deciding on the most appropriate strategy to select for a particular facility. It describes the impact that each factor can have on the strategy selection and also how the factors in combination can be used to select an optimum strategy

  8. Clearance of materials from accelerator facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokni Sayed H.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new Technical Standard that supports the clearance of materials and equipment (personal property from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE accelerator facilities has been developed. The Standard focuses on personal property that has the potential to be radiologically impacted by accelerator operations. It addresses material clearance programs and protocols for off-site releases without restriction on use. Common metals with potential volumetric activation are of main interest with technical bases provided in Appendices of the Standard. The clearance protocols in the Standard include three elements: 1 clearance criteria, 2 process knowledge, and 3 measurement methods. This paper presents the technical aspects of the new Standard, discusses operational experience gained in clearance of materials and equipment from several accelerator facilities at SLAC and examples as to how this Standard can be applied to benefit the entirety of the DOE Accelerator Complex.

  9. The international fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, T.E.; Cozzani, F.; Crandall, D.H.; Wiffen, F.W.; Katsuta, H.; Kondo, T.; Teplyakov, V.; Zavialsky, L.

    1994-01-01

    It is widely agreed that the development of materials for fusion systems requires a high flux, 14 MeV neutron source. The European Union, Japan, Russia and the US have initiated the conceptual design of such a facility. This activity, under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Fusion Materials Agreement, will develop the design for an accelerator-based D-Li system. The first organizational meeting was held in June 1994. This paper describes the system to be studied and the approach to be followed to complete the conceptual design by early 1997

  10. FMIT - the fusion materials irradiation test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    A joint effort by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has produced a preliminary design for a Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) that uses a high-power linear accelerator to fire a deuteron beam into a high-speed jet of molten lithium. The result is a continuous energy spectrum of neutrons with a 14-MeV average energy which can irradiate material samples to projected end-of-life levels in about 3 years, with a total accumulated fluence of 10 21 to 10 22 n/cm 2

  11. Material science experiments at the ATLAS facility

    CERN Document Server

    Keinigs, R K; Atchison, W L; Bartsch, R R; Faehl, R J; Flower-Maudlin, E C; Hammerberg, J E; Holtkamp, D B; Kyrala, G A; Oro, D M; Parker, J V; Preston, D L; Removsky, R E; Scudder, D W; Sheehey, P T; Shlachter, J S; Taylor, A J; Tonks, D L; Turchi, P J; Chandler, E A

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. Three experimental campaigns designed for fielding on the Atlas Pulsed Power Facility are discussed. The foci of these experiments are directed toward a better understanding of three material science issues; (1) strength at high strain and high strain rate, (2) friction at material interfaces moving at high relative velocities, and (3) material failure in convergent geometry. Atlas provides an environment for investigating these problems in parameter regimes and geometries that are inaccessible with standard techniques. For example, flow stress measurements of material strength using conventional Hopkinson bar experiments are limited to strain rates ~10/sup 4/ sec/sup -1/. Atlas will be capable of imploding metal shells to combined strains of 200% and strain rates >10/sup 6/ sec/sup -1/. Data obtained regimes is used to test different constitutive strength models used in several Los Alamos hydrocodes. Dynamic friction has been investigated for nearly 300 years, but a first...

  12. Air conditioner for radioactive material handling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takeaki.

    1991-01-01

    An air conditioner intakes open-air from an open-air intake port to remove sands and sea salt particles by air filters. Then, natural and artificial radioactive particles of less than 1 μm are removed by high performance particulate filters. After controlling the temperature by an air heater or an air cooler, air is sent to each of chambers in a facility under pressure elevation by a blower. In this case, glass fibers are used as the filter material for the high performance particulate filter, which has a performance of more than 99.97% for the particles of 0.3 μm grain size. Since this can sufficiently remove the natural radioactive materials intruded from the outside, a detection limit value in each of the chambers of the facility can be set 10 -13 to 10 -14 μci/cm 3 in respect of radiation control. Accordingly, radiation control can be conducted smoothly and appropriately. (I.N.)

  13. Materials evaluation for a transuranic processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, S.A.; Schwenk, E.B.; Divine, J.R.

    1990-11-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company, with the assistance of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is developing a transuranium extraction process for preheating double-shell tank wastes at the Hanford Site to reduce the volume of transuranic waste being sent to a repository. The bench- scale transuranium extraction process development is reaching a stage where a pilot plant design has begun for the construction of a facility in the existing B Plant. Because of the potential corrosivity of neutralized cladding removal waste process streams, existing embedded piping alloys in B Plant are being evaluated and ''new'' alloys are being selected for the full-scale plant screening corrosion tests. Once the waste is acidified with HNO 3 , some of the process streams that are high in F - and low in Al and zr can produce corrosion rates exceeding 30,000 mil/yr in austenitic alloys. Initial results results are reported concerning the applicability of existing plant materials to withstand expected process solutions and conditions to help determine the feasibility of locating the plant at the selected facility. In addition, process changes are presented that should make the process solutions less corrosive to the existing materials. Experimental work confirms that Hastelloy B is unsatisfactory for the expected process solutions; type 304L, 347 and 309S stainless steels are satisfactory for service at room temperature and 60 degrees C, if process stream complexing is performed. Inconel 625 was satisfactory for all solutions. 17 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs

  14. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility: a facility for fusion-materials qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trego, A.L.; Hagan, J.W.; Opperman, E.K.; Burke, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility will provide a unique testing environment for irradiation of structural and special purpose materials in support of fusion power systems. The neutron source will be produced by a deuteron-lithium stripping reaction to generate high energy neutrons to ensure damage similar to that of a deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum. The facility design is now ready for the start of construction and much of the supporting lithium system research has been completed. Major testing of key low energy end components of the accelerator is about to commence. The facility, its testing role, and the status and major aspects of its design and supporting system development are described

  15. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility: Low Temperature Materials Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, David E.; Moon, Ji-Won; Armstrong, Beth L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Duty, Chad E.; Gresback, Ryan; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Jellison, Gerald Earle; Jang, Gyoung Gug; Joshi, Pooran C.; Jung, Hyunsung; Meyer, Harry M.; Phelps, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) low temperature materials synthesis project was established to demonstrate a scalable and sustainable process to produce nanoparticles (NPs) for advanced manufacturing. Previous methods to chemically synthesize NPs typically required expensive, high-purity inorganic chemical reagents, organic solvents and high temperatures. These processes were typically applied at small laboratory scales at yields sufficient for NP characterization, but insufficient to support roll-to-roll processing efforts or device fabrication. The new NanoFermentation processes described here operated at a low temperature (~60 C) in low-cost, aqueous media using bacteria that produce extracellular NPs with controlled size and elemental stoichiometry. Up-scaling activities successfully demonstrated high NP yields and quality in a 900-L pilot-scale reactor, establishing this NanoFermentation process as a competitive biomanufacturing strategy to produce NPs for advanced manufacturing of power electronics, solid-state lighting and sensors.

  16. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility: Low Temperature Materials Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, David E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moon, Ji-Won [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Armstrong, Beth L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Datskos, Panos G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Duty, Chad E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gresback, Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ivanov, Ilia N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jacobs, Christopher B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jellison, Gerald Earle [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jang, Gyoung Gug [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Joshi, Pooran C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jung, Hyunsung [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Meyer, III, Harry M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Phelps, Tommy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) low temperature materials synthesis project was established to demonstrate a scalable and sustainable process to produce nanoparticles (NPs) for advanced manufacturing. Previous methods to chemically synthesize NPs typically required expensive, high-purity inorganic chemical reagents, organic solvents and high temperatures. These processes were typically applied at small laboratory scales at yields sufficient for NP characterization, but insufficient to support roll-to-roll processing efforts or device fabrication. The new NanoFermentation processes described here operated at a low temperature (~60 C) in low-cost, aqueous media using bacteria that produce extracellular NPs with controlled size and elemental stoichiometry. Up-scaling activities successfully demonstrated high NP yields and quality in a 900-L pilot-scale reactor, establishing this NanoFermentation process as a competitive biomanufacturing strategy to produce NPs for advanced manufacturing of power electronics, solid-state lighting and sensors.

  17. Ionizing radiation calculations and comparisons with LDEF data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.; Watts, J. W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    In conjunction with the analysis of LDEF ionizing radiation dosimetry data, a calculational program is in progress to aid in data interpretation and to assess the accuracy of current radiation models for future mission applications. To estimate the ionizing radiation environment at the LDEF dosimeter locations, scoping calculations for a simplified (one dimensional) LDEF mass model were made of the primary and secondary radiations produced as a function of shielding thickness due to trapped proton, galactic proton, and atmospheric (neutron and proton cosmic ray albedo) exposures. Preliminary comparisons of predictions with LDEF induced radioactivity and dose measurements were made to test a recently developed model of trapped proton anisotropy.

  18. Development of a state radioactive materials storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, P.S.

    1995-01-01

    The paper outlines the site selection and facility development processes of the state of Wisconsin for a radioactive materials facility. The facility was developed for the temporary storage of wastes from abandoned sites. Due to negative public reaction, the military site selected for the facility was removed from consideration. The primary lesson learned during the 3-year campaign was that any project involving radioactive materials is a potential political issue

  19. Intense neutron irradiation facility for fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio; Kato, Yoshio; Sugimoto, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Technical R and D of d-Li stripping type neutron irradiation facilities for development of fusion reactor materials was carried out in Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) project and Energy Selective Neutron Irradiation Test Facility (ESNIT) program. Conceptual design activity (CDA) of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), of which concept is an advanced version of FMIT and ESNIT concepts, are being performed. Progress of users` requirements and characteristics of irradiation fields in such neutron irradiation facilities, and outline of baseline conceptual design of IFMIF were described. (author)

  20. Use of the Long Duration Exposure Facility's thermal measurement system for the verification of thermal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios, William M.

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) postflight thermal model predicted temperatures were matched to flight temperature data recorded by the Thermal Measurement System (THERM), LDEF experiment P0003. Flight temperatures, recorded at intervals of approximately 112 minutes for the first 390 days of LDEF's 2105 day mission were compared with predictions using the thermal mathematical model (TMM). This model was unverified prior to flight. The postflight analysis has reduced the thermal model uncertainty at the temperature sensor locations from +/- 40 F to +/- 18 F. The improved temperature predictions will be used by the LDEF's principal investigators to calculate improved flight temperatures experienced by 57 experiments located on 86 trays of the facility.

  1. M and D SIG progress report: Laboratory simulations of LDEF impact features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horz, Friedrich; Bernhard, R. P.; See, T. H.; Atkinson, D.; Allbrooks, M.

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory impact experiments are needed to understand the relationship between a measured penetration hole diameter and associated projectile dimension in the thermal blankets of experiment A0178, which occupied some 16 sq. m. These blankets are composed of 125 micron thick Teflon that has an Ag/enconel second mirror surface, backed by organic binder and Chemglaze paint for a total thickness of some 170 microns. While dedicated experiments are required to understand the penetration behavior of this compound target in detail, we report here on impact simulations sponsored by other projects into pure Teflon and aluminum targets. These experiments will allow first order interpretations of impact features on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), and they will serve as guides for dedicated experiments that employ the real LDEF blankets, both exposed and unexposed, for a refined understanding of the LDEF's collisional environment. We employed a light gas gun to launch soda-lime glass spheres from 50 to 3200 microns in diameter that impacted targets of variable thickness. Penetration measurements are given.

  2. RTNS-II fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkinen, D.W.; Tuckerman, D.B.; Davis, J.C.; Massoletti, D.J.; Short, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-II) facility provides an intense source of 14-MeV neutrons for the fusion energy programs of Japan and the United States. Each of the two identical accelerator-based neutron sources is capable of providing source strengths in excess of 3 x 10 13 n/s using deuteron beam currents up to 150 mA. The present status of the facility, as well as the various upgrade options, will be described in detail

  3. Materials science at an Advanced Hadron Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pynn, R.

    1988-01-01

    The uses of neutron scattering as a probe for condensed matter phenomena are described briefly and some arguments are given to justify the community's desire for more powerful neutron sources. Appropriate design parameters for a neutron source at an Advanced Hadron Facility are presented, and such a source is compared with other existing and planned spallation neutron sources. 5 refs

  4. Automation in a material processing/storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, K.; Gordon, J.

    1997-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently developing a new facility, the Actinide Packaging and Storage Facility (APSF), to process and store legacy materials from the United States nuclear stockpile. A variety of materials, with a variety of properties, packaging and handling/storage requirements, will be processed and stored at the facility. Since these materials are hazardous and radioactive, automation will be used to minimize worker exposure. Other benefits derived from automation of the facility include increased throughput capacity and enhanced security. The diversity of materials and packaging geometries to be handled poses challenges to the automation of facility processes. In addition, the nature of the materials to be processed underscores the need for safety, reliability and serviceability. The application of automation in this facility must, therefore, be accomplished in a rational and disciplined manner to satisfy the strict operational requirements of the facility. Among the functions to be automated are the transport of containers between process and storage areas via an Automatic Guided Vehicle (AGV), and various processes in the Shipping Package Unpackaging (SPU) area, the Accountability Measurements (AM) area, the Special Isotope Storage (SIS) vault and the Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) vault. Other areas of the facility are also being automated, but are outside the scope of this paper

  5. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis of hypervelocity microparticle impact sites on LDEF surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, C. G.; Buonaquisti, A. J.; Batchelor, D. A.; Hunter, J. L.; Griffis, D. P.; Misra, V.; Ricks, D. R.; Wortman, J. J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Best, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    Two dimensional elemental ion maps have been recorded for hundreds of microparticle impact sites and contamination features on LDEF surfaces. Since the majority of the analyzed surfaces were metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) impact detectors from the Interplanetary Dust Experiment, a series of 'standard' and 'blank' analyses of these surfaces are included. Hypervelocity impacts of forsterite olivine microparticles on activated flight sensors served as standards while stylus and pulsed laser simulated 'impacts' served as analytical blanks. Results showed that despite serious contamination issues, impactor residues can be identified in greater than 1/3 of the impact sites. While aluminum oxide particles could not be detected on aluminum surfaces, they were detected on germanium surfaces from row 12. Remnants of manmade debris impactors consisting of paint chips and bits of metal were identified on surfaces from LDEF Rows 3 (west or trailing side), 6 (south), 9 (ram or leading side), 12 (north) and the space end. Higher than expected ratios of manmade microparticle impacts to total microparticle impacts were found on the space end and the trailing side. These results were consistent with time-tagged and time-segregated microparticle impact data from the IDE and other LDEF experiments. A myriad of contamination interferences were identified and their effects on impactor debris identification mitigated during the course of this study. These interferences include pre-, post and inflight deposited surface contaminants as well as indigenous heterogeneous material contaminants. Non-flight contaminations traced to human origins, including spittle and skin oils, contributed significant levels of alkali-rich carbonaceous interferences. A ubiquitous layer of in-flight deposited silicaceous contamination varied in thickness with location on LDEF, even on a micro scale. In-flight deposited (low velocity) contaminants include urine droplets and bits of metal film from eroded thermal

  6. Radioactive material inventory control at a waste characterization facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong, L.K.; Chapman, J.A.; Schultz, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to the recent introduction of more stringent Department of Energy (DOE) regulations and requirements pertaining to nuclear and criticality safety, the control of radioactive material inventory has emerged as an important facet of operations at DOE nuclear facilities. In order to comply with nuclear safety regulations and nuclear criticality requirements, radioactive material inventories at each nuclear facility have to be maintained below limits specified for the facility in its safety authorization basis documentation. Exceeding these radioactive material limits constitutes a breach of the facility's nuclear and criticality safety envelope and could potentially result in an accident, cause a shut-down of the facility, and bring about imminent regulatory repercussions. The practice of maintaining control of radioactive material, especially sealed and unsealed sources, is commonplace and widely implemented; however, the requirement to track the entire radioactivity inventory at each nuclear facility for the purpose of ensuring nuclear safety is a new development. To meet the new requirements, the Applied Radiation Measurements Department at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed an information system, called the open-quotes Radioactive Material Inventory Systemclose quotes (RMIS), to track the radioactive material inventory at an ORNL facility, the Waste Examination and Assay Facility (WEAF). The operations at WEAF, which revolve around the nondestructive assay and nondestructive examination of waste and related research and development activities, results in an ever-changing radioactive material inventory. Waste packages and radioactive sources are constantly being brought in or taken out of the facility; hence, use of the RMIS is necessary to ensure that the radioactive material inventory limits are not exceeded

  7. Construction of irradiated material examination facility-basic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Kim, Eun Ka; Hong, Gye Won; Herr, Young Hoi; Hong, Kwon Pyo; Lee, Myeong Han; Baik, Sang Youl; Choo, Yong Sun; Baik, Seung Je

    1989-02-01

    The basic design of the hot cell facility which has the main purpose of doing mechanical and physical property tests of irradiated materials, the examination process, and the annexed facility has been made. Also basic and detall designs for the underground excavation work have been performed. The project management and tasks required for the license application have been carried out in due course. The facility is expected to be completed by the end of 1992, if the budgetary support is sufficient. (Author)

  8. Material accountancy and control practice at a research reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.; Maurel, J.J.; Tromeur, Y.

    1982-01-01

    This session surveys the regulations, organization, and accountancy practice that compose the French State System of Accountancy and Control. Practical examples are discussed showing how inventories are verified at a critical assembly facility and at a materials testing reactor

  9. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility: experimental capabilities and test matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the experimental capabilities of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) and reference material specimen test matrices. The description of the experimental capabilities and the test matrices has been updated to match the current single test cell facility ad assessed experimenter needs. Sufficient detail has been provided so that the user can plan irradiation experiments and conceptual hardware. The types of experiments, irradiation environment and support services that will be available in FMIT are discussed

  10. Long Duration Exposure Facility experiment M0003 deintegration observation data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyetvay, S. R.; Coggi, J. M.; Meshishnek, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The four trays (2 leading edge and 2 trailing edge) of the M0003 materials experiment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) contained 1274 samples from 20 subexperiments. The complete sample complement represented a broad range of materials, including thin film optical coatings, paints, polymer sheets and tapes, adhesives, and composites, for use in various spacecraft applications, including thermal control, structures, optics, and solar power. Most subexperiments contained sets of samples exposed on both the leading and trailing edge trays of LDEF. Each individual sample was examined by high resolution optical microscope during the deintegration of the subexperiments from the M0003 trays. Observations of the post-flight condition of the samples made during this examination were recorded in a computer data base. The deintegration observation data base is available to requesters on floppy disk in 4th Dimension for the Macintosh format. Over 3,000 color macrographs and photomicrographs were shot to complement the observation records and to document the condition of the individual samples and of the M0003 trays. The photographs provide a visual comparison of the response of materials in leading and trailing edge LDEF environments. The Aerospace Corporate Archives is distributing photographs of the samples and hard copies of the database records to the general public upon request. Information on obtaining copies of the data base disks and for ordering photographs and records of specific samples or materials are given.

  11. Elastic modulus measurements of LDEF glasses and glass-ceramics using a speckle technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedlocher, D.E.; Kinser, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Elastic moduli of five glass types and the glass-ceramic Zerodur, exposed to a near-earth orbit environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), were compared to that of unexposed samples. A double exposure speckle photography technique utilizing 633 nm laser light was used in the production of the speckle pattern. Subsequent illumination of a double exposed negative using the same wavelength radiation produces Young's fringes from which the in-plane displacements are measured. Stresses imposed by compressive loading produced measurable strains in the glasses and glass-ceramic

  12. Ionizing radiation measurements on LDEF: A0015 Free flyer biostack experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Csige, I.; Frigo, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    This report covers the analysis of passive radiation detectors flown as part of the A0015 Free Flyer Biostack on LDEF (Long Duration Exposure Facility). LET (linear energy transfer) spectra and track density measurements were made with CR-39 and Polycarbonate plastic nuclear track detectors. Measurements of total absorbed dose were carried out using Thermoluminescent Detectors. Thermal and resonance neutron dose equivalents were measured with LiF/CR-39 detectors. High energy neutron and proton dose equivalents were measured with fission foil/CR-39 detectors.

  13. Design and construction of the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, C.A.

    1979-01-01

    Final design is more than 85 percent complete on the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility, the facility for post-irradiation examination of the fuels and materials tests irradiated in the FFTF and for fuel process development, experimental test pin fabrication and supporting storage, assay, and analytical chemistry functions. The overall facility is generally described with specific information given on some of the design features. Construction has been initiated and more than 10% of the construction contracts have been awarded on a fixed price basis

  14. Dry-type radioactive material storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Yasuharu; Matsuda, Masami; Kanai, Hidetoshi; Ganda, Takao.

    1996-01-01

    A plurality of container tubes containing a plurality of canisters therein are disposed in a canister storage chamber. High level radioactive materials are filled in the canisters in the form of glass solidification materials. The canister storage chamber is divided into two cooling channels by a horizontal partition wall. Each of the container tubes is suspended from a ceiling slab and pass through the horizontal partition wall. Namely, each of the container tubes vertically traverses the cooling channel formed between the ceiling slab and the partition wall and extends to the cooling channel formed between the partition wall and a floor slab. Cooling gases heated in the cooling channel below the partition wall are suppressed from rising to the cooling channel above the partition wall. Therefore, the container tubes are efficiently cooled even in a cooling channel above the partition wall to unify temperature distribution in the axial direction of the container tubes. (I.N.)

  15. Indigenous Construction Materials for Theater Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    is shown as a step-by-step plan in Figure 1. ERDC TR-13-13 5 Figure 1. Infrastructure planning. The pyramid can be initially divided into two...disadvantages in terms of constructability, structural integrity, environmental impact, and sociocultural impacts. The lower portions of the pyramid ...United States or the Nile in Sudan and Egypt ) is vital to the local economy and can provide a means for transport- ing such construction materials

  16. Methodology for categorization of nuclear material in pyroprocessing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chanki; Choi, Sungyeol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Min Su; Jeong, Yon Hong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    For the pyroprocessing facility to be commercialized in future, current regulations should be evaluated and developed in advance, based on the new types of nuclear materials in the facility. Physical protection system, especially, requires reasonable and reliable categorization of nuclear materials, to prevent from the theft of nuclear materials. In this paper, therefore, current categorization methods of nuclear material are investigated and applied to the pyroprocessing facility. After inconsistencies and gaps are found among methods, they are compared and discussed based on eight considering points (i.e, degrees of attractiveness, levels of category, discount factor, physical barriers, chemical barriers, isotopic barriers, radiological barriers, and capabilities of adversaries), to roughly suggest a new method for categorization. Current categorization methods of nuclear material, including IAEA's INFCIRC/225, U.S. DOE's method, newly expected U.S. NRC's method, FOM, and Bunn's approach, are different and can bring inconsistencies of physical protection requirements. The gap among methods will be significant if advanced fuel cycles are applied to them for the future. For example, the categorization results of 5 target materials in pyroprocessing facility show clear inconsistencies, while TRU ingot is considered the most attractive material. To resolve inconsistencies, it is necessary to determine new method suitable to pyroproessing facility, by considering the effects of eight points (i.e, degrees of attractiveness, levels of category, discount factor, physical barriers, chemical barriers, isotopic barriers, radiological barriers, and capabilities of adversaries)

  17. Methodology for categorization of nuclear material in pyroprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chanki; Choi, Sungyeol; Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Min Su; Jeong, Yon Hong

    2016-01-01

    For the pyroprocessing facility to be commercialized in future, current regulations should be evaluated and developed in advance, based on the new types of nuclear materials in the facility. Physical protection system, especially, requires reasonable and reliable categorization of nuclear materials, to prevent from the theft of nuclear materials. In this paper, therefore, current categorization methods of nuclear material are investigated and applied to the pyroprocessing facility. After inconsistencies and gaps are found among methods, they are compared and discussed based on eight considering points (i.e, degrees of attractiveness, levels of category, discount factor, physical barriers, chemical barriers, isotopic barriers, radiological barriers, and capabilities of adversaries), to roughly suggest a new method for categorization. Current categorization methods of nuclear material, including IAEA's INFCIRC/225, U.S. DOE's method, newly expected U.S. NRC's method, FOM, and Bunn's approach, are different and can bring inconsistencies of physical protection requirements. The gap among methods will be significant if advanced fuel cycles are applied to them for the future. For example, the categorization results of 5 target materials in pyroprocessing facility show clear inconsistencies, while TRU ingot is considered the most attractive material. To resolve inconsistencies, it is necessary to determine new method suitable to pyroproessing facility, by considering the effects of eight points (i.e, degrees of attractiveness, levels of category, discount factor, physical barriers, chemical barriers, isotopic barriers, radiological barriers, and capabilities of adversaries)

  18. Metallographic examination in irradiated materials examination facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Yong Sun; Lee, Key Soon; Park, Dae Gyu; Ahn, Sang Bok; Yoo, Byoung Ok

    1998-01-01

    It is very important to have equipment of metallographic examination in hot-cell to observe the micro-structure of nuclear fuels and materials irradiated at nuclear power and/or research reactor. Those equipment should be operated by master-slave manipulators, so they are designed, manufactured and modified to make exercise easy and no trouble. The metallographic examination equipment and techniques as well as its operation procedure are described, so an operator can practice the metallography in hot-cell. (author). 5 refs., 7 tabs., 21 figs.

  19. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international co-operation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and nuclear materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers

  20. Material selection for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos, W.C.

    1994-01-01

    This report briefly summarizes the history of the materials selection for the US Department of Energy's high-level waste carbon steel storage tanks. It also provide an evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. The evaluation included a materials matrix that summarized the critical design, fabrication, construction, and corrosion resistance requirements; assessed each requirement; and cataloged the advantages and disadvantages of each material. This evaluation is based on the mission of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. On the basis of the compositions of the wastes stored in Hanford waste tanks, it is recommended that tanks for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility be constructed of normalized ASME SA 516, Grade 70, carbon steel

  1. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international co-operation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and nuclear materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers [es

  2. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international co-operation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and nuclear materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers

  3. General problems specific to hot nuclear materials research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bart, G.

    1996-01-01

    During the sixties, governments have installed hot nuclear materials research facilities to characterize highly radioactive materials, to describe their in-pile behaviour, to develop and test new reactor core components, and to provide the industry with radioisotopes. Since then, the attitude towards the nuclear option has drastically changed and resources have become very tight. Within the changed political environment, the national research centres have defined new objectives. Given budgetary constraints, nuclear facilities have to co-operate internationally and to look for third party research assignments. The paper discusses the problems and needs within experimental nuclear research facilities as well as industrial requirements. Special emphasis is on cultural topics (definition of the scope of nuclear research facilities, the search for competitive advantages, and operational requirements), social aspects (overageing of personnel, recruitment, and training of new staff), safety related administrative and technical issues, and research needs for expertise and state of the art analytical infrastructure

  4. Base isolation for nuclear power and nuclear material facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidinger, J.M.; Kircher, C.A.; Vaidya, N.; Constantinou, M.; Kelly, J.M.; Seidensticker, R.; Tajirian, F.F.; Ovadia, D.

    1989-01-01

    This report serves to document the status of the practice for the use of base isolation systems in the design and construction of nuclear power and nuclear material facilities. The report first describes past and current (1989) applications of base isolation in nuclear facilities. The report then provides a brief discussion of non-nuclear applications. Finally, the report summarizes the status of known base-isolation codes and standards

  5. Physical protection of facilities and special nuclear materials in france

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanpierre, G.

    1980-01-01

    Physical protection of nuclear facilities and special nuclear materials is subject in France to a national governmental regulation which provides for the basic principles to be taken into account and the minimal level of protection deemed necessary. But the responsibility of implementation is left to the facility management and the resulting decentralization allows for maximum efficiency. All safeguards measures comply with the commitments taken at the international level by the French government

  6. Nuclear material inventory estimation in a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.E.; Beyerlein, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    A new approach in the application of modern system identification and estimation techniques is proposed to help nuclear reprocessing facilities meet the nuclear accountability requirement proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The proposed identification and estimation method considers the material inventory in a portion of the chemical separations area of a reprocessing facility. The method addresses the nonlinear aspects of the problem, the time delay through the separation facility, and the lack of measurement access. The method utilizes only input-output measured data and knowledge of the uncertainties associated with the process and measured data. 14 refs

  7. Neutron irradiation facilities for fission and fusion reactor materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The successful development of energy-conversion machines based upon nuclear fission or fusion reactors is critically dependent upon the behavior of the engineering materials used to construct the full containment and primary heat extraction systems. The development of radiation damage-resistant materials requires irradiation testing facilities which reproduce, as closely as possible, the thermal and neutronic environment expected in a power-producing reactor. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reference core design for the Center for Neutron Research (CNR) reactor provides for instrumented facilities in regions of both hard and mixed neutron spectra, with substantially higher fluxes than are currently available. The benefits of these new facilities to the development of radiation damage resistant materials are discussed in terms of the major US fission and fusion reactor programs

  8. Simulation of facility operations and materials accounting for a combined reprocessing/MOX fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulter, C.A.; Whiteson, R.; Zardecki, A.

    1991-01-01

    We are developing a computer model of facility operations and nuclear materials accounting for a facility that reprocesses spent fuel and fabricates mixed oxide (MOX) fuel rods and assemblies from the recovered uranium and plutonium. The model will be used to determine the effectiveness of various materials measurement strategies for the facility and, ultimately, of other facility safeguards functions as well. This portion of the facility consists of a spent fuel storage pond, fuel shear, dissolver, clarifier, three solvent-extraction stages with uranium-plutonium separation after the first stage, and product concentrators. In this facility area mixed oxide is formed into pellets, the pellets are loaded into fuel rods, and the fuel rods are fabricated into fuel assemblies. These two facility sections are connected by a MOX conversion line in which the uranium and plutonium solutions from reprocessing are converted to mixed oxide. The model of the intermediate MOX conversion line used in the model is based on a design provided by Mike Ehinger of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (private communication). An initial version of the simulation model has been developed for the entire MOX conversion and fuel fabrication sections of the reprocessing/MOX fuel fabrication facility, and this model has been used to obtain inventory difference variance estimates for those sections of the facility. A significant fraction of the data files for the fuel reprocessing section have been developed, but these data files are not yet complete enough to permit simulation of reprocessing operations in the facility. Accordingly, the discussion in the following sections is restricted to the MOX conversion and fuel fabrication lines. 3 tabs

  9. Development of an Extreme Environment Materials Research Facility at Princeton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.B.; Gentile, C.A.; Tully, C.G.; Austin, R.; Calaprice, F.; McDonald, K.; Ascione, G.; Baker, G.; Davidson, R.; Dudek, L.; Grisham, L.; Kugel, H.; Pagdon, K.; Stevenson, T.; Woolley, R.; Zwicker, A.

    2010-01-01

    The need for a fundamental understanding of material response to a neutron and/or high heat flux environment can yield development of improved materials and operations with existing materials. Such understanding has numerous applications in fields such as nuclear power (for the current fleet and future fission and fusion reactors), aerospace, and other research fields (e.g., high-intensity proton accelerator facilities for high energy physics research). A proposal has been advanced to develop a facility for testing various materials under extreme heat and neutron exposure conditions at Princeton. The Extreme Environment Materials Research Facility comprises an environmentally controlled chamber (48 m 3 ) capable of high vacuum conditions, with extreme flux beams and probe beams accessing a central, large volume target. The facility will have the capability to expose large surface areas (1 m 2 ) to 14 MeV neutrons at a fluence in excess of 10 13 n/s. Depending on the operating mode. Additionally beam line power on the order of 15-75 MW/m 2 for durations of 1-15 seconds are planned. The multi-second duration of exposure can be repeated every 2-10 minutes for periods of 10-12 hours. The facility will be housed in the test cell that held the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), which has the desired radiation and safety controls as well as the necessary loading and assembly infrastructure. The facility will allow testing of various materials to their physical limit of thermal endurance and allow for exploring the interplay between radiation-induced embrittlement, swelling and deformation of materials, and the fatigue and fracturing that occur in response to thermal shocks. The combination of high neutron energies and intense fluences will enable accelerated time scale studies. The results will make contributions for refining predictive failure modes (modeling) in extreme environments, as well as providing a technical platform for the development of new alloys, new

  10. Decommissioning Strategies Selection for Facilities Using Radioactive Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husen Zamroni; Jaka Rachmadetin

    2008-01-01

    The facilities using radioactive material that have been stopped operation will require some form of the decommissioning for public and environment safety. The approaches are identified by three decommissioning strategies: immediate dismantling, deferred dismantling and entombment. If a facility undergoes immediate dismantling, most radio nuclides will have no such sufficient time to decay and therefore this strategy may not provide reduction in the worker exposure. A facility that undergoes deferred dismantling may advantage from the radioactive decay of residual radio nuclides during the long term storage period and entombment could be a viable option for other nuclear facilities containing only short lived or limited concentrations of long lived radionuclides. Mostly, only two types of the decommissioning used to be done in the world, immediate and deferred dismantling. (author)

  11. Inventory extension at the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanbro, W.D.; Longmire, V.; Olinger, C.T.; Argo, P.E.

    1996-09-01

    The planned renovation of the Nuclear Material Storage Facility (NMSF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be a significant addition to the plutonium storage capacity of the nuclear weapons complex. However, the utility of the facility may be impaired by an overly conservative approach to performing inventories of material in storage. This report examines options for taking advantage of provisions in Department of Energy orders to extend the time between inventories. These extensions are based on a combination of modern surveillance technology, facility design features, and revised operational procedures. The report also addresses the possibility that NMSF could be the site of some form of international inspection as part of the US arms control and nonproliferation policy

  12. Security Culture in Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susyanta-Widyatmaka; Koraag, Venuesiana-Dewi; Taswanda-Taryo

    2005-01-01

    In nuclear related field, there are three different cultures: safety, safeguards and security culture. Safety culture has established mostly in nuclear industries, meanwhile safeguards and security culture are relatively new and still developing. The latter is intended to improve the physical protection of material and nuclear facility. This paper describes concept, properties and factors affecting security culture and interactions among these cultures. The analysis indicates that anybody involving in nuclear material and facility should have strong commitment and awareness of such culture to establish it. It is concluded that the assessment of security culture outlined in this paper is still preliminary for developing and conduction rigorous security culture implemented in a much more complex facility such as nuclear power plant

  13. Material accountancy in an electrometallurgical Fuel Conditioning Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaden, D.; Benedict, R.W.; Goff, K.M.; Keyes, R.W.; Mariani, R.D.; Bucher, R.G.; Yacout, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) treats spent nuclear fuel using an electrometallurgical process that separates the uranium from the fission products, sodium thermal bond and cladding materials. Material accountancy is necessary at FCF for two reasons: first, it provides a mechanism for detecting a potential loss of nuclear material for safeguards and security; second, it provides a periodic check of inventories to ensure that processes and material are under control. By weighing material entering and leaving a process, and using sampling results to determine composition, an inventory difference (ID) results when the measured inventory is compared to the predicted inventory. The ID and its uncertainty, based on error propagation, determines the degree of assurance that an operation proceeded according to expectations. FCF uses the ID calculation in two ways: closeout, which is the ID and uncertainty for a particular operational step, and material accountancy, which determines an ID and its associated uncertainty for a material balance area through several operational steps. Material accountancy over the whole facility for a specified time period assists in detecting diversion of nuclear material. Data from depleted uranium operations are presented to illustrate the method used in FCF

  14. An LDEF 2 dust instrument for discrimination between orbital debris and natural particles in near-Earth space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzzolino, A. J.; Simpson, J. A.; Mckibben, R. B.; Voss, H. D.; Gursky, H.

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics of a space dust instrument which would be ideally suited to carry out near-Earth dust measurements on a possible Long Duraction Exposure Facility reflight mission (LDEF 2) is discussed. As a model for the trajectory portion of the instrument proposed for LDEF 2, the characteristics of a SPAce DUSt instrument (SPADUS) currently under development for flight on the USA ARGOS mission to measure the flux, mass, velocity, and trajectory of near-Earth dust is summarized. Since natural (cosmic) dust and man-made dust particles (orbital debris) have different velocity and trajectory distributions, they are distinguished by means of the SPADUS velocity/trajectory information. The SPADUS measurements will cover the dust mass range approximately 5 x 10(exp -12) g (2 microns diameter) to approximately 1 x 10(exp -5) g (200 microns diameter), with an expected mean error in particle trajectory of approximately 7 deg (isotropic flux). Arrays of capture cell devices positioned behind the trajectory instrumentation would provide for Earth-based chemical and isotopic analysis of captured dust. The SPADUS measurement principles, characteristics, its role in the ARGOS mission, and its application to an LDEF 2 mission are summarized.

  15. Nuclear material accountability system in DUPIC facility (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, W. I.; Kim, H. D.; Byeon, K. H.; Song, D. Y.; Lee, B. D.; Hong, J. S.; Yang, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has developed a nuclear material accountability system for DUPIC(Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU) fuel cycle process. The software development for the material accountability started with a general model software, so-called CoreMAS(Core Material Accountability System), at the beginning of 1998. The development efforts have been focused on the DUPIC safeguards system, and in addition, improved to meet Korean safeguards requirements under domestic laws and regulations. The software being developed as a local area network-based accountability system with multi-user environment is able to track and control nuclear material flow within a facility and inter-facility. In addition, it could be operated in a near-real time manner and also able to generate records and reports as necessary for facility operator and domestic and international inspector. This paper addresses DMAS(DUPIC Material Accountability System) being developed by KAERI and simulation in a small-scale DUPIC process for the verification of the software performance and for seeking further works

  16. Licensing of radioactive materials and facilities in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateo, A.J.

    1976-12-01

    The importation, acquisition, possession, use, sale and/ or transfer of radioactive materials need to be regulated and controlled in order to safeguard the importer, possessor, user or seller and the general public as well. The Philippine Atomic Energy Commission pursuant to Republic Act No. 2067, as amended and Republic Act No. 5207, has been charged by the government to control, regulate and license all the radioactive materials and facilities in the Philippines. Licensing and control is accomplished through a system of rules and regulations applicable to all importers, possessors, users or sellers of radioactive materials

  17. Continuous Material Balance Reconciliation for a Modern Plutonium Processing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CLARK, THOMASG.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a safeguards approach that can be deployed at any modern plutonium processing facility to increase the level of safeguards assurance and significantly reduce the impact of safeguards on process operations. One of the most perplexing problems facing the designers of plutonium processing facilities is the constraint placed upon the limit of error of the inventory difference (LEID). The current DOE manual constrains the LEID for Category I and II material balance areas to 2 per cent of active inventory up to a Category II quantity of the material being processed. For 239Pu a Category II quantity is two kilograms. Due to the large material throughput anticipated for some of the modern plutonium facilities, the required LEID cannot be achieved reliably during a nominal two month inventory period, even by using state-of-the-science non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The most cost-effective and least disruptive solution appears to be increasing the frequency of material balance closure and thus reducing the throughput being measured during each inventory period. Current inventory accounting practices and systems can already provide the book inventory values at any point in time. However, closing the material balance with measured values has typically required the process to be cleaned out, and in-process materials packaged and measured. This process requires one to two weeks of facility down time every two months for each inventory, thus significantly reducing productivity. To provide a solution to this problem, a non-traditional approach is proposed that will include using in-line instruments to provide measurement of the process materials on a near real-time basis. A new software component will be developed that will operate with the standard LANMAS application to provide the running material balance reconciliation, including the calculation of the inventory difference and variance propagation. The combined measurement system and software

  18. The physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    The latest review (1993) of this document was of limited scope and resulted in changes to the text of INFCIRC/225/Rev.2 designed to make the categorization table in that document consistent with the categorization table contained in the Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials. Consequently, a comprehensive review of INFCIRC/225 has not been conducted since 1989. Consequently, a meeting of national experts was convened from 2-5 June 1998 and from 27-29 October 1998 for a thorough review of INFCIRC/225/Rev.3. The revised document reflects the recommendations of the national experts to improve the structure and clarity of the document and to take account of improved technology and current international and national practices. In particular, a chapter has been added which provides specific recommendations related to sabotage of nuclear facilities and nuclear material. As a result of this addition, the title has been changed to 'The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities'. The recommendations presented in this IAEA document reflect a broad consensus among Member States on the requirements which should be met by systems for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. It is hoped that they will provide helpful guidance for Member States.

  19. SEM facility for examination of reactive and radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downs, G.L.; Tucker, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) facility for the examination of tritium-containing materials is operational at Mound Laboratory. The SEM is installed with the sample chamber incorporated as an integral part of an inert gas glovebox facility to enable easy handling of radioactive and pyrophoric materials. A standard SEM (ETEC Model B-1) was modified to meet dimensional, operational, and safety-related requirements. a glovebox was designed and fabricated which permitted access with the gloves to all parts of the SEM sample chamber to facilitate director and accessory replacement and repairs. A separate console combining the electron optical column and specimen chamber was interfaced to the glovebox by a custom-made, neoprene bellows so that the vibrations normally associated with the blowers and pumps were damped. Photomicrographs of tritiated pyrophoric materials show the usefulness of this facility. Some of the difficulties involved in the investigation of these materials are also discussed. The SEM is also equipped with an energy dispersive x-ray detector (ORTEC) and a Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (3M) attachments. This latter attachment allows analysis of secondary ions with masses ranging from 1-300 amu. (Auth.)

  20. The physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    The latest review (1993) of this document was of limited scope and resulted in changes to the text of INFCIRC/225/Rev.2 designed to make the categorization table in that document consistent with the categorization table contained in the Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials. Consequently, a comprehensive review of INFCIRC/225 has not been conducted since 1989. Consequently, a meeting of national experts was convened from 2-5 June 1998 and from 27-29 October 1998 for a thorough review of INFCIRC/225/Rev.3. The revised document reflects the recommendations of the national experts to improve the structure and clarity of the document and to take account of improved technology and current international and national practices. In particular, a chapter has been added which provides specific recommendations related to sabotage of nuclear facilities and nuclear material. As a result of this addition, the title has been changed to 'The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities'. The recommendations presented in this IAEA document reflect a broad consensus among Member States on the requirements which should be met by systems for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. It is hoped that they will provide helpful guidance for Member States

  1. Contained scanning electron microscope facility for examining radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.W.

    1986-03-01

    At the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) radioactive solids are characterized with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) contained in a glove box. The system includes a research-grade Cambridge S-250 SEM, a Tracor Northern TN-5500 x-ray and image analyzer, and a Microspec wavelength-dispersive x-ray analyzer. The containment facility has a glove box train for mounting and coating samples, and for housing the SEM column, x-ray detectors, and vacuum pumps. The control consoles of the instruments are located outside the glove boxes. This facility has been actively used since October 1983 for high alpha-activity materials such as plutonium metal and plutonium oxide powders. Radioactive defense waste glasses and contaminated equipment have also been examined. During this period the facility had no safety-related incidents, and personnel radiation exposures were maintained at less than 100 mrems

  2. Preliminary concepts for materials measurement and accounting in critical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, D.D.; Sapir, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary concepts are presented for improved materials measurement and accounting in large critical facilities. These concepts will be developed as part of a study that will emphasize international safeguarding of critical facilities. The major safeguards problem is the timely verification of in-reactor inventory during periods of reactor operation. This will require a combination of measurement, statistical sampling, and data analysis techniques. Promising techniques include integral measurements of reactivity and other reactor parameters that are sensitive to the total fissile inventory, and nondestructive assay measurements of the fissile material in reactor fuel drawers and vault storage canisters coupled with statistical sampling plans tailored for the specific application. The effectiveness of proposed measurement and accounting strategies will be evaluated during the study

  3. [Safeguards for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, O.E.

    1975-01-01

    Testimony is given on the subject of safeguards for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities, particularly during transportation. The ERDA nation-wide safe-secure transportation system and the Safe-Secure Trailer are described. The nationwide ERDA voice communication system is also described. Development of hardware and systems is discussed. The use of adversary simulation for evaluating protection systems is mentioned

  4. Design guides for radioactive-material-handling facilities and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doman, D.R.; Barker, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Fourteen key areas relating to facilities and equipment for handling radioactive materials involved in examination, reprocessing, fusion fuel handling and remote maintenance have been defined and writing groups established to prepare design guides for each areas. The guides will give guidance applicable to design, construction, operation, maintenance and safety, together with examples and checklists. Each guide will be reviewed by an independent review group. The guides are expected to be compiled and published as a single document

  5. Materials, Processes, and Facile Manufacturing for Bioresorbable Electronics: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaowei; Shou, Wan; Mahajan, Bikram K; Huang, Xian; Pan, Heng

    2018-05-07

    Bioresorbable electronics refer to a new class of advanced electronics that can completely dissolve or disintegrate with environmentally and biologically benign byproducts in water and biofluids. They have provided a solution to the growing electronic waste problem with applications in temporary usage of electronics such as implantable devices and environmental sensors. Bioresorbable materials such as biodegradable polymers, dissolvable conductors, semiconductors, and dielectrics are extensively studied, enabling massive progress of bioresorbable electronic devices. Processing and patterning of these materials are predominantly relying on vacuum-based fabrication methods so far. However, for the purpose of commercialization, nonvacuum, low-cost, and facile manufacturing/printing approaches are the need of the hour. Bioresorbable electronic materials are generally more chemically reactive than conventional electronic materials, which require particular attention in developing the low-cost manufacturing processes in ambient environment. This review focuses on material reactivity, ink availability, printability, and process compatibility for facile manufacturing of bioresorbable electronics. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Irradiation facilities for materials research: IFMIF and small scale installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlado, J. M.; Victoria, M.

    2007-01-01

    The research of advance materials in nuclear fields such as new fission reactors (Generation-IV), Accelerator Driven Systems for Transmutation of Radioactive Wastes and Nuclear Fusion, is becoming very much common in the types of low activation and radiation resistant Materials. Ferritic-Martensitic Steels (based in 9-12 Cr) with or without Oxide Dispersion Techniques (Ytria Nanoparticles), Composites materials are becoming the new generation to answer requirements of high temperature, high radiation resistance of structural materials. Special dedication is appearing in general research programmes to this area of Materials. The understanding of their final performance needs a wider knowledge of the mechanisms of radiation damage in these materials from the atomistic scale to the macroscopic responses. New extensive campaigns are being funded to irradiate from simple elements to model alloys and finally the complex materials themselves. That sequence and its state of art will be presented One clear technique for that understanding is the Multi scale Modelling which includes simulation techniques from quantum mechanics, molecular dynamics, defects diffusion, mesoscopic modelling and finally the macroscopic constitutive relations for macroscopic analysis. However, in each one of these steps is necessary a systematic and well established program of experiments that combines the irradiation and the very detailed analysis with techniques such as Transmission Electron Microscope, Positron Annihilation, SIMS, Atom Probe, Nanoindebntation. A key aspect that wants to be presented in this work is the state of art and discussion of Irradiation Facilities for Materials studies. Those facilities goes from ion implantation sources, small accelerator, Experimental Reactors such High Flux Reactor, sophisticated Triple Beams Sources as JANNUS in France to generate at the same time displacements-hydrogen-helium, and projected very large neutron installation such as IFMIF. The role to

  7. Staged deployment of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, H.; Sugimoto, M.; Nakamura, H.

    2001-01-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) employs an accelerator based D-Li intense neutron source as defined in the 1995-96 Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) study. In 1999, IEA mandated a review of the CDA IFMIF design for cost reduction without change to its original mission. This objective was accomplished by eliminating the previously assumed possibility of potential upgrade of IFMIF beyond the user requirements. The total estimated cost was reduced from $797.2 M to $487.8 M. An option of deployment in 3 stages was also examined to reduce the initial investment and annual expenditures during construction. In this scenario, full performance is achieved gradually with each interim stage as follows. 1st Stage: 20% operation for material selection for ITER breeding blanket, 2nd Stage: 50% operation to demonstrate materials performance of a reference alloy for DEMO, 3rd Stage: full performance operation ( 2MW/m 2 at 500cm 3 ) to obtain engineering data for potential DEMO materials under irradiation up to 100-200 dpa. In summary, the new, reduced cost IFMIF design and staged deployment still satisfies the original mission. The estimated cost of the 1st Stage facility is only $303.6 M making it financially much more attractive. Currently, IFMIF Key Element Technology Phase (KEP) is underway to reduce the key technology risk factors. (author)

  8. Fusion materials irradiation test facility: description and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trego, A.L.; Parker, E.F.; Hagan, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility will generate a high-flux, high-energy neutron source that will provide a fusion-like radiation environment for fusion reactor materials development. The neutrons will be produced in a nuclear stripping reaction by impinging a 35 MeV beam of deuterons from an Alvarez-type linear accelerator on a flowing lithium target. The target will be located in a test cell which will provide an irradiation volume of over 750l within which 10 cm 3 will have an average neutron flux of greater than 1.4 x 10 15 n/cm 2 -s and 500 cm 3 an average flux of greater than 2.2 by 10 14 n/cm 2- s with an expected availability factor greater than 65%. The projected fluence within the 10 cm 3 high flux region of FMIT will effect damage upon the materials test specimens to 30 dpa (displacements per atom) for each 90 day irradiation period. This irradiation flux volume will be at least 500 times larger than that of any other facility with comparable neutron energy and will fully meet the fusion materials damage research objective of 100 dpa within three years for the first round of tests

  9. Method of preventing contaminations in radioactive material handling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Shunji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the contamination on the floor surface of working places by laying polyvinyl butyral sheets over the floor surface, replacing when the sheets are contaminated, followed by burning. Method: Polyvinyl butyral sheets comprising 50 - 70 mol% of butyral component are laid in a radioactive material handling facility, radioactive materials are handled on the polyvinyl butyral sheets and the sheets are replaced when contaminated. The polyvinyl butyral sheets used contain 62 - 68 mol% of butyral component and has 0.03 - 0.2 mm thickness. The contaminated sheets are subjected to burning processing. This can surely collect radioactive materials and the sheets have favorable burnability, releasing no corrosive or deleterious gases. In addition, they are inexpensive and give no hindrance to the workers walking. (Takahashi, M.)

