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Sample records for facility ldef experiment

  1. The preliminary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) materials data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Joan G.; Strickland, John W.; Davis, John M.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Materials Data Base was developed by the LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG). The LDEF Materials Data Base is envisioned to eventually contain the wide variety and vast quantity of materials data generated for LDEF. The data is searchable by optical, thermal, and mechanical properties, exposure parameters (such as atomic oxygen flux), and author(s) or principal investigator(s). The LDEF Materials Data Base was incorporated into the Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS). MAPTIS is a collection of materials data which was computerized and is available to engineers, designers, and researchers in the aerospace community involved in the design and development of spacecraft and related hardware. This paper describes the LDEF Materials Data Base and includes step-by-step example searches using the data base. Information on how to become an authorized user of the system is included.

  2. Solidification under zero gravity: A Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) experiment for an early space shuttle mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. A.; Whitfield, J. K.

    1976-01-01

    The preliminary design of two series of simple experiments the objectives of which are to determine the effect of an absence of gravity on (1) the general morphology of the structure, (2) location of ullage space, and (3) magnitude of surface tension driven convection, during the solidification of several metallic and nonmetallic systems is described. Details of the investigative approach, experimental procedure, experimental hardware, data reduction and analysis, and anticipated results are given.

  3. Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) optical systems SIG summary and database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnhoff-Hlavacek, Gail

    1992-01-01

    The main objectives of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Optical Systems Special Investigative Group (SIG) Discipline are to develop a database of experimental findings on LDEF optical systems and elements hardware, and provide an optical system overview. Unlike the electrical and mechanical disciplines, the optics effort relies primarily on the testing of hardware at the various principal investigator's laboratories, since minimal testing of optical hardware was done at Boeing. This is because all space-exposed optics hardware are part of other individual experiments. At this time, all optical systems and elements testing by experiment investigator teams is not complete, and in some cases has hardly begun. Most experiment results to date, document observations and measurements that 'show what happened'. Still to come from many principal investigators is a critical analysis to explain 'why it happened' and future design implications. The original optical system related concerns and the lessons learned at a preliminary stage in the Optical Systems Investigations are summarized. The design of the Optical Experiments Database and how to acquire and use the database to review the LDEF results are described.

  4. Data bases for LDEF results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnhoff-Hlavacek, Gail

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried 57 experiments and 10,000 specimens for some 200 LDEF experiment investigators. The external surface of LDEF had a large variety of materials exposed to the space environment which were tested preflight, during flight, and post flight. Thermal blankets, optical materials, thermal control paints, aluminum, and composites are among the materials flown. The investigations have produced an abundance of analysis results. One of the responsibilities of the Boeing Support Contract, Materials and Systems Special Investigation Group, is to collate and compile that information into an organized fashion. The databases developed at Boeing to accomplish this task is described.

  5. LDEF results for polymer matrix composite experiment AO 180

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    This report represents a summary of the results obtained to-date on a polymer matrix composite experiment (AO 180) located at station D-12, about 82 deg off the 'ram' direction. Different material systems comprised of graphite, boron, and aramid (Kevlar) fiber reinforcements were studied. Although previous results were presented on in-situ thermal-vacuum cycling effects, particularly dimensional changes associated with outgassing, additional comparative data will be shown from ground-based tests on control and flight samples. The system employed was fully automated for thermal-vacuum cycling using a laser interferometer for monitoring displacements. Erosion of all three classes of materials due to atomic oxygen (AO) will also be discussed, including angle of incidence effects. Data from this experiment will be compared to published results for similar materials in other LDEF experiments. Composite materials' erosion yields will be presented on an AO design nomogram useful for estimating total material loss for given exposure conditions in low Earth orbit (LEO). Optical properties of these materials will also be compared with control samples. A survey of the damage caused by micrometeoroids/debris impacts will be addressed as they relate to polymer matrix composites. Correlations between hole size and damage pattern will be given. Reference to a new nomogram for estimating the number distribution of micrometeoroid/debris impacts for a given space structure as a function of time in LEO will be addressed based on LDEF data.

  6. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12 The prelaunch photograph shows the six (6) inch deep Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) master control tray. The tray has three (3) mounting/cover plates elevated on fiberglass stand-offs to provide clearance and protection for hardware and electronics located underneath. The stand-offs also raise the plates to a level that minimizes shading of detectors by the tray sidewalls. The mounting plate located at the left hand end of the tray is populated with eighty (80) metaloxide-silicon (MOS) capacitor-type impact sensors and one (1) solar sensor that is located approximately in the center of the mounting plate. The IDE sensors are two (2) inch diameter MOS capacitor structures approximately 250 um thick. The detectors are formed by growing either 0.4um or 1.0um thick silicon oxide, SiO2, layer on the 250um thick, B-doped polished silicon wafer. The top metal contact, the visible surface, was formed by vapor deposition of 1000A of aluminum on the SiO2 surface. Aluminum was also vapor deposited on the backside to form the contact with the silicon substrate. Gold wires are bonded to the front and back aluminum layers for use in connecting the detectors to the circuits. The complete wafers, IDE detectors, are mounted on chromic anodized aluminum frames by bonding the detector backside to the aluminum frame with a space qualified RTV silicon adhesive, de-volatized RTV-511. The difference in colors of the detectors is caused by reflections in the metallized surfaces. A reflection of one of the technicians is visible in the three (3) rows of detector on the left hand side of the mounting plate. The solar sensor, located at the mounting plate center, consist of four (4) silicon solar cells connected in series and associated circuity bonded to an aluminum baseplate. The solar sensor registered each orbital sunrise independant of LDEF orientation at the time of sunrise. When IDE solar sensor data from the six

  7. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. Thermal, mechanical, and structural considerations leading to the design of the tray hardware are discussed. In general, changes in the retested component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials, multilayer optical interference filters, and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  8. The Long Duration Exposure Facility - A shuttle transported low cost technology experiment carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibattista, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is a passive spacecraft capable of remaining in space for extended periods. Its primary role is to accommodate advanced spacecraft technology experiments. The LDEF is space-shuttle delivered and retrieved. With retrieval, it offers unique opportunities to study, in ground-based laboratories, results from a wide variety of experiments after exposure in space.

  9. The Long Duration Exposure Facility - A shuttle transported low cost technology experiment carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibattista, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is a passive spacecraft capable of remaining in space for extended periods. Its primary role is to accommodate advanced spacecraft technology experiments. The LDEF is space-shuttle delivered and retrieved. With retrieval, it offers unique opportunities to study, in ground-based laboratories, results from a wide variety of experiments after exposure in space.

  10. Degradation of materials properties in space-overview of LDEF (Long Duration Exposure Facility)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinard, William H.; O'Neal, Robert L.; Martin, Glenna D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the initial observations of the Long Duration Exposure Facility and, in particular, the degradation of the onboard materials. The LDEF was retrieved from space on January 12, 1990, during the Space Shuttle STS Mission 32 after having remained in space for almost 6 years. Ongoing studies of this retrieved hardware are providing a wealth of basic science data on the environments of near-earth space and the synergistic effects of these space environments on a large array of typical spacecraft materials and systems.

  11. Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) radiation-induced degradation of Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) Teflon aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinza, David E.; Stiegman, A. E.; Staszak, Paul R.; Laue, Eric G.; Liang, Ranty H.

    1992-01-01

    Examination of fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) copolymer specimens recovered from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) provides evidence for degradation attributed to extended solar vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of sheared FEP film edges reveal the presence of a highly embrittled layer on the exposed surface of specimens obtained from the trailing edge of the LDEF. Similar images obtained for leading edge and control FEP films do not exhibit evidence for such an embrittled layer. Laboratory VUV irradiation of FEP films is found to produce a damage layer similar to that witnessed in the LDEF trailing edge films. Spectroscopic analyses of irradiated films provide data to advance a photochemical mechanism for degradation.

  12. LDEF materials data bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Joan G.; Strickland, John W.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the accompanying experiments were composed of and contained a wide variety of materials representing the largest collection of materials flown in low Earth orbit (LEO) and retrieved for ground based analysis to date. The results and implications of the mechanical, thermal, optical, and electrical data from these materials are the foundation on which future LEO space missions will be built. The LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) has been charged with establishing and developing data bases to document these materials and their performance to assure not only that the data are archived for future generations but also that the data are available to the spacecraft user community in an easily accessed, user-friendly form. This paper discusses the format and content of the three data bases developed or being developed to accomplish this task. The hardware and software requirements for each of these three data bases are discussed along with current availability of the data bases. This paper also serves as a user's guide to the MAPTIS LDEF Materials Data Base.

  13. LDEF (Postflight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight) The viscous magnetic damper housing is shown after removal from the interior of the LDEF. The spherical dome is fabricated from 1/32 inch thick 6061-T6 aluminum alloy sheet and is attached to the cylindrical base with aluminum screws. The cylindrical portion of the housing is a fiberglass (181 cloth / epon 828 resin) structure is covered with an aluminum tape, both inside and outside, to meet thermal control requirements. The mounting plate material is 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, with the top and bottom surfaces covered with aluminum tape. A thermistor is mounted in the top center of the dome to provide house keeping data. The lead wire, covered with a strip of aluminum tape, can be seen along the housing periphery. The assembled damper housing, with the damper inside, is mounted to the space end frame with stainless steel fasteners.

  14. Anodized aluminum on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1993-01-01

    A compilation of reported analyses and results obtained for anodized aluminum flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was prepared. Chromic acid, sulfuric acid, and dyed sulfuric acid anodized surfaces were exposed to the space environment. The vast majority of the anodized surface on LDEF was chromic acid anodize because of its selection as a thermal control coating for use on the spacecraft primary structure, trays, tray clamps, and space end thermal covers. Reports indicate that the chromic acid anodize was stable in solar absorptance and thermal emittance, but that contamination effects caused increases in absorptance on surfaces exposed to low atomic oxygen fluences. There were some discrepancies, however, in that some chromic acid anodized specimens exhibited significant increases in absorptance. Sulfuric acid anodized surfaces also appeared stable, although very little surface area was available for evaluation. One type of dyed sulfuric acid anodize was assessed as an optical baffle coating and was observed to have improved infrared absorptance characteristics with exposure on LDEF.

  15. Atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation mission total exposures for LDEF experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Gillis, J. R.; Rousslang, Ken W.

    1992-01-01

    Atomic oxygen and solar radiation exposures were determined analytically for rows, longerons, and end bays of the LDEF. Calculated atomic oxygen exposures are based on an analytical model that accounts for the effects of thermal molecular velocity, atmospheric temperature, number density, spacecraft velocity, incidence angle, and atmospheric rotation. Results also incorporate variations in solar activity, geomagnetic index, and orbital parameters occurring over the six year flight of the spacecraft. Solar radiation exposure calculations are based on the form factors reported in the Solar Illumination Data Package prepared by NASA Langley. The earth albedo value for these calculations was based on the Nimbus 7 earth radiation data set. Summary charts for both atomic oxygen and solar radiation exposure are presented to facilitate the use of the data generated by LDEF experimenters.

  16. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is being carried out in order to gather information about the low earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on materials. The large mass of the LDEF spacecraft, its stabilized configuration, and long mission duration have presented an opportunity to determine space radiation-induced radioactivities with a precision not possible before. Data presented include preliminary activities for steel and aluminum structural samples, and activation subexperiment foils. Effects seen in the data show a clear indication of the trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly and suggest contributions from different sources of external radiation fluxes.

  17. SIMS chemical and isotopic analysis of impact features from LDEF experiments AO187-1 and AO187-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadermann, Frank J.; Amari, Sachiko; Foote, John; Swan, Pat; Walker, Robert M.; Zinner, Ernst

    1995-01-01

    Previous secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) studies of extended impact features from LDEF capture cell experiment AO187-2 showed that it is possible to distinguish natural and man-made particle impacts based on the chemical composition of projectile residues. The same measurement technique has now been applied to specially prepared gold target impacts from experiment AO187-1 in order to identify the origins of projectiles that left deposits too thin to be analyzed by conventional energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The results indicate that SIMS may be the method of choice for the analysis of impact deposits on a variety of sample surfaces. SIMS was also used to determine the isotopic compositions of impact residues from several natural projectiles. Within the precision of the measurements all analyzed residues show isotopically normal compositions.

  18. Radioactive 7Be materials flown on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Following the discovery of the atmospheric cosmogenic radionuclide Be-7 on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), we began a search for other known nuclides produced by similar mechanisms. None of the others have the narrow gamma-ray line emission of Be-7 decay which enable its rapid detection and quantification. A search for Be-10 atoms on LDEF clamp plates using accelerator mass spectrometry is described. An unexpected result was obtained.

  19. Evaluation of seals, lubricants, and adhesives used on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursch, Harry; Keough, Bruce; Pippin, Gary

    1993-01-01

    A wide variety of seals, lubricants, and adhesives were used on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The results, to date, of the Systems Special Investigation Group (SIG) and the Materials SIG investigation into the effect of the long term low Earth orbit (LEO) exposure on these materials is discussed. Results of this investigation show that if the material was shielded from exposure to LDEF's external environment, the 69 month exposure to LEO had minimal effect on the material. However, if the material was on LDEF's exterior surface, a variety of events occurred ranging from no material change, to changes in mechanical or physical properties, to complete disappearance of the material. The results are from the following sources: (1) visual examinations and/or testing of materials performed by various LDEF experimenters, (2) testing done at Boeing in support of the Materials or Systems SIG investigations, (3) testing done at Boeing on Boeing hardware flown on LDEF.

  20. Analytical electron microscopy of LDEF impactor residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Barrett, Ruth A.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1995-01-01

    The LDEF contained 57 individual experiment trays or tray portions specifically designed to characterize critical aspects of meteoroid and debris environment in low-Earth orbit (LEO). However, it was realized from the beginning that the most efficient use of the satellite would be to characterize impact features from the entire surface of the LDEF. With this in mind particular interest has focused on common materials facing in all 26 LDEF facing directions; among the most important of these materials has been the tray clamps. Therefore, in an effort to better understand the nature and flux of particulates in LEO, and their effects on spacecraft hardware, we are analyzing residues found in impact features on LDEF tray clamp surfaces. This paper summarizes all data from 79 clamps located on Bay A & B of the LDEF. We also describe current efforts to characterize impactor residues recovered from the impact craters, and we have found that a low, but significant, fraction of these residues have survived in a largely unmelted state. These residues can be characterized sufficiently to permit resolution of the impactor origin. We have concentrated on the residue from chondritic interplanetary dust particles (micrometeoroids), as these represent the harshest test of our analytical capabilities.

  1. Materials And Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) LDEF materials data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Joan G.; Strickland, John W.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Materials Data Base was developed by the LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG). The LDEF Materials Data Base is envisioned to eventually contain the wide variety and vast quantity of materials data generated from LDEF. The data is searchable by optical, thermal, and mechanical properties, exposure parameters (such as atomic oxygen flux) and author(s) or principal investigator(s). Tne LDEF Materials Data Base was incorporated into the Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS). MAPTIS is a collection of materials data which has been computerized and is available to engineers, designers, and researchers in the aerospace community involved in the design and development of spacecraft and related hardware. The LDEF Materials Data Base is described and step-by-step example searches using the data base are included. Information on how to become an authorized user of the system is included.

  2. Preliminary results of the Artemia salina experiments in biostack on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graul, E. H.; Ruether, W.; Hiendl, C. O.

    1992-01-01

    The mosaic egg of the brine shrimp, Artemia salina, resting in blastula or gastrula state represents a system that during further development, proceeds without any further development to the larval stage, the free swimming nauplius. Therefore, injury to a single cell of the egg will be manifest in the larvae. In several experiments, it was shown that the passage of a single heavy ion through the shrimp egg damaged a cellular area large enough to disturb either embryogenesis or further development of the larvae, or the integrity of the adult individual. Emergence from the egg shell was heavily disturbed by the heavy ions as was hatching. Additional late effects, due to a hit by a heavy ion, are delayed of growth and of sexual maturity, and reduced fertility. Anomalies in the body and the extremities could be observed more frequently for the nauplii which had developed from eggs hit by heavy ions.

  3. M and D SIG progress report: Laboratory simulations of LDEF impact features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horz, Friedrich; Bernhard, R. P.; See, T. H.; Atkinson, D.; Allbrooks, M.

    1992-01-01

    Laboratory impact experiments are needed to understand the relationship between a measured penetration hole diameter and associated projectile dimension in the thermal blankets of experiment A0178, which occupied some 16 sq. m. These blankets are composed of 125 micron thick Teflon that has an Ag/enconel second mirror surface, backed by organic binder and Chemglaze paint for a total thickness of some 170 microns. While dedicated experiments are required to understand the penetration behavior of this compound target in detail, we report here on impact simulations sponsored by other projects into pure Teflon and aluminum targets. These experiments will allow first order interpretations of impact features on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), and they will serve as guides for dedicated experiments that employ the real LDEF blankets, both exposed and unexposed, for a refined understanding of the LDEF's collisional environment. We employed a light gas gun to launch soda-lime glass spheres from 50 to 3200 microns in diameter that impacted targets of variable thickness. Penetration measurements are given.

  4. LDEF materials special investigation group's data bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, John W.; Funk, Joan G.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was composed of and contained a wide array of materials, representing the largest collection of materials flown for space exposure and returned for ground-based analyses to date. The results and implications of the data from these materials are the foundation on which future space missions will be built. The LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) has been tasked with establishing and developing data bases to document these materials and their performance to assure not only that the data are archived for future generations but also that the data are available to the space user community in an easily accessed, user-friendly form. The format and content of the data bases developed or being developed to accomplish this task are discussed. The hardware and software requirements for each of the three data bases are discussed along with current availability of the data bases.

  5. A Comparison of Results From NASA's Meteoroid Engineering Model to the LDEF Cratering Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, S.; Moorhead, A.; Cooke, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has provided an extensive record of the meteoroid environment in Low Earth Orbit. LDEF's combination of fixed orientation, large collecting area, and long lifetime imposes constraints on the absolute flux of potentially hazardous meteoroids. The relative impact rate on each of LDEF's fourteen surfaces arises from the underlying velocity distribution and directionality of the meteoroid environment. For the first time, we model the meteoroid environment encountered by LDEF over its operational lifetime using NASA's Meteoroid Engineering Model Release 2 (MEMR2) and compare the model results with the observed craters of potentially hazardous meteoroids (i.e. crater diameters larger than approximately 0.6 mm). We discuss the extent to which the observations and model agree and how the impact rates across all of the LDEF surfaces may suggest improvements to the underlying assumptions that go into future versions of MEM.

  6. Monte Carlo modeling of atomic oxygen attack of polymers with protective coatings on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Auer, Bruce M.; Gebauer, Linda; Edwards, Jonathan L.

    1993-01-01

    Characterization of the behavior of atomic oxygen interaction with materials on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) assists in understanding of the mechanisms involved. Thus the reliability of predicting in-space durability of materials based on ground laboratory testing should be improved. A computational model which simulates atomic oxygen interaction with protected polymers was developed using Monte Carlo techniques. Through the use of an assumed mechanistic behavior of atomic oxygen interaction based on in-space atomic oxygen erosion of unprotected polymers and ground laboratory atomic oxygen interaction with protected polymers, prediction of atomic oxygen interaction with protected polymers on LDEF was accomplished. However, the results of these predictions are not consistent with the observed LDEF results at defect sites in protected polymers. Improved agreement between observed LDEF results and predicted Monte Carlo modeling can be achieved by modifying of the atomic oxygen interactive assumptions used in the model. LDEF atomic oxygen undercutting results, modeling assumptions, and implications are presented.

  7. Identification and evaluation of lubricants, adhesives, and seals used on LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keough, Bruce

    1992-01-01

    A variety of lubricants, adhesives, and seals were flown on Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). They were used in the fabrication and assembly of the experiments similar to other spacecraft applications. Typically, these materials were not exposed to U.V. radiation or atomic oxygen, except possibly around the perimeter of the joints. Most of these materials were of secondary interest and were only investigated by visual examination and a 'Did they fall?' criteria. Because of this role, most applications had only a few specimens, not enough for statistical data generation. Often, no control samples were kept, and documentation of what was used was occasionally sketchy.

  8. Experimenting with Science Facility Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the modern school science facility and how computers and teaching methods are changing their design. Issues include power, lighting, and space requirements; funding for planning; architect assessment; materials requirements for work surfaces; and classroom flexibility. (GR)

  9. Construction of STACY (Static Experiment Critical Facility)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Kiyonobu; Onodera, Seiji; Hirose, Hideyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1998-08-01

    Two critical assemblies, STACY (Static Experiment Critical Facility) and TRACY (Transient Experiment Critical Facility), were constructed in NUCEF (Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility) to promote researches on the criticality safety at a reprocessing facility. STACY aims at providing critical data of uranium nitrate solution, plutonium nitrate solution and their mixture while varying concentration of solution fuel, core tank shape and size and neutron reflecting condition. STACY achieved first criticality in February 1995, and passed the licensing inspection by STA (Science and Technology Agency of Japan) in May. After that a series of critical experiments commenced with 10 w/o enriched uranium solution. This report describes the outline of STACY at the end of FY 1996. (author)

  10. Characterizing experiments of the PPOOLEX test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puustinen, M.; Laine, J. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2008-07-15

    This report summarizes the results of the characterizing test series in 2007 with the scaled down PPOOLEX facility designed and constructed at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Air and steam/air mixture was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through a DN200 blowdown pipe to the condensation pool (wet well). Altogether eight air and four steam/air mixture experiments, each consisting of several blows (tests), were carried out. The main purpose of the experiment series was to study the general behavior of the facility and the performance of basic instrumentation. Proper operation of automation, control and safety systems was also tested. The test facility is a closed stainless steel vessel divided into two compartments, dry well and wet well. The facility is equipped with high frequency measurements for capturing different aspects of the investigated phenomena. The general behavior of the PPOOLEX facility differs significantly from that of the previous POOLEX facility because of the closed two-compartment structure of the test vessel. Heat-up by several tens of degrees due to compression in both compartments was the most obvious evidence of this. Temperatures also stratified. Condensation oscillations and chugging phenomenon were encountered in those tests where the fraction of non-condensables had time to decrease significantly. A radical change from smooth condensation behavior to oscillating one occurred quite abruptly when the air fraction of the blowdown pipe flow dropped close to zero. The experiments again demonstrated the strong diminishing effect that noncondensable gases have on dynamic unsteady loadings experienced by submerged pool structures. BWR containment like behavior related to the beginning of a postulated steam line break accident was observed in the PPOOLEX test facility during the steam/air mixture experiments. The most important task of the research project, to produce experimental data for code simulation purposes, can be

  11. Tomato seeds for LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Tomato seeds are prepared for their launch aboard the Langley's Long Duration Exposure Facility. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page 119), by James Schultz.

  12. SNOLAB: Review of the facility and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, R.

    2012-09-01

    SNOLAB is Canada's new state of the art facility for astroparticle physics and is an expansion of the highly successful Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) located near Sudbury, Ontario. Situated 2070m underground (6010m mwe), SNOLAB is the deepest ultra-clean facility in the world, and is a leading location for conducting frontier experiments in astroparticle physics with rare event and low background detectors. The laboratory has 4980m2 of climate-controlled class-2000 clean-room space, a chilled water loop, ultra-pure water, nitrogen cover gas, fire detection and suppression, with personnel and refuge facilities for over 80 occupants. The surface building also provides 520 m2 of clean-room space for detector assembly, chemistry and optics labs, low background counting, and also includes a warehouse, machine shop, offices, and meeting rooms. Current experiments under construction include detectors for cosmological dark matter (COUPP, DEAP, MiniCLEAN, PICASSO), neutrino-less double-beta decay (EXO, SNO+), solar neutrinos, geo-neutrinos, and reactor neutrinos (SNO+), and supernovae monitoring (HALO), in addition to other experiment collaborations with proposals requesting space.

  13. Analysis of Interplanetary Dust Experiment Detectors and Other Witness Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffis, D. P.; Wortman, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of analytical procedures for identifying the chemical composition of residue from impacts that occurred on the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) detectors during the flight of Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the carrying out of actual analysis on IDE detectors and other witness plates are discussed. Two papers on the following topics are presented: (1) experimental analysis of hypervelocity microparticle impact sites on IDE sensor surfaces; and (2) contaminant interfaces with secondary Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) analysis of microparticle impactor residues on LDEF surfaces.

  14. NASDA life science experiment facilities for ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigaki, F.; Masuda, D.; Yano, S.; Fujimoto, N.; Kamigaichi, S.

    National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has been developing various experiment facilities to conduct space biology researches in KIBO (JEM). The Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) and the Clean Bench (CB) are installed into JEM Life Science Rack. The Biological Experiment Units (BEU) are operated in the CBEF and the CB for many kinds of experiments on cells, tissues, plants, microorganisms, or small animals. It is possible for all researchers to use these facilities under the system of the International Announcement of Opportunity. The CBEF is a CO2 incubator to provide a controlled environment (temperature, humidity, and CO2 concentration), in which a rotating table is equipped to make variable gravity (0-2g) for reference experiments. The containers called "Canisters" can be used to install the BEU in the CBEF. The CBEF supplies power, command, sensor, and video interfaces for the BEU through the utility connectors of Canisters. The BEU is a multiuser system consisting of chambers and control segments. It is operated by pre-set programs and by commands from the ground. NASDA is currently developing three types of the BEU: the Plant Experiment Unit (PEU) for plant life cycle observations and the Cell Experiment Unit (CEU1&2) for cell culture experiments. The PEU has an automated watering system with a water sensor, an LED matrix as a light source, and a CCD camera to observe the plant growth. The CEUs have culture chambers and an automated cultural medium exchange system. Engineering models of the PEU and CEU1 have been accomplished. The preliminary design of CEU2 is in progress. The design of the BEU will be modified to meet science requirements of each experiment. The CB provides a closed aseptic work-space (Operation Chamber) with gloves for experiment operations. Samples and the BEU can be manually handled in the CB. The CB has an air lock (Disinfection Chamber) to prevent contamination, and HEPA filters to make class-100-equivalent clean air

  15. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO187-02 : Chemical and Isotropic Measurements of Micrometeoroids by Secondary Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO187-02 : Chemical and Isotropic Measurements of Micrometeoroids by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, Tray E08 The prelaunch photograph shows one hundred twenty (120) experiment capture cells installed on six support panels that are mounted in LDEF provided experiment trays. A capture cell consist of four polished high purity germanium plates covered with a 2.5um thick Mylar foil coated with 1300 angstroms of tantalum vapor deposited on the backside and 100 angstroms of gold-palladium vapor deposited on the front side. The capture cells are mounted within an aluminum frame on each panel. The fasteners are nonmagnetic stainless steel.

  16. Material science experiments at the ATLAS facility

    CERN Document Server

    Keinigs, R K; Atchison, W L; Bartsch, R R; Faehl, R J; Flower-Maudlin, E C; Hammerberg, J E; Holtkamp, D B; Kyrala, G A; Oro, D M; Parker, J V; Preston, D L; Removsky, R E; Scudder, D W; Sheehey, P T; Shlachter, J S; Taylor, A J; Tonks, D L; Turchi, P J; Chandler, E A

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. Three experimental campaigns designed for fielding on the Atlas Pulsed Power Facility are discussed. The foci of these experiments are directed toward a better understanding of three material science issues; (1) strength at high strain and high strain rate, (2) friction at material interfaces moving at high relative velocities, and (3) material failure in convergent geometry. Atlas provides an environment for investigating these problems in parameter regimes and geometries that are inaccessible with standard techniques. For example, flow stress measurements of material strength using conventional Hopkinson bar experiments are limited to strain rates ~10/sup 4/ sec/sup -1/. Atlas will be capable of imploding metal shells to combined strains of 200% and strain rates >10/sup 6/ sec/sup -1/. Data obtained regimes is used to test different constitutive strength models used in several Los Alamos hydrocodes. Dynamic friction has been investigated for nearly 300 years, but a first...

  17. Test facility for rewetting experiments at CDTN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende, Hugo C.; Mesquita, Amir Z.; Ladeira, Luiz C.D.; Santos, Andre A.C., E-mail: hcr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SETRE/CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Tecnologia de Reatores

    2015-07-01

    One of the most important subjects in nuclear reactor safety analysis is the reactor core rewetting after a Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a Light Water Reactor LWR. Several codes for the prediction of the rewetting evolution are under development based on experimental results. In a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) the reflooding phase of a LOCA is when the fuel rods are rewetted from the bottom of the core to its top after having been totally uncovered and dried out. Out-of-pile reflooding experiments performed with electrical heated fuel rod simulators show different quench behavior depending the rods geometry. A test facility for rewetting experiments (ITR - Instalacao de Testes de Remolhamento) has been constructed at the Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory of the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), with the objective of performing investigations on basic phenomena that occur during the reflood phase of a LOCA in a PWR, using tubular and annular test sections. This paper presents the design aspects of the facility, and the current stage of the works. The mechanical aspects of the installation as its instrumentation are described. Two typical tests are presented and results compered with theoretical calculations using computer code. (author)

  18. Germination, growth rates, and electron microscope analysis of tomato seeds flown on the LDEF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Bridgers, Kevin; Brown, Cecelia Wright

    1995-01-01

    The tomato seeds were flown in orbit aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for nearly six years. During this time, the tomato seeds received an abundant exposure to cosmic radiation and solar wind. Upon the return of the LDEF to earth, the seeds were distributed throughout the United States and 30 foreign countries for analysis. The purpose of the experiment was to determine the long term effect of cosmic rays on living tissue. Our university analysis included germination and growth rates as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray analysis of the control as well as Space-exposed tomato seeds. In analyzing the seeds under the Electron Microscope, usual observations were performed on the nutritional and epidermis layer of the seed. These layers appeared to be more porous in the Space-exposed seeds than on the Earth-based control seeds. This unusual characteristic may explain the increases in the space seeds growth pattern. (Several test results show that the Space-exposed seeds germinate sooner than the Earth-Based seeds. Also, the Space-exposed seeds grew at a faster rate). The porous nutritional region may allow the seeds to receive necessary nutrients and liquids more readily, thus enabling the plant to grow at a faster rate. Roots, leaves and stems were cut into small sections and mounted. After sputter coating the specimens with Argon/Gold Palladium Plasma, they were ready to be viewed under the Electron Microscope. Many micrographs were taken. The X-ray analysis displayed possible identifications of calcium, potassium, chlorine, copper, aluminum, silicon, phosphate, carbon, and sometimes sulfur and iron. The highest concentrations were shown in potassium and calcium. The Space-exposed specimens displayed a high concentration of copper and calcium in the two specimens. There was a significantly high concentration of copper in the Earth-based specimens, whereas there was no copper in the Space-exposed specimens.

  19. Anodized aluminum on LDEF: A current status of measurements on chromic acid anodized aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Johnny L.

    1992-01-01

    Chromic acid anodize was used as the exterior coating for aluminum surfaces on LDEF to provide passive thermal control. Chromic acid anodized aluminum was also used as test specimens in thermal control coatings experiments. The following is a compilation and analysis of the data obtained thus far.

  20. Modelling hypervelocity impacts into aluminum structures based on LDEF data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, C. R.; Atkinson, D. R.; Watts, A. J.; Wagner, J. R.; Allbrooks, M. K.; Hennessy, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Realizing and understanding the effects of the near-Earth space environment on a spacecraft during its mission lifetime is becoming more important with the regeneration of America's space program. Included among these potential effects are the following: erosion and surface degradation due to atomic oxygen impingement; ultraviolet exposure embrittlement; and delamination, pitting, cratering, and ring formation due to micrometeoroid and debris impacts. These effects may occur synergistically and may alter the spacecraft materials enough to modify the resultant crater, star crack, and/or perforation. This study concentrates on modelling the effects of micrometeoroid and debris hypervelocity impacts into aluminum materials (6061-T6). Space debris exists in all sizes, and has the possibility of growing into a potentially catastrophic problem, particularly since self-collisions between particles can rapidly escalate the number of small impactors. We have examined the morphologies of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) impact craters and the relationship between the observed impact damage on LDEF versus the existing models for both the natural (micrometeoroid) and manmade (debris) environments in order to better define these environments.

  1. MAUDE (Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MAUDE data represents reports of adverse events involving medical devices. The data consists of all voluntary reports since June, 1993, user facility reports since...

  2. Detectors and experiments at future neutrino facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Dydak, Friedrich

    2003-01-01

    Starting from the experimental opportunities at a neutrino factory, possibilities at other facilities which might become available well before the neutrino factory, will be discussed. Ideas abound on neutrino super-beams, beta-beams, and the use of conventional neutrino beams in off-axis mode. Nevertheless the costs and time- scales for realization will be decisive. (22 refs).

  3. First Operational Experience Of The CNGS Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Pardons, A.; Bruno, L.; Clement, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Elsener, K.; Meddahi, M.; Rangod, S.; Vincke, H.

    2008-02-01

    The CNGS project (CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso) aims at directly detecting νμ-ντ oscillation. An intense muon-neutrino beam (1017νμ/day) is generated at CERN and directed towards the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, LNGS, in Italy, where the ντ will be detected in large and complex detectors. An overview of the CNGS beam facility is given. The performance of the primary and secondary beam line during beam commissioning and physics operation is discussed. Modifications on the magnetic focusing lenses (horn and reflector) are described.

  4. The partial Reflection Experiment (PRE) facility at Ramfjordmoen, Tromsoe, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, O.; Brekke, A.; Hansen, T.

    1980-06-01

    The partial reflection method of determining electron densities and collision frequencies in the ionospheric D region, is briefly described. Possible applications of the observations to the study of turbulent fine structure in the propagation medium are mentioned. The PRE (Partial Reflection Experiment) facility at the University of Tromsoe's field site at Ramfjordmoen is described. The use of the facility in relation to and coordinated with other experiments (including rockets), is discussed.

  5. Fusion Core Imaging Experiment Based on the Shenguang Ⅱ Facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑志坚; 曹磊峰; 滕浩; 成金秀

    2002-01-01

    A laser fusion experiment was performed based on the Shenguang Ⅱ facility. An image of thermonuclear burning region was obtained with a Fresnel zone plate-coded imaging technique, where the laser-driven target was served as an α-particle source, and the coded image obtained in the experiment was reconstructed by a numerical way.

  6. Water Channel Facility for Fluid Dynamics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslam-Panah, Azar; Sabatino, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    This study presents the design, assembly, and verification process of the circulating water channel constructed by undergraduate students at the Penn State University at Berks. This work was significantly inspired from the closed-loop free-surface water channel at Lafayette College (Sabatino and Maharjan, 2015) and employed for experiments in fluid dynamics. The channel has a 11 ft length, 2.5 ft width, and 2 ft height glass test section with a maximum velocity of 3.3 ft/s. First, the investigation justifies the needs of a water channel in an undergraduate institute and its potential applications in the whole field of engineering. Then, the design procedures applied to find the geometry and material of some elements of the channel, especially the contraction, the test section, the inlet and end tanks, and the pump system are described. The optimization of the contraction design, including the maintenance of uniform exit flow and avoidance of flow separation, is also included. Finally, the discussion concludes by identifying the problems with the undergraduate education through this capstone project and suggesting some new investigations to improve flow quality.

  7. Surface analysis of anodized aluminum clamps from NASA-LDEF satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, H. L.; Wightman, J. P.; Young, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Surface analysis results of selected anodized aluminum clamps containing black (Z306) and white (A276) paints which received nearly six years of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) exposure on the Long Duration Exposure Facility are reported. Surface analytical techniques, including x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive analysis by x-ray (SEM/EDAX), showed significant differences in the surface composition of these materials depending upon the position on the LDEF. Differences in the surface composition are attributed to varying amounts of atomic oxygen and vacuum ultraviolet radiation (VUV). Silicon containing compounds were the primary contaminant detected on the materials.

  8. Elastic modulus measurements of LDEF glasses and glass-ceramics using a speckle technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedlocher, D. E.; Kinser, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Elastic moduli of five glass types and the glass-ceramic Zerodur, exposed to a near-earth orbit environment on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), were compared to that of unexposed samples. A double exposure speckle photography technique utilizing 633 nm laser light was used in the production of the speckle pattern. Subsequent illumination of a double exposed negative using the same wavelength radiation produces Young's fringes from which the in-plane displacements are measured. Stresses imposed by compressive loading produced measurable strains in the glasses and glass-ceramic.

  9. Dosimetry experiments at the MEDUSA Facility (Little Mountain).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Shaneyfelt, Marty Ray; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Schwank, James Ralph

    2010-10-01

    A series of experiments on the MEDUSA linear accelerator radiation test facility were performed to evaluate the difference in dose measured using different methods. Significant differences in dosimeter-measured radiation dose were observed for the different dosimeter types for the same radiation environments, and the results are compared and discussed in this report.

  10. Geometrical analysis of the microcraters found on LDEF samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakoshi, Kazuo; Ohashi, Hideo; Noma, Motosaku; Sakurai, Hirohisa; Nakashima, Kazuo; Nogami, Kenichi; Omori, Rie

    1993-01-01

    Diameters (D) and depths (T) of microcraters found on LDEF samples were measured and their origins were deduced by the (D/T) ratios, which distinguish projectile materials. From the results, one iron and several stony projectiles could be recognized.

  11. The refurbished Z facility : capabilities and recent experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeper, Ramon Joe; Long, Finis W.; Leifeste, Gordon T.; Hall, Clint Allen; Atherton, Briggs W.; Herrmann, Mark C.; Donovan, Guy Louis; McKee, G. Randall; Weinbrecht, Edward A.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Struve, Kenneth William; Stygar, William A.; Kiefer, Mark Linden; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Schneider, Larry X.

    2008-09-01

    The Z Refurbishment Project was completed in September 2007. Prior to the shutdown of the Z facility in July 2006 to install the new hardware, it provided currents of {le} 20 MA to produce energetic, intense X-ray sources ({approx} 1.6 MJ, > 200 TW) for performing high energy density science experiments and to produce high magnetic fields and pressures for performing dynamic material property experiments. The refurbishment project doubled the stored energy within the existing tank structure and replaced older components with modern, conventional technology and systems that were designed to drive both short-pulse Z-pinch implosions and long-pulse dynamic material property experiments. The project goals were to increase the delivered current for additional performance capability, improve overall precision and pulse shape flexibility for better reproducibility and data quality, and provide the capacity to perform more shots. Experiments over the past year have been devoted to bringing the facility up to full operating capabilities and implementing a refurbished suite of diagnostics. In addition, we have enhanced our X-ray backlighting diagnostics through the addition of a two-frame capability to the Z-Beamlet system and the addition of a high power laser (Z-Petawatt). In this paper, we will summarize the changes made to the Z facility, highlight the new capabilities, and discuss the results of some of the early experiments.

  12. DRESDYN - A new facility for MHD experiments with liquid sodium

    CERN Document Server

    Stefani, F; Gerbeth, G; Giesecke, A; Gundrum, Th; Steglich, C; Weier, T; Wustmann, B

    2012-01-01

    The DREsden Sodium facility for DYNamo and thermohydraulic studies (DRESDYN) is intended as a platform both for large scale experiments related to geo- and astrophysics as well as for experiments related to thermohydraulic and safety aspects of liquid metal batteries and liquid metal fast reactors. The most ambitious projects in the framework of DRESDYN are a homogeneous hydromagnetic dynamo driven solely by precession and a large Taylor-Couette type experiment for the combined investigation of the magnetorotational instability and the Tayler instability. In this paper we give a short summary about the ongoing preparations and delineate the next steps for the realization of DRESDYN.

  13. Utilization of the BARC critical facility for ADS related experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajeev Kumar; R Srivenkatesan

    2007-02-01

    The paper discusses the basic design of the critical facility, whose main purpose is the physics validation of AHWR. Apart from moderator level control, the facility will have shutdown systems based on shutoff rods and multiple ranges of neutron detection systems. In addition, it will have a flux mapping system based on 25 fission chambers, distributed in the core. We are planning to use this reactor for experiments with a suitable source to simulate an ADS system. Any desired sub-criticality can be achieved by adjusting the moderator level. Apart from perfecting our experimental techniques, in simple configurations, we intend to study the one-way coupled core in this facility. Preliminary calculations, employing a Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI, are presented.

  14. Physics Experiments Planned for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, Charles P.

    1998-11-01

    This talk will review the current status and plans for high energy density physics experiments to be conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The NIF a multi-laboratory effort, presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a 192 beam solid state glass laser system designed to deliver 1.8MJ (at 351nm) in temporal shaped pulses. This review will begin by introducing the NIF in the context of its role in the overall United States Stockpile Stewardship Program. The major focus of this talk will be to describe the physics experiments planned for the NIF. By way of introduction to the experiments a short review of the NIF facility design and projected capabilities will be presented. In addition the current plans and time line for the activation of the laser and experimental facilities will also be reviewed. The majority of this talk will focus on describing the national inertial confinement fusion integrated theory and experimental target ignition plan. This national plan details the theory and experimental program required for achieving ignition and modest thermonuclear gain on the NIF. This section of the presentation will include a status of the current physics basis, ignition target designs, and target fabrication issues associated with the indirect-drive and direct-drive approaches to ignition. The NIF design provides the capabilities to support experiments for both approaches to ignition. Other uses for the NIF, including non ignition physics relevant to the national security mission, studies relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy, and basic science applications, will also be described. The NIF offers the potential to generate new basic scientific understanding about matter under extreme conditions by making available a unique facility for research into: astrophysics and space physics, hydrodynamics, condensed matter physics, material properties, plasma physics and radiation sources, and radiative properties. Examples of

  15. Commercial experience with facility deactivation to safe storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sype, T.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fischer, S.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lee, J.H. Jr.; Sanchez, L.C.; Ottinger, C.A.; Pirtle, G.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has shutdown many production reactors; the Department has begun a major effort to also shutdown a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe- storage status, i.e., deactivation, before conducting decommissioning- for perhaps as long as 20 years. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons-learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and decommissioning. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this document can provide insight into transitioning challenges that Will be faced by the DOE weapons complex.

  16. Polar-direct-drive experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, P. B.; Hohenberger, M.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Bates, J.; Boehly, T. R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Dixit, S. N.; Edgell, D. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Karasik, M.; Knauer, J. P.; LePape, S.; Marozas, J. A.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J. F.; Obenschein, S.; Petrasso, R. D.; Regan, S. P.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Sio, H.; Skupsky, S.; Zylstra, A.

    2016-05-01

    Polar-direct-drive experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are being used to validate direct-drive-implosion models. Energy coupling and fast-electron preheat are the primary issues being studied in planar and imploding geometries on the NIF. Results from backlit images from implosions indicate that the overall drive is well modeled although some differences remain in the thickness of the imploding shell. Implosion experiments to mitigate cross-beam energy transfer and preheat from two-plasmon decay are planned for the next year.