  10. The ETH Zurich AMS facilities: Performance parameters and reference materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christl, M., E-mail: mchristl@phys.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Vockenhuber, C.; Kubik, P.W.; Wacker, L.; Lachner, J.; Alfimov, V.; Synal, H.-A. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    The current performance of all three AMS systems in operation at ETH Zurich, the 6 MV HVEC EN-Tandem facility 'TANDEM', the 0.5 MV NEC Pelletron 'TANDY', and the 0.2 MV system 'MICADAS' is summarized. Radionuclides routinely measured with these AMS systems include {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 129}I and the actinides. The reference materials used for the normalization of the AMS measurements at the ETH Zurich AMS facilities are presented. This paper therefore is a comprehensive status report of all three AMS systems currently operated by the Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics (LIP) at ETH Zurich and documents their performance and operation parameters.

  11. First Materials Science Research Facility Rack Capabilities and Design Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, S.; Higgins, D.; Kitchens, L.; Curreri, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The first Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) is the primary facility for U.S. sponsored materials science research on the International Space Station. MSRR-1 is contained in an International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR) equipped with the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) for the best possible microgravity environment. MSRR-1 will accommodate dual Experiment Modules and provide simultaneous on-orbit processing operations capability. The first Experiment Module for the MSRR-1, the Materials Science Laboratory (MSL), is an international cooperative activity between NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the European Space Agency's (ESA) European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC). The MSL Experiment Module will accommodate several on-orbit exchangeable experiment-specific Module Inserts which provide distinct thermal processing capabilities. Module Inserts currently planned for the MSL are a Quench Module Insert, Low Gradient Furnace, and a Solidification with Quench Furnace. The second Experiment Module for the MSRR-1 configuration is a commercial device supplied by MSFC's Space Products Development (SPD) Group. Transparent furnace assemblies include capabilities for vapor transport processes and annealing of glass fiber preforms. This Experiment Module is replaceable on-orbit. This paper will describe facility capabilities, schedule to flight and research opportunities.

  12. Standard examination stage for the fuels and materials examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, J.W.; Frandsen, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    A Standard Examination Stage (SES) has been designed, fabricated, and tested for use in the Fuel and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) at the Hanford Reservation near Richland, WA. The SES will perform multiple functions in a variety of nuclear fuel, absorber, and blanket pin handling, positioning, and examination operations in 11 of 22 work stations in the FMEF Nondestructive Examination (NDE) cell. Preprogrammable, automated, closed loop computer control provides precision positioning in the X, Y and Z directions and in pin rotational positioning. Modular construction of both the mechanical hardware and the electrical and control system has been used to facilitate in-cell maintainability

  13. Shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, L.L.; Mann, F.M.; Morford, R.J.; Wilcox, A.D.; Johnson, D.L.; Huang, S.T.

    1983-03-01

    The shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility is based upon one-, two- and three-dimensional transport calculations with experimental measurements utilized to refine the nuclear data including the neutron cross sections from 20 to 50 MeV and the gamma ray and neutron source terms. The high energy neutrons and deuterons produce activation products from the numerous reactions that are kinematically allowed. The analyses for both beam-on and beam-off (from the activation products) conditions have required extensive nuclear data libraries and the utilization of Monte Carlo, discrete ordinates, point kernel and auxiliary computer codes

  14. Material control and accounting requirements for uranium enrichment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has defined material control and accounting (MC and A) requirement for low-enriched uranium enrichment plants licensed under 10 CFR parts 40 and 70. Following detailed assessment of potential safeguards issues relevant to these facilities, a new MC and A rule was developed. The primary safeguards considerations are detection of the loss of special nuclear material, detection of clandestine production of special nuclear material of low strategic significance for unauthorized use or distribution, and detection of unauthorized production of uranium enriched to ≥10 wt % U-235. The primary safeguards concerns identified were the large absolute limit of error associated with the material balance closing, the inability to shutdown some uranium enrichment technologies to perform a cleanout inventory of the process system, and the flexibility of some of these technologies to produce higher enrichments. Unauthorized production scenarios were identified for some technologies that could circumvent the detection of the production and removal of 5 kilograms of U-235 as high-enriched uranium through conventional material control and accounting programs. Safeguards techniques, including the use of production and process control information, measurements, and technical surveillance, were identified to compensate for these concerns

  15. Physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities in CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier-Gratia, M.-H.; Jorda, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique), as nuclear operator, is responsible for the control and protection of their nuclear materials. Inside CEA, DCS (Central Security Division) is in charge of the security matters, DCS defines the CEA strategy in this field, especially in physical protection. The paper will present the physical protection strategy of CEA. DCS defines the rules and methods; the operators have to apply in order to fulfill the security objectives of CEA. CEA has to provide the regulatory authority with documents proving that it is in accordance with the requirements of the 25th July 1980 law and 12th May 1981 decree. It has to implement all the necessary means in order to achieve the results requested by the regulatory authority. All these arrangements are described in the 'license and control file'. This file should specify the facility safeguards and physical protection system. Accounting measures are also described. In this file, the petitioner has to justify its capacity for holding nuclear materials and for exercising authorized activities on them. So the organization and the installed means have to be described in this authorization file. For physical protection, containment, surveillance and physical protection measures are presented: Containment measures must prevent the unauthorized or unjustified movements of nuclear material in the framework of the authorized activities; Surveillance measures must guarantee the integrity of the containment, check that no material is exiting by an abnormal channel; Physical protection measures for the materials, the premises and the facilities are intended to protect them against malevolent actions by means of security systems. The Central Security Division has established guidelines to provide guidance to the nuclear materials holders in writing such files. Each holding unit has to establish a 'license and control file' and each CEA site establishes a 'site license and control file

  16. Asymmetrical sabotage tactics, nuclear facilities/materials, and vulnerability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The emerging paradigm of a global community wherein post-modern political violence is a fact of life that must be dealt with by safety and security planners is discussed. This paradigm shift in the philosophy of terrorism is documented by analysis of the emerging pattern of asymmetrical tactics being employed by terrorists. Such philosophical developments in violent political movements suggest a shift in the risks that security and safety personnel must account for in their planning for physical protection of fixed site nuclear source facilities like power generation stations and the eventual storage and transportation of the by-products of these facilities like spent nuclear fuel and other high level wastes. This paper presents a framework for identifying these new political realities and related threat profiles, suggests ways in which security planners and administrators can design physical protection practices to meet these emerging threats, and argues for global adoption of standards for the protection of nuclear facilities that could be used as a source site from which terrorists could inflict a mass contamination event and for standards related to the protection of the waste materials that can be used in the production of radiological weapons of mass victimization. (author)

  17. Reprocessing yields and material throughput: HTGR recycle demonstration facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, N.; Abraham, L.

    1977-08-01

    Recovery and reuse of residual U-235 and bred U-233 from the HTGR thorium-uranium fuel cycle will contribute significantly to HTGR fuel cycle economics and to uranium resource conservation. The Thorium Utilization National Program Plan for HTGR Fuel Recycle Development includes the demonstration, on a production scale, of reprocessing and refabrication processes in an HTGR Recycle Demonstration Facility (HRDF). This report addresses process yields and material throughput that may be typically expected in the reprocessing of highly enriched uranium fuels in the HRDF. Material flows will serve as guidance in conceptual design of the reprocessing portion of the HRDF. In addition, uranium loss projections, particle breakage limits, and decontamination factor requirements are identified to serve as guidance to the HTGR fuel reprocessing development program

  18. A new materials irradiation facility at the Kyoto university reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Yanagita, S.; Xu, Q.; Satoh, Y.; Tsujimoto, H.; Kozuka, T.; Kamae, K.; Mishima, K.; Shiroya, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Utsuro, M.; Fujita, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A new materials irradiation facility with improved control capabilities has been installed at the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). Several deficiencies of conventional fission neutron material irradiation systems have been corrected. The specimen temperature is controlled both by an electric heater and by the helium pressure in the irradiation tube without exposure to neutrons at temperatures different from the design test conditions. The neutron spectrum is varied by the irradiation position. Irradiation dose is changed by pulling the irradiation capsule up and down during irradiation. Several characteristics of the irradiation field were measured. The typical irradiation intensity is 9.4x10 12 n/cm 2 s (>0.1 MeV) and the irradiation temperature of specimens is controllable from 363 to 773 K with a precision of ±2 K

  19. Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) materials coating evaluation, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The Weightless Environment Training Facility Material Coating Evaluation project has included preparing, coating, testing, and evaluating 800 test panels of three differing substrates. Ten selected coating systems were evaluated in six separate exposure environments and subject to three tests for physical properties. Substrate materials were identified, the manner of surface preparation described, and exposure environments defined. Exposure environments included immersion exposure, cyclic exposure, and field exposure. Cyclic exposures, specifically QUV-Weatherometer and the KTA Envirotest were found to be the most agressive of the environments included in the study when all three evaluation criteria are considered. This was found to result primarily from chalking of the coatings under ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. Volumes 2 and 3 hold the 5 appendices to this report.

  20. Electron microscope observations of impact crater debris amongst contaminating particulates on materials surfaces exposed in space in low-Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murr, L. E.; Rivas, J. M.; Quinones, S.; Niou, C.-S.; Advani, A. H.; Marquez, B.

    1993-01-01

    Debris particles extracted from a small sampling region on the leading edge of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft have been examined by analytical transmission electron microscopy and the elemental frequency observed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry and compared with upper atmosphere (Earth) particle elemental frequency and the average elemental compositions of interplanetary dust particles. A much broader elemental distribution was observed for the exposed spacecraft surface debris milieu. Numerous metal microfragment analyses, particularly aluminum and stainless steel, were compared with scanning electron microscope observations-of impact crater features, and the corresponding elemental spectra on selected LDEF aluminium tray clamps and stainless steel bolts. The compositions and melt features for these impact craters and ejecta have been shown to be consistent with microcrystalline debris fragments in the case of aluminum, and these observations suggest an ever changing debris milieu on exposed surfaces for space craft and space system materials.

  1. Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan - TA-60 Material Recycling Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, Leonard Frank [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-31

    This Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) was developed in accordance with the provisions of the Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. §§1251 et seq., as amended), and the Multi-Sector General Permit for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Industrial Activity (U.S. EPA, June 2015) issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and using the industry specific permit requirements for Sector P-Land Transportation and Warehousing as a guide. This SWPPP applies to discharges of stormwater from the operational areas of the TA- 60 Material Recycling Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Los Alamos National Laboratory (also referred to as LANL or the “Laboratory”) is owned by the Department of Energy (DOE), and is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS). Throughout this document, the term “facility” refers to the TA-60 Material Recycling Facility. The current permit expires at midnight on June 4, 2020.

  2. Design of facilities for processing pyrophoric radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bristow, H.A.S.; Hunter, S.D.

    1976-01-01

    The safe processing of large quantities of plutonium-bearing material poses difficult problems the solution of which sometimes involves conflicting requirements. The difficulties are increased when plutonium of a high burnup is used and the position becomes considerably more complicated when the chemical nature of the material being handled is such that it is pyrophoric. This paper describes the design principles and methods used to establish a facility capable of manufacturing large quantities of mixed plutonium/uranium carbide. The facility which included process stages such as milling, granulation, pellet pressing, furnacing and pin filling, was largely a conversion of an existing processing line. The paper treats the major plant hazards individually and indicates the methods used to counter them, outlining the main design principles employed and describing their application to selected items of equipment. Examples of the problems encountered with typical items of equipment are discussed. Some guide-lines are listed which should be of general value to designers and developers working on equipment for processing plutonium-bearing solids. The methods described have been successfully employed to provide a plant for the manufacture of mixed plutonium/uranium carbide on a scale of many hundreds of kilograms with no serious incident.(author)

  3. Investigation on candidates of principal facilities for exposure dose to public for the facilities using nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazaki, Yosuke; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Takada, Shoji; Fujimoto, Nozomu

    2015-01-01

    HTTR holds the nuclear fuel material use facilities in its reactor facilities, for the purpose of study on the fracture behavior of fuel and release behavior of fission products, development of high-performance fuel, and measurement of neutron flux. Due to the revision of the 'Act on the regulation of nuclear source material, nuclear fuel material and reactor', the facilities having the 'Important safety-related facilities' among the facilities applicable to the Enforcement Ordinance Article 41 (Article 41 facilities) has come to need to conform to the 'Regulations concerning standards for the location, structure, and equipment of used facilities and others'. In this case, actions such as modification by all possible means are required. The nuclear fuel substance use facilities of HTTR correspond to Article 41 facilities. So, whether it is a candidate for the 'Important safety-related facilities' has been examined. As a result, it is confirmed that the facilities are not correspond to the 'Important safety-related facilities', and it has been concluded that modification measures for the purpose of conforming to this approval standard rule are not necessary as of the present. (A.O.)

  4. Material Control and Accountability Experience at the Fuel Conditioning Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaden, D.; Fredrickson, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    The Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) treats spent nuclear fuel using an electrometallurgical process that separates the uranium from the fission products, sodium thermal bond, and cladding materials. Material accountancy is necessary at FCF for two reasons: 1) it provides a mechanism for detecting a potential loss of nuclear material for safeguards and security, and 2) it provides a periodic check of inventories to ensure that processes and materials are within control limits. Material Control and Accountability is also a Department of Energy (DOE) requirement (DOE Order 474.1). The FCF employs a computer based Mass Tracking (MTG) System to collect, store, retrieve, and process data on all operations that directly affect the flow of materials through the FCF. The MTG System is important for the operations of the FCF because it supports activities such as material control and accountability, criticality safety, and process modeling. To conduct material control and accountability checks and to monitor process performance, mass balances are routinely performed around the process equipment. The equipment used in FCF for pyro-processing consists of two mechanical choppers and two electro-refiners (the Mark-IV with the accompanying element chopper and Mark-V with the accompanying blanket chopper for processing driver fuel and blanket, respectively), and a cathode processor (used for processing both driver fuel and blanket) and casting furnace (mostly used for processing driver fuel). Performing mass balances requires the measurement of the masses and compositions of several process streams and equipment inventories. The masses of process streams are obtained via in-cell balances (i.e., load cells) that weigh containers entering and leaving the process equipment. Samples taken at key locations are analyzed to determine the composition of process streams and equipment inventories. In cases where equipment or containers cannot be

  5. Demonstration of safety of decommissioning of facilities using radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batandjieva, Borislava; O'Donnell, Patricio

    2008-01-01

    Full text:The development of nuclear industry worldwide in the recent years has particular impact on the approach of operators, regulators and interested parties to the implementation of the final phases (decommissioning) of all facilities that use radioactive material (from nuclear power plants, fuel fabrication facilities, research reactors to small research or medical laboratories). Decommissioning is becoming an increasingly important activity for two main reasons - termination of the practice in a safe manner with the view to use the facility or the site for other purposes, or termination of the practice and reuse the facility or site for new built nuclear facilities. The latter is of special relevance to multi-facility sites where for example new nuclear power plants and envisaged. However, limited countries have the adequate legal and regulatory framework, and experience necessary for decommissioning. In order to respond to this challenge of the nuclear industry and assist Member States in the adequate planning, conduct and termination of decommissioning of wide range of facilities, over the last decade the IAEA has implemented and initiated several projects in this field. One of the main focuses of this assistance to operators, regulators and specialists involved in decommissioning is the evaluation and demonstration of safety of decommissioning. This importance of these Agency activities was also highlighted in the International Action Plan on Decommissioning, during the second Joint Convention meeting in 2006 and the International Conference on Lessons Learned from Decommissioning in Athens in 2006. The IAEA has been providing technical support to its Member States in this field through several mechanisms: (1) the establishment of a framework of safety standards on decommissioning and development of a supporting technical documents; (2) the establishment of an international peer review mechanism for decommissioning; (3) the technical cooperation projects

  6. Fuels and materials testing capabilities in Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.B.; Chastain, S.A.; Culley, G.E.; Ethridge, J.L.; Lovell, A.J.; Newland, D.J.; Pember, L.A.; Puigh, R.J.; Waltar, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor, which started operating in 1982, is a 400 MWt sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor located in Hanford, Washington State, and operated by Westinghouse Hanford Co. under contract with U.S. Department of Energy. The reactor has a wide variety of functions for irradiation tests and special tests, and its major purpose is the irradiation of fuel and material for liquid metal reactor, nuclear reactor and space reactor projects. The review first describes major technical specifications and current conditions of the FFTF reactor. Then the plan for irradiation testing is outlined focusing on general features, fuel pin/assembly irradiation tests, and absorber irradiation tests. Assemblies for special tests include the material open test assembly (MOTA), fuel open test assembly (FOTA), closed loop in-reactor assembly (CLIRA), and other special fuel assemblies. An interim examination and maintenance cell (FFTF/IEM cell) and other hot cells are used for nondestructive/destructive tests and physical/mechanical properties test of material after irradiation. (N.K.)

  7. Safety design of the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi; Yamaki, Daiju; Katsuta, Hiroji; Moeslang, Anton; Jameson, R.A.; Martone, Marcello; Shannon, T.E.

    1997-11-01

    In the Conceptual Design Activity of the IFMIF, major subsystems, as well as the entire facility is carefully designed to satisfy the safety requirements for any possible construction sites. Each subsystem is qualitatively analyzed to identify possible hazards to the workers, public and environments using Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA). The results are reflected in the design and operation procedure. Shielding of radiation, particularly neutron around the test cell is one of the most important issue in normal operation. Radiation due to beam halo and activation is a hazard for operation personnel in the accelerator system. For the maintenance, remote handling technology is designed to be applied in various facilities of the IFMIF. Lithium loop and target system hold the majority of the radioactive material in the facility. Tritium and beryllium-7 are generated by the nuclear reaction during operation and thus needed to be removed continuously. They are also the potential hazards of airborne source in off-normal events. Minimization of inventory, separation and immobilization, and multiple confinement are considered in the design. Generation of radioactive waste is anticipated to be minor, but waste treatment systems for gas, liquid and solid wastes are designed to minimize the environmental impact. Lithium leak followed by a fire is a major concern, and extensive prevention plan is made in the target design. One of the design option considered is composed of; primary enclosure of the lithium loop, secondary containment filled with positive pressure argon, and an air tight lithium cell made of concrete with a steel lining. This study will report some technical issues considered in the design of IFMIF. It was concluded that the IFMIF can be designed and constructed to meet or exceed current safely standards for workers, public and the environment with existing technology and reasonable construction cost. (J.P.N.)

  8. Prediction of LDEF exposure to the ionizing radiation environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, J. W.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Predictions of the LDEF mission's trapped proton and electron and galactic cosmic ray proton exposures have been made using the currently accepted models with improved resolution near mission end and better modeling of solar cycle effects. An extension of previous calculations, to provide a more definitive description of the LDEF exposure to ionizing radiation, is represented by trapped proton and electron flux as a function of mission time, presented considering altitude and solar activity variation during the mission and the change in galactic cosmic ray proton flux over the mission. Modifications of the AP8MAX and AP8MIN fluence led to a reduction of fluence by 20%. A modified interpolation model developed by Daly and Evans resulted in 30% higher dose and activation levels, which better agreed with measured values than results predicted using the Vette model.

  9. New facilities in Japan materials testing reactor for irradiation test of fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Sagawa, H.; Ishitsuka, E.; Sakamoto, N.; Niiho, T.

    1996-01-01

    The testing and evaluation of fusion reactor components, i.e. blanket, plasma facing components (divertor, etc.) and vacuum vessel with neutron irradiation is required for the design of fusion reactor components. Therefore, four new test facilities were developed in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor: an in-pile functional testing facility, a neutron multiplication test facility, an electron beam facility, and a re-weldability facility. The paper describes these facilities

  10. Proposed rf system for the fusion materials irradiation test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.; Johnson, H.P.; Hoffert, W.J.; Boyd, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary rf system design for the accelerator portion of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility is in progress. The 35-MeV, 100-mA, cw deuteron beam will require 6.3 MW rf power at 80 MHz. Initial testing indicates the EIMAC 8973 tetrode is the most suitable final amplifier tube for each of a series of 15 amplifier chains operating at 0.5-MW output. To satisfy the beam dynamics requirements for particle acceleration and to minimize beam spill, each amplifier output must be controlled to +-1 0 in phase and the field amplitude in the tanks must be held within a 1% tolerance. These tolerances put stringent demands on the rf phase and amplitude control system

  11. Materials evaluation programs at the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, J.T.; Iverson, D.C.; Bickford, D.F.

    1992-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been operating a nuclear fuel cycle since the 1950s to produce nuclear materials in support of the national defense effort. About 83 million gallons of high-level waste produced since operations began has been consolidated by evaporation into 33 million gallons at the waste tank farm. The Department of Energy authorized the construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the function of which is to immobilize the waste as a durable borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters prior to the placement of the canisters in a federal repository. The DWPF is now mechanically complete and is undergoing commissioning and run-in activities. A brief description of the DWPF process is provided

  12. Accelerator conceptual design of the international fusion materials irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, M.; Kinsho, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Res. Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Intense Neutron Source Lab.; Jameson, R.A.; Blind, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Teplyakov, V. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Berwald, D.; Bruhwiler, D.; Peakock, M.; Rathke, J. [Northrop Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States); Deitinghoff, H.; Klein, H.; Pozimski, Y.; Volk, K. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe Univ., Frankfurt (Germany). Inst. fur Angewandte Phys.; Ferdinand, R.; Lagniel, J.-M. [CEA Saclay LNS, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Miyahara, A. [Teikyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Olivier, M. [CEA DSM, Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Piechowiak, E. [Northrop Grumman Corp., Baltimore, MD (United States); Tanabe, Y. [Toshiba Corp., Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    The accelerator system of the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) provides the 250-mA, 40-MeV continuous-wave deuteron beam at one of the two lithium target stations. It consists of two identical linear accelerator modules, each of which independently delivers a 125-mA beam to the common footprint of 20 cm x 5 cm at the target surface. The accelerator module consists of an ion injector, a 175 MHz RFQ and eight DTL tanks, and rf power supply system. The requirements for the accelerator system and the design concept are described. The interface issues and operational considerations to attain the proposed availability are also discussed. (orig.) 8 refs.

  13. Accelerator conceptual design of the international fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, M.; Kinsho, M.; Teplyakov, V.; Berwald, D.; Bruhwiler, D.; Peakock, M.; Rathke, J.; Deitinghoff, H.; Klein, H.; Pozimski, Y.; Volk, K.; Miyahara, A.; Olivier, M.; Piechowiak, E.; Tanabe, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The accelerator system of the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) provides the 250-mA, 40-MeV continuous-wave deuteron beam at one of the two lithium target stations. It consists of two identical linear accelerator modules, each of which independently delivers a 125-mA beam to the common footprint of 20 cm x 5 cm at the target surface. The accelerator module consists of an ion injector, a 175 MHz RFQ and eight DTL tanks, and rf power supply system. The requirements for the accelerator system and the design concept are described. The interface issues and operational considerations to attain the proposed availability are also discussed. (orig.)

  14. RF structure design of the China Material Irradiation Facility RFQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxing; He, Yuan; Xu, Xianbo; Zhang, Zhouli; Wang, Fengfeng; Dou, Weiping; Wang, Zhijun; Wang, Tieshan

    2017-10-01

    The radio frequency structure design of the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) for the front end of China Material Irradiation Facility (CMIF), which is an accelerator based neutron irradiation facility for fusion reactor material qualification, has been completed. The RFQ is specified to accelerate 10 mA continuous deuteron beams from the energies of 20 keV/u to 1.5 MeV/u within the vane length of 5250 mm. The working frequency of the RFQ is selected to 162.5 MHz and the inter-vane voltage is set to 65 kV. Four-vane cavity type is selected and the cavity structure is designed drawing on the experience of China Initiative Accelerator Driven System (CIADS) Injector II RFQ. In order to reduce the azimuthal asymmetry of the field caused from errors in fabrication and assembly, a frequency separation between the working mode and its nearest dipole mode is reached to 17.66 MHz by utilizing 20 pairs of π-mode stabilizing loops (PISLs) distributed along the longitudinal direction with equal intervals. For the purpose of tuning, 100 slug tuners were introduced to compensate the errors caused by machining and assembly. In order to obtain a homogeneous electrical field distribution along cavity, vane cutbacks are introduced and output endplate is modified. Multi-physics study of the cavity with radio frequency power and water cooling is performed to obtain the water temperature tuning coefficients. Through comparing to the worldwide CW RFQs, it is indicated that the power density of the designed structure is moderate for operation under continuous wave (CW) mode.

  15. Germination, growth rates, and electron microscope analysis of tomato seeds flown on the LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Bridgers, Kevin; Brown, Cecelia Wright

    1995-01-01

    The tomato seeds were flown in orbit aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for nearly six years. During this time, the tomato seeds received an abundant exposure to cosmic radiation and solar wind. Upon the return of the LDEF to earth, the seeds were distributed throughout the United States and 30 foreign countries for analysis. The purpose of the experiment was to determine the long term effect of cosmic rays on living tissue. Our university analysis included germination and growth rates as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray analysis of the control as well as Space-exposed tomato seeds. In analyzing the seeds under the Electron Microscope, usual observations were performed on the nutritional and epidermis layer of the seed. These layers appeared to be more porous in the Space-exposed seeds than on the Earth-based control seeds. This unusual characteristic may explain the increases in the space seeds growth pattern. (Several test results show that the Space-exposed seeds germinate sooner than the Earth-Based seeds. Also, the Space-exposed seeds grew at a faster rate). The porous nutritional region may allow the seeds to receive necessary nutrients and liquids more readily, thus enabling the plant to grow at a faster rate. Roots, leaves and stems were cut into small sections and mounted. After sputter coating the specimens with Argon/Gold Palladium Plasma, they were ready to be viewed under the Electron Microscope. Many micrographs were taken. The X-ray analysis displayed possible identifications of calcium, potassium, chlorine, copper, aluminum, silicon, phosphate, carbon, and sometimes sulfur and iron. The highest concentrations were shown in potassium and calcium. The Space-exposed specimens displayed a high concentration of copper and calcium in the two specimens. There was a significantly high concentration of copper in the Earth-based specimens, whereas there was no copper in the Space-exposed specimens.

  16. Long term microparticle impact fluxes on LDEF determined from optical survey of Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, C. G.; Oliver, J. P.; Cooke, W. J.; Downey, K. I.; Kassel, P. C.

    1995-01-01

    Many of the IDE metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) capacitor-discharge impact sensors remained active during the entire Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission. An optical survey of impact sites on the active surfaces of these sensors has been extended to include all sensors from the low-flux sides of LDEF (i.e. the west or trailing side, the earth end, and the space end) and 5-7 active sensors from each LDEF's high-flux sides (i.e. the east or leading side, the south side, and the north side). This survey was facilitated by the presence of a relatively large (greater than 50 micron diameter) optical signature associated with each impact site on the active sensor surfaces. Of the approximately 4700 impacts in the optical survey data set, 84% were from particles in the 0.5 to 3 micron size range. An estimate of the total number of hypervelocity impacts on LDEF from particles greater than 0.5 micron diameter yields a value of approximately 7 x 10(exp 6). Impact feature dimensions for several dozen large craters on MOS sensors and germanium witness plates are also presented. Impact fluxes calculated from the IDE survey data closely matched surveys of similar size impacts (greater than or equal to 3 micron diameter craters in Al, or marginal penetrations of a 2.4 micron thick Al foil) by other LDEF investigators. Since the first year IDE data were electronically recorded, the flux data could be divided into three long term time periods: the first year, the entire 5.8 year mission, and the intervening 4.8 years (by difference). The IDE data show that there was an order of magnitude decrease in the long term microparticle impact flux on the trailing side of LDEF, from 1.01 to 0.098 x 10(exp -4) m(exp 2)/s, from the first year in orbit compared to years 2-6. The long term flux on the leading edge showed an increase from 8.6 to 11.2 x 10(exp -4) m(exp -2)/s over this same time period. (Short term flux increases up to 10,000 times the background rate were recorded on the

  17. Some technical aspects of the nuclear material accounting and control at nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, O.A.; Babaev, N.S.; Gryazev, V.M.; Gadzhiev, G.I.; Gabeskiriya, V.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    The possibilities of nuclear material accounting and control are discussed at nuclear facilities of fuel cycle (WWER-type reactor, fuel fabrication plant, reprocessing plant and uranium enrichment facility) and zero energy fast reactor facility. It is shown that for nuclear material control the main method is the accounting with the application isotopic correlations at the reprocessing plant and enrichment facility. Possibilities and limitations of the application of destructive and non-destructive methods are discussed for nuclear material determinations at fuel facilities and their role in the accounting and safeguards systems as well as possibilities of the application of neutron method at a zero energy fast reactor facility [ru

  18. 77 FR 60482 - Regulatory Guide 5.67, Material Control and Accounting for Uranium Enrichment Facilities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... Accounting for Uranium Enrichment Facilities Authorized To Produce Special Nuclear Material of Low Strategic... Accounting for Uranium Enrichment Facilities Authorized to Produce Special Nuclear Material of Low Strategic... and is applicable to the Paducah GDP and other uranium enrichment facilities that have been licensed...

  19. FBR structural material test facility in flowing sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugasundaram, M.; Kumar, Hemant; Ravi, S.

    2016-01-01

    In Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR), components such as Control and Safety Rod Drive Mechanism (CSRDM), Diverse Safety Rod Drive Mechanism (DSRDM), Transfer arm and primary sodium pumps etc., are experiencing friction and wear between the moving parts in contact with liquid sodium at high temperature. Hence, it is essential to evaluate the friction and wear behaviour to validate the design of components. In addition, the above core structural reactor components such as core cover plate, control plugs etc., undergoes thermal striping which is random thermal cycling induced by flow stream resulting from the mixing of non isothermal jets near that component. This leads to development of surface cracks and assist in crack growth which in turn may lead to failure of the structural component. Further, high temperature components are often subjected to low cycle fatigue due to temperature gradient induced cyclic thermal stresses caused by start-ups, shutdowns and transients. Also steady state operation at elevated temperature introduces creep and the combination of creep and fatigue leads to creep-fatigue interactions. Therefore, resistance to low cycle fatigue, creep and creep-fatigue are important considerations in the design of FBR components. Liquid sodium is used as coolant and hence the study of the above properties in dynamic sodium are equally important. In view of the above, facility for materials testing in sodium (INSOT) has been constructed and in operation for conducting the experiments such as tribology, thermal stripping, low cycle fatigue, creep and creep-fatigue interaction etc. The salient features of the operation and maintenance of creep and fatigue loops of INSOT facility are discussed in detail. (author)

  20. Protecting nuclear material and facilities: Is a new approach needed?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhausler, F.; Bunn, G.

    2002-01-01

    acquisition' of nuclear, radiological and other materials relating to weapons of mass destruction. The third principle of the partnership is to 'develop and maintain effective physical protection measures' and to 'provide assistance to states lacking sufficient resources to protect their facilities'. Other principles relate to illicit trafficking, export and border controls and disposition of stocks no longer required for defense purposes. The initial G-8 focus will be on projects in Russia, but its principles are to be applied globally. We propose a Global Physical Protection Initiative consisting of six elements in addition to what the IAEA is now doing to improve PP practices around the world: Establish a Global List of Physical Protection Priorities beyond those already agreed. The IAEA International Physical Protection Assistance Programme (IPPAS) has collected information from many countries on needs for better protection and it could prepare an initial list of priorities in cooperation with IAEA safeguards inspectors, with the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) and the Institute of Nuclear Plant Operators (INPO); Create a Multilateral Security Cooperation System calling for bilateral and multilateral cooperation among those responsible for implementing PP standards. This could start with a more detailed survey of national regulatory standards and practices than those issued by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, and with meetings of regulators from various countries to share experiences; Create an International Nuclear Threat Protection Task Force that would focus on improving cooperation between PP regulators and the police and intelligence agents expected to respond to alarms relating to sabotage or theft of nuclear and radiological materials. This collaboration could range from sharing intelligence on illicit trafficking to identifying links between organized crime and nuclear terrorism; Establish an International Radioactive Material Tracking Centre that

  1. Hazard evaluation of The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgazzi, Luciano [ENEA-Centro Ricerche ' Ezio Clementel' , Advanced Physics Technology Division, Via Martiri di Monte Sole, 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy)]. E-mail: burgazzi@bologna.enea.it

    2005-01-15

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is aimed to provide an intense neutron source by a high current deuteron linear accelerator and a high-speed lithium flow target, for testing candidate materials for fusion. Liquid lithium is being circulated through a loop and is kept at a temperature above its freezing point. In the frame of the design phase called Key Element technology Phase (KEP), jointly performed by an international team to verify the most important risk factors, safety assessment of the whole plant has been required in order to identify the hazards associated with the plant operation. This paper discusses the safety assessments that were performed and their outcome: Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) approach has been adopted in order to accomplish the task. Main conclusions of the study is that, on account of the safety and preventive measures adopted, potential plant related hazards are confined within the IFMIF security boundaries and great care must be exercised to protect workers and site personnel from operating the plant. The analysis has provided as a result a set of Postulated Initiating Events (PIEs), that is off-normal events, that could result in hazardous consequences for the plant, together with the total frequency and the list of component failures which could induce the PIE: this assures the exhaustive list of major initiating events of accident sequences, helpful to the further accident sequence analysis phase. Finally, for each one of the individuated PIEs, the evaluation of the accident evolution, in terms of effects on the plant and relative countermeasures, has allowed to verify that adequate measures are being taken both to prevent the accident occurrence and to cope with the accident consequences, thus assuring the fulfilment of the safety requirements.

  2. Guide to sampling airborne radioactive materials in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The ANSI N13.1-1969 Guide to Sampling Airborne Radioactive Materials in Nuclear Facilities is currently being revised. The revision is being drafted by a working group under the auspices of the Health Physics Society Standards Committee. The main differences between the original standard and the proposed revision are a narrowed scope, a greater emphasis on the design process, and the verification of meeting performance criteria. Compliance with the revised standard will present new challenges, especially in the area of performance validation. The progress made in the revision and key portions of the standard are discussed. The DOE has recently petitioned EPA for alternate approaches to complying with air-sampling regulations. Dealing with compliance issues until the revised standard is adopted will be a challenge for both designers and regulators. The objective of this paper is to briefly describe the content of the proposed revision in order to point out significant differences from the old standard and to describe the new challenges that the proposed revision will present

  3. Guide to sampling airborne radioactive materials in nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glissmeyer, J.A. [Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The ANSI N13.1-1969 Guide to Sampling Airborne Radioactive Materials in Nuclear Facilities is currently being revised. The revision is being drafted by a working group under the auspices of the Health Physics Society Standards Committee. The main differences between the original standard and the proposed revision are a narrowed scope, a greater emphasis on the design process, and the verification of meeting performance criteria. Compliance with the revised standard will present new challenges, especially in the area of performance validation. The progress made in the revision and key portions of the standard are discussed. The DOE has recently petitioned EPA for alternate approaches to complying with air-sampling regulations. Dealing with compliance issues until the revised standard is adopted will be a challenge for both designers and regulators. The objective of this paper is to briefly describe the content of the proposed revision in order to point out significant differences from the old standard and to describe the new challenges that the proposed revision will present.

  4. Fact Sheet for Friction Materials Manufacturing Facilities Residual Risk and Technology Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    proposed amendments to the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) for Friction Materials Manufacturing Facilities to address the results of the residual risk and technology review

  5. Building control for nuclear materials R and D facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, O.

    1979-01-01

    The new plutonium research and development facility at LASL was the first facility to be completed in the United States under the new environmental requirements. To insure that these new requirements are met, a redundant computer system is used to monitor and control the building. This paper describes the supervisory control and data acquisition system that was implemented to perform that function

  6. Fuels and Materials Examination Facility: Environmental assessment, Hanford site, Richland, Washington: Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    The Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) and the High Performance Fuel Laboratory (HPFL) were originally proposed to be constructed as separate facilities in the 400 Area of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The environmental effects of these two facilities were described and evaluated in the FMEF Environmental Assessment and the HPFL Final Environmental Impact Statement, ERDA-1550. For economic reasons, the two facilities will no longer be built as separate facilities. The FMEF facility plans have been modified to incorporate some of the features of the proposed HPFL facility while retaining essentially all of the capabilities of the original FMEF proposal. The purpose of this document is to update the FMEF Environmental Assessment to appropriately reflect addition of certain HPFL features into the FMEF facility and to assess the environmental affects of the facility which resulted from inclusion of HPFL features into the FMEF facility

  7. Facility level SSAC for model country - an introduction and material balance accounting principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    A facility level State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials (SSAC) for a model country and the principles of materials balance accounting relating to that country are described. The seven principal elements of a SSAC are examined and a facility level system based on them discussed. The seven elements are organization and management; nuclear material measurements; measurement quality; records and reports; physical inventory taking; material balance closing; containment and surveillance. 11 refs., 19 figs., 5 tabs

  8. An experimental facility for microwave induced plasma processing of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, D.S.; Ramachandran, K.; Bhide, A.L.; Venkatramani, N.

    1997-01-01

    Microwave induced plasma processing offers many advantages over conventional processes. However this technology is in the development stage. This report gives a detailed information about a microwave plasma processing facility (2.45 GHz, 700 W) set up in the Laser and Plasma Technology Division. The equipment details and the results obtained on deposition of diamond like carbon (DLC) thin films and surface modification of polymer PET (polyethylene terephthalate) using this facility are given in this report. (author)

  9. Domestic round robin exercise on analysis of uranium for nuclear material handling facilities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yoshiyasu; Nagai, Kohta; Handa, Takamitsu; Inoue, Shin-ichi; Sato, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Interlaboratory comparison programme as well as internal quality control system is an effective tool for an analytical laboratory responsible to nuclear material accountancy of a nuclear facility to maintain and enhance its capability for analysis. However, it is a burden on nuclear material handling facilities in Japan to attend interlaboratory comparison programme run by overseas institutions because of high costs and complicated procedure for importing nuclear materials, and therefore facilities which can participate in such international programme would be limited. Nuclear Material Control Center has hence started and organised an annual domestic round robin exercise on analysis of uranium standard materials, funded by the Japan Safeguards Office of the Nuclear Regulation Authority, since 2008 to enhance analytical capability of Japanese Facilities. The outline of the round robin exercise will be given and the results of uranium isotopic and concentration analysis reported by participant facilities from 2008 to 2015 will be summarised in the presentation. (author)

  10. Material control in nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. Part II. Accountability, instrumentation and measurement techniques in fuel fabrication facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgonovi, G.M.; McCartin, T.J.; McDaniel, T.; Miller, C.L.; Nguyen, T.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes the measurement techniques, the instrumentation, and the procedures used in accountability and control of nuclear materials, as they apply to fuel fabrication facilities. A general discussion is given of instrumentation and measurement techniques which are presently used being considered for fuel fabrication facilities. Those aspects which are most significant from the point of view of satisfying regulatory constraints have been emphasized. Sensors and measurement devices have been discussed, together with their interfacing into a computerized system designed to permit real-time data collection and analysis. Estimates of accuracy and precision of measurement techniques have been given, and, where applicable, estimates of associated costs have been presented. A general description of material control and accounting is also included. In this section, the general principles of nuclear material accounting have been reviewed first (closure of material balance). After a discussion of the most current techniques used to calculate the limit of error on inventory difference, a number of advanced statistical techniques are reviewed. The rest of the section deals with some regulatory aspects of data collection and analysis, for accountability purposes, and with the overall effectiveness of accountability in detecting diversion attempts in fuel fabrication facilities. A specific example of application of the accountability methods to a model fuel fabrication facility is given. The effect of random and systematic errors on the total material uncertainty has been discussed, together with the effect on uncertainty of the length of the accounting period

  11. Material control in nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. Part II. Accountability, instrumentation and measurement techniques in fuel fabrication facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgonovi, G.M.; McCartin, T.J.; McDaniel, T.; Miller, C.L.; Nguyen, T.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes the measurement techniques, the instrumentation, and the procedures used in accountability and control of nuclear materials, as they apply to fuel fabrication facilities. A general discussion is given of instrumentation and measurement techniques which are presently used being considered for fuel fabrication facilities. Those aspects which are most significant from the point of view of satisfying regulatory constraints have been emphasized. Sensors and measurement devices have been discussed, together with their interfacing into a computerized system designed to permit real-time data collection and analysis. Estimates of accuracy and precision of measurement techniques have been given, and, where applicable, estimates of associated costs have been presented. A general description of material control and accounting is also included. In this section, the general principles of nuclear material accounting have been reviewed first (closure of material balance). After a discussion of the most current techniques used to calculate the limit of error on inventory difference, a number of advanced statistical techniques are reviewed. The rest of the section deals with some regulatory aspects of data collection and analysis, for accountability purposes, and with the overall effectiveness of accountability in detecting diversion attempts in fuel fabrication facilities. A specific example of application of the accountability methods to a model fuel fabrication facility is given. The effect of random and systematic errors on the total material uncertainty has been discussed, together with the effect on uncertainty of the length of the accounting period.

  12. Thermoluminescent dosimetry for LDEF experiment M0006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.Y.; Giangano, D.; Kantorcik, T.; Stauber, M.; Snead, L.

    1992-01-01

    Experiment M0006 on the Long Duration Exposure Facility had as its objective the investigation of space radiation effects on various electronic and optical components, as well as on seed germination. The Grumman Corporate Research Center provided the radiation dosimetric measurements for M0006, comprising the preparation of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and the subsequent measurement and analysis of flight exposed and control samples. In addition, various laboratory exposures of TLD's with gamma rays and protons were performed to obtain a better understanding of the flight exposures

  13. Exposure to space radiation of high-performance infrared multilayer filters and materials technology experiment (A0056)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Gary J.; Seeley, John S.; Hunneman, Roger

    1992-01-01

    Infrared optical multilayer filters and materials were exposed to the space environment of low Earth orbit on LDEF. The effects are summarized of that environment on the physical and optical properties of the filters and materials flown.

  14. Korean plasma-material interaction researches/facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, K.-S.; Woo, H.-J.; Cho, S.-G.

    2013-01-01

    Various PMI facilities have been developed recently in Korea, such as DiPS, MP2, ECR plasma, a segmented plasma torch system, e-beam accelerator, and the TReD (Transport and Removal experiment of Dust) device. In this paper, these devices are briefly to be explained in terms of objective and specifications along with initial experimental results. (J.P.N.)

  15. Advanced materials analysis facility at CSIRO HIAF laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, M J; Wielunski, L S; Baxter, G R [CSIRO, Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Applied Physics Div.; Sie, S H; Suter, G F [CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Exploration and Mining Div.

    1994-12-31

    The HIAF facility at North Ryde, based on a 3 MV Tandetron accelerator has been operating for several years. Initially three ion sources were in operation:- conventional duoplasmatrons for proton and helium beams and a sputter ion source for heavy ions. An electrostatic focusing system was designed and built in-house for providing microbeams. The research emphasis has been largely on microbeam PIXE with particular reference to the mining industry. An AMS system was added in 1990 which prevented the inclusion of the charge exchange canal required for helium beams. The facility has been operated by CSIRO Division of Exploration and Mining. At the beginning of 1992, the lon Beam Technology Group of CSIRO Division of Applied Physics was relocated at Lindfield and became a major user of the HIAF facility. Because the research activities of this group involved Rutherford Backscattering and Channeling, it was necessary to add a helium ion source and a new high vacuum beam line incorporating a precision goniometer. These facilities became operational in the second quarter of 1992. Currently a PIXE system is being added to the chamber containing the goniometer, making the accelerator an extremely versatile one for a wide range of IBA techniques. 3 refs.

  16. Advanced materials analysis facility at CSIRO HIAF laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, M.J.; Wielunski, L.S.; Baxter, G.R. [CSIRO, Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Applied Physics Div.; Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. [CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Exploration and Mining Div.

    1993-12-31

    The HIAF facility at North Ryde, based on a 3 MV Tandetron accelerator has been operating for several years. Initially three ion sources were in operation:- conventional duoplasmatrons for proton and helium beams and a sputter ion source for heavy ions. An electrostatic focusing system was designed and built in-house for providing microbeams. The research emphasis has been largely on microbeam PIXE with particular reference to the mining industry. An AMS system was added in 1990 which prevented the inclusion of the charge exchange canal required for helium beams. The facility has been operated by CSIRO Division of Exploration and Mining. At the beginning of 1992, the lon Beam Technology Group of CSIRO Division of Applied Physics was relocated at Lindfield and became a major user of the HIAF facility. Because the research activities of this group involved Rutherford Backscattering and Channeling, it was necessary to add a helium ion source and a new high vacuum beam line incorporating a precision goniometer. These facilities became operational in the second quarter of 1992. Currently a PIXE system is being added to the chamber containing the goniometer, making the accelerator an extremely versatile one for a wide range of IBA techniques. 3 refs.

  17. Remote-handling demonstration tests for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, E.J.; Hussey, M.W.; Kelly, V.P.; Yount, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The mission of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility is to create a fusion-like environment for fusion materials development. Crucial to the success of FMIT is the development and testing of remote handling systems required to handle materials specimens and maintenance of the facility. The use of full scale mock-ups for demonstration tests provides the means for proving these systems

  18. Life Science Research Facility materials management requirements and concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine C.

    1986-01-01

    The Advanced Programs Office at NASA Ames Research Center has defined hypothetical experiments for a 90-day mission on Space Station to allow analysis of the materials necessary to conduct the experiments and to assess the impact on waste processing of recyclable materials and storage requirements of samples to be returned to earth for analysis as well as of nonrecyclable materials. The materials include the specimens themselves, the food, water, and gases necessary to maintain them, the expendables necessary to conduct the experiments, and the metabolic products of the specimens. This study defines the volumes, flow rates, and states of these materials. Process concepts for materials handling will include a cage cleaner, trash compactor, biological stabilizer, and various recycling devices.

  19. Protection of nuclear facilities and nuclear materials against malevolent actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornu, P.; Aurelle, J.; Jalouneix, J.

    2001-01-01

    The french approach for considering malevolent actions affecting the design and operation of nuclear facilities is aimed at determining the extent to which the facilities are protected. When carrying out these studies, operating organizations have to demonstrate that their are complying with the objectives set by the Competent Authority for reducing the risk of internal or external malevolent actions. The approach to be followed consist to determine the sensitivity of each zone and to estimate the vulnerability of the most critical zones to each type of aggression. The sensitivity can be defined by the level of the radiological consequences resulting from a malevolent action. The estimation of the vulnerability is made of the extent to which it is difficult to carry out a malevolent action. if need be, counter-measures are taken to protect zones for which the consequences would be unacceptable compared to the force of the aggression. Counter-measures are intended both to minimise sensitivity and make it more difficult to carry out the aggression envisaged. Acceptable consequences are taken as being those leading to levels of radioactive releases less than, or equal to, those taken into account in the facility safety case. This implies that the vulnerability of the most sensitive zones should be reduced to a minimum so that an acceptable level of protection can be provided for these areas. Emphasis will be paid on the defence in depth approach organized around prevention, management and mitigation measures. (authors)

  20. EnviroNET: An on-line environment data base for LDEF data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauriente, Michael

    1992-01-01

    EnviroNET is an on-line, free form data base intended to provide a centralized depository for a wide range of technical information on environmentally induced interactions of use to Space Shuttle customers and spacecraft designers. It provides a user friendly, menu driven format on networks that are connected globally and is available twenty-four hours a day, every day. The information updated regularly, includes expository text, tabular numerical data, charts and graphs, and models. The system pools space data collected over the years by NASA, USAF, other government facilities, industry, universities, and ESA. The models accept parameter input from the user and calculate and display the derived values corresponding to that input. In addition to the archive, interactive graphics programs are also available on space debris, the neutral atmosphere, radiation, magnetic field, and ionosphere. A user friendly informative interface is standard for all the models with a pop-up window, help window with information on inputs, outputs, and caveats. The system will eventually simplify mission analysis with analytical tools and deliver solution for computational intense graphical applications to do 'What if' scenarios. A proposed plan for developing a repository of LDEF information for a user group concludes the presentation.

  1. From LDEF to a national Space Environment and Effects (SEE) program: A natural progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, David E.; Calloway, Robert L.; Funk, Joan G.; Kinard, William H.; Levine, Arlene S.

    1995-02-01

    As the LDEF program draws to a close, it leaves in place the fundamental building blocks for a Space Environment and Effects (SEE) program. Results from LDEF data analyses and investigations now form a substantial core of knowledge on the long term effects of the space environment on materials, system and structures. In addition, these investigations form the basic structure of a critically-needed SEE archive and database system. An agency-wide effort is required to capture all elements of a SEE program to provide a more comprehensive and focused approach to understanding the space environment, determining the best techniques for both flight and ground-based experimentation, updating the models which predict both the environments and those effects on subsystems and spacecraft, and, finally, ensuring that this multitudinous information is properly maintained, and inserted into spacecraft design programs. Many parts and pieces of a SEE program already exist at various locations to fulfill specific needs. The primary purpose of this program, under the direction of the Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology (OACT) in NASA Headquarters, is to take advantage of these parts; apply synergisms where possible; identify and when possible fill-in gaps; coordinate and advocate a comprehensive SEE program. The SEE program must coordinate and support the efforts of well-established technical communities wherein the bulk of the work will continue to be done. The SEE program will consist of a NASA-led SEE Steering Committee, consisting of government and industry users, with the responsibility for coordination between technology developers and NASA customers; and Technical Working Groups with primary responsibility for program technical content in response to user needs. The Technical Working Groups are as follows: Materials and Processes; Plasma and Fields; Ionizing Radiation; Meteoroids and Orbital Debris; Neutral External Contamination; Thermosphere, Thermal, and Solar

  2. ORNL shielded facilities capable of remote handling of highly radioactive beta--gamma emitting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitson, W.R.

    1977-09-01

    A survey of ORNL facilities having adequate shielding and containment for the remote handling of experimental quantities of highly radioactive beta-gamma emitting materials is summarized. Portions of the detailed descriptions of these facilities previously published in ORNL/TM-1268 are still valid and are repeated

  3. New meteoroid model predictions for directional impacts on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divine, Neil; Agueero, Rene C.

    1993-01-01

    An extensive body of data, from meteors, zodiacal light, spacecraft-borne impact detectors (Helios, Pioneer, Galileo, Ulysses), and other sources, forms the basis of a new numerical model for the distributions of interplanetary meteoroids. For each of the five populations in this model it is possible to evaluate meteoroid concentration and flux for oriented surfaces or detectors having arbitrary position and velocity in interplanetary space. For a spacecraft in geocentric orbit the effects of gravitational focussing and shielding by the Earth have been newly derived with full attention to the directionality of the particles, both on approach (i.e., relative to a massless Earth) and at the target. This modeling approach was exercised to provide an estimate of meteoroid fluence for each of several oriented surfaces on LDEF.

  4. ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS AT A RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, Stephen; Welling, Steven; Bell, Simon

    2003-01-01

    The use of hazardous waste disposal facilities permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (''RCRA'') to dispose of low concentration and exempt radioactive materials is a cost-effective option for government and industry waste generators. The hazardous and PCB waste disposal facility operated by US Ecology Idaho, Inc. near Grand View, Idaho provides environmentally sound disposal services to both government and private industry waste generators. The Idaho facility is a major recipient of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers FUSRAP program waste and received permit approval to receive an expanded range of radioactive materials in 2001. The site has disposed of more than 300,000 tons of radioactive materials from the federal government during the past five years. This paper presents the capabilities of the Grand View, Idaho hazardous waste facility to accept radioactive materials, site-specific acceptance criteria and performance assessment, radiological safety and environmental monitoring program information

  5. Evaluation of Island and Nearshore Confined Disposal Facility Alternatives, Pascagoula River Harbor Dredged Material Management Plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bunch, Barry

    2003-01-01

    ...) for the Federal navigation project at Pascagoula, MS. The studies focused on evaluating an option under consideration for the placement of dredged material in an island confined disposal facility (CDF...

  6. Radioactive material dry-storage facility and radioactive material containing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Hidetoshi; Kumagaya, Naomi; Ganda, Takao.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a radioactive material dry storage facility which can unify the cooling efficiency of a containing tube and lower the pressure loss in a storage chamber. Namely, a cylindrical body surrounds a first containing tube situated on the side of an air discharge portion among a plurality of containing tubes and forms an annular channel extending axially between the cylindrical body and the first containing tube. An air flow channel partitioning member is disposed below a second containing tube situated closer to an air charging portion than the first containing tube. A first air flow channel is formed below the air channel partitioning member extending from the air charging portion to the annular channel. The second air channel is formed above the air channel partitioning member and extends from the air charging portion to the air discharge portion by way of a portion between the second containing tubes and the portion between the cylindrical body and the first containing tube. Then, low temperature air can be led from the air charging portion to the periphery of the first containing tube. The effect of cooling the first containing tube can be enhanced. The difference between the cooling efficiency between the second containing tube and the first containing tube is decreased. (I.S.)

  7. Transfer tunnel transporter system for the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, J.A.; Miller, S.C.; Richards, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    The detail design is complete and fabrication is approximately 75% complete on the Transfer Tunnel Transporter System. This system provides material handling capability for large, bulky equipment between two hot cells in a new Breeder Reactor Program support facility, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility. One hot cell has an air atmosphere, the other a high purity inert gas atmosphere which must be maintained during transfer operations. System design features, operational capabilities and remote recovery provisions are described

  8. Processing device for discharged water from radioactive material handling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Takao; Kono, Hiroyuki; Yasui, Katsuaki; Kataiki, Koichi.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a mechanical floating material-removing means for removing floating materials in discharged water, an ultrafiltration device for separating processed water discharged from the removing means by membranes, a reverse osmotic filtration device for separating the permeated water and a condensing means for evaporating condensed water. Since processed water after mechanically removing floating materials is supplied to the ultrafiltration device, the load applied on the filtering membrane is reduced, to simplify the operation control as a total. In addition, since the amount of resultant condensed water is reduced, and the devolumed condensed water is condensed and dried, the condensing device is made compact and the amount of resultant wastes is reduced. (T.M.)

  9. Materials for advanced reactor facilities: development and application. Materials of School-Conference for young scientists and specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    In the collection of works there are the texts, summaries and presentations of lectures delivered by the leading specialists of the branch as well as the abstracts of the students of school-conference for young scientists and specialists Materials for advanced reactor facilities: development and application, which took place on October, 29 - November, 2, 2012 in Zvenigorod. In the materials presented different aspects of development and application of materials of reactor cores and vessels of advanced reactors, computerized simulation of properties of radiation-resistant materials and simulation investigations of material radiation hardness are considered [ru

  10. Demonstration test operation of Feed Materials Production Center Biodenitrification Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benear, A.K.; Patton, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    A fluidized-bed biological denitrification (BDN) system was used to treat high-nitrate wastewater streams from a DOE owned uranium processing plant. A two-column system was used to demonstrate BDN operation on a production scale. In a continuous 200 hour rate determination period, the BDN processed over 1.6 million gallons that contained over 4700 kilograms of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen. The BDN removed an average 97% of the incoming nitrate and nitrite. The BDN effluent was discharged to the FMPC sewage treatment plant where it caused increased levels of TOD, TSS and fecal coliforms in the STP discharge. This indicated the BDN effluent will require treatment prior to discharge to the environment. Preliminary chemical consumption rates and associated costs of operation were determined. Several modifications and additions to the system were identified as necessary for the permanent production facility. 3 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  11. 45 CFR 1304.53 - Facilities, materials, and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND... development of each child. (2) Grantee and delegate agencies must provide appropriate space for the conduct of... meet the needs and facilitate the participation of children and adults. Equipment, toys, materials, and...

  12. Materials Science Division HVEM-Tandem Facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, A.

    1981-10-01

    The ANL-Materials Science Division High Voltage Electron Microscope-Tandem Facility is a unique national research facility available to scientists from industry, universities, and other national laboratories, following a peer evaluation of their research proposals by the Facility Steering Committee. The principal equipment consists of a Kratos EM7 1.2-MV high voltage electron microscope, a 300-kV Texas Nuclear ion accelerator, and a National Electrostatics 2-MV Tandem accelerator. Ions from both accelerators are transmitted into the electron microscope through the ion-beam interface. Recent work at the facility is summarized

  13. Toward the Framework and Implementation for Clearance of Materials from Regulated Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shih-Yew; Moeller, Dade W.; Dornsife, William P.; Meyer, H Robert; Lamastra, Anthony; Lubenau, Joel O.; Strom, Daniel J.; Yusko, James G.

    2005-01-01

    The disposition of solid materials from nuclear facilities has been a subject of public debate for several decades. The primary concern has been the potential health effects resulting from exposure to residual radioactive materials to be released for unrestricted use. These debates have intensified in the last decade as many regulated facilities are seeking viable management decisions on the disposition of the large amounts of materials potentially containing very low levels of residual radioactivity. Such facilities include the nuclear weapons complex sites managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), commercial power plants licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and other materials licensees regulated by the NRC or the Agreement States. Other facilities that generate radioactive material containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) or technologically enhanced NORM (TENORM) are also seeking to dispose of similar materials that may be radioactively contaminated. In contrast to the facilities operated by the DOE and the nuclear power plants licensed by the NRC, NORM and TENORM facilities are regulated by the individual states. Current federal laws and regulations do not specify criteria for releasing these materials that may contain residual radioactivity of either man-made or natural origin from regulatory controls. In fact, the current regulatory scheme offers no explicit provision as to permit materials being released as ''non-radioactive'', including those that are essentially free of contamination. The only method used to date with limited success has been case-by-case evaluation and approval. In addition, there is a poorly defined and inconsistent regulatory framework for regulating NORM and TENORM. Some years ago, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) introduced the concept of clearance, that is, controlling releases of any such materials within the regulatory domain. This paper aims to clarify clearance as an

  14. Toward the framework and implementation for clearance of materials from regulated facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S Y; Moeller, D W; Dornsife, W P; Meyer, H R; Lamastra, A; Lubenau, J O; Strom, D J; Yusko, J G

    2005-08-01

    The disposition of solid materials from nuclear facilities has been a subject of public debate for several decades. The primary concern has been the potential health effects resulting from exposure to residual radioactive materials to be released for unrestricted use. These debates have intensified in the last decade as many regulated facilities are seeking viable management decisions on the disposition of the large amounts of materials potentially containing very low levels of residual radioactivity. Such facilities include the nuclear weapons complex sites managed by the U.S. Department of Energy, commercial power plants licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and other materials licensees regulated by the NRC or the Agreement States. Other facilities that generate radioactive material containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) or technologically enhanced NORM (TENORM) are also seeking to dispose of similar materials that may be radioactively contaminated. In contrast to the facilities operated by the DOE and the nuclear power plants licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NORM and TENORM facilities are regulated by the individual states. Current federal laws and regulations do not specify criteria for releasing these materials that may contain residual radioactivity of either man-made or natural origin from regulatory controls. In fact, the current regulatory scheme offers no explicit provision to permit materials being released as "non-radioactive," including those that are essentially free of contamination. The only method used to date with limited success has been case-by-case evaluation and approval. In addition, there is a poorly defined and inconsistent regulatory framework for regulating NORM and TENORM. Some years ago, the International Atomic Energy Agency introduced the concept of clearance, that is, controlling releases of any such materials within the regulatory domain. This paper aims to clarify

  15. HiRadMat: A high‐energy, pulsed beam, material irradiation facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    HiRadMat is a facility constructed in 2011, designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where different material samples or accelerator components can be tested. The facility, located at the CERN SPS accelerator complex, uses a 440 GeV proton beam with a pulse length up to 7.2 μs and a maximum intensity up to 1E13 protons / pulse. The facility, a unique place for performing state-of-the art beam-to-material experiments, operates under transnational access and welcomes and financially supports, under certain conditions, experimental teams to perform their experiments.

  16. Management of Excess Material in the Navys Real Time Reutilization Asset Management Facilities Needs Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-23

    Commands, that originally purchased the material from the command’s operational and maintenance fund. A flowchart of the RRAM material management process...streamlines business operations for financial and supply chain management . 22 SECNAVINST 4440.33A. The Navy retained excess material stored in 10 of...No. DODIG-2017-043 J A N U A R Y 2 3 , 2 0 1 7 Management of Excess Material in the Navy’s Real-Time Reutilization Asset Management Facilities

  17. Numerical regulation of a test facility of materials for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zauq, M.H.

    1982-02-01

    The installation aims at testing materials used in nuclear power plants; tests consists in simulations of a design basis accident (failure of a primary circuit of a PWR type reactor) for a qualification of these materials. A description of the test installation, of the thermodynamic control, and of the control system is presented. The organisation of the software is then given: description of the sequence chaining monitor, operation, list and function of the programs. The analog information processing is also presented (data transmission). A real-time microcomputer and clock are used for this work. The microprocessor is the 6800 of MOTOROLA. The microcomputer used has been built around the MC 6800; its structure is described. The data acquisition include an analog data acquisition system and a numerical data acquisition system. Laboratory and on-site tests are finally presented [fr

  18. Lunar materials for construction of space manufacturing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Development of industrial operations in deep space would be prohibitively expensive if most of the construction and expendable masses had to be transported from earth. Use of lunar materials reduces the needed investments by a factor of 15 to 20. It is shown in this paper that judicious selection of lunar materials will allow one to obtain hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon, helium and other specific elements critical to the support of life in large space habitats at relatively low costs and lower total investment even further. Necessary selection techniques and extraction schemes are outlined. In addition, tables are presented of the oxide and elemental abundances characteristic of the mare and highland regions of the moon which should be useful in evaluating what can be extracted from the lunar soils.

  19. A Cryogenic RF Material Testing Facility at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiquan; Martin, David; Tantawi, Sami; Yoneda, Charles; /SLAC

    2012-06-22

    The authors have developed an X-band SRF testing system using a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom for the testing of different materials. By measuring the Q of the cavity, the system is capable to characterize the quenching magnetic field of the superconducting samples at different power level and temperature, as well as the surface resistivity. This paper presents the most recent development of the system and testing results.

  20. Seismic qualification program plan for continued operation at DOE-SRS nuclear material processing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talukdar, B.K.; Kennedy, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    The Savannah River Facilities for the most part were constructed and maintained to standards that were developed by Du Pont and are not rigorously in compliance with the current General Design Criteria (GDC); DOE Order 6430.IA requirements. In addition, many of the facilities were built more than 30 years ago, well before DOE standards for design were issued. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) his developed a program to address the evaluation of the Nuclear Material Processing (NMP) facilities to GDC requirements. The program includes a facility base-line review, assessment of areas that are not in compliance with the GDC requirements, planned corrective actions or exemptions to address the requirements, and a safety assessment. The authors from their direct involvement with the Program, describe the program plan for seismic qualification including other natural phenomena hazards,for existing NMP facility structures to continue operation Professionals involved in similar effort at other DOE facilities may find the program useful

  1. Environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities. A MITE Program evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This report documents an evaluation of the environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities (MRFs) conducted under the Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program. The MITE Program is sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency to foster the demonstration and development of innovative technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). This project was also funded by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Material recovery facilities are increasingly being used as one option for managing a significant portion of municipal solid waste (MSW). The owners and operators of these facilities employ a combination of manual and mechanical techniques to separate and sort the recyclable fraction of MSW and to transport the separated materials to recycling facilities.

  2. Materials, processes, and environmental engineering network

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Margo M.

    1993-01-01

    The Materials, Processes, and Environmental Engineering Network (MPEEN) was developed as a central holding facility for materials testing information generated by the Materials and Processes Laboratory. It contains information from other NASA centers and outside agencies, and also includes the NASA Environmental Information System (NEIS) and Failure Analysis Information System (FAIS) data. Environmental replacement materials information is a newly developed focus of MPEEN. This database is the NASA Environmental Information System, NEIS, which is accessible through MPEEN. Environmental concerns are addressed regarding materials identified by the NASA Operational Environment Team, NOET, to be hazardous to the environment. An environmental replacement technology database is contained within NEIS. Environmental concerns about materials are identified by NOET, and control or replacement strategies are formed. This database also contains the usage and performance characteristics of these hazardous materials. In addition to addressing environmental concerns, MPEEN contains one of the largest materials databases in the world. Over 600 users access this network on a daily basis. There is information available on failure analysis, metals and nonmetals testing, materials properties, standard and commercial parts, foreign alloy cross-reference, Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) data, and Materials and Processes Selection List data.

  3. Legal Aspects of international cooperation in the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herron, L.W.

    1981-10-01

    This paper provides a detailed analysis of developments in the number field having led the IAEA to promote international cooperation in ensuring adequate physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials. This work resulted in the establishment of recommendations and guidelines in this respect and culminated in the development of the 1980 Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials. (NEA) [fr

  4. Materials and degradation modes in an alternative LLW [low-level waste] disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowgill, M.G.; MacKenzie, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The materials used in the construction of alternative low-level waste disposal facilities will be subject to interaction with both the internal and the external environments associated with the facilities and unless precautions are taken, may degrade, leading to structural failure. This paper reviews the characteristics of both environments with respect to three alternative disposal concepts, then assesses how reaction with them might affect the properties of the materials, which include concrete, steel-reinforced concrete, structural steel, and various protective coatings and membranes. It identifies and evaluates the probability of reactions occurring which might lead to degradation of the materials and so compromise the structure. The probability of failure (interpreted relative to the ability of the structure to restrict ingress and egress of water) is assessed for each material and precautionary measures, intended to maximize the durability of the facility, are reviewed. 19 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Implementation of safeguards and security for fissile materials disposition reactor alternative facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, C.D.; Duggan, R.A.; Tolk, K.M.

    1995-01-01

    A number of different disposition alternatives are being considered and include facilities which provide for long-ten-n and interim storage, convert and stabilize fissile materials for other disposition alternatives, immobilize fissile material in glass and/or ceramic material, fabricate fissile material into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for reactors, use reactor based technologies to convert material into spent fuel, and dispose of fissile material using a number of geologic alternatives. Particular attention will be given to the reactor alternatives which include existing, partially completed, advanced or evolutionary LWRs and CANDU reactors. The various reactor alternatives are all very similar and include processing which converts Pu to a usable form for fuel fabrication, a MOX fuel fab facility located in either the US or in Europe, US LWRs or the CANDU reactors and ultimate disposal of spent fuel in a geologic repository. This paper focuses on how the objectives of reducing security risks and strengthening arms reduction and nonproliferation will be accomplished and the possible impacts of meeting these objectives on facility operations and design. Some of the areas in this paper include: (1) domestic and international safeguards requirements, (2) non-proliferation criteria and measures, (3) the threat, and (4) potential proliferation risks, the impacts on the facilities, and safeguards and security issues unique to the presence of Category 1 or strategic special nuclear material

  6. Nondestructive assay of special nuclear material for uranium fuel-fabrication facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.A. Jr.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    1997-01-01

    A high-quality materials accounting system and effective international inspections in uranium fuel-fabrication facilities depend heavily upon accurate nondestructive assay measurements of the facility's nuclear materials. While item accounting can monitor a large portion of the facility inventory (fuel rods, assemblies, storage items), the contents of all such items and mass values for all bulk materials must be based on quantitative measurements. Weight measurements, combined with destructive analysis of process samples, can provide highly accurate quantitative information on well-characterized and uniform product materials. However, to cover the full range of process materials and to provide timely accountancy data on hard-to-measure items and rapid verification of previous measurements, radiation-based nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques play an important role. NDA for uranium fuel fabrication facilities relies on passive gamma spectroscopy for enrichment and U isotope mass values of medium-to-low-density samples and holdup deposits; it relies on active neutron techniques for U-235 mass values of high-density and heterogeneous samples. This paper will describe the basic radiation-based nondestructive assay techniques used to perform these measurements. The authors will also discuss the NDA measurement applications for international inspections of European fuel-fabrication facilities

  7. Global nuclear material monitoring with NDA and C/S data through integrated facility monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.A.; Menlove, H.O.; Argo, P.; Goulding, C.; Klosterbuer, S.; Halbig, J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper focuses on a flexible, integrated demonstration of a monitoring approach for nuclear material monitoring. This includes aspects of item signature identification, perimeter portal monitoring, advanced data analysis, and communication as a part of an unattended continuous monitoring system in an operating nuclear facility. Advanced analysis is applied to the integrated nondestructive assay and containment and surveillance data that are synchronized in time. End result will be the foundation for a cost-effective monitoring system that could provide the necessary transparency even in areas that are denied to foreign nationals of both US and Russia should these processes and materials come under full-scope safeguards or bilateral agreements. Monitoring systems of this kind have the potential to provide additional benefits including improved nuclear facility security and safeguards and lower personnel radiation exposures. Demonstration facilities in this paper include VTRAP-prototype, Los Alamos Critical Assemblies Facility, Kazakhstan BM-350 Reactor monitor, DUPIC radiation monitoring, and JOYO and MONJU radiation monitoring

  8. Modelling the near-Earth space environment using LDEF data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Dale R.; Coombs, Cassandra R.; Crowell, Lawrence B.; Watts, Alan J.

    1992-01-01

    Near-Earth space is a dynamic environment, that is currently not well understood. In an effort to better characterize the near-Earth space environment, this study compares the results of actual impact crater measurement data and the Space Environment (SPENV) Program developed in-house at POD, to theoretical models established by Kessler (NASA TM-100471, 1987) and Cour-Palais (NASA SP-8013, 1969). With the continuing escalation of debris there will exist a definite hazard to unmanned satellites as well as manned operations. Since the smaller non-trackable debris has the highest impact rate, it is clearly necessary to establish the true debris environment for all particle sizes. Proper comprehension of the near-Earth space environment and its origin will permit improvement in spacecraft design and mission planning, thereby reducing potential disasters and extreme costs. Results of this study directly relate to the survivability of future spacecraft and satellites that are to travel through and/or reside in low Earth orbit (LEO). More specifically, these data are being used to: (1) characterize the effects of the LEO micrometeoroid an debris environment on satellite designs and components; (2) update the current theoretical micrometeoroid and debris models for LEO; (3) help assess the survivability of spacecraft and satellites that must travel through or reside in LEO, and the probability of their collision with already resident debris; and (4) help define and evaluate future debris mitigation and disposal methods. Combined model predictions match relatively well with the LDEF data for impact craters larger than approximately 0.05 cm, diameter; however, for smaller impact craters, the combined predictions diverge and do not reflect the sporadic clouds identified by the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) aboard LDEF. The divergences cannot currently be explained by the authors or model developers. The mean flux of small craters (approximately 0.05 cm diameter) is

  9. An overview of safety and environmental considerations in the selection of materials for fusion facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petti, D.A.; Piet, S.J.; Seki, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Safety and environmental considerations can play a large role in the selection of fusion materials. In this paper, we review the attributes of different structural, plasma facing, and breeding materials from a safety perspective and discuss some generic waste management issues as they relate to fusion materials in general. Specific safety concerns exist for each material that must be dealt with in fusion facility design. Low activation materials offer inherent safety benefits compared with conventional materials, but more work is needed before these materials have the requisite certified databases. In the interim, the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) has selected more conventional materials and is showing that the safety concerns with these materials can be addressed by proper attention to design. In the area of waste management disposal criteria differ by country. However, the criteria are all very strict making disposal of fusion components difficult. As a result, recycling has gained increasing attention. (orig.)

  10. IFMIF [International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility], an accelerator-based neutron source for fusion components irradiation testing: Materials testing capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, F.M.

    1988-08-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is proposed as an advanced accelerator-based neutron source for high-flux irradiation testing of large-sized fusion reactor components. The facility would require only small extensions to existing accelerator and target technology originally developed for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility. At the extended facility, neutrons would be produced by a 0.1-A beam of 35-MeV deuterons incident upon a liquid lithium target. The volume available for high-flux (>10/sup 15/ n/cm/sup 2/-s) testing in IFMITF would be over a liter, a factor of about three larger than in the FMIT facility. This is because the effective beam current of 35-MeV deuterons on target can be increased by a factor of ten to 1A or more. Such an increase can be accomplished by funneling beams of deuterium ions from the radio-frequency quadruple into a linear accelerator and by taking advantage of recent developments in accelerator technology. Multiple beams and large total current allow great variety in available testing. For example, multiple simultaneous experiments, and great flexibility in tailoring spatial distributions of flux and spectra can be achieved. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  11. Test facilities for radioactive material transport packages (AEA Technology plc, Winfrith,UK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillard, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Transport containers for radioactive materials are tested to demonstrate compliance with national and international standards. Transport package design, testing, assessment and approval requires a wide range of skills and facilities. The comprehensive capability of AEA Technology in these areas is described. The facilities described include drop-test cranes and targets (up to 700 tonne); pool fires, furnaces and rigs for thermal tests, including heat dissipation on prototype flasks; shielding facilities; criticality simulations and leak test techniques. These are illustrated with photographs demonstrating the comprehensive nature of package testing services supplied to customers. (author)

  12. Test facilities for radioactive material transport packages (AEA Technology plc, Winfrith,UK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, J.E

    2001-07-01

    Transport containers for radioactive materials are tested to demonstrate compliance with national and international standards. Transport package design, testing, assessment and approval requires a wide range of skills and facilities. The comprehensive capability of AEA Technology in these areas is described. The facilities described include drop-test cranes and targets (up to 700 tonne); pool fires, furnaces and rigs for thermal tests, including heat dissipation on prototype flasks; shielding facilities; criticality simulations and leak test techniques. These are illustrated with photographs demonstrating the comprehensive nature of package testing services supplied to customers. (author)

  13. Study on applying technology of utilizing long-term materials for corrosion facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Chul; Park, Young Kyu; Baek, Soo Gon; Lee, Jong Sub [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Soo [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Won Suk [Inha University (Korea, Republic of); Song, Rhyo Seong [Hankuk Aviation, University (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    Nowadays, as the pollution in seawater is escalating rapidly because of fast industrialization, corrosion rate and repairing frequency of seawater facilities in power plant are increasing. In addition, new construction is restricted with narrow limits due to the deterioration of social condition, asking for extension of facility life and repairing frequency. The objectives of this study are to select the appropriate new high corrosion resistance materials and apply them in the field, to make the corrosion data base in accordance with their usage conditions and to predict the remaining life and optimum repairing period by predicting the life of facilities. (author). 77 refs., 54 figs.

  14. Filling the gaps in SCWR materials research: advanced nuclear corrosion research facilities in Hamilton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krausher, J.L.; Zheng, W.; Li, J.; Guzonas, D.; Botton, G.

    2011-01-01

    Research efforts on materials selection and development in support of the design of supercritical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs) have produced a considerable amount of data on corrosion, creep and other related properties. Summaries of the data on corrosion [1] and stress corrosion cracking [2] have recently been produced. As research on the SCWR advances, gaps and limitations in the published data are being identified. In terms of corrosion properties, these gaps can be seen in several areas, including: 1) the test environment, 2) the physical and chemical severity of the tests conducted as compared with likely reactor service/operating conditions, and 3) the test methods used. While some of these gaps can be filled readily using existing facilities, others require the availability of advanced test facilities for specific tests and assessments. In this paper, highlights of the new materials research facilities jointly established in Hamilton by CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory and McMaster University are presented. (author)

  15. Evolution of Safeguards over Time: Past, Present, and Projected Facilities, Material, and Budget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollar, Lenka; Mathews, Caroline E.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the past trends and evolution of safeguards over time and projects growth through 2030. The report documents the amount of nuclear material and facilities under safeguards from 1970 until present, along with the corresponding budget. Estimates for the future amount of facilities and material under safeguards are made according to non-nuclear-weapons states (NNWS) plans to build more nuclear capacity and sustain current nuclear infrastructure. Since nuclear energy is seen as a clean and economic option for base load electric power, many countries are seeking to either expand their current nuclear infrastructure, or introduce nuclear power. In order to feed new nuclear power plants and sustain existing ones, more nuclear facilities will need to be built, and thus more nuclear material will be introduced into the safeguards system. The projections in this study conclude that a zero real growth scenario for the IAEA safeguards budget will result in large resource gaps in the near future.

  16. Evolution of Safeguards over Time: Past, Present, and Projected Facilities, Material, and Budget

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollar, Lenka; Mathews, Caroline E.

    2009-07-01

    This study examines the past trends and evolution of safeguards over time and projects growth through 2030. The report documents the amount of nuclear material and facilities under safeguards from 1970 until present, along with the corresponding budget. Estimates for the future amount of facilities and material under safeguards are made according to non-nuclear-weapons states’ (NNWS) plans to build more nuclear capacity and sustain current nuclear infrastructure. Since nuclear energy is seen as a clean and economic option for base load electric power, many countries are seeking to either expand their current nuclear infrastructure, or introduce nuclear power. In order to feed new nuclear power plants and sustain existing ones, more nuclear facilities will need to be built, and thus more nuclear material will be introduced into the safeguards system. The projections in this study conclude that a zero real growth scenario for the IAEA safeguards budget will result in large resource gaps in the near future.

  17. New electron beam facility for irradiated plasma facing materials testing in hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, N.; Kawamura, H.; Akiba, M.

    1995-01-01

    Since plasma facing components such as the first wall and the divertor for the next step fusion reactors are exposed to high heat loads and high energy neutron flux generated by the plasma, it is urgent to develop of plasma facing components which can resist these. Then, we have established electron beam heat facility (open-quotes OHBISclose quotes, Oarai Hot-cell electron Beam Irradiating System) at a hot cell in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) hot laboratory in order to estimate thermal shock resistivity of plasma facing materials and heat removal capabilities of divertor elements under steady state heating. In this facility, irradiated plasma facing materials (beryllium, carbon based materials and so on) and divertor elements can be treated. This facility consists of an electron beam unit with the maximum beam power of 50kW and the vacuum vessel. The acceleration voltage and the maximum beam current are 30kV (constant) and 1.7A, respectively. The loading time of electron beam is more than 0.1ms. The shape of vacuum vessel is cylindrical, and the mainly dimensions are 500mm in inner diameter, 1000mm in height. The ultimate vacuum of this vessel is 1 x 10 -4 Pa. At present, the facility for thermal shock test has been established in a hot cell. And performance estimation on the electron beam is being conducted. Presently, the devices for heat loading tests under steady state will be added to this facility

  18. New electron beam facility for irradiated plasma facing materials testing in hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimakawa, S.; Akiba, M.; Kawamura, H.

    1996-01-01

    Since plasma facing components such as the first wall and the divertor for the next step fusion reactors are exposed to high heat loads and high energy neutron flux generated by the plasma, it is urgent to develop plasma facing components which can resist these. We have established electron beam heat facility ('OHBIS', Oarai hot-cell electron beam irradiating system) at a hot cell in JMTR (Japan materials testing reactor) hot laboratory in order to estimate thermal shock resistivity of plasma facing materials and heat removal capabilities of divertor elements under steady state heating. In this facility, irradiated plasma facing materials (beryllium, carbon based materials and so on) and divertor elements can be treated. This facility consists of an electron beam unit with the maximum beam power of 50 kW and the vacuum vessel. The acceleration voltage and the maximum beam current are 30 kV (constant) and 1.7 A, respectively. The loading time of the electron beam is more than 0.1 ms. The shape of vacuum vessel is cylindrical, and the main dimensions are 500 mm in inside diameter, 1000 mm in height. The ultimate vacuum of this vessel is 1 x 10 -4 Pa. At present, the facility for the thermal shock test has been established in a hot cell. The performance of the electron beam is being evaluated at this time. In the future, the equipment for conducting static heat loadings will be incorporated into the facility. (orig.)

  19. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Yutani, Toshiaki (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-03-01

    Activities of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) have been performed under an IEA collaboration since 1995. IFMIF is an accelerator-based deuteron (D{sup +})-lithium (Li) neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field (2 MW/m{sup 2}, 20 dpa/year for Fe) in a volume of 500 cm{sup 3} for testing candidate fusion materials. In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was started to reduce the key technology risk factors. This interim report summarizes the KEP activities until mid 2001 in the major project work-breakdown areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  20. Design of a high-flux test assembly for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.; Vogel, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Material Test Facility (FMIT) will provide a high flux fusion-like neutron environment in which a variety of structural and non-structural materials irradiations can be conducted. The FMIT experiments, called test assemblies, that are subjected to the highest neutron flux magnitudes and associated heating rates will require forced convection liquid metal cooling systems to remove the neutron deposited power and maintain test specimens at uniform temperatures. A brief description of the FMIT facility and experimental areas is given with emphasis on the design, capabilities and handling of the high flux test assembly

  1. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Yutani, Toshiaki

    2002-03-01

    Activities of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) have been performed under an IEA collaboration since 1995. IFMIF is an accelerator-based deuteron (D + )-lithium (Li) neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field (2 MW/m 2 , 20 dpa/year for Fe) in a volume of 500 cm 3 for testing candidate fusion materials. In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was started to reduce the key technology risk factors. This interim report summarizes the KEP activities until mid 2001 in the major project work-breakdown areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  2. Simulated Irradiation of Samples in HFIR for use as Possible Test Materials in the MPEX (Material Plasma Exposure Experiment) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Rapp, Juergen [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The importance of Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) facility will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. The project presented in this paper involved performing assessments of the induced radioactivity and resulting radiation fields of a variety of potential fusion reactor materials. The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR; generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. These state-of-the-art simulation methods were used in addressing the challenge of the MPEX project to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

  3. Fissile material detection and control facility with pulsed neutron sources and digital data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romodanov, V.L.; Chernikova, D.N.; Afanasiev, V.V.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: In connection with possible nuclear terrorism, there is long-felt need of devices for effective control of radioactive and fissile materials in the key points of crossing the state borders (airports, seaports, etc.), as well as various customs check-points. In International Science and Technology Center Projects No. 596 and No. 2978, a new physical method and digital technology have been developed for the detection of fissile and radioactive materials in models of customs facilities with a graphite moderator, pulsed neutron source and digital processing of responses from scintillation PSD detectors. Detectability of fissile materials, even those shielded with various radiation-absorbing screens, has been shown. The use of digital processing of scintillation signals in this facility is a necessary element, as neutrons and photons are discriminated in the time dependence of fissile materials responses at such loads on the electronic channels that standard types of spectrometers are inapplicable. Digital processing of neutron and photon responses practically resolves the problem of dead time and allows implementing devices, in which various energy groups of neutrons exist for some time after a pulse of source neutrons. Thus, it is possible to detect fissile materials deliberately concealed with shields having a large cross-section of absorption of photons and thermal neutrons. Two models of detection and the control of fissile materials were advanced: 1. the model based on graphite neutrons moderator and PSD scintillators with digital technology of neutrons and photons responses separation; 2. the model based on plastic scintillators and detecting of time coincidences of fission particles by digital technology. Facilities that count time coincidences of neutrons and photons occurring in the fission of fissile materials can use an Am Li source of neutrons, e.g. that is the case with the AWCC system. The disadvantages of the facility are related to the issues

  4. International measures needed to protect metal recycling facilities from radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattia, M.; Wiener, R.

    1999-01-01

    In almost every major city and region of every country, there is a recycling facility that is designed to process or consume scrap metal. These same countries will probably have widespread applications of radioactive materials and radiation generating equipment. This material and equipment will have metal as a primary component of its housing or instrumentation. It is this metal that will cause these sources of radioactivity, when lost, stolen or mishandled, to be taken to a metal recycling facility to be sold for the value of the metal. This is the problem that has faced scrap recycling facilities for many years. The recycling industry has spent millions of dollars for installation of radiation monitors and training in identification of radioactive material. It has expended millions more for the disposal of radioactive material that has mistakenly entered these facilities. Action must be taken to prevent this material from entering the conventional recycling process. There are more than 2,300 known incidents of radioactive material found in recycled metal scrap. Worldwide, more than 50 smeltings of radioactive sources have been confirmed. Seven fatal accidents involving uncontrolled radioactive material have also been documented. Hazardous exposures to radioactive material have plagued not just the workers at metal recycling facilities. The families of these workers, including their children, have been exposed to potentially harmful levels of radioactivity. The threat from this material does not stop there. Radioactive material that is not caught at recycling facilities can be melted and the radioactivity has been found in construction materials used to build homes, as well as shovels, fencing material, and furniture offered for sale to the general public. The time has come for the international community to address the issue of the uncontrolled sources of radioactive material. The following are the key points that must be addressed. (i) Identification of sources

  5. Material handling for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittman, P.; Roybal, J.; Durrer, R.; Gordon, D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper will present the design and application of material handling and automation systems currently being developed for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Nuclear Material Storage Facility (NMSF) renovation project. The NMSF is a long-term storage facility for nuclear material in various forms. The material is stored within tubes in a rack called a basket. The material handling equipment range from simple lift assist devices to more sophisticated fully automated robots, and are split into three basic systems: a Vault Automation System, an NDA automation System, and a Drum handling System. The Vault Automation system provides a mechanism to handle a basket of material cans and to load/unload storage tubes within the material vault. In addition, another robot is provided to load/unload material cans within the baskets. The NDA Automation System provides a mechanism to move material within the small canister NDA laboratory and to load/unload the NDA instruments. The Drum Handling System consists of a series of off the shelf components used to assist in lifting heavy objects such as pallets of material or drums and barrels

  6. Petroleum and hazardous material releases from industrial facilities associated with Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, Nicholas; Steinberg, Laura J; Sengul, Hatice

    2010-04-01

    Hurricane Katrina struck an area dense with industry, causing numerous releases of petroleum and hazardous materials. This study integrates information from a number of sources to describe the frequency, causes, and effects of these releases in order to inform analysis of risk from future hurricanes. Over 200 onshore releases of hazardous chemicals, petroleum, or natural gas were reported. Storm surge was responsible for the majority of petroleum releases and failure of storage tanks was the most common mechanism of release. Of the smaller number of hazardous chemical releases reported, many were associated with flaring from plant startup, shutdown, or process upset. In areas impacted by storm surge, 10% of the facilities within the Risk Management Plan (RMP) and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) databases and 28% of SIC 1311 facilities experienced accidental releases. In areas subject only to hurricane strength winds, a lower fraction (1% of RMP and TRI and 10% of SIC 1311 facilities) experienced a release while 1% of all facility types reported a release in areas that experienced tropical storm strength winds. Of industrial facilities surveyed, more experienced indirect disruptions such as displacement of workers, loss of electricity and communication systems, and difficulty acquiring supplies and contractors for operations or reconstruction (55%), than experienced releases. To reduce the risk of hazardous material releases and speed the return to normal operations under these difficult conditions, greater attention should be devoted to risk-based facility design and improved prevention and response planning.

  7. Engineering and technology in the deconstruction of nuclear materials production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingsley, R.S.; Reynolds, W.E.; Heffner, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    Technology and equipment exist to support nuclear facility deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning. In reality, this statement is not surprising because the nuclear industry has been decontaminating and decommissioning production plants for decades as new generations of production technology were introduced. Since the 1950s, the Babcock and Wilcox Company (B ampersand W) has operated a number of nuclear materials processing facilities to manufacture nuclear fuel for the commercial power industry and the U.S. Navy. These manufacturing facilities included a mixed oxide (PuO 2 -UO 2 ) nuclear fuel manufacturing plant, low- and high-enriched uranium (HEU/LEU) chemical and fuel plants, and fuel assembly plants. In addition, B ampersand W designed and build a major nuclear research center in Lynchburg, Virginia, to support these nuclear fuel manufacturing activities and to conduct nuclear power research. These nuclear research facilities included two research reactors, a hot-cell complex for nuclear materials research, four critical experiment facilities, and a plutonium fuels research and development facility. This article describes the B ampersand W deactivation, decomtanimation, and decommisioning program

  8. A study of the material accountancy procedure at the uranium enrichment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirahashi, J.; Akiba, M.; Omae, M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes an evaluation of material accountancy based on total uranium (U element MUF) to detect diversions of significant quantity in the uranium enrichment facility operating at a stated maximum enrichment level of 5%. Verification that material production is within the declared enrichment can be achieved by the inspection activities associated with limited - frequency unannounced access (LFUA) to cascade areas as treated extensively in HSP. According to the experience of the material accountancy at our facility, the reduction of the material accountancy capability by changing from U-235 isotope MUF to U element MUF is only about half. However, still the U element MUF approach can meet the current IAEA detection goals for the up to about 1000 tswu/a plant

  9. Bulk-shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, L.L.; Mann, F.M.; Morford, R.J.; Johnson, D.L.; Huang, S.T.

    1982-07-01

    The accelerator-based Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility will provide a high-fluence, fusion-like radiation environment for the testing of materials. While the neutron spectrum produced in the forward direction by the 35 MeV deuterons incident upon a flowing lithium target is characterized by a broad peak around 14 MeV, a high energy tail extends up to about 50 MeV. Some shield design considerations are reviewed

  10. High flux materials testing reactor HFR Petten. Characteristics of facilities and standard irradiation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roettger, H.; Hardt, P. von der; Tas, A.; Voorbraak, W.P.

    1981-01-01

    For the materials testing reactor HFR some characteristic information is presented. Besides the nuclear data for the experiment positions short descriptions are given of the most important standard facilities for material irradiation and radionuclide production. One paragraph deals with the experimental set-ups for solid state and nuclear structure investigations. The information in this report refers to a core type, which is operational since March 1977. The numerical data compiled have been up-dated to January 1981

  11. International fusion materials irradiation facility and neutronic calculations for its test modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokcic-Kostic, M.

    1997-01-01

    The International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a projected high intensity neutron source for material testing. Neutron transport calculations for the IFMIF project are performed for variety of here explained reasons. The results of MCNP neutronic calculations for IFMIF test modules with NaK and He cooled high flux test cells are presented in this paper. (author). 3 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Risk classification for nuclear facilities in connection with the illegal use of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahm, W.; Naegele, G.; Sellinschegg, D.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown, and illustrated by an example, that specific conditions at a nuclear facility to a large extent determine the probability of a successful illegal attack against that facility. Therefore, a categorization of nuclear materials according to the associated hazards alone, as practised currently, does not appear to be sufficient for the establishment of a balanced national physical protection system. In this paper a possible way of categorizing nuclear facilities according to the associated risks, determined as objectively as possible, is discussed. It is felt that initially the analysis should be restricted to the determination of the conditional risks, associated with illegal acquisition and use of radioactive materials by a postulated hostile or similar group. (author)

  13. A novel facility for ageing materials with narrow-band ultraviolet radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaerhae, Petri; Ruokolainen, Kimmo; Heikkilae, Anu; Kaunismaa, Merja

    2011-01-01

    A facility for exploring wavelength dependencies in ultraviolet (UV) radiation induced degradation in materials has been designed and constructed. The device is essentially a spectrograph separating light from a lamp to spectrally resolved UV radiation. It is based on a 1 kW xenon lamp and a flat-field concave holographic grating 10 cm in diameter. Radiation at the wavelength range 250-500 nm is dispersed onto the sample plane of 1.5 cm in height and 21 cm in width. The optical performance of the device has been characterized by radiometric measurements. Using the facility, test samples prepared of regular newspaper have been irradiated from 1 to 8 h. Color changes on the different locations of the aged samples have been quantified by color measurements. Yellowness indices computed from the color measurements demonstrate the capability of the facility in revealing wavelength dependencies of the material property changes in reasonable time frames.

  14. Neutronics analysis of International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). Japanese contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Yukio; Noda, Kenji; Kosako, Kazuaki.

    1997-10-01

    In fusion reactor development for demonstration reactor, i.e., DEMO, materials tolerable for D-T neutron irradiation are absolutely required for both mechanical and safety point of views. For this requirement, several kinds of low activation materials were proposed. However, experimental data by actual D-T fusion neutron irradiation have not existed so far because of lack of fusion neutron irradiation facility, except fundamental radiation damage studies at very low neutron fluence. Therefore such a facility has been strongly requested. According to agreement of need for such a facility among the international parties, a conceptual design activity (CDA) of International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has been carried out under the frame work of the IEA-Implementing Agreement. In the activity, a neutronics analysis on irradiation field optimization in the IFMIF test cell was performed in three parties, Japan, US and EU. As the Japanese contribution, the present paper describes a neutron source term as well as incident deuteron beam angle optimization of two beam geometry, beam shape (foot print) optimization, and dpa, gas production and heating estimation inside various material loading Module, including a sensitivity analysis of source term uncertainty to the estimated irradiation parameters. (author)

  15. Modern methods of material accounting for mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggers, R.F.; Pindak, J.L.; Brouns, R.J.; Williams, R.C.; Brite, D.W.; Kinnison, R.R.; Fager, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    The generic requirements loss detection, and response to alarms of a contemporary material control and accounting (MCandA) philosophy have been applied to a mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant to produce a detailed preliminary MCandA system design that is generally applicable to facilities of this type. This paper summarizes and discusses detailed results of the mixed oxide fuel fabrication plant study

  16. Status of the nondestructive examination equipment for the fuels and materials examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frandsen, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    The present status of Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Equipment proposed for the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) now under construction at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory is discussed. Items discussed include the NDE cell receiving machine, the dismantling machine, the standard examination stage, profilometry, eddy current, wire wrap removal machine, surface examination, gamma scan and general NDE equipment

  17. Occupational radiation Exposure at Agreement State-Licensed Materials Facilities, 1997-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2012-07-07

    The purpose of this report is to examine occupational radiation exposures received under Agreement State licensees. As such, this report reflects the occupational radiation exposure data contained in the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) database, for 1997 through 2010, from Agreement State-licensed materials facilities.

  18. Safeguards material control and accounting at licensed processing facilities. Quarterly report, July--September 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacks, I.J.

    1978-12-01

    Objective was to develop the methodology and software needed for assessing Material Control and Accounting (MC and A) systems at fixed site nuclear fuel facilities. The assessment of an MC and A system requires five steps: target identification, event set generation, MC and A response determination, component performance models, and thermo-physical property data base. Progress on each is reported

  19. Water holding capacity and evaporative loss from organic bedding materials used in livestock facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical and chemical characteristics of organic bedding materials determine how well they will absorb and retain moisture and may influence the environment in livestock facilities where bedding is used. The objective of this study was to determine water holding capacity (WHC) and rate of evaporativ...

  20. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 6, Alternatives study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL's weapons research, development, and testing (WRD ampersand T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL's inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for material and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections outlined by Attachment 111-2 of DOE Document AL 4700.1, Project Management System. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part VI - Alternatives Study, presents a study of the different storage/containment options considered for NMSF

  1. Anodized aluminum on LDEF: A current status of measurements on chromic acid anodized aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Chromic acid anodize was used as the exterior coating for aluminum surfaces on LDEF to provide passive thermal control. Chromic acid anodized aluminum was also used as test specimens in thermal control coatings experiments. The following is a compilation and analysis of the data obtained thus far

  2. Anodized aluminum on LDEF: A current status of measurements on chromic acid anodized aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1992-01-01

    Chromic acid anodize was used as the exterior coating for aluminum surfaces on LDEF to provide passive thermal control. Chromic acid anodized aluminum was also used as test specimens in thermal control coatings experiments. The following is a compilation and analysis of the data obtained thus far.

  3. Use of Cementitious Materials for SRS Reactor Facility In-Situ Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.; Stefanko, D.B.; Serrato, M.G.; Blankenship, J.K.; Griffin, W.G.; Long, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of producing (reactor facilities), processing (isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The Savannah River Site 105-P and 105-R Reactor Facility ISD project requires approximately 250000 cubic yards of cementitious materials to fill the below-grade structure. The fills are designed to prevent subsidence, reduce water infiltration, and isolate contaminated materials. This work is being performed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act (CERCLA) action and is part of the overall soil and groundwater completion projects for P- and R-Areas. Funding is being provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Cementitious materials were designed for the following applications: (A) Below-grade massive voids / rooms: Portland cement-based structural flowable fills for: (A.1) Bulk filling; (A.2) Restricted placement and (A.3) Underwater placement. (B) Special below-grade applications for reduced load bearing capacity needs: (B.1) Cellular portland cement lightweight fill. (C) Reactor vessel fills that are compatible with reactive metal (aluminum metal) components in the reactor vessels (C.1) Blended calcium aluminate - calcium sulfate based flowable fill; (C.2) Magnesium potassium phosphate flowable fill. (D) Caps to prevent water infiltration and intrusion into areas with the highest levels of radionuclides: (D.1) Portland cement based shrinkage compensating concrete. A system engineering approach was used to identify functions and requirements of the fill and capping materials. Laboratory testing was performed to identify candidate formulations and develop final design mixes. Scale-up testing was performed to verify material production and placement as well as fresh and cured

  4. Recycle and reuse of materials and components from waste streams of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    All nuclear fuel cycle processes utilize a wide range of equipment and materials to produce the final products they are designed for. However, as at any other industrial facility, during operation of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities, apart from the main products some byproducts, spent materials and waste are generated. A lot of these materials, byproducts or some components of waste have a potential value and may be recycled within the original process or reused outside either directly or after appropriate treatment. The issue of recycle and reuse of valuable material is important for all industries including the nuclear fuel cycle. The level of different materials involvement and opportunities for their recycle and reuse in nuclear industry are different at different stages of nuclear fuel cycle activity, generally increasing from the front end to the back end processes and decommissioning. Minimization of waste arisings and the practice of recycle and reuse can improve process economics and can minimize the potential environmental impact. Recognizing the importance of this subject, the International Atomic Energy Agency initiated the preparation of this report aiming to review and summarize the information on the existing recycling and reuse practice for both radioactive and non-radioactive components of waste streams at nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This report analyses the existing options, approaches and developments in recycle and reuse in nuclear industry

  5. Tests and studies of USSR materials at the US coal burning MHD facility UTSI-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telegin, G P; Romanov, A I; Rekov, A I; Spiridonov, E G; Barodina, T I; Vysotsky, D A

    1978-10-01

    In accordance with the overall program of the US--USSR cooperation in the field of MHD power generation tests of Soviet electrode materials were conducted at the coal burning MHD facility UTSI-2 of the University of Tennessee Space Institute. The main purposes of the tests are evaluation of electrode materials behavior in the channel of the MHD generator operating with combustion products of coal containing ionizing alkali seed, study of thermal and physical stability of materials in the presence of corrosive slag, study of electrophysical characteristics of electrode materials when they are subjected to the passage of current through the plasma-slag-electrode system. Tests were conducted on electrodes made of silicon carbide doped with titanium and LaCrO/sub 3/--Cr cermet. Results are reported on the phase and chemical composition and structure of these two materials, their thermophysical and electrophysical properties, and the electrode fabrication methods. The MHD facility UTSI-2, where the tests were conducted is one of few utilizing actual coal as the fuel. A description of this facility is given, and its main operating parameters and the methods used to conduct electrode tests with and without an applied current are described.

  6. Management of Small Quantity of Nuclear Material at Locations Outside Facilities in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung Sik; Kim, Ki Hyun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Small quantity of nuclear material (SQNM) is prescribed to be less than specified minimum quantities of nuclear material in a facility. SQNM is used at the locations called locations outside facilities (LOFs). LOFs are used to control the locations and installations that store nuclear materials under one effective Kg, respectively. Holders of SQNM don't need to require a license for use or possession of Uranium or Thorium exclusively for non-nuclear activities, or neither report them to the System of Accounting for and Control of nuclear material (SSAC) under specified quantities according to the Atomic Safety Law. Well defined safeguards law is fundamental to the effective control of nuclear material, facilities and nuclear related activities. In the current nuclear safety legislation, there are some exceptive clauses. Users of SQNM don't need to require a license for use or possession of Uranium or Thorium exclusively for non-nuclear activities, or not report them to the national authority below specified amount.