  17. Shock Timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Robey, H. F.; Datte, P. S.; Bowers, M. W.; Krauter, K. G.; Frieders, G.; Ross, G. F.; Jackson, J. L.; Olson, R. E.; Munro, D. H.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Horner, J. B.; Hamza, A. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Gibson, C. R.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Park, H.-S.; Young, B. K.; Hsing, W. W.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2011-06-01

    Experiments are proceeding to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). The results of these measurements will be used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions to follow. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. The First Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landen, O L; Glenzer, S; Froula, D; Dewald, E; Suter, L J; Schneider, M; Hinkel, D; Fernandez, J; Kline, J; Goldman, S; Braun, D; Celliers, P; Moon, S; Robey, H; Lanier, N; Glendinning, G; Blue, B; Wilde, B; Jones, O; Schein, J; Divol, L; Kalantar, D; Campbell, K; Holder, J; MacDonald, J; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A; Collins, R; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; Hicks, D; Gregori, G; Kirkwood, R; Young, B; Foster, J; Hansen, F; Perry, T; Munro, D; Baldis, H; Grim, G; Heeter, R; Hegelich, B; Montgomery, D; Rochau, G; Olson, R; Turner, R; Workman, J; Berger, R; Cohen, B; Kruer, W; Langdon, B; Langer, S; Meezan, N; Rose, H; Still, B; Williams, E; Dodd, E; Edwards, J; Monteil, M; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B; Coker, R; Magelssen, G; Rosen, P; Stry, P; Woods, D; Weber, S; Alvarez, S; Armstrong, G; Bahr, R; Bourgade, J; Bower, D; Celeste, J; Chrisp, M; Compton, S; Cox, J; Constantin, C; Costa, R; Duncan, J; Ellis, A; Emig, J; Gautier, C; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hargrove, D; James, T; Kamperschroer, J; Kimbrough, J; Landon, M; Lee, D; Malone, R; May, M; Montelongo, S; Moody, J; Ng, E; Nikitin, A; Pellinen, D; Piston, K; Poole, M; Rekow, V; Rhodes, M; Shepherd, R; Shiromizu, S; Voloshin, D; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Young, P; Arnold, P; Atherton, L J; Bardsley, G; Bonanno, R; Borger, T; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S; Burkhart, S; Cooper, F; Dixit, S; Erbert, G; Eder, D; Ehrlich, B; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Gardner, S; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Hall, T; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermann, M; Hermes, G; Huber, S; Jancaitis, K; Johnson, S; Kauffman, B; Kelleher, T; Kohut, T; Koniges, A E; Labiak, T; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lund, D; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K R; Marshall, C; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Menapace, J; Mertens, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Ross, G; Robert, V; Tobin, M; Sailors, S; Saunders, R; Schmitt, M; Shaw, M; Singh, M; Spaeth, M; Stephens, A; Tietbohl, G; Tuck, J; Van Wonterghem, B; Vidal, R; Wegner, P; Whitman, P; Williams, K; Winward, K; Work, K

    2005-11-11

    A first set of laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). In parallel, a robust set of optical and x-ray spectrometers, interferometer, calorimeters and imagers have been activated. The experiments have been undertaken with laser powers and energies of up to 8 TW and 17 kJ in flattop and shaped 1-9 ns pulses focused with various beam smoothing options.

  19. LDEF (Postflight), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03 EL-1994-00266 LDEF (Postflight), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03 The experiment is shown in the postflight configuration before closing the canisters with ground support equipment that bypassed the experiments onboard electronics circuitry. Three full panels and approximately 3/4th of the other panel are covered with gold foil (>99.99 percent pure). The remaining area on the fourth panel is covered with strips of other detector materials: zirconium, beryllium, titanium, platium, aluminum, carbon, Kapton, polyethylene and TEFLON®. A brown stain is visible on the experiment tray flanges, however, most of the stains observed in the flight photograph are obscured by reflected light. All materials remain intact with no visual evidence of damage to the experiment. The reflection of a video camera on a tripod and light sources can be seen on the gold foil covered panels. The experiment canisters are shown after being closed by using the experiments ground support equipment. The stain buildup can be clearly seen at the vertical center of the right tray flange. The clean area was located under the experiment tray clamp block and was not exposed to the staining medium. The stain also coats other areas that were exposed during the mission but are not as noticeable. The experiment hardware seems to be intact and have no damage.

  20. Boiling Experiment Facility for Heat Transfer Studies in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delombard, Richard; McQuillen, John; Chao, David

    2008-01-01

    Pool boiling in microgravity is an area of both scientific and practical interest. By conducting tests in microgravity, it is possible to assess the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and assess the relative magnitude of effects with regards to other "forces" and phenomena such as Marangoni forces, liquid momentum forces, and microlayer evaporation. The Boiling eXperiment Facility is now being built for the Microgravity Science Glovebox that will use normal perfluorohexane as a test fluid to extend the range of test conditions to include longer test durations and less liquid subcooling. Two experiments, the Microheater Array Boiling Experiment and the Nucleate Pool Boiling eXperiment will use the Boiling eXperiment Facility. The objectives of these studies are to determine the differences in local boiling heat transfer mechanisms in microgravity and normal gravity from nucleate boiling, through critical heat flux and into the transition boiling regime and to examine the bubble nucleation, growth, departure and coalescence processes. Custom-designed heaters will be utilized to achieve these objectives.

  1. EXPERIENCE AND PLANS OF THE JLAB FEL FACILITY AS A USER FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelle D. Shinn

    2007-08-26

    Jefferson Lab's IR Upgrade FEL building was planned from the beginning to be a user facility, and includes an associated 600 m2 area containing seven laboratories. The high average power capability (multikilowatt-level) in the near-infrared (1-3 microns), and many hundreds of watts at longer wavelengths, along with an ultrafast (~ 1 ps) high PRF (10's MHz) temporal structure makes this laser a unique source for both applied and basic research. In addition to the FEL, we have a dedicated laboratory capable of delivering high power (many tens of watts) of broadband THz light. After commissioning the IR Upgrade, we once again began delivering beam to users in 2005. In this presentation, I will give an overview of the FEL facility and its current performance, lessons learned over the last two years, and a synopsis of current and future experiments.

  2. An LDEF 2 dust instrument for discrimination between orbital debris and natural particles in near-Earth space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzzolino, A. J.; Simpson, J. A.; Mckibben, R. B.; Voss, H. D.; Gursky, H.

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics of a space dust instrument which would be ideally suited to carry out near-Earth dust measurements on a possible Long Duraction Exposure Facility reflight mission (LDEF 2) is discussed. As a model for the trajectory portion of the instrument proposed for LDEF 2, the characteristics of a SPAce DUSt instrument (SPADUS) currently under development for flight on the USA ARGOS mission to measure the flux, mass, velocity, and trajectory of near-Earth dust is summarized. Since natural (cosmic) dust and man-made dust particles (orbital debris) have different velocity and trajectory distributions, they are distinguished by means of the SPADUS velocity/trajectory information. The SPADUS measurements will cover the dust mass range approximately 5 x 10(exp -12) g (2 microns diameter) to approximately 1 x 10(exp -5) g (200 microns diameter), with an expected mean error in particle trajectory of approximately 7 deg (isotropic flux). Arrays of capture cell devices positioned behind the trajectory instrumentation would provide for Earth-based chemical and isotopic analysis of captured dust. The SPADUS measurement principles, characteristics, its role in the ARGOS mission, and its application to an LDEF 2 mission are summarized.

  3. The first target experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landen, O.L.; Glenzer, S.H.; Froula, D.H.; Dewald, E.L.; Suter, L.J.; Schneider, M.B.; Hinkel, D.E.; Fernandez, J.C.; Kline, J.L.; Goldman, S.R.; Braun, D.G.; Celliers, P.M.; Moon, S.J.; Robey, H.S.; Lanier, N.E.; Glendinning, S.G.; Blue, B.E.; Wilde, B.H.; Jones, O.S.; Schein, J.; Divol, L.; Kalantar, D.H.; Campbell, K.M.; Holder, J.P.; McDonald, J.W.; Niemann, C.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Collins, G.W.; Bradley, D.K.; Eggert, J.H.; Hicks, D.G.; Gregori, G.; Kirkwood, R.K.; Young, B.K.; Foster, J.M.; Hansen, J.F.; Perry, T.S.; Munro, D.H.; Baldis, H.A.; Grim, G.P.; Heeter, R.F.; Hegelich, M.B.; Montgomery, D.S.; Rochau, G.A.; Olson, R.E.; Turner, R.E.; Workman, J.B.; Berger, R.L.; Cohen, B.I.; Kruer, W.L.; Langdon, A.B.; Langer, S.H.; Meezan, N.B.; Rose, H.A.; Still, C.H.; Williams, E.A.; Dodd, E.A.; Edwards, M.J.; Monteil, M.C.; Stevenson, R.M.; Thomas, B.R.; Coker, R.F.; Magelssen, G.R.; Rosen, P.A.; Stry, P.E.; Woods, D.; Weber, S.V.; Young, P.E.; Alvarez, S.; Armstrong, G.; Bahr, R.; Bourgade, G.L.; Bower, D.; Celeste, J.; Chrisp, M.; Compton, S.; Cox, J.; Constantin, C.; Costa, R.; Duncan, J.; Ellis, A.; Emig, J.; Gautier, C.; Greenwood, A.; Griffith, R.; Holdner, F.; Holtmeier, G.; Hargrove, D.; James, T.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Landon, M.; Lee, F.D.; Malone, R.; May, M.; Montelongo, S.; Moody, J.; Ng, E.; Nikitin, A.; Pellinen, D.; Piston, K.; Poole, M.; Rekow, V.; Rhodes, M.; Shepherd, R.; Shiromizu, S.; Voloshin, D.; Warrick, A.; Watts, P.; Weber, F.; Young, P.; Arnold, P

    2007-08-15

    A first set of shock timing, laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). In parallel, a robust set of optical and X-ray spectrometers, interferometer, calorimeters and imagers have been activated. The experiments have been undertaken with laser powers and energies of up to 8 TW and 17 kJ in flattop and shaped 1-9 ns pulses focused with various beam smoothing options. The experiments have demonstrated excellent agreement between measured and predicted laser-target coupling in foils and hohlraums, even when extended to a longer pulse regime unattainable at previous laser facilities, validated the predicted effects of beam smoothing on intense laser beam propagation in long scale-length plasmas and begun to test 3-dimensional codes by extending the study of laser driven hydrodynamic jets to 3-dimensional geometries. (authors)

  4. Experiments with the HORUS-II test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alt, S.; Lischke, W. [Univ. for Applied Sciences Zittau/Goerlitz, Zittau (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Within the scope of the German reactor safety research the thermohydraulic computer code ATHLET which was developed for accident analyses of western nuclear power plants is more and more used for the accident analysis of VVER-plants particularly for VVER-440,V-213. The experiments with the HORUS-facilities and the analyses with the ATHLET-code have been realized at the Technical University Zittau/Goerlitz since 1991. The aim of the investigations was to improve and verify the condensation model particularly the correlations for the calculation of the heat transfer coefficients in the ATHLET-code for pure steam and steam-noncondensing gas mixtures in horizontal tubes. About 130 condensation experiments have been performed at the HORUS-II facility. The experiments have been carried out with pure steam as well as with noncondensing gas injections into the steam mass flow. The experimental simulations are characterized as accident simulation tests for SBLOCA for VVER-conditions. The simulation conditions had been adjusted correspondingly to the parameters of a postulated SBLOCA`s fourth phase at the original plant. 4 refs.

  5. Design of MagLIF experiments using the Z facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefkow, Adam

    2013-10-01

    The MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) concept has been presented as a path toward obtaining substantial fusion yields using the Z facility, and related experiments have begun in earnest at Sandia National Laboratories. We present fully integrated numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the MagLIF concept, which include laser preheating of the fuel, the presence of electrodes, and end loss effects. These simulations have been used to design neutron-producing integrated MagLIF experiments on the Z facility for the capabilities that presently exist, namely, D2 fuel, peak currents of Imax 15-18 MA, pre-seeded axial magnetic fields of Bz0 = 7-10 T, and laser preheat energies of Elaser = 2-3 kJ delivered in 2 ns. The first fully integrated experiments, based on these simulations, are planned to occur in 2013. Neutron yields in excess of 1011 are predicted with the available laser preheat energy and accelerator drive energy. In several years, we plan to upgrade the laser to increase Elaser = by several more kJ, provide Bz0 up to 30 T, deliver Imax 22 MA or more to the load, and develop the capability to use DT fuel. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Simulations of flashing experiments in TOPFLOW facility with TRACE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikuž, Blaž, E-mail: blaz.mikuz@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Engineering Division, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tiselj, Iztok [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Engineering Division, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Beyer, Matthias; Lucas, Dirk [Institute of Fluid Dynamics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Two decompression experiments performed at TOPFLOW are simulated with a TRACE code. • The depressurization triggers flashing of the slightly undersaturated liquid water. • Pressure, temperature and void fractions are compared with measurements. • Prediction of the choked flow is the most critical parameter of simulations. • Good agreement with measurements at high initial pressure (i.e. 65 and 40 bars). - Abstract: The decompression experiments performed at TOPFLOW facility in 2010 have been reproduced using the latest best-estimate thermohydraulic system code TRACE (V 5.0 Patch 3). The main component of TOPFLOW facility was about 8 m long vertical tube with an inner diameter of 195.3 mm. The evaporation of liquid water to steam caused by depressurization was simulated using two different procedures: from stagnant water and during circulating of water in tubes. The liquid water was almost saturated at initial pressure values of 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 6.5 MPa. Our approach applies one-dimensional code to simulate all the important parts of the facility not just the vertical test section, where the measurements were taken. The obtained simulated pressure, temperature and void fractions are compared with measured values. The simulations of the first procedure (stagnant water at beginning) are in a good agreement with measurements, especially for the cases with longer transients and higher initial pressure, however, choked flow model through the blow-off valve had to be adjusted. There is a short transient (about 2 s) after the fast opening valve opens, which was not reproduced correctly with TRACE. The simulations of the second procedure (circulating water in a loop) correctly predict pressure and temperature decrease, but underpredict void fraction. No modification of the default TRACE choked flow model was needed for procedure B.

  7. New synchrotron powder diffraction facility for long-duration experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Claire A.; Potter, Jonathan; Day, Sarah J.; Baker, Annabelle R.; Thompson, Stephen P.; Kelly, Jon; Morris, Christopher G.; Tang, Chiu C.

    2017-01-01

    A new synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction instrument has been built and commissioned for long-duration experiments on beamline I11 at Diamond Light Source. The concept is unique, with design features to house multiple experiments running in parallel, in particular with specific stages for sample environments to study slow kinetic systems or processes. The instrument benefits from a high-brightness X-ray beam and a large area detector. Diffraction data from the commissioning work have shown that the objectives and criteria are met. Supported by two case studies, the results from months of measurements have demonstrated the viability of this large-scale instrument, which is the world’s first dedicated facility for long-term studies (weeks to years) using synchrotron radiation. PMID:28190992

  8. Advances in shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  9. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: First experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celliers, P. M.; Robey, H. F.; Boehly, T. R.; Alger, E.; Azevedo, S.; Berzins, L. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Bowers, M. W.; Brereton, S. J.; Callahan, D.; Castro, C.; Chandrasekaran, H.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Coffee, K. R.; Datte, P. S.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; Dixit, S.; Döppner, T.; Dzenitis, E.; Edwards, M. J.; Eggert, J. H.; Fair, J.; Farley, D. R.; Frieders, G.; Gibson, C. R.; Giraldez, E.; Haan, S.; Haid, B.; Hamza, A. V.; Haynam, C.; Hicks, D. G.; Holunga, D. M.; Horner, J. B.; Jancaitis, K.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D.; Kline, J. L.; Krauter, K. G.; Kroll, J. J.; LaFortune, K. N.; Le Pape, S.; Malsbury, T.; Mapoles, E. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J. D.; Moreno, K.; Munro, D. H.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Parham, T.; Pollaine, S.; Radousky, H. B.; Ross, G. F.; Sater, J.; Schneider, M. B.; Shaw, M.; Smith, R. F.; Sterne, P. A.; Thomas, C. A.; Throop, A.; Town, R. P. J.; Trummer, D.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; Walters, C. F.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C.; Young, B. K.; Atherton, L. J.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Moses, E. I.

    2013-11-01

    An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a re-entrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements in the target design. We describe the results and interpretation of the initial tuning experiments.

  10. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: First experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celliers P.M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a re-entrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements in the target design. We describe the results and interpretation of the initial tuning experiments.

  11. New synchrotron powder diffraction facility for long-duration experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Claire A; Potter, Jonathan; Day, Sarah J; Baker, Annabelle R; Thompson, Stephen P; Kelly, Jon; Morris, Christopher G; Yang, Sihai; Tang, Chiu C

    2017-02-01

    A new synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction instrument has been built and commissioned for long-duration experiments on beamline I11 at Diamond Light Source. The concept is unique, with design features to house multiple experiments running in parallel, in particular with specific stages for sample environments to study slow kinetic systems or processes. The instrument benefits from a high-brightness X-ray beam and a large area detector. Diffraction data from the commissioning work have shown that the objectives and criteria are met. Supported by two case studies, the results from months of measurements have demonstrated the viability of this large-scale instrument, which is the world's first dedicated facility for long-term studies (weeks to years) using synchrotron radiation.

  12. LDEF (Postflight), M0001 : Heavy Ions in Space, Tray H03

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), M0001 : Heavy Ions in Space, Tray H03 The post landing photograph of the Heavy Ions in Space Experiment was taken from the Orbiter's cargo bay access hatch during post landing opera tions to prepare the Orbiter for the ferry flight from the Dryden Flight Research Center to the Kennedy Space Center. The photograph shows extensive damage to the multi-layer thermal insulation blanket. The tape joints appear to have failed along two (2) sides of each experiment module and allowed the multi layer thermal insulation blanket to curled back over its self. The golden colored surfaces that have been exposed are the top sheet of the experiment's Lexan detector stacks that are held securely in place by the Z shaped aluminum structure. A light tan stain can be seen on the LDEF end structure along the upper edge of the experiment tray flange. Lighter stains that appear to be finger prints are also visible on the trays top flange. The paint on the top layer of the thermal blankets, origi nally white, now appears brown or light tan. The fragments of aluminum in the lower two quad rants appear to be the results of delamination of the vapor deposited aluminum from the thin aluminized Mylar thermal film.

  13. Development of aquatic animal experiment facility, Aquatic Habitat (AQH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, S.; Kono, Y.; Sakimura, T.; Nishikawa, W.; Fujimoto, N.; Murakami, K.; Nakamura, T.

    We have been performing technical studies to develop aquatic animal experiment facility, Aquatic Habitat (AQH), for both of short-term experiments in the Space Shuttle middeck and long-term experiments in the Space Station including the Centrifuge Accommodation Module (CAM). The AQH will have the capabilities to accommodate three-generations of small freshwater fish (medaka and zebrafish) and egg through metamorphosis of amphibian (African clawed frog). For these purposes, the AQH will have the following brand-new capabilities that the previous facilities have never had; 90days experiment duration, automatic feeding according to specimen types and their developmental stages, separation of generations for fish, specimen sample collection in various developmental stages, air/water interface control for amphibian, continuous monitoring of specimen behavior even in dark condition, and so on. We have already performed preliminary breeding tests for medaka and zebrafish with a breeding system prototype. Their mating behavior was performed successfully in the small closed chamber and the hatched larvae grew and started spawning on the 45-47th day after hatching. These results demonstrated that three generational breeding of medaka and zebrafish within 90days would be possible based on this breeding system prototype. Also, we have developed almost of the above new mechanisms, that is, an automatic feeding system, an egg separation mechanism for fish, an air stabilizer to control air/water interface, and a continuous specimen monitoring system through light/dark cycle. Based on these results, we have manufactured a BBM of AQH water circulation system and performed biological compatibility tests as a next step. For African clawed frog breeding, some problems have been revealed through the preliminary tests with the breeding system prototype. Currently, we are performing the investigations to resolve the problems and preparing to proceed to the next step.

  14. The integration of microgravity science experiments into shared or previously existing experiment facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer-Peckham, M. S.; Mccarley, K. S.

    1991-01-01

    The overall flow for integrating a sample into an experiment facility, specifically materials science is discussed using the Crystal Growth Furnace as an example. A typical preflight timeline for an experiment is discussed, including identification of all documentation and hardware deliveries. Each of the items presented is discussed in detail including the experiment requirements document, the announcement opportunity response, the experiment specific equipment, safety reviews, mission plan, and hardware integration plan. These items are addressed both individualy and with respect to their relevance to the program as a whole.

  15. The integration of microgravity science experiments into shared or previously existing experiment facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer-Peckham, M. S.; Mccarley, K. S.

    1991-01-01

    The overall flow for integrating a sample into an experiment facility, specifically materials science is discussed using the Crystal Growth Furnace as an example. A typical preflight timeline for an experiment is discussed, including identification of all documentation and hardware deliveries. Each of the items presented is discussed in detail including the experiment requirements document, the announcement opportunity response, the experiment specific equipment, safety reviews, mission plan, and hardware integration plan. These items are addressed both individualy and with respect to their relevance to the program as a whole.

  16. HITRAP: A Facility for Experiments with Trapped Highly Charged Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quint, W.; Dilling, J. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Djekic, S. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Haeffner, H. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Hermanspahn, N. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Kluge, H.-J.; Marx, G. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Moore, R. [McGill University (Canada); Rodriguez, D.; Schoenfelder, J.; Sikler, G. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Valenzuela, T.; Verdu, J. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Weber, C. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Werth, G. [Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany)

    2001-01-15

    HITRAP is a planned ion trap facility for capturing and cooling of highly charged ions produced at GSI in the heavy-ion complex of the UNILAC-SIS accelerators and the ESR storage ring. In this facility heavy highly charged ions up to uranium will be available as bare nuclei, hydrogen-like ions or few-electron systems at low temperatures. The trap for receiving and studying these ions is designed for operation at extremely high vacuum by cooling to cryogenic temperatures. The stored highly charged ions can be investigated in the trap itself or can be extracted from the trap at energies up to about 10 keV/q. The proposed physics experiments are collision studies with highly charged ions at well-defined low energies (eV/u), high-accuracy measurements to determine the g-factor of the electron bound in a hydrogen-like heavy ion and the atomic binding energies of few-electron systems, laser spectroscopy of HFS transitions and X-ray spectroscopy.

  17. Steam line rupture experiments with the PPOOLEX test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, J.; Puustinen, M. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2008-07-15

    The results of the steam line rupture experiment series in 2007 with the scaled down PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at Lappeenranta University of Technology are reported. The test facility is a closed stainless steel vessel divided into two compartments, dry well and wet well. Air was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through a DN200 blowdown pipe to the condensation pool. Altogether five experiments, each consisting of several blows (tests), were carried out. The main purpose of the experiment series was to study the initial phase of a postulated steam line break accident inside a BWR containment. Specifically, thermal stratification in the dry well compartment and ejection of water plug from the blowdown pipe were of interest. In addition, the effect of counterpressure on bubble dynamics was studied. A temperature difference of approximately 15 deg. C between the upper and lower part of the dry well was measured. In the wet well gas space, a temperature difference of more than 30 deg. C was registered. These were measured during the compression period of the tests. Towards the end of the tests the temperature differences tended to disappear. To get a more detailed picture of temperature distribution in the wet well, especially close to the water level, a dense net of measurements is required in future experiments. In longer experiments, heat conduction to structures and heat losses to surroundings should also be taken into account. Ejection of water plugs from the blowdown pipe did not cause notable loads to the structures due to the suppressing effect of the dry well compartment. The maximum measured pressure pulse at the pool bottom was only 10 kPa and the maximum strain amplitude at the pool bottom rounding was negligible both in axial and circumferential direction. As the counterpressure of the system increased, but the flow rate remained the same, the maximum size of the air bubbles at the blowdown pipe outlet got smaller and

  18. Five years operating experience at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumhardt, R. J.; Bechtold, R. A.

    1987-04-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400 Mw(t), loop-type, sodium-cooled, fast neutron reactor. It is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the United States Department of Energy at Richland, Washington. The FFTF is a multipurpose test reactor used to irradiate fuels and materials for programs such as Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) research, fusion research, space power systems, isotope production and international research. FFTF is also used for testing concepts to be used in Advanced Reactors which will be designed to maximize passive safety features and not require complex shutdown systems to assure safe shutdown and heat removal. The FFTF also provides experience in the operation and maintenance of a reactor having prototypic components and systems typical of large LMR (LMFBR) power plants. The 5 year operational performance of the FFTF reactor is discussed in this report. 6 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. CHARM 2010: Experiment summary and future charm facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    The CHARM 2010 meeting had over 30 presentations of experimental results, plus additional future facilities talks just before this summary talk. Since there is not enough time to even summarize all that has been shown from experiments and to recognize all the memorable plots and results - tempting as it is to reproduce the many clean signals and data vs theory figures, the quantum correlations plots, and the D-mixing plots before and after the latest CLEO-c data is added. So, this review will give only my personal observations, exposing my prejudices and my areas of ignorance, no doubt. This overview will be at a fairly high level of abstraction - no re-showing individual plots or results. I ask the forgiveness of those who will have been slighted in this way - meaning all the presents.

  20. Atlas Pulsed Power Facility for High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Barr, G.W.; Bowman, D.W.; Chochrane, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Elizondo, J.M.; Gribble, R.F.; Griego, J.R.; Hicks, R.D.; Hinckley, W.B.; Hosack, K.W.; Nielsen, K.E.; Parker, J.V.; Parsons, M.O.; Rickets, R.L.; Salazar, H.R.; Sanchez, P.G.; Scudder, D.W.; Shapiro, C.; Thompson, M.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Valdez, G.A.; Vigil, B.N.; Watt, R.G.; Wysock, F.J.

    1999-06-07

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. It is intended to be an international user facility, providing opportunities for researchers from national laboratories and academic institutions around the world. Emphasizing institutions around the world. Emphasizing hydrodynamic experiments, Atlas will provide the capability for achieving steady shock pressures exceeding 10-Mbar in a volume of several cubic centimeters. In addition, the kinetic energy associated with solid liner implosion velocities exceeding 12 km/s is sufficient to drive dense, hydrodynamic targets into the ionized regime, permitting the study of complex issues associated with strongly-coupled plasmas. The primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently-removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-{micro}s risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line components has been completed. A complete maintenance module and its associated transmission line (the First Article) are now under construction and testing. The current Atlas schedule calls for construction of the machine to be complete by August, 2000. Acceptance testing is scheduled to begin in November, 2000, leading to initial operations in January, 2001.

  1. Atmospheric discharges from nuclear facilities during decommissioning: German experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, H.; Goertz, R.; Weil, L.

    1997-08-01

    In Germany, a substantial amount of experience is available with planning, licensing and realization of decommissioning projects. In total, a number of 18 nuclear power plants including prototype facilities as well as 6 research reactors and 3 fuel cycle facilities have been shut down finally and are at different stages of decommissioning. Only recently the final {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} stage of the Niederaichbach Nuclear Power Plant total dismantlement project has been achieved. From the regulatory point of view, a survey of the decommissioning experience in Germany is presented highlighting the aspects of production and retention of airborne radioactivity. Nuclear air cleaning technology, discharge limits prescribed in licences and actual discharges are presented. As compared to operation, the composition of the discharged radioactivity is different as well as the off-gas discharge rate. In practically all cases, there is no significant amount of short-lived radionuclides. The discussion further includes lessons learned, for example inadvertent discharges of radionuclides expected not to be in the plants inventory. It is demonstrated that, as for operation of nuclear power plants, the limits prescribed in the Ordinance on Radiological Protection can be met using existing air cleaning technology, Optimization of protection results in public exposures substantially below the limits. In the frame of the regulatory investigation programme a study has been conducted to assess the airborne radioactivity created during certain decommissioning activities like decontamination, segmentation and handling of contaminated or activated parts. The essential results of this study are presented, which are supposed to support planning for decommissioning, for LWRs, Co-60 and Cs-137 are expected to be the dominant radionuclides in airborne discharges. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohenberger, M. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Radha, P. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Myatt, J. F. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Marozas, J. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Marshall, F. J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Michel, D. T. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Seka, W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Shvydky, A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Bates, J. W. [U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA; Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Bonino, M. J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Collins, T. J. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Craxton, R. S. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Delettrez, J. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Edgell, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Epstein, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Fiksel, G. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Fitzsimmons, P. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121, USA; Frenje, J. A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Goncharov, V. N. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Harding, D. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Kalantar, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Karasik, M. [U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA; Kessler, T. J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121, USA; Knauer, J. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Kurz, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121, USA; Lafon, M. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; LaFortune, K. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; MacGowan, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Mackinnon, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; MacPhee, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; McCrory, R. L. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; McKenty, P. W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Meeker, J. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Nagel, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121, USA; Obenschain, S. [U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Ralph, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Rinderknecht, H. G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Rosenberg, M. J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Schmitt, A. J. [U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA; Wallace, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Weaver, J. [U. S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA; Widmayer, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Skupsky, S. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Solodov, A. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Yaakobi, B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA; Zuegel, J. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299, USA

    2015-05-01

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive–specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beam geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D2 gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ~500-750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 x 1014 to 1.2 x 1015 W/cm2. Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.

  3. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T. R.; Bonino, M. J.; Collins, T. J. B.; Craxton, R. S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive–specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beam geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D{sub 2} gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ∼500 to 750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 × 10{sup 14} to 1.2 × 10{sup 15 }W/cm{sup 2}. Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.

  4. The Underground Laboratory in South Korea : facilities and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeongduk

    2017-01-01

    We have developed underground physics programs for last 15 years in South Korea. The scientific and technical motivation for this initiative was the lack of local facility of a large accelerator in Korea. Thanks to the large underground electric power generator in Yangyang area, we could construct a deep underground laboratory (Yangyang Laboratory, Y2L) and has performed some pioneering experiments for dark matter search and double beta decay experiments. Since year of 2013, a new research center in the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Center for Underground Physics (CUP), is approved by the government and Y2L laboratory is managed by CUP. Due to the limited space in Y2L, we are proposing to construct a new deep underground laboratory where we can host larger scale experiments of next generation. The site is in an active iron mine, and will be made in 1100 meter underground with a space of about 2000 m2 by the end of 2019. I will describe the status and future plan for this underground laboratory. CUP has two main experimental programs. (1) Identification of dark matter : The annual modulation signal of DAMA/LIBRA experiment has been contradictory to many other experiments such as XENON100, LUX, and Super CDMS. Yale University and CUP (COSINE-100) experimentalists agreed to do an experiment together at the Y2L and recently commissioned a 100kg scale low background NaI(Tl) crystal experiment. In future, we will develop NaI(Tl) crystals with lower internal backgrounds and try to run identical detectors at both north and south hemisphere. Low mass WIMP search is also planned with a development of low temperature sensors coupled with highly scintillating crystals. (2) Neutrinoless double beta decay search : The mass of the lightest neutrino and the Majorana nature of the neutrinos are not determined yet. Neutrinoless double beta decay experiment can answer both of the questions directly, and ultra-low backgrounds and excellent energy resolution are critical to

  5. Evaluation of seals and lubricants used on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursch, H. W.; Keough, B. K.; Pippin, H. G.

    1994-01-01

    This report described results from testing and analysis of seals and lubricants subsequent to the 69-month low-earth-orbit (LEO) exposure on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Results show that if the materials were shielded from exposure to LDEF's external environment, the 69-month exposure to LEO resulted in minimal changes to material properties. However, if the materials were exposed to LDEF's exterior environments (atomic oxygen, solar radiation, meteoroids, and/or space debris), a variety of events occurred, ranging from no material change, to changes in properties, to significant erosion of the material.

  6. Facilities as teaching tools: A transformative participatory professional development experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Eric A.

    Resource consumption continues to increase as the population grows. In order to secure a sustainable future, society must educate the next generation to become "sustainability natives." Schools play a pivotal role in educating a sustainability-literate society. However, a disconnect exists between the hidden curriculum of the built environment and the enacted curriculum. This study employs a transformative participatory professional development model to instruct teachers on how to use their school grounds as teaching tools for the purpose of helping students make explicit choices in energy consumption, materials use, and sustainable living. Incorporating a phenomenological perspective, this study considers the lived experience of two sustainability coordinators. Grounded theory provides an interpretational context for the participants' interactions with each other and the professional development process. Through a year long professional development experience - commencing with an intense, participatory two-day workshop -the participants discussed challenges they faced with integrating facilities into school curriculum and institutionalizing a culture of sustainability. Two major needs were identified in this study. For successful sustainability initiatives, a hybrid model that melds top-down and bottom-up approaches offers the requisite mix of administrative support, ground level buy-in, and excitement vis-a-vis sustainability. Second, related to this hybrid approach, K-12 sustainability coordinators ideally need administrative capabilities with access to decision making, while remaining connected to students in a meaningful way, either directly in the classroom, as a mentor, or through work with student groups and projects.

  7. Multiple blowdown pipe experiments with the PPOOLEX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puustinen, M.; Laine, J.; Raesaenen, A. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2011-03-15

    This report summarizes the results of the experiments with two steel blowdown pipes carried out with the scaled down PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Steam was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through the blowdown pipes to the condensation pool. The main purpose of the experiment series was to study chugging phenomena (rapid condensation) while steam is discharged through two parallel blowdown pipes into the condensation pool filled with sub-cooled water. Particularly, the aim was to study if the pipe material (polycarbonate) used in the earlier experiment series with two blowdown pipes has had an effect on the general chugging behaviour and measured loads. In the experiments the initial temperature of the pool water was 20 deg. C. The steam flow rate ranged from 220 g/s to 2 350 g/s and the temperature of incoming steam from 148 deg. C to 207 deg. C. The formation and collapse of steam bubbles and the movement of the steam/water interface inside the pipes was non-synchronous. There could be even a 70 ms time difference between the occurrences of steam bubble collapses at the outlets of the two pipes. There was no clear pattern in which pipe the steam bubble first starts to collapse. Several successive bubbles could collapse first in either pipe but then the order changed for a single or several cycles. High pressure loads were measured inside the blowdown pipes due to rapid condensation of the steam volumes in the pipes and resulting water hammer effects. The loads seemed to be higher in pipe 1 than in pipe 2. An explanation for this could be a possible unequal distribution of steam flow between the two pipes. The pipe material has an effect on the condensation phenomena inside the blowdown pipes. A huge difference in the measured pressure curves inside the pipes could be observed compared to the experiments with the polycarbonate pipes. With the same test conditions the amplitude of the

  8. Adaptation of existing facilities to isentropic compression experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasker, Douglas G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, Charles H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rickel, Dwight G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-07

    We demonstrate that the established pulsed power infrastructure at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory - Pulsed Field Facility (NHMFL-PFF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory can be adapted to obtain high quality isentropic compression experiment (ICE) data on materials in extreme conditions of dynamic high pressure. Experiments utilized a single-turn magnet pulsed power system at the NHMFL-PFF that was originally designed to measure actinide samples in extremes of high magnetic field (to 300 Tesla). A simple modification to the single-turn magnet has converted it to a fast turnaround dynamic high pressure measurement system. This paper details the work done including important background details that indicate that much more can be accomplished with optimization of the load characteristics in terms of ultimate peak pressures. To match the rise time of the NHMFL capacitor bank ({approx}2 {mu}s versus {approx}0.5 {mu}s for the Sandia Z-machine) the sample dimensions can be relatively large, i.e., up to 5 mm thickness. The maximum stresses are {approx}50GPa (0.5 Mbar) at the maximum bank voltage (60 kV) and higher pressures may be possible if the sample is tamped. For the design and predictions of performance of the NHMFL-ICE experiment it is important to have good predictive models. A SPICE code simulation was chosen to model all aspects of the experiment, electrical and physical. To this end, accurate dynamic load models were developed to simulate the compression and expansion of the dynamic load at high pressures using shock physics principles. A series experiments have been performed which demonstrated the feasibility of the NHMFL-ICE technique. The results will be shown and discussed. The NHMFL-ICE technique is an excellent method for measuring equations of state (EOS) at megabar pressures. Because a complete EOS can be obtained in one experiment from zero to the peak pressure, and because many shots can be fired in one day, the technique promises to

  9. HLM fuel pin bundle experiments in the CIRCE pool facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martelli, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.martelli@ing.unipi.it [University of Pisa, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Pisa (Italy); Forgione, Nicola [University of Pisa, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Pisa (Italy); Di Piazza, Ivan; Tarantino, Mariano [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, C.R. ENEA Brasimone (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The experimental results represent the first set of values for LBE pool facility. • Heat transfer is investigated for a 37-pin electrical bundle cooled by LBE. • Experimental data are presented together with a detailed error analysis. • Nu is computed as a function of the Pe and compared with correlations. • Experimental Nu is about 25% lower than Nu derived from correlations. - Abstract: Since Lead-cooled Fast Reactors (LFR) have been conceptualized in the frame of GEN IV International Forum (GIF), great interest has focused on the development and testing of new technologies related to HLM nuclear reactors. In this frame the Integral Circulation Experiment (ICE) test section has been installed into the CIRCE pool facility and suitable experiments have been carried out aiming to fully investigate the heat transfer phenomena in grid spaced fuel pin bundles providing experimental data in support of European fast reactor development. In particular, the fuel pin bundle simulator (FPS) cooled by lead bismuth eutectic (LBE), has been conceived with a thermal power of about 1 MW and a uniform linear power up to 25 kW/m, relevant values for a LFR. It consists of 37 fuel pins (electrically simulated) placed on a hexagonal lattice with a pitch to diameter ratio of 1.8. The FPS was deeply instrumented by several thermocouples. In particular, two sections of the FPS were instrumented in order to evaluate the heat transfer coefficient along the bundle as well as the cladding temperature in different ranks of sub-channels. Nusselt number in the central sub-channel was therefore calculated as a function of the Peclet number and the obtained results were compared to Nusselt numbers obtained from convective heat transfer correlations available in literature on Heavy Liquid Metals (HLM). Results reported in the present work, represent the first set of experimental data concerning fuel pin bundle behaviour in a heavy liquid metal pool, both in forced and

  10. Recent X-Ray Laser Experiments on the COMET Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Nilsen, J; Hunter, J R; Barbee, T W; Shlyaptsev, V N; Filevich, J; Rocca, J J; Marconi, M C; Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A

    2001-09-22

    The development of the transient collisional excitation x-ray laser scheme using tabletop laser systems with multiple pulse capability has progressed rapidly in the last three years. The high small-signal gain and strong x-ray output have been demonstrated for laser drive energies of typically less than 10 J. We report recent x-ray laser experiments on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) tabletop facility using this technique. In particular, the saturated output from the Ni-like Pd ion 4d - 4p x-ray laser at 146.8 {angstrom} has been well characterized and has potential towards a useable x-ray source in a number of applications. One important application of a short wavelength x-ray laser beam with picosecond pulse duration is the study of a high density laser-produced plasma. We report the implementation of a Mach-Zehnder type interferometer using diffraction grating optics as beam splitters designed for the Ni-like Pd laser and show results from probing a 600 ps heated plasma. In addition, gas puff targets are investigated as an x-ray laser gain medium and we report results of strong lasing on the n = 3 - 3 transitions of Ne-like Ar.

  11. Analysis of Silverized Teflon Thermal Control Material Flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, H. Gary

    1995-01-01

    Silver backed teflon (Ag/FEP) material used for thermal control on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has been examined in detail. Optical, mechanical, and chemical properties were characterized for specimens exposed to a variety of space environmental conditions. Recession rates were determined for this material. Samples were obtained from virtually every LDEF location except the Earth-end. Atomic oxygen exposed regions changed from specular to diffusely reflective.

  12. High-toughness graphite/epoxy composite material experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felbeck, David K.

    1993-01-01

    This experiment was designed to measure the effect of near-earth space exposure on three mechanical properties of specially toughened 5208/T300 graphite/epoxy composite materials. The properties measured are elastic modulus, strength, and fracture toughness. Six toughness specimens and nine tensile specimens were mounted on an external frame during the 5.8-year orbit of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Three identical sets of specimens were manufactured at the outset: the flight set, a zero-time non-flight set, and a total-time non-flight set.

  13. Metals Processing Laboratory User Facility: Facilities capabilities; Interactive programs; Recent experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Raschke, R.A. [eds.] [comps.

    1998-02-12

    MPLUS is a DOE designated User Facility providing extensive Technical Expertise and Specialized Facilities to assist Industrial and Academic Partners in becoming more Energy Efficient and enhancing US Competitiveness in the World market. MPLUS focusing on 7 major vision industries (aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metals castings, refineries, and steel) identified by DOE as being energy intensive, as well as cross-cutting industries such as welding and heat treating. MPLUS consists of four primary facilities: (1) Materials Processing, (2) Materials Joining, (3) Materials Characterization and Properties, and (4) Materials Process Modeling. Each facility provides rapid access to unique, state-of-the-art equipment, capabilities, and technical expertise necessary for solving materials processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging technologies. These capabilities include: (1) materials synthesis; (2) deformation processing; (3) materials characterization; (4) joining and mathematical modeling.

  14. 14 CFR 135.97 - Aircraft and facilities for recent flight experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft and facilities for recent flight experience. 135.97 Section 135.97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Flight Operations § 135.97 Aircraft and facilities for recent flight experience. Each certificate holder...

  15. An Experience of Thermowell Design in RCP Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y. S.; Kim, B. D.; Youn, Y. J.; Jeon, W. J.; Kim, S.; Bae, B. U.; Cho, Y. J.; Choi, H. S.; Park, J. K; Cho, S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Flow rates for the test should vary in the range of 90% to 130% of rated flowrate under prototypic operational conditions, as shown in Table 1. Generally for the flow control, a combination of a control valve and an orifice was used in previous RCP test facilities. From the commissioning startup of the RCP test facility, it was found the combination of valve and orifice induced quite a large vibration for the RCP. As a solution to minimize the vibration and to facilitate the flowrate control, one of KAERI's staff suggested a variable restriction orifice (VRO), which controls most of the required flowrates except highest flowrates, as shown in Fig. 2. For the highest flowrates, e.g., around run-out flowrate (130%), control valves in bypass lines were also used to achieve required flowrates. From a performance test, it was found the VRO is very effective measures to control flowrates in the RCP test facility. During the commissioning startup operation, one of thermowells located at the upstream of the RCP was cracked due to high speed coolant velocity, which was - fortunately - found under a leakage test before running the RCP test loop. The cracked thermowell, whose tapered-shank was detached from the weld collar after uninstalling, is shown in Fig. 3. As can be seen the figure, most of the cross-section at the root of the thermowell shank was cracked. In this paper, an investigation of the integrity of thermowells in the RCP test facility was performed according to the current code and overall aspects on the thermowell designs were also discussed. An RCP test facility has been constructed in KAERI. During the commissioning startup operation, one of thermowells was cracked due to high speed coolant velocity. To complete the startup operation, a modified design of thermowells was proposed and all the original thermowells were replaced by the modified ones. From evaluation of the original and modified designs of thermowells according to the recent PTC code, the

  16. Simulation of photofission experiments at the ELI-NP facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, P., E-mail: paul.constantin@eli-np.ro [Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics, “Horia Hulubei” National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Str. Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest Magurele (Romania); Balabanski, D.L. [Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics, “Horia Hulubei” National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Str. Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest Magurele (Romania); Cuong, P.V. [Centre of Nuclear Physics, Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2016-04-01

    An extensive experimental program for the study of photofission will take place at the Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility, where different actinide targets will be exposed to a brilliant gamma beam to produce fission fragments. We report on the implementation within the Geant4 simulation toolkit of the photofission process, of related background processes, and of extended ionic charge parameterization. These developments are used to evaluate the production rates of photofission fragments and their release efficiency from the actinide targets.

  17. Different views of AEGIS / AD-6 Experiment (AD facility) AD-6

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    Different views of AEGIS / AD-6 Experiment (AD facility) in July of 2012. The visible parts are the positron accumulator (blue structures on top of of the antiproton extraction line) and the 5T magnet which traps the antiprotons.

  18. Feasibility of BNCT radiobiological experiments at the HYTHOR facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, J.; Ceballos, C.; Soncin, M.; Fabris, C.; Friso, E.; Moro, D.; Colautti, P.; Jori, G.; Rosi, G.; Nava, E.

    2008-06-01

    HYTHOR (HYbrid Thermal spectrum sHifter tapirO Reactor) is a new thermal-neutron irradiation facility, which was installed and became operative in mid 2005 at the TAPIRO (TAratura PIla Rapida potenza 0) fast reactor, in the Casaccia research centre (near Rome) of ENEA (Ente per le Nuove tecnologie Energia ed Ambiente). The facility has been designed for in vivo radiobiological studies. In HYTHOR irradiation cavity, 1-6 mice can be simultaneously irradiated to study skin melanoma treatments with the BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy). The therapeutic effects of HYTHOR radiation field on mouse melanoma has been studied as a preliminary investigation before studying the tumour local control due to boron neutron capture effect after boronated molecule injection. The method to properly irradiate small animals has been precisely defined. Results show that HYTHOR radiation field is by itself effective in reducing the tumour-growth rate. This finding has to be taken into account in studying the effectiveness of new 10B carriers. A method to properly measure the reduction of the tumour-growth rate is reported and discussed.

  19. Hydrodynamic growth and mix experiments at National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Caggiano, J.; Casey, D.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, J.; Grim, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W.; Hurricane, O.; Kilkenny, J.; Kline, J.; Knauer, J.; Landen, O.; McNaney, J.; Mintz, M.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Park, H.-S.; Pino, J.; Raman, K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Rowley, D.; Tipton, R.; Weber, S.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic growth and its effects on implosion performance and mix were studied at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Spherical shells with pre-imposed 2D modulations were used to measure Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth in the acceleration phase of implosions using in-flight x-ray radiography. In addition, implosion performance and mix have been studied at peak compression using plastic shells filled with tritium gas and imbedding localized CD diagnostic layer in various locations in the ablator. Neutron yield and ion temperature of the DT fusion reactions were used as a measure of shell-gas mix, while neutron yield of the TT fusion reaction was used as a measure of implosion performance. The results have indicated that the low-mode hydrodynamic instabilities due to surface roughness were the primary culprits to yield degradation, with atomic ablator-gas mix playing a secondary role.

  20. MagLev Cobra: Test Facilities and Operational Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, G. G.; Dias, D. H. J. N.; de Oliveira, R. A. H.; Ferreira, A. C.; De Andrade, R., Jr.; Stephan, R. M.

    2014-05-01

    The superconducting MagLev technology for transportation systems is becoming mature due to the research and developing effort of recent years. The Brazilian project, named MagLev-Cobra, started in 1998. It has the goal of developing a superconducting levitation vehicle for urban areas. The adopted levitation technology is based on the diamagnetic and the flux pinning properties of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) bulk blocks in the interaction with Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets. A laboratory test facility with permanent magnet guideway, linear induction motor and one vehicle module is been built to investigate its operation. The MagLev-Cobra project state of the art is presented in the present paper, describing some construction details of the new test line with 200 m.

  1. Experiences with systematic triangulation at the Global Environment Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carugi, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Systematic triangulation may address common challenges in evaluation, such as the scarcity or unreliability of data, or the complexities of comparing and cross-checking evidence from diverse disciplines. Used to identify key evaluation findings, its application has proven to be effective in addressing the limitations encountered in country-level evaluation analysis conducted by the Independent Evaluation Office of the Global Environment Facility (GEF). These include the scarcity or unreliability of national statistics on environmental indicators and data series, especially in Least Developed Countries; challenges in evaluating the impacts of GEF projects; and inherent difficulties in defining the GEF portfolio of projects prior to the undertaking of the evaluation. In addition to responding to the need for further developing triangulation protocols, procedures and/or methodologies advocated by some authors, the approach offers a contribution to evaluation practice. This applies particularly to those evaluation units tasked with country-level evaluations in international organizations, facing similar constraints.

  2. Status of Wakefield Monitor Experiments at the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, Reidar; Aftab, Namra; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Grudiev, Alexej; Javeed, Sumera; Pfingstner, Juergen; Wuensch, Walter

    2016-01-01

    For the very low emittance beams in CLIC, it is vital to mitigate emittance growth which leads to reduced luminosity in the detectors. One factor that leads to emittance growth is transverse wakefields in the accelerating structures. In order to combat this the structures must be aligned with a precision of a few um. For achieving this tolerance, accelerating structures are equipped with wakefield monitors that measure higher-order dipole modes excited by the beam when offset from the structure axis. We report on such measurements, performed using prototype CLIC accelerating structures which are part of the module installed in the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. Measurements with and without the drive beam that feeds rf power to the structures are compared. Improvements to the experimental setup are discussed, and finally remaining measurements that should be performed before the completion of the program are summarized.

  3. Microvibration monitoring: some recent experiences in an operating microelectronics facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Kevin

    1992-02-01

    Major construction work is currently underway at Intel''s Aloha, Oregon, campus. Because of concerns about the effects that construction-generated vibration might have on adjacent ongoing microelectronics manufacturing activities, two important steps were taken. The first of these was to establish guidelines that would be followed by the construction contractor to limit vibration disturbance. The second was to install a computer-based monitoring system that would continuously measure the vibration on the floor of the microelectronics manufacturing facility. In this way, the vibration effects of the construction activities would be monitored and adjusted, by modifying procedures, if necessary. The monitoring program is discussed in this paper. The major characteristics of the monitoring system, the placement of the transducers, and the ways in which the data were managed are described. Some typical data are shown and discussed.

  4. FASTRACK (TM): Parabolic and Suborbital Experiment Support Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Stephanie E. (Compiler); Levine, Howard G.; Romero, V.

    2016-01-01

    FASTRACK was developed by NASA Kennedy Space Center and Space Florida to provide capabilities to conduct frequent, affordable, and responsive flight opportunities for reduced gravity experiments, technology development, and hardware testing on suborbital vehicles and parabolic flights.

  5. Opacity Experiments At The National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, T. S.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A.; Sherrill, M. E.; Dodd, E. S.; Devolder, B. G.; Urbatsch, T. J.; Heeter, R. F.; Schneider, M. B.; Liedahl, D. A.; Wilson, B. G.; Iglesias, C. A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Ross, P. W.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray opacities are essential to the radiation-hydrodynamic simulations used to model astrophysical systems or inertial confinement fusion experiments. Recent opacity experiments have shown up to a factor of two discrepancy between theory and experiment. To address this issue a new experimental opacity platform is being developed on the NIF to crosscheck the recent results. The first experiments, starting in 2017, will begin by measuring the opacity of iron at a temperature of 160 eV and an electron density of 7x1021 cm-3. This and several following presentations will describe this effort. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Lab under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  6. A numerical optimization of high altitude testing facility for wind tunnel experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Ralphin Rose J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available High altitude test facilities are required to test the high area ratio nozzles operating at the upper stages of rocket in the nozzle full flow conditions. It is typically achieved by creating the ambient pressure equal or less than the nozzle exit pressure. On average, air/GN2 is used as active gas for ejector system that is stored in the high pressure cylinders. The wind tunnel facilities are used for conducting aerodynamic simulation experiments at/under various flow velocities and operating conditions. However, constructing both of these facilities require more laboratory space and expensive instruments. Because of this demerit, a novel scheme is implemented for conducting wind tunnel experiments by using the existing infrastructure available in the high altitude testing (HAT facility. This article presents the details about the methods implemented for suitably modifying the sub-scale HAT facility to conduct wind tunnel experiments. Hence, the design of nozzle for required area ratio A/A∗, realization of test section and the optimized configuration are focused in the present analysis. Specific insights into various rocket models including high thrust cryogenic engines and their holding mechanisms to conduct wind tunnel experiments in the HAT facility are analyzed. A detailed CFD analysis is done to propose this conversion without affecting the existing functional requirements of the HAT facility.

  7. Modeling HEDLA magnetic field generation experiments on laser facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatenejad, M.; Bell, A. R.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Crowston, R.; Drake, R. P.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Krauland, C.; Lamb, D.; Lee, D.; Marques, J. R.; Meinecke, J.; Miniati, F.; Murphy, C. D.; Park, H.-S.; Pelka, A.; Ravasio, A.; Remington, B.; Reville, B.; Scopatz, A.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.; Woolsey, N.; Young, R.; Yurchak, R.

    2013-03-01

    The Flash Center is engaged in a collaboration to simulate laser driven experiments aimed at understanding the generation and amplification of cosmological magnetic fields using the FLASH code. In these experiments a laser illuminates a solid plastic or graphite target launching an asymmetric blast wave into a chamber which contains either Helium or Argon at millibar pressures. Induction coils placed several centimeters away from the target detect large scale magnetic fields on the order of tens to hundreds of Gauss. The time dependence of the magnetic field is consistent with generation via the Biermann battery mechanism near the blast wave. Attempts to perform simulations of these experiments using the FLASH code have uncovered previously unreported numerical difficulties in modeling the Biermann battery mechanism near shock waves which can lead to the production of large non-physical magnetic fields. We report on these difficulties and offer a potential solution.

  8. Photofission experiments at the ELI-NP facility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dimiter L Balabanski; ELI-NP Science Team

    2015-09-01

    At ELI-NP, high-power lasers together with a very brilliant beam are the main research tools. The high-power laser system (HPLS) and the beam system (GBS) of ELI-NP are presented. The expected performance of the electron accelerator and production lasers of the GBS, and the targeted operational parameters of the beam are described. Possible laser-induced fission and beam photofission experiments which are under preparation at ELI-NP, and the different set-ups and instrumentation, are designed for these experiments, are presented.

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Coolant Mixing Experiments at the ROCOM, Vattenfall, and Gidropress Test Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kliem

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Coolant mixing is an important mitigative mechanism against reactivity accidents caused by local boron dilution. Experiments on coolant mixing were carried out at three different test facilities representing three different reactor types. These are the ROCOM test facility modelling a German KONVOI-type reactor, the Vattenfall test facility being a model of a Westinghouse three-loop PWR, and the Gidropress test facility modelling a VVER-1000 PWR. The scenario of the start-up of the first main coolant pump was investigated in all three facilities. The experiments were accompanied by velocity measurements in the downcomer for the same scenario in the ROCOM and the Vattenfall test facilities. A similar flow structure was found in these measurements in both cases. A maximum of the velocity is measured at the opposite side in regard to the position of the loop with the starting-up pump whilst a recirculation area was found just below this inlet nozzle in both facilities. The analysis of the slug mixing experiments showed also comparable flow behaviour. In accordance with the velocity measurements, the first part of the deboration is also found on the opposite side. In this region, the maximum deboration is measured in all three cases. These maximum values are in the same order of magnitude for nearly identical initial slug volumes.

  10. Simulation experiments for maximising the availability of a commercial octene production facility

    OpenAIRE

    RF Rossouw; RLJ Coetzer; PD Pretorius

    2010-01-01

    Overall availability of a chemical process is of critical importance in industry. In this paper we evaluate the process design factors that influence the availability of a new chemical production facility by performing computer experiments on a stochastic simulation model. Experimental designs commonly used in the Design and Analysis of Computer Experiments (DACE) and Classical Design of Experiments (DOE) are evaluated and compared for application by means of simulation experiments. Furthermo...

  11. Experiments in hand-operated, hypersonic shock tunnel facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2016-11-01

    Experiments were conducted using the newly developed table-top, hand-operated hypersonic shock tunnel, otherwise known as the Reddy hypersonic shock tunnel. This novel instrument uses only manual force to generate the shock wave in the shock tube, and is designed to generate a freestream flow of Mach 6.5 in the test section. The flow was characterized using stagnation point pressure measurements made using fast-acting piezoelectric transducers. Schlieren visualization was also carried out to capture the bow shock in front of a hemispherical body placed in the flow. Freestream Mach numbers estimated at various points in the test section showed that for a minimum diameter of 46 mm within the test section, the value did not vary by more than 3 % along any cross-sectional plane. The results of the experiments presented here indicate that the device may be successfully employed for basic hypersonic research activities at the university level.

  12. The second space experiment of protein crystallization with domestic facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王耀萍; 潘冀燊; 牛秀田; 周元聪; 华子千; 徐谦; 吴伸; 韩青; 李宏民; 刘延顺; 滕脉坤; 何海辉; 林胜祥; 毕汝昌

    1996-01-01

    The second experiment of protein crystallization was performed on domestic re-entry satelliteFSW-2 in 1994-07. The results are superior to the ones of the first mission in 1992: 9 of 10 different proteins were crystallized in space, and 70% of the total 48 samples yielded single crystals. Besides hen egg-white lysozyme which grew high-quality crystals on the first mission, an acidic phospholipase A2(aPLA2) from snake venom and hemoglobin from Anser Indicus produced good-quality crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction analyses. The positive effect of microgravity on protein crystal growth is verified again at this time.

  13. Proposed test program and data base for LDEF polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, R. C.; George, Pete; Steckel, Gary L.; Zimcik, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of the polymer matrix composite materials that were flown on Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is presented with particular attention to the effect of circumferential location (alpha) on the measured degradation and property changes. Specifically, it is known that atomic oxygen fluence (AO), VUV radiation dose, and number of impacts by micrometeoroids/debris vary with alpha. Thus, it is possible to assess material degradation and property damage changes with alpha for those materials that are common to three or more locations. Once the alpha-dependence functions were defined, other material samples will provide data that can readily be used to predict damage and property changes as a function of alpha as well. What data can be realistically obtained from these materials, how this data can be obtained, and the scientific/design value of the data to the user community is summarized. Finally, a proposed test plan is presented with recommended characterization methodologies that should be employed by all investigators to ensure consistency in the data base that will result from this exercise.

  14. Tethered elevator and platforms as space station facilities: Systems studies and demonstrative experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Several key concepts of the science and applications tethered platforms were studied. Some conclusions reached are herein listed. Tether elevator and platform could improve the space station scientific and applicative capabilities. The space elevator presents unique characteristics as microgravity facility and as a tethered platform servicing vehicle. Pointing platforms could represent a new kind of observation facility for large class of payloads. The dynamical, control and technological complexity of these concepts advised demonstrative experiments. The on-going tethered satellite system offers the opportunity to perform such experiments. And feasibility studies are in progress.

  15. Materials Science Experiments Under Microgravity - A Review of History, Facilities, and Future Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Materials science experiments have been a key issue already since the early days of research under microgravity conditions. A microgravity environment facilitates processing of metallic and semiconductor melts without buoyancy driven convection and sedimentation. Hence, crystal growth of semiconductors, solidification of metallic alloys, and the measurement of thermo-physical parameters are the major applications in the field of materials science making use of these dedicated conditions in space. In the last three decades a large number of successful experiments have been performed, mainly in international collaborations. In parallel, the development of high-performance research facilities and the technological upgrade of diagnostic and stimuli elements have also contributed to providing optimum conditions to perform such experiments. A review of the history of materials science experiments in space focussing on the development of research facilities is given. Furthermore, current opportunities to perform such experiments onboard ISS are described and potential future options are outlined.

  16. Design Optimisation of a High Intensity Beam Facility and Feasibility Experiment of a Solid Fragmented Target

    CERN Document Server

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Rivkin, Leonid

    2014-06-13

    The present PhD thesis describes the design, execution and results of the HRMT-10 experiment performed at the HiRadMat facility of the CERN/SPS complex. The first part of the thesis covers the design optimization studies of the HiRadMat facility, focusing in particular on the radiation protection issues. A detailed Monte-Carlo model of the facility has been developed and validated through comparison with measurements. A very satisfactory agreement between the simulation and the experimental data is observed. In the second part of this thesis, a novel feasibility experiment of a fragmented solid target for a future Neutrino Factory or a Super Beam facility, able to support high beam powers ( 1 MW) is presented in detail. A solid granular target has been proposed as an interesting alternative to an open Hg jet target, presently considered as the baseline for such facilities, but posing considerable technical challenges. The HRMT-10 experiment seeks to address the lack of experimental data of the feasibility of...

  17. Integration and use of Microgravity Research Facility: Lessons learned by the crystals by vapor transport experiment and Space Experiments Facility programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heizer, Barbara L.

    1992-01-01

    The Crystals by Vapor Transport Experiment (CVTE) and Space Experiments Facility (SEF) are materials processing facilities designed and built for use on the Space Shuttle mid deck. The CVTE was built as a commercial facility owned by the Boeing Company. The SEF was built under contract to the UAH Center for Commercial Development of Space (CCDS). Both facilities include up to three furnaces capable of reaching 850 C minimum, stand-alone electronics and software, and independent cooling control. In addition, the CVTE includes a dedicated stowage locker for cameras, a laptop computer, and other ancillary equipment. Both systems are designed to fly in a Middeck Accommodations Rack (MAR), though the SEF is currently being integrated into a Spacehab rack. The CVTE hardware includes two transparent furnaces capable of achieving temperatures in the 850 to 870 C range. The transparent feature allows scientists/astronauts to directly observe and affect crystal growth both on the ground and in space. Cameras mounted to the rack provide photodocumentation of the crystal growth. The basic design of the furnace allows for modification to accommodate techniques other than vapor crystal growth. Early in the CVTE program, the decision was made to assign a principal scientist to develop the experiment plan, affect the hardware/software design, run the ground and flight research effort, and interface with the scientific community. The principal scientist is responsible to the program manager and is a critical member of the engineering development team. As a result of this decision, the hardware/experiment requirements were established in such a way as to balance the engineering and science demands on the equipment. Program schedules for hardware development, experiment definition and material selection, flight operations development and crew training, both ground support and astronauts, were all planned and carried out with the understanding that the success of the program science

  18. Status of the FLARE (Facility for Laboratory Reconnection Experiments) Construction Project and Plans as a User Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, H.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Prager, S.; Daughton, W.; Chen, Y.; Cutler, R.; Fox, W.; Hoffmann, F.; Kalish, M.; Jara-Almonte, J.; Myers, C.; Ren, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yoo, J.; Bale, S. D.; Carter, T.; Dorfman, S.; Drake, J.; Egedal, J.; Sarff, J.; Wallace, J.

    2016-10-01

    The FLARE device (flare.pppl.gov) is a new intermediate-scale plasma experiment under construction at Princeton for the studies of magnetic reconnection in the multiple X-line regimes directly relevant to space, solar, astrophysical, and fusion plasmas, as guided by a reconnection phase diagram [Ji & Daughton, (2011)]. Most of major components either have been already fabricated or are near their completion, including the two most crucial magnets called flux cores. The hardware assembly and installation begin in this summer, followed by commissioning in 2017. Initial comprehensive set of research diagnostics will be constructed and installed also in 2017. The main diagnostics is an extensive set of magnetic probe arrays, covering multiple scales from local electron scales, to intermediate ion scales, and global MHD scales. The planned procedures and example topics as a user facility will be discussed.

  19. Improvement in performance and operational experience of 14 UD Pelletron Accelerator Facility, BARC–TIFR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P V Bhagwat

    2002-11-01

    14 UD Pelletron Accelerator Facility at Mumbai has been operational since 1989. The project MEHIA (medium energy heavy ion accelerator) started in 1982 and was formally inaugurated on 30th December 1988. Since then the accelerator has been working round the clock. Improvement in accelerator performance and operational experience are described.

  20. Facility for parity and time reversal experiments with intense epithermal (eV) neutron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, C. D.; Bowman, J. D.; Herczeg, P.; Szymanski, J.; Yuan, V. W.; Anaya, J. M.; Mortensen, R.; Postma, H.; Delheij, P. P. J.; Baker, O. K.; Gould, C. R.; Haase, D. G.; Mitchell, G. E.; Roberson, N. R.; Zhu, X.; McDonald, A. B.; Benton, D.; Tippens, B.; Chupp, T. E.

    1988-12-01

    A facility for polarized epithermal neutrons of high intensity is set up at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for parityviolation and time reversal experiments at neutron resonances over a wide range of neutron energies. The beam is polarized with the aid of a polarized proton target used as a neutronspin filter. Total cross section measurements as well as capture gamma-ray experiments will be carried out. The main features of this system will be discussed.

  1. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schietinger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measurements performed during the operation of the test facility, including the results of the test of an in-vacuum undulator prototype generating radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and optical range.

  2. Operating experience of the tile carrier transfer facility during the JET remote tile exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, P.; Patel, B.; Davies, N.; Middleton, R.; Mills, S.; Palmer, J.; Pedrick, L.; Wilson, D.W. [JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Hurd, F. [NET Team, Garching (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    During the Remote Tile Exchange shutdown at JET, the purpose built Tile Carrier Transfer Facility (TCTF) has been successfully used for the remote removal and storage of activated, tritiated and beryllium contaminated torus components. The short boom, end effector and tine arrangement was also used during the installation of the new Gas Box Divertor. Tritium levels required the use of techniques and practices which were successful in confining contamination and allowed the declassification of work areas. A holding area and posting facilities enabled ancillary equipment / tool logistics to be managed efficiently. This article presents and describes all the equipment used and reports the operational experience. (authors)

  3. Experiments, conceptual design, preliminary cost estimates and schedules for an underground research facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korbin, G.; Wollenberg, H.; Wilson, C.; Strisower, B.; Chan, T.; Wedge, D.

    1981-09-01

    Plans for an underground research facility are presented, incorporating techniques to assess the hydrological and thermomechanical response of a rock mass to the introduction and long-term isolation of radioactive waste, and to assess the effects of excavation on the hydrologic integrity of a repository and its subsequent backfill, plugging, and sealing. The project is designed to utilize existing mine or civil works for access to experimental areas and is estimated to last 8 years at a total cost for contruction and operation of $39.0 million (1981 dollars). Performing the same experiments in an existing underground research facility would reduce the duration to 7-1/2 years and cost $27.7 million as a lower-bound estimate. These preliminary plans and estimates should be revised after specific sites are identified which would accommodate the facility.

  4. Summary of 2016 Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Physical Science Experiments on ISS. Update of LMM Science Experiments and Facility Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicker, Ronald J.; Meyer, William V.; Foster, William M.; Fletcher, William A.; Williams, Stuart J.; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will feature a series of short, entertaining, and informative videos that describe the current status and science support for the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) facility on the International Space Station. These interviews will focus on current experiments and provide an overview of future capabilities. The recently completed experiments include nano-particle haloing, 3-D self-assembly with Janus particles and a model system for nano-particle drug delivery. The videos will share perspectives from the scientists, engineers, and managers working with the NASA Light Microscopy program.

  5. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schietinger, T.; Aiba, M.; Arsov, V.; Bettoni, S.; Beutner, B.; Calvi, M.; Craievich, P.; Dehler, M.; Frei, F.; Ganter, R.; Hauri, C. P.; Ischebeck, R.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Janousch, M.; Kaiser, M.; Keil, B.; Löhl, F.; Orlandi, G. L.; Ozkan Loch, C.; Peier, P.; Prat, E.; Raguin, J.-Y.; Reiche, S.; Schilcher, T.; Wiegand, P.; Zimoch, E.; Anicic, D.; Armstrong, D.; Baldinger, M.; Baldinger, R.; Bertrand, A.; Bitterli, K.; Bopp, M.; Brands, H.; Braun, H. H.; Brönnimann, M.; Brunnenkant, I.; Chevtsov, P.; Chrin, J.; Citterio, A.; Csatari Divall, M.; Dach, M.; Dax, A.; Ditter, R.; Divall, E.; Falone, A.; Fitze, H.; Geiselhart, C.; Guetg, M. W.; Hämmerli, F.; Hauff, A.; Heiniger, M.; Higgs, C.; Hugentobler, W.; Hunziker, S.; Janser, G.; Kalantari, B.; Kalt, R.; Kim, Y.; Koprek, W.; Korhonen, T.; Krempaska, R.; Laznovsky, M.; Lehner, S.; Le Pimpec, F.; Lippuner, T.; Lutz, H.; Mair, S.; Marcellini, F.; Marinkovic, G.; Menzel, R.; Milas, N.; Pal, T.; Pollet, P.; Portmann, W.; Rezaeizadeh, A.; Ritt, S.; Rohrer, M.; Schär, M.; Schebacher, L.; Scherrer, St.; Schlott, V.; Schmidt, T.; Schulz, L.; Smit, B.; Stadler, M.; Steffen, Bernd; Stingelin, L.; Sturzenegger, W.; Treyer, D. M.; Trisorio, A.; Tron, W.; Vicario, C.; Zennaro, R.; Zimoch, D.

    2016-10-26

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including atransverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunchesof up to200 pC chargeand up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of a FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measureme...

  6. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schietinger, T; Aiba, M; Arsov, V; Bettoni, S; Beutner, B; Calvi, M; Craievich, P; Dehler, M; Frei, F; Ganter, R; Hauri, C P; Ischebeck, R; Ivanisenko, Y; Janousch, M; Kaiser, M; Keil, B; Löhl, F; Orlandi, G L; Loch, C Ozkan; Peier, P; Prat, E; Raguin, J -Y; Reiche, S; Schilcher, T; Wiegand, P; Zimoch, E; Anicic, D; Armstrong, D; Baldinger, M; Baldinger, R; Bertrand, A; Bitterli, K; Bopp, M; Brands, H; Braun, H H; Brönnimann, M; Brunnenkant, I; Chevtsov, P; Chrin, J; Citterio, A; Divall, M Csatari; Dach, M; Dax, A; Ditter, R; Divall, E; Falone, A; Fitze, H; Geiselhart, C; Guetg, M W; Hämmerli, F; Hauff, A; Heiniger, M; Higgs, C; Hugentobler, W; Hunziker, S; Janser, G; Kalantari, B; Kalt, R; Kim, Y; Koprek, W; Korhonen, T; Krempaska, R; Laznovsky, M; Lehner, S; Pimpec, F Le; Lippuner, T; Lutz, H; Mair, S; Marcellini, F; Marinkovic, G; Menzel, R; Milas, N; Pal, T; Pollet, P; Portmann, W; Rezaeizadeh, A; Ritt, S; Rohrer, M; Schär, M; Schebacher, L; Scherrer, St; Schmidt, V Schlott T; Schulz, L; Smit, B; Stadler, M; Steffen, B; Stingelin, L; Sturzenegger, W; Treyer, D M; Trisorio, A; Tron, W; Vicario, C; Zennaro, R; Zimoch, D

    2016-01-01

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and testbed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the X-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultra-low-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics meas...

  7. SRS analyses of direct-drive ICF experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, P.; Rosenberg, M.; Myatt, J.; Solodov, A.; Seka, W.; Chapman, T.; Hohenberger, M.; Masse, L.; Goyon, C.; Turnbull, D.; Regan, S.; Moody, J. D.

    2016-10-01

    A series of planar target experiments was recently conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to study the laser-plasma interactions processes responsible for the production of suprathermal electrons, and their scaling from experiments at the Omega facility to full-scale ICF experiments at the MJ level on the NIF. We will present experimental analyses and simulations of Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) in these planar target experiments. Our work indicates the presence of purely backscattered SRS refracted off nearly one-dimensional density gradients, as well as more complicated features such as side-scatter and scattering from non-1D features (e.g. edges) in the target. Simulations using ray- and paraxial-wave- based simulation codes are used to extrapolate the hot electron fraction from the SRS measurements, and point to SRS being the primary mechanism for the generation of suprathermal electrons in these experiments. We will also present analyses of spherical implosions experiments and provide extrapolations and implications for future full-scale direct-drive experiments at NIF. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.

    1984-10-01

    The following chapters are included in this study: (1) fusion nuclear issues, (2) survey of experimental needs, (3) requirements of the experiments, (4) non-fusion facilities, (5) fusion facilities for nuclear experiments, and (6) fusion research and development scenarios. (MOW)

  9. CFD Simulations of Selected Steady-State and Transient Experiments in the PLANDTL Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgacz, S.; Bieder, U.; Gorsse, Y.; Swirski, K.

    2016-09-01

    In Sodium Cooled Fast Neutron Reactors natural convection flow and thermal stratification in the upper plenum may occur under emergency shutdown conditions. Thermal stratification phenomena have been examined experimentally in the PLANDTL facility of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. This paper presents the results of numerical simulations of selected steady-state and transient experiments in the PLANDTL facility, using TrioCFD/MC2 code developed at CEA. CFD approach for the flow in large volumes and a sub-channel approach for the flow in the core region are used. Calculated results have been validated against experimental values. Validation of the upper plenum modelling has been also made based on CEA Sodium mixed convection experiments.

  10. Target fabrication for the POLAR experiment on the Orion laser facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C.Spindloe; D.Wyatt; D.Haddock; I.East; J.E.Cross; C.N.Danson; E.Falize; J.M.Foster; M.Koenig; G.Gregori

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication of a suite of laser targets by the Target Fabrication group in the Central Laser Facility(CLF), STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory for the first academic-access experiment on the Orion laser facility(Hopps et al., Appl. Opt. 52, 3597–3601(2013)) at Atomic Weapons Establishment(AWE). This experiment, part of the POLAR project(Falize et al., Astrophys. Space Sci. 336, 81–85(2011); Busschaert et al., New J. Phys. 15, 035020(2013)),studied conditions relevant to the radiation-hydrodynamic processes occurring in a remarkable class of astrophysical star systems known as magnetic cataclysmic variables. A large number of complex fabrication technologies and research and development activities were required to field a total of 80 high-specification targets. Target design and fabrication procedures are described and initial alignment and characterization data are discussed.

  11. Adverse events associated with ultrasonic scalers: A manufacturer and user facility device experience database analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Rajagopal Athmarao Thennukonda; Bhavani Rekha Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study was conducted to determine the frequency and type of adverse events (AEs) associated with ultrasonic scaler reported to the Food and Drug Administration manufacturer and user facility device experience (MAUDE) database. Materials and Methods: The authors reviewed the ultrasonic scaler units (USU) related AEs reported to MAUDE from October 1, 1995, to September 31, 2015. Analyses of details collected are presented. Results: MAUDE received a total of 667 un...

  12. Life science experiments performed in space in the ISS/Kibo facility and future research plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    2016-08-01

    Over the past several years, current techniques in molecular biology have been used to perform experiments in space, focusing on the nature and effects of space radiation. In the Japanese 'Kibo' facility in the International Space Station (ISS), the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has performed five life science experiments since 2009, and two additional experiments are currently in progress. The first life science experiment in space was the 'Rad Gene' project, which utilized two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines containing a mutated P53 : gene (m P53 : ) and a parental wild-type P53 : gene (wt P53 : ) respectively. Four parameters were examined: (i) detecting space radiation-induced DSBs by observing γH2AX foci; (ii) observing P53 : -dependent gene expression during space flight; (iii) observing P53 : -dependent gene expression after space flight; and (iv) observing the adaptive response in the two cell lines containing the mutated and wild type P53 : genes after exposure to space radiation. These observations were completed and have been reported, and this paper is a review of these experiments. In addition, recent new information from space-based experiments involving radiation biology is presented here. These experiments involve human cultured cells, silkworm eggs, mouse embryonic stem cells and mouse eggs in various experiments designed by other principal investigators in the ISS/Kibo. The progress of Japanese science groups involved in these space experiments together with JAXA are also discussed here. The Japanese Society for Biological Sciences in Space (JSBSS), the Utilization Committee of Space Environment Science (UCSES) and the Science Council of Japan (ACJ) have supported these new projects and new experimental facilities in ISS/Kibo. Currently, these organizations are proposing new experiments for the ISS through 2024. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and

  13. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Fabich, Adrian; Meddahi, Malika; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/201...

  14. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos [CERN; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias [CERN; Fabich, Adrian [CERN; Meddahi, Malika [CERN; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/2016.

  15. Direct condensation and entrainment steam experiments at the Topflow-Denise facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Tobias [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Fluid Dynamics

    2015-10-15

    In a hypothetical Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident (SB-LOCA) in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), the Reactor Pressure Vessel wall (RPV) may be exposed to thermal stress, since the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) injects cold water. The loads on the primary loop and RPV walls are determined by mixing processes with the surrounding hot water and by the condensation of steam on the surface. For the development and validation of CFD-models, experiments have to meet a high standard of reproducibility, measurement certainty and temporal and local resolution. The pressure tank technology of the TOPFLOW facility allows conducting such experiments at reasonable effort.

  16. Establishing a cGMP pancreatic islet processing facility: the first experience in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larijani, Bagher; Arjmand, Babak; Amoli, Mahsa M; Ao, Ziliang; Jafarian, Ali; Mahdavi-Mazdah, Mitra; Ghanaati, Hossein; Baradar-Jalili, Reza; Sharghi, Sasan; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Aghayan, Hamid Reza

    2012-12-01

    It has been predicted that one of the greatest increase in prevalence of diabetes will happen in the Middle East bear in the next decades. The aim of standard therapeutic strategies for diabetes is better control of complications. In contrast, some new strategies like cell and gene therapy have aimed to cure the disease. In recent years, significant progress has occurred in beta-cell replacement therapies with a progressive improvement of short-term and long term outcomes. In year 2005, considering the impact of the disease in Iran and the promising results of the Edmonton protocol, the funding for establishing a current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) islet processing facility by Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center was approved by Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Several islet isolations were performed following establishment of cGMP facility and recruitment of all required equipments for process validation and experimental purpose. Finally the first successful clinical islet isolation and transplantation was performed in September 2010. In spite of a high cost of the procedure it is considered beneficial and may prevent long term complications and the costs associated with secondary cares. In this article we will briefly describe our experience in setting up a cGMP islet processing facility which can provide valuable information for regional countries interested to establish similar facilities.

  17. Natural circulation in a VVER reactor geometry: Experiments with the PACTEL facility and Cathare simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raussi, P.; Kainulainen, S. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Lappeenranta (Finland); Kouhia, J. [VTT Energy, Lappeenranta (Finland)

    1995-09-01

    There are some 40 reactors based on the VVER design in use. Database available for computer code assessment for VVER reactors is rather limited. Experiments were conducted to study natural circulation behaviour in the PACTEL facility, a medium-scale integral test loop patterned after VVER pressurized water reactors. Flow behaviour over a range of coolant inventories was studied with a small-break experiment. In the small-break experiments, flow stagnation and system repressurization were observed when the water level in the upper plenum fell below the entrances to the hot legs. The cause was attributed to the hot leg loop seals, which are a unique feature of the VVER geometry. At low primary inventories, core cooling was achieved through the boiler-condenser mode. The experiment was simulated using French thermalhydraulic system code CATHARE.

  18. The Antares facility for inertial-fusion experiments: Status and plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, P. D.; Allen, G. R.; Jansen, H.; Saxman, A.; Singer, S.; Thuot, M.

    Antares is a large, 30 to 40 kJ CO2 laser system which will provide a base for experiments to determine the efficiency with which 10 micrometers of light can be used to drive target implosions while maintaining an acceptable level of preheat. Construction of the facility is in the final stages and diagnostics for initial experiments are being designed and constructed with operations scheduled to begin early in FY-84. After an initial shakedown period, a series of measurements will be performed to determine the energy scaling of hot electron temperature and target coupling efficiency in selected sets of targets including simple spheres. Experiments, now planned for Helios, will be continued to determine whether CO2-produced ions are appropriate for driving inertial fusion targets with acceptable efficiency (Helios experiments have demonstrated that as much as 40% of the incident light can be converted to fast ions).

  19. SBLOCA AND LOFW EXPERIMENTS IN A SCALED-DOWN IET FACILITY OF REX-10 REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YEON-GUN LEE

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation of the small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA and the loss-of-feedwater accident (LOFW in a scaled integral test facility of REX-10. REX-10 is a small integral-type PWR in which the coolant flow is driven by natural circulation, and the RCS is pressurized by the steam-gas pressurizer. The postulated accidents of REX-10 include the system depressurization initiated by the break of a nitrogen injection line connected to the steam-gas pressurizer and the complete loss of normal feedwater flow by the malfunction of control systems. The integral effect tests on SBLOCA and LOFW are conducted at the REX-10 Test Facility (RTF, a full-height full-pressure facility with reduced power by 1/50. The SBLOCA experiment is initiated by opening a flow passage out of the pressurizer vessel, and the LOFW experiment begins with the termination of the feedwater supply into the helical-coil steam generator. The experimental results reveal that the RTF can assure sufficient cooldown capability with the simulated PRHRS flow during these DBAs. In particular, the RTF exhibits faster pressurization during the LOFW test when employing the steam-gas pressurizer than the steam pressurizer. This experimental study can provide unique data to validate the thermal-hydraulic analysis code for REX-10.

  20. Status of The Facility for Experiments of Nuclear Reactions in Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longland, Richard; Kelley, John; Marshall, Caleb; Portillo, Federico; Setoodehnia, Kiana; Underwood, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    To make connections between observations of stellar atmospheres and the processes occurring deep inside stars, me must rely on accurate nuclear cross sections. Often, the Coulomb barrier makes these cross sections immeasurably small in the laboratory. Particle transfer reactions are one tool in our inventory that can be used to infer the necessary properties of nuclear reactions, thus opening an avenue to calculate their cross sections. Enge split-pole magnetic spectrographs are one tool in our inventory that have been used successfully to perform these experiments. However, after a rash of closures, there were no operational spectrographs of this kind in North America to provide these valuable capabilities. Over the last few years, we have revived the Enge split-pole spectrograph at TUNL. We have also upgraded much of the equipment, ranging from the data acquisition system to the control system and detector package. These upgrades have enabled a powerful, flexible, and modern facility - the Facility for Experiments of Nuclear Reactions in Stars (FENRIS). In this talk, I will present a status upgrade of FENRIS, highlighting our upgrades, capabilities, and first science results. I will also highlight future upgrade plans for the facility.

  1. Design and Testing of a Breadboard Electrical Power Control Unit for the Fluid Combustion Facility Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimnach, Greg L.; Lebron, Ramon C.

    1999-01-01

    The Fluid Combustion Facility (FCF) Project and the Power Technology Division at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) at Lewis Field in Cleveland, OH along with the Sundstrand Corporation in Rockford, IL are jointly developing an Electrical Power Converter Unit (EPCU) for the Fluid Combustion Facility to be flown on the International Space Station (ISS). The FCF facility experiment contains three racks: A core rack, a combustion rack, and a fluids rack. The EPCU will be used as the power interface to the ISS 120V(sub dc) power distribution system by each FCF experiment rack which requires 28V(sub dc). The EPCU is a modular design which contains three 120V(sub dc)-to-28V(sub dc) full-bridge, power converters rated at 1 kW(sub e) each bus transferring input relays and solid-state, current-limiting input switches, 48 current-limiting, solid-state, output switches; and control and telemetry hardware. The EPCU has all controls required to autonomously share load demand between the power feeds and--if absolutely necessary--shed loads. The EPCU, which maximizes the usage of allocated ISS power and minimizes loss of power to loads, can be paralleled with other EPCUs. This paper overviews the electrical design and operating characteristics of the EPCU and presents test data from the breadboard design.

  2. Licensing Procedures for Sodium Experiment Facility using Safety Control of Dangerous Substances Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Minhwan; Jeong, Jiyoung; Lee, Jewhan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Sodium used as a coolant in the SFR is utilized in various fields and yet there has been no record of handling and storing sodium exceeding designated quantity, which is a quantity that serves as the lowest level permitted for construction. The difficulty in achieving the license for sodium experiment facilities and equipment has been the main issue since the first time of sodium-related plan. Sodium is under regulation of four kinds of laws including the Safety Control of Dangerous Substances Act and it is under categorized as Class 3(pyrophoric material and water-prohibiting substance). The objective of this study is to investigate the procedure of installing a sodium-related facility and achieving the license from the fire agency of government. In this work, the licensing procedure for a sodium experiment facility was investigated under the Safety Control of Dangerous Substances Act. For the construction of the PGSFR (Prototype Gen-IV Sodium cooled Fast Reactor), the described procedure should be reviewed and prepared carefully in accordance with the fire safety regulatory body.

  3. Rolling out of kangaroo mother care in secondary level facilities in Bihar-Some experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutapa B Neogi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preterm birth is one of the leading causes of under-five child deaths worldwide and in India. Kangaroo mother care (KMC is a powerful and easy-to-use method to promote health and well-being and reduce morbidity and mortality in preterm/low birth weight (LBW babies. Objective: As the part of the roll-out of India Newborn Action Plan interventions, we implemented KMC in select facilities with an objective to assess the responsiveness of public health system to roll out KMC. Methods: KMC intervention was implemented in two select high priority districts, Gaya and Purnea in Bihar over the duration of 8 months from August 2015 to March 2016. The implementation of intervention was phased out into; situation analysis, implementation of intervention, and interim assessment. KMC model, as envisaged keeping in mind the building blocks of health system, was established in 6 identified health-care facilities. A pretested simple checklist was used to assess the awareness, knowledge, skills, and practice of KMC during baseline situational analysis and interim assessment phases for comparison. Results: The intervention clearly seemed to improve the awareness among auxiliary nurse midwives/nurses about KMC. Improvements were also observed in the availability of infrastructure required for KMC and support logistics like facility for manual expression of breast milk, cups/suitable devices such as paladi cups for feeding small babies and digital weighing scale. Although the recording of information regarding LBW babies and KMC practice improved, still there is scope for much improvement. Conclusion: There is a commitment at the national level to promote KMC in every facility. The present experience shows the possibility of rolling out KMC in secondary level facilities with support from government functionaries.

  4. Facilities for Territorial Medicine: the experiences of Piedmont and Lombardy Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Capolongo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the demographic transition and epidemiological has made the health system hospital-centric obsolete and has highlighted the need for a new organization focused on territorial health community, taking charge of the patient, on team work and can ensure, through dedicated facilities, continuity of care and integration of social welfare.The main changes in the regulatory field have thus oriented investments both structural and economic towards poles to network with hospitals that represent new points of reference for the health of citizens, where primary care services are integrated with the territory and the specialized services of the Public Health departments.These facilities provide the organizational paradigm to which the regional realities must strive.The article reports recent experiments conducted within the regions of Piedmont and Lombardy in this sector and the ongoing research in the field of CNETO on behalf of the Lombardy Region.

  5. The Dlr Solar Furnace - A Facility For Astrophysical and Mineralogical Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerborn, M.; Neumann, A.; Seboldt, W.; Klerner, S.

    The energy of solar radiation can be used to cause thermal or photochemical effects in the irradiated materials. The DLR Solar Furnace in Cologne is a facility that concentrates the direct solar radiation (concentration factor up to 5200 suns) for research experiments. It offers many different possibilities of using concentrated solar radiation to scientists and industrial users. For astrophysical and mineralogical applications a vacuum chamber with a special design and different instruments for measurements were developed, installed in the solar furnace and tested in experiments with small solid samples. The goal of the first project was to simulate the formation of so-called `chondrules' - constituents of meteorites - by "flash- heating" appropriate mineral samples with the concentrated beam of the solar furnace. The samples were melted and solidified subsequently by controlled cooling. The experiments had to be carried out under vacuum or controlled oxygen fugacity. Some results are presented as part of the paper "DYNAMIC CRYSTALLIZATION EXPERIMENTS USING CONVENTIONAL and SOLAR FURNACE TECHNIQUES - IMPLICATIONS FOR THE FORMATION of REFRACTORY FORSTERITE IN CHONDRITES", submitted to this conference. In a second series of experiments a slightly varied design was used to cause thermal reduction of samples of metal oxide and of lunar regolith simulate. The goal of this ongoing activity is to produce oxygen by pyrolysis. The process is conducted under high vacuum. The paper describes the facility with its properties and presents first results of the mentioned experiments. The two projects are co-operations between the High Flux Solar Furnace of DLR in Cologne (a department of the Solar Technology Division) and the Mission Architecture and Advanced Technologies Section (a department of the Institute of Space Sensor Technology and Planetary Exploration of DLR). In the first experiments and in the sample analysis the Institute of Mineralogy and Geochemistry of the

  6. Bayesian Analysis of Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Gaffney, J A; Sonnad, V; Libby, S B

    2012-01-01

    We develop a Bayesian inference method that allows the efficient determination of several interesting parameters from complicated high-energy-density experiments performed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The model is based on an exploration of phase space using the hydrodynamic code HYDRA. A linear model is used to describe the effect of nuisance parameters on the analysis, allowing an analytic likelihood to be derived that can be determined from a small number of HYDRA runs and then used in existing advanced statistical analysis methods. This approach is applied to a recent experiment in order to determine the carbon opacity and X-ray drive; it is found that the inclusion of prior expert knowledge and fluctuations in capsule dimensions and chemical composition significantly improve the agreement between experiment and theoretical opacity calculations. A parameterisation of HYDRA results is used to test the application of both Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and genetic algorithm (GA) techniques to e...