  7. Management of Small Quantity of Nuclear Material at Locations Outside Facilities in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seung Sik; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Small quantity of nuclear material (SQNM) is prescribed to be less than specified minimum quantities of nuclear material in a facility. SQNM is used at the locations called locations outside facilities (LOFs). LOFs are used to control the locations and installations that store nuclear materials under one effective Kg, respectively. Holders of SQNM don't need to require a license for use or possession of Uranium or Thorium exclusively for non-nuclear activities, or neither report them to the System of Accounting for and Control of nuclear material (SSAC) under specified quantities according to the Atomic Safety Law. Well defined safeguards law is fundamental to the effective control of nuclear material, facilities and nuclear related activities. In the current nuclear safety legislation, there are some exceptive clauses. Users of SQNM don't need to require a license for use or possession of Uranium or Thorium exclusively for non-nuclear activities, or not report them to the national authority below specified amount

  8. Investigation on proper materials of a liner system for trench type disposal facilities of radioactive wastes from research, industrial and medical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Hisakazu; Amazawa, Hiroya; Sakai, Akihiro; Arikawa, Masanobu; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki

    2011-08-01

    The Low-level Radioactive Waste Disposal Project Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency will settle on near surface disposal facilities with and without engineered barriers for radioactive wastes from research, industrial and medical facilities. Both of them are so called 'concrete pit type' and 'trench type', respectively. The technical standard of constructing and operating a disposal facility based on 'Law for the Regulations of Nuclear Source Material, Nuclear Fuel Material and Reactors' have been regulated partly by referring to that of 'Waste Management and Public Cleansing Law'. This means that the concrete pit type and the trench type disposal facility resemble an isolated type for specified industrial wastes and a non leachate controlled type final disposal site for stable industrial wastes, respectively. On the other, We plan to design a disposal facility with a liner system corresponding to a leachate controlled type final disposal site on a crucial assumption that radioactive wastes other than stable industrial wastes to be disposed into the trench type disposal facility is generated. By current nuclear related regulations in Japan, There are no technical standard of constructing the disposal facility with the liner system referring to that of 'Waste Management and Public Cleansing Law'. We investigate the function of the liner system in order to design a proper liner system for the trench type disposal facility. In this report, We investigated liner materials currently in use by actual leachate controlled type final disposal sites in Japan. Thereby important items such as tensile strength, durability from a view point of selecting proper liner materials were studied. The items were classified into three categories according to importance. We ranked proper liner materials for the trench type disposal facility by evaluating the important items per material. As a result, high density polyethylene(HDPE) of high elasticity type polymetric sheet was selected

  9. Use of Nuclear Material Accounting and Control for Nuclear Security Purposes at Facilities. Implementing Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear material accounting and control (NMAC) works in a complementary fashion with the international safeguards programme and physical protection systems to help prevent, deter or detect the unauthorized acquisition and use of nuclear materials. These three methodologies are employed by Member States to defend against external threats, internal threats and both state actors and non-state actors. This publication offers guidance for implementing NMAC measures for nuclear security at the nuclear facility level. It focuses on measures to mitigate the risk posed by insider threats and describes elements of a programme that can be implemented at a nuclear facility in coordination with the physical protection system for the purpose of deterring and detecting unauthorized removal of nuclear material

  10. Materials Science Experiments Under Microgravity - A Review of History, Facilities, and Future Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Materials science experiments have been a key issue already since the early days of research under microgravity conditions. A microgravity environment facilitates processing of metallic and semiconductor melts without buoyancy driven convection and sedimentation. Hence, crystal growth of semiconductors, solidification of metallic alloys, and the measurement of thermo-physical parameters are the major applications in the field of materials science making use of these dedicated conditions in space. In the last three decades a large number of successful experiments have been performed, mainly in international collaborations. In parallel, the development of high-performance research facilities and the technological upgrade of diagnostic and stimuli elements have also contributed to providing optimum conditions to perform such experiments. A review of the history of materials science experiments in space focussing on the development of research facilities is given. Furthermore, current opportunities to perform such experiments onboard ISS are described and potential future options are outlined.

  11. IFMIF : International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility Conceptual Design Activity: Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report is a summary of the results of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) on the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), conducted during 1995 and 1996. The activity is under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement for a Programme of Research and Development on Fusion Materials. An IEA Fusion Materials Executive Subcommittee was charged with overseeing the IFMIF-CDA work. Participants in the CDA are the European Union, Japan, and the United States, with the Russian Federation as an associate member

  12. IFMIF : International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility Conceptual Design Activity: Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report is a summary of the results of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) on the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), conducted during 1995 and 1996. The activity is under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement for a Programme of Research and Development on Fusion Materials. An IEA Fusion Materials Executive Subcommittee was charged with overseeing the IFMIF-CDA work. Participants in the CDA are the European Union, Japan, and the United States, with the Russian Federation as an associate member.

  13. Design of teletherapy facility: effect of space and occupancy on the material cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dash Sharma, P.K.; Janakiraman, G.; Shirva, V.K.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the material cost involved by making the room spacious, orientation of the layout with regards to occupancy around the installation, for 15 MV accelerator and telecobalt facility has been worked out. Here, the cost of RCC (2.35 gm/cc), which is generally used as shielding material is only considered and not the cost of other materials, transportation and labour. This paper may be useful for users to optimise the plan so as to reduce the cost of construction

  14. IFMIF : International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility Conceptual Design Activity: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martone, M.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) on the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), conducted during 1995 and 1996. The activity is under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement for a Programme of Research and Development on Fusion Materials. An IEA Fusion Materials Executive Subcommittee was charged with overseeing the IFMIF-CDA work. Participants in the CDA are the European Union, Japan, and the United States, with the Russian Federation as an associate member

  15. IFMIF : International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility Conceptual Design Activity: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martone, M [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) on the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), conducted during 1995 and 1996. The activity is under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement for a Programme of Research and Development on Fusion Materials. An IEA Fusion Materials Executive Subcommittee was charged with overseeing the IFMIF-CDA work. Participants in the CDA are the European Union, Japan, and the United States, with the Russian Federation as an associate member.

  16. Biosafety Procedure for Safe Handling of Genetically Modified Plant Materials in Bio Design Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaiton Ahmad; Shuhaimi Shamsudin; Mohamed Najli Mohamed Yasin; Affrida Abu Hassan; Mohd Zaid Hassan; Rusli Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Bio Design Facility is the specifically designed glass house for propagation, screening and analysis of high quality plant varieties developed through biotechnology or a combination of nuclear technology and biotechnology. High quality plant varieties especially genetically modified plants (GMO) require a special glass house facility for propagation and screening to isolate them from cross-pollinating with wild type varieties in surrounding ecosystem, and for carrying out evaluation of possible risks of the plants to human, animal and environment before they are proven safe for field trials or commercial release. This facility which was developed under the Ninth Malaysia Plan is classified as the Plant Containment Level 2 and is compliance with the bio safety regulations and guidance for the safe release of GMO according to Malaysian Bio safety Act 2007. Bio Design Facility is fully operational since 2010 and in 2012, it has also been certified as the glass house for post-entry quarantine by The Department of Agriculture. This paper summarizes the bio safety procedure for a safe, controlled and contained growing and evaluation of GMO in Bio Design Facility. This procedure covers the physical (containment and equipment's) and operational (including responsibility, code of practice, growing, decontamination and disposal of plant materials, emergency and contingency plan) aspects of the facility. (author)

  17. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 7, Estimate data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections outlined by Attachment III-2 of DOE Document AL 4700.1, Project Management System. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part VII - Estimate Data, contains the project cost estimate information.

  18. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL's weapons research, development, and testing (WRD ampersand T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL's inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system

  19. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 7, Estimate data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL's weapons research, development, and testing (WRD ampersand T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL's inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections outlined by Attachment III-2 of DOE Document AL 4700.1, Project Management System. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part VII - Estimate Data, contains the project cost estimate information

  20. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 3, Supplemental information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL's weapons research, development, and testing (WRD ampersand T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL's inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. It is organized into seven parts. Part I - Design Concept describes the selected solution. Part III - Supplemental Information contains calculations for the various disciplines as well as other supporting information and analyses

  1. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

  2. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 3, Supplemental information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. It is organized into seven parts. Part I - Design Concept describes the selected solution. Part III - Supplemental Information contains calculations for the various disciplines as well as other supporting information and analyses.

  3. Innovative technologies for recycling and reusing radioactively contaminated materials from DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, S.J.; Hyde, J.

    1993-01-01

    Through award of ten contracts under the solicitation, DOE is continuing efforts to develop innovative technologies for decontamination and recycling or reusing of process equipment, scrap metal, and concrete. These ten technologies are describe briefly in this report. There is great economic incentive for recycling or reusing materials generated during D ampersand D of DOE's facilities. If successfully developed, these superior technologies will enable DOE to clean its facilities by 2019. These technologies will also generate a reusable or recyclable product, while achieving D ampersand D in less time at lower cost with reduced health and safety risks to the workers, the public and the environment

  4. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in the oil and gas processing and production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najera F, J.

    1994-01-01

    NORM contamination is produced by concentration in petroleum facilities of naturally occurring radioactive materials. The presence of NORM in petroleum reservoirs and in the oil and gas industry has been widely recognized. It's not a critical technical problem if you proceed timely to solve it. NORM is a great but controllable hazard to the human health and the environment, and represents a severe waste management problem. We suggest to the latino american oil companies to conduct studies to detect NORM contamination in their facilities an use to them to plan the appropriate actions to control the situation. (author). 15 refs

  5. Materials and construction techniques for cryogenic wind tunnel facilities for instruction/research use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, S. F.; Roper, A. T.

    1975-01-01

    The results of the cryogenic wind tunnel program conducted at NASA Langley Research Center are presented to provide a starting point for the design of an instructional/research wind tunnel facility. The advantages of the cryogenic concept are discussed, and operating envelopes for a representative facility are presented to indicate the range and mode of operation. Special attention is given to the design, construction and materials problems peculiar to cryogenic wind tunnels. The control system for operation of a cryogenic tunnel is considered, and a portion of a linearized mathematical model is developed for determining the tunnel dynamic characteristics.

  6. Material control in nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. Part II. Accountability, instrumntation, and measurement techniques in fuel fabrication facilities, P.O.1236909. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgonovi, G.M.; McCartin, T.J.; McDaniel, T.; Miller, C.L.; Nguyen, T.

    1978-12-01

    This report describes the measurement techniques, the instrumentation, and the procedures used in accountability and control of nuclear materials, as they apply to fuel fabrication facilities. Some of the material included has appeared elswhere and it has been summarized. An extensive bibliography is included. A spcific example of application of the accountability methods to a model fuel fabrication facility which is based on the Westinghouse Anderson design

  7. Material control in nuclear fuel fabrication facilities. Part II. Accountability, instrumntation, and measurement techniques in fuel fabrication facilities, P. O. 1236909. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgonovi, G.M.; McCartin, T.J.; McDaniel, T.; Miller, C.L.; Nguyen, T.

    1978-12-01

    This report describes the measurement techniques, the instrumentation, and the procedures used in accountability and control of nuclear materials, as they apply to fuel fabrication facilities. Some of the material included has appeared elswhere and it has been summarized. An extensive bibliography is included. A spcific example of application of the accountability methods to a model fuel fabrication facility which is based on the Westinghouse Anderson design.

  8. Hazardous Materials Verification and Limited Characterization Report on Sodium and Caustic Residuals in Materials and Fuel Complex Facilities MFC-799/799A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Mecham

    2010-08-01

    This report is a companion to the Facilities Condition and Hazard Assessment for Materials and Fuel Complex Sodium Processing Facilities MFC-799/799A and Nuclear Calibration Laboratory MFC-770C (referred to as the Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment). This report specifically responds to the requirement of Section 9.2, Item 6, of the Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment to provide an updated assessment and verification of the residual hazardous materials remaining in the Sodium Processing Facilities processing system. The hazardous materials of concern are sodium and sodium hydroxide (caustic). The information supplied in this report supports the end-point objectives identified in the Transition Plan for Multiple Facilities at the Materials and Fuels Complex, Advanced Test Reactor, Central Facilities Area, and Power Burst Facility, as well as the deactivation and decommissioning critical decision milestone 1, as specified in U.S. Department of Energy Guide 413.3-8, “Environmental Management Cleanup Projects.” Using a tailored approach and based on information obtained through a combination of process knowledge, emergency management hazardous assessment documentation, and visual inspection, this report provides sufficient detail regarding the quantity of hazardous materials for the purposes of facility transfer; it also provides that further characterization/verification of these materials is unnecessary.

  9. A Computer Simulation to Assess the Nuclear Material Accountancy System of a MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portaix, C.G.; Binner, R.; John, H.

    2015-01-01

    SimMOX is a computer programme that simulates container histories as they pass through a MOX facility. It performs two parallel calculations: · the first quantifies the actual movements of material that might be expected to occur, given certain assumptions about, for instance, the accumulation of material and waste, and of their subsequent treatment; · the second quantifies the same movements on the basis of the operator's perception of the quantities involved; that is, they are based on assumptions about quantities contained in the containers. Separate skeletal Excel computer programmes are provided, which can be configured to generate further accountancy results based on these two parallel calculations. SimMOX is flexible in that it makes few assumptions about the order and operational performance of individual activities that might take place at each stage of the process. It is able to do this because its focus is on material flows, and not on the performance of individual processes. Similarly there are no pre-conceptions about the different types of containers that might be involved. At the macroscopic level, the simulation takes steady operation as its base case, i.e., the same quantity of material is deemed to enter and leave the simulated area, over any given period. Transient situations can then be superimposed onto this base scene, by simulating them as operational incidents. A general facility has been incorporated into SimMOX to enable the user to create an ''act of a play'' based on a number of operational incidents that have been built into the programme. By doing this a simulation can be constructed that predicts the way the facility would respond to any number of transient activities. This computer programme can help assess the nuclear material accountancy system of a MOX fuel fabrication facility; for instance the implications of applying NRTA (near real time accountancy). (author)

  10. Materials and Fuels Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvego, Lisa; Bennett, Brion

    2011-01-01

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Fuels Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  11. Materials and Security Consolidation Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Security Consolidation Center facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  12. A spallation-based irradiation test facility for fusion and future fission materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samec, K.; Fusco, Y.; Kadi, Y.; Luis, R.; Romanets, Y.; Behzad, M.; Aleksan, R.; Bousson, S.

    2014-01-01

    The EU's FP7 TIARA program for developing accelerator-based facilities has recently demonstrated the unique capabilities of a compact and powerful spallation source for irradiating advanced nuclear materials. The spectrum and intensity of the neutron flux produced in the proposed facility fulfils the requirements of the proposed DEMO fusion reactor, ADS reactors and also Gen III / IV reactors. Test conditions can be modulated, covering temperature from 400 to 550 deg. C, liquid metal corrosion, cyclical or static stress up to 500 MPa and neutron/proton irradiation damage of up to 25 DPA per annum over a volume occupying one litre. The entire 'TMIF' facility fits inside a cube 2 metres on a side, and is dimensioned for an accelerator beam power of 100 kW, thus reducing costs and offering great versatility and flexibility. (authors)

  13. Test facilities for radioactive material transport packages (AEA Technology, Winfrith, UK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgess, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Transport packages for radioactive materials are tested to demonstrate compliance with national and international regulations. The involvement of AEA Technology is traced from the establishment of the early IAEA Regulations. Transport package design, testing, assessment and approval requires a wide variety of skills and facilities. The comprehensive capability of AEA Technology in these areas is described with references to practical experience in the form of a short bibliography. The facilities described include drop-test cranes and targets (up to 700te); air guns for impacts up to sonic velocities; pool fires, furnaces and rigs for thermal tests including heat dissipation on prototype flasks; shielding facilities and instruments; criticality simulations and leak test instruments. These are illustrated with photographs demonstrating the comprehensive nature of package testing services supplied to customers. (author)

  14. Technical critique on radiation test facilities for the CTR surface and materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persiani, P.J.

    1975-02-01

    Major radiation test facilities will be necessary in the near-term (5 years) and long-term (greater than 10 years) future for the timely development and understanding of fusion confinement systems and of prototype fusion power reactors. The study includes the technical justifications and requirements for CTR Neutron and Plasma Radiation Test Facilities. The initial technical critique covers the feasibility and design problems: in upgrading the performance of the accelerator-rotating (solid TiT) target systems, and in transforming the accelerator-supersonic jet target concept into a radiation testing facility. A scoping assessment on the potential of a pulsed high-beta plasma device (dense plasma focus) is introduced to explore plasma concepts as near-term neutron and plasma radiation sources for the CTR Surface and Materials Program. (U.S.)

  15. A spallation-based irradiation test facility for fusion and future fission materials

    CERN Document Server

    Samec, K; Kadi, Y; Luis, R; Romanets, Y; Behzad, M; Aleksan, R; Bousson, S

    2014-01-01

    The EU’s FP7 TIARA program for developing accelerator-based facilities has recently demonstrated the unique capabilities of a compact and powerful spallation source for irradiating advanced nuclear materials. The spectrum and intensity of the neutron flux produced in the proposed facility fulfils the requirements of the DEMO fusion reactor for ITER, ADS reactors and also Gen III / IV reactors. Test conditions can be modulated, covering temperature from 400 to 550°C, liquid metal corrosion, cyclical or static stress up to 500 MPa and neutron/proton irradiation damage of up to 25 DPA per annum. The entire “TMIF” facility fits inside a cube 2 metres on a side, and is dimensioned for an accelerator beam power of 100 kW, thus reducing costs and offering great versatility and flexibility.

  16. IFMIF - International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility Conceptual Design Activity/Interim Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennich, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    Environmental acceptability, safety, and economic viability win ultimately be the keys to the widespread introduction of fusion power. This will entail the development of radiation- resistant and low- activation materials. These low-activation materials must also survive exposure to damage from neutrons having an energy spectrum peaked near 14 MeV with annual radiation doses in the range of 20 displacements per atom (dpa). Testing of candidate materials, therefore, requires a high-flux source of high energy neutrons. The problem is that there is currently no high-flux source of neutrons in the energy range above a few MeV. The goal, is therefore, to provide an irradiation facility for use by fusion material scientists in the search for low-activation and damage-resistant materials. An accellerator-based neutron source has been established through a number of international studies and workshops' as an essential step for materials development and testing. The mission of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is to provide an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium (D-Li) neutron source to produce high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials up to about a full lifetime of anticipated use in fusion energy reactors. would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator-based irradiation tests. It would generate material- specific activation and radiological properties data, and support the analysis of materials for use in safety, maintenance, recycling, decommissioning, and waste disposal systems

  17. NASA GRC's High Pressure Burner Rig Facility and Materials Test Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    The High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) at NASA Glenn Research Center is a high-velocity. pressurized combustion test rig used for high-temperature environmental durability studies of advanced materials and components. The facility burns jet fuel and air in controlled ratios, simulating combustion gas chemistries and temperatures that are realistic to those in gas turbine engines. In addition, the test section is capable of simulating the pressures and gas velocities representative of today's aircraft. The HPBR provides a relatively inexpensive. yet sophisticated means for researchers to study the high-temperature oxidation of advanced materials. The facility has the unique capability of operating under both fuel-lean and fuel-rich gas mixtures. using a fume incinerator to eliminate any harmful byproduct emissions (CO, H2S) of rich-burn operation. Test samples are easily accessible for ongoing inspection and documentation of weight change, thickness, cracking, and other metrics. Temperature measurement is available in the form of both thermocouples and optical pyrometery. and the facility is equipped with quartz windows for observation and video taping. Operating conditions include: (1) 1.0 kg/sec (2.0 lbm/sec) combustion and secondary cooling airflow capability: (2) Equivalence ratios of 0.5- 1.0 (lean) to 1.5-2.0 (rich), with typically 10% H2O vapor pressure: (3) Gas temperatures ranging 700-1650 C (1300-3000 F): (4) Test pressures ranging 4-12 atmospheres: (5) Gas flow velocities ranging 10-30 m/s (50-100) ft/sec.: and (6) Cyclic and steady-state exposure capabilities. The facility has historically been used to test coupon-size materials. including metals and ceramics. However complex-shaped components have also been tested including cylinders, airfoils, and film-cooled end walls. The facility has also been used to develop thin-film temperature measurement sensors.

  18. A new Brazilian regulation for the security of nuclear material and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Renato L.A.; Filho, Josélio S.M.; Torres, Luiz F.B.; Lima, Alexandre R.; Lima, Fabiano P.C.

    2017-01-01

    The present paper aims to outline the challenges related to the elaboration and concepts involved in a regulatory transition from a purely prescriptive approach to a combined approach that mixes performance-based concepts and evaluation metrics based on statistical data of equipment and personnel. This methodology might represent an improvement compared to a purely prescriptive approach, in which the regulatory authority defines the measures to be taken by operators of nuclear facilities to prevent theft, sabotage events, and mitigate their consequences. The prescriptive approach, despite having the advantages of clarity in the definition of requirements, simplicity in regulatory terms (inspections to verify compliance), and homogeneity in relation to various facilities, does not allow a clear and effective performance measurement, may provide insufficient or excessive security measures (with excessive expenditure of material and human resources), and the possibility of providing a false sense of security. It is known that, in many countries, the state-sponsored nuclear security regime mixes elements of the two mentioned approaches, prescriptive and based on performance, which is not Brazilian practice nowadays. Such methodological developments happened globally due to the increase of threat level for nuclear facilities and materials. The currently regulation in force is CNEN-NE 2.01, which provides a set of measures intended to implement Physical Protection Systems in Nuclear, Radiological Facilities as well as Transport Operations, and all documents related to security of such issues. The new regulation, named CNEN-NN 2.01, will focus only on Nuclear Material and Facilities (two other regulations specific for Security of Radioactive Sources and Transport Operations are under elaboration process). CNEN NN 2.01 is intended to provide further adherence to new international recommendations, e.g, IAEA INFCIRC 225 Rev.5 (NSS 13), which is currently regarded as the

  19. A new Brazilian regulation for the security of nuclear material and nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Renato L.A.; Filho, Josélio S.M.; Torres, Luiz F.B.; Lima, Alexandre R., E-mail: renato.tavares@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: joselio@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: ltorres@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: alexandre.lima@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Diretoria de Radioproteção e Segurança Nuclear; Lima, Fabiano P.C., E-mail: fabianopetruceli@outlook.com [Presidência da República, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Gabinete de Segurança Institucional

    2017-07-01

    The present paper aims to outline the challenges related to the elaboration and concepts involved in a regulatory transition from a purely prescriptive approach to a combined approach that mixes performance-based concepts and evaluation metrics based on statistical data of equipment and personnel. This methodology might represent an improvement compared to a purely prescriptive approach, in which the regulatory authority defines the measures to be taken by operators of nuclear facilities to prevent theft, sabotage events, and mitigate their consequences. The prescriptive approach, despite having the advantages of clarity in the definition of requirements, simplicity in regulatory terms (inspections to verify compliance), and homogeneity in relation to various facilities, does not allow a clear and effective performance measurement, may provide insufficient or excessive security measures (with excessive expenditure of material and human resources), and the possibility of providing a false sense of security. It is known that, in many countries, the state-sponsored nuclear security regime mixes elements of the two mentioned approaches, prescriptive and based on performance, which is not Brazilian practice nowadays. Such methodological developments happened globally due to the increase of threat level for nuclear facilities and materials. The currently regulation in force is CNEN-NE 2.01, which provides a set of measures intended to implement Physical Protection Systems in Nuclear, Radiological Facilities as well as Transport Operations, and all documents related to security of such issues. The new regulation, named CNEN-NN 2.01, will focus only on Nuclear Material and Facilities (two other regulations specific for Security of Radioactive Sources and Transport Operations are under elaboration process). CNEN NN 2.01 is intended to provide further adherence to new international recommendations, e.g, IAEA INFCIRC 225 Rev.5 (NSS 13), which is currently regarded as the

  20. A Strategy for Quantifying Radioactive Material in a Low-Level Waste Incineration Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.

    1997-03-01

    One of the methods proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the volume reduction and stabilization of a variety of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) is incineration. Many commercial incinerators are in operation treating both non-hazardous and hazardous wastes. These can obtain volume reductions factors of 50 or more for certain wastes, and produce a waste (ash) that can be easily stabilized if necessary by vitrification or cementation. However, there are few incinerators designed to accommodate radioactive wastes. One has been recently built at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC and is burning non-radioactive hazardous waste and radioactive wastes in successive campaigns. The SRS Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) is RCRA permitted as a Low Chemical Hazard, Radiological facility as defined by DOE criteria (Ref. 1). Accordingly, the CIF must operate within specified chemical, radionuclide, and fissile material inventory limits (Ref. 2). The radionuclide and fissile material limits are unique to radiological or nuclear facilities, and require special measurement and removal strategies to assure compliance, and the CIF may be required to shut down periodically in order to clean out the radionuclide inventory which builds up in various parts of the facility

  1. Standardized facility record and report model system (FARMS) for material accounting and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Hideo; Ihara, Hitoshi; Hisamatsu, Yoshinori.

    1990-07-01

    A facility in which nuclear materials are handled maintains a facility system of accounting for and control of nuclear material. Such a system contains, as one of key elements, a record and report system. This record and report information system is a rather complex one because it needs to conform to various requirements from the national or international safeguards authorities and from the plant operator who has to achieve a safe and economical operation of the plant. Therefore it is mandatory to computerize such information system. The authors have reviewed these requirements and standardized the book-keeping and reporting procedures in line with their computerization. On the basis of this result the authors have developed a computer system, FARMS, named as an acronym of standardized facility record and report model system, mainly reflecting the requirements from the national and international safeguards authorities. The development of FARMS has also been carried out as a JASPAS - Japan Support Programme for Agency Safeguards - project since 1985 and the FARMS code was demonstrated as an accountancy tool in the regional SSAC training courses held in Japan in 1985 and 1987. This report describes the standardization of a record and report system at the facility level, its computerization as a model system and the demonstration of the developed system, FARMS. (author)

  2. IFMIF-KEP. International fusion materials irradiation facility key element technology phase report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field that will simulate the neutron environment of a D-T fusion reactor. IFMIF will provide a neutron flux equivalent to 2 MW/m{sup 2}, 20 dpa/y in Fe, in a volume of 500 cm{sup 3} and will be used in the development and qualification of materials for fusion systems. The design activities of IFMIF are performed under an IEA collaboration which began in 1995. In 2000, a three-year Key Element Technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was undertaken to reduce the key technology risk factors. This KEP report describes the results of the three-year KEP activities in the major project areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  3. IFMIF-KEP. International fusion materials irradiation facility key element technology phase report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field that will simulate the neutron environment of a D-T fusion reactor. IFMIF will provide a neutron flux equivalent to 2 MW/m 2 , 20 dpa/y in Fe, in a volume of 500 cm 3 and will be used in the development and qualification of materials for fusion systems. The design activities of IFMIF are performed under an IEA collaboration which began in 1995. In 2000, a three-year Key Element Technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was undertaken to reduce the key technology risk factors. This KEP report describes the results of the three-year KEP activities in the major project areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  4. Inventory extension considerations for long-term storage at the nuclear materials storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinger, C.T.; Stanbro, W.D.; Longmire, V.; Argo, P.E.; Nielson, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is in the process of modifying its nuclear materials storage facility to a long-term storage configuration. In support of this effort, we examined technical and administrative means to extend periods between physical inventories. Both the frequency and sample size during a physical inventory could significantly impact required sizing of the non-destructive assay (NDA) laboratory as well as material handling capabilities. Several options are being considered, including (1) treating each storage location as a separate vault, (2) minimizing the number of items returned for quantitative analysis by optimizing the use of in situ confirmatory measurements, and (3) utilizing advanced monitoring technologies. Careful consideration of these parameters should allow us to achieve and demonstrate safe and secure storage while minimizing the impact on facility operations and without having to increase the size of the NDA laboratory beyond that required for anticipated shipping and receiving activities

  5. Design and operating technique for ventilating system of irradiated materials examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yong Hwa; Hong, Kwon Pyo; Eom, Sung Ho

    1999-08-01

    Ventilation and air filtering system is installed at IMEF to maintain optimized operating condition of the facility by keeping different negative pressure condition depending on contamination level in the IMEF due to its treatment of radioactive materials. Inspection on each system, air flow measurement, filter leak test and other related test are periodically performed as the performance test for increasing operational efficiency and safety. (Author). 16 refs., 21 tabs., 9 figs

  6. Coordinated safeguards for materials management in a mixed-oxide fuel facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, J.P.; Cobb, D.D.; Dietz, R.J.; Evans, M.L.; Schelonka, E.P.; Smith, D.B.; Walton, R.B.

    1977-02-01

    A coordinated safeguards system is described for safeguarding strategic quantities of special nuclear materials in mixed-oxide recycle fuel fabrication facilities. The safeguards system is compatible with industrial process requirements and combines maximum effectiveness consistent with modest cost and minimal process interference. It is based on unit process accounting using a combination of conventional and state-of-the-art NDA measurement techniques. The effectiveness of the system against single and multiple thefts is evaluated using computer modeling and simulation techniques

  7. Systematic approach to remote maintenance in the fuels and materials examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frandsen, G.B.; Nash, C.R.; Divona, C.J.; May, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    The Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) is systematically analyzed from a remote maintenance standpoint using functional analysis methods. From the analysis the remote maintainability of equipment is ascertained, required tooling lists are formed, and maintenance downtimes are established. These techniques identify deficiencies or inefficiencies in the early design stage where changes have a minimum impact on cost. Special tooling and fixture requirements are minimized by standardizing remote maintenance design features

  8. Analysis of material recovery facilities for use in life-cycle assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Pressley, Phillip N.; Levis, James W.; Damgaard, Anders; Barlaz, Morton A.; DeCarolis, Joseph F.

    2015-01-01

    Insights derived from life-cycle assessment of solid waste management strategies depend critically on assumptions, data, and modeling at the unit process level. Based on new primary data, a process model was developed to estimate the cost and energy use associated with material recovery facilities (MRFs), which are responsible for sorting recyclables into saleable streams and as such represent a key piece of recycling infrastructure. The model includes four modules, each with a different proc...

  9. Coordinated safeguards for materials management in a mixed-oxide fuel facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipley, J.P.; Cobb, D.D.; Dietz, R.J.; Evans, M.L.; Schelonka, E.P.; Smith, D.B.; Walton, R.B.

    1977-02-01

    A coordinated safeguards system is described for safeguarding strategic quantities of special nuclear materials in mixed-oxide recycle fuel fabrication facilities. The safeguards system is compatible with industrial process requirements and combines maximum effectiveness consistent with modest cost and minimal process interference. It is based on unit process accounting using a combination of conventional and state-of-the-art NDA measurement techniques. The effectiveness of the system against single and multiple thefts is evaluated using computer modeling and simulation techniques.

  10. Structural analysis of hatch cover plates on Fuels and Materials Examination Facility high bay mezzanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixson, G.E.

    1997-01-01

    In order to move the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) trailer into position for testing on the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) 42 ft level mezzanine one of the trailer's wheels will have to sit on a circular hatch cover fabricated from one-inch thick steel plate. The attached calculations verify that the hatch cover plate is strong enough to support the weight of the INEL LDUA trailer's wheel

  11. Use Of Cementitious Materials For SRS Reactor Facility In-Situ Decommissioning - 11620

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Waymer, J.; Matheny, D.; Singh, D.

    2010-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., producing (reactor facilities), processing (isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The Savannah River Site 105-P and 105-R Reactor Facility ISD requires about 250,000 cubic yards of grout to fill the below grade structure. The fills are designed to prevent subsidence, reduce water infiltration, and isolate contaminated materials. This work is being performed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act (CERCLA) action and is part of the overall soil and groundwater completion projects for P- and R-Areas. Cementitious materials were designed for the following applications: (1) Below grade massive voids/rooms: Portland cement-based structural flowable fills for - Bulk filling, Restricted placement and Underwater placement. (2) Special below grade applications for reduced load bearing capacity needs: Cellular portland cement lightweight fill (3) Reactor vessel fills that are compatible with reactive metal (aluminum metal) components in the reactor vessels: Calcium sulfoaluminate flowable fill, and Magnesium potassium phosphate flowable fill. (4) Caps to prevent water infiltration and intrusion into areas with the highest levels of radionuclides: Portland cement based shrinkage compensating concrete. A system engineering approach was used to identify functions and requirements of the fill and capping materials. Laboratory testing was performed to identify candidate formulations and develop final design mixes. Scale-up testing was performed to verify material production and placement as well as fresh and cured properties. The 105-P and 105-R ISD projects are currently in progress and are expected to be complete in 2012. The focus of this paper is to describe the (1) grout mixes

  12. USE OF CEMENTITIOUS MATERIALS FOR SRS REACTOR FACILITY IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING - 11620

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Waymer, J.; Matheny, D.; Singh, D.

    2010-12-07

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., producing (reactor facilities), processing (isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The Savannah River Site 105-P and 105-R Reactor Facility ISD requires about 250,000 cubic yards of grout to fill the below grade structure. The fills are designed to prevent subsidence, reduce water infiltration, and isolate contaminated materials. This work is being performed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act (CERCLA) action and is part of the overall soil and groundwater completion projects for P- and R-Areas. Cementitious materials were designed for the following applications: (1) Below grade massive voids/rooms: Portland cement-based structural flowable fills for - Bulk filling, Restricted placement and Underwater placement. (2) Special below grade applications for reduced load bearing capacity needs: Cellular portland cement lightweight fill (3) Reactor vessel fills that are compatible with reactive metal (aluminum metal) components in the reactor vessels: Calcium sulfoaluminate flowable fill, and Magnesium potassium phosphate flowable fill. (4) Caps to prevent water infiltration and intrusion into areas with the highest levels of radionuclides: Portland cement based shrinkage compensating concrete. A system engineering approach was used to identify functions and requirements of the fill and capping materials. Laboratory testing was performed to identify candidate formulations and develop final design mixes. Scale-up testing was performed to verify material production and placement as well as fresh and cured properties. The 105-P and 105-R ISD projects are currently in progress and are expected to be complete in 2012. The focus of this paper is to describe the (1) grout mixes

  13. Optimization of a fuel converter for the MERLIN materials testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouleur, Y.; Raedt, Ch. de; Malambu, E.; Minsart, G.; Vermunt, J.

    1998-01-01

    SCK-CEN is at the present time developing the MERLIN materials testing facility, to be placed in the pool at the BR2 high flux materials testing reactor. It aims at irradiating large amounts of steel samples that are subsequently to be analyzed in the framework of reactor vessel embrittlement research programmes. In order to fulfill the required fast neutron flux conditions, a converter made of highly enriched uranium fuel plates, has to be inserted between the reactor vessel and the samples. The converter will transform the BR2 thermal neutron outflow into the required fast neutron flux. This converter has to be optimised. (author)

  14. Studies of neutron methods for process control and criticality surveillance of fissile material processing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoltowski, T.

    1988-01-01

    The development of radiochemical processes for fissile material processing and spent fuel handling need new control procedures enabling an improvement of plant throughput. This is strictly related to the implementation of continuous criticality control policy and developing reliable methods for monitoring the reactivity of radiochemical plant operations in presence of the process perturbations. Neutron methods seem to be applicable for fissile material control in some technological facilities. The measurement of epithermal neutron source multiplication with heuristic evaluation of measured data enables surveillance of anomalous reactivity enhancement leading to unsafe states. 80 refs., 47 figs., 33 tabs. (author)

  15. Automated personal identification: a new technique for controlling access to nuclear materials and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccles, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    Special nuclear materials must be protected against the threat of diversion or theft, and nuclear facilities against the threat of industrial sabotage. Implicit in this protection is the means of controlling access to protected areas, material access areas, and vital areas. With the advent of automated personal identification technology, the processes of access control can be automated to yield both higher security and reduced costs. This paper first surveys the conventional methods of access control; next, automated personal identification concepts are presented and various systems approaches are highlighted; finally, Calspan's FINGERSCAN /sub TM/ system for identity verification is described

  16. Analysis of glycerin waste in A-Area sanitary treatment facility material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    TNX has a large supply of 55 gallon drums containing pure glycerin and glycerin with additives. The glycerin drums were procured to simulate the glass stream in a pilot-scale melter process at TNX. Since the glycerin was not used for this process, TNX is looking at disposing the material in a sanitary waste treatment facility onsite. The effect of adding the contents of the drums to sewage bacteria was tested. A drum of pure glycerin and a drum of glycerin mixed with lithium chloride were tested. The test consisted of mixing sanitary sludge material with the glycerin material. The purpose of the test was to determine if the glycerin impacted the aerobic bacterial population. The bacterial densities were determined by taking samples from the sludge/glycerin mixtures and using aerobic plate count methods. The total organic carbon (TOC) levels were measured before and after testing. The results indicate that the cell density of the aerobic bacteria increased with the addition of glycerin and the glycerin mixture and the TOC removal rate was different for all tests. Disposal of glycerin in the wastewater treatment facilities should pose no problems. Additional testing and analysis of the mixed samples should be done before its disposal in a waste water treatment facility

  17. MaRIE; a proposed materials facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourke, M.A.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    This presentation will describe the current definition of a proposed new facility called MaRIE at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The concept is of decadal scope and is predicated on the collocation of a fourth-generation X-ray light source with a proton accelerator spallation neutron source and complementary synthesis and characterization capabilities. MaRIE is an acronym which stands for Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes. The facility has been conceived partly in response to the increasing role that control science is expected to play in materials research compared to observation science. If new materials are to be implemented in a timely fashion for the most aggressive conditions of proposed fission and fusion energy applications they will have to rely, at least in part, on models, simulations and scientific insight. Validation of these models will require measurements at spatial and temporal scales that have only recently become enabled by the latest generations of light sources. A hallmark of the MaRIE concept is an emphasis on in situ studies (under extreme neutron, photon and ion irradiation conditions) of the phenomena that lead to swelling, phase transformations, thermal properties and corrosion. Insights and data, relevant to atomistic and quantum mechanical models, are major goals, as well as the facilitation of rapid materials discovery. It is hoped that this presentation will solicit input on aspects of the facility definition that should be strengthened or diminished to meet the needs of the fission community. (authors)

  18. Nuclear data needs for neutron spectrum tailoring at International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi

    2001-01-01

    International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a proposal of D-Li intense neutron source to cover all aspects of the fusion materials development in the framework of IEA collaboration. The new activity has been started to qualifying the important technical issues called Key Element technology Phase since 2000. Although the neutron spectrum can be adjusted by changing the incident beam energy, it is favorable to be carried out many irradiation tasks at the same time under the unique beam condition. For designing the tailored neutron spectrum, neutron nuclear data for the moderator-reflector materials up to 50 MeV are required. The data for estimating the induced radioactivity is also required to keep the radiation level low enough at maintenance time. The candidate materials and the required accuracy of nuclear data are summarized. (author)

  19. Nuclear data needs for neutron spectrum tailoring at International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Masayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is a proposal of D-Li intense neutron source to cover all aspects of the fusion materials development in the framework of IEA collaboration. The new activity has been started to qualifying the important technical issues called Key Element technology Phase since 2000. Although the neutron spectrum can be adjusted by changing the incident beam energy, it is favorable to be carried out many irradiation tasks at the same time under the unique beam condition. For designing the tailored neutron spectrum, neutron nuclear data for the moderator-reflector materials up to 50 MeV are required. The data for estimating the induced radioactivity is also required to keep the radiation level low enough at maintenance time. The candidate materials and the required accuracy of nuclear data are summarized. (author)

  20. Mach 0.3 Burner Rig Facility at the NASA Glenn Materials Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming; Perez, Michael; Cuy, Michael D.; Robinson, R. Craig

    2011-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum presents the current capabilities of the state-of-the-art Mach 0.3 Burner Rig Facility. It is used for materials research including oxidation, corrosion, erosion and impact. Consisting of seven computer controlled jet-fueled combustors in individual test cells, these relatively small rigs burn just 2 to 3 gal of jet fuel per hour. The rigs are used as an efficient means of subjecting potential aircraft engine/airframe advanced materials to the high temperatures, high velocities and thermal cycling closely approximating actual operating environments. Materials of various geometries and compositions can be evaluated at temperatures from 700 to 2400 F. Tests are conducted not only on bare superalloys and ceramics, but also to study the behavior and durability of protective coatings applied to those materials.

  1. Facile Selective and Diverse Fabrication of Superhydrophobic, Superoleophobic-Superhydrophilic and Superamphiphobic Materials from Kaolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mengnan; Ma, Xuerui; He, Jinmei; Feng, Juan; Liu, Shanshan; Yao, Yali; Hou, Lingang; Liu, Xiangrong

    2017-01-11

    As the starting material, kaolin is selectively and diversely fabricated to the superhydrophobic, superoleophobic-superhydrophilic, and superamphiphobic materials, respectively. The wettability of the kaolin surface can be selectively controlled and regulated to different superwetting states by choosing the corresponding modification reagent. The procedure is facile to operate, and no special technique or equipment is required. In addition, the procedure is cost-effective and time-saving and the obtained super-repellent properties are very stable. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrates different changes of kaolin particles surfaces which are responsible for the different super-repellency. The scanning electron microscopy displays geometric micro- and nanometer structures of the obtained three kinds of super-repellent materials. The results show that kaolin has good applications in many kinds of superwetting materials. The method demonstrated in this paper provides a new strategy for regulating and controlling the wettability of solid surfaces selectively, diversely, and comprehensively.

  2. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Exploratory Shaft Facility fluids and materials evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, K.A.

    1988-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if any fluids or materials used in the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) of Yucca Mountain will make the mountain unsuitable for future construction of a nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain, an area on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada, USA, is a candidate site for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from commercial nuclear power and defense nuclear activities. To properly characterize Yucca Mountain, it will be necessary to construct an underground test facility, in which in situ site characterization tests can be conducted. The candidate repository horizon at Yucca Mountain, however, could potentially be compromised by fluids and materials used in the site characterization tests. To minimize this possibility, Los Alamos National Laboratory was directed to evaluate the kinds of fluids and materials that will be used and their potential impacts on the site. A secondary objective was to identify fluids and materials, if any, that should be prohibited from, or controlled in, the underground. 56 refs., 19 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities (Implementation of INFCIRC/225/Revision 5). Implementing Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    This publication is the lead Implementing Guide in a suite of guidance on implementing the Nuclear Security Recommendations on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities (INFCIRC/225/Revision 5), IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 13. It provides guidance and suggestions to assist States and their competent authorities in establishing, strengthening and sustaining their national physical protection regime and implementing the associated systems and measures, including operators’ physical protection systems. The structure of this publication is as follows. After this introduction, Section 2 describes the objectives of physical protection and the overall approach to managing the risks of the unauthorized removal of nuclear material and the sabotage of nuclear facilities. Section 3 provides guidance for the State and its competent authorities on the physical protection elements of the nuclear security regime; this guidance is based on the fundamental principles set out in the Recommendations publication. Section 4 provides guidance on the operator’s physical protection system and describes a systematic, integrated approach. Appendix I gives an annotated outline of the typical contents of an operator’s security plan. Appendix II provides similar guidance for the contingency plan. Appendix III provides a description of nuclear material aggregation that can be used to categorize nuclear material and determine the appropriate level of protection against unauthorized removal. Appendix IV presents a table of paragraph cross-references between the Recommendations publication and this Implementing Guide.

  4. Study of the application of near-real-time materials accountancy to safeguards for reprocessing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikawa, Koji; Ihara, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Hideo; Hirata, Mitsuho; Sakuragi, Hirotaka; Ido, Masaru.

    1983-09-01

    This report describes the results of TASTEX task F, the basic purpose of which was to investigate the feasibility of applying the basic concepts of near-real-time materials accountancy to small or medium-sized spent fuel reprocessing facilities, using the PNC-Tokai facility as a model. The background of Task-F and the proposed IAEA requirements on reprocessing plant safeguards are briefly shown. A model of near-real-time materials accountancy based on weekly material balances covering the entire process MBA is outlined, and the effectiveness of this model is evaluated based on simulation and analysis procedures developed for the study. The results show that the proposed materials accountancy model should provide sufficient information to satisfy IAEA guidelines for detection goals. Field testing of the model began in 1980, and the preliminary evaluation of this field test data shows that weekly in-process physical inventories are possible without affecting process operations. This report also describes studies related to IAEA verification procedures, and identifies necessary further work. (author)

  5. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Exploratory Shaft Facility fluids and materials evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, K.A.

    1988-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if any fluids or materials used in the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) of Yucca Mountain will make the mountain unsuitable for future construction of a nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain, an area on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada, USA, is a candidate site for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from commercial nuclear power and defense nuclear activities. To properly characterize Yucca Mountain, it will be necessary to construct an underground test facility, in which in situ site characterization tests can be conducted. The candidate repository horizon at Yucca Mountain, however, could potentially be compromised by fluids and materials used in the site characterization tests. To minimize this possibility, Los Alamos National Laboratory was directed to evaluate the kinds of fluids and materials that will be used and their potential impacts on the site. A secondary objective was to identify fluids and materials, if any, that should be prohibited from, or controlled in, the underground. 56 refs., 19 figs., 11 tabs

  6. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) conceptual design activity reduced cost report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-02-01

    This report describes the results of a preliminary reevaluation of the design and cost of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) Project in response to the request from the 28th FPCC meeting in January 1999. Two major ideas have been considered: 1) reduction of the total construction cost through elimination of the previously planned facility upgrade and 2) a facility deployment in 3 stages with capabilities for limited experiments in the first stage. As a result, the size and complexity of the facility could be significantly reduced, leading to substantial cost savings. In addition to these two ideas, this study also included a critical review of the original CDA specification with the objective of elimination of nonessential items. For example, the number of lithium targets was reduced from two to one. As a result of these changes in addition to the elimination of the upgrade, the total cost estimate was very substantially reduced from 797.2 MICF to 487.8 MICF, where 1 MICF = 1 Million of the IFMIF Conversion Units (approximately $1M US January, 1996). (author)

  7. Integrated software package for nuclear material safeguards in a MOX fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, H.J.; Piana, M.; Moussalli, G.; Saukkonen, H.

    2000-01-01

    Since computerized data processing was introduced to Safeguards at large bulk handling facilities, a large number of individual software applications have been developed for nuclear material Safeguards implementation. Facility inventory and flow data are provided in computerized format for performing stratification, sample size calculation and selection of samples for destructive and non-destructive assay. Data is collected from nuclear measurement systems running in attended, unattended mode and more recently from remote monitoring systems controlled. Data sets from various sources have to be evaluated for Safeguards purposes, such as raw data, processed data and conclusions drawn from data evaluation results. They are reported in computerized format at the International Atomic Energy Agency headquarters and feedback from the Agency's mainframe computer system is used to prepare and support Safeguards inspection activities. The integration of all such data originating from various sources cannot be ensured without the existence of a common data format and a database system. This paper describes the fundamental relations between data streams, individual data processing tools, data evaluation results and requirements for an integrated software solution to facilitate nuclear material Safeguards at a bulk handling facility. The paper also explains the basis for designing a software package to manage data streams from various data sources and for incorporating diverse data processing tools that until now have been used independently from each other and under different computer operating systems. (author)

  8. Long term integrity of spent fuel and construction materials for dry storage facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saegusa, T [CRIEPI (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    In Japan, two dry storage facilities at reactor sites have already been operating since 1995 and 2002, respectively. Additionally, a large scale dry storage facility away from reactor sites is under safety examination for license near the coast and desired to start its operation in 2010. Its final storage capacity is 5,000tU. It is therefore necessary to obtain and evaluate the related data on integrity of spent fuels loaded into and construction materials of casks during long term dry storage. The objectives are: - Spent fuel rod: To evaluate hydrogen migration along axial fuel direction on irradiated claddings stored for twenty years in air; To evaluate pellet oxidation behaviour for high burn-up UO{sub 2} fuels; - Construction materials for dry storage facilities: To evaluate long term reliability of welded stainless steel canister under stress corrosion cracking (SCC) environment; To evaluate long term integrity of concrete cask under carbonation and salt attack environment; To evaluate integrity of sealability of metal gasket under long term storage and short term accidental impact force.

  9. Testing of ceramic filter materials at the PCFB test facility; Keraamisten suodinmateriaalien testaus PCFB-koelaitoksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuivalainen, R; Eriksson, T; Lehtonen, P; Tiensuu, J [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Karhula (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) combustion technology has been developed in Karhula, Finland since 1986. In 1989, a 10 MW PCFB test facility was constructed. The test facility has been used for performance testing with different coal types through the years 1990-1994 for obtaining data for design and commercialization of the high-efficiency low-emission PCFB combustion technology. The main objective of the project Y53 was to evaluate advanced candle filter materials for the Hot Gas Clean-up Unit (HGCU) to be used in a commercial PCFB Demonstration Project. To achieve this goal, the selected candle materials were exposed to actual high temperature, high pressure coal combustion flue gases for a period of 1000-1500 h during the PCFB test runs. The test runs were carried out in three test segments in Foster Wheeler`s PCFB test facility at the Karhula R and D Center. An extensive inspection and sampling program was carried out after the second test segment. Selected sample candles were analyzed by the filter supplier and the preliminary results were encouraging. The material strength had decreased only within expected range. Slight elongation of the silicon carbide candles was observed, but at this phase the elongation can not be addressed to creep, unlike in the candles tested in 1993-94. The third and last test segment was completed successfully in October 1996. The filter system was inspected and several sample candles were selected for material characterization. The results will be available in February - March 1997. (orig.)

  10. One-Step Facile Synthesis of a Simple Hole Transport Material for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hu

    2016-04-04

    A hole transporting material was designed for use in perovskite solar cells, with a facile one-step synthesis from inexpensive, com-mercially available reagents. The molecule comprises a central fluorinated phenyl core with pendant aryl amines, namely, 3,6-difluoro-N1,N1,N2,N2,N4,N4,N5,N5-octakis(4-methoxyphenyl)benzene-1,2,4,5-tetraamine (DFTAB). A power conversion efficiency of up to 10.4% was achieved in a mesoporous perovskite device architecture. The merits of a simple and potentially low cost syn-thetic route as well as promising performance in perovskite devices, encourages further development of this materials class as new low-cost hole transporting materials for the scale up of perovskite solar cells.

  11. Evaluation on construction quality of pit filler material of cavern type radioactive waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takechi, Shin-ichi; Yokozeki, Kosuke; Shimbo, Hiroshi; Terada, Kenji; Akiyama, Yoshihiro; Yada, Tsutomu; Tsuji, Yukikazu

    2014-01-01

    The pit filler material of the underground cavern-type radioactive waste disposal facility, which is poured directly around the radioactive waste packages where high temperature environment is assumed by their decay heat, is concerned to be adversely affected on the filling behavior and its hardened properties. There also are specific issues that required quality of construction must be achieved by unmanned construction with remote operation, because the pit filler construction shall be done under radiation environment. In this paper, the mix proportion of filler material is deliberated with filling experiments simulating high temperature environment, and also the effect of temperature on hardened properties are confirmed with high temperature curing test. Subsequently, the feasibility of unmanned construction method of filler material by pumping, and by movable bucket, are comparatively discussed through a real size demonstration. (author)

  12. Techno-economic assessment of central sorting at material recovery facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimpan, Ciprian; Maul, Anja; Wenzel, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    sales and sorting residues disposal costs. Material flows through the plants were simulated considering both optimal process conditions and real or typical conditions characterised by downtime and frequent operation at overcapacity. By modelling four plants of progressively higher capacity (size......Simulation of technical and economic performance for materials recovery facilities (MRFs) is a basic requirement for planning new, or evaluating existing, separate waste collection and recycling systems. This study mitigates the current pervasive scarcity of data on process efficiency and costs...... 7 to 21 million EUR and the yearly operational expenditure grew by a factor of 2.4 from 2 to 4.7 million EUR. As a result, specific unit processing cost decreased from 110 to 70 EUR/tonne. Material sales and disposal costs summed to between a net cost of 25 EUR/tonne and net revenue of 50 EUR...

  13. A novel, efficient and facile method for the template removal from mesoporous materials

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Lu

    2014-11-12

    © 2014, Jilin University, The Editorial Department of Chemical Research in Chinese Universities and Springer-Verlag GmbH. A new catalytic-oxidation method was adopted to remove the templates from SBA-15 and MCM-41 mesoporous materials via Fenton-like techniques under microwave irradiation. The mesoporous silica materials were treated with different Fenton agents based on the template’s property and textural property. The samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction(XRD) measurement, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, infrared spectroscopy, 29Si MAS NMR and thermo gravimetric analysis(TGA). The results reveal that this is an efficient and facile approach to the thorough template-removal from mesoporous silica materials, as well as to offering products with more stable structures, higher BET surface areas, larger pore volumes and larger quantity of silanol groups.

  14. Coordinated safeguards for materials management in a nitrate-to-oxide conversion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayem, H.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dietz, R.J.; Hakkila, E.A.; Kern, E.A.; Shipley, J.P.; Smith, D.B.; Bowersox, D.F.

    1977-09-01

    The conceptual design of a materials management system for safeguarding special nuclear materials in a plutonium nitrate-to-oxide conversion facility is developed and evaluated. Dynamic material balances are drawn from information provided by nondestructive-analysis techniques, process-control instrumentation, and conventional chemical analyses augmented by process-monitoring devices. Powerful statistical methods, cast in the framework of decision analysis and applied to unit-process accounting areas, ensure adequate spatial and temporal quantification of possible diversion with minimal process disruption. Modeling and simulation techniques assist in evaluating the sensitivity of the system to various diversion schemes and in comparing safeguards strategies. Features that would improve the safeguardability of the conversion process are discussed

  15. How to improve the irradiation conditions for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Daum, E

    2000-01-01

    The accelerator-based intense D-Li neutron source International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) provides very suitable irradiation conditions for fusion materials development with the attractive option of accelerated irradiations. Investigations show that a neutron moderator made of tungsten and placed in the IFMIF test cell can further improve the irradiation conditions. The moderator softens the IFMIF neutron spectrum by enhancing the fraction of low energy neutrons. For displacement damage, the ratio of point defects to cascades is more DEMO relevant and for tritium production in Li-based breeding ceramic materials it leads to a preferred production via the sup 6 Li(n,t) sup 4 He channel as it occurs in a DEMO breeding blanket.

  16. One-Step Facile Synthesis of a Simple Hole Transport Material for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hu; Bryant, Daniel; Troughton, Joel; Kirkus, Mindaugas; Neophytou, Marios; Miao, Xiaohe; Durrant, James R.; McCulloch, Iain

    2016-01-01

    A hole transporting material was designed for use in perovskite solar cells, with a facile one-step synthesis from inexpensive, com-mercially available reagents. The molecule comprises a central fluorinated phenyl core with pendant aryl amines, namely, 3,6-difluoro-N1,N1,N2,N2,N4,N4,N5,N5-octakis(4-methoxyphenyl)benzene-1,2,4,5-tetraamine (DFTAB). A power conversion efficiency of up to 10.4% was achieved in a mesoporous perovskite device architecture. The merits of a simple and potentially low cost syn-thetic route as well as promising performance in perovskite devices, encourages further development of this materials class as new low-cost hole transporting materials for the scale up of perovskite solar cells.

  17. Use of the National Low-Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) for fusion materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Kerchner, H.R.; Klabunde, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    In May 1983 the Division of Materials Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy authorized the establishment of a National Low-Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) at ORNL's Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR). The NLTNIF, which will be available for qualified experiments at no cost to users, will provide a combination of high radiation intensities and special environmental and testing conditions that have not been previously available in the US. Since the DOE authorization, work has proceeded on the design and construction of the new facility without interruption. This report describes the present status of the development of NLTNIF and, for the information of new candidate users, a recounting of the major specifications and capabilities is also given

  18. Computerization of nuclear material accounting and control at storage facilities of RT-1 plant, PA Mayak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakhmal'nik, V.I.; Menshchikov, Yu.L.; Mozhaev, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    Computerized system for nuclear material (NM) accounting and control at RT-1 plant is being created on the basis of advanced engineering and programming tools, which give a possibility to ensure prompt access to the information required, to unify the accounting and report documentation, make statistical processing of the data, and trace the NM transfers in the chain of its storage at facilities of RT-1 plant. Currently, the accounting is performed in parallel, both by the old methods and with computerized system. The following functions are performed by the system at the current stage: input of data on the end product's (plutonium dioxide) quantitative and qualitative composition; data input on the localization of containers with finished products at storage facilities of the plant and the product's temporary characteristics; selective verification of the data on containers and batches, according to the criteria prespecified by the user; data protection against unauthorized access; data archiving; report documents formation and providing [ru

  19. Seismic risk analysis for the Atomics International Nuclear Materials Development Facility, Santa Susana California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This report presents the results of a detailed seismic risk analysis of the Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF) operated by Atomics International at Santa Susana, California. The historical seismic record was established after a review of available literature, consultation with operators of local seismic arrays and examination of appropriate seismic data bases including the USGS, California Institute of Technology and NEIS data bases. The resulting seismic record, covering the period 1969 to 1977, was used to identify all possible sources of seismicity that could affect the site. The best estimate curve indicates that the facility will experience 30% g with a return period of 55 years and 60% g with a return period of 750 years

  20. Materials selection of surface coatings in an advanced size reduction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.L.; Younger, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    A materials selection test program was conducted to characterize optimum interior surface coatings for an advanced size reduction facility. The equipment to be processed by this facility consists of stainless steel apparatus (e.g., glove boxes, piping, and tanks) used for the chemical recovery of plutonium. Test results showed that a primary requirement for a satisfactory coating is ease of decontamination. A closely related concern is the resistance of paint films to nitric acid - plutonium environments. A vinyl copolymer base paint was the only coating, of eight paints tested, with properties that permitted satisfactory decontamination of plutonium and also performed equal to or better than the other paints in the chemical resistance, radiation stability, and impact tests

  1. National Nanotechnology Laboratory (LNNano) open facilities for scientific community: new methods for polymeric materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Cristiane A.; Santos, Ramon H.Z. dos; Bernardes, Juliana S.; Gouveia, Rubia F.

    2015-01-01

    National Nanotechnology Laboratory (LNNano) at the National Center for Energy and Materials (CNPEM) presents open facilities for scientific public in some areas. In this work will be discussed the facilities for mainly the polymeric community, as well as new methods for the characterization. Low density polyethylene (LDPE) surfaces were characterized by X-ray microtomography and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results obtained by microtomography have shown that these surfaces present different contrasts when compared with the bulk. These differences are correlated with the formation of an oxidized layer at the polymer surface, which consequently have a greater X-ray attenuation. This hypothesis is confirmed by XPS, which shows LDPE surface layers are richer in carbonyl, carboxyl and vinyl groups than the bulk. This work presents that microtomography can be used as a new method for detection and characterization of polymer surface oxidation. (author)

  2. Seismic risk analysis for the Atomics International Nuclear Materials Development Facility, Santa Susana California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-29

    This report presents the results of a detailed seismic risk analysis of the Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF) operated by Atomics International at Santa Susana, California. The historical seismic record was established after a review of available literature, consultation with operators of local seismic arrays and examination of appropriate seismic data bases including the USGS, California Institute of Technology and NEIS data bases. The resulting seismic record, covering the period 1969 to 1977, was used to identify all possible sources of seismicity that could affect the site. The best estimate curve indicates that the facility will experience 30% g with a return period of 55 years and 60% g with a return period of 750 years.

  3. Nuclear Security Recommendations on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities (INFCIRC/225/Revision 5): Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This publication, Revision 5 of Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities (INFCIRC/225), is intended to provide guidance to States and their competent authorities on how to develop or enhance, implement and maintain a physical protection regime for nuclear material and nuclear facilities, through the establishment or improvement of their capabilities to implement legislative and regulatory programmes. The recommendations presented in this publication reflect a broad consensus among IAEA Member States on the requirements which should be met for the physical protection of nuclear materials and nuclear facilities.

  4. Outline of facility for studying high level radioactive materials (CPF) and study programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Motoi

    1983-01-01

    The Chemical Processing Facility for studying high level radioactive materials in Tokai Works of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. is a facility for fundamental studies centering around hot cells, necessary for the development of fuel recycle techniques for fast breeder reactors, an important point of nuclear fuel cycle, and of the techniques for processing and disposing high level radioactive liquid wastes. The operation of the facility was started in 1982, for both the system A (the test of fuel recycle for fast breeder reactors) and the system B (the test of vitrification of high level liquid wastes). In this report, the outline of the facility, the contents of testings and the reflection of the results are described. For the fuel recycle test, the hot test of the spent fuel pins of JOYO MK-1 core was started, and now the uranium and plutonium extraction test is underway. The scheduled tests are fuel solubility, the confirmation of residual properties in fuel melting, the confirmation of extracting conditions, the electrolytic reduction of plutonium, off-gas behaviour and the test of material reliability. For the test of vitrification of high level liquid wastes, the fundamental test on the solidifying techniques for the actual high level wastes eluted from the Tokai reprocessing plant has been started, and the following tests are programmed: Assessment of the properties of actual liquid wastes, denitration and concentration test, vitrification test, off-gas treatment test, the test of evaluating solidified wastes, and the test of storing solidified wastes. These test results are programmed to be reflected to the safety deliberation and the demonstration operation of a vitrification pilot plant. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  5. Leak-Path Factor Analysis for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, C.; Leonard, M.

    1999-01-01

    Leak-path factors (LPFs) were calculated for the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) located in the Plutonium Facility, Building 41 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 55. In the unlikely event of an accidental fire powerful enough to fail a container holding actinides, the subsequent release of oxides, modeled as PuO 2 aerosols, from the facility and into the surrounding environment was predicted. A 1-h nondestructive assay (NDA) laboratory fire accident was simulated with the MELCOR severe accident analysis code. Fire-driven air movement along with wind-driven air infiltration transported a portion of these actinides from the building. This fraction is referred to as the leak-path factor. The potential effect of smoke aerosol on the transport of the actinides was investigated to verify the validity of neglecting the smoke as conservative. The input model for the NMSF consisted of a system of control volumes, flow pathways, and surfaces sufficient to model the thermal-hydraulic conditions within the facility and the aerosol transport data necessary to simulate the transport of PuO 2 particles. The thermal-hydraulic, heat-transfer, and aerosol-transport models are solved simultaneously with data being exchanged between models. A MELCOR input model was designed such that it would reproduce the salient features of the fire per the corresponding CFAST calculation. Air infiltration into and out of the facility would be affected strongly by wind-driven differential pressures across the building. Therefore, differential pressures were applied to each side of the building according to guidance found in the ASHRAE handbook using a standard-velocity head equation with a leading multiplier to account for the orientation of the wind with the building. The model for the transport of aerosols considered all applicable transport processes, but the deposition within the building clearly was dominated by gravitational settling

  6. Materials Characterization at Utah State University: Facilities and Knowledge-base of Electronic Properties of Materials Applicable to Spacecraft Charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, J. R.; Thomson, C. D.; Kite, J.; Zavyalov, V.; Corbridge, Jodie

    2004-01-01

    In an effort to improve the reliability and versatility of spacecraft charging models designed to assist spacecraft designers in accommodating and mitigating the harmful effects of charging on spacecraft, the NASA Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program has funded development of facilities at Utah State University for the measurement of the electronic properties of both conducting and insulating spacecraft materials. We present here an overview of our instrumentation and capabilities, which are particularly well suited to study electron emission as related to spacecraft charging. These measurements include electron-induced secondary and backscattered yields, spectra, and angular resolved measurements as a function of incident energy, species and angle, plus investigations of ion-induced electron yields, photoelectron yields, sample charging and dielectric breakdown. Extensive surface science characterization capabilities are also available to fully characterize the samples in situ. Our measurements for a wide array of conducting and insulating spacecraft materials have been incorporated into the SEE Charge Collector Knowledge-base as a Database of Electronic Properties of Materials Applicable to Spacecraft Charging. This Database provides an extensive compilation of electronic properties, together with parameterization of these properties in a format that can be easily used with existing spacecraft charging engineering tools and with next generation plasma, charging, and radiation models. Tabulated properties in the Database include: electron-induced secondary electron yield, backscattered yield and emitted electron spectra; He, Ar and Xe ion-induced electron yields and emitted electron spectra; photoyield and solar emittance spectra; and materials characterization including reflectivity, dielectric constant, resistivity, arcing, optical microscopy images, scanning electron micrographs, scanning tunneling microscopy images, and Auger electron spectra. Further

  7. A Road map for Establishing the Physical Protection Regime of Nuclear Materials and Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Ho-Sik; Kwak, Sung-Woo; Jang, Sung-Soon; Kim, Jae-Kwang; Kim, Jung-Soo; Yoon, Wan-Ki

    2007-01-01

    The importance of physical protection for nuclear materials and facilities that can be an objective for terrorists has never been more stressed. The responsibility for physical protection within a State does not rest entirely with that state because cross-border transactions related to nuclear materials increase as nuclear related industries expand. The international community has prepared measures to strengthen the regime of physical protection such as the IAEA's proposal of the 'Nuclear Security Plan for 2006-2009' and UN's resolution on 'the International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism'. In order to cope with this, Korea has also made efforts to establish the implementation system for physical protection in the field of nuclear industries since the law for Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Facility and Radiological Emergency Preparedness (LPPREP) was promulgated in 2004. The detailed plans should be prepared to accomplish this. This study has been performed to derive the items for establishing the regime of physical protection. The items derived were classified as short, mid and long-term depending on their characteristics and environmental circumstances. The regime of national physical protection will be established if the studies on these items are carried out successfully and tangible results are obtained

  8. Containers for short-term storage of nuclear materials at the Los Alamos plutonium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, R.; Gladson, J.

    1997-01-01

    The Los Alamos Plutonium Facility for the past 18 yr has stored nuclear samples for archiving and in support of nuclear materials research and processing programs. In the past several years, a small number of storage containers have been found in a deteriorated condition. A failed plutonium container can cause personnel contamination exposure and expensive physical area decontamination. Containers are stored in a physically secure radiation area vault, making close inspection costly in the form of personnel radiation exposure and work time. A moderate number of these containers are used in support of plutonium processing and must withstand daily handling abuse. A 2-yr evaluation of failed containers and those that have shown no deterioration has been conducted. Based on that study, a program was established to formalize our packing methods and materials and standardize the size and shape of containers that are used for short-term use. A standardized set of containers was designed, evaluated, tested, and procured for use in the facility. This paper reviews our vault storage problems, shows some failed containers, and presents our planned solutions to provide safe and secure containment of nuclear materials

  9. Analysis of displacement damage in materials in nuclear fusion facilities (DEMO, IFMIF and TechnoFusion)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, F.; Vila, R.; Ortiz, C.; Garcia, A.; Casal, N.; Ibarra, A.; Rapisarda, D.; Queral, V.

    2011-01-01

    Present pathway to fusion reactors includes a rigorous material testing program. To reach this objective, irradiation facilities must produce the displacement damage per atom (dpa), primary knock-on atom (PKA) spectrum and gaseous elements by transmutation reactions (He, H) as closely as possible to the ones expected in the future fusion reactors (as DEMO).The irradiation parameters (PKA spectra and damage function) of some candidate materials for fusion reactors (Al 2 O 3 , SiC and Fe) have been studied and then, the suitability of some proposed experimental facilities, such as IFMIF and TechnoFusion, to perform relevant tests with these materials has been assessed.The following method has been applied: neutron fluxes present in different irradiation modules of IFMIF have been calculated by the neutron transport McDeLicious code. In parallel, the energy differential cross sections of PKA have been calculated by using the NJOY code. After that, the damage generated by the PKA spectra was analyzed using the MARLOWE code (binary collision approximation) and custom analysis codes. Finally, to analyze the ions effects in different irradiation conditions in the TechnoFusion irradiation area, the SRIM and Marlowe codes have been used. The results have been compared with the expected ones for a DEMO HCLL reactor.

  10. Analysis of displacement damage in materials in nuclear fusion facilities (DEMO, IFMIF and TechnoFusion)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, F., E-mail: fernando.mota@ciemat.es [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Vila, R.; Ortiz, C.; Garcia, A.; Casal, N.; Ibarra, A.; Rapisarda, D.; Queral, V. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    Present pathway to fusion reactors includes a rigorous material testing program. To reach this objective, irradiation facilities must produce the displacement damage per atom (dpa), primary knock-on atom (PKA) spectrum and gaseous elements by transmutation reactions (He, H) as closely as possible to the ones expected in the future fusion reactors (as DEMO).The irradiation parameters (PKA spectra and damage function) of some candidate materials for fusion reactors (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC and Fe) have been studied and then, the suitability of some proposed experimental facilities, such as IFMIF and TechnoFusion, to perform relevant tests with these materials has been assessed.The following method has been applied: neutron fluxes present in different irradiation modules of IFMIF have been calculated by the neutron transport McDeLicious code. In parallel, the energy differential cross sections of PKA have been calculated by using the NJOY code. After that, the damage generated by the PKA spectra was analyzed using the MARLOWE code (binary collision approximation) and custom analysis codes. Finally, to analyze the ions effects in different irradiation conditions in the TechnoFusion irradiation area, the SRIM and Marlowe codes have been used. The results have been compared with the expected ones for a DEMO HCLL reactor.

  11. Conservative method for determination of material thickness used in shielding of veterinary facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lava, Deise D.; Borges, Diogo da S.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de L.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.

    2014-01-01

    For determination of an effective method for shielding of veterinary rooms, was provided shielding methods generally used in rooms which works with X-ray production and radiotherapy. Every calculation procedure is based in traditional variables used to transmission calculation. The thickness of the materials used for primary and secondary shieldings are obtained to respect the limits set by the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). This work presents the development of a computer code in order to serve as a practical tool for determining rapid and effective materials and their thicknesses to shield veterinary facilities. The code determines transmission values of the shieldings and compares them with data from transmission 'maps' provided by NCRP-148 report. These 'maps' were added to the algorithm through interpolation techniques of curves of materials used for shielding. Each interpolation generates about 1,000,000 points that are used to generate a new curve. The new curve is subjected to regression techniques, which makes possible to obtain nine degree polynomial, and exponential equations. These equations whose variables consist of transmission of values, enable trace all the points of this curve with high precision. The data obtained from the algorithm were satisfactory with official data presented by the National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and can contribute as a practical tool for verification of shielding of veterinary facilities that require using Radiotherapy techniques and X-ray production

  12. Impurity Control Test Facility (ICTF) for the study of fusion reactor plasma/edge materials interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Mattas, R.F.; Ehst, D.A.; Boley, C.D.; Hershkowitz, N.

    1984-05-01

    A test facility for investigating many of the impurity control issues associated with the interactions of materials with the plasma edge is outlined. Analysis indicates that the plasma edge conditions expected in TFCX, INTOR, etc. can be readily produced at the end cells of an rf stabilized mirror, similar in some respects to the Phaedrus device at the University of Wisconsin. A steady-state, Impurity Control Test Facility (ICTF) based on such a mirror device is expected to produce a plasma with typical parameters of n/sub e/ approx. 3 x 10 18 m -3 , T/sub e/ = 50 eV, and T/sub i/ = 100 eV at each end cell. A heat load of approx. 2 MW/m 2 over areas of approx. 1600 cm 2 could be produced at each end with 800 kW of ICRH power. These conditions would provide a unique capability for examining issues such as erosion/redeposition behavior, properties of redeposited materials, high recycling regimes, plasma edge operating limits for high-Z materials, and particle pumping efficiencies for limiter and divertor designs

  13. A quantitative approach to design of material accounting system for a complex facility. Study at the PNC reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikawa, K.

    1994-01-01

    An approach to a design of nuclear materials accounting sysyem for a complex facility in Japan is discussed. Near-real-time materials accountancy model studied at the PNC reprocessing plant is described. Main features of the computerized nuclear materials accounting system are considered as well as the PROMAC - C code algorithm for statistical data processing is presented. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  14. Method for assessing the performance of a material control and accounting system at an operating nuclear fuel processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellwein, L.B.; Harris, L.; Altman, W.D.; Gramann, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses a method for assessing the performance of a material control and accounting (MCandA) system in an operating nuclear fuel processing facility. The performance criteria inherent in the assessment are 16 key goals established by NRC's 1978 Material Control and Material Accounting Task Force. 7 refs

  15. Status and possible prospects of an international fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzani, F.

    1999-01-01

    Structural materials for future DT fusion power reactors will have to operate under intense neutron fields with energies up to 14 MeV and fluences in the order of 2 MW/m 2 per year. As environmental acceptability, safety considerations and economic viability will be ultimately the keys to the widespread introduction of fusion power, the development of radiation-resistant and low activation materials would contribute significantly to fusion development. For this purpose, testing of materials under irradiation conditions close to those expected in a fusion power station would require the availability, in an appropriate time framework, of an intense, high-energy neutron source. Recent advances in linear accelerator technology, in small specimens testing technology, and in the comprehension of damage phenomena, lead to the conclusion that an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source, with beam energy variability, would provide the most realistic option for a fusion materials testing facility. Under the auspices of the IEA, an international effort (EU, Japan, US, RF) to carry out the conceptual design activities (CDA) of an international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF), based on the D-Li concept, have been carried out successfully. A final conceptual design report was produced at the end of 1996. A phase of conceptual design evaluation (CDE), presently underway, is extending and further refining some of the conceptual design details of IFMIF. The results indicate that an IFMIF-class installation would be technically feasible and could meet its mission objectives. However, a suitable phase of Engineering Validation, to carry out some complementary R and D and prototyping, would still be needed to resolve a few key technical uncertainties before the possibility to proceed toward detailed design and construction could be explored. (orig.)

  16. Use of the SPIRAL 2 facility for material irradiations with 14 MeV energy neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosnier, A.; Ridikas, D.; Ledoux, X.; Pellemoine, F.; Anne, R.; Huguet, Y.; Lipa, M.; Magaud, P.; Marbach, G.; Saint-Laurent, M.G.; Villari, A.C.C.

    2005-01-01

    The primary goal of an irradiation facility for fusion applications will be to generate a material irradiation database for the design, construction, licensing and safe operation of a fusion demonstration power station (e.g., DEMO). This will be achieved through testing and qualifying material performance under neutron irradiation that simulates service up to the full lifetime anticipated in the power plant. Preliminary investigations of 14 MeV neutron effects on different kinds of fusion material could be assessed by the SPIRAL 2 Project at GANIL (Caen, France), aiming at rare isotope beams production for nuclear physics research with first beams expected by 2009. In SPIRAL 2, a deuteron beam of 5 mA and 40 MeV interacts with a rotating carbon disk producing high-energy neutrons (in the range between 1 and 40 MeV) via C (d, xn) reactions. Then, the facility could be used for 3-4 months y -1 for material irradiation purposes. This would correspond to damage rates in the order of 1-2 dpa y -1 (in Fe) in a volume of ∼10 cm 3 . Therefore, the use of miniaturized specimens will be essential in order to effectively utilize the available irradiation volume in SPIRAL 2. Sample package irradiation temperature would be in the range of 250-1000 deg. C. The irradiation level of 1-2 dpa y -1 with 14 MeV neutrons (average energy) may be interesting for micro-structural and metallurgical investigations (e.g., mini-traction, small punch tests, etc.) and possibly for the understanding of specimen size/geometric effects of critical material properties. Due to the small test cell volume, sample in situ experiments are not foreseen. However, sample packages would be, if required, available each month after transfer in a special hot cell on-site

  17. Facile Fabrication of 3D Hierarchically Porous Carbon Foam as Supercapacitor Electrode Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfang Gao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A hierarchically porous 3D starch-derived carbon foam (SCF with a high specific surface area (up to 1693 m2·g−1 was first prepared by a facile solvothermal treatment, in which Na2CO3 is used as both the template and activating agent. The hierarchically porous structure and high specific area endow the SCF with favorable electrochemical properties such as a high specific capacitance of 179.6 F·g−1 at 0.5 A·g−1 and a great rate capability and cycling stability, which suggest that the material can be a promising candidate for energy storage applications.

  18. Remotely operated organic liquid waste incinerator for the fuels and materials examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, W.L.; Barker, R.E.; Hershey, R.B.

    1980-01-01

    The search for a practical method for the disposal of small quantities of oraganic liquid waste, a waste product of metallographic sample preparation at the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility has led to the design of an incinerator/off-gas system to burn organic liquid wastes and selected organic solids. The incinerator is to be installed in a shielded inert-atmosphere cell, and will be remotely operated and maintained. The off-gas system is a wet-scrubber and filter system designed to release particulate-free off-gas to the FMEF Building Exhaust System

  19. Facile synthesis of polypyrrole nanowires for high-performance supercapacitor electrode materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Junhong; Wu, Jinping; Li, Bing; Du, Weimin; Huang, Qingli; Zheng, Mingbo; Xue, Huaiguo; Pang, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Polypyrrole nanowires are facile synthesized under a mild condition with FeCl3 as an oxidant. Polypyrrole nanowires with the width of 120 nm form many nanogaps or pores due to the intertwined nanostructures. More importantly, PPy nanowires were further applied for supercapacitor electrode materials. After electrochemical testing, it was observed that the PPy nanowire based electrode showed a large specific capacitance (420 F g−1, 1.5 A g−1) and good rate capability (272 F g−1, 18.0 A g−1), wh...

  20. Thermal-vacuum facility with in-situ mechanical loading. [for testing space construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Hansen, J. S.; Holzer, R. P.; Uffen, B.; Mabson, G.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a thermal-vacuum space simulator used to assess property changes of fiber-reinforced polymer composite systems. The facility can achieve a vacuum of approximately .0000001 torr with temperatures ranging from -200 to +300 F. Some preliminary experimental results are presented for materials subjected to thermal loading up to 200 F. The tests conducted include the evaluation of matrix modulus and strength, coefficients of thermal expansion, and fracture toughness. Though the experimental program is at an early stage, the data appear to indicate that these parameters are influenced by hard vacuum.

  1. Construction of a naturally occurring radioactive material project in the BeAAT hazardous waste facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuahmad, H

    2015-06-01

    This paper does not necessarily reflect the views of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is produced during exploration and production operations of subsidiaries of the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC) in the United Arab Emirates, and accumulates in drilling tubulars, plant equipment, and components. These NORM hazardous wastes need to be managed in such a way that they do not damage human health and the environment. The primary radionuclides of concern in the oil and gas industries are radium-226 and radium-228. These radioisotopes are the decay products of uranium and thorium isotopes that are present in subsurface formations from which hydrocarbons are produced. While uranium and thorium are largely immobile, radium is slightly more soluble and may become mobilised in the fluid phases of the formation (International Association of Oil & Gas Producers, 2008). In order to treat and dispose of NORM waste products safely, ADNOC's subsidiary 'TAKREER' is developing a new facility, on behalf of all ADNOC subsidiaries, within the existing Central Environmental Protection Facilities (BeAAT) in Ruwais city. The NORM plant is envisaged to treat, handle, and dispose of NORM waste in the forms of scale, sludge, and contaminated equipment. The NORM treatment facility will cover activities such as decontamination, volume reduction, NORM handling, and concrete immobilisation of NORM waste into packages for designated landfilling. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. The ANTARES accelerator: a facility for environmental monitoring and materials characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuniz, C.

    1997-01-01

    An analytical facility for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) has been under development since 1989 on the 8-MV tandem accelerator ANTARES at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre. Three beamlines are presently dedicated to the AMS analysis of long-lived radionuclides and one is used for the study of multilayered semiconductor structures by heavy ion recoil spectrometry. Having accomplished the task of transforming the old nuclear physics accelerator from Rutgers University into a world-class analytical facility, ANSTO scientists are now promoting research projects based on the capability of the ANTARES instruments. New instruments are being constructed on the ANTARES accelerator for future programs in environmental monitoring, safeguards, nuclear waste disposal and applications in advanced materials. A new AMS beamline has been designed that is expected to be capable of measuring rare heavy radionuclides, such as 236 U, 229 , 230T h and 244 Pu, in natural samples with ultra-high sensitivity. A novel, heavy ion microprobe will allow IBA of surfaces with a spatial resolution of 10 μm for high-energy ions (20-100 MeV) from chlorine to iodine. These instruments are complementary to other advanced analytical tools developed by ANSTO, such as the synchrotron radiation beamline at the Australian National Beamline Facility

  3. Investigation of high flux test module for the international fusion materials irradiation facilities (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Makoto; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Yutani, Toshiaki

    2007-03-01

    This report describes investigation on structure of a high neutron flux test module (HFTM) for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facilities (IFMIF). The HFTM is aimed for neutron irradiation of a specimen in a high neutron flux domain of the test cell for irradiation ground of IFMIF. We investigated the overall structure of the HFTM that was able to include specimens in a rig and thermocouple arrangement, an interface of control signal and support structure. Moreover, pressure and the amount of the bend in the module vessel (a rectangular section pressure vessel) were calculated. The module vessel did a rectangular section from limitation of a high neutron flux domain. Also, we investigated damage of thermocouples under neutron irradiation, which was a temperature sensor of irradiation materials temperature control demanded high precision. Based on these results, drawings on the HTFM structure. (author)

  4. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Brilliant Light Facilities and Research in Life and Material Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Tsakanov, Vasili; Brilliant Light in Life and Material Sciences

    2007-01-01

    The present book contains an excellent overview of the status and highlights of brilliant light facilities and their applications in biology, chemistry, medicine, materials and environmental sciences. Overview papers on diverse fields of research by leading experts are accompanied by the highlights in the near and long-term perspectives of brilliant X-Ray photon beam usage for fundamental and applied research. The book includes advanced topics in the fields of high brightness photon beams, instrumentation, the spectroscopy, microscopy, scattering and imaging experimental techniques and their applications. The book is strongly recommended for students, engineers and scientists in the field of accelerator physics, X-ray optics and instrumentation, life, materials and environmental sciences, bio and nanotechnology.

  5. Development of an In-Situ Radiological Classification Technique for Material from CERN's Accelerator Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081300; Froeschl, Robert; Forkel-Wirth, Doris

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, operates high energy accelerators for particle physics research. Because of beam losses and subsequent particle interactions, radioactivity can be induced in certain accelerator components. Material and waste taken out of the accelerators facilities as a result of maintenance repair and upgrade actions as well as in case of decommissioning needs to be radiologically classied for future handling. Depending on the level of residual activity, some of these components are candidates for clearance from regulatory control in Switzerland. The Swiss radiation protection ordinance sets as criteria for clearance of material and waste from regulatory control the compliance with radionuclide specic limits for surface contamination and for specic activity as well as an ambient dose equivalent rate criterion. For objects with a mass below 1 kg a radionuclide specic clearance limit for total activity has to be respected. This work is focused on the specic activity criter...

  6. Studies of a mirror facility for radiation testing of materials, PROMETHEUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Chilton, A.B.; Chen, S.Y.; Miller, R.L.; Fenske, G.R.

    1975-01-01

    The PROMETHEUS (Plasma Reactor Optimized for Materials Experimentation for THermonuclear Energy USage) project was initiated in 1971 with the realization that the technology was in hand to design a fusion plasma neutron source if net energy consumption rather than production is allowed. The basic ground rules for this project were quite similar to those that evolved in later ''FERF'' studies; namely, to maximize the neutron flux intensity and usable volume; to maximize the flexibility of the facility to enable a variety of both materials and engineering experiments; to minimize capital and operating costs; and to utilize near-term technology. Based on these considerations, a neutral-beam injected mirror device was selected for detailed study. Results from an overall system study are briefly described, but stress is placed on three key areas: (1) plasma considerations including potential ''twin-beam'' operation, (2) beam-injection aspects such as charge-exchange bombardment of the first wall, and (3) optimized magnet shielding

  7. 3D flow simulation of liquid lead in the erosion test facility for ADS materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscher, Heinrich; Kieser, Martin; Weisenburger, Alfons; Mueller, Georg

    2009-01-01

    Future nuclear reactor concepts, such as GEN IV or ADS use liquid lead for neutron multiplication and coolant purposes. The design concepts assumes that the structural material is in contact with the liquid metal at temperatures up to 600 C and a flow rate of 20 m/s. Therefore a significant effect of liquid metal corrosion/erosion is expected. The paper describes the fluid dynamical simulation of the ADS erosion test facility. Earlier studies on the laminar flow modeling were completed by introduction of transient behavior and extended to 3D-models. The results for liquid lead should be transferable to LBE (lead bismuth eutectic). Further work has to include a mass transport model for modeling of the global isothermal erosion rate of the structural material dependent on time (for liquid lead and LBE).

  8. Material-related issues at high-power and high-energy ion beam facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bender, M.; Tomut, M.; Trautmann, C.

    2015-01-01

    When solids are exposed to energetic ions (MeV-GeV), their physical and chemical structure can be severely modified. The change is governed by ultrafast dynamical processes starting from the deposition of large energy densities, electronic excitation and ionization processes, and finally damage creation in the atomic lattice system. In many materials, each projectile creates a cylindrical track with a few nanometers in diameter and up to many μm in length. To study and monitor the creation of damage, the GSI irradiation facility dedicated to materials science provides different in-situ and on-line techniques such as high resolution microscopy, X-ray diffraction, optical absorption spectroscopy, thermal imaging and residual gas analysis. The irradiation experiments can be performed under various gas atmospheres and under cryogenic or elevated temperature.

  9. The Relative Patient Costs and Availability of Dental Services, Materials and Equipment in Public Oral Care Facilities in Tanzania.

    OpenAIRE

    Nyamuryekung'e, Kasusu K; Lahti, Satu M; Tuominen, Risto J

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient charges and availability of dental services influence utilization of dental services. There is little available information on the cost of dental services and availability of materials and equipment in public dental facilities in Africa. This study aimed to determine the relative cost and availability of dental services, materials and equipment in public oral care facilities in Tanzania. The local factors affecting availability were also studied. Methods A survey of all dis...

  10. Materials SIG quantification and characterization of surface contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crutcher, E. Russ

    1992-01-01

    When LDEF entered orbit its cleanliness was approximately a MIL-STD-1246B Level 2000C. Its burden of contaminants included particles from every part of its history including a relatively small contribution from the shuttle bay itself. Although this satellite was far from what is normally considered clean in the aerospace industry, contaminating events in orbit and from processing after recovery were easily detected. The molecular contaminants carried into orbit were dwarfed by the heavy deposition of UV polymerized films from outgassing urethane paints and silicone based materials. Impacts by relatively small objects in orbit could create particulate contaminants that easily dominated the particle counts within a centimeter of the impact site. During the recovery activities LDEF was 'sprayed' with a liquid high in organics and water soluble salts. With reentry turbulence, vibration, and gravitational loading particulate contaminants were redistributed about LDEF and the shuttle bay.

  11. Potential applications of fusion neutral beam facilities for advanced material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.M.; Tsai, C.C.; Stirling, W.L.; Whealton, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    Surface processing techniques involving high energy ion implantation have achieved commercial success for semiconductors and biomaterials. However, wider use has been limited in good part by economic factors, some of which are related to the line-of-sight nature of the beam implantation process. Plasma source ion implantation is intended to remove some of the limitations imposed by directionality of beam systems and also to help provide economies of scale. The present paper will outline relevant technologies and areas of expertise that exist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in relation to possible future needs in materials processing. Experience in generation of plasmas, control of ionization states, pulsed extraction, and sheath physics exists. Contributions to future technology can be made either for the immersion mode or for the extracted beam mode. Existing facilities include the High Power Test Facility, which could conservatively operate at 1 A of continuous current at 100 kV delivered to areas of about 1 m 2 . Higher instantaneous voltages and currents are available with a reduced duty cycle. Another facility, the High Heat Flux Facility can supply a maximum of 60 kV and currents of up to 60 A for 2 s on a 10% duty cycle. Plasmas may be generated by use of microwaves, radio-frequency induction or other methods and plasma properties may be tailored to suit specific needs. In addition to ion implantation of large steel components, foreseeable applications include ion implantation of polymers, ion implantation of Ti alloys, Al alloys, or other reactive surfaces

  12. Environmental performances of different configurations of a material recovery facility in a life cycle perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardolino, Filomena; Berto, Chiara; Arena, Umberto

    2017-10-01

    The study evaluated the environmental performances of an integrated material recovery facility (MRF) able to treat 32kt/y of unsorted mixed waste, made of residuals from household source separation and separate collection. The facility includes a mechanical sorting platform for the production of a solid recovered fuel (SRF) utilized in an external waste-to-energy plant, bio-cells for tunnel composting of organic fraction, and a sanitary landfill for the safe disposal of ultimate waste. All the MRF sub-units have been analysed in depth in order to acquire reliable data for a life cycle assessment study, focused on the environmental performances of different configurations of the facility. The study investigated a "past" configuration, including just mechanical sorting, landfilling and biogas combustion in a gas engine, and the "present" one, which includes also a composting unit. Two possible "future" configurations, having a gasifier inside the MRF battery limits, have been also analysed, assessing the performances of two fluidized bed reactors of different size, able to gasify only the residues generated by the sorting platform or the whole amount of produced SRF, respectively. The analysis evaluated the contributions of each unit in the different configurations and allowed a reliable assessment of the technological evolution of the facility. The results quantified the positive effect of the inclusion of an aerobic treatment of the waste organic fraction. The SRF gasification in situ appears to improve the MRF environmental performances in all the impact categories, with the exclusion of that of global warming. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermal analysis of the drywell for the Nuclear Material Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinke, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility Renovation Project has a conceptual design for the facility to store nuclear materials in containers inside drywells with passive cooling for long-term storage. The CFX thermal-hydraulic computer program was used to analyze internal heat-transfer processes by conduction, convection, and radiation with natural circulation of air by hydraulic buoyancy with turbulence and thermal stratification (TS) evaluated. A vertical drywell was modeled with 14 containers on support plates at 12-in. intervals. The TS of bay air outside the drywell increased the container maximum temperature by 0.728 F for each 1.0 F of bay-air TS from the bottom to the top of the drywell. The drywell outer-surface peak heat flux was shifted downward because of the effect of bay-air TS. An equivalent model was evaluated by the nodal-network conduction, convection, and radiation heat-transfer computer program (Thermal System Analysis Program) TSAP. The TSAP results are in good agreement with the CFX-model results, with the difference in results understood based on the approximations of each model

  14. Facile synthesis of birnessite-type manganese oxide nanoparticles as supercapacitor electrode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lihu; Luo, Yao; Tan, Wenfeng; Zhang, Yashan; Liu, Fan; Qiu, Guohong

    2016-11-15

    Manganese oxides are environmentally benign supercapacitor electrode materials and, in particular, birnessite-type structure shows very promising electrochemical performance. In this work, nanostructured birnessite was facilely prepared by adding dropwise NH2OH·HCl to KMnO4 solution under ambient temperature and pressure. In order to fully exploit the potential of birnessite-type manganese oxide electrode materials, the effects of specific surface area, pore size, content of K(+), and manganese average oxidation state (Mn AOS) on their electrochemical performance were studied. The results showed that with the increase of NH2OH·HCl, the Mn AOS decreased and the corresponding pore sizes and specific surface area of birnessite increased. The synthesized nanostructured birnessite showed the highest specific capacitance of 245Fg(-1) at a current density of 0.1Ag(-1) within a potential range of 0-0.9V, and excellent cycle stability with a capacitance retention rate of 92% after 3000 cycles at a current density of 1.0Ag(-1). The present work implies that specific capacitance is mainly affected by specific surface area and pore volume, and provides a new method for the facile preparation of birnessite-type manganese oxide with excellent capacitive performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Material handling systems for use in glovebox lines: A survey of Department of Energy facility experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teese, G.D.; Randall, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    The Nuclear Weapons Complex Reconfiguration Study has recommended that a new manufacturing facility be constructed to replace the Rocky Flats Plant. In the new facility, use of an automated material handling system for movement of components would reduce both the cost and radiation exposure associated with production and maintenance operations. Contamination control would be improved between process steps through the use of airlocks and portals. Part damage associated with improper transport would be reduced, and accountability would be increased. In-process workpieces could be stored in a secure vault, awaiting a request for parts at a production station. However, all of these desirable features rely on the proper implementation of an automated material handling system. The Department of Energy Weapons Production Complex has experience with a variety of methods for transporting discrete parts in glovebox lines. The authors visited several sites to evaluate the existing technologies for their suitability for the application of plutonium manufacturing. Technologies reviewed were Linear motors, belt conveyors, roller conveyors, accumulating roller conveyors, pneumatic transport, and cart systems. The sites visited were The Idaho National Engineering laboratory, the Hanford Site, and the Rocky Flats Plant. Linear motors appear to be the most promising technology observed for the movement of discrete parts, and further investigation is recommended

  16. Strengthened implementation of physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities in the Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, H.-W.; Lee, J.-U.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Since the 9.11 terror, strengthening physical protection has been an accelerated trend internationally. IAEA has been requesting that member states implement a strengthened physical protection of nuclear facilities on the basis of threat assessments. In order to cope with this demand, the Korean government promulgated the 'Law for Physical Protection and Radiological Emergency Preparedness (LPPRE)' as a substantial countermeasure against possible threats. Pursuant to LPPRE, which entered into force on February 16, 2004, nuclear enterprisers are obliged to implement an effective physical protection of nuclear materials, get approval for its physical protection system, and be constantly inspected on. The Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) approved physical protection regulations of 24 domestic facilities operated by 14 enterprisers. National Nuclear management and Control Agency (NNCA) is entrusted with physical protection related duty and has been conducting physical protection inspection on nuclear materials in use, storage and transport. In addition, NNCA has established the methodology of threat assessment that entails organizing the threat assessment working group to develop a design basis threat (DBT). Korea is putting its best efforts to construct the threat assessment system and strengthen domestic physical protection regime in cooperation with competent authorities. (author)

  17. Safety measures to address the year 2000 issue at medical facilities which use radiation generators and radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    In resolution GC(42)/RES/11 on 'Measures to Address the Year 2000 (Y2K) Issue', adopted on 25 September 1998, the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) - inter alia - urged Member States 'to share information with the Secretariat regarding diagnostic and corrective actions being planned or implemented by operating and regulatory organizations at their ... medical facilities which use radioactive materials to make those facilities Year 2000 ready', encouraged the Secretariat 'within existing resources to act as a clearing-house and central point of contact for Member States to exchange information regarding diagnostic and remediation actions being taken at ... medical facilities which use radioactive materials to make these facilities Year 2000 ready', urged the Secretariat 'to handle the information provided by Member States carefully' and requested the Director General to report to it at its next (1999) regular session on the implementation of that resolution. The IAEA Secretariat convened a group of consultants who met in Vienna from 14 to 18 December 1998 and produced this report. The consultants decided that the report should cover not just 'medical facilities which use radioactive materials' but also medical facilities which, while perhaps not using radioactive materials, use ionizing radiation produced by radiation generators such as accelerators. The reports issued together are: Achieving Year 2000 Readiness: Basic Processes; Safety Measures to Address the Year 2000 Issue at Medical Facilities Which Use Radiation Generators and Radioactive Materials; and Safety Measures to Address the Year 2000 Issue at Radioactive Waste Management Facilities. This report addresses means of dealing with the Y2K problem at medical facilities which use radiation generators and radioactive materials

  18. Methods to estimate equipment and materials that are candidates for removal during the decontamination of fuel processing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.; Valero, O.J.; Hyre, R.A.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; Millar, J.S.; Reddick, J.A.

    1995-02-01

    The methodology presented in this report provides a model for estimating the volume and types of waste expected from the removal of equipment and other materials during Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of canyon-type fuel reprocessing facilities. This methodology offers a rough estimation technique based on a comparative analysis for a similar, previously studied, reprocessing facility. This approach is especially useful as a planning tool to save time and money while preparing for final D and D. The basic methodology described here can be extended for use at other types of facilities, such as glovebox or reactor facilities

  19. A facile route for 3D aerogels from nanostructured 1D and 2D materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung Mi; Jung, Hyun Young; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Jung, Yung Joon; Kong, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Aerogels have numerous applications due to their high surface area and low densities. However, creating aerogels from a large variety of materials has remained an outstanding challenge. Here, we report a new methodology to enable aerogel production with a wide range of materials. The method is based on the assembly of anisotropic nano-objects (one-dimensional (1D) nanotubes, nanowires, or two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets) into a cross-linking network from their colloidal suspensions at the transition from the semi-dilute to the isotropic concentrated regime. The resultant aerogels have highly porous and ultrafine three-dimensional (3D) networks consisting of 1D (Ag, Si, MnO2, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)) and 2D materials (MoS2, graphene, h-BN) with high surface areas, low densities, and high electrical conductivities. This method opens up a facile route for aerogel production with a wide variety of materials and tremendous opportunities for bio-scaffold, energy storage, thermoelectric, catalysis, and hydrogen storage applications. PMID:23152940

  20. Modeling and experiments of x-ray ablation of National Ignition Facility first wall materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.T.; Burnham, A.K.; Tobin, M.T.; Peterson, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses results of modeling and experiments on the x-ray response of selected materials relevant to NIF target chamber design. X-ray energy deposition occurs in such small characteristic depths (on the order of a micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion significantly affect the material response, even during the typical 10-ns pulses. The finite-difference ablation model integrates four separate processes: x-ray energy deposition, heat conduction, hydrodynamics, and surface vaporization. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser facility in Livermore on response of various materials to NIF-relevant x-ray fluences. Fused silica, Si nitride, B carbide, B, Si carbide, C, Al2O3, and Al were tested. Response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with SEM and atomic force microscopes. Judgements were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material; relative importances of these processes were also studied with the x-ray response model

  1. Development of melting facilities and techniques for decontamination and recycling of radioactively contaminated material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, W.

    1998-01-01

    One decade after the accident at unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station a melting plant for radioactively contaminated metallic materials, the so-called SURF facility is being planned and licensed for erection in the direct neighbourhood of the NPP area. Main goal is the recycling of the material, largely decontaminated by the melting process, by means of manufacturing of casks and containers for waste disposal and of shielding equipment. The melting plant will be placed as part of the Ukrainian waste handling centre (CPPRO). The technology is based on the long-term experience gained at Siempelkamp's CARLA plant in Krefeld. In 1995-1997 the licensing conditions were defined, the licensing documents prepared and the formal procedure initiated. For completion of the recycling technique and to broaden the application fields for the re-usable material a granules production method has been developed and formally qualified. The essential is the substitution of the hematite portion in concrete structures providing an alternative sink for recycling material. (author)

  2. International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity. Present status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Tatsuo; Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio

    1998-01-01

    For developing the materials for nuclear fusion reactors, it is indispensable to study on the neutron irradiation behavior under fusion reactor conditions, but there is not any high energy neutron irradiation facility that can simulate fusion reactor conditions at present. Therefore, the investigation of the IFMIF was begun jointly by Japan, USA, Europe and Russia following the initiative of IEA. The conceptual design activities were completed in 1997. As to the background and the course, the present status of the research on heavy irradiation and the testing means for fusion materials, the requirement and the technical basis of high energy neutron irradiation, and the international joint design activities are reported. The materials for fusion reactors are exposed to the neutron irradiation with the energy spectra up to 14 MeV. The requirements from the users that the IFMIF should satisfy, the demand of the tests for the materials of prototype and demonstration fusion reactors and the evaluation of the neutron field characteristics of the IFMIF are discussed. As to the conceptual design of the IFMIF, the whole constitution, the operational mode, accelerator system and target system are described. (K.I.)