  7. Low-energy photon scattering and photoactivation experiments: selected recent results from the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kneiss, U

    2002-01-01

    Photon scattering off bound nuclear states (nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF)) and photoactivation of long-lived isomers are complementary to one another and share the principal advantage of a well-known reaction mechanism. The experimental progress achieved during the last years allows nowadays experiments of tremendously increased sensitivity opening new fields of applications. In the present lecture recent results are summarized from experiments performed at the well-established Bremsstrahlung photon scattering and photoactivation facilities of the 4.3 MV Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator. Three current topics are discussed in details: The systematics of E1 two-phonon excitations of the type (2 sup + x 3 sup -) in nuclei near shell closures; the first observation of a population inversion of nuclear states, the precondition for a possible gamma-laser, by feeding from higher-lying photo-excited states (NRF experiments on sup 1 sup 0 sup 3 Rh); and the photoactivation of long-lived isomers. Here first resu...

  8. ENERGY PARTITIONING, ENERGY COUPLING (EPEC) EXPERIMENTS AT THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K B; Brown, C G; May, M J; Dunlop, W H; Compton, S M; Kane, J O; Mirkarimi, P B; Guyton, R L; Huffman, E

    2012-01-05

    The energy-partitioning, energy-coupling (EPEC) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will simultaneously measure the coupling of energy into both ground shock and air-blast overpressure from a laser-driven target. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of seismic and air-blast phenomena caused by a nuclear weapon. In what follows, we discuss the motivation for our investigation and briefly describe NIF. Then, we introduce the EPEC experiments, including diagnostics, in more detail.

  9. Beam studies and experimental facility for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, Chiara; Petrenko, Alexey; Timko, Helga; Argyropoulos, Theodoros; Bartosik, Hannes; Bohl, Thomas; Esteban Müller, Juan; Goddard, Brennan; Meddahi, Malika; Pardons, Ans; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Velotti, Francesco M; Vincke, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    A Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment has been proposed as an approach to eventually accelerate an electron beam to the TeV energy range in a single plasma section. To verify this novel technique, a proof of principle R&D experiment, AWAKE, is planned at CERN using 400 GeV proton bunches from the SPS. An electron beam will be injected into the plasma cell to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the CNGS facility profiting from existing infrastructure where only minor modifications need to be foreseen. The design of the experimental area and the proton and electron beam lines are shown. The achievable SPS proton bunch properties and their reproducibility have been measured and are presented.

  10. Melt dispersion and direct containment heating (DCH) experiments in the DISCO-H test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, L.; Albrecht, G.; Kirstahler, M.; Schwall, M.; Wachter, E.; Woerner, G.

    2004-05-01

    The DISCO-H Test Facility at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe was set up to perform scaled experiments that simulate melt ejection scenarios under low system pressure in Severe Accidents in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). These experiments are designed to investigate the fluid-dynamic, thermal and chemical processes during melt ejection out of a breach in the lower head of a PWR pressure vessel at pressures below 2 MPa with an iron-alumina melt and steam. In the past, a detailed study of pressure and geometry effects on the fluid dynamics of the melt dispersion process had been performed with cold model fluids in the facility DISCO-C. The main components of the facility are scaled about 1:18 linearly to a large European pressurized water reactor. Standard test results are: pressure and temperature history in the RPV, the cavity, the reactor compartment and the containment, post test melt fractions in all locations with size distribution of the debris, video film in reactor compartment and containment (timing of melt flow and hydrogen burning), and pre- and post test gas analysis in the cavity and the containment. The results of six experiments are presented here. All experiments were done with 10.6 kg of iron-alumina melt (scaling to 16 m{sup 3} corium), and a hole of 56 mm diameter (1 m scaled) or 28 mm at the center of the lower head. For comparison with a similar experiment conducted in a larger scale (1:10), the basis experiment was performed with an open path from the reactor pit to the containment (open pit), with prototypical conditions concerning the steam driven ejection out of the RPV, and a containment atmosphere, that was part air and part steam at an elevated pressure, with 3 mole-% hydrogen. In this and other tests, hydrogen production and combustion occurred. In one experiment the hydrogen effect was excluded by using only nitrogen as driving gas and a pure air atmosphere in the containment. In some tests the direct path to the containment was closed

  11. An application of the IMC software to controller design for the JPL LSCL Experiment Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guoming; Skelton, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    A software package which Integrates Model reduction and Controller design (The IMC software) is applied to design controllers for the JPL Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment Facility. Modal Cost Analysis is used for the model reduction, and various Output Covariance Constraints are guaranteed by the controller design. The main motivation is to find the controller with the 'best' performance with respect to output variances. Indeed it is shown that by iterating on the reduced order design model, the controller designed does have better performance than that obtained with the first model reduction.

  12. ATLAS Experience with HEP Software at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    CERN Document Server

    LeCompte, T; The ATLAS collaboration; Benjamin, D

    2014-01-01

    A number of HEP software packages used by the ATLAS experiment, including GEANT4, ROOT and ALPGEN, have been adapted to run on the IBM Blue Gene supercomputers at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. These computers use a non-x86 architecture and have a considerably less rich operating environment than in common use in HEP, but also represent a computing capacity an order of magnitude beyond what ATLAS is presently using via the LCG. The status and potential for making use of leadership-class computing, including the status of integration with the ATLAS production system, is discussed.

  13. Health Facilities Safety in Natural Disasters: Experiences and Challenges from South East Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesela Radovic

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations named 2010 as a year of natural disasters, and launched a worldwide campaign to improve the safety of schools and hospitals from natural disasters. In the region of South East Europe, Croatia and Serbia have suffered the greatest impacts of natural disasters on their communities and health facilities. In this paper the disaster management approaches of the two countries are compared, with a special emphasis on the existing technological and legislative systems for safety and protection of health facilities and people. Strategic measures that should be taken in future to provide better safety for health facilities and populations, based on the best practices and positive experiences in other countries are recommended. Due to the expected consequences of global climate change in the region and the increased different environmental risks both countries need to refine their disaster preparedness strategies. Also, in the South East Europe, the effects of a natural disaster are amplified in the health sector due to its critical medical infrastructure. Therefore, the principles of environmental security should be implemented in public health policies in the described region, along with principles of disaster management through regional collaborations.

  14. Design of control software for the closed ecology experiment facilities (CEEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, H.; Abe, K.; Hirosaki, T.; Ishikawa, Y.

    A habitation experiment using a closed ecology experiment facilities CEEF was started in fiscal 2005 three experiments in which two humans stayed for one week were conducted Their stays will be extended gradually until fiscal 2009 when an experiment will be launched with two humans staying for four months The CEEF has an ambitious target of acquiring the technology of an advanced life support system and the system is being developed based on the technology of conventional plant systems Especially in respect to supervision and control of the system the system still has little automation This system has many manual operation parts whose starts and stops are determined by human judgment There are even several parts requiring off-line measurements that include analyses performed by hand At present a CEEF behavioral prediction system CPS is being developed as the first stage for controlling such a system In this CPS an operator creates an operational schedule after due consideration However creation of the operational schedule of the complex CEEF is not easy and it is above the operator s capability to fully cope with alterations of the operational schedule that occur during a long-term habitation experiment Therefore we are going to develop an automatic creation function of the operational schedule that will be incorporated into the CPS by the beginning of the habitation experiment in fiscal 2009 This function will enable automation of most of the operational schedule that human operators currently set up In this paper we examine

  15. Strengthening health facilities for maternal and newborn care: experiences from rural eastern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertrude Namazzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Uganda maternal and neonatal mortality remains high due to a number of factors, including poor quality of care at health facilities. Objective: This paper describes the experience of building capacity for maternal and newborn care at a district hospital and lower-level health facilities in eastern Uganda within the existing system parameters and a robust community outreach programme. Design: This health system strengthening study, part of the Uganda Newborn Study (UNEST, aimed to increase frontline health worker capacity through district-led training, support supervision, and mentoring at one district hospital and 19 lower-level facilities. A once-off supply of essential medicines and equipment was provided to address immediate critical gaps. Health workers were empowered to requisition subsequent supplies through use of district resources. Minimal infrastructure adjustments were provided. Quantitative data collection was done within routine process monitoring and qualitative data were collected during support supervision visits. We use the World Health Organization Health System Building Blocks to describe the process of district-led health facility strengthening. Results: Seventy two per cent of eligible health workers were trained. The mean post-training knowledge score was 68% compared to 32% in the pre-training test, and 80% 1 year later. Health worker skills and competencies in care of high-risk babies improved following support supervision and mentoring. Health facility deliveries increased from 3,151 to 4,115 (a 30% increase in 2 years. Of 547 preterm babies admitted to the newly introduced kangaroo mother care (KMC unit, 85% were discharged alive to continue KMC at home. There was a non-significant declining trend for in-hospital neonatal deaths across the 2-year study period. While equipment levels remained high after initial improvement efforts, maintaining supply of even the most basic medications was a challenge, with

  16. Microgravity Combustion Science and Fluid Physics Experiments and Facilities for the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauver, Richard W.; Kohl, Fred J.; Weiland, Karen J.; Zurawski, Robert L.; Hill, Myron E.; Corban, Robert R.

    2001-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, the Microgravity Science Program supports both ground-based and flight experiment research in the disciplines of Combustion Science and Fluid Physics. Combustion Science research includes the areas of gas jet diffusion flames, laminar flames, burning of droplets and misting fuels, solids and materials flammability, fire and fire suppressants, turbulent combustion, reaction kinetics, materials synthesis, and other combustion systems. The Fluid Physics discipline includes the areas of complex fluids (colloids, gels, foams, magneto-rheological fluids, non-Newtonian fluids, suspensions, granular materials), dynamics and instabilities (bubble and drop dynamics, magneto/electrohydrodynamics, electrochemical transport, geophysical flows), interfacial phenomena (wetting, capillarity, contact line hydrodynamics), and multiphase flows and phase changes (boiling and condensation, heat transfer, flow instabilities). A specialized International Space Station (ISS) facility that provides sophisticated research capabilities for these disciplines is the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF). The FCF consists of the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR), the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) and the Shared Accommodations Rack and is designed to accomplish a large number of science investigations over the life of the ISS. The modular, multiuser facility is designed to optimize the science return within the available resources of on-orbit power, uplink/downlink capacity, crew time, upmass/downmass, volume, etc. A suite of diagnostics capabilities, with emphasis on optical techniques, will be provided to complement the capabilities of the subsystem multiuser or principal investigator-specific experiment modules. The paper will discuss the systems concept, technical capabilities, functionality, and the initial science investigations in each discipline.

  17. Progress on Establishing Guidelines for National Ignition Facility (NIF) Experiments to Extend Debris Shield Lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, M; Eder, D; Braun, D; MacGowan, B

    2000-07-26

    The survivability and performance of the debris shields on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are a key factor for the successful conduct and affordable operation of the facility. The improvements required over Nova debris shields are described. Estimates of debris shield lifetimes in the presence of target emissions with 4 - 5 J/cm{sup 2} laser fluences (and higher) indicate lifetimes that may contribute unacceptably to operations costs for NIF. We are developing detailed guidance for target and experiment designers for NIF to assist in minimizing the damage to, and therefore the cost of, maintaining NIF debris shields. The guidance limits the target mass that is allowed to become particulate on the debris shields (300 mg). It also limits the amount of material that can become shrapnel for any given shot (10 mg). Finally, it restricts the introduction of non-volatile residue (NVR) that is a threat to the sol-gel coatings on the debris shields to ensure that the chamber loading at any time is less than 1 pg/cm{sup 2}. We review the experimentation on the Nova chamber that included measuring quantities of particulate on debris shields by element and capturing shrapnel pieces in aerogel samples mounted in the chamber. We also describe computations of x-ray emissions from a likely NIF target and the associated ablation expected from this x-ray exposure on supporting target hardware. We describe progress in assessing the benefits of a pre-shield and the possible impact on the guidance for target experiments on NIF. Plans for possible experimentation on Omega and other facilities to improve our understanding of target emissions and their impacts are discussed. Our discussion of planned future work provides a forum to invite possible collaboration with the IFE community.

  18. First results from the LUX dark matter experiment at the Sanford Underground Research Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Akerib, D S; Bai, X; Bailey, A J; Balajthy, J; Bedikian, S; Bernard, E; Bernstein, A; Bolozdynya, A; Bradley, A; Byram, D; Cahn, S B; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Chan, C; Chapman, J J; Chiller, A A; Chiller, C; Clark, K; Coffey, T; Currie, A; Curioni, A; Dazeley, S; de Viveiros, L; Dobi, A; Dobson, J; Dragowsky, E M; Druszkiewicz, E; Edwards, B; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Flores, C; Gaitskell, R J; Gehman, V M; Ghag, C; Gibson, K R; Gilchriese, M G D; Hall, C; Hanhardt, M; Hertel, S A; Horn, M; Huang, D Q; Ihm, M; Jacobsen, R G; Kastens, L; Kazkaz, K; Knoche, R; Kyre, S; Lander, R; Larsen, N A; Lee, C; Leonard, D S; Lesko, K T; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Lyashenko, A; Malling, D C; Mannino, R; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D -M; Mock, J; Moongweluwan, M; Morad, J; Morii, M; Murphy, A St J; Nehrkorn, C; Nelson, H; Neves, F; Nikkel, J A; Ott, R A; Pangilinan, M; Parker, P D; Pease, E K; Pech, K; Phelps, P; Reichhart, L; Shutt, T; Silva, C; Skulski, W; Sofka, C J; Solovov, V N; Sorensen, P; Stiegler, T; O`Sullivan, K; Sumner, T J; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Szydagis, M; Taylor, D; Tennyson, B; Tiedt, D R; Tripathi, M; Uvarov, S; Verbus, J R; Walsh, N; Webb, R; White, J T; White, D; Witherell, M S; Wlasenko, M; Wolfs, F L H; Woods, M; Zhang, C

    2013-01-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment, a dual-phase xenon time-projection chamber operating at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (Lead, South Dakota), was cooled and filled in February 2013. We report results of the first WIMP search dataset, taken during the period April to August 2013, presenting the analysis of 85.3 live-days of data with a fiducial volume of 118 kg. A profile-likelihood analysis technique shows our data to be consistent with the background-only hypothesis, allowing 90% confidence limits to be set on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering with a minimum upper limit on the cross section of $7.6 \\times 10^{-46}$ cm$^{2}$ at a WIMP mass of 33 GeV/c$^2$. We find that the LUX data are in strong disagreement with low-mass WIMP signal interpretations of the results from several recent direct detection experiments.

  19. NEUTRINO SUPER BEAM FACILITY FOR A LONG BASELINE EXPERIMENT FROM BNL TO HOMESTAKE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KAHN,S.

    2002-10-21

    An upgrade to the BNL Alternate Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) could produce a very intense proton source at a relatively low cost. Such a proton beam could be used to generate a conventional neutrino beam with a significant flux at large distances from the laboratory. This provides the possibility of a very long baseline neutrino experiment at the Homestake mine. The construction of this facility would allow a program of experiments to study many of the aspects of neutrino oscillations including CP violations. This study examines a 1 MW proton source at BNL and a large 1 megaton detector positioned at the Homestake Mine as the ultimate goal of a staged program to study neutrino oscillations.

  20. First Results of an Experiment on Advanced Collimator Materials at CERN HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Assmann, R; Berthome, E; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Donzé, M; Francon, P; Garlasché, M; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Moyret, P; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Peroni, L; Scapin, M; Calderon, M; Charitonidis, N

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment (HRMT-14) has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility on six different materials of interest for Beam Intercepting Devices (collimators, targets, dumps). Both traditional materials (Mo, W and Cu alloys) as well as advanced metal/diamond and metal/graphite composites were tested under extreme conditions as to pressure, density and temperature, leading to the development of highly dynamic phenomena as shock-waves, spallation, explosions. Experimental data were acquired, mostly in real time, relying on extensive integrated instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature and vacuum sensors) and on remote acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The experiment was a success under all points of view in spite of the technological challenges and harsh environment. First measurements are in good agreement with results of complex simulations, confirming the effectiveness of the acquisition system and the reliability of advanced numerical...

  1. Sodium Loop Safety Facility W-2 experiment fuel pin rupture detection system. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Kirchner, T.L.; Meyers, S.C.

    1980-05-01

    The objective of the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) W-2 experiment is to characterize the combined effects of a preconditioned full-length fuel column and slow transient overpower (TOP) conditions on breeder reactor (BR) fuel pin cladding failures. The W-2 experiment will meet this objective by providing data in two technological areas: (1) time and location of cladding failure, and (2) early post-failure test fuel behavior. The test involves a seven pin, prototypic full-length fast test reactor (FTR) fuel pin bundle which will be subjected to a simulated unprotected 5 cents/s reactivity transient overpower event. The outer six pins will provide the necessary prototypic thermal-hydraulic environment for the center pin.

  2. Laser performance upgrade for precise ICF experiment in SG-Ⅲ laser facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanguo Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The SG-Ⅲ laser facility (SG-Ⅲ is the largest laser driver for inertial confinement fusion (ICF researches in China, which has 48 beamlines and can deliver 180 kJ ultraviolet laser energy in 3 ns. In order to meet the requirements of precise physics experiments, some new functionalities need to be added to SG-Ⅲ and some intrinsic laser performances need upgrade. So at the end of SG-Ⅲ's engineering construction, the 2-year laser performance upgrade project started. This paper will introduce the newly added functionalities and the latest laser performance of SG-Ⅲ. With these function extensions and performance upgrade, SG-Ⅲ is now fully prepared for precise ICF experiments and solidly paves the way towards fusion ignition.

  3. Analysis of selected specimens from the STS-46 Energetic Oxygen Interaction with Materials-3 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Johnny L.; Bourassa, Roger J.; Dursch, Harry W.; Pippin, H. Gary

    1995-01-01

    The Energetic Oxygen Interaction with Materials 3 (EOIM-3) experiment was flown on the STS-46 mission, which was launched on 31 Jul. 1992 and returned 8 Aug. 1992. Boeing specimens were located on both the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) tray and the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) tray integrated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The EOIM-3 pallet was mounted in the Space Shuttle payload bay near the aft bulkhead. During the mission, the atomic oxygen (AO) exposure levels of specimens in these passive sample trays was about 2.3 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm. The specimens also received an estimated 22 equivalent sun hours of solar exposure. In addition, it appears that the EOIM-3 pallet was exposed to a silicone contamination source and many specimens had a thin layer of silicon based deposit on their surfaces after the flight. The specimens on the MSFC tray included seven solid film lubricants, a selection of butyl rubber (B612) and silicone (S383) o-rings, three indirect scatter surfaces, and Silver/Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (Ag/FEP) and Chemglaze A276 specimens which had previously flown on trailing edge locations of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The specimens on the JPL tray included composites previously flown on LDEF and two indirect scattering surfaces.

  4. First experiment on LMJ facility: pointing and synchronisation qualification, sequences qualification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Olivier; Bretheau, Dominique; Luttmann, Michel; Graillot, Herve; Ferri, Michel; Seguineau, Frederic; Bar, Emmanuel; Patissou, Loic; Canal, Phillipe; Sautarel, Françoise; Tranquille Marques, Yves; Raffestin, Didier

    2016-10-01

    The LMJ (Laser mega Joule) facility at the CESTA site (Aquitaine, France) is a tool designed to deliver up to 1.2 MJ at 351 nm for plasma experiments. The experiment system will include 11 diagnostics: UV and X energy balances, imagers (Streak and stripe camera, CCD), spectrometers, and a Visar/pyrometer. The facility must be able to deliver, within the hour following the shot, all the results of the plasma diagnostics, alignment images and laser diagnostic measurements. These results have to be guaranteed in terms of conformity to the request and quality of measurement. The end of 2014 was devoted to the qualification of system pointing on target and synchronization within and between beams. The shots made with one chain (divided in 2 quads - 8 laser beams) have achieved 50 µm of misalignment accuracy (chain and quad channel) and a synchronization accuracy in the order of 50 ps. The performances achieved for plasma diagnostic (in the order of less 100 µm of alignment and timing accuracy less than 150 ps) comply with expectations. At the same time the first automatic sequences were tested. They allowed a shot on target every 6h:30 and in some case twice a day by reducing preparation actions, leading to a sequence of 4h:00. These shooting sequences are managed by an operating team of 7 people helped by 3 people for security aspects.

  5. Ion traps for precision experiments at rare-isotope-beam facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Ion traps first entered experimental nuclear physics when the ISOLTRAP team demonstrated Penning trap mass spectrometry of radionuclides. From then on, the demand for ion traps has grown at radioactive-ion-beam (RIB) facilities since beams can be tailored for the desired experiment. Ion traps have been deployed for beam preparation, from bunching (thereby allowing time coincidences) to beam purification. Isomerically pure beams needed for nuclear-structure investigations can be prepared for trap-assisted or in-trap decay spectroscopy. The latter permits studies of highly charged ions for stellar evolution, which would be impossible with traditional experimental nuclear-physics methods. Moreover, the textbook-like conditions and advanced ion manipulation - even of a single ion - permit high-precision experiments. Consequently, the most accurate and precise mass measurements are now performed in Penning traps. After a brief introduction to ion trapping, I will focus on examples which showcase the versatility and utility of the technique at RIB facilities. I will demonstrate how this atomic-physics technique has been integrated into nuclear science, accelerator physics, and chemistry. DOE.

  6. Ramp-wave compression experiment with direct laser illumination on Shen Guang III prototype Laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Xu, Tao; Optical Team Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Ramp-wave compression (RWC) experiment to balance the high compression pressure generation in aluminum and x-ray blanking effect in transparent window was demonstrated on Shen Guang-III prototype laser facility. A new target concept was proposed to develop a laser-driven shocks-RWC technique for studying material behavior under dynamic, high pressure conditions. As the ``little shocks'' in our experiment cannot be avoided, the effort to diminish the shock under a special level has been demonstrated with Al/Au/Al/LiF target. The highest pressure is about 500GPa after using the multilayer target design Al/Au/Al/LiF and about 1013W/cm2 laser pulse incident on the planer Al target, instantaneously affecting ablation layer located 500 μm away. As the x-ray generated by Al layer had been prevented by the Au layer, the width abrupt onset of strong absorption of an optical probe beam (λ = 532 nm) in LiF window may be the limitation for this kind if RWC experiment during the experiment time scale for 30 μm thick step. With the design laser shape and target structure of Al/Au/Al/LiF, 500GPa may be the highest pressure after balance the preheat effect and ablation efficiency for laser direct-drive experiment.

  7. LMFBR source term experiments in the Fuel Aerosol Simulant Test (FAST) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrykowski, J.C.; Longest, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    The transport of uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) aerosol through liquid sodium was studied in a series of ten experiments in the Fuel Aerosol Simulant Test (FAST) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The experiments were designed to provide a mechanistic basis for evaluating the radiological source term associated with a postulated, energetic core disruptive accident (CDA) in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Aerosol was generated by capacitor discharge vaporization of UO/sub 2/ pellets which were submerged in a sodium pool under an argon cover gas. Measurements of the pool and cover gas pressures were used to study the transport of aerosol contained by vapor bubbles within the pool. Samples of cover gas were filtered to determine the quantity of aerosol released from the pool. The depth at which the aerosol was generated was found to be the most critical parameter affecting release. The largest release was observed in the baseline experiment where the sample was vaporized above the sodium pool. In the nine ''undersodium'' experiments aerosol was generated beneath the surface of the pool at depths varying from 30 to 1060 mm. The mass of aerosol released from the pool was found to be a very small fraction of the original specimen. It appears that the bulk of aerosol was contained by bubbles which collapsed within the pool. 18 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. A new experiment station on beamline 4B7A at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L., E-mail: zhenglei@ihep.ac.cn; Zhao, Y.D.; Tang, K.; Ma, C.Y.; Hong, C.H.; Han, Y.; Cui, M.Q.; Guo, Z.Y.

    2014-11-01

    A new experiment station was installed on beamline 4B7A at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF), making it possible to record X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectrum in three modes over an energy range from 1750 eV to 6000 eV. A 13-element Si(Li) array detector and a single-element SDD detector were used to acquire data in partial fluorescence yield (PFY) mode. Two low-pressure noble gas ion chambers were adopted for measuring XAFS in transmission mode. In total electron yield (TEY) mode the current of sample is recorded. Solid, wet and liquid samples were suitable for this experimental station. Some representative results obtained from this station were shown and discussed. - Highlights: • A new experiment station was installed on beamline 4B7A at BSRF. • This experiment station has three modes for recording X-ray XAFS spectrum. • The energy region covers the K-edge of elements Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca and Ti. • Solid, wet and liquid samples can be measured in this experiment station.

  9. Conceptual design of initial opacity experiments on the national ignition facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeter, R. F.; Bailey, J. E.; Craxton, R. S.; Devolder, B. G.; Dodd, E. S.; Garcia, E. M.; Huffman, E. J.; Iglesias, C. A.; King, J. A.; Kline, J. L.; Liedahl, D. A.; McKenty, P. W.; Opachich, Y. P.; Rochau, G. A.; Ross, P. W.; Schneider, M. B.; Sherrill, M. E.; Wilson, B. G.; Zhang, R.; Perry, T. S.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate models of X-ray absorption and re-emission in partly stripped ions are necessary to calculate the structure of stars, the performance of hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion and many other systems in high-energy-density plasma physics. Despite theoretical progress, a persistent discrepancy exists with recent experiments at the Sandia Z facility studying iron in conditions characteristic of the solar radiative-convective transition region. The increased iron opacity measured at Z could help resolve a longstanding issue with the standard solar model, but requires a radical departure for opacity theory. To replicate the Z measurements, an opacity experiment has been designed for the National Facility (NIF). The design uses established techniques scaled to NIF. A laser-heated hohlraum will produce X-ray-heated uniform iron plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at temperatures eV and electron densities 21~\\text{cm}-3$ . The iron will be probed using continuum X-rays emitted in a ps, diameter source from a 2 mm diameter polystyrene (CH) capsule implosion. In this design, of the NIF beams deliver 500 kJ to the mm diameter hohlraum, and the remaining directly drive the CH capsule with 200 kJ. Calculations indicate this capsule backlighter should outshine the iron sample, delivering a point-projection transmission opacity measurement to a time-integrated X-ray spectrometer viewing down the hohlraum axis. Preliminary experiments to develop the backlighter and hohlraum are underway, informing simulated measurements to guide the final design.

  10. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B., E-mail: fournier2@llnl.gov; Brown, C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Blue, B. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Fisher, J. H.; Newlander, C. D.; Gilliam, R. P.; Froula, N. [Fifth Gait Technologies, Inc., 14040 Camden Circle, Huntsville, Alabama 35803 (United States); Seiler, S. W.; Davis, J. F.; Lerch, MAJ. A. [Defense Threat Reduction Agency, 8725 John J. Kingman Road, Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060-6201 (United States); Hinshelwood, D. [Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lilly, M. [Dynasen, Inc., 20 Arnold Pl., Goleta, California 93117 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the National Ignition Facility’s diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built-in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight. The measured accuracy of sample responses as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette is discussed.

  11. A new experiment station on beamline 4B7A at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L.; Zhao, Y. D.; Tang, K.; Ma, C. Y.; Hong, C. H.; Han, Y.; Cui, M. Q.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2014-11-01

    A new experiment station was installed on beamline 4B7A at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF), making it possible to record X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectrum in three modes over an energy range from 1750 eV to 6000 eV. A 13-element Si(Li) array detector and a single-element SDD detector were used to acquire data in partial fluorescence yield (PFY) mode. Two low-pressure noble gas ion chambers were adopted for measuring XAFS in transmission mode. In total electron yield (TEY) mode the current of sample is recorded. Solid, wet and liquid samples were suitable for this experimental station. Some representative results obtained from this station were shown and discussed.

  12. The External-Injection experiment at the SPARC{sub L}AB facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Andrea R., E-mail: andrea.rossi@mi.infn.it [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Bacci, Alberto [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Belleveglia, Marco; Chiadroni, Enrica [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, Alessandro [“Tor Vergata” University, Physics Department, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Di Pirro, Giampiero; Ferrario, Massimo; Gallo, Alessandro; Gatti, Giancarlo [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Maroli, Cesare [University of Milan, Physics Department, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Mostacci, Andrea [“La Sapienza” University, SBAI Department, via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Petrillo, Vittoria [University of Milan, Physics Department, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Serafini, Luca [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Tomassini, Paolo [University of Milan, Physics Department, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Vaccarezza, Cristina [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2014-03-11

    At the SPARC{sub L}AB facility of INFN-LNF we are installing a transport lines for ultra-short electron bunches and another for ultra-intense laser pulses, generated by the SPARC photo-injector and by the FLAME laser in a synchronized fashion at the tens of fs level, to co-propagate inside a hydrogen filled glass capillary, in order to perform acceleration of the electron bunch by a plasma wave driven by the laser pulse. The main aim of this experiment is to demonstrate that a high brightness electron beam can be accelerated by a plasma wave without any significant degradation of its quality. Motivations of the technical choices are made and expected performances are reported.

  13. First downscattered neutron images from Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Nevzat

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF are designed to understand and test the basic principles of self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT filled cryogenic plastic (CH capsules. The experimental campaign is ongoing to tune the implosions and characterize the burning plasma conditions. Nuclear diagnostics play an important role in measuring the characteristics of these burning plasmas, providing feedback to improve the implosion dynamics. The Neutron Imaging (NI diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by collecting images at two different energy bands for primary (13–15 MeV and downscattered (10–12 MeV neutrons. From these distributions, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. The first downscattered neutron images from imploding ICF capsules are shown in this paper.

  14. Analysis of Ar line spectra from indirectly-driven implosion experiments on SGII facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Yu-Dong; Zhang Ji-Yan; Yang Jia-Min; Huang Tian-Xuan; Ding Yong-Kun

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the indirectly-driven implosion experiments on SGII laser facility in which Ar emission spectrum from Ar-doped D-filled plastic capsule is recorded with the crystal spectrometer. Spectral features of Ar Heβ line and its associated satellites are analysed to extract the electron temperature and density of the implosion core. Non local thermal equilibrium (NLTE) collisional-radiative atomic kinetics and Strark broadening line shape are included in the present calculation. By comparing the calculated spectrum with the measured one, the core electron temperature and density are inferred to be 700 eV and 2.5 × 1023 cm-3 respectively. With these inferred values of electron temperature and density, neutron yield can be estimated to agree with the measured value in magnitude despite of the very simple model used for the estimation.

  15. Recent results and experience with the Birmingham MC40 irradiation facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allport, P.; Baca, M.; Briglin, D.; Broughton, J.; Canavan, R.; Chisholm, A.; Gonella, L.; Knights, P.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Parker, D.; Price, T.; Thomas, J.; Wilson, J.; Affolder, A.; Casse, G.; Dervan, P.; Greenall, A.; Tsurin, I.; Wonsak, S.; Dixon, S.; Edwards, S.; French, R.; Hodgson, P.; Kemp-Russell, P.; Kourlitis, E.; Marin-Reyes, H.; Parker, K.

    2017-03-01

    Operational experience with the recently upgraded irradiation facility at the University of Birmingham is presented. This is based around the high intensity area of the MC40 medical cyclotron providing proton energies between 3 and 38 MeV and currents ranging from tens of fA to A. Accurate dosimetry for displacement damage and total ionizing dose, using a combination of techniques, is offered. Irradiations are carried out in a temperature controlled chamber that can be scanned through the beam, with the possibility for the devices to be biased, clocked, and read-out. Fluence up to several 1016 1 MeV neq/cm2 and GRad ionizing dose can be delivered within a day.

  16. Status of Indirect Drive ICF Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewald, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-21

    In the quest to demonstrate Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ignition of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled capsules and propagating thermonuclear burn with net energy gain (fusion energy/laser energy >1), recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have shown progress towards increasing capsule hot spot temperature (Tion>5 keV) and fusion neutron yield (~1016), while achieving ~2x yield amplification by alpha particle deposition. At the same time a performance cliff was reached, resulting in lower fusion yields than expected as the implosion velocity was increased. Ongoing studies of the hohlraum and capsule physics are attempting to disseminate possible causes for this performance ceiling.

  17. First Operating Experiences of Beam Position Monitors in the TESLA Test Facility Linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R.; Sachwitz, M.; Schreiber, H. J.; Tonisch, F.; Castellano, M.; Patteri, P.; Tazzioli, F.; Catani, L.

    1997-05-01

    Different types of monitors where installed in the TESLA Test Facility Linac to measure the beam position. At each superconducting quadrupole, the transverse beam position will be measured with a resolution of better than 10 μm, using a cylindrical cavity excited in the TM_110-mode by an off-center beam. In addition, two 'warm' cavities working at room temperature were built for the Injector I and the Bunch Compressor. The amplitude of the TM_110-mode and its phase are measured in a homodyne receiver. For the experimental area, stripline monitors having a resolution of better than 100 μm were built, tested and installed. The averaged position of the whole bunch train of Injector I is measured in a narrowband receiver using the amplitude-to-phase conversion. This paper summarizes the designs, cold tests and first operating experiences of both monitor types.

  18. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A.; Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T.

    2014-01-01

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  19. Capture cavity cryomodule for quantum beam experiment at KEK superconducting RF test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Hara, K.; Hayano, H.; Kako, E.; Kojima, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nakai, H.; Noguchi, S.; Ohuchi, N.; Terashima, A. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Horikoshi, A.; Semba, T. [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Works, Hitachi, Ibaraki 317-8511 (Japan)

    2014-01-29

    A capture cavity cryomodule was fabricated and used in a beam line for quantum beam experiments at the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) of the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. The cryomodule is about 4 m long and contains two nine-cell cavities. The cross section is almost the same as that of the STF cryomodules that were fabricated to develop superconducting RF cavities for the International Linear Collider. An attempt was made to reduce the large deflection of the helium gas return pipe (GRP) that was observed in the STF cryomodules during cool-down and warm-up. This paper briefly describes the structure and cryogenic performance of the captures cavity cryomodule, and also reports the measured displacement of the GRP and the cavity-containing helium vessels during regular operation.

  20. Experimental results from magnetized-jet experiments executed at the Jupiter Laser Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Kuranz, C. C.; Rasmus, A. M.; Klein, S. R.; MacDonald, M. J.; Trantham, M. R.; Fein, J. R.; Belancourt, P. X.; Young, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Drake, R. P.; Pollock, B. B.; Park, J.; Hazi, A. U.; Williams, G. J.; Chen, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent experiments at the Jupiter Laser Facility investigated magnetization effects on collimated plasma jets. Laser-irradiated plastic-cone-targets produced collimated, millimeter-scale plasma flows as indicated by optical interferometry. Proton radiography of these jets showed no indication of strong, self-generated magnetic fields, suggesting a dominantly hydrodynamic collimating mechanism. Targets were placed in a custom-designed solenoid capable of generating field strengths up to 5 T. Proton radiographs of the well-characterized B-field, without a plasma jet, suggested an external source of trapped electrons that affects proton trajectories. The background magnetic field was aligned with the jet propagation direction, as is the case in many astrophysical systems. Optical interferometry showed that magnetization of the plasma results in disruption of the collimated flow and instead produces a hollow cavity. This result is a topic of ongoing investigation.

  1. HITRAP - a facility for experiments on heavy highly charged ions and on antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andjelkovic, Z; Barth, W; Brantjes, N P M; Braeuning-Demian, A; Dahl, L; Herfurth, F; Kester, O; Kluge, H J; Koszudowski, S; Kozhuharov, C; Maero, G; Noertershaeuser, W [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Birkl, G [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Blank, I; Goetz, S [Universitaet Freiburg (Germany); Blaum, K [Max-Planck Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Bodewits, E; Hoekstra, R [KVI Groningen (Netherlands); Church, D [Texas AM University, Texas (United States); Pfister, J, E-mail: w.quint@gsi.d [Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany)

    2009-11-01

    HITRAP is a facility for very slow highly-charged heavy ions at GSI. HITRAP uses the GSI relativistic ion beams, the Experimental Storage Ring ESR for electron cooling and deceleration to 4 MeV/u, and consists of a combination of an interdigital H-mode (IH) structure with a radiofrequency quadrupole structure for further deceleration to 6 keV/u, and a Penning trap for accumulation and cooling to low temperatures. Finally, ion beams with low emittance will be delivered to a large variety of atomic and nuclear physics experiments. Presently, HITRAP is in the commissioning phase. The deceleration of heavy-ion beam from the ESR storage ring to an energy of 500 keV/u with the IH structure has been demonstrated and studied in detail. The commissioning of the RFQ structure and the cooler trap is ongoing.

  2. Experiments on the transportation of a magnetized plasma stream in the GOL-3 facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postupaev, V. V.; Batkin, V. I.; Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kuklin, K. N.; Mekler, K. I.; Rovenskikh, A. F.

    2016-04-01

    The program of the deep upgrade of the GOL-3 multiple-mirror trap is presented. The upgrade is aimed at creating a new GOL-NB open trap located at the GOL-3 site and intended to directly demonstrate the efficiency of using multiple-mirror magnetic cells to improve longitudinal plasma confinement in a gasdynamic open trap. The GOL-NB device will consist of a new central trap, adjoint cells with a multiple-mirror magnetic field, and end tanks (magnetic flux expanders). Plasma in the central trap will be heated by neutral beam injection with a power of up to 1.5 MW and duration of 1 ms. At present, physical experiments directed at developing plasma technologies that are novel for this facility are being carried out using the 6-m-long autonomous part of the GOL-3 solenoid. The aim of this work was to develop a method for filling the central trap with a low-temperature start plasma. Transportation of a plasma stream from an arc source over a distance of 3 m in a uniform magnetic field with an induction of 0.5-4.5 T is demonstrated. In these experiments, the axial plasma density was (1-4) × 1020 m-3 and the mirror ratio varied from 5 to 60. In general, the experiments confirmed the correctness of the adopted decisions for the start plasma source of the GOL-NB device.

  3. Acoustic interactions between an altitude test facility and jet engine plumes: Theory and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Jones, R. R., III; Tam, C. K.; Massey, K. C.; Fleming, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the described effort was to develop an understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in the flow/acoustic interactions experienced in full-scale altitude engine test facilities. This is done by conducting subscale experiments and through development of a theoretical model. Model cold jet experiments with an axisymmetric convergent nozzle are performed in a test setup that stimulates a supersonic jet exhausting into a cylindrical diffuser. The measured data consist of detailed flow visualization data and acoustic spectra for a free and a ducted plume. It is shown that duct resonance is most likely responsible by theoretical calculations. Theoretical calculations also indicate that the higher discrete tones observed in the measurements are related to the screech phenomena. Limited experiments on the sensitivity of a free 2-D, C-D nozzle to externally imposed sound are also presented. It is shown that a 2-D, C-D nozzle with a cutback is less excitable than a 2-D C-D nozzle with no cutback. At a pressure ratio of 1.5 unsteady separation from the diverging walls of the nozzle is noticed. This separation switches from one wall to the opposite wall thus providing an unsteady deflection of the plume. It is shown that this phenomenon is related to the venting provided by the cutback section.

  4. Capsule modeling of high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. S.; Kritcher, A. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Marinak, M. M.; Patel, M. V.; Sepke, S. M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper summarizes the results of detailed, capsule-only simulations of a set of high foot implosion experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments span a range of ablator thicknesses, laser powers, and laser energies, and modeling these experiments as a set is important to assess whether the simulation model can reproduce the trends seen experimentally as the implosion parameters were varied. Two-dimensional (2D) simulations have been run including a number of effects—both nominal and off-nominal—such as hohlraum radiation asymmetries, surface roughness, the capsule support tent, and hot electron pre-heat. Selected three-dimensional simulations have also been run to assess the validity of the 2D axisymmetric approximation. As a composite, these simulations represent the current state of understanding of NIF high foot implosion performance using the best and most detailed computational model available. While the most detailed simulations show approximate agreement with the experimental data, it is evident that the model remains incomplete and further refinements are needed. Nevertheless, avenues for improved performance are clearly indicated.

  5. Physical Design of Critical Experiment Facility for Verifying Characteristics and Effects of Coupling Between Reactor and Spallation Target of ADS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN; Sheng-gui; ZHOU; Qi; LI; Yan

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of studying and verifying characteristics and effects of coupling between reactor and spallation target of ADS,based on the critical experimental facility design criteria and the availableexperiment condition,physical design of a critical experiment facility with lead coolant is completed,using critical calculation code MONK-9A.The contents of physical designs mainly include nuclear fuel,array of fuel rods,neutron source

  6. The fiber-SiPMT beam monitor of the R484 experiment at the RIKEN-RAL muon facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, R.; Bonesini, M.; Bertoni, R.; Mazza, R.; Rossella, M.; Tortora, L.; Vacchi, A.; Vallazza, E.; Zampa, G.

    2015-03-01

    The scintillating fibers SiPM based beam monitor detector, designed to deliver position, shape and timing of the low energy muon beam at the RIKEN-RAL muon facility for the R484 experiment, has been successfully tested on the electron beam at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of the INFN LNF laboratories. We report here the lay out and the read out structure as well as the very promising results.

  7. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  8. Decontamination techniques for decommissioning nuclear cycle facilities COGEMA experience and R and R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decobert, G.; Bordie, J. C. [COGEMA FCR/DSDP, St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); Faury, M.; Fournel, B. [Commissariat aa l' Energie Atomique, CEN Cadarache DESD/SEP/LETD, Paul lez Durance (France)

    1999-07-01

    All industrial nuclear facilities have a limited life-time. Then, dismantling at different levels of these facilities occurs and has to be done without endangering decommissioning staff, public and environment. Decontamination is an important procedure and is often used ina dismantling operation. It doesn't noly reduce irradiation dose for workers during decommissioning operations, according to the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle, but also has the potential for waste downgrading in order to achieve lower disposal costs. The COGEMA group which is world-leader in the nuclear fuel cycle from uranium prospecting to spent fuel reprocessing and recycling (including refining, conversion, enrichment of natural uranium, manufacturing of nuclear fuels and waste conditioning) has already been involved in nuclear clean-up and decommissioning programs and participates in several R and D projects with the CEA (Commissariat aa l'Energie Atomique). This paper will present first some example of the experience acquired on COGEMA and the CEA sites: - COGEMA La Hague reprocessing plant operating and heavy maintenance experience. - COGEMA Marcoule UP1 decommissioning feed-back experience. - Various CEA decommissioning operations. The experience acquired in the plant during operation clearly shows that, for most chemical equipment, conventional rinsing ensures sufficient internal decontamination to allow dismantling. Nevertheless, some specific equipment will require more aggressive reactants to lower the final dose rate. At this stage, the choice for a process is done step. Preliminary information is needed such as the physical state of the installation, the nature of the support, the radioactive inventory and its history whenever possible. After carrying inactive and active testing at a pilot level on the most promising processes, particular attention have to be put on the generated waste. (volume, treatment and final repository). COGEMA is developing a

  9. STAR - Research Experiences at National Laboratory Facilities for Pre-Service and Early Career Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, J. M.; Rebar, B.; Buxner, S.