  3. Material testing facilities and programs for plasma-facing component testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Unterberg, B.; Coenen, J. W.; Doerner, R. P.; Greuner, H.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.

    2017-09-01

    Component development for operation in a large-scale fusion device requires thorough testing and qualification for the intended operational conditions. In particular environments are necessary which are comparable to the real operation conditions, allowing at the same time for in situ/in vacuo diagnostics and flexible operation, even beyond design limits during the testing. Various electron and neutral particle devices provide the capabilities for high heat load tests, suited for material samples and components from lab-scale dimensions up to full-size parts, containing toxic materials like beryllium, and being activated by neutron irradiation. To simulate the conditions specific to a fusion plasma both at the first wall and in the divertor of fusion devices, linear plasma devices allow for a test of erosion and hydrogen isotope recycling behavior under well-defined and controlled conditions. Finally, the complex conditions in a fusion device (including the effects caused by magnetic fields) are exploited for component and material tests by exposing test mock-ups or material samples to a fusion plasma by manipulator systems. They allow for easy exchange of test pieces in a tokamak or stellarator device, without opening the vessel. Such a chain of test devices and qualification procedures is required for the development of plasma-facing components which then can be successfully operated in future fusion power devices. The various available as well as newly planned devices and test stands, together with their specific capabilities, are presented in this manuscript. Results from experimental programs on test facilities illustrate their significance for the qualification of plasma-facing materials and components. An extended set of references provides access to the current status of material and component testing capabilities in the international fusion programs.

  4. Materials and Fuels Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-09-01

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Fuels Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  5. Nuclear data for the production of radioisotopes in fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.; Schenter, R.E.; Mann, F.M.; Ikeda, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The fusion materials irradiation facility (FMIF) is a neutron source generator that will produce a high-intensity 14-MeV neutron field for testing candidate fusion materials under reactor irradiation conditions. The construction of such a facility is one of the very important development stages toward realization of fusion energy as a practical energy source for electricity production. As a result of the high-intensity neutron field, 10 MW/m 2 or more equivalent neutron wall loading, and the relatively high-energy (10- to 20-MeV) neutrons, the FMIF, as future fusion reactors, also bears the potential capability of producing a significant quantity of radioisotopes. A study is being conducted to identify the potential capability of the FMIF to produce radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications. Two types of radioisotopes are involved: one is already available; the second might not be readily available using conventional production methods. For those radioisotopes that are not readily available, the FMIF could develop significant benefits for future generations as a result of the availability of such radioisotopes for medical or industrial applications. The current production of radioisotopes could help finance the operation of the FMIF for irradiating the candidate fusion materials; thus this concept is attractive. In any case, nuclear data are needed for calculating the neutron flux and spectrum in the FMIF and the potential production rates of these isotopes. In this paper, the authors report the result of a preliminary investigation on the production of 99 Mo, the parent radioisotope for 99m Tc

  6. Mobile Pit verification system design based on passive special nuclear material verification in weapons storage facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, J. N.; Chin, M. R.; Sjoden, G. E. [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Program, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 770 State St, Atlanta, GA 30332-0745 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A mobile 'drive by' passive radiation detection system to be applied in special nuclear materials (SNM) storage facilities for validation and compliance purposes has been designed through the use of computational modeling and new radiation detection methods. This project was the result of work over a 1 year period to create optimal design specifications to include creation of 3D models using both Monte Carlo and deterministic codes to characterize the gamma and neutron leakage out each surface of SNM-bearing canisters. Results were compared and agreement was demonstrated between both models. Container leakages were then used to determine the expected reaction rates using transport theory in the detectors when placed at varying distances from the can. A 'typical' background signature was incorporated to determine the minimum signatures versus the probability of detection to evaluate moving source protocols with collimation. This established the criteria for verification of source presence and time gating at a given vehicle speed. New methods for the passive detection of SNM were employed and shown to give reliable identification of age and material for highly enriched uranium (HEU) and weapons grade plutonium (WGPu). The finalized 'Mobile Pit Verification System' (MPVS) design demonstrated that a 'drive-by' detection system, collimated and operating at nominally 2 mph, is capable of rapidly verifying each and every weapon pit stored in regularly spaced, shelved storage containers, using completely passive gamma and neutron signatures for HEU and WGPu. This system is ready for real evaluation to demonstrate passive total material accountability in storage facilities. (authors)

  7. Qualification testing facility for packages to be used for transport and storage of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    The radioactive materials (RAM) packaging have to comply to all modes and transport condition, routine or in accident conditions possibly to occur during transportation operations. It is well known that the safety in the transport of RAM is dependent on packaging appropriate for the contents being shipped rather than on operational and/or administrative actions required for the package. The quality of these packages - type A, B or C has to be proved by performing qualification tests in accordance with the ROMANIAN nuclear regulation conditions provided by CNCAN Order no. 357/22.12.2005- 'Norms for a Safe Transport of Radioactive Material', the IAEA Vienna Recommendation stipulated in the Safety standard TS-R-1- Regulation for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, 2005 Edition, and other applicable international recommendations. The paper will describe the components of the designed testing facilities, and the qualification testing to be performed for all type A, B and C packages subjected to the testing. In addition, a part of the qualification tests for a package (designed and manufactured in INR Pitesti) used for transport and storage of spent fuel LEU elements of a TRIGA nuclear reactor will be described and analyzed. Quality assurance and quality controls measures taken in order to meet technical specification provided by the design are also presented and commented. The paper concludes that the new Romanian Testing Facilities for RAM packages will comply with the national safe standards as well as with the IAEA applicable recommendation provided by the TS-R-1 safety standard. (author)

  8. Evaluation of performance indicators applied to a material recovery facility fed by mixed packaging waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellone, Maria Laura; Cremiato, Raffaele; Zaccariello, Lucio; Lotito, Roberta

    2017-06-01

    Most of the integrated systems for municipal solid waste management aim to increase the recycling of secondary materials by means of physical processes including sorting, shredding and reprocessing. Several restrictions prevent from reaching a very high material recycling efficiency: the variability of the composition of new-marketed materials used for packaging production and its shape and complexity are critical issues. The packaging goods are in fact made of different materials (aluminium, polymers, paper, etc.), possibly assembled, having different shape (flat, cylindrical, one-dimensional, etc.), density, colours, optical properties and so on. These aspects limit the effectiveness and efficiency of the sorting and reprocessing plants. The scope of this study was to evaluate the performance of a large scale Material Recovery Facility (MRF) by utilizing data collected during a long period of monitoring. The database resulted from the measured data has been organized in four sections: (1) data related to the amount and type of inlet waste; (2) amount and composition of output products and waste; (3) operating data (such as worked hours for shift, planned and unscheduled maintenance time, setting parameters of the equipment, and energy consumption for shift); (4) economic data (value of each product, disposal price for the produced waste, penalty for non-compliance of products and waste, etc.). A part of this database has been utilized to build an executive dashboard composed by a set of performance indicators suitable to measure the effectiveness and the efficiency of the MRF operations. The dashboard revealed itself as a powerful tool to support managers and engineers in their decisions in respect to the market demand or compliance regulation variation as well as in the designing of the lay-out improvements. The results indicated that the 40% of the input waste was recovered as valuable products and that a large part of these (88%) complied with the standards of

  9. Fuels and materials research under the high neutron fluence using a fast reactor Joyo and post-irradiation examination facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soga, Tomonori; Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi; Suzuki, Soju

    2009-01-01

    The experimental fast reactor Joyo at Oarai Research and Development Center (ORDC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is Japan's sodium-cooled fast reactor (FR). In 2003, this reactor's upgrade to the 140MWt MK-III core was completed to increase the irradiation testing capability. The MK-III core provides the fast neutron flux of 4.0x10 15 n/cm 2 s as an irradiation test bed for improving the fuels and material of FR in Japan. Three post-irradiation examination (PIE) facilities named FMF, MMF and AGF related to Joyo are in ORDC. Irradiated subassemblies and core components are carried into the FMF (Fuel Monitoring Facility) and conducted nondestructive examinations. Each subassembly is disassembled to conduct some destructive examinations and to prepare the fuel and material samples for further detailed examinations. Fuel samples are sent to the AGF (Alpha-Gamma Facility), and material samples are sent to the MMF (Materials Monitoring Facility). These overall and elaborate data provided by PIE contribute to investigate the irradiation effect and behavior of fuels and materials. This facility complex is indispensable to promote the R and D of FR in Japan. And, the function and technology of irradiation test and PIE enable to contribute to the R and D of innovative fission or fusion reactor material which will be required to use under the high neutron exposure. (author)

  10. Survey of radioactive effluent releases from byproduct material facilities. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    A survey of over 3,000 NRC byproduct material licensees was conducted in late 1980 to collect data on annual effluent releases of radioactivity. The survey was conducted through a questionnaire, which was sent to NRC licensees who handle radioactive material in unsealed form, i.e., research, medical, and industrial institutions. Principal findings from the survey analysis are as follows: More than 98% of the reported annual releases to air (484 to 490) yield calculated average concentrations at the boundary of the unrestricted area that were at 1% or less than the maximum permissible concentration (MPC) of Appendix B, Table II, Column 1 of 10 CFR 20. The largest reported annual release was estimated to yield a concentration that was approximately 12% of MPC, the 5 other releases ranged from 1 to 10% of MPC. All reported annual releases of liquid waste were within the limits specified by NRC with most facilities reporting annual releases of only a fraction of a curie. Based on the data provided by licensees and analyzed in this report, it appears that in general the environmental impacts from research, medical and industrial institutions and organizations licensed by the NRC to possess and use byproduct materials are minimal and correspond to a small fraction of that from natural background

  11. Potentiality of an accounting system for nuclear materials in the PNC plutonium fuel facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, T.; Aoki, M.; Tsutsumi, M.; Akutsu, H.

    1976-01-01

    The accounting system based on data filing and inquiry processing by the use of an optical mark reader (OMR) has been developed and operated satisfactorily for criticality control and accountancy of nuclear materials in the plutonium facilities of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC). The OMR system has merits, especially compared with an old chit and punch-card system, such as low cost, abundance of the data included on a single sheet, universality of use for all kinds of material transfers, ease of data correction, and a large capacity. The OMR system is applied to the material transfer and also for physical inventory taking. This system, together with the use of an accurate automatic balance equipped at each glove box, which is generally designated as an accounting unit for the criticality control, generated a MUF of 0.43% for a fuel fabrication campaign of 119 assemblies for a fast reactor, which can be decreased further. In relation to the recent safeguarding situation and also to fitting in with an automatic fuel fabrication process, however, a further development of the present system will be necessary in the near future. This future system is discussed with reference to criticism of the current accountancy system by Rosenbaum and others, and its possible framework with the emphasis on the weighing and reading of numbered items is suggested. (author)

  12. Physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials. Safeguards and the role of the IAEA in physical protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolej, M.

    1999-01-01

    The physical protection and security of nuclear facilities and materials concerns utilities, manufactures, the general public, and those who are responsible for licensing and regulating such facilities. The requirements and process to ensure an acceptable physical protection and security system have been evolutionary in nature. This paper reviews the first step of such process: the State's safeguards system and the international safeguards system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), including the relationship between these two safeguards systems. The elements of these systems that are reviewed include the State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material, physical protection measures, and containment and surveillance measures. In addition, the interactions between the State, the facility operator, and the IAEA are described. The paper addresses the IAEA safeguards system, including material accountancy and containment and surveillance; the State safeguards system, including material control and accountancy, and physical protection; the role of the IAEA in physical protection; a summary of safeguards system interactions.(author)

  13. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase task description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, M.; Nakamura, H.; Sugimoto, M.; Yutani, T.; Takeuchi, H. [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai Research Establishment, Fusion Neutron Laboratory, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has been initiated to reduce the key technology risk factors needed to achieve continuous wave (CW) beam with the desired current and energy and to reach the corresponding power handling capabilities in the liquid lithium target system. In the KEP, the IFMIF team (EU, Japan, Russian Federation, US) will perform required tasks. The contents of the tasks are described in the task description sheet. As the KEP tasks, the IFMIF team have proposed 27 tasks for Test Facilities, 12 tasks for Target, 26 tasks for Accelerator and 18 tasks for Design Integration. The task description by RF is not yet available. The task items and task descriptions may be added or revised with the progress of KEP activities. These task description sheets have been compiled in this report. After 3 years KEP, the results of the KEP tasks will be reviewed. Following the KEP, 3 years Engineering Validation Phase (EVP) will continue for IFMIF construction. (author)

  14. IFMIF, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity cost report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennich, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the cost estimate for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) at the completion of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). The estimate corresponds to the design documented in the Final IFMIF CDA Report. In order to effectively involve all the collaborating parties in the development of the estimate, a preparatory meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1996 to jointly establish guidelines to insure that the estimate was uniformly prepared while still permitting each country to use customary costing techniques. These guidelines are described in Section 4. A preliminary cost estimate was issued in July 1996 based on the results of the Second Design Integration Meeting, May 20--27, 1996 at JAERI, Tokai, Japan. This document served as the basis for the final costing and review efforts culminating in a final review during the Third IFMIF Design Integration Meeting, October 14--25, 1996, ENEA, Frascati, Italy. The present estimate is a baseline cost estimate which does not apply to a specific site. A revised cost estimate will be prepared following the assignment of both the site and all the facility responsibilities

  15. Analysis of material recovery facilities for use in life-cycle assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pressley, Phillip N.; Levis, James W.; Damgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Insights derived from life-cycle assessment of solid waste management strategies depend critically on assumptions, data, and modeling at the unit process level. Based on new primary data, a process model was developed to estimate the cost and energy use associated with material recovery facilities...... (MRFs), which are responsible for sorting recyclables into saleable streams and as such represent a key piece of recycling infrastructure. The model includes four modules, each with a different process flow, for separation of single-stream, dual-stream, pre-sorted recyclables, and mixed-waste. Each MRF...... type has a distinct combination of equipment and default input waste composition. Model results for total amortized costs from each MRF type ranged from $19.8 to $24.9 per Mg (1 Mg = 1 metric ton) of waste input. Electricity use ranged from 4.7 to 7.8 kWh per Mg of waste input. In a single-stream MRF...

  16. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility lithium system: a design and development status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbury, P.J.; Bazinet, G.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The design and development of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system is outlined. This unique liquid lithium recirculating system, the largest of its kind in the world, is described with emphasis on the liquid lithium target assembly and other important components necessary to provide lithium flow to the target. The operational status and role of the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) in the design of the FMIT lithium system are discussed. Safety aspects of operating the FMIT lithium system in a highly radioactive condition are described. Potential spillage of the lithium is controlled by cell liners, by argon flood systems and by remote maintenance features. Lithium chemistry is monitored and controlled by a side-stream loop, where impurities measured by instruments are collected by hot and cold traps

  17. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility lithium system: a design and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackenbury, P.J.; Bazinet, G.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The design and development of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system is outlined. This unique liquid lithium recirculating system, the largest of its kind in the world, is described with emphasis on the liquid lithium target assembly and other important components necessary to provide lithium flow to the target. The operational status and role of the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) in the design of the FMIT lithium system are discussed. Safety aspects of operating the FMIT lithium system in a highly radioactive condition are described. Potential spillage of the lithium is controlled by cell liners, by argon flood systems and by remote maintenance features. Lithium chemistry is monitored and controlled by a side-stream loop, where impurities measured by instruments are collected by hot and cold traps.

  18. National Ignition Facility quality assurance plan for laser materials and optical technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, C.R.

    1996-05-01

    Quality achievement is the responsibility of the line organizations of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. This subtier Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) applies to activities of the Laser Materials & Optical Technology (LM&OT) organization and its subcontractors. It responds to the NIF Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP, L-15958-2, NIF-95-499) and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C. This Plan is organized according to 10 Quality Assurance (QA) criteria and subelements of a management system as outlined in the NIF QAPP. This Plan describes how those QA requirements are met. This Plan is authorized by the Associate Project Leader for the LM&OT organization, who has assigned responsibility to the Optics QA engineer to maintain this plan, with the assistance of the NIF QA organization. This Plan governs quality-affecting activities associated with: design; procurement; fabrication; testing and acceptance; handling and storage; and installation of NIF Project optical components into mounts and subassemblies.

  19. Test facilities for radioactive materials transport packages (Chicago Bridge and Iron, USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, T.A.

    1991-01-01

    Chicago Bridge and Iron, Research and Development Center located in Plainfield, Illinois offers the total capabilities required to perform design verification testing of hazardous waste shipping containers. The tests, defined in the United States Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 71 (10CFR71), include vertical drop tests, puncture tests, crush tests, immersion tests, thermal tests, and container leak rate tests. Container structural design analysis, container manufacturing analysis, materials development testing plus dimensional analysis of individual components is also available. The test facilities meet or exceed the requirements given in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Guide, Safety Series No. 37, 1987. Additional capabilities for the design and fabrication of scale models and components for the test programme are also presented. (author)

  20. Facile synthesis of polypyrrole nanowires for high-performance supercapacitor electrode materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhong Zhao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Polypyrrole nanowires are facile synthesized under a mild condition with FeCl3 as an oxidant. Polypyrrole nanowires with the width of 120 nm form many nanogaps or pores due to the intertwined nanostructures. More importantly, PPy nanowires were further applied for supercapacitor electrode materials. After electrochemical testing, it was observed that the PPy nanowire based electrode showed a large specific capacitance (420 F g−1, 1.5 A g−1 and good rate capability (272 F g−1, 18.0 A g−1, which is larger than that of most of published results. The as-prepared electrode can work well even after 8000 cycles at 1.5 A g−1.

  1. Modern methods of material accounting for mixed-oxide fuel-fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggers, R.F.; Brouns, R.J.; Brite, D.W.; Pindak, J.L.

    1981-07-01

    The generic requirements loss detection, and response to alarms of a contemporary material control and accounting (MC and A) philosophy have been applied to a mixed-oxide fuel-fabrication plant to produce a detailed preliminary MC and A system design that is generally applicable to facilities of this type. This paper summarizes and discusses detailed results of the mixed-oxide fuel-fabrication plant study. Topics covered in this paper include: mixed-oxide fuel-fabrication process description, process disaggregation into MC and A system control units, quantitative results of analysis of control units for abrupt and recurring loss-detection capability, impact of short- and long-term holdup on loss-detection capability, response to alarms for abrupt loss, and response to alarms for recurring loss

  2. Characterization of contaminated nuclear sites, facilities and materials: radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical manufacturers and suppliers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing environmental protection standards for evaluating the risks and characterizing problems associated with disposal of radioactive wastes arising from decontamination and decommissioning DandD operations. Information on operations conducted at sites authorized to possess radioactive materials for the production and/or distribution of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals was compiled and evaluated. This information was used to project the types, nature, and volumes of wastes which are likely to be generated during decontamination and decommissioning at representative facilities and identifying special problems that may occur. Radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical manufacturers have been grouped together because decommissioning operations will be similar. Nuclear pharmacies were also evaluated because of their increasing numbers and their role as middlemen between manufacturers and users of radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of the radioactive waste will arise from the decontamination of the laboratories, rather than the disposal of components

  3. Novel technologies for the detection of undeclared nuclear activities, materials and facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whichello, Julian V.K.; Annese, Cynthia E. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Division of Technical Support

    2008-07-01

    This paper will discuss the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) Novel Technologies Project and its main goal of developing improved methods and technologies that will further enhance the detection of undeclared nuclear activities, materials and facilities. A major and fundamental task within the Project has been the development of methodologies and tools for identifying, documenting and utilizing nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) indicators and signatures (I and S) to facilitate a nuclear safeguards technology gap analysis. The outcome of this work will provide a basis for a novel range of methods and instruments, the development of which will contribute to the IAEA's overall objective of enhanced detection capabilities. (author)

  4. The Vapor Plume at Material Disposal Are C in Relation to Pajarito Corridor Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, William B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-02

    A vapor plume made up of volatile organic compounds is present beneath Material Disposal Area C (MDA C) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The location and concentrations within the vapor plume are discussed in relation to existing and planned facilities and construction activities along Pajarito Road (the 'Pajarito Corridor') and in terms of worker health and safety. This document provides information that indicates that the vapor plume does not pose a threat to the health of LANL workers nor will it pose a threat to workers during construction of proposed facilities along Pajarito Road. The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) monitors emissions, effluents, and environmental media to meet environmental compliance requirements, determine actions to protect the environment, and monitor the long-term health of the local environment. LANL also studies and characterizes 'legacy' waste from past Laboratory operations to make informed decisions regarding eventual corrective actions and the disposition of that waste. Starting in 1969, these activities have been annually reported in the LANL Environmental Report (formerly Environmental Surveillance Report), and are detailed in publicly accessible technical reports meeting environmental compliance requirements. Included among the legacy sites being investigated are several formerly used material disposal areas (MDAs) set aside by the Laboratory for the general on-site disposal of waste from mission-related activities. One such area is MDA C located in Technical Area 50 (TA-50), which was used for waste disposal between 1948 and 1974. The location of TA-50 is depicted in Figure 1. The present paper uses a series of maps and cross sections to address the public concerns raised about the vapor plume at MDA C. As illustrated here, extensive sampling and data interpretation indicate that the vapor plume at MDA C does not pose a threat to the health of LANL workers nor will it pose a

  5. Materials science and biophysics applications at the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, U., E-mail: uwahl@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-12-15

    The ISOLDE isotope separator facility at CERN provides a variety of radioactive ion beams, currently more than 800 different isotopes from {approx}70 chemical elements. The radioisotopes are produced on-line by nuclear reactions from a 1.4 GeV proton beam with various types of targets, outdiffusion of the reaction products and, if possible, chemically selective ionisation, followed by 60 kV acceleration and mass separation. While ISOLDE is mainly used for nuclear and atomic physics studies, applications in materials science and biophysics account for a significant part (currently {approx}15%) of the delivered beam time, requested by 18 different experiments. The ISOLDE materials science and biophysics community currently consists of {approx}80 scientists from more than 40 participating institutes and 21 countries. In the field of materials science, investigations focus on the study of semiconductors and oxides, with the recent additions of nanoparticles and metals, while the biophysics studies address the toxicity of metal ions in biological systems. The characterisation methods used are typical radioactive probe techniques such as Moessbauer spectroscopy, perturbed angular correlation, emission channeling, and tracer diffusion studies. In addition to these 'classic' methods of nuclear solid state physics, also standard semiconductor analysis techniques such as photoluminescence or deep level transient spectroscopy profit from the application of radioactive isotopes, which helps them to overcome their chemical 'blindness' since the nuclear half life of radioisotopes provides a signal that changes in time with characteristic exponential decay or saturation curves. In this presentation an overview will be given on the recent research activities in materials science and biophysics at ISOLDE, presenting some of the highlights during the last five years, together with a short outlook on the new developments under way.

  6. The relative patient costs and availability of dental services, materials and equipment in public oral care facilities in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamuryekung'e, Kasusu K; Lahti, Satu M; Tuominen, Risto J

    2015-07-01

    Patient charges and availability of dental services influence utilization of dental services. There is little available information on the cost of dental services and availability of materials and equipment in public dental facilities in Africa. This study aimed to determine the relative cost and availability of dental services, materials and equipment in public oral care facilities in Tanzania. The local factors affecting availability were also studied. A survey of all district and regional dental clinics in selected regions was conducted in 2014. A total of 28/30 facilities participated in the study. A structured interview was undertaken amongst practitioners and clinic managers within the facilities. Daily resources for consumption (DRC) were used for estimation of patients' relative cost. DRC are the quantified average financial resources required for an adult Tanzanian's overall consumption per day. Tooth extractions were found to cost four times the DRC whereas restorations were 9-10 times the DRC. Studied facilities provided tooth extractions (100%), scaling (86%), fillings (79%), root canal treatment (46%) and fabrication of removable partial dentures (32%). The ratio of tooth fillings to extractions in the facilities was 1:16. Less than 50% of the facilities had any of the investigated dental materials consistently available throughout the year, and just three facilities had all the investigated equipment functional and in use. Dental materials and equipment availability, skills of the practitioners and the cost of services all play major roles in provision and utilization of comprehensive oral care. These factors are likely to be interlinked and should be taken into consideration when studying any of the factors individually.

  7. Reduced cost design of liquid lithium target for international fusion material irradiation facility (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Yutani, Toshiaki

    2001-01-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is being jointly planned to provide an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source to produce intense high energy neutrons (2 MW/m 2 ) up to 200 dpa and a sufficient irradiation volume (500 cm 3 ) for testing the candidate materials and components up to about a full lifetime of their anticipated use in ITER and DEMO. To realize such a condition, 40 MeV deuteron beam with a current of 250 mA is injected into high speed liquid lithium flow with a speed of 20 m/s. Following Conceptual Design Activity (1995-1998), a design study with focus on cost reduction without changing its original mission has been done in 1999. The following major changes to the CAD target design have been considered in the study and included in the new design: i) number of the Li target has been changed from 2 to 1, ii) spare of impurity traps of the Li loop was removed although the spare will be stored in a laboratory for quick exchange, iii) building volume was reduced via design changes in lithium loop length. This paper describes the reduced cost design of the lithium target system and recent status of Key Element Technology activities. (author)

  8. Fluidized column biodenitrification demonstration facility at the FMPC [Feed Materials Production Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patton, J.B.

    1987-02-01

    The mission of the Fernald Ohio Feed Materials Production Center, owned by DOE and operated by Westinghouse Materials Company of Ohio, is to produce uranium metal primarily for fuel in production reactors at Hanford, Washington, and Savannah River, South Carolina. Several waste streams result from production that are combined in the plant general sump and processed through settling basins prior to discharge. Individual streams have varying nitrate concentrations which, when combined, may range up to about 10,000 milligrams/liter. A fluidized-bed technology has been operated to demonstrate nitrate reduction by bacteriological denitrification on production scale. The system consists of two columns operating in series. The demonstration run will be considering: rate of biodenitrification; methyl alcohol consumption (bacterial substrate); sulfuric acid requirement (pH adjustment); accommodation of the biomass by the plant sewage treatment facility; flexibility of the system to receive a waste stream which varies in both volume and nitrate concentration; and modification and/or additions needed in the system to function as a permanent production operation. 8 figs

  9. A facile method to compare EFTEM maps obtained from materials changing composition over time

    KAUST Repository

    Casu, Alberto

    2015-10-31

    Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy (EFTEM) is an analytical tool that has been successfully and widely employed in the last two decades for obtaining fast elemental maps in TEM mode. Several studies and efforts have been addressed to investigate limitations and advantages of such technique, as well as to improve the spatial resolution of compositional maps. Usually, EFTEM maps undergo post-acquisition treatments by changing brightness and contrast levels, either via dedicated software or via human elaboration, in order to maximize their signal-to-noise ratio and render them as visible as possible. However, elemental maps forming a single set of EFTEM images are usually subjected to independent map-by-map image treatment. This post-acquisition step becomes crucial when analyzing materials that change composition over time as a consequence of an external stimulus, because the map-by-map approach doesn\\'t take into account how the chemical features of the imaged materials actually progress, in particular when the investigated elements exhibit very low signals. In this article, we present a facile procedure applicable to whole sets of EFTEM maps acquired on a sample that is evolving over time. The main aim is to find a common method to treat the images features, in order to make them as comparable as possible without affecting the information there contained. Microsc. Res. Tech. 78:1090–1097, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Experimental study of radioactive aerosols emission during the thermal degradation of organic materials in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Yvette

    1993-01-01

    Radioactive products may be released during a fire in nuclear fuel cycles facilities. These products must be confined to avoid a contamination spread in the environment. It is therefore necessary to be able to predict the amount and the physico-chemical forms of radioactive material that may be airborne. The aim of this study is to determine experimentally the release of contamination aerosols in a typical fire scenario involving plutonium oxide in a glove box. Firstly, this phenomenon has been studied in a small scale test chamber where samples of polymethylmethacrylate (Plexiglas) contaminated by cerium oxide (used as a substitute for plutonium oxide) were submitted to thermal degradation (pyrolysis and combustion). The release of radioactive material is determined by the quantity of contaminant emitted, the kinetics of the release and the particle size distribution of aerosols. Secondly, the development of an experimental procedure allowed to realize large scale fires in more realistic conditions. The experimental tools developed in the course of this study allow to consider application to other scenarios. (author) [fr

  11. TEMPERATURE PREDICTION IN 3013 CONTAINERS IN K AREA MATERIAL STORAGE (KAMS) FACILITY USING REGRESSION METHODS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N

    2008-01-01

    3013 containers are designed in accordance with the DOE-STD-3013-2004. These containers are qualified to store plutonium (Pu) bearing materials such as PuO2 for 50 years. DOT shipping packages such as the 9975 are used to store the 3013 containers in the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility at Savannah River Site (SRS). DOE-STD-3013-2004 requires that a comprehensive surveillance program be set up to ensure that the 3013 container design parameters are not violated during the long term storage. To ensure structural integrity of the 3013 containers, thermal analyses using finite element models were performed to predict the contents and component temperatures for different but well defined parameters such as storage ambient temperature, PuO 2 density, fill heights, weights, and thermal loading. Interpolation is normally used to calculate temperatures if the actual parameter values are different from the analyzed values. A statistical analysis technique using regression methods is proposed to develop simple polynomial relations to predict temperatures for the actual parameter values found in the containers. The analysis shows that regression analysis is a powerful tool to develop simple relations to assess component temperatures

  12. A facile method to compare EFTEM maps obtained from materials changing composition over time

    KAUST Repository

    Casu, Alberto; Genovese, Alessandro; Di Benedetto, Cristiano; Lentijo Mozo, Sergio; Sogne, Elisa; Zuddas, Efisio; Falqui, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy (EFTEM) is an analytical tool that has been successfully and widely employed in the last two decades for obtaining fast elemental maps in TEM mode. Several studies and efforts have been addressed to investigate limitations and advantages of such technique, as well as to improve the spatial resolution of compositional maps. Usually, EFTEM maps undergo post-acquisition treatments by changing brightness and contrast levels, either via dedicated software or via human elaboration, in order to maximize their signal-to-noise ratio and render them as visible as possible. However, elemental maps forming a single set of EFTEM images are usually subjected to independent map-by-map image treatment. This post-acquisition step becomes crucial when analyzing materials that change composition over time as a consequence of an external stimulus, because the map-by-map approach doesn't take into account how the chemical features of the imaged materials actually progress, in particular when the investigated elements exhibit very low signals. In this article, we present a facile procedure applicable to whole sets of EFTEM maps acquired on a sample that is evolving over time. The main aim is to find a common method to treat the images features, in order to make them as comparable as possible without affecting the information there contained. Microsc. Res. Tech. 78:1090–1097, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Studying international fuel cycle robustness with the GENIUSv2 discrete facilities/materials fuel cycle systems analysis tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, P.H. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

    2009-06-15

    GENIUSv2 (Global Evaluation of Nuclear Infrastructure Utilization Scenarios, hereafter 'GENIUS') is a discrete-facilities/materials nuclear fuel cycle systems analysis tool currently under development at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. For a given scenario, it models nuclear fuel cycle facilities (reactors, fuel fabrication, enrichment, etc.), the institutions that own them (utilities and governments), and the regions in which those institutions operate (sub-national, national, and super-national entities). Facilities work together to provide each other with the materials they need. The results of each simulation include the electricity production in each region as well as operational histories of each facility and isotopic and facility histories of each material object. GENIUS users specify an initial condition and a facility deployment plan. The former describes each region and institution in the scenario as well as facilities that exist at the start. The latter specifies all the facilities that will be built over the course of the simulation (and by which institutions). Each region, institution, and facility can be assigned financial parameters such as tax and interest rates, and facilities also get assigned technical information about how they actually operate. Much of the power of the data model comes from the flexibility to model individual entities to a fine level of detail or to allow them to inherit region-, institution-, or facility-type-specific default parameters. Most importantly to the evaluation of regional, national, and international policies, users can also specify rules that define the affinity (or lack thereof) for trade of particular commodities between particular entities. For instance, these rules could dictate that a particular region or institution always buy a certain commodity (ore, enriched UF{sub 6}, fabricated fuel, etc.) from a particular region or institution, never buy from that region, or merely have a certain

  14. Environmental Assessment For the Proposed Construction of A Hazardous Materials Issue Facility and a Hazardous Wastes Storage Facility at Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    hazardous materials in accordance with the Occupational Health and Safety Administration ( OSHA ) storage standards. This facility would make the...subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia , Pakistan, or the Philippine Islands; and • Native Hawaiian and Other...regulated by the USEPA and the OSHA . The state of Colorado also has regulations pertaining to ACM abatement. Emissions of asbestos fibers into the

  15. CFD analysis and experimental investigation associated with the design of the Los Alamos nuclear materials storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardin, J.D.; Hopkins, S.; Gregory, W.S.; Martin, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is being renovated for long-term storage of canisters designed to hold heat-generating nuclear materials, such as powders, ingots, and other components. The continual heat generation within the canisters necessitates a reliable cooling scheme of sufficient magnitude which maintains the stored material temperatures within acceptable limits. The primary goal of this study was to develop both an experimental facility and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a subsection of the NMSF which could be used to observe general performance trends of a proposed passive cooling scheme and serve as a design tool for canister holding fixtures. Comparisons of numerical temperature and velocity predictions with empirical data indicate that the CFD model provides an accurate representation of the NMSF experimental facility. Minor modifications in the model geometry and boundary conditions are needed to enhance its accuracy, however, the various fluid and thermal models correctly capture the basic physics

  16. Evaluation of engineered barrier materials for surface disposal facilities. Appendix 2: Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, L.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In practice, those nuclear installations that generate most wastes in Brazil often have interim storage facilities at the same site. They can also accommodate wastes from small users that have no suitable place to manage their wastes. The forecast at the time of the CRP for Brazilian waste generation due to all nuclear and radioactive activities by the year 2010 is to be about 5000 m 3 , not including the waste of 3500 m 3 from Goiania accident. With the impact of the accident on the public opinion, the quest for a safe disposal facility became more urgent, especially the siting and licensing a disposal facility which could receive the Goiania waste. Although the construction of a national repository was a matter of future decision at the time of the CRP, research programmes were being developed and carried out by the research institutes of the Brazilian National Commission of Nuclear Energy. The R and D programmes were primarily intended to establish required technical capability in dealing with the subject especially in terms of issues related to the evaluation of disposal facility performance and lifetime. Some activities of the programmes were within the scope of the CRP, namely: study of diffusion through cementitious materials; degradation of concrete due to chemical corrosion and microbiological attack; evaluation of additives for the improvement of structural concrete and cemented wasteform quality. In the work relating to the improvement of wasteforms and concrete, silica-fume was being evaluated as an admixture in the cementation process. Ion-exchange resins, a typical power reactor waste, and simulated liquid waste from fission production were used as reference wastes. The performance of the produced wasteforms was evaluated by measuring four properties of interest: setting time; heat developed during hydration process, compressive strength, and leachability. Results showed that the addition of silica-fume increased the compressive strength

  17. Technical Meeting on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycle Facilities with Improved Economic Characteristics. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, engineering oriented work, rather than basic research and development (R&D), has led to significant progress in improving the economics of innovative fast reactors and associated fuel cycle facilities, while maintaining and even enhancing the safety features of these systems. Optimization of plant size and layout, more compact designs, reduction of the amount of plant materials and the building volumes, higher operating temperatures to attain higher generating efficiencies, improvement of load factor, extended core lifetimes, high fuel burnup, etc. are good examples of achievements to date that have improved the economics of fast neutron systems. The IAEA, through its Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR) and Technical Working Group on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options and Spent Fuel Management (TWG-NFCO), devotes many of its initiatives to encouraging technical cooperation and promoting common research and technology development projects among Member States with fast reactor and advanced fuel cycle development programmes, with the general aim of catalysing and accelerating technology advances in these fields. In particular the theme of fast reactor deployment, scenarios and economics has been largely debated during the recent IAEA International Conference on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycles: Safe Technologies and Sustainable Scenarios, held in Paris in March 2013. Several papers presented at this conference discussed the economics of fast reactors from different national and regional perspectives, including business cases, investment scenarios, funding mechanisms and design options that offer significant capital and energy production cost reductions. This Technical Meeting on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycle Facilities with Improved Economic Characteristics addresses Member States’ expressed need for information exchange in the field, with the aim of identifying the main open issues and launching possible initiatives to help and

  18. Guidance and considerations for the implementation of INFCIRC/225/Rev.4, the physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-05-01

    This publication is intended to provide guidance and considerations for a State's competent authority to better understand and prescribe appropriate requirements, consistent with INFCIRC/225/Rev.4 for the protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities which are compatible with accepted international practice. This report, together with a more detailed report, Handbook on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Facilities, which addresses to the licencee or designer of physical protection systems who has specific implementation and compliance responsibilities, should be used in conjunction to each other to provide better and comprehensive guidance on physical protection

  19. Guidance and considerations for the implementation of INFCIRC/225/Rev.4, the physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-05-01

    This publication is intended to provide guidance and considerations for a State's competent authority to better understand and prescribe appropriate requirements, consistent with INFCIRC/225/Rev.4 for the protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities which are compatible with accepted international practice. This report, together with a more detailed report, Handbook on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Facilities, which addresses to the licensee or designer of physical protection systems who has specific implementation and compliance responsibilities, should be used in conjunction to each other to provide better and comprehensive guidance on physical protection

  20. Integrated Corrosion Facility for long-term testing of candidate materials for high-level radioactive waste containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estill, J.C.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Gdowski, G.E.; McCright, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    A long-term-testing facility, the Integrated Corrosion Facility (I.C.F.), is being developed to investigate the corrosion behavior of candidate construction materials for high-level-radioactive waste packages for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Corrosion phenomena will be characterized in environments considered possible under various scenarios of water contact with the waste packages. The testing of the materials will be conducted both in the liquid and high humidity vapor phases at 60 and 90 degrees C. Three classes of materials with different degrees of corrosion resistance will be investigated in order to encompass the various design configurations of waste packages. The facility is expected to be in operation for a minimum of five years, and operation could be extended to longer times if warranted. A sufficient number of specimens will be emplaced in the test environments so that some can be removed and characterized periodically. The corrosion phenomena to be characterized are general, localized, galvanic, and stress corrosion cracking. The long-term data obtained from this study will be used in corrosion mechanism modeling, performance assessment, and waste package design. Three classes of materials are under consideration. The corrosion resistant materials are high-nickel alloys and titanium alloys; the corrosion allowance materials are low-alloy and carbon steels; and the intermediate corrosion resistant materials are copper-nickel alloys

  1. US-Russian Cooperation in Upgrading MC and A System at Rosatom Facilities: Measurement of Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Danny H.; Jensen, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Improve protection of weapons-usable nuclear material from theft or diversion through the development and support of a nationwide sustainable and effective Material Control and Accountability (MC and A) program based on material measurement. The material protection, control, and accountability (MPC and A) cooperation has yielded significant results in implementing MC and A measurements at Russian nuclear facilities: (1) Establishment of MEM WG and MEMS SP; (2) Infrastructure for development, certification, and distribution of RMs; and (3) Coordination on development and implementation of MMs.

  2. Natural occurrence radioactive material in E and P facilities : Brazilian current panorama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta, Luiz Ernesto S. de C.; Neder, Lucia de Toledo Camara

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Occupational and public exposures due to naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are of concern of international community. A great deal of investigation have being conducted to evaluate the hazards posed by NORM materials to human health and environment and by these means provide a more accurate assessment and protective measures. Although typical NORM from oil and gas operations are represented by diffuse NORM, this type of waste with much lower concentration of radioactivity but higher volumes, poses a different type of problem to regulators and industry and all efforts are being made by to guarantee safe manipulation and disposal of NORM materials to mitigate occupational and public exposure. In previous study, occupational exposure from offshore and onshore operations were determined for one core oil field region in Brazil. Samples of crude oil and hard/soft scale formed inside production equipment of the oil and gas industry onshore and offshore operations were analysed for 226-Ra and 228-Ra. Survey for external gamma ray dose rate (mSv/h) was also performed to establish potential occupational doses. Results obtained for gamma ray dose rates vary from 0.2 to 2.0 μSv/h and mean activity concentrations measured from oily sludge samples resulted 105 Bq/g for 226-Ra and 80 Bq/g for 228-Ra. Results for scale samples shown mean activity concentrations of 33 Bq/g for 226-Ra and 23 Bq/g for 228-Ra. Although most of results obtained fell within the acceptable dose limits for workers, protective measures were introduced to minimise the doses to workers in different operations both onshore and offshore. A more broader investigation on naturally occurring radioactive material was designed and conducted including all regions with oil and gas operations in Brazil. Besides monitoring external gamma ray dose rates (mSv/h) and activity concentrations of 226-Ra and 228-Ra in crude oil and scale samples, a new methodology of assessment for flow lines and

  3. Emergency preparedness source term development for the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards-Licensed Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutter, S.L.; Mishima, J.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Lindsey, C.G.

    1984-08-01

    In order to establish requirements for emergency preparedness plans at facilities licensed by the Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) needs to develop source terms (the amount of material made airborne) in accidents. These source terms are used to estimate the potential public doses from the events, which, in turn, will be used to judge whether emergency preparedness plans are needed for a particular type of facility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory is providing the NRC with source terms by developing several accident scenarios for eleven types of fuel cycle and by-product operations. Several scenarios are developed for each operation, leading to the identification of the maximum release considered for emergency preparedness planning (MREPP) scenario. The MREPP scenarios postulated were of three types: fire, tornado, and criticality. Fire was significant at oxide fuel fabrication, UF 6 production, radiopharmaceutical manufacturing, radiopharmacy, sealed source manufacturing, waste warehousing, and university research and development facilities. Tornadoes were MREPP events for uranium mills and plutonium contaminated facilities, and criticalities were significant at nonoxide fuel fabrication and nuclear research and development facilities. Techniques for adjusting the MREPP release to different facilities are also described

  4. Preliminary results of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility deuteron injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gobin, R.; Adroit, G.; Bogard, D.; Bourdelle, G.; Chauvin, N.; Delferriere, O.; Gauthier, Y.; Girardot, P.; Guiho, P.; Harrault, F.; Jannin, J. L.; Loiseau, D.; Mattei, P.; Roger, A.; Sauce, Y.; Senee, F.; Vacher, T. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energie Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, 91191-Gif/Yvette (France)

    2012-02-15

    In the framework of the IFMIF-EVEDA project (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility-Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities), CEA/IRFU is in charge of the design, construction, and characterization of the 140 mA continuous deuteron injector, including the source and the low energy beam line. The electron cyclotron resonance ion source which operates at 2.45 GHz is associated with a 4-electrode extraction system in order to minimize beam divergence at the source exit. Krypton gas injection is foreseen in the 2-solenoid low energy beam line. Such Kr injection will allow reaching a high level of space charge compensation in order to improve the beam matching at the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) entrance. The injector construction is now completed on the Saclay site and the first plasma and beam production has been produced in May 2011. This installation will be tested with proton and deuteron beams either in pulsed or continuous mode at Saclay before shipping to Japan. In this paper, after a brief description of the installation, the preliminary results obtained with hydrogen gas injection into the plasma chamber will be reported.

  5. The JRC Nanomaterials Repository: A unique facility providing representative test materials for nanoEHS research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totaro, Sara; Cotogno, Giulio; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Pianella, Francesca; Roncaglia, Marco; Olsson, Heidi; Riego Sintes, Juan M; Crutzen, Hugues P

    2016-11-01

    The European Commission has established a Nanomaterials Repository that hosts industrially manufactured nanomaterials that are distributed world-wide for safety testing of nanomaterials. In a first instance these materials were tested in the OECD Testing Programme. They have then also been tested in several EU funded research projects. The JRC Repository of Nanomaterials has thus developed into serving the global scientific community active in the nanoEHS (regulatory) research. The unique Repository facility is a state-of-the-art installation that allows customised sub-sampling under the safest possible conditions, with traceable final sample vials distributed world-wide for research purposes. This paper describes the design of the Repository to perform a semi-automated subsampling procedure, offering high degree of flexibility and precision in the preparation of NM vials for customers, while guaranteeing the safety of the operators, and environmental protection. The JRC nanomaterials are representative for part of the world NMs market. Their wide use world-wide facilitates the generation of comparable and reliable experimental results and datasets in (regulatory) research by the scientific community, ultimately supporting the further development of the OECD regulatory test guidelines. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. National Ignition Facility quality assurance plan for laser materials and optical technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, C.R.

    1996-05-01

    Quality achievement is the responsibility of the line organizations of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. This subtier Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) applies to activities of the Laser Materials ampersand Optical Technology (LM ampersand OT) organization and its subcontractors. It responds to the NIF Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP, L-15958-2, NIF-95-499) and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5700.6C. This Plan is organized according to 10 Quality Assurance (QA) criteria and subelements of a management system as outlined in the NIF QAPP. This Plan describes how those QA requirements are met. This Plan is authorized by the Associate Project Leader for the LM ampersand OT organization, who has assigned responsibility to the Optics QA engineer to maintain this plan, with the assistance of the NIF QA organization. This Plan governs quality-affecting activities associated with: design; procurement; fabrication; testing and acceptance; handling and storage; and installation of NIF Project optical components into mounts and subassemblies

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of photon buildup factors for shielding materials in diagnostic x-ray facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharrati, Hedi; Agrebi, Amel; Karoui, Mohamed Karim

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A simulation of buildup factors for ordinary concrete, steel, lead, plate glass, lead glass, and gypsum wallboard in broad beam geometry for photons energies from 10 keV to 150 keV at 5 keV intervals is presented. Methods: Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code has been used to determine the buildup factors for the studied shielding materials. Results: An example concretizing the use of the obtained buildup factors data in computing the broad beam transmission for tube potentials at 70, 100, 120, and 140 kVp is given. The half value layer, the tenth value layer, and the equilibrium tenth value layer are calculated from the broad beam transmission for these tube potentials. Conclusions: The obtained values compared with those calculated from the published data show the ability of these data to predict shielding transmission curves. Therefore, the buildup factors data can be combined with primary, scatter, and leakage x-ray spectra to provide a computationally based solution to broad beam transmission for barriers in shielding x-ray facilities.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of photon buildup factors for shielding materials in diagnostic x-ray facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharrati, Hedi; Agrebi, Amel; Karoui, Mohamed Karim

    2012-10-01

    A simulation of buildup factors for ordinary concrete, steel, lead, plate glass, lead glass, and gypsum wallboard in broad beam geometry for photons energies from 10 keV to 150 keV at 5 keV intervals is presented. Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code has been used to determine the buildup factors for the studied shielding materials. An example concretizing the use of the obtained buildup factors data in computing the broad beam transmission for tube potentials at 70, 100, 120, and 140 kVp is given. The half value layer, the tenth value layer, and the equilibrium tenth value layer are calculated from the broad beam transmission for these tube potentials. The obtained values compared with those calculated from the published data show the ability of these data to predict shielding transmission curves. Therefore, the buildup factors data can be combined with primary, scatter, and leakage x-ray spectra to provide a computationally based solution to broad beam transmission for barriers in shielding x-ray facilities.

  9. A comparative study for different shielding material composition and beam geometry applied to PET facilities: simulated transmission curves

    OpenAIRE

    Hoff, Gabriela; Costa, Paulo Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to simulate transmission data for different beam geometry and material composition in order to evaluate the effect of these parameters on transmission curves. The simulations are focused on outgoing spectra for shielding barriers used in PET facilities. The behavior of the transmission was evaluated as a function of the shielding material composition and thickness using Geant4 Monte Carlo code, version 9.2 p 03.The application was benchmarked for barited mortar and com...

  10. Facile synthesis of SnO2 nanocrystals anchored onto graphene nanosheets as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjun; Jiang, Li; Wang, Chunru

    2015-08-21

    A SnO2/graphene nanocomposite was prepared via a facile solvothermal process using stannous octoate as a Sn source. The as-prepared SnO2/graphene nanocomposite exhibited excellent electrochemical behavior with a high reversible capacity, a long cycle life and a good rate capability when used as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

  11. Influences of Inadequate Instructional Materials and Facilities in Teaching and Learning of Electrical/Electronics Technology Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbu, James E.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the influences of inadequate instructional materials and facilities in the teaching and learning of electrical/electronics (E/E) technology education courses. The study was guided by two research questions and two null hypotheses which were tested at 0.05 level of significance. The design employed was descriptive survey…

  12. The materials production and processing facility at the Spanish National Centre for fusion technologies (TechnoFusion)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, A.; Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R.; Hernandez, M.T.; Jimenez-Rey, D.; Roman, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Perlado, M.; Ibarra, A.

    2011-01-01

    In response to the urgent request from the EU Fusion Program, a new facility (TechnoFusion) for research and development of fusion materials has been planned with support from the Regional Government of Madrid and the Ministry of Science and Innovation of Spain. TechnoFusion, the National Centre for Fusion Technologies, aims screening different technologies relevant for ITER and DEMO environments while promoting the contribution of international companies and research groups into the Fusion Programme. For this purpose, the centre will be provided with a large number of unique facilities for the manufacture, testing (a triple-beam multi-ion irradiation, a plasma-wall interaction device, a remote handling for under ionizing radiation testing) and analysis of critical fusion materials. Particularly, the objectives, semi-industrial scale capabilities and present status of the TechnoFusion Materials Production and Processing (MPP) facility are presented. Previous studies revealed that the MPP facility will be a very promising infrastructure for the development of new materials and prototypes demanded by the fusion technology and therefore some of them will be here briefly summarized.

  13. The materials production and processing facility at the Spanish National Centre for fusion technologies (TechnoFusion)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A., E-mail: rpp@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica, UC3M, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R. [Departamento de Fisica, UC3M, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Hernandez, M.T. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Jimenez-Rey, D. [CMAM, UAM, C/Faraday 3, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Roman, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Garcia-Cortes, I. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Perlado, M. [IFN, ETSII, UPM, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ibarra, A. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    In response to the urgent request from the EU Fusion Program, a new facility (TechnoFusion) for research and development of fusion materials has been planned with support from the Regional Government of Madrid and the Ministry of Science and Innovation of Spain. TechnoFusion, the National Centre for Fusion Technologies, aims screening different technologies relevant for ITER and DEMO environments while promoting the contribution of international companies and research groups into the Fusion Programme. For this purpose, the centre will be provided with a large number of unique facilities for the manufacture, testing (a triple-beam multi-ion irradiation, a plasma-wall interaction device, a remote handling for under ionizing radiation testing) and analysis of critical fusion materials. Particularly, the objectives, semi-industrial scale capabilities and present status of the TechnoFusion Materials Production and Processing (MPP) facility are presented. Previous studies revealed that the MPP facility will be a very promising infrastructure for the development of new materials and prototypes demanded by the fusion technology and therefore some of them will be here briefly summarized.

  14. 10 CFR 8.4 - Interpretation by the General Counsel: AEC jurisdiction over nuclear facilities and materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... facilities and materials except the States' traditional regulatory authority over generation, sale, and... qualified in the field increased, questions arose as to the role State authorities should play with regard... Commission determines should, because of the hazards or potential hazards thereof, not be so disposed of...

  15. Production of fiberglass/metal composite material suitable for building habitat and manufacturing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The production of a fiberglass/metal composite material suitable for building habitats and manufacturing facilities was the project for Clemson. The concept and development of the knowledge necessary to produce glass fibers originated in the spring semester. During the summer, while at Johnson Space Center, fiberglass from a rock composition similar to ones found at the Apollo 16 site on the moon was successfully produced. The project this year was a continuation of last year's studies. We addressed the following problems which emerged as the work progressed: (1) Methods for coating the fibers with a metal were explored. We manufactured composites in two stages: Glass fibers without any coating on them; and fibers coated with metals as they were made. This proved to be a difficult process. Future activities include using a chemical vapor deposition process on fibers which have been made. (2) A glass furnace was developed which relies primarily on solar energy for melting the glass. The temperature of the melted glass is maintained by electrical means. The design is for 250 kg of glass per day. An electrical engineering student developed a scheme for controlling the melting and manufacturing process from the earth. This was done to minimize the human risk. Graphite refractories are relied on to contain the melt. (3) The glass composition chosen for the project is a relatively pure anorthite which is available in the highland regions of the lunar surface. A major problems with this material is that it melts at a comparatively high temperature. This problem will be solved by using graphite refractory materials for the furnace. The advantage of this glass composition is that it is very stable and does not tend to crystallize. (4) We have also refined the experimental furnace and fiber making machinery which we will be using at Johnson Space Center this summer. We believe that we will be able to draw and coat glass fibers in a vacuum for use in composites. We intend to

  16. Neutron Absorbing Ability Variation in Neutron Absorbing Material Caused by the Neutron Irradiation in Spent Fuel Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Hee Dong; Han, Seul Gi; Lee, Sang Dong; Kim, Ki Hong; Ryu, Eag Hyang; Park, Hwa Gyu [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In spent fuel storage facility like high density spent fuel storage racks and dry storage casks, spent fuels are stored with neutron absorbing materials installed as a part of those facilities, and they are used for absorbing neutrons emitted from spent fuels. Usually structural material with neutron absorbing material of racks and casks are located around spent fuels, so it is irradiated by neutrons for long time. Neutron absorbing ability could be changed by the variation of nuclide composition in neutron absorbing material caused by the irradiation of neutrons. So, neutron absorbing materials are continuously faced with spent fuels with boric acid solution or inert gas environment. Major nuclides in neutron absorbing material are Al{sup 27}, C{sup 12}, B{sup 11}, B{sup 10} and they are changed to numerous other ones as radioactive decay or neutron absorption reaction. The B{sup 10} content in neutron absorbing material dominates the neutron absorbing ability, so, the variation of nuclide composition including the decrease of B{sup 10} content is the critical factor on neutron absorbing ability. In this study, neutron flux in spent fuel, the activation of neutron absorbing material and the variation of nuclide composition are calculated. And, the minimum neutron flux causing the decrease of B{sup 10} content is calculated in spent fuel storage facility. Finally, the variation of neutron multiplication factor is identified according to the one of B{sup 10} content in neutron absorbing material. The minimum neutron flux to impact the neutron absorbing ability is 10{sup 10} order, however, usual neutron flux from spent fuel is 10{sup 8} order. Therefore, even though neutron absorbing material is irradiated for over 40 years, B{sup 10} content is little decreased, so, initial neutron absorbing ability could be kept continuously.

  17. Technical Meeting on Existing and Proposed Experimental Facilities for Fast Neutron Systems. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the TM on “Existing and proposed experimental facilities for fast neutron systems” was threefold: 1) presenting and exchanging information about existing and planned experimental facilities in support of the development of innovative fast neutron systems; 2) allow creating a catalogue of existing and planned experimental facilities currently operated/developed within national or international fast reactors programmes; 3) once a clear picture of the existing experimental infrastructures is defined, new experimental facilities are discussed and proposed, on the basis of the identified R&D needs

  18. Establishing design basis threats for the physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetvergov, S.

    2001-01-01

    government troops of neighboring countries on the west and east of the Republic of Kazakhstan against extremist and terrorist groups that have a goal to come to power in separate regions and to establish terrorist regimes. This factor is an essential issue because of the high level of training and equipment of terrorist groups that repeatedly accomplish terrorist actions within the territory of Russia and Uzbekistan, with grave consequences for the population; High mercantile interest to the uranium pellets, including the production of Ulba metallurgical plant, of the groups that want to have high profit due to stealing of these materials and their resale to third parties. This tendency is confirmed by the recent statistic data, because only during the period from July 1999 to March 2000 three criminal groups were captured in the RK that had nuclear fuel pellets with enrichment of U-235 up to 4.4% for resale to third parties; As was registered by international agencies through the territory of the RK (because of its geographic location), the ways of illegal drugs transfer are passing. It is also possible with respect to illegal transit of nuclear and radioactive materials. Stages for Establishing of Design Basis Threat - Training: In 1998, jointly with Nuclear Regulatory Commission of the US, a training seminar on assessment of physical protection system of research nuclear reactor WWR-K of NNC was carried out; In 1999, jointly with the national security agencies, practical training on assessment of physical protection system of commercial nuclear plant BN-350 in Aktau was carried out; In May 2000, jointly with the German Society of Nuclear Reactors and Facilities Security, a training seminar was carried out on establishing a design threat for hypothetical research reactor and creation of physical protection conception; Seminar on establishing of design basis threat according to IAEA methods, with attraction of international expertise (USA, Germany, Great Britain, France) is

  19. An overview of research activities on materials for nuclear applications at the INL Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderoni, P., E-mail: Pattrick.Calderoni@inl.gov [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-7113 (United States); Sharpe, J.; Shimada, M.; Denny, B.; Pawelko, B.; Schuetz, S.; Longhurst, G. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-7113 (United States); Hatano, Y.; Hara, M. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Oya, Y. [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Otsuka, T.; Katayama, K. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Konishi, S.; Noborio, K.; Yamamoto, Y. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    The Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility at the Idaho National Laboratory is a US Department of Energy National User Facility engaged in various aspects of materials research for nuclear applications related to fusion and advanced fission systems. Research activities are mainly focused on the interaction of tritium with materials, in particular plasma facing components, liquid breeders, high temperature coolants, fuel cladding, cooling and blanket structures and heat exchangers. Other activities include validation and verification experiments in support of the Fusion Safety Program, such as beryllium dust reactivity and dust transport in vacuum vessels, and support of Advanced Test Reactor irradiation experiments. This paper presents an overview of the programs engaged in the activities, which include the US-Japan TITAN collaboration, the US ITER program, the Next Generation Power Plant program and the tritium production program, and a presentation of ongoing experiments as well as a summary of recent results with emphasis on fusion relevant materials.

  20. An overview of research activities on materials for nuclear applications at the INL Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderoni, P.; Sharpe, J.; Shimada, M.; Denny, B.; Pawelko, B.; Schuetz, S.; Longhurst, G.; Hatano, Y.; Hara, M.; Oya, Y.; Otsuka, T.; Katayama, K.; Konishi, S.; Noborio, K.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility at the Idaho National Laboratory is a US Department of Energy National User Facility engaged in various aspects of materials research for nuclear applications related to fusion and advanced fission systems. Research activities are mainly focused on the interaction of tritium with materials, in particular plasma facing components, liquid breeders, high temperature coolants, fuel cladding, cooling and blanket structures and heat exchangers. Other activities include validation and verification experiments in support of the Fusion Safety Program, such as beryllium dust reactivity and dust transport in vacuum vessels, and support of Advanced Test Reactor irradiation experiments. This paper presents an overview of the programs engaged in the activities, which include the US-Japan TITAN collaboration, the US ITER program, the Next Generation Power Plant program and the tritium production program, and a presentation of ongoing experiments as well as a summary of recent results with emphasis on fusion relevant materials.

  1. Establishing a system of nuclear materials accountancy and control at the facility level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Lizana, Fernando

    2001-01-01

    This paper is the guide to a workshop designed to enable the participants to gain a better understanding of National Safeguards Systems and their functions. The workshop provides the opportunity to address the principal elements of the accounting system to be implemented at the facility level (research reactor and laboratory facilities) as a part of the national safeguards system

  2. Development of in situ time-resolved Raman spectroscopy facility for dynamic shock loading in materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, S.; Rastogi, V.; Rao, U.; Sijoy, C. D.; Mishra, V.; Deo, M. N.

    2017-11-01

    The transient state of excitation and relaxation processes in materials under shock compression can be investigated by coupling the laser driven shock facility with Raman spectroscopy. For this purpose, a time resolved Raman spectroscopy setup has been developed to monitor the physical and the chemical changes such as phase transitions, chemical reactions, molecular kinetics etc., under shock compression with nanosecond time resolution. This system consist of mainly three parts, a 2 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser system used for generation of pump and probe beams, a Raman spectrometer with temporal and spectral resolution of 1.2 ns and 3 cm-1 respectively and a target holder in confinement geometry assembly. Detailed simulation for the optimization of confinement geometry targets is performed. Time resolved measurement of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) targets at focused laser intensity of 2.2 GW/cm2 has been done. The corresponding pressure in the Aluminum and PTFE are 3.6 and 1.7 GPa respectively. At 1.7 GPa in PTFE, a red shift of 5 cm-1 is observed for the CF2 twisting mode (291 cm-1). Shock velocity in PTFE is calculated by measuring rate of change of ratios of the intensity of Raman lines scattered from shocked volume to total volume of sample in the laser focal spot along the laser axis. The calculated shock velocity in PTFE is found to be 1.64 ± 0.16 km/s at shock pressure of 1.7 GPa, for present experimental conditions.

  3. Nuclear material facilities - security systems and technology R and D trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, D.; Steele, B.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In the US, physical security research and development (R and D) during the 1970s and 1980s created a body of technology and systems engineering that largely defined the industry for several decades. However, despite today's terrorists threats and risks, the overall funding of new and innovative physical security solutions is relatively very small. Such factors constraining physical security R and D include the expansion of overall security responsibilities, the emphasis on programmatic and business performance, in addition to evolving (mis)perceptions that 'the problem has been solved' or that 'anyone can do security'. Underlying these factors, the lack of robust standards and certifications has limited the development and application of physical security products, systems, and services. The research and development of new security technologies must be evaluated against very demanding constraints - including costs/benefits, emerging threats, and policies. Going forward, the goal will be to create a more comprehensive approach to physical security of nuclear material facilities that matches evolving threats and that will complement the transition to an integrated security/operations management environment. Such a management model evaluates the additional value of increasing security alternatives in addition to determining trade-offs between the programmatic mission and security issues. Correspondingly, more explicit and strategically useful measures must be developed to determine importance that, in turn, will influence security-related R and D efforts. The research and development of security technologies should be based upon identified needs and requirements resulting from a systematic analysis of the threat and other conditions. In particular, security technologies and systems must be evaluated in terms of current and long-term impacts. Such needs are (will be) diverse and will depend upon sustained research investments in a broad range of technologies

  4. PIREX II, a new irradiation facility for testing fusion first wall materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmy, P.; Daum, M.; Gavillet, D.; Green, S.; Green, W.V.; Hegedues, F.; Pronnecke, S.; Rohrer, U.; Stiefel, U.; Victoria, M.

    1988-12-01

    A new irradiation facility, PIREX II, became operational in March 1987. It is located on a dedicated beam line split from the main beam of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Irradiation with protons of this energy introduces simultaneously displacement damage, helium and other impurities. Because of the penetration range of 590 MeV protons, both damage and impurities are homogeneously distributed in the target. The installation has its own beam line optics that can support a proton current of up to 50 μA. At a typical beam density of 4 μA/mm 2 , the damage rate in steels is 0.7 x 10 -5 dpa/sec (dpa: displacements per atom) and the helium production rate is 170 appm He/dpa. Both flat tensile specimens of up to 0.4 mm thickness and tubular fatigue samples of 3 mm diameter can be irradiated. Cooling of the temperatures can be controlled between 100 o and 800 o C. Installation of an in situ low cycle fatigue device is foreseen. Beams of up to 20 μA have been obtained, the beam having approximately a gaussian distribution of elliptical cross section with 4 σ between 0.8 and 3 mm by 10 mm. Irradiations for a dosimetry program have been completed on samples of Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Au, W, and the 1.4914 ferritic steel. The evaluation of results allows the correct choice of reactions to be used for determining total dose, from the standpoint of half life and gamma energy. A program of irradiations on candidate materials for the Next European Torus (NET) design (Cu and Cu alloys, the 1.4914 ferritic martensitic steel, W and W-Re alloys and Mo alloys), where the above mentioned characteristics of this type of irradiation can be used advantageously, is now under way. (author) 11 figs., 4 tabs., 20 refs

  5. Class notes from the first international training course on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrington, P.B. (ed.)

    1979-05-01

    The International Training Course on Physical Protection of Nuclear Facilities and Materials was intended for representatives from the developing countries who are responsible for preparing regulations and designing and assessing physical protection systems. The first part of the course consists of lectures on the objectives, organizational characteristics, and licensing and regulations requirements of a state system of physical protection. Since the participants may have little experience in nuclear energy, background information is provided on the topics of nuclear materials, radiation hazards, reactor systems, and reactor operations. Transportation of nuclear materials is addressed and emphasis is placed on regulations. Included in these discussions are presentations by guest speakers from countries outside the United States of America who present their countries' threat to nuclear facilities. Effectiveness evaluation methodology is introduced to the participants by means of instructions which teach them how to use logic trees and the EASI (Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption) program. The following elements of a physical protection system are discussed: barriers, protective force, intrusion detection systems, communications, and entry-control systems. Total systems concepts of physical protection system design are emphasized throughout the course. Costs, manpower/technology trade-offs, and other practical considerations are discussed. Approximately one-third of the course is devoted to practical exercises during which the attendees participatein problem solving. A hypothetical nuclear facility is introduced, and the attendees participate in the conceptual design of a physical protection system for the facility.

  6. Class notes from the first international training course on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrington, P.B.

    1979-05-01

    The International Training Course on Physical Protection of Nuclear Facilities and Materials was intended for representatives from the developing countries who are responsible for preparing regulations and designing and assessing physical protection systems. The first part of the course consists of lectures on the objectives, organizational characteristics, and licensing and regulations requirements of a state system of physical protection. Since the participants may have little experience in nuclear energy, background information is provided on the topics of nuclear materials, radiation hazards, reactor systems, and reactor operations. Transportation of nuclear materials is addressed and emphasis is placed on regulations. Included in these discussions are presentations by guest speakers from countries outside the United States of America who present their countries' threat to nuclear facilities. Effectiveness evaluation methodology is introduced to the participants by means of instructions which teach them how to use logic trees and the EASI (Estimate of Adversary Sequence Interruption) program. The following elements of a physical protection system are discussed: barriers, protective force, intrusion detection systems, communications, and entry-control systems. Total systems concepts of physical protection system design are emphasized throughout the course. Costs, manpower/technology trade-offs, and other practical considerations are discussed. Approximately one-third of the course is devoted to practical exercises during which the attendees participatein problem solving. A hypothetical nuclear facility is introduced, and the attendees participate in the conceptual design of a physical protection system for the facility

  7. ACTINIDE AND ULTRA-HEAVY ABUNDANCES IN THE LOCAL GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS: AN ANALYSIS OF THE RESULTS FROM THE LDEF ULTRA-HEAVY COSMIC-RAY EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, J. [Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT), School of Physics, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Thompson, A.; O' Sullivan, D.; Daly, J.; Drury, L. [School of Cosmic Physics, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Domingo, V.; Wenzel, K.-P. [European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC), Keplerlaan 1, Postbus 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    The LDEF Ultra-Heavy Cosmic-Ray Experiment (UHCRE) detected Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) of charge Z {>=} 70 in Earth orbit with an exposure factor of 170 m{sup 2} sr yr, much larger than any other experiment. The major results include the first statistically significant uniform sample of GCR actinides with 35 events passing quality cuts, evidence for the existence of transuranic nuclei in the GCR with one {sub 96}Cm candidate event, and a low {sub 82}Pb/{sub 78}Pt ratio consistent with other experiments. The probability of the existence of a transuranic component is estimated as 96%, while the most likely {sub 92}U/{sub 90}Th ratio is found to be 0.4 within a wide 70% confidence interval ranging from 0 to 0.96. Overall, the results are consistent with a volatility-based acceleration bias and source material which is mainly ordinary interstellar medium material with some recent contamination by freshly synthesized material. Uncertainty in the key {sub 92}U/{sub 90}Th ratio is dominated by statistical errors resulting from the small sample size and any improved determination will thus require an experiment with a substantially larger exposure factor than the UHCRE.

  8. Operational experience in the non-destructive assay of fissile material in General Electric's nuclear fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    Operational experience in the non-destructive assay of fissile material in a variety of forms and containers and incorporation of the assay devices into the accountability measurement system for General Electric's Wilmington Fuel Fabrication Facility measurement control programme is detailed. Description of the purpose and related operational requirements of each non-destructive assay system is also included. In addition, the accountability data acquisition and processing system is described in relation to its interaction with the various non-destructive assay devices and scales used for accountability purposes within the facility. (author)

  9. {sup 137}Cs sorption into bentonite from Cidadap-Tasikmalaya as buffer material for disposal demonstration plant facility at Serpong

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setiawan, B., E-mail: bravo@batan.go.id; Sriwahyuni, H., E-mail: bravo@batan.go.id; Ekaningrum, NE., E-mail: bravo@batan.go.id; Sumantry, T., E-mail: bravo@batan.go.id [Radwaste Technology Center-National Nuclear Energy Agency, PUSPIPTEK, Serpong-Tangerang 15310 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    According to co-location principle, near surface disposal type the disposal demonstration plant facility will be build at Serpong nuclear area. The facility also for anticipation of future needs to provide national facility for the servicing of radwaste management of non-nuclear power plant activity in Serpong Nuclear Area. It is needs to study the material of buffer and backfill for the safety of demonstration plant facility. A local bentonite rock from Cidadap-Tasikmalaya was used as the buffer materials. Objective of experiment is to find out the specific data of sorption characteristic of Cidadap bentonite as buffer material in a radwaste disposal system. Experiments were performed in batch method, where bentonite samples were contacted with CsCl solution labeled with Cs-137 in 100 ml/g liquid:solid ratio. Initial Cs concentration was 10{sup −8} M and to study the effects of ionic strength and Cs concentration in solution, 0.1 and 1.0 M NaCl also CsCl concentration ranging 10{sup −8} - 10{sup −4} M were added in solution. As the indicator of Cs saturated in bentonite samples, Kd value was applied. Affected parameters in the experiment were contact time, effects of ionic strength and concentration of CsCl. Results showed that sorption of Cs by bentonite reached constantly after 16 days contacted, and Kd value was 10.600 ml/g. Effect of CsCl concentration on Kd value may decreased in increased in CsCl concentration. Effect of ionic strength increased according to increased in concentration of background and would effect to Kd value due to competition of Na ions and Cs in solution interacts with bentonite. By obtaining the bentonite character data as buffer material, the results could be used as the basis for making of design and the basic of performance assessment the near surface disposal facility in terms of isolation capacity of radwaste later.

  10. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertarelli, A., E-mail: alessandro.bertarelli@cern.ch [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Berthome, E. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Boccone, V. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carra, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cerutti, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Charitonidis, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Machines and Experimental Facilities Group (EN-MEF), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Charrondiere, C. [CERN, Engineering Department, Industrial Controls and Engineering Group (EN-ICE), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Dallocchio, A.; Fernandez Carmona, P.; Francon, P.; Gentini, L.; Guinchard, M.; Mariani, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Masi, A. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marques dos Santos, S.D.; Moyret, P. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Peroni, L. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Redaelli, S. [CERN, Beams Department, Accelerators and Beams Physics Group (BE-ABP), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Scapin, M. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The method presented in this paper, combining experimental measurements with numerical simulations, may find applications to assess materials under very high strain rates and temperatures in domains well beyond particle physics (severe accidents in fusion and fission nuclear facilities, space debris impacts, fast and intense loadings on materials and structures etc.)

  11. Low-Gravity Centrifuge Facilities for Asteroid Lander and Material Processing and Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphaug, E.; Thangavelautham, J.; Schwartz, S.

    2018-02-01

    We are developing space centrifuge research facilities for attaining low-gravity to micro-gravity geological environmental conditions representative of the environment on the surfaces of asteroids and comets.

  12. The RaDIATE High-Energy Proton Materials Irradiation Experiment at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammigan, Kavin; et al.

    2017-05-01

    The RaDIATE collaboration (Radiation Damage In Accelerator Target Environments) was founded in 2012 to bring together the high-energy accelerator target and nuclear materials communities to address the challenging issue of radiation damage effects in beam-intercepting materials. Success of current and future high intensity accelerator target facilities requires a fundamental understanding of these effects including measurement of materials property data. Toward this goal, the RaDIATE collaboration organized and carried out a materials irradiation run at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer facility (BLIP). The experiment utilized a 181 MeV proton beam to irradiate several capsules, each containing many candidate material samples for various accelerator components. Materials included various grades/alloys of beryllium, graphite, silicon, iridium, titanium, TZM, CuCrZr, and aluminum. Attainable peak damage from an 8-week irradiation run ranges from 0.03 DPA (Be) to 7 DPA (Ir). Helium production is expected to range from 5 appm/DPA (Ir) to 3,000 appm/DPA (Be). The motivation, experimental parameters, as well as the post-irradiation examination plans of this experiment are described.

  13. Near term, low cost, 14 MeV fusion neutron irradiation facility for testing the viability of fusion structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulcinski, Gerald L., E-mail: glkulcin@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Radel, Ross F. [Phoenix Nuclear Labs LLC, Monona, WI (United States); Davis, Andrew [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-11-01

    For over 50 years, engineers have been looking for an irradiation facility that can provide a fusion reactor appropriate neutron spectrum over a significant volume to test fusion reactor materials that is relatively inexpensive and can be built in a minimum of time. The 14 MeV neutron irradiation facility described here can nearly exactly duplicate the neutron spectrum typical of a DT fusion reactor first wall at damage rates of ≈4 displacements per atom and 40 appm He generated over a 2 l volume per full power year of operation. The projected cost of this multi-beam facility is estimated at ≈$20 million and it can be built in <4 years. A single-beam prototype, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, is already being built to produce medical isotopes. The neutrons are produced by a 300 keV deuterium beam accelerated into 4 kPa (30 Torr) tritium target. The total tritium inventory is <2 g and <0.1 g of T{sub 2} is consumed per year. The core technology proposed has already been fully demonstrated, and no new plasma physics or materials innovations will be required for the test facility to become operational.

  14. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charitonidis, N; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Fernandez Carmona, P; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Marques dos Santos, S D; Moyret, P; Peroni, L; Redaelli, S; Scapin, M

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser ...

  15. Overview of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) project and Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yujiro

    2008-01-01

    The J-PARC project has been conducted jointly by JAERI and KEK since 2001. This paper reports an overview and current status of the project. The high intensity proton accelerator consists of a 400 MeV Linac, a 3 GeV synchrotron and 50 GeV synchrotron to deliver MW level pulsed proton beam to experimental facilities. The MW proton power will provide an advanced scientific experimental research complex aiming at making breakthroughs in materials and life science with neutron and muon, nuclear and elementary physics, etc. Regarding the project being close to its completion in 2008, this paper describes the overview of J-PARC project with emphasis of the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility, in which the MW pulsed neutron and muon sources, are placed to provide high quality neutron and muon beams to the world wide users. (author)

  16. Waste Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset was developed from the Vermont DEC's list of certified solid waste facilities. It includes facility name, contact information, and the materials...

  17. SIMS analysis of extended impact features on LDEF experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, S.; Foote, J.; Jessberger, E. K.; Simon, C.; Stadermann, F. J.; Swan, P.; Walker, R.; Zinner, E.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed here are the first Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis of projectile material deposited in extended impact features on Ge wafers from the trailing edge. Although most capture cells lost their plastic film covers, they contain extended impact features that apparently were produced by high velocity impacts when the plastic foils were still intact. Detailed optical scanning of all bare capture cells from the trailing edge revealed more than 100 impacts. Fifty-eight were selected by scanning electron microscope (SEM) inspection as prime candidates for SIMS analysis. Preliminary SIMS measurements were made on 15 impacts. More than half showed substantial enhancements of Mg, Al, Si, Ca, and Fe in the impact region, indicating micrometeorites as the projectiles.

  18. 20th International Training Course (ITC-20) on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials evaluation report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Amanda Ann

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this evaluation report is to provide the information necessary to improve the effectiveness of the ITC provided to the International Atomic Energy Agency Member States. This report examines ITC-20 training content, delivery methods, scheduling, and logistics. Ultimately, this report evaluates whether the course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the participants needs in the protection of nuclear materials and facilities.

  19. Performance of backfill materials in near surface disposal facilities for low and intermediate level radwaste. Appendix 4: China (a)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunli, G.; Yawen, H.; Zhiwen, F.; Anxi, C.; Xiuzhen, L.; Jinsheng, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Backfill material is an important component of a multi-barriered disposal facility for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. This appendix describes the work concerning 'performance study on engineering materials of shallow land disposal of low and intermediate level radwaste'. At the time of the CRP, China had planned to establish five regional disposal sites for low-and-intermediate level radioactive waste. According to the potential distribution of these sites, forty-three sampling points were selected through information survey and table discussion. After field survey and screening, eight of them were selected for further studies in laboratory. Basic physical and chemical properties of each sample were measured in laboratory. The results indicate that no one of the samples can individually function as the backfill material in a multi-barriered near surface facility. Then nine additives for adsorption modification were tested using a static method. Further adsorption tests were conducted: three additives screened out in previous experiment were evaluated using the static method. Results obtained show that the Kd values of mixtures of 90% NW-3 and 10% BC for Co-60, Cs-134 and Sr-85, compared with those of 100% NW-3, are 4.8, 4.6 and 4.7 times higher, respectively. Effects of contact time, pH of tracer solutions and radionuclide concentrations of tracer solutions on Kd values of three samples, NW-3, BC and 90% NW-3 with 10% BC, were also be evaluated using the static method. Column tests were performed to evaluate migration of Co-60, Cs-134 and Sr-85 in NW-3 columns with different densities. The column tests were carried out for 210 days. However, no breakthrough was obtained. Long term performance of backfill materials was assessed through natural analogue. We compared Chinese ancient tombs with near-surface low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) disposal facilities. Both were designed based upon multi-barrier principle. Then three

  20. Catalogue of facilities in Member States of the European Community for testing the packaging of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchal, A.; Swindell, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    A group of experts convened by the Commission of the European Communities in Brussels on 2 July 1980 to suggest possible actions in connection with the safe transport of radioactive materials, recommended, among other things, that the Commission should collect and distribute information on packaging test facilities in Member States. In response to that recommendation a letter of enquiry was sent informally, on behalf of the Commission, to the competent authorities of the Member States. The purpose of the enquiry is to assist in the effective implementation of the internationally accepted Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials through the dissemination of information on test facilities and on the terms and conditions under which the services of these facilities could be made available for the testing of packaging designed in other countries. As an aid to the presentation of the material in a harmonized format, it was suggested that the information provided should cover relevant topics. The information received by the Commission has been assembled for each installation according to this format

  1. High intensity 5 eV cw laser substained O-atom exposure facility for material degradation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, J.B.; Spangler, L.H.; Hoffbauer, M.A.; Archuleta, F.A.

    1986-01-01

    An atomic oxygen exposure facility has been developed for studies of material degradation. The goal of these studies is to provide design criteria and information for the manufacture of long life (20 to 30 years) construction material for use in low earth orbit. The studies that are being undertaken using the facility will provide (1) absolute reaction cross sections for use in engineering design problems, (2) formulations of reaction mechanisms for use in selection of suitable existing materials and design of new more resistant ones, and (3) calibration of flight hardware (mass spectrometers, etc.) in order to directly relate experiments performed in low earth orbit to ground based investigations. The facility consists of (1) a cw laser sustained discharge source of O-atoms having a variable energy up to 5 eV and an intensity of between 10 15 -10 17 O-atoms s -1 cm -2 , (2) an atomic beam formation and diagnostics system consisting of various stages of differential pumping, mass spectrometer detector and time-of-flight analysis, (3) a spinning rotor viscometer for absolute O-atom flux measurements, and (4) provision for using the system for calibration of flight instruments. 15 refs., 10 figs

  2. HiRadMat at CERN/SPS - A dedicated facility providing high intensity beam pulses to material samples

    CERN Multimedia

    Charitonidis, N; Efthymiopoulos, I

    2014-01-01

    HiRadMat (High Radiation to Materials), constructed in 2011, is a facility at CERN designed to provide high‐intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, high power beam targets, collimators…) can be tested. The facility uses a 440 GeV proton beam extracted from the CERN SPS with a pulse length of up to 7.2 us, and with a maximum pulse energy of 3.4 MJ (3xE13 proton/pulse). In addition to protons, ion beams with energy of 440 GeV/charge and total pulse energy of 21 kJ can be provided. The beam parameters can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. HiRadMat is not an irradiation facility where large doses on equipment can be accumulated. It is rather a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high‐intensity pulsed beams on materials or accelerator component assemblies in a controlled environment. The fa‐ cility is designed for a maximum of 1E16 protons per year, dist...

  3. Coordinated safeguards for materials management in a uranium--plutonium nitrate-to-oxide coconversion facility: Coprecal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayem, H.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dietz, R.J.; Hakkila, E.A.; Kern, E.A.; Schelonka, E.P.; Shipley, J.P.; Smith, D.B.

    1979-02-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of an advanced materials-management system for safeguarding special nuclear materials in a uranium--plutonium nitrate-to-oxide coconversion facility based on the Coprecal process. Design concepts are presented for near real-time (dynamic) accountability by forming dynamic materials balances from information provided by chemical and nondestructive analyses and from process-control instrumentation. Modeling and simulation techniques are used to compare the sensitivities of proposed dynamic materials accounting strategies to both abrupt and protracted diversion. The safeguards implications of coconversion as well as some unique features of the reference process are discussed and design criteria are identified to improve the safeguardability of the Coprecal coconversion process

  4. Nuclear Security Recommendations on Radioactive Material and Associated Facilities: Recommendations (Spanish Edition); Recomendaciones de Seguridad Fisica Nuclear sobre Materiales Radiactivos e Instalaciones Conexas: Recomendaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    The purpose of this publication is to provide guidance to States and competent authorities on how to develop or enhance, implement and maintain a nuclear security regime for facilities dealing with radioactive material and associated activities. This is to be achieved through the establishment or improvement of their capabilities to implement a legislative and regulatory framework to address the security of radioactive material, associated facilities and associated activities in order to reduce the likelihood of malicious acts involving those materials. These recommendations reflect a broad consensus among States on the requirements which should be met for the security of radioactive material, associated facilities and activities.

  5. Standard format and content for emergency plans for fuel cycle and materials facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This regulatory guides is being developed to provide guidance acceptable to the NRC staff on the information to be included in emergency plans and to establish a format for presenting the information. Use of a standard format will help ensure uniformity and completeness in the preparation of emergency plans. An acceptable emergency plan should describe the licensed activities conducted at the facility and the types of accidents that might occur. It should provide information on classifying postulated accidents and the licensee's procedures for notifying and coordinating with offsite authorities. The plan should provide information on emergency response measures that might be necessary, the equipment and facilities available to respond to an emergency, and how the licensee will maintain emergency preparedness capability. It should describe the records and reports that will be maintained. There should also be a section on recovery after an accident and plans for restoring the facility to a safe condition. 4 refs

  6. Team engineering for successful reuse and mission enhancement of a former DOE Weapons Material Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackford, L.T.; Mizner, J.H. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes the team engineering approach used to resolve issues associated with converting a 50-year-old fuel processing facility into a decontamination facility. In only nine months, the multi-disciplinary team formed for this task has made significant progress toward both long-term and short-term goals, including conceptual design of two decontamination modules. The team's accomplishments are even more notable in light of frequent changes in scope and mission. Today, the team serves as a venue for troubleshooting operational issues, sharing vendor information, developing long-range strategies, and addressing integration issues within the facility's organizational structure. The team's approach could serve as a useful model to address the many issues surrounding the transition of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and commercial complexes from a production and supply role to one of cleanup and environmental remediation

  7. A real-time material control concept for safeguarding special nuclear material in United States licensed processing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shea, T.E.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes general safeguards research being undertaken by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Efforts to improve the ability of United States licensed plants to contend with the perceived threat of covert material theft are emphasized. The framework for this improvement is to break down the internal control and accounting system into subsystems to achieve material isolation, inventory control, inventory characterization, and inventory containment analysis. A general programme is outlined to develop and evaluate appropriate mechanisms, integrate selected mechanisms into subsystems, and evaluate the subsystems in the context of policy requirements. (author)

  8. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  9. CSER-98-002: Criticality analysis for the storage of special nuclear material sources and standards in the WRAP Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility will store uranium and transuranic (TRU) sources and standards for certification that WRAP meets the requirements of the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In addition, WRAP must meet internal requirements for testing and validation of measuring instruments for nondestructive assay (NDA). In order to be certified for WIPP, WRAP will participate in the NDA Performance Demonstration Program (PDP). This program is a blind test of the NDA capabilities for TRU waste. It is intended to ensure that the NDA capabilities of this facility satisfy the requirements of the quality assurance program plan for the WIPP. The PDP standards have been provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for this program. These standards will be used in the WRAP facility. To internally check the accuracy and sensitivity of the NDA instruments, a further set of sources and standards will also be used by the facility. Each sealed source or standard will be referred to herein as a unit. Various combinations of these units will be placed in test drums and/or boxes which will be subject to their own limits until unloaded. There will be two sealed test drums with five grams of weapons grade plutonium loaded in them. These drums will be appropriately marked and will be subject to the unit limits rather than the drum limits. This analysis shows that the storage and use of special nuclear material sources and standards within the limited control facility of WRAP (Rooms 101 and 104) is safe from a criticality standpoint. With the form, geometry, and masses involved with this evaluation, a criticality is not possible. The limits given in Section 2 should be imposed on facility operations

  10. Test facility of transport packagings for radioactive materials in the St. Petersburg region (Russia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guskov, V.D.; Korotkov, G.V.; Drozdov, V.P.; Ershov, V.N.; Yanovskaya, N.S.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes the test facility located near St. Petersburg (Russia) where test of packagings of mass up to 140 tons are carried out. The results of tests of some new designs of packaging for irradiated nuclear fuel are briefly considered. (author)

  11. Program for upgrading nuclear materials protection, control, and accounting at all facilities within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuferev, V.; Zhikharev, S.; Yakimov, Y.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy-Russian program for strengthening nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A), plans have now been formulated to install an integrated MPC and A system at all facilities containing large quantities of weapons-usable nuclear material within the All-Russian Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF, Arzamas-16) complex. In addition to storage facilities, the complex houses a number of critical facilities used to conduct nuclear physics research and facilities for developing procedures for disassembly of nuclear weapons

  12. The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities; Proteccion Fisica De Los Materiales Y Las Instalaciones Nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-15

    Physical protection against the theft or unauthorized diversion of nuclear materials and against the sabotage of nuclear facilities by individuals or groups has long been a matter of national and international concern. Although responsibility for establishing and operating a comprehensive physical protection system for nuclear materials and facilities within a State rests entirely with the Government of that State, it is not a matter of indifference to other States whether and to what extent that responsibility is fulfilled. Physical protection has therefore become a matter of international concern and co-operation. The need for international co-operation becomes evident in situations where the effectiveness of physical protection in one State depends on the taking by other States also of adequate measures to deter or defeat hostile actions against nuclear facilities and nuclear materials, particularly when such materials are transported across national frontiers [Spanish] La proteccion fisica contra el robo o la desviacion no autorizada de materiales nucleares y contra el sabotaje de las instalaciones nucleares por parte de individuos o grupos es motivo de preocupacion nacional e internacional desde hace mucho tiempo. Aunque la obligacion de crear y hacer funcionar un sistema completo de proteccion fisica de las instalaciones y materiales nucleares en el territorio de un Estado determinado incumbe exclusivamente al Gobierno de dicho Estado, el que esa obligacion se cumpla o no, y si se cumple, en que medida o hasta que punto, son cosas que no dejan indiferentes a los demas Estados. Por ello, la proteccion fisica se ha convertido en motivo de interes y cooperacion internacional. La necesidad de la cooperacion internacional se hace evidente en los casos en que la eficacia de la proteccion fisica en el territorio de un Estado depende de que otros Estados tomen tambien medidas apropiadas para evitar o hacer fracasar los actos hostiles dirigidos contra instalaciones y

  13. Evaluation of the effects of strain rate on material properties of the high strength concrete used in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Shohei; Shirai, Koji; Takayanagi, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Concrete physical properties (compressive strength, tensile strength, initial elastic modulus and maximum strain) affected by strain rate weren't fully utilize for material model in dynamic response analysis for seismic and impact load because of few reports and various difficulties of impact tests. Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) methods are the most popular high-speed material testing and were also applied for composite material. We applied SHPB for concrete specimen and reported the strain rate effect to the concrete physical property. We used hydraulic testing device for 10 -5 /s to 10 0 /s strain rate and SHPB methods for over 10 1 /s. Four cases of concrete tests (high (50MPa at 28days)/low (35MPa at 28days) compressive strength (based on the test of exiting nuclear power facilities) and dry/wet condition) were done. And we formulated strain rate effect about compressive strength and initial elastic modulus from comparing with previous studies. (author)

  14. Technical Meeting on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycle Facilities with Improved Economic Characteristics. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the meeting were: - To identify the main issues and technical features that affect capital and energy production costs of fast reactors and related fuel cycle facilities; - To present fast reactor concepts and designs with enhanced economic characteristics, as well as innovative technical solutions (components, subsystems, etc.) that have the potential to reduce the capital costs of fast reactors and related fuel cycle facilities; - To present energy models and advanced tools for the cost assessment of innovative fast reactors and associated nuclear fuel cycles; - To discuss the results of studies and on-going R&D activities that address cost reduction and the future economic competitiveness of fast reactors; and - To identify research and technology development needs in the field, also in view of new IAEA initiatives to help and support Member States in improving the economic competitiveness of fast reactors and associated nuclear fuel cycles

  15. Radiation facilities for fusion-reactor first-wall and blanket structural-materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1981-12-01

    Present and future irradiation facilities for the study of fusion reactor irradiation damage are reviewed. Present studies are centered on irradiation in accelerator-based neutron sources, fast- and mixed-spectrum fission reactors, and ion accelerators. The accelerator-based neutron sources are used to demonstrate damage equivalence between high-energy neutrons and fission reactor neutrons. Once equivalence is demonstrated, the large volume of test space available in fission reactors can be used to study displacement damage, and in some instances, the effects of high-helium concentrations and the interaction of displacement damage and helium on properties. Ion bombardment can be used to study the mechanisms of damage evolution and the interaction of displacement damage and helium. These techniques are reviewed, and typical results obtained from such studies are examined. Finally, future techniques and facilities for developing damage levels that more closely approach those expected in an operating fusion reactor are discussed

  16. Remote-maintenance features of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility lithium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, V.P.

    1981-01-01

    The FMIT Facitlity has been redesigned to allow remote maintenance of lithium system components such as the main lithium pump, heat exchanger, traps, and valves. Remote versus contact maintenance is required due to the limited effectiveness of methods planned for control of the radioisotope 7 Be which is formed in the lithium during the neutron generating process. The altered FMIT arrangement provides cubicles for isolation of the main pump and system dump valve to allow personnel access for completing welds on large diameter piping after replacing failed components. Maintenance on other components such as the main heat exchanger and traps will be done remotely. The resulting arrangement provides full capability to meet the required facility availability criteria with minimum impact on the facility and with minimum associated development costs

  17. Fuel elements and fuel element materials. Experimental facilities for fission products lift-off tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, R.J.; Veyrat, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    One of the hypothetical accidents on the HTGR primary cooling circuits is the failure of a circuit resulting in a depressurization in the primary loops of the reactor. There is a risk of release of fission products in relation to the size of the failure. Experimental facilities for HTGR tests were developed: an in pile helium loop Comedie and an out of pile helium loop

  18. Remote handling features of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klos, D.B.; Wierman, R.W.; Kelly, V.P.; Yount, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Initial design of the experimental system provided two modes of access to the test cells. The horizontal mode was the predominant one. However, as the design progressed unacceptable risks were identified that increased personnel exposure to radiation and decreased testing availability of the facility. Consequently, vertical-only access was adopted. Remote handling features of both design concepts are described including the technical basis for the transition from the first to the second concept

  19. Material Accounting Issues at the U.S. MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, E.

    2015-01-01

    The Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) is under construction in the United States. The plant is being licenced by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which as the U.S. SSAC regulates both domestic MC and A and compliance with international safeguards (where applicable). Among the NRC's MC and A requirements for Category I fuel cycle facilities are programmes for item and process monitoring. The NRC also has requirements for timely resolution of alarms and assessment of the validity of alleged thefts. NRC's item monitoring requirement specifies that the operator must be able to verify the 'presence and integrity' of items, with the goal of detecting the loss of items containing 2 kilogrammes of plutonium within certain time periods. The requirements for resolution of alarms and assessment of alleged thefts also generally require some capability to locate and verify items on demand. However, to the extent these regulations mandate that individual items be physically located and verified by hand, they can be difficult (or impossible) to meet for facilities with large numbers of items. The MFFF design was based largely on French facilities that were not subject to similar requirements. Consequently, the applicant proposed a novel item monitoring approach that relies on the data within the plant's computerized inventory and process control systems. This proposal was challenged in July 2010 by intervenors, raising questions such as whether computer systems could be used as the sole means for verification, given the potential for data to be compromised. In February 2014, the NRC's Atomic Safety and Licencing Board issued a decision upholding the applicant's plan, but one of the three judges issued a dissent, citing concern about cyberterrorism. This paper will discuss the issues argued during the hearing and their broader relevance. (author)

  20. Release of radioisotopes and activated materials from nuclear installations and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manfredi, P.F.; Millaud, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    This report discusses the problems of release of items from facilities and installations where radiation-based activities have been carried out. Several situations are reviewed and their release problems are discussed in detail. Particular attention is devoted to the assessment of the activity of the items to be released. A correct assessment of the activity will help the decision about the final use of the items removed from the radiation-related facility, either re-use, entering the public market, recycling, disposal and storage under different procedures. Even the final destination of the building which hosted the facility needs to be decided on the basis of an accurate assessment of the residual activity. The assessment of the activity, besides being fundamental in guaranteeing a safe approach to the procedures related to the release may result in a substantial profit. This is the case of items whose level of activity is so low that they can be put on the public market, reused or recycled for final product subject to very stringent radiation safety requirements. It will be shown that detector techniques play a fundamental role in the release process. In particular, the low-level counting techniques are fundamental in establishing whether or not the unrestrained release is feasible or not

  1. Facile Synthesis of MnPO4·H2O Nanowire/Graphene Oxide Composite Material and Its Application as Electrode Material for High Performance Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we reported a facile one-pot hydrothermal method to synthesize MnPO4·H2O nanowire/graphene oxide composite material with coated graphene oxide. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscope were employed to study its morphology information, and X-ray diffraction was used to study the phase and structure of the material. Additionally, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to study the elements information. To measure electrochemical performances of electrode materials and the symmetry cell, cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and electrochemical impedance spectrometry were conducted on electrochemical workstation using 3 M KOH electrolytes. Importantly, electrochemical results showed that the as-prepared MnPO4·H2O nanowire/graphene oxide composite material exhibited high specific capacitance (287.9 F·g−1 at 0.625 A·g−1 and specific power (1.5 × 105 W·kg−1 at 2.271 Wh·kg−1, which is expected to have promising applications as supercapacitor electrode material.

  2. A novel diamond-based beam position monitoring system for the High Radiation to Materials facility at CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2092886; Höglund, Carina

    The High Radiation to Materials facility employs a high intensity pulsed beam imposing several challenges on the beam position monitors. Diamond has been shown to be a resilient material with its radiation hardness and mechanical strength, while it is also simple due to its wide bandgap removing the need for doping. A new type of diamond based beam position monitor has been constructed, which includes a hole in the center of the diamond where the majority of the beam is intended to pass through. This increases the longevity of the detectors as well as allowing them to be used for high intensity beams. The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the performance of the detectors in the High Radiation to Materials facility for various beam parameters, involving differences in position, size, bunch intensity and bunch number. A prestudy consisting of calibration of the detectors using single incident particles is also presented. The detectors are shown to work as intended after a recalibration of the algorithm, alb...

  3. Insert Concepts for the Material Science Research Rack (MSRR-1) of the Material Science Research Facility (MSRF) on the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Myscha; Carswell, Bill; Farmer, Jeff; Rose, Fred; Tidwell, Paul

    2000-01-01

    The Material Science Research Rack I (MSRR-1) of the Material Science Research Facility (MSRF) contains an Experiment Module (EM) being developed collaboratively by NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). This NASA/ESA EM will accommodate several different removable and replaceable Module Inserts (MIs) which are installed on orbit NASA's planned inserts include the Quench Module Insert (QMI) and the Diffusion Module Insert (DMI). The QMI is a high-gradient Bridgman-type vacuum furnace with quench capabilities used for experiments on directional solidification of metal alloys. The DMI is a vacuum Bridgman-Stockbarger-type furnace for experiments on Fickian and Soret diffusion in liquids. This paper discusses specific design features and performance capabilities of each insert. The paper also presents current prototype QMI hardware analysis and testing activities and selected results.

  4. Savannah River Site's H-Canyon Facility: Impacts of Foreign Obligations on Special Nuclear Material Disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magoulas, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The US has a non-proliferation policy to receive foreign and domestic research reactor returns of spent fuel materials of US origin. These spent fuel materials are returned to the Department of Energy (DOE) and placed in storage in the L-area spent fuel basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The foreign research reactor returns fall subject to the 123 agreements for peaceful cooperation. These ''123 agreements'' are named after section 123 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and govern the conditions of nuclear cooperation with foreign partners. The SRS management of these foreign obligations while planning material disposition paths can be a challenge.

  5. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Facility Registry Service (FRS) Emergency Response (ER) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Facilities - Oil and Hazardous Materials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The purpose of this web feature service is to provide users with access to integrated facility information from FRS, limited to the subset of facilities that link to...

  6. Risks, costs and benefits analysis for exhumation of buried radioactive materials at a nuclear fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, J.S.; Moore, R.A.; Huston, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    A Risks, Costs and Benefits analysis provides a tool for selecting a cost-effective remedial action alternative. This analysis can help avoid transferring risks to other populations and can objectively measure the benefits of a specific remedial action project. This paper describes the methods and results of a Risks, Costs and Benefits analysis performed at a nuclear fuel fabrication facility. The analysis examined exhuming and transporting radioactive waste to an offsite disposal facility. Risks evaluated for the remedial action project were divided into two categories: risks posed to the worker and risks posed to public health. Risks to workers included exposure to radioactive contaminants during excavation and packaging of waste materials and the use of heavy machinery. Potential public health risks included exposure to radioactive materials during transport from the exhumation site to the disposal facility. Methods included use of site-specific and published data, and existing computer models. Occupational risks were quantified using data from similar onsite remedial action projects. Computer modeling was used to evaluate public health risks from transporting radioactive materials; the consequences or probability of traffic accidents; and radiation exposure to potential inhabitants occupying the site considering various land use scenarios. A costs analysis was based on data obtained from similar onsite remedial action projects. Scenarios used to identify benefits resulting from the remedial action project included (1) an evaluation of reduction in risks to human health; (2) cost reductions associated with the unrestricted release of the property; and (3) benefits identified by evaluating regulatory mandates applicable to decommissioning. This paper will provide an overview of the methods used and a discussion of the results of a Risks, Costs and Benefits analysis for a site-specific remedial action scenario

  7. Heat-processing method and facility for helium-containing metal material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takahiko; Kodama, Hideyo; Matsumoto, Toshimi; Aono, Yasuhisa; Nagata, Tetsuya; Hattori, Shigeo; Kaneda, Jun-ya; Ono, Shigeki.