    2012-12-01

    The STEM Teacher and Researcher (STAR) Program provides pre-service and beginning teachers the opportunity to develop identity as both teachers and researchers early in their careers. Founded and implemented by the Center for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Education (CESaME) at California Polytechnic State University on behalf of the California State University (CSU) system, STAR provides cutting edge research experiences and career development for students affiliated with the CSU system. Over the past three summers, STAR has also partnered with the NSF Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program to include Noyce Scholars from across the country. Key experiences are one to three summers of paid research experience at federal research facilities associated with the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA), and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). Anchoring beginning teachers in the research community enhances participant understanding of what it means to be both researchers and effective teachers. Since its inception in 2007, the STAR Program has partnered with 15 national lab facilities to provide 290 research experiences to 230 participants. Several of the 68 STAR Fellows participating in the program during Summer 2012 have submitted abstracts to the Fall AGU Meeting. Through continued partnership with the Noyce Scholar Program and contributions from outside funding sources, the CSU is committed to sustaining the STAR Program in its efforts to significantly impact teacher preparation. Evaluation results from the program continue to indicate program effectiveness in recruiting high quality science and math majors into the teaching profession and impacting their attitudes and beliefs towards the nature of science and teaching through inquiry. Additionally, surveys and interviews are being conducted of participants who are now teaching in the classroom as

  10. LDEF- 69 Months in Space: Second Post-Retrieval Symposium, Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-05

    EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS The LDEF aluminum samples analyzed at PNL for 22Na consisted of rectangular slabs of aluminum of various dimensions. The slabs...SRS), Pacific Northwest Laboratory/Battelle Memorial In- stitute ( PNL ), the Tennessee Valley Authority Western Area Radiological Laboratory (TVA...shown in Fig. 4, which represents a composite of data from LBL (Smith and Hurley, 1993), PNL (Reeves, et al.), and JSC (Lindstrom, private comm

  11. Results from Direct-Drive Shock-Timing Experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, P. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Boehly, T. R.; Campbell, E. M.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Marozas, J. A.; Myatt, J. F.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Dixit, S.

    2016-10-01

    The timing of multiple shocks is critical to set an inertial confinement capsule on a desired adiabat. Several factors including laser-energy deposition, heat conduction, and equation of state determine the adiabat of the compressing shell. Dual-axis cone-in-shell experiments, performed with plastic, (CH) shells and solid spheres, are used to diagnose the first shock velocity and the catch up of subsequent shocks at the National Ignition Facility. The shocks are launched with multiple pickets, expected to be used in ignition-relevant designs, at two different intensities. In separate experiments, continuous pulse shapes are also diagnosed. The measurements are compared to two-dimensional DRACO simulations that include the effects of nonlocal heat transport, cross-beam energy transfer, and the first-principles equation of state of CH. Designs that could potentially diagnose late-time energy coupling through shocks are also presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  12. The Cold Atom Laboratory: a facility for ultracold atom experiments aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveline, David; CAL Team

    2016-05-01

    Spread across the globe there are many different experiments in cold quantum gases, enabling the creation and study of novel states of matter, as well as some of the most accurate inertial sensors currently known. The Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL), being built at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), will be a multi-user facility that will allow the first study of ultracold quantum gases in the microgravity conditions of the International Space Station (ISS). The microgravity environment offers a wealth of advantages for studies of cold atoms, including expansion into extremely weak traps and achieving unearthly cold temperatures. It will also enable very long interaction times with released samples, thereby enhancing the sensitivity of cold atom interferometry. We will describe the CAL mission objectives and the flight hardware architecture. We will also report our ongoing technology development for the CAL mission, including the first microwave evaporation to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) on a miniaturized atom chip system, demonstrated in JPL's CAL Ground Testbed. We will present the design, setup, and operation of two experiments that reliably generate and probe BECs and dual-species mixtures of Rb-87 and K-39 (or K-41). CAL is scheduled to launch to the ISS in 2017. The CAL mission is supported by NASA's SLPS and ISS-PO. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under Contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  13. First results from the LUX dark matter experiment at the Sanford underground research facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerib, D S; Araújo, H M; Bai, X; Bailey, A J; Balajthy, J; Bedikian, S; Bernard, E; Bernstein, A; Bolozdynya, A; Bradley, A; Byram, D; Cahn, S B; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Chan, C; Chapman, J J; Chiller, A A; Chiller, C; Clark, K; Coffey, T; Currie, A; Curioni, A; Dazeley, S; de Viveiros, L; Dobi, A; Dobson, J; Dragowsky, E M; Druszkiewicz, E; Edwards, B; Faham, C H; Fiorucci, S; Flores, C; Gaitskell, R J; Gehman, V M; Ghag, C; Gibson, K R; Gilchriese, M G D; Hall, C; Hanhardt, M; Hertel, S A; Horn, M; Huang, D Q; Ihm, M; Jacobsen, R G; Kastens, L; Kazkaz, K; Knoche, R; Kyre, S; Lander, R; Larsen, N A; Lee, C; Leonard, D S; Lesko, K T; Lindote, A; Lopes, M I; Lyashenko, A; Malling, D C; Mannino, R; McKinsey, D N; Mei, D-M; Mock, J; Moongweluwan, M; Morad, J; Morii, M; Murphy, A St J; Nehrkorn, C; Nelson, H; Neves, F; Nikkel, J A; Ott, R A; Pangilinan, M; Parker, P D; Pease, E K; Pech, K; Phelps, P; Reichhart, L; Shutt, T; Silva, C; Skulski, W; Sofka, C J; Solovov, V N; Sorensen, P; Stiegler, T; O'Sullivan, K; Sumner, T J; Svoboda, R; Sweany, M; Szydagis, M; Taylor, D; Tennyson, B; Tiedt, D R; Tripathi, M; Uvarov, S; Verbus, J R; Walsh, N; Webb, R; White, J T; White, D; Witherell, M S; Wlasenko, M; Wolfs, F L H; Woods, M; Zhang, C

    2014-03-07

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment is a dual-phase xenon time-projection chamber operating at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (Lead, South Dakota). The LUX cryostat was filled for the first time in the underground laboratory in February 2013. We report results of the first WIMP search data set, taken during the period from April to August 2013, presenting the analysis of 85.3 live days of data with a fiducial volume of 118 kg. A profile-likelihood analysis technique shows our data to be consistent with the background-only hypothesis, allowing 90% confidence limits to be set on spin-independent WIMP-nucleon elastic scattering with a minimum upper limit on the cross section of 7.6 × 10(-46) cm(2) at a WIMP mass of 33 GeV/c(2). We find that the LUX data are in disagreement with low-mass WIMP signal interpretations of the results from several recent direct detection experiments.

  14. Modeling and experiments of x-ray ablation of National Ignition Facility first wall materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, A.T.; Burnham, A.K.; Tobin, M.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Peterson, P.F. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-06-04

    This paper discusses results of modeling and experiments on the x-ray response of selected materials relevant to NIF target chamber design. X-ray energy deposition occurs in such small characteristic depths (on the order of a micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion significantly affect the material response, even during the typical 10-ns pulses. The finite-difference ablation model integrates four separate processes: x-ray energy deposition, heat conduction, hydrodynamics, and surface vaporization. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser facility in Livermore on response of various materials to NIF-relevant x-ray fluences. Fused silica, Si nitride, B carbide, B, Si carbide, C, Al2O3, and Al were tested. Response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with SEM and atomic force microscopes. Judgements were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material; relative importances of these processes were also studied with the x-ray response model.

  15. Results from colliding magnetized plasma jet experiments executed at the Trident laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Rasmus, A. M.; Kurnaz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Davis, J. S.; Drake, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Adams, C. S.; Pollock, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of high-velocity plasma flows in a background magnetic field has applications in pulsed-power and fusion schemes, as well as astrophysical environments, such as accretion systems and stellar mass ejections into the magnetosphere. Experiments recently executed at the Trident Laser Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory investigated the effects of an expanding aluminum plasma flow into a uniform 4.5-Tesla magnetic field created using a solenoid designed and manufactured at the University of Michigan. Opposing-target experiments demonstrate interesting collisional behavior between the two magnetized flows. Preliminary interferometry and Faraday rotation measurements will be presented and discussed. This work is funded by the U.S Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840. Support for this work was provided by NASA through Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship grant number PF3-140111 awarded by the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Astrophysical Observatory for NASA under contract NAS8-03060.

  16. Counter-propagating radiative shock experiments on the Orion laser facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayson, T.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Swadling, G. F.; Burdiak, G. C.; Patankar, S.; Smith, R. A.; Foster, J.; Skidmore, J.; Gumbrell, E.; Graham, P.; Danson, C.; Stehlé, C.; Singh, R. L.; Chaulagain, U.; Larour, J.; Kozlova, M.; Spindloe, C.

    2016-10-01

    The Orion high-power laser facility, at AWE Aldermaston UK, was used to produce hyper-sonic radiative shocks, travelling at 60km/s, in noble gases, between 0.1 and 1.0 bar. These experiments aimed to study the radiative precursor, a heat and ionization wave preceding the shock front, and dynamics of colliding radiative shocks. X-ray backlighting and optical self-emission streak imaging were used to study the shock front and collision dynamics, while multi-frame and streaked interferometry were used to simultaneously study the radiative precursor. These experiments compared the shock and collision dynamics in different gases (e.g. Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), while maintaining a constant mass density, to vary the strength of the radiative precursor. Some shocks exhibited features suggesting the formation of hydrodynamic or radiative instabilities. The experimental data is in good agreement with 2-D rad-hydro simulations and provides a new benchmark for codes to be tested against. Supported by Orion Academic Access, the Royal Society, EPSRC, Labex PLAS@PAR.

  17. LDEF (Flight), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03 EL-1994-00680 LDEF (Flight), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03 The flight photograph was taken with the LDEF on the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing the spacecraft in the cargo bay. The canisters are in their open condition (they were expected to open about two (2) weeks after launch and close about eleven (11) months into the mission) with three (3) full panels and 3/4th of the fourth panel covered with a highly reflective gold foil (>99.99 percent pure).The remaining area is covered with strips of other detector materials: zirconium, beryllium, titanium, platium, aluminum, carbon, Kapton, polyethylene and TEFLON®. The exposed fasteners are non-magnetic stainless steel. All of the exposed materials seem to be secure and no damage is evident. The contamination stain that has changed the white paint dot on the tray clamp blocks to brown also coats the tray flanges and the aluminum canister hardware. The end support beam scuff plate in the photograph was a bright yellow prior to launch but is a much darker, mustard yellow after the space exposure.

  18. Using a qualitative approach for understanding hospital-affiliated integrated clinical and fitness facilities: characteristics and members' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingzhen; Kingsbury, Diana; Nichols, Matthew; Grimm, Kristin; Ding, Kele; Hallam, Jeffrey

    2015-06-19

    With health care shifting away from the traditional sick care model, many hospitals are integrating fitness facilities and programs into their clinical services in order to support health promotion and disease prevention at the community level. Through a series of focus groups, the present study assessed characteristics of hospital-affiliated integrated facilities located in Northeast Ohio, United States and members' experiences with respect to these facilities. Adult members were invited to participate in a focus group using a recruitment flyer. A total of 6 focus groups were conducted in 2013, each lasting one hour, ranging from 5 to 12 participants per group. The responses and discussions were recorded and transcribed verbatim, then analyzed independently by research team members. Major themes were identified after consensus was reached. The participants' average age was 57, with 56.8% currently under a doctor's care. Four major themes associated with integrated facilities and members' experiences emerged across the six focus groups: 1) facility/program, 2) social atmosphere, 3) provider, and 4) member. Within each theme, several sub-themes were also identified. A key feature of integrated facilities is the availability of clinical and fitness services "under one roof". Many participants remarked that they initially attended physical therapy, becoming members of the fitness facility afterwards, or vice versa. The participants had favorable views of and experiences with the superior physical environment and atmosphere, personal attention, tailored programs, and knowledgeable, friendly, and attentive staff. In particular, participants favored the emphasis on preventive care and the promotion of holistic health and wellness. These results support the integration of wellness promotion and programming with traditional medical care and call for the further evaluation of such a model with regard to participants' health outcomes.

  19. Experiences of registered nurses as managers and leaders in residential aged care facilities: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Drew

    2011-12-01

    The phenomenon of an ageing population is being experienced globally, as countries struggle to change and improve residential models of care and provide services to the elderly. The role of the registered nurse (RN) is considered crucial to the clinical governance and management of care given. To date, however, no systematic review has examined the RN's experience in leadership and management. The objective of this review is to critically appraise, synthesise and present best available evidence on the experiences of RNs as clinical leaders and managers in residential aged care facilities. This review considered qualitative research papers that addressed the experiences of RNs as clinical leaders and managers in residential aged care facilities. Participants of interest were RNs, nurse leaders, nurses holding registration and or regulation under a board of nursing, nurses working in residential aged care and long-term care facilities. The diversity and use of language to describe nurses' roles and models of care for the elderly care environment were considered in the review. The search strategy sought to find both published studies and papers, limited to the English language and published between January 1997 and February 2011. An initial limited search was done in Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases to identify the key words contained in the title or abstract and index terms used to describe the relevant terms in the article. A second extensive search was undertaken and extended to other relevant databases using all identified keywords and index terms. The third step involved searching reference lists and bibliographies of chosen articles for additional studies. Each paper was assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological quality prior to inclusion in the review using an appropriate critical appraisal instrument from the System for the Unified Management

  20. Plasma switch as a temporal overlap tool for pump-probe experiments at FEL facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmand, M.; Murphy, C. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Cammarata, M.; Döppner, T.; Düsterer, S.; Fritz, D.; Förster, E.; Galtier, E.; Gaudin, J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Göde, S.; Gregori, G.; Hilbert, V.; Hochhaus, D.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Lemke, H.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Moinard, A.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Redlin, H.; Schulz, M.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tavella, F.; Tschentscher, T.; White, T.; Zastrau, U.; Toleikis, S.

    2012-08-01

    We have developed an easy-to-use and reliable timing tool to determine the arrival time of an optical laser and a free electron laser (FEL) pulses within the jitter limitation. This timing tool can be used from XUV to X-rays and exploits high FELs intensities. It uses a shadowgraph technique where we optically (at 800 nm) image a plasma created by an intense XUV or X-ray FEL pulse on a transparent sample (glass slide) directly placed at the pump - probe sample position. It is based on the physical principle that the optical properties of the material are drastically changed when its free electron density reaches the critical density. At this point the excited glass sample becomes opaque to the optical laser pulse. The ultra-short and intense XUV or X-ray FEL pulse ensures that a critical electron density can be reached via photoionization and subsequent collisional ionization within the XUV or X-ray FEL pulse duration or even faster. This technique allows to determine the relative arrival time between the optical laser and the FEL pulses in only few single shots with an accuracy mainly limited by the optical laser pulse duration and the jitter between the FEL and the optical laser. Considering the major interest in pump-probe experiments at FEL facilities in general, such a femtosecond resolution timing tool is of utmost importance.

  1. The Atlas pulsed power facility for high energy density physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, R B; Barr, G W; Bowman, D W; Cochrane, J C; Davis, H A; Elizondo, J M; Gribble, R F; Griego, J R; Hicks, R D; Hinckley, W B; Hosack, K W; Nielsen, K E; Parker, J V; Parsons, M O; Rickets, R L; Salazar, H R; Sánchez, P G; Scudder, D W; Shapiro, C; Thompson, M C; Trainor, R J; Valdez, G A; Vigil, B N; Watt, R G; Wysocki, F J; Kirbie, H C

    1999-01-01

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. Here, the authors describe how the primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently- removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the Marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-ys risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line compo...

  2. A test cassette for x-ray-exposure experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K. B.; Celeste, J.; Rekow, V.; Bopp, D. R.; May, M. J.; Fisher, J. H.; Horton, R.; Newlander, C. D.; Jenkins, P.; Trautz, K.

    2010-07-01

    We present the design and operation of a test cassette for exposure of samples to radiation environments at the National Ignition Facility. The cassette provides options for square and round samples and exposure areas; the cassette provides for multiple levels of filtration on a single sample, which allows dynamic range in experiments. The samples had normal lines of sight to the x-ray source in order to have uniform x-ray illumination. The incident x-radiation onto the samples was determined by the choice of filter thicknesses and materials. The samples were held at precise locations, accurate to within a few hundred microns, in the target chamber in order to have a known fluence incident. In the cassette, the samples were held in place in such a way that a minimal “line contact” allows them to have the maximal mechanical response to the x-ray load. We present postshot images of the debris found on films used for filters, and pre- and postexposure specimens.

  3. Hydrodynamic instability experiments with three-dimensional modulations at the National Ignition Facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.A.Smalyuk; S.V.Weber; D.T.Casey; D.S.Clark; J.E.Field; S.W.Haan; A.V.Hamza; D.E.Hoover; O.L.Landen; A.Nikroo; H.F.Robey; C.R.Weber

    2015-01-01

    The first hydrodynamic instability growth measurements with three-dimensional(3D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on CH shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility(NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841(2004)]. The initial capsule outer-surface amplitudes were increased approximately four times, compared with the standard specifications, to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, helping to qualify a technique for measuring small 3D modulations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray through-foil radiography based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 15 similar images significantly increased the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3D simulations. At a convergence ratio of~2.4, the measured modulation levels were~3 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. Several hypotheses are discussed, including increased instability growth due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. Future experiments will be focused on measurements with standard 3D ‘nativeroughness’ capsules as well as with deliberately imposed oxygen modulations.

  4. Comparison of Staged Z-pinch Experiments at the NTF Zebra Facility with Mach2 simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruskov, E.; Wessel, F. J.; Rahman, H. U.; Ney, P.; Darling, T. W.; Johnson, Z.; McGee, E.; Covington, A.; Dutra, E.; Valenzuela, J. C.; Conti, F.; Narkis, J.; Beg, F.

    2016-10-01

    Staged Z-pinch experiments at the University of Nevada, Reno, 1MA Z-pinch Zebra facility were conducted. A hollow shell of argon gas liner is injected between 1 cm anode-cathode gap through a supersonic nozzle of 2.0 cm diameter with a throat gap of 240 microns. A deuterium plasma fill is injected inside the argon gas shell through a plasma gun as a fusible target plasma. An axial magnetic field is also applied throughout the pinch region. Experimental measurements such as pinch current, X-ray signal, neutron yield, and streak images are compared with MACH2 radiation hydrodynamic code simulations. The argon liner density profiles, obtained from the CFD (FLUENT), are used as an input to MACH2. The comparison suggests a fairly close agreement between the experimental measurements and the simulation results. This study not only helps to benchmark the code but also suggests the importance of the Z-pinch implosion time, optimizing both liner and target plasma density to obtain the maximum energy coupling between the circuit and the load. Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy, DE-AR0000569.

  5. A new Large Lab-scale Facility for Hydro-Geophysical Experiments: Hydrogeosite

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Penna, V.; Cuomo, V.; Rizzo, E.; Fiore, S.; Troisi, S.; Straface, S.

    2006-12-01

    ; piezometric probes; grid of electrodes (in surface and holes) for geoelectrical measurements (DC, IP and SP); GPR antennae. The Hydrogeosite will serve several research activities and it represents an intermediate stage between laboratory experiments and field survey. Therefore, it has the advantage to obtain controlled results, like in a laboratory experiment, but at scales comparable to the field ones. The new Laboratory of Hydrogeophysics of IMAA-CNR would like to have placed the facility at international researcher disposal to study a wide spectra of hydrogeological phenomena, to assess new geophysical techniques and to test new sensors and instruments, etc.. Research centers interested to plan experiments in this full-scale model are welcome.

  6. Boiling eXperiment Facility (BXF) Fluid Toxicity Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM) with the Payload Safety Review Panel (PSRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheredy, William A.

    2012-01-01

    A Technical Interchange meeting was held between the payload developers for the Boiling eXperiment Facility (BXF) and the NASA Safety Review Panel concerning operational anomaly that resulted in overheating one of the fluid heaters, shorted a 24VDC power supply and generated Perfluoroisobutylene (PFiB) from Perfluorohexane.

  7. Polar direct drive: Proof-of-principle experiments on OMEGA and prospects for ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craxton, R.S.; Marshall, F.J.; Bonino, M.J.; Epstein, R.; McKenty, P.W.; Skupsky, S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.W.; Knauer, J.P.; Marozas, J.A.; Radha, P.B.; Seka, W.

    2005-04-15

    Polar direct drive (PDD) shows promise for achieving direct-drive ignition while the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is initially configured for indirect drive. Experiments have been carried out using 40 repointed beams of the 60-beam OMEGA laser system to approximate the NIF PDD configuration.

  8. Botany Facility. Thermal Control (TC) subsystem test report on experiment container of laboratory model and breadboard centrifuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, W.

    1986-11-01

    The Botany Facility TC (Thermal Control or Thermocouple) subsystem was tested in the environmental laboratory. All data could be generated within the required accuracy and to the required extent. The TC-subsystems of the Laboratory Model and Experiment Container and Centrifuge were successfully tested.

  9. Conceptual design of initial opacity experiments on the national ignition facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeter, R.  F.; Bailey, J.  E.; Craxton, R.  S.; DeVolder, B.  G.; Dodd, E.  S.; Garcia, E.  M.; Huffman, E.  J.; Iglesias, C.  A.; King, J.  A.; Kline, J.  L.; Liedahl, D.  A.; McKenty, P.  W.; Opachich, Y.  P.; Rochau, G.  A.; Ross, P.  W.; Schneider, M.  B.; Sherrill, M.  E.; Wilson, B.  G.; Zhang, R.; Perry, T.  S.

    2017-01-09

    Accurate models of X-ray absorption and re-emission in partly stripped ions are necessary to calculate the structure of stars, the performance of hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion and many other systems in high-energy-density plasma physics. Despite theoretical progress, a persistent discrepancy exists with recent experiments at the Sandia Z facility studying iron in conditions characteristic of the solar radiative–convective transition region. The increased iron opacity measured at Z could help resolve a longstanding issue with the standard solar model, but requires a radical departure for opacity theory. To replicate the Z measurements, an opacity experiment has been designed for the National Facility (NIF). The design uses established techniques scaled to NIF. A laser-heated hohlraum will produce X-ray-heated uniform iron plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) at temperatures${\\geqslant}150$ eV and electron densities${\\geqslant}7\\times 10^{21}~\\text{cm}^{-3}$. The iron will be probed using continuum X-rays emitted in a${\\sim}200$ ps,${\\sim}200~\\unicode[STIX]{x03BC}\\text{m}$diameter source from a 2 mm diameter polystyrene (CH) capsule implosion. In this design

  10. Soil and crop management experiments in the Laboratory Biosphere: an analogue system for the Mars on Earth(R) facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstone, S; Nelson, M; Alling, A; Allen, J P

    2005-01-01

    During the years 2002 and 2003, three closed system experiments were carried out in the "Laboratory Biosphere" facility located in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The program involved experimentation of "Hoyt" Soy Beans, (experiment #1) USU Apogee Wheat (experiment #2) and TU-82-155 sweet potato (experiment #3) using a 5.37 m2 soil planting bed which was 30 cm deep. The soil texture, 40% clay, 31% sand and 28% silt (a clay loam), was collected from an organic farm in New Mexico to avoid chemical residues. Soil management practices involved minimal tillage, mulching, returning crop residues to the soil after each experiment and increasing soil biota by introducing worms, soil bacteria and mycorrhizae fungi. High soil pH of the original soil appeared to be a factor affecting the first two experiments. Hence, between experiments #2 and #3, the top 15 cm of the soil was amended using a mix of peat moss, green sand, humates and pumice to improve soil texture, lower soil pH and increase nutrient availability. This resulted in lowering the initial pH of 8.0-6.7 at the start of experiment #3. At the end of the experiment, the pH was 7.6. Soil nitrogen and phosphorus has been adequate, but some chlorosis was evident in the first two experiments. Aphid infestation was the only crop pest problem during the three experiments and was handled using an introduction of Hyppodamia convergens. Experimentation showed there were environmental differences even in this 1200 cubic foot ecological system facility, such as temperature and humidity gradients because of ventilation and airflow patterns which resulted in consequent variations in plant growth and yield. Additional humidifiers were added to counteract low humidity and helped optimize conditions for the sweet potato experiment. The experience and information gained from these experiments are being applied to the future design of the Mars On Earth(R) facility (Silverstone et al., Development and research program for a soil

  11. Soil and crop management experiments in the Laboratory Biosphere: An analogue system for the Mars on Earth ® facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstone, S.; Nelson, M.; Alling, A.; Allen, J. P.

    During the years 2002 and 2003, three closed system experiments were carried out in the "Laboratory Biosphere" facility located in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The program involved experimentation of "Hoyt" Soy Beans, (experiment #1) USU Apogee Wheat (experiment #2) and TU-82-155 sweet potato (experiment #3) using a 5.37 m 2 soil planting bed which was 30 cm deep. The soil texture, 40% clay, 31% sand and 28% silt (a clay loam), was collected from an organic farm in New Mexico to avoid chemical residues. Soil management practices involved minimal tillage, mulching, returning crop residues to the soil after each experiment and increasing soil biota by introducing worms, soil bacteria and mycorrhizae fungi. High soil pH of the original soil appeared to be a factor affecting the first two experiments. Hence, between experiments #2 and #3, the top 15 cm of the soil was amended using a mix of peat moss, green sand, humates and pumice to improve soil texture, lower soil pH and increase nutrient availability. This resulted in lowering the initial pH of 8.0-6.7 at the start of experiment #3. At the end of the experiment, the pH was 7.6. Soil nitrogen and phosphorus has been adequate, but some chlorosis was evident in the first two experiments. Aphid infestation was the only crop pest problem during the three experiments and was handled using an introduction of Hyppodamia convergens. Experimentation showed there were environmental differences even in this 1200 cubic foot ecological system facility, such as temperature and humidity gradients because of ventilation and airflow patterns which resulted in consequent variations in plant growth and yield. Additional humidifiers were added to counteract low humidity and helped optimize conditions for the sweet potato experiment. The experience and information gained from these experiments are being applied to the future design of the Mars On Earth ® facility (Silverstone et al., Development and research program for a soil

  12. Applications and results of X-ray spectroscopy in implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, R.; Regan, S. P.; Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Scott, H. A.; Barrios, M. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C.; Collins, G. W.; Dixit, S. N.; Döppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Farley, D. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Golovkin, I. E.; Hamza, A.; Hicks, D. G.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Key, M. H.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Mancini, R. C.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Nikroo, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Springer, P. T.; Town, R. P. J.; Tucker, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    Current inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] are attempting to demonstrate thermonuclear ignition using x-ray drive by imploding spherical targets containing hydrogen-isotope fuel in the form of a thin cryogenic layer surrounding a central volume of fuel vapor [J. Lindl, Phys. Plasmas 2, 3933 (1995)]. The fuel is contained within a plastic ablator layer with small concentrations of one or more mid-Z elements, e.g., Ge or Cu. The capsule implodes, driven by intense x-ray emission from the inner surface of a hohlraum enclosure irradiated by the NIF laser, and fusion reactions occur in the central hot spot near the time of peak compression. Ignition will occur if the hot spot within the compressed fuel layer attains a high-enough areal density to retain enough of the reaction product energy to reach nuclear reaction temperatures within the inertial hydrodynamic disassembly time of the fuel mass [J. Lindl, Phys. Plasmas 2, 3933 (1995)]. The primary purpose of the ablator dopants is to shield the ablator surface adjacent to the DT ice from heating by the hohlraum x-ray drive [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. Simulations predicted that these dopants would produce characteristic K-shell emission if ablator material mixed into the hot spot [B. A. Hammel et al., High Energy Density Phys. 6, 171 (2010)]. In NIF ignition experiments, emission and absorption features from these dopants appear in x-ray spectra measured with the hot-spot x-ray spectrometer in Supersnout II [S. P. Regan et al., "Hot-Spot X-Ray Spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility," to be submitted to Review of Scientific Instruments]. These include K-shell emission lines from the hot spot (driven primarily by inner-shell collisional ionization and dielectronic recombination) and photoionization edges, fluorescence, and absorption lines caused by the absorption of the

  13. REVIEW OF FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) FUEL EXPERIMENTS FOR STORAGE IN INTERIM STORAGE CASKS (ISC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHASTAIN, S.A.

    2005-10-24

    Appendix H, Section H.3.3.10.11 of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), provides the limits to be observed for fueled components authorized for storage in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) spent fuel storage system. Currently, the authorization basis allows standard driver fuel assemblies (DFA), as described in the FSAR Chapter 17, Section 17.5.3.1, to be stored provided decay power per assembly is {le} 250 watts, post-irradiation time is four years minimum, average assembly burn-up is 150,000 MWD/MTHM maximum and the pre-irradiation enrichment is 29.3% maximum (per H.3.3.10.11). In addition, driver evaluation (DE), core characterizer assemblies (CCA), and run-to-cladding-breach (RTCB) assemblies are included based on their similarities to a standard DFA. Ident-69 pin containers with fuel pins from these DFAs can also be stored. Section H.3.3.10.11 states that fuel types outside the specification criteria above will be addressed on a case-by-case basis. There are many different types of fuel and blanket experiments that were irradiated in the FFTF which now require offload to the spent fuel storage system. Two reviews were completed for a portion of these special type fuel components to determine if placement into the Core Component Container (CCC)/Interim Storage Cask (ISC) would require any special considerations or changes to the authorization basis. Project mission priorities coupled with availability of resources and analysts prevented these evaluations from being completed as a single effort. Areas of review have included radiological accident release consequences, radiological shielding adequacy, criticality safety, thermal limits, confinement, and stress. The results of these reviews are available in WHC-SD-FF-RPT-005, Rev. 0 and 1, ''Review of FFTF Fuel Experiments for Storage at ISA'', (Reference I), which subsequently allowed a large portion of these components to be included in the authorization basis (Table H.3.3-21). The

  14. Investigation of gamma-ray time shifts caused by capsule areal density variations in inertial confinement fusion experiments at the national ignition facility and the omega facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafil, Elliot M.

    This thesis describes work on Cherenkov based gamma detectors used as diag- nostics at Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) facilities. The first part describes the calibration and commissioning of the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic which is a four cell Cherenkov detector array used to characterize the ICF implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by measuring the gamma rays generated during the fusion event. Two of the key metrics which the GRH measures are Gamma Bang Time (GBT) generated from the D(T,α)n thermonuclear burn and Ablator Peak Time (APT) caused by (n,n‧)gamma reactions in the surrounding capsule ablator. Simulations of ignition capsules predict that GBT and APT should be time synchronized. After GRH commissioning, the array was used during first year of NIF operation in the National Ignition Campaign. Contrary to expectations, time shifts between GBT and APT of order 10s of picoseconds were observed. In order to further investigate the possibility of these time shifts in view of testing both instrument and code credibility an ICF shot campaign at the smaller OMEGA facility in Rochester was devised. It was performed during two full shot days in April of 2013 and 2014 and confirmed in principle the viability of the Cherenkov detector approach but raised additional questions regarding the credibility of the simulation codes used to describe ICF experiments. Specifically the measurements show that the understanding of temporal behavior of GBT vs APT may not be properly modeled in the DRACO code used at OMEGA. In view of the OMEGA results which showed no time shifts between GBT and APT, the readout and timing synchronization system of the GRH setup at the NIF was reevaluated in the framework of this thesis. Motivated by the results, which highlighted the use of wrong optical fiber diameters and possible problems with the installed variable optical attenuators, the NIF equipment has been updated over the recent months and new timing tests will

  15. The National Criticality Experiments Research Center at the Device Assembly Facility, Nevada National Security Site: Status and Capabilities, Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner

    2011-09-01

    The National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) was officially opened on August 29, 2011. Located within the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), the NCERC has become a consolidation facility within the United States for critical configuration testing, particularly those involving highly enriched uranium (HEU). The DAF is a Department of Energy (DOE) owned facility that is operated by the National Nuclear Security Agency/Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). User laboratories include the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Personnel bring their home lab qualifications and procedures with them to the DAF, such that non-site specific training need not be repeated to conduct work at DAF. The NNSS Management and Operating contractor is National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) and the NNSS Safeguards and Security contractor is Wackenhut Services. The complete report provides an overview and status of the available laboratories and test bays at NCERC, available test materials and test support configurations, and test requirements and limitations for performing sub-critical and critical tests. The current summary provides a brief summary of the facility status and the method by which experiments may be introduced to NCERC.

  16. Optimizing pain care delivery in outpatient facilities: experience in NCI, Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Khaled Abdel

    2011-04-01

    satisfaction. In addition, monitoring the improvement of such plans is an integral part of the quality process. Importantly, the facility provides comprehensive care with professionals available 24 hours/7 days. On-call teams assigned to manage pain and other treatment modalities comprises of staff supervised by the primary cancer clinicians; this arrangement facilitates reaching this goal. This study will illustrate our experience through 25 years, trying to provide the highest care of patients with cancer pain on an outpatient basis.

  17. Proton irradiated graphite grades for a long baseline neutrino facility experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simos, N.; Nocera, P.; Zhong, Z.; Zwaska, R.; Mokhov, N.; Misek, J.; Ammigan, K.; Hurh, P.; Kotsina, Z.

    2017-07-01

    In search of a low-Z pion production target for the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) four graphite grades were irradiated with protons in the energy range of 140-180 MeV, to peak fluence of ˜6.1 ×1020 p /cm2 and irradiation temperatures between 120 - 200 °C . The test array included POCO ZXF-5Q, Toyo-Tanso IG 430, Carbone-Lorraine 2020 and SGL R7650 grades of graphite. Irradiation was performed at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer. Postirradiation analyses were performed with the objective of (a) comparing their response under the postulated irradiation conditions to guide a graphite grade selection for use as a pion target and (b) understanding changes in physical and mechanical properties as well as microstructure that occurred as a result of the achieved fluence and in particular at this low-temperature regime where pion graphite targets are expected to operate. A further goal of the postirradiation evaluation was to establish a proton-neutron correlation damage on graphite that will allow for the use of a wealth of available neutron-based damage data in proton-based studies and applications. Macroscopic postirradiation analyses as well as energy dispersive x-ray diffraction of 200 KeV x rays at the NSLS synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory were employed. The macroscopic analyses revealed differences in the physical and strength properties of the four grades with behavior however under proton irradiation that qualitatively agrees with that reported for graphite under neutrons for the same low temperature regime and in particular the increase of thermal expansion, strength and Young's modulus. The proton fluence level of ˜1020 cm-2 where strength reaches a maximum before it begins to decrease at higher fluences has been identified and it agrees with neutron-induced changes. X-ray diffraction analyses of the proton irradiated graphite revealed for the first time the similarity in

  18. Mark I 1/5-scale boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment facility report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altes, R.G.; Pitts, J.H.; Ingraham, R.F.; Collins, E.K.; McCauley, E.W.

    1977-10-11

    An accurate Mark I /sup 1///sub 5/-scale, boiling water reactor (BWR), pressure suppression facility was designed and constructed at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) in 11 months. Twenty-seven air tests using the facility are described. Cost was minimized by utilizing equipment borrowed from other LLL programs. The total value of borrowed equipment exceeded the program's budget of $2,020,000. Substantial flexibility in the facility was used to permit independent variation in the drywell pressure-time history, initial pressure in the drywell and toroidal wetwells, initial toroidal wetwell water level and downcomer length, vent line flow resistance, and vent line flow asymmetry. The two- and three-dimensional sectors of the toroidal wetwell provided significant data.

  19. Low pressure corium dispersion experiments in the DISCO test facility with cold simulant fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, L.; Gargallo, M.; Kirstahler, M.; Schwall, M.; Wachter, E.; Woerner, G.

    2006-08-15

    In a severe accident special pressure relief valves in the primary circuit of German Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) will transfer a high pressure accident into a low pressure scenario. However, there may be a time window during late in-vessel reflooding scenarios where the pressure is in the order of 1 or 2 MPa at the moment of the reactor vessel rupture. A failure in the bottom head of the reactor pressure vessel, followed by melt expulsion and blowdown of the reactor cooling system, might disperse molten core debris out of the reactor pit, even at such low pressures. The mechanisms of efficient debris-to-gas heat transfer, exothermic metal/oxygen reactions, and hydrogen combustion may cause a rapid increase in pressure and temperature in the reactor containment. Integral experiments are necessary to furnish data for modeling these processes in computer codes, that will be used to apply these result to the reactor case. The acquired knowledge can lead to realize additional safety margins for existing or future plants. The test facility DISCO-C (DIspersion of Simulant COrium - Cold) models the annular reactor cavity and the subcompartments of a large European reactor in a scale 1:18. The fluid dynamics of the dispersion process was studied using model fluids, water or bismuth alloy instead of corium, and nitrogen or helium instead of steam. The effects of different breach sizes and locations, and different failure pressures on the dispersion were studied, specifically by testing central holes, lateral holes, horizontal rips, and complete ripping of the bottom head. 22 experiments were performed in a basic cavity geometry with holes at the bottom of the lower head to study the similarity relations. Variables were the hole diameter, the initial pressure in the RPV and the fluids used. The only flow path out of the reactor pit was the annular gap between the inner wall of the reactor pit and the RPV, and then along the main coolant lines into the subcompartments

  20. The new hybrid thermal neutron facility at TAPIRO reactor for BNCT radiobiological experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, J; Rosi, G; Agosteo, S

    2007-01-01

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility, devoted to carry out both dosimetric and radiobiological studies on boron carriers, which are being developed in the framework of INFN BNCT project, has been installed at the ENEA Casaccia TAPIRO research fast reactor. The thermal column, based on an original, hybrid, neutron spectrum shifter configuration, has been recently become operative. In spite of its low power (5 kW), the new facility is able to provide a high thermal neutron flux level, uniformly distributed inside the irradiation cavity, with a quite low gamma background. The main features and preliminary benchmark measurements of the Beam-shaping assembly are here presented and discussed.

  1. Digital Support for Teachers' Teaching. Current Experience on Using Internet Facilities in Virtual University Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Luis Manuel Borges

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the use of a personal Web home page and university Internet facilities to support teaching activity at the University Fernando Pessoa (Portugal). Topics include a requirement for students to have laptop computers; local-area networks; changing educational paradigms; the need for user support; and a framework for evaluation. (Author/LRW)

  2. Overview of recent AWE fusion-related studies, experiments and facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts P.D.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The presentation will describe the current status of modelling short and long pulse laser irradiation and its application to inertial fusion designs. Recent results will be described which give confidence in the modelling in specific regimes. An update will be given of the AWE ORION laser facility and the availability planned for academic access.

  3. Evaluating Treatment Efficacy in Commercial Food Facilities: Insights Gained from Small-Scale Simulated Warehouse Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although critical to a successful IPM program, it is challenging to evaluate treatment efficacy in commercial food facilities because of the inability to obtain absolute estimates of insect population levels. These populations are spatially fragmented and occupy cryptic habitats, such as equipment,...

  4. New pedestrian facilities : technique, observations and opinions : the Dutch experiment. DRIVE project V1061 : pussycats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levelt, P.M.B.

    1993-01-01

    This report is the Dutch part of an international (French-British-Dutch) evaluation study of new pedestrian crossing facilities, summarized under the name 'PUSSYCATS' (See also IRRD 859331). 'PUSSYCATS' is a new system, characterized by technical improvements better adapted to the behaviour and need

  5. Safety analysis of the Los Alamos critical experiments facility: burst operation of Skua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orndoff, J.D.; Paxton, H.C.; Wimett, T.F.

    1980-12-01

    Detailed consideration of the Skua burst assembly is provided, thereby supplementing the facility Safety Analysis Report covering the operation of other critical assemblies at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. As with these assemblies the small fission-product inventory, ambient pressure, and moderate temperatures in Skua are amenable to straightforward measures to ensure the protection of the public.

  6. Does identity shape leadership and management practice? Experiences of PHC facility managers in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daire, Judith; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-09-01

    In South Africa, as elsewhere, Primary Health Care (PHC) facilities are managed by professional nurses. Little is known about the dimensions and challenges of their job, or what influences their managerial practice. Drawing on leadership and organizational theory, this study explored what the job of being a PHC manager entails, and what factors influence their managerial practice. We specifically considered whether the appointment of professional nurses as facility managers leads to an identity transition, from nurse to manager. The overall intention was to generate ideas about how to support leadership development among PHC facility managers. Adopting case study methodology, the primary researcher facilitated in-depth discussions (about their personal history and managerial experiences) with eight participating facility managers from one geographical area. Other data were collected through in-depth interviews with key informants, document review and researcher field notes/journaling. Analysis involved data triangulation, respondent and peer review and cross-case analysis. The experiences show that the PHC facility manager's job is dominated by a range of tasks and procedures focused on clinical service management, but is expected to encompass action to address the population and public health needs of the surrounding community. Managing with and through others, and in a complex system, requiring self-management, are critical aspects of the job. A range of personal, professional and contextual factors influence managerial practice, including professional identity. The current largely facility-focused management practice reflects the strong nursing identity of managers and broader organizational influences. However, three of the eight managers appear to self-identify an emerging leadership identity and demonstrate related managerial practices. Nonetheless, there is currently limited support for an identity transition towards leadership in this context. Better

  7. Instellar Gas Experiment (IGE): Testing interstellar gas particles to provide information on the processes of nucleosynthesis in the big bang stars and supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Don

    1985-01-01

    The Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) is designed to collect particles of the interstellar gas - a wind of interstellar media particles moving in the vicinity of the solar system. These particles will be returned to earth where the isotopic ratios of the noble gases among these particles will be measured. IGE was designed and programmed to expose 7 sets of six copper-beryllium metallic collecting foils to the flux of neutral interstellar gas particles which penetrate the heliosphere to the vicinity of the earth's orbit. These particles are trapped in the collecting foils and will be returned to earth for mass-spectrographic analysis when Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) on which IGE was launched, is recovered.