    1996-01-01

    Electric current is supplied to an objective portion of a He-containing metal material to be applied with heat processing without causing melting, to decrease the He content of the portion. Subsequently, the defect portion of the tissues of the He-containing metal is modified by heating the portion with melting. Since electric current can be supplied to the metal material in a state where the metal material is heated and the temperature thereof is elevated, an effect of further reducing the He content can be obtained. Further, if the current supply and/or the heating relative to the metal material is performed in a vacuum or inert gas atmosphere, an effect of reducing the degradation of the surface of the objective portion to be supplied with electric current can be obtained. (T.M.)

  8. Selection of the reference concept for the surface examination stations in the fuels and materials examination facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frandsen, G.B.; Nash, C.R.

    1978-01-01

    The prototype surface examination station for the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) will use closed circuit television (CCTV) for routine modes of operation along with a nuclear periscope for special examination needs. The CCTV and the nuclear periscope were evaluated against prescribed station requirements and compared in a side-by-side demonstration. A quantitative evaluation of their outputs showed that both systems were capable of meeting surface anomaly detection requirements. The CCTV system was superior in its ability to collect, suppress and present data into a more useful form for the experimenters

  9. Application of the basic concepts of dynamic materials accountancy to the Tokai spent fuel reprocessing facilityssing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovett, J.E.; Ikawa, Koji; Hirata, Mitsuho; Augustson, R.H.

    1980-11-01

    During 1978 and 1979 individuals from the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute investigated the feasibility of applying the basic concepts of dynamic materials accountancy to PNC-Tokai reprocessing facility in Japan. The system developed for Tokai requires weekly in-process physical inventories for the process MBA, and allows 2-3 additional days for completion of measurements and for data reduction and evaluation. The study concluded that such a system would be feasible, and recommended that an actual field test should be conducted as soon as feasible. (author)

  10. Modeling of the charge-state separation at ITEP experimental facility for material science based on a Bernas ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barminova, H Y; Saratovskyh, M S

    2016-02-01

    The experiment automation system is supposed to be developed for experimental facility for material science at ITEP, based on a Bernas ion source. The program CAMFT is assumed to be involved into the program of the experiment automation. CAMFT is developed to simulate the intense charged particle bunch motion in the external magnetic fields with arbitrary geometry by means of the accurate solution of the particle motion equation. Program allows the consideration of the bunch intensity up to 10(10) ppb. Preliminary calculations are performed at ITEP supercomputer. The results of the simulation of the beam pre-acceleration and following turn in magnetic field are presented for different initial conditions.

  11. Ventilation and exhaust ducts for dry storage facilities with self-heating radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knappe, O.; Hame, W.

    1986-01-01

    The storage facilities are cooled by natural convection. In order to achieve this, the air inlet and outlet openings or ducts for the PWR and BWR fuel store are arranged at the level of the roof structure. There are two types of air inlet openings arranged on top and on the sides respectively but having got common inlet ducts. Air supply is improved by means of baffle noses, baffle edges, and baffle plates. The exhaust air ducts terminate near the roof structure, the openings having got dropping edges, protective sills and separating plates. (orig./PW)

  12. Case study of a traditional material (adobe) for facilities design destined to X-ray equipment emplacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar Serrano, Lola

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work is to use the existent material (adobe) in the national market as an alternative for an optimum design that counts with the conditions for radiological protection as well as an adequate infrastructure to service assistance. Therefore, it gives a tool of professional use for an X-ray installation design, because the adobes represent an adequate protection for employees as Worker occupational exposed (WOE) and for general public, also for economics reasons and construction technical aspects. With the study of above material is demonstrated that in X-ray facilities construction is not always necessary the use of lead sheets or another materials for walls, which are used as shielding elements against ionizing radiation. The adobe election for this study, is because Bolivia counts with a great percentage of constructed areas whit this type of material because is economical and raw material is accessible for users. From the experimental tests we get the graphics that allow to found the half value thickness (HVT) of the half layer (HVL) of this adobe, is that thickness of material with when placed in the path of the radiation will attenuate it to one half its original value. A tenth value thickness (TVT) similarly reduces the radiation to one tenth of its original value. Material which contains heavy atoms and molecules such as steel and lead provide the most effective (thinnest) shields for X-rays. The contribute of this study, carried out with the construction material (adobe) that exists in the national market will be of great utility for society because there is no values recorded in the bibliography. (author)

  13. Slow positron applications at slow positron facility of institute of materials structure science, KEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, Toshio; Mochizuki, Izumi; Wada, Ken; Toge, Nobukazu; Shidara, Tetsuo

    2018-05-01

    Slow Positron Facility at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy-tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam created by a dedicated ˜ 50 MeV linac. It operates in a short pulse (width 1-12 ns, variable, 5×106 e+/s) and a long pulse (width 1.2 µs, 5×107 e+/s) modes of 50 Hz. High energy positrons from pair creation are moderated by reemission after thermalization in W foils. The reemitted positrons are then electrostatically accelerated to a desired energy up to 35 keV and magnetically transported. A pulse-stretching section (pulse stretcher) is installed in the middle of the beamline. It stretches the slow positron pulse for the experiments where too many positrons annihilating in the sample at the same time has to be avoided. Four experiment stations for TRHEPD (total-reflection high-energy positron diffraction), LEPD (low-energy positron diffraction), Ps- (positronium negative ion), and Ps-TOF (positronium time-of-flight) experiments are connected to the beamline branches, SPF-A3, SPF-A4, SPF-B1 and SPF-B2, respectively. Recent results of these stations are briefly described.

  14. Design and operation of off-gas cleaning and ventilation systems in facilities handling low and intermediate level radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The number of developing countries constructing new nuclear facilities is increasing. These facilities include the production and processing of radioisotopes, as well as all types of laboratories and installations, which handle radioactive material and deal with the treatment of radioactive wastes. Ventilation and air cleaning systems are a vital part of the general design of any nuclear facility. The combination of a well designed ventilation system with thorough cleaning of exhaust air is the main method of preventing radioactive contamination of the air in working areas and in the surrounding atmosphere. This report provides the latest information on the design and operation of off-gas cleaning and ventilation systems for designers and regulatory authorities in the control and operation of such systems in nuclear establishments. The report presents the findings of an Advisory Group Meeting held in Vienna from 1 to 5 December 1986 and attended by 12 experts from 11 Member States. Following this meeting, a revised report was prepared by the International Atomic Energy Agency Secretariat and three consultants, M.J. Kabat (Canada), W. Stotz (Federal Republic of Germany) and W.A. Fairhurst (United Kingdom). The final draft was commented upon and approved by the participants of the meeting. 69 refs, 37 figs, 12 tabs

  15. Comparison between penalties coming from malevolent act against nuclear materials and facilities in Japan, US, Italy and France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    In the last years, some relevant terrorist events have demonstrated that an attack on a nuclear facility might be attempted and that terrorists have formidable capabilities and dedication. As a consequence, these events have served as a catalyst for the development of the global nuclear security regime in all countries. This has led to an increased focus on defenses against terrorists at nuclear facilities, as well as at other critical infrastructures. This intention of increase defense is carried out from both an operational and a legislative point of view. In addition to, and following the IAEA recommendations, national law starts considering these events in term of penalties of these acts. In this framework, this work aimed to compare the sanctions and punishments provided from law coming not only from the non-conformity with the legislation, but also from malevolent act against nuclear materials and facilities, in different countries. Taking as reference the US (with the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 as amended) and France (with the French Defense Code), the Italian and Japanese case will be compared showing similarities, differences and vacancies in their legislations. (author)

  16. Neutron-irradiation facilities at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source-I for fusion magnet materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.S.; Blewitt, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    The decommissioning of reactor-based neutron sources in the USA has led to the development of a new generation of neutron sources that employ high-energy accelerators. Among the accelerator-based neutron sources presently in operation, the highest-flux source is the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), a user facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Neutrons in this source are produced by the interaction of 400 to 500 MeV protons with either of two 238 U target systems. In the Radiation Effects Facility (REF), the 238 U target is surrounded by Pb for neutron generatjion and reflection. The REF has three separate irradiation thimbles. Two thimbles provide irradiation temperatures between that of liquid He and several hundred degrees centigrade. The third thimble operates at ambient temperature. The large irradiation volume, the neutron spectrum and flux, the ability to transfer samples without warm up, and the dedication of the facilities during the irradiation make this ideally suited for radiation damage studies on components for superconducting fusion magnets. Possible experiments for fusion magnet materials are discussed on cyclic irradiation and annealing of stabilizers in a high magnetic field, mechanical tests on organic insulation irradiated at 4 K, and superconductors measured in high fields after irradiation

  17. Materials-related issues in the safety and licensing of nuclear fusion facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, N.; Merrill, B.; Cadwallader, L.; Di Pace, L.; El-Guebaly, L.; Humrickhouse, P.; Panayotov, D.; Pinna, T.; Porfiri, M.-T.; Reyes, S.; Shimada, M.; Willms, S.

    2017-09-01

    Fusion power holds the promise of electricity production with a high degree of safety and low environmental impact. Favourable characteristics of fusion as an energy source provide the potential for this very good safety and environmental performance. But to fully realize the potential, attention must be paid in the design of a demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO) or a commercial power plant to minimize the radiological hazards. These hazards arise principally from the inventory of tritium and from materials that become activated by neutrons from the plasma. The confinement of these radioactive substances, and prevention of radiation exposure, are the primary goals of the safety approach for fusion, in order to minimize the potential for harm to personnel, the public, and the environment. The safety functions that are implemented in the design to achieve these goals are dependent on the performance of a range of materials. Degradation of the properties of materials can lead to challenges to key safety functions such as confinement. In this paper the principal types of material that have some role in safety are recalled. These either represent a potential source of hazard or contribute to the amelioration of hazards; in each case the related issues are reviewed. The resolution of these issues lead, in some instances, to requirements on materials specifications or to limits on their performance.

  18. Analysis of the tritium-water (T-H2O) system for a fusion material test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.; Reed, C.B.

    1992-04-01

    The need for a high flux, high energy neutron test facility to evaluate performance of fusion reactor materials is urgent. An accelerator based D-Li source is generally accepted as the most reasonable approach to a high flux neutron source in the near future. The idea is to bombard a high energy (35 MeV) deuteron beam into a lithium target to produce high energy neutrons to simulate the fusion environment. More recently it was proposed to use a 21 MeV triton beam incident on a water jet target to produce the required neutron source for testing and simulating fusion material environments. The advantages of such a system are discussed. Major concerns regarding the feasibility of this system are also highlighted

  19. Results from the CDE phase activity on neutron dosimetry for the international fusion materials irradiation facility test cell

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, B; Maruccia, G; Petrizzi, L; Bignon, G; Blandin, C; Chauffriat, S; Lebrun, A; Recroix, H; Trapp, J P; Kaschuck, Y

    2000-01-01

    The international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) project deals with the study of an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium source, producing high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials for fusion energy reactors. IFMIF would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator based irradiation tests. This paper describes the activity on neutron/gamma dosimetry (necessary for the characterization of the specimens' irradiation) performed in the frame of the IFMIF conceptual design evaluation (CDE) neutronics tasks. During the previous phase (conceptual design activity (CDA)) the multifoil activation method was proposed for the measurement of the neutron fluence and spectrum and a set of suitable foils was defined. The cross section variances and covariances of this set of foils have now been used for tests on the sensitivity of the IFMIF neutron spectrum determination to cross section uncertainties...

  20. Storage capacity for fissile material as a function of facility shape (room length-to-width ratio)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altschuler, S.J.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a previous study for applying surface density methods to square room of varying size are shown to be conservative for rectangular rooms as well. The surface density required to produce criticality has been calculated as a function of the facility length-to-width ratio for a variety of room widths and unit sizes, shapes, and fissile material compositions. For a length to width ratio greater than or equal to 6, the critical surface density is essentially constant. This allows further economies since more fissile material can be stored at a given subcritical value of k/ sub eff/(0.90) in a rectangular vault of given usable area than in a square one. (U.S.)

  1. Security programs for Category I or II nuclear material or certain nuclear facilities. Regulatory guide G-274

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this regulatory guide is to help applicants for a Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) licence in respect of Category I or II nuclear material - other than a licence to transport - , or a nuclear facility consisting of a nuclear reactor that may exceed 10 MW thermal power during normal operation, prepare and submit the security information to be included with the application, pursuant to the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA). Category I and II nuclear material are defined in Appendix B to this guide. This guide describes: the security information that should typically be included with the application for any licence referred to above; how the security information may be organized and presented in a separate document (hereinafter 'the security program description'), in order to assist CNSC review and processing of the application; and, the administrative procedures to be followed when preparing, submitting or revising the security program description. (author)

  2. New facility for ion beam materials characterization and modification at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesmer, J.R.; Maggiore, C.J.; Parkin, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a new Los Alamos laboratory devoted to the characterization and modification of the near surfaces of materials. The primary instruments of the IBML are a tandem electrostatic accelerator, a National Electrostatics Corp. Model 9SDH, coupled with a Varian CF-3000 ion implanter. The unique organizational structure of the IBML as well as the operational characteristics of the 9SDH (after approximately 3000 h of operation) and the laboratories' research capabilities will be discussed. Examples of current research results will also be presented. 5 refs., 2 figs

  3. Qualification testing facility for type A, B and C packages to be used for transport and storage of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieru, G.; Nistor, V.; Vasile, A.; Cojocaru, V.

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with the Economic Commission for Europe-Committee on inland transport (ADR- European Agreement-concerning the international carriage of dangerous goods by road, 2007 Edition) the Safety and Security of the dangerous goods class No. 7 - Radioactive Materials during transport in all different modes - by road, by rail, by sea, by inland rivers or by air - have to be ensured at a very high level. The radioactive materials (RAM) packaging have to comply to all transport conditions, routine or in accident conditions, possibly to occur during transportation operations. It is well known that the safety in the transport of RAM is dependent on packaging appropriate for the contents being shipped rather than on operational and/or administrative actions required for the package. The quality of these packages - type A, B or C has to be proved by performing qualification tests in accordance with the Romanian nuclear regulation conditions provided by CNCAN Order no. 357/22.12.2005- N orms for a Safe Transport of Radioactive Material , the IAEA Vienna Recommendation (1, 2) stipulated in the Safety standard TS-R-1- Regulation for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, 2005 Edition, and other applicable international recommendations. The paper will describe the components of the designed testing facilities, and the qualification testing to be performed for all type A, B and C packages subjected to the testing Quality assurance and quality controls measures taken in order to meet technical specification provided by the design are also presented and commented. The paper concludes that the new Romanian Testing Facilities for RAM packages will comply with the national safe standards as well as with the IAEA applicable recommendation provided by the TS-R-1 safety standard. (authors)

  4. Results of thermal interaction tests for various materials performed in the Ispra tank facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasoli-Stella, P.; Holtbecker, H.; Jorzik, E.; Schlittenhardt, P.; Thoma, U.

    A test facility for fuel/coolant thermal interaction measurements is described together with recent improvements of the melting oven design, the instrumentation and the collection and cleaning of the debris. The formation of a UO 2 crust on the melting crucible is investigated theoretically taking into account the heat losses during transport of the crucible from the oven to the reaction chamber. Experimental results for the systems steel-sodium, steel-water and UO 2 -sodium are presented and discussed with respect to particle size distribution and appearence of the debris. A sodium/fuel interaction model is introduced in the hydrodynamic REXCO-H-code. The results of test calculations are dealt with

  5. Management of radioactive material safety programs at medical facilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camper, L.W.; Schlueter, J.; Woods, S.

    1997-05-01

    A Task Force, comprising eight US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and two Agreement State program staff members, developed the guidance contained in this report. This report describes a systematic approach for effectively managing radiation safety programs at medical facilities. This is accomplished by defining and emphasizing the roles of an institution's executive management, radiation safety committee, and radiation safety officer. Various aspects of program management are discussed and guidance is offered on selecting the radiation safety officer, determining adequate resources for the program, using such contractual services as consultants and service companies, conducting audits, and establishing the roles of authorized users and supervised individuals; NRC's reporting and notification requirements are discussed, and a general description is given of how NRC's licensing, inspection and enforcement programs work

  6. The JANNUS Saclay facility: A new platform for materials irradiation, implantation and ion beam analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrino, S., E-mail: stephanie.pellegrino@cea.fr [CEA, INSTN, UEPTN, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Trocellier, P.; Miro, S.; Serruys, Y.; Bordas, E.; Martin, H. [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chaabane, N.; Vaubaillon, S. [CEA, INSTN, UEPTN, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gallien, J.P.; Beck, L. [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-02-15

    The third accelerator of the multi-ion irradiation platform JANNUS (Joint Accelerators for Nanosciences and NUclear Simulation), a 6SDH-2 Pelletron from National Electrostatic Corporation, Middleton was installed at Saclay in October 2009. The first triple beam irradiation combining Fe, He and H ion beams has been performed in March 2010. In the first part of this paper, we give a technical description of the triple beam facility, its performances and experimental capabilities. Typically, damage dose up to 100 dpa can be reached in 10 h irradiation with heavy ion beams, with or without simultaneous bombardment by protons, helium-4 ions or any other heavy ion beam. In the second part of this paper, we illustrate some IBA results obtained after irradiation and implantation experiments.

  7. Management of radioactive material safety programs at medical facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camper, L.W.; Schlueter, J.; Woods, S. [and others

    1997-05-01

    A Task Force, comprising eight US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and two Agreement State program staff members, developed the guidance contained in this report. This report describes a systematic approach for effectively managing radiation safety programs at medical facilities. This is accomplished by defining and emphasizing the roles of an institution`s executive management, radiation safety committee, and radiation safety officer. Various aspects of program management are discussed and guidance is offered on selecting the radiation safety officer, determining adequate resources for the program, using such contractual services as consultants and service companies, conducting audits, and establishing the roles of authorized users and supervised individuals; NRC`s reporting and notification requirements are discussed, and a general description is given of how NRC`s licensing, inspection and enforcement programs work.

  8. Technical Meeting on Existing and Proposed Experimental Facilities for Fast Neutron Systems. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The discussion which followed the different presentations highlighted the following points: • All the Member States representatives participating in the technical meeting welcomed this IAEA initiative and expressed their potential interest in contributing to the catalogue; • Not all the countries with a fast reactor programme were represented at the meeting. In particular, it was noted that there was no participation from China, the Russian Federation and the USA. Even contribution from Sweden and Spain would be beneficial. It will be a task of the IAEA Secretariat to try involving also these countries in the preparation of the catalogue; • The catalogue will focus only on experimental facilities supporting development of liquid metal cooled fast reactors (Sodium, Lead and Lead-Bismuth). For the time being, facilities in support of GFR and MSR research will not be included; • As for countries involved in HLM technology research, only European countries were participating at the meeting, i.e. Belgium, France, Italy and Germany. In order to avoid duplication of the work performed within the European project ADRIANA, representatives from these countries underlined that a condition for their contribution to the IAEA catalogue is the involvement of non-European countries with HLM research programmes; • The advice from the Member States is fundamental to clearly define scope, objectives and content of the catalogue. The plan for its drafting has also to be further discussed with Member States representatives; • The catalogue is also intended to identify gaps and future needs that require further R&D initiatives; • The catalogue will be a useful tool to set up international collaboration

  9. Facile Synthesis and High performance of a New Carbazole-Based Hole Transporting Material for Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong

    2015-06-26

    Perovskite solar cells are very promising for practical applications owing to their rapidly rising power conversion efficiency and low cost of solution-based processing. 2,2’,7,7’-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine) 9,9’-spirobifluorene (Spiro-OMeTAD) is most widely used as hole transporting material (HTM) in perovskite solar cells. However, the tedious synthesis and high cost of Spiro-OMeTAD inhibit its commercial-scale application in the photovoltaic industry. In this article, we report a carbazole-based compound (R01) as a new HTM in efficient perovskite solar cells. R01 is synthesized via a facile route consisting of only two steps from inexpensive commercially available materials. Furthermore, R01 exhibits higher hole mobility and conductivity than the state-of-the-art Spiro-OMeTAD. Perovskite solar cells fabricated with R01 produce a power conversion efficiency of 12.03%, comparable to that obtained in devices using Spiro-OMeTAD in this study. Our findings underscore R01 as a highly promising HTM with high performance, and its facile synthesis and low cost may facilitate the large-scale applications of perovskite solar cells.

  10. Characterization of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Environmental Assessment (EA) glass Standard Reference Material. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.; Beam, D.C.; Crawford, C.L.; Pickett, M.A.

    1993-06-01

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be immobilized by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Other waste form producers, such as West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP), will also immobilize high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass. The canistered waste will be stored temporarily at each facility for eventual permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The Department of Energy has defined a set of requirements for the canistered waste forms, the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The current Waste Acceptance Primary Specification (WAPS) 1.3, the product consistency specification, requires the waste form producers to demonstrate control of the consistency of the final waste form using a crushed glass durability test, the Product Consistency Test (PCI). In order to be acceptable, a waste glass must be more durable during PCT analysis than the waste glass identified in the DWPF Environmental Assessment (EA). In order to supply all the waste form producers with the same standard benchmark glass, 1000 pounds of the EA glass was fabricated. The chemical analyses and characterization of the benchmark EA glass are reported. This material is now available to act as a durability and/or redox Standard Reference Material (SRM) for all waste form producers.

  11. Facile Synthesis and High performance of a New Carbazole-Based Hole Transporting Material for Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong; Sheikh, Arif D.; Feng, Quanyou; Li, Feng; Chen, Yin; Yu, Weili; Alarousu, Erkki; Ma, Chun; Haque, Mohammed; Shi, Dong; Wang, Zhong-Sheng; Mohammed, Omar F.; Bakr, Osman; Wu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells are very promising for practical applications owing to their rapidly rising power conversion efficiency and low cost of solution-based processing. 2,2’,7,7’-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine) 9,9’-spirobifluorene (Spiro-OMeTAD) is most widely used as hole transporting material (HTM) in perovskite solar cells. However, the tedious synthesis and high cost of Spiro-OMeTAD inhibit its commercial-scale application in the photovoltaic industry. In this article, we report a carbazole-based compound (R01) as a new HTM in efficient perovskite solar cells. R01 is synthesized via a facile route consisting of only two steps from inexpensive commercially available materials. Furthermore, R01 exhibits higher hole mobility and conductivity than the state-of-the-art Spiro-OMeTAD. Perovskite solar cells fabricated with R01 produce a power conversion efficiency of 12.03%, comparable to that obtained in devices using Spiro-OMeTAD in this study. Our findings underscore R01 as a highly promising HTM with high performance, and its facile synthesis and low cost may facilitate the large-scale applications of perovskite solar cells.

  12. A novel, efficient and facile method for the template removal from mesoporous materials

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Lu; Jiang, Shang; Wang, Runwei; Zhang, Zongtao; Qiu, Shilun

    2014-01-01

    © 2014, Jilin University, The Editorial Department of Chemical Research in Chinese Universities and Springer-Verlag GmbH. A new catalytic-oxidation method was adopted to remove the templates from SBA-15 and MCM-41 mesoporous materials via Fenton

  13. Standard format and content for radiological contingency plans for fuel cycle and materials facilities. Regulatory report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    This report is issued as guidance to those fuel cycle and major materials licensees who are required by the NRC to prepare and submit a radiological contingency plan. This Standard Format has been prepared to help assure uniformity and completeness in the preparation of those plans

  14. National architectures for the detection of nuclear and radioactive materials at port facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, A.

    2009-01-01

    The basic objective of the national architectures is to protect people and the environment against a possible misuse of nuclear and radioactive materials. This issue has become even more important in recent years because maritime transport currently amounts to 80% of world trade, growing from 83 million shipments in 1990 to 334 million in 2005. (Author)

  15. Development of polymer concrete for dike insulation at LNG facilities: Phase 4, Low cost materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Earlier GRI-sponsored work at Brookhaven National Laboratory has resulted in the development and utilization of insulating polymer concrete composites (IPC) as a means of reducing the evaporation rate of liquified natural gas in the event of a spill into a containment dike, thereby improving the safety at these sites. Although all of the required properties can be attained with the IPC, it was estimated that a low-cost replacement for the expensive organic binder would be necessary before use of the material would be cost-effective. In the current program, several latex modified cement formulations were evaluated and the most promising one identified. A mixture of two carboxylated styrene-butadiene latexes was selected for use in detailed laboratory property characterizations and a subsequent field evaluation. When compared to the properties of IPC, the latex-modified insulating materials display somewhat higher thermal conductivities, greater permeability to water, and reduced strength. However, these properties still meet most of the performance criteria, and the unit cost of the material is less than one-fifth that of IPC made with epoxy binders. When installed as a 0.75-in. thick overlay, material costs are estimated to be $1.00/ft{sup 2}.

  16. Test facilities for radioactive materials transport packages (Transportation Technology Center Inc., Pueblo, Colorado, USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlon, P.C.L.

    2001-01-01

    Transportation Technology Center, Inc. is capable of conducting tests on rail vehicle systems designed for transporting radioactive materials including low level waste debris, transuranic waste, and spent nuclear fuel and high level waste. Services include rail vehicle dynamics modelling, on-track performance testing, full scale structural fatigue testing, rail vehicle impact tests, engineering design and technology consulting, and emergency response training. (author)

  17. Effect of turning frequency and season on composting materials from swine high-rise facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Composting of swine manure has several advantages, liquid slurries are converted to solid, the total volume of material is reduced and the stabilized product is more easily transported off-site. Despite this, swine waste is generally stored, treated and applied in its liquid form. The high-rise fini...

  18. Cd and Zn concentrations in small mammals and willow leaves on disposal facilities for dredged material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, J.; Luyssaert, S.; Verbeeren, S.; Vervaeke, P; Lust, N

    2001-01-01

    Disposal sites for dredged material are often polluted with heavy metals. The uptake of Cd and Zn by small mammals and willow trees was assessed on three sites with a different pollution degree. Detailed soil sampling showed a huge variation in soil characteristics within the sites, typical for

  19. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory response to the December 13, 1991, Congressional inquiry on offsite release of hazardous and solid waste containing radioactive materials from Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, C.; Garcia, K.M.; McMurtrey, C.D.; Williams, K.L.; Jordan, P.J.

    1992-05-01

    This report is a response to the December 13, 1991, Congressional inquiry that requested information on all hazardous and solid waste containing radioactive materials sent from Department of Energy facilities to offsite facilities for treatment or disposal since January 1, 1981. This response is for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Other Department of Energy laboratories are preparing responses for their respective operations. The request includes ten questions, which the report divides into three parts, each responding to a related group of questions. Part 1 answers Questions 5, 6, and 7, which call for a description of Department of Energy and contractor documentation governing the release of waste containing radioactive materials to offsite facilities. ''Offsite'' is defined as non-Department of Energy and non-Department of Defense facilities, such as commercial facilities. Also requested is a description of the review process for relevant release criteria and a list of afl Department of Energy and contractor documents concerning release criteria as of January 1, 1981. Part 2 answers Questions 4, 8, and 9, which call for information about actual releases of waste containing radioactive materials to offsite facilities from 1981 to the present, including radiation levels and pertinent documentation. Part 3 answers Question 10, which requests a description of the process for selecting offsite facilities for treatment or disposal of waste from Department of Energy facilities. In accordance with instructions from the Department of Energy, the report does not address Questions 1, 2, and 3

  20. Generic Design, Technical Guidelines and Optimal Location of Tsetse Fly Mass-Rearing Facilities. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    of these AW-IPM based efforts to create T and T free zones. It is, therefore, foreseeable that the demand for good quality sterile tsetse fly males will increase. This is already resulting in proposals to establish additional tsetse fly mass-rearing facilities in Africa. AW-IPM programmes against T and T involving a SIT component will require high investments at an early stage of programme implementation, particularly for the mass-rearing facilities. In order to realize optimum efficacy and efficiency, these programmes must be carefully planned and implemented in a consistent and flexible manner over sufficiently large areas and a rather long time frame. Decisions on the geographic location and design of rearing facilities must be objective, and based on sound assessment criteria. A meeting of expert consultants was convened in Vienna, Austria October 11-15, 2004 under the auspices of FAO/IAEA, in an effort to assist countries in planning the geographic location and in designing large tsetse fly mass-rearing facilities. With regards to assessing the suitability of (proposed) tsetse mass-rearing locations, the meeting identified a number of critical, important and desirable criteria under four (4) main categories, namely Site Characteristics, Climate and Environment, Manpower and Infrastructure and Social and Political supports. A worksheet was developed to summarize scores reached for the identified criteria, in order to ensure that the assessments are objective and verifiable. The meeting also elaborated on the concept of tsetse factory design, based on considerations regarding the involved rooms, their functions, ergonomic flow of the production process and other relevant factors. Required support services were identified and specifics were provided on aspects like controlled environment system design, desired room conditions and occupancy, air filtration and distribution and electricity supply. The consultants' recommendations underline that meeting and this

  1. Trilateral Initiative: IAEA authentication and national certification of verification equipment for facilities with classified forms of fissile material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Eckard; Sukhanov, Alexander; Murphy, John

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Within the framework of the Trilateral Initiative, technical challenges have arisen due to the potential of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) monitoring fissile material with classified characteristics, as well as the IAEA using facility or host country supplied monitoring equipment. In monitoring material with classified characteristics, it is recognized that the host country needs to assure that classified information is not made available to the IAEA inspectors. Thus, any monitoring equipment used to monitor material with classified characteristics has to contain information security capabilities, such as information barriers. But likewise in using host-country-supplied monitoring equipment, regarding the material being monitored the IAEA has to have confidence that the information provided by the equipment is genuine and can be used by the IAEA in fulfilling its obligation to derive conclusions based on independent verification measures. Thus the IAEA needs to go through the process of authenticating the monitoring equipment. In the same way the host country needs to go through the process to assure itself that the monitoring equipment integrated with an information barrier will not divulge any classified information about an inspected sensitive item. Both processes require on large extent identical measures, but partially also may conflict with each other. The fact that monitoring equipment needs to exhibit information security throughout its lifecycle while at the same time be capable of being authenticated necessitates the need for creative technical approaches to be pursued. (author)

  2. Assessment of the gas dynamic trap mirror facility as intense neutron source for fusion material test irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Moeslang, A.; Ivanov, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    The gas dynamic trap (GDT) mirror machine has been proposed by the Budker Institute of nuclear physics, Novosibirsk, as a volumetric neutron source for fusion material test irradiations. On the basis of the GDT plasma confinement concept, 14 MeV neutrons are generated at high production rates in the two end sections of the axially symmetrical central mirror cell, serving as suitable irradiation test regions. In this paper, we present an assessment of the GDT as intense neutron source for fusion material test irradiations. This includes comparisons to irradiation conditions in fusion reactor systems (ITER, Demo) and the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), as well as a conceptual design for a helium-cooled tubular test assembly elaborated for the largest of the two test zones taking proper account of neutronics, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical aspects. This tubular test assembly incorporates ten rigs of about 200 cm length used for inserting instrumented test capsules with miniaturized specimens taking advantage of the 'small specimen test technology'. The proposed design allows individual temperatures in each of the rigs, and active heating systems inside the capsules ensures specimen temperature stability even during beam-off periods. The major concern is about the maximum achievable dpa accumulation of less than 15 dpa per full power year on the basis of the present design parameters of the GDT neutron source. A design upgrading is proposed to allow for higher neutron wall loadings in the material test regions

  3. A facile route to ketene-functionalized polymers for general materials applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibfarth, Frank A.; Kang, Minhyuk; Ham, Myungsoo; Kim, Joohee; Campos, Luis M.; Gupta, Nalini; Moon, Bongjin; Hawker, Craig J.

    2010-03-01

    Function matters in materials science, and methodologies that provide paths to multiple functionality in a single step are to be prized. Therefore, we introduce a robust and efficient strategy for exploiting the versatile reactivity of ketenes in polymer chemistry. New monomers for both radical and ring-opening metathesis polymerization have been developed, which take advantage of Meldrum's acid as both a synthetic building block and a thermolytic precursor to dialkyl ketenes. The ketene-functionalized polymers are directly detected by their characteristic infrared absorption and are found to be stable under ambient conditions. The inherent ability of ketenes to provide crosslinking via dimerization and to act as reactive chemical handles via addition, provides simple methodology for application in complex materials challenges. Such versatile characteristics are illustrated by covalently attaching and patterning a dye through microcontact printing. The strategy highlights the significant opportunities afforded by the traditionally neglected ketene functional group in polymer chemistry.

  4. The economic and community impacts of closing Hanford's N Reactor and nuclear materials production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, M.J.; Belzer, D.B.; Nesse, R.J.; Schultz, R.W.; Stokowski, P.A.; Clark, D.C.

    1987-08-01

    This study discusses the negative economic impact on local cities and counties and the State of Washington of a permanent closure of nuclear materials production at the Hanford Site, located in the southeastern part of the state. The loss of nuclear materials production, the largest and most important of the five Department of Energy (DOE) missions at Hanford, could occur if Hanford's N Reactor is permanently closed and not replaced. The study provides estimates of statewide and local losses in jobs, income, and purchases from the private sector caused by such an event; it forecasts impacts on state and local government finances; and it describes certain local community and social impacts in the Tri-Cities (Richland, Kennewick, and Pasco) and surrounding communities. 33 refs., 8 figs., 22 tabs

  5. [Efficiencies of contamination source for flooring and some materials used in unencapsulated radioactivity handling facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, M; Yoshizawa, M; Minami, K

    1990-09-01

    The efficiencies of contamination source, defined in ISO Report 7506-1, were experimentally determined for such materials as flooring, polyethylene, smear-tested filter paper and stainless steel plate. 5 nuclides of 147Pm, 60Co, 137Cs, 204Tl and 90Sr-Y were used to study beta-ray energy dependence of the efficiency, and 241Am as alpha-ray emitter. The charge-up effect in the measurement by a window-less 2 pi-proportional counter was evaluated to obtain reliable surface emission rate. The measured efficiencies for non-permeable materials, except for two cases, are more than 0.5 even for 147Pm. The ISO recommendations were shown to be conservative enough on the basis of present results.

  6. Efficiencies of contamination source for flooring and some materials used in unencapsulated radioactivity handling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Makoto; Yoshizawa, Michio; Minami, Kentaro

    1990-01-01

    The efficiencies of contamination source, defined in ISO Report 7506-1, were experimentally determined for such materials as flooring, polyethylene, smear-tested filter paper and stainless steel plate. 5 nuclides of 147 Pm, 60 Co, 137 Cs, 204 Tl and 90 Sr-Y were used to study β-ray energy dependence of the efficiency, and 241 Am as α-ray emitter. The charge-up effect in the measurement by a window-less 2π-proportional counter was evaluated to obtain reliable surface emission rate. The measured efficiencies for non-permeable materials, except for two cases, are more than 0.5 even for 147 Pm. The ISO recommendations were shown to be conservative enough on the basis of present results. (author)

  7. Characterization of the new neutron imaging and materials science facility IMAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minniti, Triestino; Watanabe, Kenichi; Burca, Genoveva; Pooley, Daniel E.; Kockelmann, Winfried

    2018-04-01

    IMAT is a new cold neutron imaging and diffraction instrument located at the second target station of the pulsed neutron spallation source ISIS, UK. A broad range of materials science and materials testing areas will be covered by IMAT. We present the characterization of the imaging part, including the energy-selective and energy-dispersive imaging options, and provide the basic parameters of the radiography and tomography instrument. In particular, detailed studies on mono and bi-dimensional neutron beam flux profiles, neutron flux as a function of the neutron wavelength, spatial and energy dependent neutron beam uniformities, guide artifacts, divergence and spatial resolution, and neutron pulse widths are provided. An accurate characterization of the neutron beam at the sample position, located 56 m from the source, is required to optimize collection of radiographic and tomographic data sets and for performing energy-dispersive neutron imaging via time-of-flight methods in particular.

  8. Cladding tube materials for advanced nuclear facilities with closed fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartosova, I. [Slovenska technicka univerzita v Bratislave, Fakulta elektrotechniky a informatiky, Ustav jadroveho a fyzikalneho inzinierstva, 81219 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2013-04-16

    The paper is aimed on perspective materials for fuel cladding in advanced nuclear reactors. Samples of Eurofer and ODS Eurofer were studied by various techniques such as Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy, Vickers Hardness and Coincidence Doppler Broadening. After studying the samples by these methods, we implanted them by Helium atoms to simulate irradiation damage. Samples were then remeasured by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy to determine the affect of implantation on its behavior. (authors)

  9. Analysis of the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) Test System for Friction-Ignition of Metallic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoffstall, Michael S.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2000-01-01

    Friction is a known ignition source for metals in oxygen-enriched atmospheres. The test system developed by the NASA White Sands Test Facility in response to ASTM G-94 has been used successfully to determine the relative ignition from friction of numerous metallic materials and metallic materials pairs. These results have been ranked in terms of a pressure-velocity product (PV) as measured under the prescribed test conditions. A high value of 4.1(exp 8) watts per square meter for Inconel MA 754 is used to imply resistance to friction ignition, whereas a low value of 1.04(exp 8) watts per square meter for stainless steel 304 is taken as indicating material susceptible to friction ignition. No attempt has been made to relate PV values to other material properties. This work reports the analysis of the WSTF friction-ignition test system for producing fundamental properties of metallic materials relating to ignition through friction. Three materials, aluminum, titanium, and nickel were tested in the WSTF frictional ignition instrument system under atmospheres of oxygen or nitrogen. Test conditions were modified to reach a steady state of operation, that is applied, the force was reduced and the rotational speed was reduced. Additional temperature measurements were made on the stator sample. The aluminum immediately galled on contact (reproducible) and the test was stopped. Titanium immediately ignited as a result of non-uniform contact of the stator and rotor. This was reproducible. A portion of the stator sampled burned, but the test continued. Temperature measurements on the stator were used to validate the mathematical model used for estimating the interface (stator/rotor) temperature. These interface temperature measurements and the associate thermal flux into the stator were used to distinguish material-phase transitions, chemical reaction, and mechanical work. The mechanical work was used to analyze surface asperities in the materials and to estimate a

  10. Innovative materials for GEN IV systems and transmutation facilities (cross-cutting research project GETMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, Concetta; Rieth, Michael; Gomez Briceno, Dolores; Gessi, Alessandro; Henry, Jean; Malerba, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of the 'Generation IV and Transmutation Materials' (GETMAT) project is to contribute to the development, qualification and ranking of different types of ODS steels and to qualify Ferritic/Martensitic steels in a wide irradiation condition range. The experimental approach is complemented by the development of physical models with the aim to understand and improve the predictability of the materials performance. The GETMAT consortium is composed of fourteen Research centres, nine Universities and one Utility, from eleven European countries. The R and D tasks address (i) the materials availability, fabricability, weldability and their fundamental mechanical properties, (ii) their compatibility with aggressive coolants and development of corrosion protection methods; (iii) their performance under neutron irradiation, and (iv) starting from model alloys relevant for the two classes of alloys, the development and validation of physical models. The exploitation of results to potential end-users will occur through the 'GETMAT User Group', where exchange of information with the nuclear and steel industries, international (outside Europe) Research Organisations and engineers involved in the design of the new reactors, will occur. The exploitation of results to potential end-users will occur through the G ETMAT User Group , where exchange of information with the nuclear and steel industries, international (outside Europe) Research Organisations and engineers involved in the design of the new reactors, will occur

  11. Detecting anomalous nuclear materials accounting transactions: Applying machine learning to plutonium processing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccaro, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear materials accountancy is the only safeguards measure that provides direct evidence of the status of nuclear materials. Of the six categories that gives rise to inventory differences, the technical capability is now in place to implement the technical innovations necessary to reduce the human error categories. There are really three main approaches to detecting anomalies in materials control and accountability (MC ampersand A) data: (1) Statistical: numeric methods such as the Page's Test, CUSUM, CUMUF, SITMUF, etc., can detect anomalies in metric (numeric) data. (2) Expert systems: Human expert's rules can be encoded into software systems such as ART, KEE, or Prolog. (3) Machine learning: Training data, such as historical MC ampersand A records, can be fed to a classifier program or neutral net or other machine learning algorithm. The Wisdom ampersand Sense (W ampersand S) software is a combination of approaches 2 and 3. The W ampersand S program includes full features for adding administrative rules and expert judgment rules to the rule base. if desired, the software can enforce consistency among all rules in the rule base

  12. Performance of engineered barriers materials in near surface disposal facilities in Spain. Appendix 11: Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuloaga, P.

    2001-01-01

    In October 1992 the Ministry of Industry and Energy issued the Operating License of El Cabril Near Surface Disposal Facility, in the province of Cordoba, some 100 km away from Cordoba city. Waste packages, mainly 0.22 m 3 steel drums, containing solidified waste in a cement based waste form or pellets coming from the super-compaction process, are placed inside concrete disposal containers. These containers are made of reinforced concrete and in their construction fabrication joints have been avoided. Once these containers are filled with 18 drums (0.22 m 3 ) or 30 to 60 compaction pellets, they are backfilled and sealed with a mortar grout, resulting into a solid block. These blocks are then disposed of inside concrete vaults, called disposal cells, each one with a capacity for 320 containers. The full vaults are backfilled with gravel in the existing central gap left to absorb fabrication and handling tolerances. Then a plastic film is placed on the containers to prevent a true union between the last layer of disposal containers and the massed concrete layer cast to protect the workers during the construction of the closing slab. This 0.5 m thick closing slab is made of reinforced concrete and is protected by acrylic/fibreglass unperceived film. Galleries are made of a 300 kg/cm 2 characteristic strength concrete

  13. Feasibility Study for Monitoring Actinide Elements in Process Materials Using FO-LIBS at Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Bo-Young; Choi, Daewoong; Park, Se Hwan; Kim, Ho-Dong [Nonproliferation System Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Dae, Dongsun [Department of Chemistry, Mokpo National University, Jeonnam 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Whitehouse, Andrew I. [Applied Photonics Ltd., Unit 8 Carleton Business Park, Skipton, North Yorkshire BD23 2DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) have been developing the design and deployment methodology of Laser- Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument for safeguards application within the argon hot cell environment at Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility (ACPF), where ACPF is a facility being refurbished for the laboratory-scaled demonstration of advanced spent fuel conditioning process. LIBS is an analysis technology used to measure the emission spectra of excited elements in the local plasma of a target material induced by a laser. The spectra measured by LIBS are analyzed to verify the quality and quantity of the specific element in the target matrix. Recently LIBS has been recognized as a promising technology for safeguards purposes in terms of several advantages including a simple sample preparation and in-situ analysis capability. In particular, a feasibility study of LIBS to remotely monitor the nuclear material in a high radiation environment has been carried out for supporting the IAEA safeguards implementation. Fiber-Optic LIBS (FO-LIBS) deployment was proposed by Applied Photonics Ltd because the use of fiber optics had benefited applications of LIBS by delivering the laser energy to the target and by collecting the plasma light. The design of FO-LIBS instrument for the measurement of actinides in the spent fuel and high temperature molten salt at ACPF had been developed in cooperation with Applied Photonics Ltd. FO-LIBS has some advantages as followings: the detectable plasma light wavelength range is not limited by the optical properties of the thick lead-glass shield window and the potential risk of laser damage to the lead-glass shield window is not considered. The remote LIBS instrument had been installed at ACPF and then the feasibility study for monitoring actinide elements such as uranium, plutonium, and curium in process materials has been carried out. (authors)

  14. Feasibility Study for Monitoring Actinide Elements in Process Materials Using FO-LIBS at Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Bo-Young; Choi, Daewoong; Park, Se Hwan; Kim, Ho-Dong; Dae, Dongsun; Whitehouse, Andrew I.

    2015-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) have been developing the design and deployment methodology of Laser- Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument for safeguards application within the argon hot cell environment at Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility (ACPF), where ACPF is a facility being refurbished for the laboratory-scaled demonstration of advanced spent fuel conditioning process. LIBS is an analysis technology used to measure the emission spectra of excited elements in the local plasma of a target material induced by a laser. The spectra measured by LIBS are analyzed to verify the quality and quantity of the specific element in the target matrix. Recently LIBS has been recognized as a promising technology for safeguards purposes in terms of several advantages including a simple sample preparation and in-situ analysis capability. In particular, a feasibility study of LIBS to remotely monitor the nuclear material in a high radiation environment has been carried out for supporting the IAEA safeguards implementation. Fiber-Optic LIBS (FO-LIBS) deployment was proposed by Applied Photonics Ltd because the use of fiber optics had benefited applications of LIBS by delivering the laser energy to the target and by collecting the plasma light. The design of FO-LIBS instrument for the measurement of actinides in the spent fuel and high temperature molten salt at ACPF had been developed in cooperation with Applied Photonics Ltd. FO-LIBS has some advantages as followings: the detectable plasma light wavelength range is not limited by the optical properties of the thick lead-glass shield window and the potential risk of laser damage to the lead-glass shield window is not considered. The remote LIBS instrument had been installed at ACPF and then the feasibility study for monitoring actinide elements such as uranium, plutonium, and curium in process materials has been carried out. (authors)

  15. Sequential analysis of materials balances. Application to a prospective reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picard, R.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses near-real-time accounting in the context of the prospective DWK reprocessing plant. Sensitivity of a standard sequential testing procedure, applied to unfalsified operator data only, is examined with respect to a variety of loss scenarios. It is seen that large inventories preclude high-probability detection of certain protracted losses of material. In Sec. 2, a rough error propagation for the MBA of interest is outlined. Mathematical development for the analysis is given in Sec. 3, and generic aspects of sequential testing are reviewed in Sec. 4. In Sec. 5, results from a simulation to quantify performance of the accounting system are presented

  16. Development and evaluation of first wall materials for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnham, A.K.; Tobin, M.T.; Anderson, A.T.; Honea, E.C.; Skulina, K.M.; Milam, D.; Evans, M.; Rainer, F.; Gerassimenko, M.

    1996-01-01

    Several low-Z refractory materials are evaluated for use as the NIF first wall in terms of their cost and ability to survive laser light, target emissions and debris, as well as be cleanable and not outgas excessively. Best performers contain B, C, or both, with B 4 C being the best overall. It appears possible at this time that plasma-sprayed B 4 C can be fabricated with low enough porosity and cost to be preferred to hot-pressed B 4 C, the conservative choice

  17. Facilities projects performance measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erben, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The two DOE-owned facilities at Hanford, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), and the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT), are described. The performance measurement systems used at these two facilities are next described

  18. First radiobiological results of LDEF-1 experiment A0015 with Arabidopsis seed embryos and Sordaria fungus spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, M. W.; Gartenbach, K. E.; Kranz, A. R.

    1994-10-01

    This article highlights the first results of investigations on the general vitality and damage endpoints caused by cosmic ionizing radiation in dry, dormant plant seeds of the crucifer plant Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Hennh. and the ascomycete Sordaria fimicola after 69 month stay in space. Wild-type and mutant gene marker lines were included in Free Flyer Biostack containers and exposed on earth and side tray of the LDEF-1 satellite. The damage in biological endpoints observed in the seeds increased in the side tray sample compared to the earth tray sample. For the ascospores we found different effects depending on the biological endpoints investigated for both expositions.

  19. Concrete material characterization reinforced concrete tank structure Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkel, B.V.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project position on the concrete mechanical properties needed to perform design/analysis calculations for the MWTF secondary concrete structure. This report provides a position on MWTF concrete properties for the Title 1 and Title 2 calculations. The scope of the report is limited to mechanical properties and does not include the thermophysical properties of concrete needed to perform heat transfer calculations. In the 1970's, a comprehensive series of tests were performed at Construction Technology Laboratories (CTL) on two different Hanford concrete mix designs. Statistical correlations of the CTL data were later generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). These test results and property correlations have been utilized in various design/analysis efforts of Hanford waste tanks. However, due to changes in the concrete design mix and the lower range of MWTF operating temperatures, plus uncertainties in the CTL data and PNL correlations, it was prudent to evaluate the CTL data base and PNL correlations, relative to the MWTF application, and develop a defendable position. The CTL test program for Hanford concrete involved two different mix designs: a 3 kip/in 2 mix and a 4.5 kip/in 2 mix. The proposed 28-day design strength for the MWTF tanks is 5 kip/in 2 . In addition to this design strength difference, there are also differences between the CTL and MWTF mix design details. Also of interest, are the appropriate application of the MWTF concrete properties in performing calculations demonstrating ACI Code compliance. Mix design details and ACI Code issues are addressed in Sections 3.0 and 5.0, respectively. The CTL test program and PNL data correlations focused on a temperature range of 250 to 450 F. The temperature range of interest for the MWTF tank concrete application is 70 to 200 F

  20. Application of exemption principles to the recycle and reuse of materials from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Radioactive waste is generated from the production of nuclear energy and from the use of radioactive materials in industrial applications, research and medicine. The importance of the safe management of radioactive waste for the protection of human health and the environment has long been recognized and considerable experience has been gained in this field. The Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme is the IAEA's contribution to establishing and promoting, in a coherent and comprehensive manner, the basic safety philosophy for radioactive waste management and the steps necessary to ensure its implementation. The RADWASS publications will: (a) reflect the existing international consensus in the approaches and methodologies for safe waste management, including disposal, and provide mechanisms to establish consensus where it does not yet exist; and (b) provide Member States with a comprehensive series of internationally agreed upon documents to assist in the derivation of new, or to complement existing, national criteria, standards and practices. This Safety Practices publication is concerned with procedures for determining the levels of radionuclides in materials below which they can be exempted from regulatory control and recycled or reused without any further restriction. It describes how the internationally agreed upon principles for exemption can be applied in the case of recycle and reuse. The methodology is applied to derive the typical ranges of exempt concentrations for representative radionuclides. Refs, figs and tabs