  8. Proton irradiated graphite grades for a long baseline neutrino facility experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Simos

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In search of a low-Z pion production target for the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE four graphite grades were irradiated with protons in the energy range of 140–180 MeV, to peak fluence of ∼6.1×10^{20}  p/cm^{2} and irradiation temperatures between 120–200 °C. The test array included POCO ZXF-5Q, Toyo-Tanso IG 430, Carbone-Lorraine 2020 and SGL R7650 grades of graphite. Irradiation was performed at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer. Postirradiation analyses were performed with the objective of (a comparing their response under the postulated irradiation conditions to guide a graphite grade selection for use as a pion target and (b understanding changes in physical and mechanical properties as well as microstructure that occurred as a result of the achieved fluence and in particular at this low-temperature regime where pion graphite targets are expected to operate. A further goal of the postirradiation evaluation was to establish a proton-neutron correlation damage on graphite that will allow for the use of a wealth of available neutron-based damage data in proton-based studies and applications. Macroscopic postirradiation analyses as well as energy dispersive x-ray diffraction of 200 KeV x rays at the NSLS synchrotron of Brookhaven National Laboratory were employed. The macroscopic analyses revealed differences in the physical and strength properties of the four grades with behavior however under proton irradiation that qualitatively agrees with that reported for graphite under neutrons for the same low temperature regime and in particular the increase of thermal expansion, strength and Young’s modulus. The proton fluence level of ∼10^{20}  cm^{−2} where strength reaches a maximum before it begins to decrease at higher fluences has been identified and it agrees with neutron-induced changes. X-ray diffraction analyses of the proton irradiated graphite

  9. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charitonidis, N; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Fernandez Carmona, P; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Marques dos Santos, S D; Moyret, P; Peroni, L; Redaelli, S; Scapin, M

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser ...

  10. Test Plan for the Wake Steering Experiment at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) Facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naughton, Brian Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This document is a test plan describing the objectives, configuration, procedures, reporting, roles, and responsibilities for conducting the joint Sandia National Laboratories and National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wake Steering Experiment at the Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility near Lubbock, Texas in 2016 and 2017 . The purpose of this document is to ensure the test objectives and procedures are sufficiently detailed such that al l involved personnel are able to contribute to the technical success of the test. This document is not intended to address safety explicitly which is addressed in a separate document listed in the references titled Sandia SWiFT Facility Site Operations Manual . Both documents should be reviewed by all test personnel.

  11. Public preferences for establishing nephrology facilities in Greenland: estimating willingness-to-pay using a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjær, Trine; Bech, Mickael; Kronborg, Christian; Mørkbak, Morten Raun

    2013-10-01

    At present there are no nephrology facilities in Greenland. Greenlandic patients with renal failure needing dialysis thus have to travel to Denmark to obtain treatment. For patients in haemodialysis this necessitates a permanent residence in Denmark. Our study was aimed at examining Greenlanders' preferences for establishing nephrology facilities in Greenland at Queen Ingrid's Hospital in Nuuk, and to estimate the associated change in welfare. Preferences were elicited using a discrete choice experiment (DCE). A random sample of 500 individuals of the general population was sent a postal questionnaire in which they were asked to consider the trade-offs of establishing nephrology facilities in Greenland as opposed to the current situation. This involved trading off the benefits of having such facilities in their home country against the costs of the intervention. Besides including a payment attribute described in terms of incremental tax payment, the DCE included two interventions attributes related to (1) the organisation of labour, and (2) the physical settings of the patients. Respondents succeeded in answering the DCE despite cultural and linguistic disparity. We found that all the included attributes had a significant effect on respondents' choices, and that respondents' answers to the DCE were in keeping with their values as stated in the questionnaire. DCE data was analyzed using a random parameter logit model reparametrized in willingness-to-pay space. The results showed that establishing facilities in Greenland were preferred to the current treatment in Denmark. The welfare estimate from the DCE, at DKK 18.74 million, exceeds the estimated annual costs of establishing treatment facilities for patients with chronic renal failure. Given the estimated confidence interval this result seems robust. Establishing facilities in Greenland therefore would appear to be welfare-improving, deriving positive net benefits. Despite the relatively narrow policy focus, we

  12. TRACE code validation for BWR spray cooling injection based on GOTA facility experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racca, S. [San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG), Pisa (Italy); Kozlowski, T. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    Best estimate codes have been used in the past thirty years for the design, licensing and safety of NPP. Nevertheless, large efforts are necessary for the qualification and the assessment of such codes. The aim of this work is to study the main phenomena involved in the emergency spray cooling injection in a Swedish designed BWR. For this purpose, data from the Swedish separate effect test facility GOTA have been simulated using TRACE version 5.0 Patch 2. Furthermore, uncertainty calculations have been performed with the propagation of input errors method and the identification of the input parameters that mostly influence the peak cladding temperature has been performed. (author)

  13. Beam-loading Compensation Experiment in the CLIC Test Facility. Modelling and Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Kononenko, Oleksiy; Grudiev, Alexej; Tecker, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Transient beam-loading in the main linac is an important performance issue for a Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study. In order to keep the luminosity losses less than 1%, the rms bunch-to-bunch relative energy spread must be below 0.03%. Beam-loading model and a compensation scheme, which meet this requirement, have been recently developed for CLIC. In this paper we propose ways to confirm the feasibility of the compensation scheme experimentally in the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3). As a part of this study a CTF3-specific model to simulate an RF power production is developed and the corresponding numerical results are discussed

  14. Review of past experiments at the FELIX facility and future plans for ITER applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, T.Q.; Turner, L.R.

    1993-10-01

    FELIX is an experimental test facility at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the study of electromagnetic effects in first wall, blanket, shield systems of fusion reactors. From 1983 to 1986 five major test series, including static and dynamic tests, were conducted and are reviewed in this paper. The dynamic tests demonstrated an important coupling effect between eddy currents and motion in a conducting structure. Recently the US has proposed to the ITER Joint Central Team to use FELIX for testing mock-up components to study electromagnetic effects encountered during plasma disruptions and other off-normal events. The near and long term plans for ITER applications are discussed.

  15. First experiment with the NUSTAR/FAIR Decay Total Absorption γ -Ray Spectrometer (DTAS) at the IGISOL IV facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadilla, V.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Agramunt, J.; Äystö, J.; Briz, J. A.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cucoanes, A.; Eronen, T.; Estienne, M.; Fallot, M.; Fraile, L. M.; Ganioglu, E.; Gelletly, W.; Gorelov, D.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Jordan, D.; Kankainen, A.; Kolhinen, V.; Koponen, J.; Lebois, M.; Martinez, T.; Monserrate, M.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Moore, I.; Nácher, E.; Orrigo, S.; Penttilä, H.; Podolyak, Zs.; Pohjalainen, I.; Porta, A.; Regan, P.; Reinikainen, J.; Reponen, M.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rubio, B.; Rytkönen, K.; Shiba, T.; Sonnenschein, V.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Valencia, E.; Vedia, V.; Voss, A.; Wilson, J. N.; Zakari-Issoufou, A.-A.

    2016-06-01

    The new Decay Total Absorption Spectrometer (DTAS) has been commissioned with low energy radioactive beams at the upgraded IGISOL IV facility. The DTAS is a segmented detector composed of up to 18 NaI(Tl) crystals and it will be a key instrument in the DESPEC experiment at FAIR. In this document we report on the experimental setup and the first measurements performed with DTAS at IGISOL. The detector was characterized by means of MC simulations, and this allowed us to calculate the response function of the spectrometer and analyse the first cases of interest.

  16. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertarelli, A., E-mail: alessandro.bertarelli@cern.ch [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Berthome, E. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Boccone, V. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carra, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cerutti, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Charitonidis, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Machines and Experimental Facilities Group (EN-MEF), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Charrondiere, C. [CERN, Engineering Department, Industrial Controls and Engineering Group (EN-ICE), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Dallocchio, A.; Fernandez Carmona, P.; Francon, P.; Gentini, L.; Guinchard, M.; Mariani, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Masi, A. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marques dos Santos, S.D.; Moyret, P. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Peroni, L. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Redaelli, S. [CERN, Beams Department, Accelerators and Beams Physics Group (BE-ABP), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Scapin, M. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The method presented in this paper, combining experimental measurements with numerical simulations, may find applications to assess materials under very high strain rates and temperatures in domains well beyond particle physics (severe accidents in fusion and fission nuclear facilities, space debris impacts, fast and intense loadings on materials and structures etc.)

  17. Simulated Irradiation of Samples in HFIR for use as Possible Test Materials in the MPEX (Material Plasma Exposure Experiment) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Rapp, Juergen [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The importance of Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) facility will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. The project presented in this paper involved performing assessments of the induced radioactivity and resulting radiation fields of a variety of potential fusion reactor materials. The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR; generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. These state-of-the-art simulation methods were used in addressing the challenge of the MPEX project to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

  18. A Review on Radiation Damage in Concrete for Nuclear Facilities: From Experiments to Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Pomaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a relatively cheap material and easy to be cast into variously shaped structures. Its good shielding properties against neutrons and gamma-rays, due to its intrinsic water content and relatively high-density, respectively, make it the most widely used material for radiation shielding also. Concrete is so chosen as biological barrier in nuclear reactors and other nuclear facilities where neutron sources are hosted. Theoretical formulas are available in nuclear engineering manuals for the optimum thickness of shielding for radioprotection purposes; however they are restricted to one-dimensional problems; besides the basic empirical constants do not consider radiation damage effects, while its long-term performance is crucial for the safe operation of such facilities. To understand the behaviour of concrete properties, it is necessary to examine concrete strength and stiffness, water behavior, volume change of cement paste, and aggregate under irradiated conditions. Radiation damage process is not well understood yet and there is not a unified approach to the practical and predictive assessment of irradiated concrete, which combines both physics and structural mechanics issues. This paper provides a collection of the most distinguished contributions on this topic in the past 50 years. At present a remarkable renewed interest in the subject is shown.

  19. Progress in detailed modelling of low foot and high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Kritcher, A. L.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    Several dozen high convergence inertial confinement fusion ignition experiments have now been completed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These include both “low foot” experiments from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and more recent “high foot” experiments. At the time of the NIC, there were large discrepancies between simulated implosion performance and experimental data. In particular, simulations over predicted neutron yields by up to an order of magnitude, and some experiments showed clear evidence of mixing of ablator material deep into the hot spot that could not be explained at the time. While the agreement between data and simulation improved for high foot implosion experiments, discrepancies nevertheless remain. This paper describes the state of detailed modelling of both low foot and high foot implosions using 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D radiation hydrodynamics simulations with HYDRA. The simulations include a range of effects, in particular, the impact of the plastic membrane used to support the capsule in the hohlraum, as well as low-mode radiation asymmetries tuned to match radiography measurements. The same simulation methodology is applied to low foot NIC implosion experiments and high foot implosions, and shows a qualitatively similar level of agreement for both types of implosions. While comparison with the experimental data remains imperfect, a reasonable level of agreement is emerging and shows a growing understanding of the high-convergence implosions being performed on NIF.

  20. The lived experiences of resilience in Iranian adolescents living in residential care facilities: A hermeneutic phenomenological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manijeh Nourian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resilience is one of the main factors affecting human health, and perceiving its meaning for high-risk adolescents is of particular importance in initiating preventive measures and providing resilience care. Objectives: This qualitative study was conducted to explain the meaning of resilience in the lived experiences of Iranian adolescents living in governmental residential care facilities. Materials and methods: This study was conducted using the hermeneutic phenomenological method. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight adolescents aged 13–17 living in governmental residential care facilities of Tehran province affiliated to the Welfare Organization of Iran who articulated their experiences of resilience. Sampling lasted from May 2014 to July 2015 and continued until new themes were no longer emerging. The researchers analyzed the verbatim transcripts using Van Manen's six-step method of phenomenology. Results: The themes obtained in this study included “going through life's hardships,” “aspiring for achievement,” “self-protection,” “self-reliance,” and “spirituality.” Conclusion: Our study indicates that the meaning of resilience coexists with self-reliance in adolescents’ lived experiences. Adolescents look forward to a better future. They always trust God in the face of difficulties and experience resilience by keeping themselves physically and mentally away from difficulties. Adverse and bitter experiences of the past positively affected their positive view on life and its difficulties and also their resilience. The five themes that emerged from the findings describe the results in detail. The findings of this study enable nurses, health administrators, and healthcare providers working with adolescents to help this vulnerable group cope better with their stressful life conditions and improve their health through increasing their capacity for resilience.

  1. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE): Conceptual Design Report. Volume 3: Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, James [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); McCluskey, Elaine [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lundin, Tracy [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Willhite, Joshua [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hamernik, Thomas [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Papadimitriou, Vaia [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Marchionni, Alberto [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Kim, Min Jeong [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Frascati (Italy). National Lab. of Frascati (INFN-LNF); Nessi, Marzio [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Montanari, David [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Heavey, Anne [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-01-21

    This volume of the LBNF/DUNE Conceptual Design Report covers the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE and describes the LBNF Project, which includes design and construction of the beamline at Fermilab, the conventional facilities at both Fermilab and SURF, and the cryostat and cryogenics infrastructure required for the DUNE far detector.

  2. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) Conceptual Design Report Volume 3: Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE June 24, 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Strait, James; Lundin, Tracy; Willhite, Joshua; Hamernik, Thomas; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Marchionni, Alberto; Kim, Min Jeong; Nessi, Marzio; Montanari, David; Heavey, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This volume of the LBNF/DUNE Conceptual Design Report cover the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility for DUNE and describes the LBNF Project, which includes design and construction of the beamline at Fermilab, the conventional facilities at both Fermilab and SURF, and the cryostat and cryogenics infrastructure required for the DUNE far detector.

  3. Experiences of Fast Queue health care users in primary health care facilities in eThekwini district, South AfricaExperiences of Fast Queue health care users in primary health care facilities in eThekwini district, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudu G. Sokhela

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Comprehensive Primary Health Care (PHC, based on the principles of accessibility, availability, affordability, equity and acceptability, was introduced in South Africa to address inequalities in health service provision. Whilst the Fast Queue was instrumental in the promotion of access to health care, a major goal of the PHC approach, facilities were not prepared for the sudden influx of clients. Increased access resulted in long waiting times and queues contributing to dissatisfaction with the service which could lead to missed appointments and non-compliance with established treatment plans.Objectives: Firstly to describe the experiences of clients using the Fast Queue strategy to access routine healthcare services and secondly, to determine how the clients’ experiences led to satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the Fast Queue service.Method: A descriptive qualitative survey using content analysis explored the experiences of the Fast Queue users in a PHC setting. Setting was first identified based on greatest number using the Fast Queue and geographic diversity and then a convenience sample of health care users of the Fast Queue were sampled individually along with one focus group of users who accessed the Queue monthly for medication refills. The same interview guide questions were used for both individual interviews and the one focus group discussion. Five clinics with the highest number of attendees during a three month period and a total of 83 health care users of the Fast Queue were interviewed. The average participant was female, 31 years old, single and unemployed.Results: Two themes with sub-themes emerged: health care user flow and communication, which highlights both satisfaction and dissatisfaction with the fast queue and queue marshals, could assist in directing users to the respective queues, reduce waiting time and keep users satisfied with the use of sign posts where there is a lack of human resources

  4. Review Of Decommissioning Experience In Spent Fuel Reprocessing Facilities at Marcoule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiberteau, Ph.; Vendroux, M. [CODEM GIE, BP 21004, 30201 Bagnols sur Ceze cedex (France); Berlan, C. [COGEMA Reprocessing Business Unit, 2, rue Paul Dautier - BP.4, 78141 Velizy Cedex (France)

    2003-07-01

    Final shutdown and decontamination, dismantling, and legacy waste retrieval programs are currently in progress at the Marcoule nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in southern France. They began in 1998 and will continue until about 2040. CODEM is the funding, decision-making and inspection organization for these decommissioning operations, COGEMA is the nuclear operator and the industrial contractor. After an overview of the facilities, the project and the participants, most significant operations are discussed in greater detail. High activity levels and the presence of large quantities of {alpha}-emitters complicate operating and waste treatment conditions. The major issues impacting cost-effectiveness-scenario, waste removal and project organization will be highlighted in the conclusion.

  5. First liquid-layer implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylstra, Alex; Olson, R.; Leeper, R.; Kline, J.; Yi, S. A.; Peterson, R.; Bradley, P.; Haines, B.; Yin, L.; Wilson, D.; Herrmann, H.; Shah, R.; Biener, J.; Braun, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Hamza, A.; Nikroo, A.; Meezan, N.; Biener, M.; Sater, J.; Walters, C.

    2016-10-01

    Replacing the standard ice layer in an ignition design with a liquid layer allows fielding the target with a higher central vapor pressure, leading to reduced implosion convergence ratio (CR). At lower CR, the implosions are expected to be more robust to instabilities and asymmetries than standard ignition designs. The first liquid-layer implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been performed by wicking the liquid fuel into a supporting foam. A 3-shot series has been conducted at CR=14-16 using a HDC ablator driven by a 3-shock pulse in a near-vacuum Au hohlraum; data and inferred quantities, such as pressure, show good agreement with expectations.

  6. Feasibility of low energy radiative capture experiments at the LUNA underground accelerator facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bemmerer, D; Lemut, A; Bonetti, R; Broggini, C; Corvisiero, P; Costantini, H; Cruz, J; Formicola, A; Fülöp, Z; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, G; Imbriani, G; Jesus, A P; Junker, M; Limata, B; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rogalla, D; Rolfs, C; Romano, M; Alvarez, C R; Schumann, F; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Strieder, F; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P; Vomiero, A; Fulop, Zs.; Gyurky, Gy.

    2005-01-01

    The LUNA (Laboratory Underground for Nuclear Astrophysics) facility has been designed to study nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest. It is located deep underground in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy. Two electrostatic accelerators, with 50 and 400 kV maximum voltage, in combination with solid and gas target setups allowed to measure the total cross sections of the radiative capture reactions $^2$H(p,$\\gamma$)3He and $^{14}$N(p,$\\gamma$)$^{15}$O within their relevant Gamow peaks. We report on the gamma background in the Gran Sasso laboratory measured by germanium and bismuth germanate detectors, with and without an incident proton beam. A method to localize the sources of beam induced background using the Doppler shift of emitted gamma rays is presented. The feasibility of radiative capture studies at energies of astrophysical interest is discussed for several experimental scenarios.

  7. [The social responsibility report drafting in healthcare facilities. Experiences in Fatebenefratelli's Hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberti, Giovanni; Franco, Claudia; Pimpinella, Giovanni; Piscioneri, Patrizia; Primavera, Angela; Bonannini, Barbara; Calvo, Manlio; Pavese, Ida; Di Palma, Mario; Fiore, Rosalia

    2013-01-01

    Medical facilities have the duty to report, in a transparent, comprehensive and integrated manner, their performance, not only in relation to the services provided directly but also in relation to the interest of the various stakeholders and the economic and social benefits for the community. The Social Report is not only a communication tool related to corporate social responsibility but also the initial basis for acquiring social legitimacy, and serves the role of "social accounting" of the activities of an organization, with respect to its mission and institutional role. In healthcare, it can contribute to achieving the fundamental objectives of the healthcare system, in the financial area (fair financing), and also in the medical (outcomes) and ethical-social areas.

  8. Study of energetic particle dynamics in Harbin Dipole eXperiment (HDX) on Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhibin, W.; Xiao, Q.; Wang, X.; Xiao, C.; Zheng, J.; E, P.; Ji, H.; Ding, W.; Lu, Q.; Ren, Y.; Mao, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zhibin Wang1, Qingmei Xiao1, Xiaogang Wang1, Chijie Xiao2, Jinxing Zheng3, Peng E1, Hantao Ji1,5, Weixing Ding4, Quaming Lu6, Y. Ren1,5, Aohua Mao11 Laboratory for Space Environment and Physical Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China 150001 2 State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics & Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, China 100871 3ASIPP, Hefei, China, 230031 4University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 90095 5Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 6University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China, 230026 A new terrella device for laboratory studies of space physics relevant to the inner magnetospheric plasmas, Harbin Dipole eXperiment (HDX), is scheduled to be built at Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT), China. HDX is one of two essential parts of Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF), which is a major national research facility for space physics studies. HDX is designed to provide a laboratory experimental platform to reproduce the earth's magnetospheric structure for investigations on the mechanism of acceleration/loss and wave-particle interaction of energetic particles in radiation belt, and on the influence of magnetic storms on the inner magnetosphere. It can be operated together with Harbin Reconnection eXperiment (HRX), which is another part of SPERF, to study the fundamental processes during interactions between solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere. In this presentation, the scientific goals and experimental plans for HDX, together with the means applied to generate the plasma with desired parameters, including multiple plasma sources and different kinds of coils with specific functions, as well as advanced diagnostics designed to be equipped to the facility for multi-functions, are reviewed. Three typical scenarios of HDX with operations of various coils and plasma sources to study specific physical processes in space plasmas will also be

  9. Analysis of the Fall-1989 two-meter box test bed experiments performed at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. O.; Drischler, J. D.; Barnes, J. M.

    This report summarizes the results of a benchmark analysis of the Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System (MASH) against a series of experiments performed at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) in Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The series of experiments was performed in the Fall of 1989 and involved experimentalists from APRF; the Defense Research Establishment Ottawa, Canada (DREO); Bubble Technology Industries, Canada, (BTI); and the Establishment Technique Central de l'Armement, France (ETCA). The 'benchmark' analysis of MASH is designed to determine the capability of MASH to reproduce the measured neutron and gamma ray integral and differential (spectral) data. Results of the 'benchmark' analysis are to be used in the recommendations to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Panel 7 Ad Hoc Group of Shielding Experts for replacing the Vehicle Code System (VCS) with MASH as the reference code of choice for armored vehicle nuclear vulnerability calculations.

  10. Quantifying equation-of-state and opacity errors using integrated supersonic diffusive radiation flow experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guymer, T. M., E-mail: Thomas.Guymer@awe.co.uk; Moore, A. S.; Morton, J.; Allan, S.; Bazin, N.; Benstead, J.; Bentley, C.; Comley, A. J.; Garbett, W.; Reed, L.; Stevenson, R. M. [AWE Plc., Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kline, J. L.; Cowan, J.; Flippo, K.; Hamilton, C.; Lanier, N. E.; Mussack, K.; Obrey, K.; Schmidt, D. W.; Taccetti, J. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); and others

    2015-04-15

    A well diagnosed campaign of supersonic, diffusive radiation flow experiments has been fielded on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments have used the accurate measurements of delivered laser energy and foam density to enable an investigation into SESAME's tabulated equation-of-state values and CASSANDRA's predicted opacity values for the low-density C{sub 8}H{sub 7}Cl foam used throughout the campaign. We report that the results from initial simulations under-predicted the arrival time of the radiation wave through the foam by ≈22%. A simulation study was conducted that artificially scaled the equation-of-state and opacity with the intended aim of quantifying the systematic offsets in both CASSANDRA and SESAME. Two separate hypotheses which describe these errors have been tested using the entire ensemble of data, with one being supported by these data.

  11. Examining the radiation drive asymmetries present in implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Arthur

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the origin, interplay, and mitigation of time dependent radiation drive asymmetries is critical to improving the performance of indirectly driven implosion experiments. Recent work has successfully modeled many aspects of the observed symmetry in implosions using the so-called high foot radiation drive by applying a semi-empirical fit to the low mode time dependent flux asymmetries that the capsule experiences. In these experiments, laser plasma interactions, including cross beam energy transfer, inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption, and stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering, make controlling the symmetry of the radiation flux that drives the implosion challenging. More recently, control of implosion symmetry without the use of cross beam energy transfer, in hohlraums with lower gas fill densities using both plastic and high density carbon ablators, have been explored. The aim of these experiments was to reduce the amount of highly non-linear laser plasma interactions and develop implosions in which the radiation flux symmetry could be more easily understood and controlled. This work describes the experimental reemission, shock timing, radiography, and x-ray self emission measurements that inform our understanding of time dependent radiation drive asymmetries. This data indicates that in the high foot series of implosion experiments, the drive asymmetry initialized during the first shock of the implosion was enhanced by the asymmetry that develops during the peak of the radiation drive. In contrast, in lower gas filled hohlraum experiments, a reduction in the magnitude of time dependent radiation asymmetries has been observed. Incorporating additional data and modeling, this work seeks to further our understanding of the physical mechanisms that currently limit symmetry control in implosion experiments. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA

  12. Experiences of acute pain in children who present to a healthcare facility for treatment: a systematic review of qualitative evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Nicole; Tallon, Mary; McConigley, Ruth; Leslie, Gavin; Wilson, Sally

    2017-06-01

    Pain is a universal and complex phenomenon that is personal, subjective and specific. Despite growing knowledge in pediatric pain, management of children's pain remains sub-optimal and is linked to negative behavioral and physiological consequences later in life. As there is no synthesis of these studies, it was timely to undertake a systematic review. To identify, evaluate and synthesize the existing qualitative evidence on children's experiences of acute pain, including pain management, within a healthcare facility. Children aged four to 18 years (inclusive) attending a healthcare facility who experienced acute pain associated with any injury, medical condition or treatment. Children's experiences and perceptions of their acute pain, pain management and expectations of others in managing their pain. Studies on children's experiences of pain in the postoperative context were excluded as a systematic review exploring this phenomenon had previously been published. Studies reporting on children's experiences of chronic pain were also excluded. Any healthcare facility including general practitioners' surgeries, hospitals, emergency departments and outpatient clinics. Qualitative studies including phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research designs. Using a three-step search strategy, databases were searched in December 2015 to identify both published and unpublished articles from 2000 to 2015. Studies published in languages other than English were excluded. All studies that met the inclusion criteria were assessed by at least two independent reviewers for methodological quality using a standardized critical appraisal tool from the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-QARI). Data were extracted from the papers included in the review using standardized data extraction tool from JBI-QARI. Findings were pooled using JBI-QARI. Findings were rated according to their level of credibility and

  13. Current experiences and educational preferences of general practitioners and staff caring for people with dementia living in residential facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherer Samuel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Residential care is important for older adults, particularly for those with advanced dementia and their families. Education interventions that achieve sustainable improvement in the care of older adults are critical to quality care. There are few systematic data available regarding the educational needs of Residential Care Facility (RCF staff and General Practitioners (GPs relating to dementia, or the sustainability of educational interventions. We sought to determine participation in dementia education, perceived levels of current knowledge regarding dementia, perceived unmet educational needs, current barriers, facilitators and preferences for dementia education. Methods A mixed methods study design was utilised. A survey was distributed to a convenience sample of general practitioners, and staff in 223 consecutive residential care facilities in Perth, Western Australia. Responses were received from 102 RCF staff working in 10 facilities (out of 33 facilities who agreed to distribute the survey and 202 GPs (19% of metropolitan GPs. Quantitative survey data were summarised descriptively and chi squared statistics were used to analyse the distribution of categorical variables. Qualitative data were collected from general practitioners, staff in residential care facilities and family carers of people with dementia utilizing individual interviews, surveys and focus groups. Qualitative data were analysed thematically. Results Among RCF staff and GPs attending RCF, participation in dementia education was high, and knowledge levels generally perceived as good. The individual experiences and needs of people with dementia and their families were emphasised. Participants identified the need for a person centred philosophy to underpin educational interventions. Limited time was a frequently mentioned barrier, especially in relation to attending dementia care education. Perceived educational needs relating to behaviours of concern

  14. Experiences of Fast Queue health care users in primary health care facilities in eThekwini district, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudu G. Sokhela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Comprehensive Primary Health Care (PHC, based on the principles of accessibility, availability, affordability, equity and acceptability, was introduced in South Africa to address inequalities in health service provision. Whilst the Fast Queue was instrumental in the promotion of access to health care, a major goal of the PHC approach, facilities were not prepared for the sudden influx of clients. Increased access resulted in long waiting times and queues contributing to dissatisfaction with the service which could lead to missed appointments and non-compliance with established treatment plans. Objectives: Firstly to describe the experiences of clients using the Fast Queue strategy to access routine healthcare services and secondly, to determine how the clients’ experiences led to satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the Fast Queue service.Method: A descriptive qualitative survey using content analysis explored the experiences of the Fast Queue users in a PHC setting. Setting was first identified based on greatest number using the Fast Queue and geographic diversity and then a convenience sample of health care users of the Fast Queue were sampled individually along with one focus group of users who accessed the Queue monthly for medication refills. The same interview guide questions were used for both individual interviews and the one focus group discussion. Five clinics with the highest number of attendees during a three month period and a total of 83 health care users of the Fast Queue were interviewed. The average participant was female, 31 years old, single and unemployed.Results: Two themes with sub-themes emerged: health care user flow and communication, which highlights both satisfaction and dissatisfaction with the fast queue and queue marshals, could assist in directing users to the respective queues, reduce waiting time and keep users satisfied with the use of sign posts where there is a lack of human resources

  15. Analysis Facility infrastructure (TIER3) for ATLAS High Energy physics experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez de la Hoz, S.; March, L.; Ros, E.; Sanchez, J.; Amoros, G.; Fassi, F.; Fernandez, A.; Kaci, M.; Lamas, A.; Salt, J.

    2007-07-01

    ATLAS project has been asked to define the scope and role of Tier-3 resources (facilities or centres) within the existing ATLAS computing model, activities and facilities. This document attempts to address these questions by describing Tier-3 resources generally, and their relationship to the ATLAS Software and Computing Project. Originally the tiered computing model came out of MONARC (see http://monarc.web.cern.ch/MONARC/) work and was predicated upon the network being a scarce resource. In this model the tiered hierarchy ranged from the Tier-0 (CERN) down to the desktop or workstation (Tier 3). The focus on defining the roles of each tiered component has evolved with the initial emphasis on the Tier-0 (CERN) and Tier-1 (National centres) definition and roles. The various LHC projects, including ATLAS, then evolved the tiered hierarchy to include Tier-2s (Regional centers) as part of their projects. Tier-3s, on the other hand, have (implicitly and sometime explicitly) been defined as whatever an institution could construct to support their Physics goals using institutional and otherwise leveraged resources and therefore have not been considered to be part of the official ATLAS Research Program computing resources nor under their control, meaning there is no formal MOU process to designate sites as Tier-3s and no formal control of the program over the Tier-3 resources. Tier-3s are the responsibility of individual institutions to define, fund, deploy and support. However, having noted this, we must also recognize that Tier-3s must exist and will have implications for how our computing model should support ATLAS physicists. Tier-3 users will want to access data and simulations and will want to enable their Tier-3 resources to support their analysis and simulation work. Tiers 3s are an important resource for physicists to analyze LHC (Large Hadron Collider) data. This document will define how Tier-3s should best interact with the ATLAS computing model, detail the

  16. Non-equilibrium between ions and electrons inside hot spots from National Ignition Facility experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengfeng Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The non-equilibrium between ions and electrons in the hot spot can relax the ignition conditions in inertial confinement fusion [Fan et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 010703 (2016], and obvious ion-electron non-equilibrium could be observed by our simulations of high-foot implosions when the ion-electron relaxation is enlarged by a factor of 2. On the other hand, in many shots of high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility, the observed X-ray enhancement factors due to ablator mixing into the hot spot are less than unity assuming electrons and ions have the same temperature [Meezan et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 062703 (2015], which is not self-consistent because it can lead to negative ablator mixing into the hot spot. Actually, this non-consistency implies ion-electron non-equilibrium within the hot spot. From our study, we can infer that ion-electron non-equilibrium exists in high-foot implosions and the ion temperature could be ∼9% larger than the equilibrium temperature in some NIF shots.

  17. Induction cell breakdown experiments for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earley, L.M.; Barnes, G.A.; Eversole, S.A.; Kauppila, T.J.; Keel, G.; Liska, D.J.; Moir, D.C.; Parsons, W.M.; Rader, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    Linear induction cells for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) Facility have been tested to determine their high-voltage breakdown characteristics. A variety of full scale insulators were tested both in actual cells and in fixtures simulating induction cells. All insulators were constructed using cross-linked polystyrene (Rexolite). High-voltage pulses up to 550 kV were applied to the insulators using both a 60-ns pulse Blumlein and a 200-ns pulse cable Marx. Two different vacuum gaps were used in these tests, 1.46 and 1.91 cm. The tests were performed at various vacuum levels ranging from 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} torr. Breakdown tests of the insulators were also performed with an electron beam generated in the vacuum gap through the use of a velvet emitter. The gap voltage and current were measured using calibrated E-dot and B-dot probes. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Power production experiments at the Test Beam Line in the CLIC Test Facility 3

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, Reidar Lunde; Adli, Erik; Lundheim, Lars Magne

    2010-01-01

    CLIC is an international study of a future multi-TeV electron-positron linear collider, where the energy of a high-intensity drive beam is extracted and transferred to the main beam via Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS) in the form of rf power. The study of power production is therefore essential for the feasibility of CLIC. Power production in PETS has been studied, and ex- periments have been performed in the decelerator Test Beam Line in the CLIC Test Facility 3. In particular, the correlation of the power production and the beam position inside the structure has been studied. It is shown that the total produced power is constant when the beam has a position offset through the PETS. In addition, the difference between the measured phases from each side is independent of the beam position, which allows for efficient combination of the fields. However, the ratio of the power on each side of the PETS unexpectedly shows a linear dependence on the horizontal offset, with a correlation value of 0.8...

  19. OPENMED: A facility for biomedical experiments based on the CERN Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carli, Christian

    At present protons and carbon ions are in clinical use for hadron therapy at a growing number of treatment centers all over the world. Nevertheless, only limited direct clinical evidence of their superiority over other forms of radiotherapy is available [1]. Furthermore fundamental studies on biological effects of hadron beams have been carried out at different times (some a long time ago) in different laboratories and under different conditions. Despite an increased availability of ion beams for hadron therapy, beam time for preclinical studies is expected to remain insufficient as the priority for therapy centers is to treat the maximum number of patients. Most of the remaining beam time is expected to be required for setting up and measurements to guarantee appropriate good quality beams for treatments. The proposed facility for biomedical research [2] in support of hadron therapy centers would provide ion beams for interested research groups and allow them to carry out basic studies under well defined conditions. Typical studies would include radiobiological phenomena like relative biological effectiveness with different energies, ion species, and intensities. Furthermore possible studies include the development of advanced dosimetry in heterogeneous materials that resemble the human body, imaging techniques and, at a later stage, when the maximum energy with the LEIR magnets can be reached, fragmentation.

  20. Abuse and discrimination towards indigenous people in public health care facilities: experiences from rural Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón, Alejandro; Ruano, Ana Lorena; Sánchez, Silvia; Chew, Aiken S; Díaz, Diego; Hernández, Alison; Flores, Walter

    2016-05-13

    Health inequalities disproportionally affect indigenous people in Guatemala. Previous studies have noted that the disadvantageous situation of indigenous people is the result of complex and structural elements such as social exclusion, racism and discrimination. These elements need to be addressed in order to tackle the social determinants of health. This research was part of a larger participatory collaboration between Centro de Estudios para la Equidad y Gobernanza en los Servicios de Salud (CEGSS) and community based organizations aiming to implement social accountability in rural indigenous municipalities of Guatemala. Discrimination while seeking health care services in public facilities was ranked among the top three problems by communities and that should be addressed in the social accountability intervention. This study aimed to understand and categorize the episodes of discrimination as reported by indigenous communities. A participatory approach was used, involving CEGSS's researchers and field staff and community leaders. One focus group in one rural village of 13 different municipalities was implemented. Focus groups were aimed at identifying instances of mistreatment in health care services and documenting the account of those who were affected or who witnessed them. All of the 132 obtained episodes were transcribed and scrutinized using a thematic analysis. Episodes described by participants ranged from indifference to violence (psychological, symbolic, and physical), including coercion, mockery, deception and racism. Different expressions of discrimination and mistreatment associated to poverty, language barriers, gender, ethnicity and social class were narrated by participants. Addressing mistreatment in public health settings will involve tackling the prevalent forms of discrimination, including racism. This will likely require profound, complex and sustained interventions at the programmatic and policy levels beyond the strict realm of public

  1. Calibration of X-ray spectrometers for opacity experiments at the Orion laser facility (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, C.; Allan, P.; Brent, K.; Bruce, N.; Hoarty, D.; Meadowcroft, A.; Percival, J.; Opie, C.

    2016-11-01

    Accurately calibrated and characterised x-ray diagnostics are a key requirement in the fielding of experiments on the Orion laser where absolute measurements of x-ray emission are used to underpin the validity of models of emissivity and opacity. Diffraction crystals are used in spectrometers on Orion to record the dispersed spectral features emitted by the laser produced plasma to obtain a measurement of the plasma conditions. The ability to undertake diffraction crystal calibrations supports the successful outcome of these Orion experiments. This paper details the design and commissioning of a system to undertake these calibrations in the energy range 2.0 keV to approximately 8.5 keV. Improvements to the design are detailed which will extend the commissioned range of energies to below 1 keV.

  2. On krypton-doped capsule implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Ma, T.; Nora, R.; Barrios, M. A.; Scott, H. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Casey, D. T.; Hammel, B. A.; Jarrott, L. C.; Landen, O. L.; Patel, P. K.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Spears, B. K.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the spectroscopic aspects of using Krypton as a dopant in NIF capsule implosions through simulation studies and the first set of NIF experiments. Using a combination of 2D hohlraum and 1D capsule simulations with comprehensive spectroscopic modeling, the calculations focused on the effect of dopant concentration on the implosion, and the impact of gradients in the electron density and temperature to the Kr line features and plasma opacity. Experimental data were obtained from three NIF Kr-dopant experiments, performed with varying Kr dopant concentrations between 0.01% and 0.03%. The implosion performance, hotspot images, and detailed Kr spectral analysis are summarized relative to the predictions. Data show that fuel-dopant spectroscopy can serve as a powerful and viable diagnostic for inertial confinement fusion implosions.

  3. Reliability Lessons Learned From GPU Experience With The Titan Supercomputer at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallarno, George [Christian Brothers University; Rogers, James H [ORNL; Maxwell, Don E [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The high computational capability of graphics processing units (GPUs) is enabling and driving the scientific discovery process at large-scale. The world s second fastest supercomputer for open science, Titan, has more than 18,000 GPUs that computational scientists use to perform scientific simu- lations and data analysis. Understanding of GPU reliability characteristics, however, is still in its nascent stage since GPUs have only recently been deployed at large-scale. This paper presents a detailed study of GPU errors and their impact on system operations and applications, describing experiences with the 18,688 GPUs on the Titan supercom- puter as well as lessons learned in the process of efficient operation of GPUs at scale. These experiences are helpful to HPC sites which already have large-scale GPU clusters or plan to deploy GPUs in the future.

  4. Asian Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahata, M.

    2011-04-01

    Asian underground facilities are reviewed. The YangYang underground Laboratory in Korea and the Kamioka observatory in Japan are operational and several astrophysical experiments are running. Indian Neutrino Observatory(INO) and China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL) are under construction and underground experiments are being prepared. Current activities and future prospects at those underground sites are described.

  5. Instrumentation concepts and requirements for a space vacuum research facility. [molecular shield for spaceborne experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, H. N.

    1979-01-01

    An earth-orbiting molecular shield that offers a unique opportunity for conducting physics, chemistry, and material processing experiments under a combination of environmental conditions that are not available in terrestrial laboratories is equipped with apparatus for forming a molecular beam from the freestream. Experiments are carried out using a moderate energy, high flux density, high purity atomic oxygen beam in the very low density environment within the molecular shield. As a minimum, the following instruments are required for the molecular shield: (1) a mass spectrometer; (2) a multifunction material analysis instrumentation system; and (3) optical spectrometry equipment. The design is given of a furlable molecular shield that allows deployment and retrieval of the system (including instrumentation and experiments) to be performed without contamination. Interfaces between the molecular shield system and the associated spacecraft are given. An in-flight deployment sequence is discussed that minimizes the spacecraft-induced contamination in the vicinity of the shield. Design approaches toward a precursor molecular shield system are shown.

  6. An 800-MeV proton radiography facility for dynamic experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, N.S.P.; Adams, K.; Alrick, K.R.; Crow, M.L.; Cushing, S.B.; Eddleman, J.C.; Fife, T.T.; Gallegos, R.A.; Gray, N.T.; Hogan, G.E.; Holmes, V.H.; Knudsson, J.N.; London, R.K.; Lopez, R.R.; McDonald, T.E.; McClelland, J.B.; Merrill, F.E.; Morley, K.B.; Morris, C.L.; Naivar, F.J.; Pazuchanics, P.D.; Pillai, C.; Riedel, C.M.; Sarracino, J.S.; Shelley, F.E. Jr.; Stacy, H.L.; Takala, B.E.; Tucker, H.E.; Yates, G.J.; Ziock, H.-J.; Zumbro, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ables, E. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Balzar, Stephen [Bechtel Nevada, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Barnes, P.D. Jr. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Flores, Paul [Bechtel Nevada, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Fujino, D. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Hartouni, E.P. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Jaramillo, S.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Parker, E.L. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Park, H.S. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Thompson, Richard [Bechtel Nevada, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    1999-11-03

    The capability has successfully been developed at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) to utilize a spatially and temporally prepared 800 MeV proton beam to produce proton radiographs. A series of proton bursts are transmitted through a dynamic object and transported, via a unique magnetic lens system, to an image plane. The magnetic lens system permits correcting for the effects of multiple coulomb scattering which would otherwise completely blur the spatially transmitted information at the image plane. The proton radiographs are recorded either on a time integrating film plate or with a recently developed multi-frame electronic imaging camera system. The latter technique permits obtaining a time dependent series of proton radiographs with time intervals (modulo 358 ns) up to many microseconds and variable time intervals between images. One electronically shuttered, intensified, CCD camera is required per image. These cameras can detect single protons interacting with a scintillating fiber optic array in the image plane but also have a dynamic range which permits recording radiographs with better than 5% statistics for observation of detailed density variations in the object. A number of tests have been carried out to characterize the quality of the proton radiography system for absolute mass determination, resolution, and dynamic range. Initial dynamic experiments characterized the temporal and spatial behavior of shock propagation in a high explosive sample with up to six images per experiment. Based on experience with the prototype system, a number of upgrades are being implemented including the anticipated capability for enhanced mass discrimination through differential multiple coulomb scattering radiographs and more images with improved imaging techniques.

  7. An 800-MeV proton radiography facility for dynamic experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, N. S. P.; Ables, E.; Adams, Ken; Alrick, K. R.; Amann, J. F.; Balzar, Stephen; Barnes, P. D., Jr.; Crow, M. L.; Cushing, S. B.; Eddleman, J. C.; Fife, T. T.; Flores, Paul; Fujino, D.; Gallegos, R. A.; Gray, N. T.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hogan, G. E.; Holmes, V. H.; Jaramillo, S. A.; Knudsson, J. N.; London, R. K.; Lopez, R. R.; McDonald, T. E.; McClelland, J. B.; Merrill, F. E.; Morley, K. B.; Morris, C. L.; Naivar, F. J.; Parker, E. L.; Park, H. S.; Pazuchanics, P. D.; Pillai, C.; Riedel, C. M.; Sarracino, J. S.; Shelley, F. E., Jr.; Stacy, H. L.; Takala, B. E.; Thompson, Richard; Tucker, H. E.; Yates, G. J.; Ziock, H.-J.; Zumbro, J. D.

    1999-11-01

    The capability has successfully been developed at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) to utilize a spatially and temporally prepared 800 MeV proton beam to produce proton radiographs. A series of proton bursts are transmitted through a dynamic object and transported, via a unique magnetic lens system, to an image plane. The magnetic lens system permits correcting for the effects of multiple coulomb scattering which would otherwise completely blur the spatially transmitted information at the image plane. The proton radiographs are recorded either on a time integrating film plate or with a recently developed multi-frame electronic imaging camera system. The latter technique permits obtaining a time dependent series of proton radiographs with time intervals (modulo 358 ns) up to many microseconds and variable time intervals between images. One electronically shuttered, intensified, CCD camera is required per image. These cameras can detect single protons interacting with a scintillating fiber optic array in the image plane but also have a dynamic range which permits recording radiographs with better than 5% statistics for observation of detailed density variations in the object. A number of tests have been carried out to characterize the quality of the proton radiography system for absolute mass determination, resolution, and dynamic range. Initial dynamic experiments characterized the temporal and spatial behavior of shock propagation in a high explosive sample with up to six images per experiment. Based on experience with the prototype system, a number of upgrades are being implemented including the anticipated capability for enhanced mass discrimination through differential multiple coulomb scattering radiographs and more images with improved imaging techniques.

  8. An alternative explanation for the dibaryon suggested by experiments at the WASA facility at Julich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugg, D.V. [Queen Mary, University of London, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    A series of publications of the WASA Collaboration culminates in a recent paper of Pricking, Bashkanov and Clement claiming a ΔΔ dibaryon resonance at 2370 MeV. However, as explained here, there are logical flaws in this result. A natural alternative arises from the reaction pd → NN*(1440)p{sub s}, where p{sub s} is a spectator proton. There is supporting evidence from a recent experiment of Mielke et al. on dp → {sup 3}He π{sup +}π{sup -}. (orig.)

  9. Improving a high-efficiency, gated spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Döppner, T., E-mail: doeppner1@llnl.gov; Bachmann, B.; Emig, J.; Hardy, M.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; Wood, R. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94720 (United States); Kraus, D.; Saunders, A. M. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neumayer, P. [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Falcone, R. W. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Fletcher, L. B. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We are developing x-ray Thomson scattering for applications in implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility. In particular we have designed and fielded MACS, a high-efficiency, gated x-ray spectrometer at 7.5–10 keV [T. Döppner et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 11D617 (2014)]. Here we report on two new Bragg crystals based on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG), a flat crystal and a dual-section cylindrically curved crystal. We have performed in situ calibration measurements using a brass foil target, and we used the flat HOPG crystal to measure Mo K-shell emission at 18 keV in 2nd order diffraction. Such high photon energy line emission will be required to penetrate and probe ultra-high-density plasmas or plasmas of mid-Z elements.

  10. History of the vapor condensation experiments in the TOPFLOW facility; Geschichtete Dampf-Kondensationsexperimente in der TOPFLOW-Anlage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Tobias [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Numerical simulation methods for multi-phase flow have reached increasing importance due to the enhanced computer capabilities and the improved CFD models. The enhancement of the models requires experimental data with high spatial and temporal resolution. Due to the improved reliability of multi-phase simulation results the prediction of accident sequences using CFD models is of increased interest for the safety analysis of nuclear power plants. The contribution deals with so-called pressurized thermal shock (PTS) scenarios. It has to be excluded that during a hypothetical emergency cooling process in PWR-type reactor the cold water introduced stresses will trigger a reactor pressure vessel failure. Experiments with high-resolution measuring technology were prepared for investigations of specific effects during multi-phase PTS scenarios using the TOPFLOW-DENISE facility.

  11. Three- and Two- Dimensional Simulations of Re-shock Experiments at High Energy Densities at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Raman, Kumar; MacLaren, Stephan; Huntington, Channing; Nagel, Sabrina

    2016-10-01

    We present simulations of recent high-energy-density (HED) re-shock experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The experiments study the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability growth that occurs after successive shocks transit a sinusoidally-perturbed interface between materials of different densities. The shock tube is driven at one or both ends using indirect-drive laser cavities or hohlraums. X-ray area-backlit imaging is used to visualize the growth at different times. Our simulations are done with the three-dimensional, radiation hydrodynamics code ARES, developed at LLNL. We show the instabilitygrowth rate, inferred from the experimental radiographs, agrees well with our 2D and 3D simulations. We also discuss some 3D geometrical effects, suggested by our simulations, which could deteriorate the images at late times, unless properly accounted for in the experiment design. Work supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE- AC52-06NA27279. LLNL-ABS-680789.

  12. Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Target Material Radiation Damage Studies Using Energetic Protons of the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Production (BLIP) Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Simos, N; Hurh, P; Mokhov, N; Kotsina, Z

    2014-01-01

    One of the future multi-MW accelerators is the LBNE Experiment where Fermilab aims to produce a beam of neutrinos with a 2.3 MW proton beam as part of a suite of experiments associated with Project X. Specifically, the LBNE Neutrino Beam Facility aims for a 2+ MW, 60 -120 GeV pulsed, high intensity proton beam produced in the Project X accelerator intercepted by a low Z solid target to facilitate the production of low energy neutrinos. The multi-MW level LBNE proton beam will be characterized by intensities of the order of 1.6 e+14 p/pulse, {\\sigma} radius of 1.5 -3.5 mm and a 9.8 microsecond pulse length. These parameters are expected to push many target materials to their limit thus making the target design very challenging. To address a host of critical design issues revealed by recent high intensity beam on target experience a series of experimental studies on radiation damage and thermal shock response conducted at BNL focusing on low-Z materials have been undertaken with the latest one focusing on LBNE.

  13. The role of context and the interpersonal experience of loneliness among older people in a residential care facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Roos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Older people are more prone to experience loneliness when living in residential care facilities. The purpose of this study was to explore older people's experiences of loneliness in the context of institutionalized care. A voluntary and convenience-based sample of 10 white South African older people (age range 62 to 82 years; three men and seven women was drawn. Data on the subjective experience of loneliness were then gathered through the Mmogo-method®, whereby drawings were employed to explore matters and issues of importance in the lives of older people that could be used to deal with loneliness. Data were analyzed thematically and visually as well as through the use of keywords in context. The results showed that older people experienced loneliness in terms of having unavailable interactions due to loss, and an absence of meaningful interpersonal interactions. Meaningful interpersonal interactions were described as when the older people had regular contact and a variety of interactions. Ineffective interpersonal styles (e.g. taking a controlling position in relationships and being rigid elicited rejection and isolation, and were associated with a lack of confirmatory interpersonal relationships. It is recommended that greater emphasis should be placed on creating awareness of unhealthy group dynamics as well as on psychosocial interventions to develop group support. Interpersonal styles, either effective or ineffective, take place in a social context, which, in this research, was observed to be unsafe, lacking in care, and a non-stimulating environment.

  14. The FRS Ion Catcher - A facility for high-precision experiments with stopped projectile and fission fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaß, W. R.; Dickel, T.; Purushothaman, S.; Dendooven, P.; Geissel, H.; Ebert, J.; Haettner, E.; Jesch, C.; Ranjan, M.; Reiter, M. P.; Weick, H.; Amjad, F.; Ayet, S.; Diwisch, M.; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Greiner, F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Knöbel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Lang, J.; Moore, I.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Petrick, M.; Pfützner, M.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rink, A.-K.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Schäfer, D.; Scheidenberger, C.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, Y. K.; Winfield, J. S.; Yavor, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    At the FRS Ion Catcher at GSI, projectile and fission fragments are produced at relativistic energies, separated in-flight, range-focused, slowed down and thermalized in a cryogenic stopping cell. A multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) is used to perform direct mass measurements and to provide an isobarically clean beam for further experiments, such as mass-selected decay spectroscopy. A versatile RF quadrupole transport and diagnostics unit guides the ions from the stopping cell to the MR-TOF-MS, provides differential pumping, ion identification and includes reference ion sources. The FRS Ion Catcher serves as a test facility for the Low-Energy Branch of the Super-FRS at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR), where the cryogenic stopping cell and the MR-TOF-MS will be key devices for the research with stopped projectile and fission fragments that will be performed with the experiments MATS and LaSpec. Off-line tests of the stopping cell yield a combined ion survival and extraction efficiency for 219Rn ions of about 30% and an extraction time of about 25 ms. The stopping cell and the MR-TOF-MS were commissioned on-line as part of the FRS Ion Catcher. For the first time, a stopping cell for exotic nuclei was operated on-line at cryogenic temperatures. Using a gas density almost two times higher than ever reached before for a stopping cell with RF ion repelling structures, various 238U projectile fragments were thermalized and extracted with very high efficiency. Direct mass measurements of projectile fragments were performed with the MR-TOF-MS, among them the nuclide 213Rn with a half-life of 19.5 ms only.

  15. Feasibility studies for accessing nucleon structure observables with the PANDA experiment at the future FAIR facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora Espi, Maria Carmen

    2012-10-15

    The availability of a high-intensity antiproton beam with momentum up to 15 GeV/c at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will open a unique opportunity to investigate wide areas of nuclear physics with the PANDA (antiProton ANnihilations at DArmstadt) detector. Part of these investigations concern the Electromagnetic Form Factors of the proton in the time-like region and the study of the transition distribution amplitudes, for which feasibility studies have been performed in this thesis. Moreover, simulations to study the efficiency and the energy resolution of the backward endcap of the electromagnetic calorimeter of PANDA are presented. This detector is crucial especially for the reconstruction of processes like anti pp{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, investigated in this work. Different arrangements of dead material were studied. The results show that both, the efficiency and the energy resolution of the backward endcap of the electromagnetic calorimeter fulfill the requirements for the detection of backward particles, and that this detector is necessary for the reconstruction of the channels of interest. The study of the annihilation channel anti pp{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -} will improve the knowledge of the electromagnetic form factors in the time-like region, and will help to understand their connection with the electromagnetic form factors in the space-like region. In this thesis the feasibility of a measurement of the anti pp{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -} cross section with PANDA is studied using Monte-Carlo simulations. The major background channel anti pp{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is taken into account. The results show a 10{sup 9} background suppression factor, which assure a sufficiently clean signal with less than 0.1 % background contamination. The signal can be measured with an efficiency greater than 30 % up to s=14 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The Electromagnetic Form Factors are extracted from the reconstructed signal and corrected

  16. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: a facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, C M; Brookhart, M; Clark, M; Collins, C; Ding, W X; Flanagan, K; Khalzov, I; Li, Y; Milhone, J; Nornberg, M; Nonn, P; Weisberg, D; Whyte, D G; Zweibel, E; Forest, C B

    2013-01-01

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and other high-$\\beta$ phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3 m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000 G samarium cobalt magnets which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains $\\sim$14 m$^{3}$ of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized $(>50\\%)$. At present, up to 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB$_6$) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500 V, drawing 40 A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100 kW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB$_6$ cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through ${\\bf J}\\times{\\bf B}$ torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies...

  17. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: A facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C. M.; Wallace, J.; Brookhart, M.; Clark, M.; Collins, C.; Ding, W. X.; Flanagan, K.; Khalzov, I.; Li, Y.; Milhone, J.; Nornberg, M.; Nonn, P.; Weisberg, D.; Whyte, D. G.; Zweibel, E.; Forest, C. B.

    2014-01-01

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and other high-β phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3 m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000 G samarium cobalt magnets, which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains ˜14 m3 of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized (>50%). At present, 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500 V, drawing 40 A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100 kW of electron cyclotron heating power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB6 cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through J × B torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies on MPDX require a high magnetic Reynolds number Rm > 1000, and an adjustable fluid Reynolds number 10 1). Initial results from MPDX are presented along with a 0-dimensional power and particle balance model to predict the viscosity and resistivity to achieve dynamo action.

  18. X-ray laser experiments by using a gas puff target with the ASTERIX IV facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Fill, E.; Li, Y.; Pretzler, G.; Szczurek, M. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1996-05-01

    We report the first X-ray laser experiments with the use of laser-irradiated gas puff targets. The targets, produced by pulsed injection of a small amount of gas from a high-pressure solenoid valve through a nozzle in a form of a slit, has been characterized by optical interferometry and X-ray backlighting. The formation of elongated hot plasma columns up to 30-mm long is demonstrated. The spatial uniformity of the column was monitored by means of an X-ray pinhole camera. XUV spectra measurements for SF{sub 6} gas puff targets show predominant 3{endash}2 line of hydrogenic fluorine ({lambda}=8.1 nm), however, only linear increasing of its intensity with the target length was observed. An inversion on the lithium-like 4{ital d}-3{ital p} line can be inferred from the relative intensities of the Li-like resonance lines. Results for Kr target indicate that the plasma temperature was too low to create Ne-like ions. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Analysis of gamma-ray dosimetry experiments in the zero power MINERVE facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amharrak, H.; Di Salvo, J.; Lyoussi, A.; Roche, A.; Masson-Fauchier, M.; Bosq, J. C. [CEA, DEN, DER, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Carette, M. [Aix-Marseille Univ., LCP UMR 6264, 13397, Marseille (France)

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop nuclear heating measurement methods in zero power experimental reactors. These developments contribute to the qualification of photonics calculation schemes for the assessment of gamma heating in the future Jules Horowitz Material Testing Reactor. This paper presents the analysis of thermoluminescent detector (TLD) experiments in the UO{sub 2} core of the MINERVE Research Reactor at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission center in Cadarache. The experimental sources of uncertainty in the gamma dose have been reduced by improving the measurement conditions and the repeatability of the calibration step for each individual TLD. The interpretation of these measurements needs to take into account the calculation of cavity correction factors related to calibration and irradiation configurations, as well as neutron correction calculations. These calculations are based on Monte Carlo simulations of neutron-gamma and gamma-electron transport coupled particles. The comparison between calculated and measured integral gamma-ray absorbed doses in the aluminum material surrounding the TLD shows that calculations slightly overestimate the measurement, with a calculated versus experimental ratio equal to 1.04 {+-} 5.7 % (k=2). (authors)

  20. An Integrated Testing Facility for the Global Trigger of the CMS Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Themel, Thomas; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    The Global Trigger is part of the Level-1 Trigger of the CMS experiment at CERN, with the task to find the most interesting events corresponding to a rate of 100 kHz from the basic Large Hadron Collider interaction rate of 40 MHz. It is expected to render a decision within 3:2 $\\mu$s, which necessitates an implementation using custom hardware. The implementation makes heavy use of Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology to reconcile the performance requirements with the need for exibility. The complexity of the Global Trigger system (13 boards with 51 FPGA chips) makes it vulnerable to a multitude of errors, from electrical errors such as bad solder joints or plug contacts up to logical errors in the implementation of the firmrmware and the configuration software. The goal of the work described in this thesis was to provide an integrated system that allows users to easily determine whether the system is working correctly and assists experts in tracking down the internal causes of such errors within th...

  1. SU-E-J-233: A Facility for Radiobiological Experiments in a Large Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlone, M; Heaton, R; Keller, H [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Wouters, B [Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jaffray, D [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ontario Cancer Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing medical linear accelerators with integrated image guidance by MRI. Less work has been done on the fundamental biology of cell survival in the presence of a strong magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to describe an experimental system capable of measuring cell survival response in the types of MRI-linac systems currently under development. Methods: We have integrated a cobalt irradiator with a solenoid magnet. The solenoid magnet has inner diameter of 10 cm. To enable measurement of the biological effects as a function of depth, we are utilizing the sliced gel technique, in which cells are embedded and fixed within a gelatin matrix. Irradiated cells at defined positions (sub mm resolution) can subsequently be recovered and assessed for cell survival or other biological effects. Results: The magnetic field profile in the solenoid has a peak magnetic field 36 cm below the top edge of the magnet bore and can be placed at and SAD of 100 cm. At a solenoid current of 35 A, the peak magnetic field is 0.25 T. The dose rate of the cobalt irradiator is 16 cGy/min at 100 cm SAD. EBT3 film was used to demonstrate the system functionality. It was irradiated at 1 cm depth at 100 cm SSD with a 4×4 field to 1.5 Gy in a 0.25 T magnetic field. The dose profile was similar between this film and the control exposure without magnetic field. Conclusion: Integrating a cobalt irradiator with a high field magnet is demonstrated. The magnetic field at the cobalt defining head was minimal and did not interfere with the functioning of this unit. Cell survival experiments can be reproduced exactly in the presence or absence of a magnetic field since a resistive magnet is used.

  2. Reproductive health and access to healthcare facilities: risk factors for depression and anxiety in women with an earthquake experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadoul Ahmed

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reproductive and mental health of women contributes significantly to their overall well-being. Three of the eight Millennium Development Goals are directly related to reproductive and sexual health while mental disorders make up three of the ten leading causes of disease burden in low and middle-income countries. Among mental disorders, depression and anxiety are two of the most prevalent. In the context of slower progress in achieving Millennium Development Goals in developing countries and the ever-increasing man-made and natural disasters in these areas, it is important to understand the association between reproductive health and mental health among women with post-disaster experiences. Methods This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 387 women of reproductive age (15-49 years randomly selected from the October 2005 earthquake affected areas of Pakistan. Data on reproductive health was collected using the Centers for Disease Control reproductive health assessment toolkit. Depression and anxiety were measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25, while earthquake experiences were captured using the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire. The association of either depression or anxiety with socio-demographic variables, earthquake experiences, reproductive health and access to health facilities was estimated using multivariate logistic regression. Results Post-earthquake reproductive health events together with economic deprivation, lower family support and poorer access to health care facilities explained a significant proportion of differences in the experiencing of clinical levels of depression and anxiety. For instance, women losing resources for subsistence, separation from family and experiencing reproductive health events such as having a stillbirth, having had an abortion, having had abnormal vaginal discharge or having had genital ulcers, were at significant risk of depression and anxiety. Conclusion The

  3. Development of a polar direct drive platform for mix and burn experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, T. J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Bradley, P. A.; Cobble, J. A.; Tregillis, I. L.; Obrey, K. A. D.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Shah, R. C.; Hakel, P.; Kline, J. L.; Schmitt, M. J.; Kanzleiter, R. J.; Batha, S. H.; Wallace, R. J.; Bhandarkar, S.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Hoppe, M.; Nikroo, A.; McKenty, P.

    2016-03-01

    Capsules driven with polar drive [1, 2] on the National Ignition Facility [3] are being used [4] to study mix in convergent geometry. In preparation for experiments that will utilize deuterated plastic shells with a pure tritium fill, hydrogen-filled capsules with copper- doped deuterated layers have been imploded on NIF to provide spectroscopic and nuclear measurements of capsule performance. Experiments have shown that the mix region, when composed of shell material doped with about 1% copper (by atom), reaches temperatures of about 2 keV, while undoped mixed regions reach about 3 keV. Based on the yield from these implosions, we estimate the thickness of CD that mixed into the gas as between about 0.25 and 0.43 μm of the inner capsule surface, corresponding to about 5 to 9 μg of material. Using 5 atm of tritium as the fill gas should result in over 1013 DT neutrons being produced, which is sufficient for neutron imaging [5].

  4. Belgian class II nuclear facilities such as irradiators and accelerators. Regulatory Body attention points and operating experience feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minne, Etienne; Peters, Christelle; Mommaert, Chantal; Kennes, Christian; Cortenbosch, Geert; Schmitz, Frederic; Haesendonck, Michel van [Bel V, Brussels (Belgium); Carlier, Pascal; Schrayen, Virginie; Wertelaers, An [Federal Agency for Nuclear Control, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this paper is to present the Regulatory Body attention points and the operating experience feedback from Belgian ''class IIA'' facilities such as industrial and research irradiators, bulk radionuclides producers and conditioners. Reinforcement of the nuclear safety and radiation protection has been promoted by the Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (FANC) since 2009. This paper is clearly a continuation of the former paper [1] presenting the evolution in the regulatory framework relative to the creation of Bel V, the subsidiary of the FANC, and to the new ''class IIA'' covering heavy installations such as those mentioned above. Some lessons learnt are extracted from the operating experience feedback based on the events declared to the authorities. Even though a real willingness to meet the new safety requirements is observed among the ''class IIA'' licensees, promoting the safety culture, the nuclear safety and radiation protection remains an endless challenge for the Regulatory Body.

  5. The LVD Core Facility: a study of LVD as muon veto and active shielding for dark matter experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Selvi, Marco

    2008-01-01

    In this study we explore the possibility of using the existing structure of a running experiment, the LVD supernova observatory at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, as an active shield and veto for the muon-induced background. In our vision LVD could become (without affecting in any way its main purpose of SN neutrino telescope) a host for a relatively compact but massive experiment looking for rare events. The empty volume that can be obtained removing 2 modules from the most internal part of the detector is 2.1m x 6.2m x 2.8m; we will call it LVD Core Facility (LVD-CF). We have evaluated the active vetoing and shielding power of LVD, with a detailed MC simulation (based on Geant4) of the detector and the rock that surrounds it. The results show that the flux of neutrons that are not associated with a visible muon in LVD is very low; it results reduced by a factor 50, equivalent to the one present in a much deeper underground laboratory, i.e. Sudbury. Moreover we present the results of on-going measur...

  6. RELAP-5/MOD 3.2 Assessment Using an 11% Upper Plenum Break Experiment in the PSB Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul D. Bayless

    2003-01-01

    The RELAP/MOD3.2 computer code has been assessed using an 11% upper plenum break experiment in the PSB test facility at the Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center. This work was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's International Nuclear Safety Program, and is part of the effort addressing the capability of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code to model transients in Soviet-designed reactors. Designated VVER Standard Problem PSBV1, the test addressed several important phenomena related to VVER behavior that the code needs to simulate well. The code was judged to reasonably model the phenomena of two-phase flow natural circulation in the primary coolant system, asymmetric loop behavior, leak flow, loop seal clearance in the cold legs, heat transfer in a covered core, heat transfer in a partially covered core, pressurizer thermal-hydraulics, and integral system effects. The code was judged to be in minimal agreement with the experiment data for the mixture level and entrainment in the core, leading to a user recommendation to assess the sensitivity of transient calculations to the interphase drag modeling in the core. No judgments were made for the phenomena of phase separation without mixture level formation, mixture level and entrainment in the steam generators, pool formation in the upper plenum, or flow stratification in horizontal pipes because either the phenomenon did not occur in the test or there were insufficient measurements to characterize the behavior.

  7. Design and analysis of x-ray driven shock wave equation-of-state experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, R. A.; Lazicki, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Erskine, D. J.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Meezan, N. B.; Peterson, J. L.; NIF EOS Team

    2016-10-01

    The equation-of-state (EOS) is important for describing and predicting material properties in the field of high energy density physics. Especially important is the EOS of materials compressed and heated from ambient conditions by shockwaves. For most materials, experimental data at high pressures, much above 10 Mbar, is sparse. The large energy and power of the National Ignition Facility readily enable EOS experiments in a new regime, at pressures on order of 100 Mbar. We describe a platform for EOS measurements using planar shockwaves driven by x rays within a hohlraum target. The EOS is determined by an impedance matching method, using a reference material of known EOS. For transparent materials, the shock velocity is measured directly by optical interferometry, while for opaque materials, the measurement is done by timing the entrance and exit of the shock and correcting for time variations with an adjacent transparent reference. We describe the computational design and analysis of experiments. Predicted shock velocities and transit times are used to set the target layer thicknesses and interferometer timing. Data from several NIF shots are compared to post-shot calculations. New, high pressure EOS data is presented for several materials. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. RELAP/MOD3.2 Assessment Using an 11% Upper Plenum Break Experiment in the PSB Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayless, P.D.

    2003-01-17

    The RELAP/MOD3.2 computer code has been assessed using an 11% upper plenum break experiment in the PSB test facility at the Electrogorsk Research and Engineering Center. This work was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's International Nuclear Safety Program, and is part of the effort addressing the capability of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code to model transients in Soviet-designed reactors. Designated VVER Standard Problem PSBV1, the test addressed several important phenomena related to VVER behavior that the code needs to simulate well. The code was judged to reasonably model the phenomena of two-phase flow natural circulation in the primary coolant system, asymmetric loop behavior, leak flow, loop seal clearance in the cold legs, heat transfer in a covered core, heat transfer in a partially covered core, pressurizer thermal-hydraulics, and integral system effects. The code was judged to be in minimal agreement with the experiment data for the mixture level and entrainment in the core, leading to a user recommendation to assess the sensitivity of transient calculations to the interphase drag modeling in the core. No judgments were made for the phenomena of phase separation without mixture level formation, mixture level and entrainment in the steam generators, pool formation in the upper plenum, or flow stratification in horizontal pipes because either the phenomenon did not occur in the test or there were insufficient measurements to characterize the behavior.

  9. Ion Beam Textured and Coated Surfaces Experiment (IBEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Stevens, Nicholas; Olle, Raymond; Merrow, James

    1992-01-01

    Ion beam textured and commercial materials suitable for use in space power systems were flown in low Earth orbit on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for 5.8 years. Because of their location on LDEF (98 deg from the ram direction), the 36 materials were primarily exposed to vacuum ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, the vacuum of space, the micrometeoroid environment, and grazing incidence atomic oxygen. Measurements of solar absorptance and thermal emittance (pre- and post-flight) showed no changes for almost all of the materials, except for the S-13G and Kapton and coated Kapton samples. The optical property stability of ion beam textured surfaces and most other surfaces indicates that they are functionally durable to the synergistic rigors of the space environment.

  10. ARADISH - Development of a Standardized Plant Growth Chamber for Experiments in Gravitational Biology Using Ground Based Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüler, Oliver; Krause, Lars; Görög, Mark; Hauslage, Jens; Kesseler, Leona; Böhmer, Maik; Hemmersbach, Ruth

    2016-06-01

    Plant development strongly relies on environmental conditions. Growth of plants in Biological Life Support Systems (BLSS), which are a necessity to allow human survival during long-term space exploration missions, poses a particular problem for plant growth, as in addition to the traditional environmental factors, microgravity (or reduced gravity such as on Moon or Mars) and limited gas exchange hamper plant growth. Studying the effects of reduced gravity on plants requires real or simulated microgravity experiments under highly standardized conditions, in order to avoid the influence of other environmental factors. Analysis of a large number of biological replicates, which is necessary for the detection of subtle phenotypical differences, can so far only be achieved in Ground Based Facilities (GBF). Besides different experimental conditions, the usage of a variety of different plant growth chambers was a major factor that led to a lack of reproducibility and comparability in previous studies. We have developed a flexible and customizable plant growth chamber, called ARAbidopsis DISH (ARADISH), which allows plant growth from seed to seedling, being realized in a hydroponic system or on Agar. By developing a special holder, the ARADISH can be used for experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana or a plant with a similar habitus on common GBF hardware, including 2D clinostats and Random Positioning Machines (RPM). The ARADISH growth chamber has a controlled illumination system of red and blue light emitting diodes (LED), which allows the user to apply defined light conditions. As a proof of concept we tested a prototype in a proteomic experiment in which plants were exposed to simulated microgravity or a 90° stimulus. We optimized the design and performed viability tests after several days of growth in the hardware that underline the utility of ARADISH in microgravity research.

  11. Atomic physics of relativistic high contrast laser-produced plasmas in experiments on Leopard laser facility at UNR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronova, A. S.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Faenov, A. Y.; Safronova, U. I.; Wiewior, P.; Renard-Le Galloudec, N.; Esaulov, A. A.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Wilcox, P.; Shrestha, I.; Ouart, N. D.; Shlyaptseva, V.; Osborne, G. C.; Chalyy, O.; Paudel, Y.

    2012-06-01

    The results of the recent experiments focused on study of x-ray radiation from multicharged plasmas irradiated by relativistic (I > 1019 W/cm2) sub-ps laser pulses on Leopard laser facility at NTF/UNR are presented. These shots were done under different experimental conditions related to laser pulse and contrast. In particular, the duration of the laser pulse was 350 fs or 0.8 ns and the contrast was varied from high (10-7) to moderate (10-5). The thin laser targets (from 4 to 750 μm) made of a broad range of materials (from Teflon to iron and molybden to tungsten and gold) were utilized. Using the x-ray diagnostics including the high-precision spectrometer with resolution R ˜ 3000 and a survey spectrometer, we have observed unique spectral features that are illustrated in this paper. Specifically, the observed L-shell spectra for Fe targets subject to high intensity lasers (˜1019 W/cm2) indicate electron beams, while at lower intensities (˜1016 W/cm2) or for Cu targets there is much less evidence for an electron beam. In addition, K-shell Mg features with dielectronic satellites from high-Rydberg states, and the new K-shell F features with dielectronic satellites including exotic transitions from hollow ions are highlighted.

  12. Principal component analysis of soft x-ray signals generated by the PF-1000 facility in experiments with solid targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska-Strzęciwilk, Ewa; Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Czarnecka, Agata; Kubkowska, Monika; Paduch, Marian; Zielińska, Ewa

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents the analysis of soft x-ray signals generated in the PF-1000 facility equipped with a modified inner electrode with a central tungsten insert of 50 mm diameter in experiments with tungsten and carbon samples. The PF-1000 machine was operated with pure deuterium filling under the initial pressure of 1.3 hPa. The machine was powered using a condenser bank charged initially to 24 kV, corresponding to the stored energy of 380 kJ, with the maximum discharge current amounted to 1.8 MA. For investigation of plasma stream-sample interactions, we applied 16-frame laser interferometry, optical spectroscopy and soft x-ray measurements with the use of a system of four silicon pin-diodes. In this paper, we mainly focus on the principal component analysis (PCA) of the registered x-ray signals to find a corelation between the neutron yield and observed maxima in signals. X-ray signals collected by four pin-diodes covered a 9 cm range in front of the electrode ends. Each diode collected a signal from the circle of 3 cm diameter. The presented PCA analysis is based on 57 PF discharges and 16 parameters are taken into account in the analysis. The study of signals from the pin-diode system showed good correlation between the neutron yield and the maximum in the x-ray signal, which appeared about 1000-1300 ns after the maximum of plasma compression.

  13. Tritium Plasma Experiment Upgrade and Improvement of Surface Diagnostic Capabilities at STAR Facility for Enhancing Tritium and Nuclear PMI Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, M.; Taylor, C. N.; Pawelko, R. J.; Cadwallader, L. C.; Merrill, B. J.

    2016-04-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) is a unique high-flux linear plasma device that can handle beryllium, tritium, and neutron-irradiated plasma facing materials, and is the only existing device dedicated to directly study tritium retention and permeation in neutron-irradiated materials with tritium [M. Shimada et.al., Rev. Sci. Instru. 82 (2011) 083503 and and M. Shimada, et.al., Nucl. Fusion 55 (2015) 013008]. The plasma-material-interaction (PMI) determines a boundary condition for diffusing tritium into bulk PFCs, and the tritium PMI is crucial for enhancing fundamental sciences that dictate tritium fuel cycles and safety and are high importance to an FNSF and DEMO. Recently the TPE has undergone major upgrades in its electrical and control systems. New DC power supplies and a new control center enable remote plasma operations from outside of the contamination area for tritium, minimizing the possible exposure risk with tritium and beryllium. We discuss the electrical upgrade, enhanced operational safety, improved plasma performance, and development of optical spectrometer system. This upgrade not only improves operational safety of the worker, but also enhances plasma performance to better simulate extreme plasma-material conditions expected in ITER, Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF), and Demonstration reactor (DEMO). This work was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under the DOE Idaho Field Office contract number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  14. Planar Laser-Plasma Interaction Experiments at Direct-Drive Ignition-Relevant Scale Lengths at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Seka, W.; Myatt, J. F.; Regan, S. P.; Hohenberger, M.; Epstein, R.; Froula, D. H.; Radha, P. B.; Michel, P. A.; Moody, J. D.; Masse, L.; Goyon, C.; Turnbull, D. P.; Barrios, M. A.; Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    The first experiments at the National Ignition Facility to probe laser-plasma interactions and the hot electron production at scale lengths relevant to direct-drive ignition are reported. The irradiation on one side of planar CH foils generated a plasma at the quarter-critical surface with predicted density scale lengths of Ln 600 μm, measured electron temperatures of Te 3.5 to 4.0 keV, and overlapped laser intensities of I 6 to 15 ×1014W/cm2. Optical emission from stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and at ω/2 are correlated with the time-dependent hard x-ray signal. The fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons increased from 0.5 % to 2.3 % as the laser intensity increased from 6 to 15 ×1014W/cm2, while the hot electron temperature was nearly constant around 40 to 50 keV. Only a sharp red-shifted feature is observed around ω/2, and both refracted and sidescattered SRS are detected, suggesting that multibeam SRS contributes to, and may even dominate, hot-electron production. These results imply a diminished presence of two-plasmon decay relative to SRS at these conditions, which has implications for hot-electron preheat mitigation strategies for direct-drive ignition. This work is supported by the DOE NNSA under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  15. Indo-Soviet experiment on an MHD generator test section at the Soviet U-O/sub 2/ facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananthapadmanabhan, P.V.; Bapat, A.V.; Das, A.K. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India))

    1982-09-01

    This paper summarizes the major results of the joint Indo-Soviet experiment for testing the Indian MHD generator channel section, designed and fabricated at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, which was carried out at the U-02 facility in Moscow, USSR, in May 1980. The total test duration was 65 hours and included electrophysical tests and life tests under applied electric fields. The main purpose of the tests was to substantiate the physical concepts, computer codes, design features and special processing techniques involved in the development of MHD generators for the Indian pilot plant at Tiruchirapalli. The experimental observations on the phenomena of heat transfer to the walls, gas dynamics in the channel, electrical characteristics of the generator and near-electrode processes including the analysis of arc spots correlate with the theoretical estimates based on present uderstanding of the physical processes occuring in similar MHD generators. The post-operational inspection of the channel section and extensive investigation of materials through microscopic analysis, chemical analysis and x-ray analysis are also reported in this paper. The joint test programme has clearly demonstrated the definite operating capability of the test section and has given sufficient information and encouragement for building better and improved channels for the future.

  16. Experiments at the GELINA facility for the validation of the self-indication neutron resonance densitometry technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossa Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-Indication Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD is a passive non-destructive method that is being investigated to quantify the 239Pu content in a spent fuel assembly. The technique relies on the energy dependence of total cross sections for neutron induced reaction. The cross sections show resonance structures that can be used to quantify the presence of materials in objects, e.g. the total cross-section of 239Pu shows a strong resonance close to 0.3 eV. This resonance will cause a reduction of the number of neutrons emitted from spent fuel when 239Pu is present. Hence such a reduction can be used to quantify the amount of 239Pu present in the fuel. A neutron detector with a high sensitivity to neutrons in this energy region is used to enhance the sensitivity to 239Pu. This principle is similar to self-indication cross section measurements. An appropriate detector can be realized by surrounding a 239Pu-loaded fission chamber with appropriate neutron absorbing material. In this contribution experiments performed at the GELINA time-of-flight facility of the JRC at Geel (Belgium to validate the simulations are discussed. The results confirm that the strongest sensitivity to the target material was achieved with the self-indication technique, highlighting the importance of using a 239Pu fission chamber for the SINRD measurements.

  17. Three-dimensional simulations of low foot and high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kritcher, A. L.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Sepke, S. M.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    In order to achieve the several hundred Gbar stagnation pressures necessary for inertial confinement fusion ignition, implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] require the compression of deuterium-tritium fuel layers by a convergence ratio as high as forty. Such high convergence implosions are subject to degradation by a range of perturbations, including the growth of small-scale defects due to hydrodynamic instabilities, as well as longer scale modulations due to radiation flux asymmetries in the enclosing hohlraum. Due to the broad range of scales involved, and also the genuinely three-dimensional (3D) character of the flow, accurately modeling NIF implosions remains at the edge of current simulation capabilities. This paper describes the current state of progress of 3D capsule-only simulations of NIF implosions aimed at accurately describing the performance of specific NIF experiments. Current simulations include the effects of hohlraum radiation asymmetries, capsule surface defects, the capsule support tent and fill tube, and use a grid resolution shown to be converged in companion two-dimensional simulations. The results of detailed simulations of low foot implosions from the National Ignition Campaign are contrasted against results for more recent high foot implosions. While the simulations suggest that low foot performance was dominated by ablation front instability growth, especially the defect seeded by the capsule support tent, high foot implosions appear to be dominated by hohlraum flux asymmetries, although the support tent still plays a significant role. For both implosion types, the simulations show reasonable, though not perfect, agreement with the data and suggest that a reliable predictive capability is developing to guide future implosions toward ignition.

  18. The construction of the Fiber-SiPM beam monitor system of the R484 and R582 experiments at the RIKEN-RAL muon facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonesini, M.; Bertoni, R.; Chignoli, F.; Mazza, R.; Cervi, T.; de Bari, A.; Menegolli, A.; Prata, M. C.; Rossella, M.; Tortora, L.; Carbone, R.; Mocchiutti, E.; Vacchi, A.; Vallazza, E.; Zampa, G.

    2017-03-01

    The scintillating fiber-SiPM beam monitor detectors, designed to deliver beam informations for the R484 and R582 experiments at the high intensity, low energy pulsed muon beam at the RIKEN-RAL facility, have been successfully constructed and operated. Details on their construction and first performances in beam are reported.

  19. The Lived Experiences of Single Hispanic Mothers Raising Gang-Affiliated Male Youth Released from Texas Juvenile Justice Department State Facilities: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Almendarez, Ruby

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The purpose of this transcendental phenomenological study (Moustakas, 1994) was to describe the experiences that single Hispanic mothers of gang-affiliated male juveniles face during their sons' reentry process after being released from a Texas Juvenile Justice Department state facility. Methods: After an extensive…

  20. Tanpopo: Astrobiology Exposure and Micrometeoroid Capture, a Sample Return Experiment to Test Quasi-Panspermia Hypothesis Onboard the ISS-Kibo Exposed Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, H.; Yamagishi, A.; Hashimoto, H.; Yokobori, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Yabuta, H.; Mita, H.; Tabata, M.; Kawai, H.; Higashide, M.; Okudaira, K.; Sasaki, S.; Imai, E.; Kawaguchi, Y.; Uchibori, Y.; Kodaira, S.; Tanpopo Project Team

    2013-11-01

    As the first Japanese astrobiology experiment in space, the Tanpopo will test key concepts of the quasi-panspermia hypothesis by sample returns of microbe and bio-orgaincs exposure and micrometeoroid capture onboard ISS-Kibo Exposed Facility ExHAM.

  1. The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)-A conceptual design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonov, A.N.; Gaidarov, M.K. [INRNE-BAS Sofia (Bulgaria); Ivanov, M.V. [Grupo de Physica Nuclear, Complutense University of Madrid (Spain); Kadrev, D.N. [INRNE-BAS Sofia (Bulgaria); Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires Bordeaux-Gradingnan (CENBG) (France); Belier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taieb, J. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Dore, D.; Letourneau, A.; Ridikas, D.; Dupont, E.; Berthoumieux, E.; Panebianco, S. [CEA Saclay (France); Farget, F.; Schmitt, C. [GANIL Caen (France)

    2011-05-01

    The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe is part of the installations envisaged at the new experimental storage ring at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. It offers an unique opportunity to use electrons as probe in investigations of the structure of exotic nuclei. The conceptual design and the scientific challenges of ELISe are presented.

  2. The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)-A conceptual design study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.; Ivanov, M. V.; Kadrev, D. N.; Aiche, M.; Barreau, G.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Belier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Granier, T.; Taieb, J.; Dore, D.; Letourneau, A.; Ridikas, D.; Dupont, E.; Berthoumieux, E.; Panebianco, S.; Farget, F.; Schmitt, C.; Audouin, L.; Khan, E.; Tassan-Got, L.; Aumann, T.; Beller, P.; Boretzky, K.; Dolinskii, A.; Egelhof, P.; Emling, H.; Franzke, B.; Geissel, H.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Kester, O.; Kurz, N.; Litvinov, Y.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nolden, F.; Schmidt, K. -H.; Scheidenberger, Ch.; Simon, H.; Steck, M.; Weick, H.; Enders, J.; Pietralla, N.; Richter, A.; Schrieder, G.; Zilges, A.; Distler, M. O.; Merkel, H.; Mueller, U.; Junghans, A. R.; Lenske, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Suda, T.; Kato, S.; Adachi, T.; Hamieh, S.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Woertche, H.; Berg, G. P. A.; Koop, I. A.; Logatchov, P. V.; Otboev, A. V.; Parkhomchuk, V. V.; Shatilov, D. N.; Shatunov, P. Y.; Shatunov, Y. M.; Shiyankov, S. V.; Shvartz, D. I.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Chulkov, L. V.; Danilin, B. V.; Korsheninnikov, A. A.; Kuzmin, E. A.; Ogloblin, A. A.; Volkov, V. A.; Grishkin, Y.; Lisin, V. P.; Mushkarenkov, A. N.; Nedorezov, V.; Polonski, A. L.; Rudnev, N. V.; Turinge, A. A.; Artukh, A.; Avdeichikov, V.; Ershov, S. N.; Fomichev, A.; Golovkov, M.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Grigorenko, L.; Klygin, S.; Krupko, S.; Meshkov, I. N.; Rodin, A.; Sereda, Y.; Seleznev, I.; Sidorchuk, S.; Syresin, E.; Stepantsov, S.; Ter-Akopian, G.; Teterev, Y.; Vorontsov, A. N.; Kamerdzhiev, S. P.; Litvinova, E. V.; Karataglidis, S.; Alvarez Rodriguez, R.; Borge, M. J. G.; Ramirez, C. Fernandez; Garrido, E.; Sarriguren, P.; Vignote, J. R.; Fraile Prieto, L. M.; Lopez Herraiz, J.; Moya de Guerra, E.; Udias-Moinelo, J.; Amaro Soriano, J. E.; Rojo, A. M. Lallena; Caballero, J. A.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Zhukov, M.; Golubev, P.; Rudolph, D.; Hencken, K.; Jourdan, J.; Krusche, B.; Rauscher, T.; Kiselev, D.; Trautmann, D.; Al-Khalili, J.; Catford, W.; Johnson, R.; Stevenson, P. D.; Barton, C.; Jenkins, D.; Lemmon, R.; Chartier, M.; Cullen, D.; Bertulani, C. A.; Heinz, A.

    2011-01-01

    The electron-ion scattering experiment ELISe is part of the installations envisaged at the new experimental storage ring at the International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany. It offers an unique opportunity to use electrons as probe in investigations of the

  3. The Lived Experiences of Single Hispanic Mothers Raising Gang-Affiliated Male Youth Released from Texas Juvenile Justice Department State Facilities: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Almendarez, Ruby

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The purpose of this transcendental phenomenological study (Moustakas, 1994) was to describe the experiences that single Hispanic mothers of gang-affiliated male juveniles face during their sons' reentry process after being released from a Texas Juvenile Justice Department state facility. Methods: After an extensive review of…

  4. Three- and two-dimensional simulations of counter-propagating shear experiments at high energy densities at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ping; Zhou, Ye, E-mail: yezhou@llnl.gov; MacLaren, Stephan A.; Huntington, Channing M.; Raman, Kumar S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Doss, Forrest W.; Flippo, Kirk A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Three- and two-dimensional numerical studies have been carried out to simulate recent counter-propagating shear flow experiments on the National Ignition Facility. A multi-physics three-dimensional, time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulation code is used. Using a Reynolds Averaging Navier-Stokes model, we show that the evolution of the mixing layer width obtained from the simulations agrees well with that measured from the experiments. A sensitivity study is conducted to illustrate a 3D geometrical effect that could confuse the measurement at late times, if the energy drives from the two ends of the shock tube are asymmetric. Implications for future experiments are discussed.

  5. Early uptake of HIV counseling and testing among pregnant women at different levels of health facilities - experiences from a community-based study in Northern Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gammeltoft Tine

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV counselling and testing for pregnant women is a key factor for successful prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV. Women's access to testing can be improved by scaling up the distribution of this service at all levels of health facilities. However, this strategy will only be effective if pregnant women are tested early and provided enough counselling. Objective To assess early uptake of HIV testing and the provision of HIV counselling among pregnant women who attend antenatal care at primary and higher level health facilities. Methods A community based study was conducted among 1108 nursing mothers. Data was collected during interviews using a structured questionnaire focused on socio-economic background, reproductive history, experience with antenatal HIV counselling and testing as well as types of health facility providing the services. Results In all 91.0% of the women interviewed had attended antenatal care and 90.3% had been tested for HIV during their most recent pregnancy. Women who had their first antenatal checkup at primary health facilities were significantly more likely to be tested before 34 weeks of gestation (OR = 43.2, CI: 18.9-98.1. The reported HIV counselling provision was also higher at primary health facilities, where women in comparison with women attending higher level health facilities were nearly three or and four times more likely to receive pre-test (OR = 2.7; CI:2.1-3.5 and post-test counseling (OR = 4.0; CI: 2.3-6.8. Conclusions The results suggest that antenatal HIV counseling and testing can be scaled up to primary heath facilities and that such scaling up may enhance early uptake of testing and provision of counseling.

  6. Small craters on the meteoroid and space debris impact experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, Donald H.

    1995-01-01

    Examination of 9.34 m(exp 2) of thick aluminum plates from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) using a 25X microscope revealed 4341 craters that were 0.1 mm in diameter or larger. The largest was 3 mm in diameter. Most were roughly hemispherical with lips that were raised above the original plate surface. The crater diameter measured was the diameter at the top of the raised lips. There was a large variation in the number density of craters around the three-axis gravity-gradient stabilized spacecraft. A model of the near-Earth meteoroid environment is presented which uses a meteoroid size distribution based on the crater size distribution on the space end of the LDEF. An argument is made that nearly all the craters on the space end must have been caused by meteoroids and that very few could have been caused by man-made orbital debris. However, no chemical analysis of impactor residue that will distinguish between meteoroids and man-made debris is yet available. A small area (0.0447 m(exp 2)) of one of the plates on the space end was scanned with a 200X microscope revealing 155 craters between 10 micron and 100 micron in diameter and 3 craters smaller than 10 micron. This data was used to extend the size distribution of meteoroids down to approximately 1 micron. New penetration equations developed by Alan Watts were used to relate crater dimensions to meteoroid size. The equations suggest that meteoroids must have a density near 2.5 g/cm(exp 3) to produce craters of the shape found on the LDEF. The near-Earth meteoroid model suggests that about 80 to 85 percent of the 100 micron to 1 mm diameter craters on the twelve peripheral rows of the LDEF were caused by meteoroids, leaving 15 to 20 percent to be caused by man-made orbital debris.

  7. Hydrodynamic simulations of long-scale-length two-plasmon-decay experiments at the Omega Laser Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, S. X.; Michel, D. T.; Edgell, D. H.; Froula, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Myatt, J. F.; Skupsky, S.; Yaakobi, B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 E. River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Direct-drive-ignition designs with plastic CH ablators create plasmas of long density scale lengths (L{sub n} {>=} 500 {mu}m) at the quarter-critical density (N{sub qc}) region of the driving laser. The two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability can exceed its threshold in such long-scale-length plasmas (LSPs). To investigate the scaling of TPD-induced hot electrons to laser intensity and plasma conditions, a series of planar experiments have been conducted at the Omega Laser Facility with 2-ns square pulses at the maximum laser energies available on OMEGA and OMEGA EP. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations have been performed for these LSP experiments using the two-dimensional hydrocode draco. The simulated hydrodynamic evolution of such long-scale-length plasmas has been validated with the time-resolved full-aperture backscattering and Thomson-scattering measurements. draco simulations for CH ablator indicate that (1) ignition-relevant long-scale-length plasmas of L{sub n} approaching {approx}400 {mu}m have been created; (2) the density scale length at N{sub qc} scales as L{sub n}({mu}m) Asymptotically-Equal-To (R{sub DPP} Multiplication-Sign I{sup 1/4}/2); and (3) the electron temperature T{sub e} at N{sub qc} scales as T{sub e}(keV) Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.95 Multiplication-Sign {radical}(I), with the incident intensity (I) measured in 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} for plasmas created on both OMEGA and OMEGA EP configurations with different-sized (R{sub DPP}) distributed phase plates. These intensity scalings are in good agreement with the self-similar model predictions. The measured conversion fraction of laser energy into hot electrons f{sub hot} is found to have a similar behavior for both configurations: a rapid growth [f{sub hot} Asymptotically-Equal-To f{sub c} Multiplication-Sign (G{sub c}/4){sup 6} for G{sub c} < 4] followed by a saturation of the form, f{sub hot} Asymptotically-Equal-To f{sub c} Multiplication-Sign (G{sub c}/4){sup 1.2} for G{sub c} {>=} 4, with the

  8. Early Commissioning Experience and Future Plans for the 12 GeV Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spata, Michael F. [JLAB

    2014-12-01

    Jefferson Lab has recently completed the accelerator portion of the 12 GeV Upgrade for the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility. All 52 SRF cryomodules have been commissioned and operated with beam. The initial beam transport goals of demonstrating 2.2 GeV per pass, greater than 6 GeV in 3 passes to an existing experimental facility and greater than 10 GeV in 5-1/2 passes have all been accomplished. These results along with future plans to commission the remaining beamlines and to increase the performance of the accelerator to achieve reliable, robust and efficient operations at 12 GeV are presented.

  9. Microbeam facility extension for single-cell irradiation experiments. Investigations about bystander effect and reactive oxygen species impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanot, M.; Khodja, H.; Daudin, L.; Hoarau, J.; Carriere, M.; Gouget, B. [CEA Saclay, Lab. Pierre Sue (LPS), CEA-CNRS UMR9956, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    The LPS microbeam facility is based on a KN3750 Van de Graaff accelerator devoted to microbeam analysis [1]. It is equipped with two horizontal microbeam lines used in various fields such as material science, geological science, nuclear material science and biology. Since two years, a single ion hit device is being developed at the LPS. The setup is dedicated to the study of ionizing radiation effects on living cells by performing single ion irradiation at controlled doses and locations. This study will complete current researches conducted on uranium chemical toxicity on renal an d osteoblastic cells. After ingestion, most uranium is excreted from the body within a few days except small fraction that is absorbed into the blood-stream (0.2 to 5%) and then deposit and preferentially in kidneys and bones, where it can remain for many years. Uranium is a heavy metal and a primarily alpha emitter. It can lead to bone cancer as a result of the ionizing radiation associated with the radioactive decay products. The study of the response to an exposure to alpha particles will permit to distinguish radiotoxicity and chemical toxicity of uranium bone cells with a special emphasis or the bystander effect at low dose.All the beam lines at the LPS nuclear microprobe are horizontal and under vacuum. A dedicated deflecting magnet was inserted in one of the two available beam lines of the facility. The ion beam is extracted to air using a 100 nm thick silicon nitride membrane, thin enough to induce negligible effects on the ions in terms of energy loss and spatial resolution. By this way, we believe that we minimize the experimental setup impact on the living cells easing the detection of low irradiation dose impact. The atmosphere around the samples is also important to guaranty low stressed cell culture conditions. A temperature, hygrometry and CO{sub 2} controlled atmosphere device will be implanted in the future. The irradiation microbeam is produced using a fused silica

  10. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) Conceptual Design Report Volume 1: The LBNF and DUNE Projects

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, R.; Adamowski, M.; Adams, C.; Adamson, P.; Adhikari, S.; Ahmad, Z.; Albright, C.H.; Alion, T.; Amador, E.; Anderson, J.; Anderson, K.; Andreopoulos, C.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Anjos, J. d.; Ankowski, A.; Antonello, M.; Aranda Fernandez, A.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Aristizabal, D.; Arrieta-Diaz, E.; Aryal, K.; Asaadi, J.; Asner, D.; Athar, M.S.; Auger, M.; Aurisano, A.; Aushev, V.; Autiero, D.; Avila, M.; Back, J.J.; Bai, X.; Baibussinov, B.; Baird, M.; Balantekin, B.; Baller, B.; Ballett, P.; Bambah, B.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Barker, G.J.; Barletta, W.A.; Barr, G.; Barros, N.; Bartosz, B.; Bartoszek, L.; Bashyal, A.; Bass, M.; Bay, F.; Beacom, J.; Behera, B.R.; Bellettini, G.; Bellini, V.; Beltramello, O.; Benekos, N.; Benetti, P.A.; Bercellie, A.; Bergevin, M.; Berman, E.; Berns, H.; Bernstein, R.; Bertolucci, S.; Bhandari, B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bian, J.; Biery, K.; Bishai, M.; Blackburn, T.; Blake, A.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blaufuss, E.; Bleakley, B.; Blucher, E.; Bocean, V.; Boffelli, F.; Boissevain, J.; Bolognesi, S.; Bolton, T.; Bonesini, M.; Boone, T.; Booth, C.; Bordoni, S.; Borysova, M.; Bourguille, B.; Boyd, S.B.; Brailsford, D.; Brandt, A.; Bremer, J.; Brice, S.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brown, G.; Brown, R.; Brunetti, G.; Bu, X.; Buchanan, N.; Budd, H.; Bugg, B.; Calafiura, P.; Calligarich, E.; Calvo, E.; Camilleri, L.; Campanelli, M.; Cantini, C.; Carls, B.; Carr, R.; Cascella, M.; Castromonte, C.; Mur, E.Catano; Cavanna, F.; Centro, S.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Chalifour, M.; Chandratre, V.B.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chaussard, L.; Chembra, S.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, M.; Cherdack, D.; Chi, C.; Childress, S.; Choubey, S.; Choudhary, B.C.; Christodoulou, G.; Christofferson, C.; Church, E.; Cianci, D.; Cline, D.; Coan, T.; Cocco, A.; Coelho, J.; Cole, P.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Convery, M.; Corey, R.; Corwin, L.; Cranshaw, J.; Crivelli, P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Curioni, A.; Cushing, J.; Adams, D.L.; Dale, D.; Das, S.R.; Davenne, T.; Davies, G.S.; Davies, J.; Dawson, J.; De, K.; de Gouvea, A.; de Jong, J.K.; de Jong, P.; De Lurgio, P.; Decowski, M.; Delbart, A.; Densham, C.; Dharmapalan, R.; Dhingra, N.; Di Luise, S.; Diamantopoulou, M.; Diaz, J.S.; Diaz Bautista, G.; Diwan, M.; Djurcic, Z.; Dolph, J.; Drake, G.; Duchesneau, D.; Duvernois, M.; Duyang, H.; Dwyer, D.A.; Dye, S.; Dytman, S.; Eberly, B.; Edgecock, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elliott, S.; Elnimr, M.; Emery, S.; Endress, E.; Eno, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escobar, C.O.; Evans, J.; Falcone, A.; Falk, L.; Farbin, A.; Farnese, C.; Farzan, Y.; Fava, A.; Favilli, L.; Felde, J.; Felix, J.; Fernandes, S.; Fields, L.; Finch, A.; Fitton, M.; Fleming, B.; Forest, T.; Fowler, J.; Fox, W.; Fried, J.; Friedland, A.; Fuess, S.; Fujikawa, B.; Gago, A.; Gallagher, H.; Galymov, S.; Gamble, T.; Gandhi, R.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Gardiner, S.; Garvey, G.; Gehman, V.M.; Gendotti, A.; Geronimo, G. d.; Ghag, C.; Ghoshal, P.; Gibin, D.; Gil-Botella, I.; Gill, R.; Girardelli, D.; Giri, A.; Glavin, S.; Goeldi, D.; Golapinni, S.; Gold, M.; Gomes, R.A.; Gomez Cadenas, J.J.; Goodman, M.C.; Gorbunov, D.; Goswami, S.; Graf, N.; Graf, N.; Graham, M.; Gramelini, E.; Gran, R.; Grant, C.; Grant, N.; Greco, V.; Greenlee, H.; Greenler, L.; Greenley, C.; Groh, M.; Grullon, S.; Grundy, T.; Grzelak, K.; Guardincerri, E.; Guarino, V.; Guarnaccia, E.; Guedes, G.P.; Guenette, R.; Guglielmi, A.; Habig, A.T.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hackenburg, A.; Hadavand, H.; Haenni, R.; Hahn, A.; Haigh, M.D.; Haines, T.; Hamernik, T.; Handler, T.; Hans, S.; Harris, D.; Hartnell, J.; Hasegawa, T.; Hatcher, R.; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Hays, S.; Hazen, E.; Headley, M.; Heavey, A.; Heeger, K.; Heise, J.; Hennessy, K.; Hewes, J.; Higuera, A.; Hill, T.; Himmel, A.; Hogan, M.; Holanda, P.; Holin, A.; Honey, W.; Horikawa, S.; Horton-Smith, G.; Howard, B.; Howell, J.; Hurh, P.; Huston, J.; Hylen, J.; Imlay, R.; Insler, J.; Introzzi, G.; Ioanisyan, D.; Ioannisian, A.; Iwamoto, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jackson, C.; Jaffe, D.E.; James, C.; James, E.; Jediny, F.; Jen, C.; Jhingan, A.; Jimenez, S.; Jo, J.H.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, R.; Johnstone, J.; Jones, B.J.; Joshi, J.; Jostlein, H.; Jung, C.K.; Junk, T.; Kaboth, A.; Kadel, R.; Kafka, T.; Kalousis, L.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Karagiorgi, G.; Karasavvas, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, P.; Kayser, B.; Kazaryan, N.; Kearns, E.; Keener, P.; Kemboi, S.; Kemp, E.; Kettell, S.H.; Khabibullin, M.; Khandaker, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kirby, B.; Kirby, M.; Klein, J.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kohn, S.; Koizumi, G.; Kopylov, A.; Kordosky, M.; Kormos, L.; Kose, U.; Kostelecky, A.; Kramer, M.; Kreslo, I.; Kriske, R.; Kropp, W.; Kudenko, Y.; Kudryavtsev, V.A.; Kulagin, S.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, G.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kutter, T.; Laminack, A.; Lande, K.; Lane, C.; Lang, K.; Lanni, F.; Learned, J.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, D.; Lee, H.; Lee, K.; Lee, W.M.; Leigui de Oliveira, M.A.; Li, Q.; Li, S.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Libo, J.; Lin, C.S.; Lin, S.; Ling, J.; Link, J.; Liptak, Z.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N.; Loew, T.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, K.; Lopes, M.D.L.; Lopez, J.P.; Losecco, J.; Louis, W.; Lowery, J.; Luethi, M.; Luk, K.; Lundberg, B.; Lundin, T.; Luo, X.; Lux, T.; Lykken, J.; Machado, A.A.; Macier, J.R.; Magill, S.; Mahler, G.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Malhotra, S.; Malon, D.; Mammoliti, F.; Mancina, S.; Mandal, S.K.; Mandodi, S.; Manly, S.L.; Mann, A.; Marchionni, A.; Marciano, W.; Mariani, C.; Maricic, J.; Marino, A.; Marshak, M.; Marshall, C.; Marshall, J.; Marteau, J.; Martin-Albo, J.; Martinez, D.; Matsuno, S.; Matthews, J.; Mauger, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mayilyan, D.; Mazzucato, E.; McCauley, N.; McCluskey, E.; McConkey, N.; McDonald, K.; McFarland, K.S.; McGowan, A.M.; McGrew, C.; McKeown, R.; McNulty, D.; McTaggart, R.; Mefodiev, A.; Mehrian, M.; Mehta, P.; Mei, D.; Mena, O.; Menary, S.; Mendez, H.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Meng, Y.; Mertins, D.; Merritt, H.; Messier, M.; Metcalf, W.; Mewes, M.; Meyer, H.; Miao, T.; Milincic, R.; Miller, W.; Mills, G.; Mineev, O.; Miranda, O.; Mishra, C.S.; Mishra, S.R.; Mitrica, B.; Mladenov, D.; Mocioiu, I.; Mohanta, R.; Mokhov, N.; Montanari, C.; Montanari, D.; Moon, J.; Mooney, M.; Moore, C.; Morfin, J.; Morgan, B.; Morris, C.; Morse, W.; Moss, Z.; Mossey, C.; Moura, C.A.; Mousseau, J.; Mualem, L.; Muether, M.; Mufson, S.; Murphy, S.; Musser, J.; Musser, R.; Nakajima, Y.; Naples, D.; Napolitano, J.; Navarro, J.; Navas, D.; Nelson, J.; Nessi, M.; Newcomer, M.; Ng, Y.; Nichol, R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Nikolics, K.; Niner, E.; Norris, B.; Noto, F.; Novakova, P.; Novella, P.; Nowak, J.; Nunes, M.S.; O'Keeffe, H.; Oldeman, R.; Oliveira, R.; Olson, T.; Onishchuk, Y.; Osta, J.; Ovsjannikova, T.; Page, B.; Pakvasa, S.; Pal, S.; Palamara, O.; Palazzo, A.; Paley, J.; Palomares, C.; Pantic, E.; Paolone, V.; Papadimitriou, V.; Park, J.; Parke, S.; Parsa, Z.; Pascoli, S.; Patterson, R.; Patton, S.; Patzak, T.; Paulos, B.; Paulucci, L.; Pavlovic, Z.; Pawloski, G.; Peeters, S.; Pennacchio, E.; Perch, A.; Perdue, G.N.; Periale, L.; Perkin, J.D.; Pessard, H.; Petrillo, G.; Petti, R.; Petukhov, A.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potenza, R.; Potukuchi, B.; Poudyal, N.; Prokofiev, O.; Pruthi, N.; Przewlocki, P.; Pushka, D.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J.L.; Raboanary, R.; Radeka, V.; Radovic, A.; Raffelt, G.; Rakhno, I.; Rakotondramanana, H.T.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramachers, Y.A.; Rameika, R.; Ramsey, J.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.; Ratoff, P.; Rebel, B.; Regenfus, C.; Reichenbacher, J.; Reitzner, D.; Remoto, A.; Renshaw, A.; Rescia, S.; Richardson, M.; Rielage, K.; Riesselmann, K.; Robinson, M.; Rochester, L.; Rodrigues, O.B.; Rodrigues, P.; Roe, B.; Rosen, M.; Roser, R.M.; Ross-Lonergan, M.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rubbia, C.; Rucinski, R.; von Rohr, C.Rudolph; Russell, B.; Ruterbories, D.; Saakyan, R.; Sahu, N.; Sala, P.; Samios, N.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez, M.; Sands, B.; Santana, S.; Santorelli, R.; Santucci, G.; Saoulidou, N.; Scaramelli, A.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmitt, R.; Schmitz, D.; Schneps, J.; Scholberg, K.; Schukraft, A.; Schwehr, J.; Segreto, E.; Seibert, S.; Sepulveda-Quiroz, J.A.; Sergiampietri, F.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shahi, J.; Shahsavarani, S.; Shanahan, P.; Shankar, S.U.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, R.K.; Shaw, T.; Shrock, R.; Shyrma, I.; Simos, N.; Sinev, G.; Singh, I.; Singh, J.; Singh, J.; Singh, V.; Sinnis, G.; Sippach, W.; Smargianaki, D.; Smy, M.; Snider, E.; Snopok, P.; Sobczyk, J.; Sobel, H.; Soderberg, M.; Solomey, N.; Sondheim, W.; Sorel, M.; Sousa, A.; Soustruznik, K.; Spitz, J.; Spooner, N.J.; Stancari, M.; Stancu, I.; Stefan, D.; Steiner, H.M.; Stewart, J.; Stock, J.; Stoica, S.; Stone, J.; Strait, J.; Strait, M.; Strauss, T.; Striganov, S.; Sulej, R.; Sullivan, G.; Sun, Y.; Suter, L.; Sutera, C.M.; Svoboda, R.; Szczerbinska, B.; Szelc, A.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Talaga, R.; Tamsett, M.; Tariq, S.; Tatar, E.; Tayloe, R.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, D.; Terao, K.; Thiesse, M.; Thomas, J.; Thompson, L.F.; Thomson, M.; Thorn, C.; Thorpe, M.; Tian, X.; Tiedt, D.; Timm, S.C.; Tonazzo, A.; Tope, T.; Topkar, A.; Torres, F.R.; Torti, M.; Tortola, M.; Tortorici, F.; Toups, M.; Touramanis, C.; Tripathi, M.; Tropin, I.; Tsai, Y.; Tsang, K.V.; Tsenov, R.; Tufanli, S.; Tull, C.; Turner, J.; Tzanov, M.; Tziaferi, E.; Uchida, Y.; Urheim, J.; Usher, T.; Vagins, M.; Vahle, P.; Valdiviesso, G.A.; Valerio, L.; Vallari, Z.; Valle, J.; Van Berg, R.; Van de Water, R.; Van Gemmeren, P.; Varanini, F.; Varner, G.; Vasseur, G.; Vaziri, K.; Velev, G.; Ventura, S.; Verdugo, A.; Viant, T.; Vieira, T.V.; Vignoli, C.; Vilela, C.; Viren, B.; Vrba, T.; Wachala, T.; Wahl, D.; Wallbank, M.; Walsh, N.; Wang, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, L.; Wang, T.; Warburton, T.K.; Warner, D.; Wascko, M.; Waters, D.; Watson, T.B.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wei, W.; Weinstein, A.; Wells, D.; Wenman, D.; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; Whitehead, L.; Whittington, D.; Wilking, M.; Willhite, J.; Wilson, P.; Wilson, R.J.; Winslow, L.; Wittich, P.; Wojcicki, S.; Wong, H.H.; Wood, K.; Worcester, E.; Worcester, M.; Wu, S.; Xin, T.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yarritu, K.; Ye, J.; Yeh, M.; Yershov, N.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, B.; Yu, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zalewska, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zang, L.; Zani, A.; Zani, A.; Zavala, G.; Zeller, G.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C.; Zimmerman, E.D.; Zito, M.; Zwaska, R.

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) put forward by an international neutrino community to pursue the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment at the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF/DUNE), a groundbreaking science experiment for long-baseline neutrino oscillation studies and for neutrino astrophysics and nucleon decay searches. The DUNE far detector will be a very large modular liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) located deep underground, coupled to the LBNF multi-megawatt wide-band neutrino beam. DUNE will also have a high-resolution and high-precision near detector.

  11. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE): Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1: The LBNF and DUNE Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciarri, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); et al.

    2016-01-22

    This document presents the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) put forward by an international neutrino community to pursue the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment at the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF/DUNE), a groundbreaking science experiment for long-baseline neutrino oscillation studies and for neutrino astrophysics and nucleon decay searches. The DUNE far detector will be a very large modular liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) located deep underground, coupled to the LBNF multi-megawatt wide-band neutrino beam. DUNE will also have a high-resolution and high-precision near detector.

  12. Development of a 1-week cycle menu for an Advanced Life Support System (ALSS) utilizing practical biomass production data from the Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities (CEEF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Tsuyoshi; Arai, Ryuuji; Komatsubara, Osamu; Tako, Yasuhiro; Harashima, Emiko; Nitta, Keiji

    2005-01-01

    Productivities of 29 crops in the Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities (CEEF) were measured. Rice and soybean showed higher productivities than these given by the Advanced Life Support System Modeling and Analysis Project Baseline Values and Assumption Document (BVAD), but productivities of some other crops, such as potato and sweet potato, were lower. The cultivation data were utilized to develop a 1-week cycle menu for Closed Habitation Experiment. The menu met most of the nutritional requirements. Necessary cultivation area per crew was estimated to be 255 m2. Results from this study can be used to help design the future Advanced Life Support System (ALSS) including the CEEF.

  13. Experience of media presentations for the alleviation of agitation and emotional distress among dementia patients in a long-term nursing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Joohyun; Choi, Seong-In; Kim, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Although the cause and the cure for dementia remain unknown, it is clear that environmental factors can offer relief of cognitive impairment and encourage emotional stability. The purpose was to explore dementia patients' experiences of a media presentation including images of nature. Combining a qualitative approach with quantitative data analysis, the project exposed 23 participants to slide show presentations of fascinating natural scenes over 4 weeks. The patients' feelings and experiences of the media presentations were investigated using semistructured interviews and daily chart reviews in which weekly behavioral changes. The experience of natural scenes in dementia patients' everyday atmosphere became a new and positive aspect of life at the long-term nursing facility, although the quantitative data did not significantly change during the project. This treatment could provide dementia patients with a nurturing relationship, making nature a supportive part of their everyday experience.

  14. Calibration Facilities for NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, T.S.

    2000-06-15

    The calibration facilities will be dynamic and will change to meet the needs of experiments. Small sources, such as the Manson Source should be available to everyone at any time. Carrying out experiments at Omega is providing ample opportunity for practice in pre-shot preparation. Hopefully, the needs that are demonstrated in these experiments will assure the development of (or keep in service) facilities at each of the laboratories that will be essential for in-house preparation for experiments at NIF.

  15. PROOF-based analysis on the ATLAS Grid facilities: first experience with the PoD/PanDa plugin

    CERN Document Server

    Vilucchi, E; The ATLAS collaboration; Di Donato, C; Di Nardo, R; Doria, A; Ganis, G; Manafov, A; Mancini, G; Mazza, S; Preltz, F; Rebatto, D; Salvucci, A; Pineda, A S

    2014-01-01

    In the ATLAS computing model Grid resources are managed by the PanDA system, a data-driven workload management system designed for production and distributed analysis. Data are stored under various formats in ROOT files and end-user physicists have the choice to use either the ATHENA framework or directly ROOT. The ROOT way to analyze data provides users the possibility to use PROOF to exploit the computing power of multi-core machines or to dynamically manage analysis facilities. Since analysis facilities are, in general, not dedicated to PROOF only, PROOF-on-Demand (PoD) is used to enable PROOF on top of an existing resource management system.\

  16. Development of neutron radiography facility for boiling two-phase flow experiment in Kyoto University Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Y.; Sekimoto, S.; Hino, M.; Kawabata, Y.

    2011-09-01

    To visualize boiling two-phase flow at high heat flux by using neutron radiography, a new neutron radiography facility was developed in the B-4 beam hole of KUR. The B-4 beam hole is equipped with a supermirror neutron guide tube with a characteristic wavelength of 1.2 Å, whose geometrical parameters of the guide tube are: 11.7 m total length and 10 mm wide ×74 mm high beam cross-section. The total neutron flux obtained from the KUR supermirror guide tube is about 5×10 7 n/cm 2 s with a nominal thermal output of 5 MW of KUR, which is about 100 times what is obtainable with the conventional KUR neutron radiography facility (E-2 beam hole). In this study a new imaging device, an electric power supply (1200 A, 20 V), and a thermal hydraulic loop were installed. The neutron source, the beam tube, and the radiography rooms are described in detail and the preliminary images obtained at the developed facility are shown.

  17. Evaluation of the concrete shield compositions from the 2010 criticality accident alarm system benchmark experiments at the CEA Valduc SILENE facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Thomas Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Celik, Cihangir [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dunn, Michael E [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wagner, John C [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McMahan, Kimberly L [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Authier, Nicolas [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Valduc, Is-sur-Tille (France); Jacquet, Xavier [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Valduc, Is-sur-Tille (France); Rousseau, Guillaume [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Valduc, Is-sur-Tille (France); Wolff, Herve [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Valduc, Is-sur-Tille (France); Savanier, Laurence [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Valduc, Is-sur-Tille (France); Baclet, Nathalie [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Valduc, Is-sur-Tille (France); Lee, Yi-kang [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); Trama, Jean-Christophe [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); Masse, Veronique [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); Gagnier, Emmanuel [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); Naury, Sylvie [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); Blanc-Tranchant, Patrick [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France); Hunter, Richard [Babcock International Group (United Kingdom); Kim, Soon [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dulik, George Michael [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, Kevin H. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In October 2010, a series of benchmark experiments were conducted at the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) Valduc SILENE facility. These experiments were a joint effort between the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program and the CEA. The purpose of these experiments was to create three benchmarks for the verification and validation of radiation transport codes and evaluated nuclear data used in the analysis of criticality accident alarm systems. This series of experiments consisted of three single-pulsed experiments with the SILENE reactor. For the first experiment, the reactor was bare (unshielded), whereas in the second and third experiments, it was shielded by lead and polyethylene, respectively. The polyethylene shield of the third experiment had a cadmium liner on its internal and external surfaces, which vertically was located near the fuel region of SILENE. During each experiment, several neutron activation foils and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed around the reactor. Nearly half of the foils and TLDs had additional high-density magnetite concrete, high-density barite concrete, standard concrete, and/or BoroBond shields. CEA Saclay provided all the concrete, and the US Y-12 National Security Complex provided the BoroBond. Measurement data from the experiments were published at the 2011 International Conference on Nuclear Criticality (ICNC 2011) and the 2013 Nuclear Criticality Safety Division (NCSD 2013) topical meeting. Preliminary computational results for the first experiment were presented in the ICNC 2011 paper, which showed poor agreement between the computational results and the measured values of the foils shielded by concrete. Recently the hydrogen content, boron content, and density of these concrete shields were further investigated within the constraints of the previously available data. New computational results for the first experiment are now available

  18. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed.

  19. Ion microprobe elemental analyses of impact features on interplanetary dust experiment sensor surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jerry L.; Wortman, Jim J.; Griffis, Dieter P.; Simon, Charles G.

    1991-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact features on several of the electro-active dust sensors utilized in the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) were subjected to elemental analysis using an ion microprobe. The negatively biased dust sensor surfaces acted as ion traps for cations produced in the plasma plumes of impacting particles. Impactor residue surrounds most impact features to two or three feature diameters. After etching away a layer of carbonaceous/silicaceous surface contamination, low mass resolution elemental survey scans are used to tentatively identify the presence of impactor debris. High mass resolution two-dimensional elemental maps and three dimensional depth profiling of the feature and surrounding area show the distribution and relative composition of the debris. The location of these sensors on the six primary Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) sides provides a unique opportunity to further define the debris environment. Researchers applied the same techniques to impact and contaminant features on a set of ultra-pure, highly polished single crystal germanium wafer witness plates that were mounted on row 12 and exposed to the environment during the entire mission.

  20. PROOF-based analysis on the ATLAS Grid facilities: first experience with the PoD/PanDa plugin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilucchi, E.; De Salvo, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Nardo, R.; Doria, A.; Ganis, G.; Manafov, A.; Mancini, G.; Mazza, S.; Preltz, F.; Rebatto, D.; Salvucci, A.; Sanchez Pineda, A. R.

    2014-06-01

    In the ATLAS computing model Grid resources are managed by PanDA, the system designed for production and distributed analysis, and data are stored under various formats in ROOT files. End-user physicists have the choice to use either the ATHENA framework or directly ROOT, that provides users the possibility to use PROOF to exploit the computing power of multi-core machines or to dynamically manage analysis facilities. Since analysis facilities are, in general, not dedicated to PROOF only, PROOF-on-Demand (PoD) is used to enable PROOF on top of an existing resource management system. In a previous work we investigated the usage of PoD to enable PROOF-based analysis on Tier-2 facilities using the PoD/gLite plug-in interface. In this paper we present the status of our investigations using the recently developed PoD/PanDA plug-in to enable PROOF and a real end-user ATLAS physics analysis as payload. For this work, data were accessed using two different protocols: XRootD and file protocol. The former in the site where the SRM interface is Disk Pool Manager (DPM) and the latter where the SRM interface is StoRM with GPFS file system. We will first describe the results of some benchmark tests we run on the ATLAS Italian Tier-1 and Tier-2s sites and at CERN. Then, we will compare the results of different types of analysis, comparing performances accessing data in relation to different types of SRM interfaces and accessing data with XRootD in the LAN and in the WAN using the ATLAS XROOTD storage federation infrastructure.

  1. Conceptual design of a First Wall mock-up experiment in preparation for the qualification of breeding blanket technologies in the Helium Loop Karlsruhe (HELOKA) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeile, C., E-mail: christian.zeile@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Abou-Sena, A.; Boccaccini, L.V.; Ghidersa, B.E.; Kang, Q.; Kunze, A. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Lamberti, L. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Dipartimento Energia, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); Maione, I.A.; Rey, J.; Weth, A. von der [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Experiment in preparation for the qualification of Breeding Blanket technologies in HELOKA facility is proposed. • Experimental capabilities, instrumentation of the mock-up and experimental program are presented. • Design and manufacturing of the mock-up is described. • Design of modular attachment system to obtain different stress levels and distributions on the mock-up is discussed. - Abstract: An experimental program based on a First Wall mock-up is presented as preparation for the qualification of breeding blanket mock-ups at high heat flux in the Helium Loop Karlsruhe (HELOKA) facility. Two objectives of the experimental program have been defined: testing of the experimental setup and a first validation of FE models. The design and manufacturing of mock-up representing about 1/3 of the heated zone of an ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM) First Wall is discussed. A modular attachment system concept has been developed for the fixation of the mock-up in order to be able to generate different stress distributions and levels on the plate, which is confirmed by thermo-mechanical analyses. The HELOKA facility is able to provide a TBM relevant helium cooling system and to generate the required surface heat flux by an electron beam gun. An installed IR camera can be used to measure the temperature distribution on the surface.

  2. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  3. Analysis of the conditions of experiments on the compression of capsules with a foam absorber at Iskra V facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demchenko, N N; Doskoch, I Y; Gus' kov, S Y; Rozanov, V B; Stepanov, R V; Yakhin, R A [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Garanin, S G; Suslov, N A; Zhidkov, N V [Russian Federation Nuclear Center - VNIIEF, Sarov (Russian Federation); Gatin, A A; Tishkin, V F; Zmitrenko, N V [Institute of Mathematical Modelling of RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: rozanov@sci.lebedev.ru

    2008-05-15

    The compression conditions are analyzed and the capsules are discussed for the energy of {approx}2 kJ and pulse duration of {approx}0.5 ns at the second harmonic of an iodine laser ({lambda} = 0.66 {mu}m) under irradiation by a small number of beams at Iskra V facility (the facility has 12 beams, which are focused in a certain way onto the capsule). The authors consider different capsules filled with DT gas: the glass capsules (the inner radius is 260 {mu}m; the thickness, 1.2-1.3 {mu}m; the aspect ratio A = 200) experimentally examined with Iskra V; the capsules made of polystyrene (R = 140-170 {mu}m; {delta} = 5-10 {mu}m; A = 14-34), and the capsules made of polystyrene and covered by a foam absorber (R = 140-170 {mu}m; {delta} = 5-10 {mu}m; A = 14-34, foam absorber {delta} = 150 {mu}m) - 'Laser Greenhouse'.

  4. A facility birth can be the time to start family planning: postpartum intrauterine device experiences from six countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfitzer, Anne; Mackenzie, Devon; Blanchard, Holly; Hyjazi, Yolande; Kumar, Somesh; Lisanework Kassa, Serawit; Marinduque, Bernabe; Mateo, Marie Grace; Mukarugwiro, Beata; Ngabo, Fidele; Zaeem, Shabana; Zafar, Zonobia; Smith, Jeffrey Michael

    2015-06-01

    Initiation of family planning at the time of birth is opportune, since few women in low-resource settings who give birth in a facility return for further care. Postpartum family planning (PPFP) and postpartum intrauterine device (PPIUD) services were integrated into maternal care in six low- and middle-income countries, applying an insertion technique developed in Paraguay. Facilities with high delivery volume were selected to integrate PPFP/PPIUD services into routine care. Effective PPFP/PPIUD integration requires training and mentoring those providers assisting women at the time of birth. Ongoing monitoring generated data for advocacy. The percentages of PPIUD acceptors ranged from 2.3% of women counseled in Pakistan to 5.8% in the Philippines. Rates of complications among women returning for follow-up were low. Expulsion rates were 3.7% in Pakistan, 3.6% in Ethiopia, and 1.7% in Guinea and the Philippines. Infection rates did not exceed 1.3%, and three countries recorded no cases. Offering PPFP/PPIUD at birth improves access to contraception.

  5. Healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial use in long-term care facilities: the Irish experience with the HALT surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, K; Roche, F; Donlon, S

    2015-04-01

    In the context of an ageing European population, point prevalence surveys (PPS) of healthcare-associated infection and antimicrobial use in long-term care facilities (HALT) in Europe were commissioned by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Sixty-nine Irish long-term care facilities (LTCFs) took part in the first survey in 2010. A series of interventions to raise the profile of infection prevention and control and antimicrobial stewardship in Irish LTCFs followed. HALT was repeated in Ireland in 2011, with 108 participating LTCFs, and again in 2013 as part of the second European HALT survey, with 190 participating LTCFs. The latest Irish HALT report incorporates data from the three PPSs to date, and discusses the findings and the national implementation priorities recommended by the Irish multi-disciplinary steering group. Ireland contributed ∼10% of the total resident population in both of the European HALT PPSs. This, and the growing number of participating LTCFs, shows that healthcare professionals in Irish LTCFs are committed to improving the quality and safety of resident care.

  6. Assessing the Impact of Community Engagement Interventions on Health Worker Motivation and Experiences with Clients in Primary Health Facilities in Ghana: A Randomized Cluster Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kaba Alhassan

    Full Text Available Health worker density per 1000 population in Ghana is one of the lowest in the world estimated to be 2.3, below the global average of 9.3. Low health worker motivation induced by poor working conditions partly explain this challenge. Albeit the wage bill for public sector health workers is about 90% of domestic government expenditure on health in countries such as Ghana, staff motivation and performance output remain a challenge, suggesting the need to complement financial incentives with non-financial incentives through a community-based approach. In this study, a systematic community engagement (SCE intervention was implemented to engage community groups in healthcare quality assessment to promote mutual collaboration between clients and healthcare providers, and enhance health worker motivation levels. SCE involves structured use of existing community groups and associations to assess healthcare quality in health facilities. Identified quality gaps are discussed with healthcare providers, improvements made and rewards given to best performing facilities for closing quality care gaps.To evaluate the effect of SCE interventions on health worker motivation and experiences with clients.The study is a cluster randomized trial involving health workers in private (n = 38 and public (n = 26 primary healthcare facilities in two administrative regions in Ghana. Out of 324 clinical and non-clinical staff randomly interviewed at baseline, 234 (72% were successfully followed at end-line and interviewed on workplace motivation factors and personal experiences with clients. Propensity score matching and difference-in-difference estimations were used to estimate treatment effect of the interventions on staff motivation.Intrinsic (non-financial work incentives including cordiality with clients and perceived career prospects appeared to be prime sources of motivation for health staff interviewed in intervention health facilities while financial incentives were

  7. Assessing the Impact of Community Engagement Interventions on Health Worker Motivation and Experiences with Clients in Primary Health Facilities in Ghana: A Randomized Cluster Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, Robert Kaba; Nketiah-Amponsah, Edward; Spieker, Nicole; Arhinful, Daniel Kojo; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F

    2016-01-01

    Health worker density per 1000 population in Ghana is one of the lowest in the world estimated to be 2.3, below the global average of 9.3. Low health worker motivation induced by poor working conditions partly explain this challenge. Albeit the wage bill for public sector health workers is about 90% of domestic government expenditure on health in countries such as Ghana, staff motivation and performance output remain a challenge, suggesting the need to complement financial incentives with non-financial incentives through a community-based approach. In this study, a systematic community engagement (SCE) intervention was implemented to engage community groups in healthcare quality assessment to promote mutual collaboration between clients and healthcare providers, and enhance health worker motivation levels. SCE involves structured use of existing community groups and associations to assess healthcare quality in health facilities. Identified quality gaps are discussed with healthcare providers, improvements made and rewards given to best performing facilities for closing quality care gaps. To evaluate the effect of SCE interventions on health worker motivation and experiences with clients. The study is a cluster randomized trial involving health workers in private (n = 38) and public (n = 26) primary healthcare facilities in two administrative regions in Ghana. Out of 324 clinical and non-clinical staff randomly interviewed at baseline, 234 (72%) were successfully followed at end-line and interviewed on workplace motivation factors and personal experiences with clients. Propensity score matching and difference-in-difference estimations were used to estimate treatment effect of the interventions on staff motivation. Intrinsic (non-financial) work incentives including cordiality with clients and perceived career prospects appeared to be prime sources of motivation for health staff interviewed in intervention health facilities while financial incentives were ranked

  8. Availability of drugs and medical supplies for emergency obstetric care: experience of health facility managers in a rural District of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkoka, Dickson Ally; Goicolea, Isabel; Kiwara, Angwara; Mwangu, Mughwira; Hurtig, Anna-Karin

    2014-03-19

    Provision of quality emergency obstetric care relies upon the presence of skilled health attendants working in an environment where drugs and medical supplies are available when needed and in adequate quantity and of assured quality. This study aimed to describe the experience of rural health facility managers in ensuring the timely availability of drugs and medical supplies for emergency obstetric care (EmOC). In-depth interviews were conducted with a total of 17 health facility managers: 14 from dispensaries and three from health centers. Two members of the Council Health Management Team and one member of the Council Health Service Board were also interviewed. A survey of health facilities was conducted to supplement the data. All the materials were analysed using a qualitative thematic analysis approach. Participants reported on the unreliability of obtaining drugs and medical supplies for EmOC; this was supported by the absence of essential items observed during the facility survey. The unreliability of obtaining drugs and medical supplies was reported to result in the provision of untimely and suboptimal EmOC services. An insufficient budget for drugs from central government, lack of accountability within the supply system and a bureaucratic process of accessing the locally mobilized drug fund were reported to contribute to the current situation. The unreliability of obtaining drugs and medical supplies compromises the timely provision of quality EmOC. Multiple approaches should be used to address challenges within the health system that prevent access to essential drugs and supplies for maternal health. There should be a special focus on improving the governance of the drug delivery system so that it promotes the accountability of key players, transparency in the handling of information and drug funds, and the participation of key stakeholders in decision making over the allocation of locally collected drug funds.

  9. Whisker/Cone growth on the thermal control surfaces experiment no. S0069

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiener, James M.; Coston, James E., Jr.; Miller, Edgar R.; Mell, Richard J.; Wilkes, Donald R.

    1995-01-01

    An unusual surface 'growth' was found during scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigations of the Thermal Control Surface Experiment (TCSE) S0069 front thermal cover. This 'growth' is similar to the cone type whisker growth phenomena as studied by G. K. Wehner beginning in the 1960's. Extensive analysis has identified the most probable composition of the whiskers to be a silicate type glass. Sources of the growth material are outgassing products from the experiment and orbital atomic oxygen, which occurs naturally at the orbital altitudes of the LDEF mission in the form of neutral atomic oxygen. The highly ordered symmetry and directionality of the whiskers are attributed to the long term (5.8 year) stable flight orientation of the LDEF.

  10. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  11. Towards offline PET monitoring at a cyclotron-based proton therapy facility. Experiments and Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuerl, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Matthias Wuerl presents two essential steps to implement offline PET monitoring of proton dose delivery at a clinical facility, namely the setting up of an accurate Monte Carlo model of the clinical beamline and the experimental validation of positron emitter production cross-sections. In the first part, the field size dependence of the dose output is described for scanned proton beams. Both the Monte Carlo and an analytical computational beam model were able to accurately predict target dose, while the latter tends to overestimate dose in normal tissue. In the second part, the author presents PET measurements of different phantom materials, which were activated by the proton beam. The results indicate that for an irradiation with a high number of protons for the sake of good statistics, dead time losses of the PET scanner may become important and lead to an underestimation of positron-emitter production yields.

  12. Experiments and analysis of gold disk targets irradiated by smoothing beams of Xingguang II facilities with 350 nm wavelength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Gold disk targets were irradiated using focusing and beam smoothing methods on Xingguang (XG-II) laser facilities with 350 nm wavelength, 0.6 ns pulse width and 20-80 Joules energies. Laser absorption, light scattering and X-ray conversion were experimentally investigated. The experimental results showed that laser absorption and scattered light were about 90% and 10%, respectively, under focusing irradiation, but the laser absorption increased 5%-10% and the scattered light about 1% under the condition of beam smoothing. Compared with the case of focusing irradiation, the laser absorption was effectively improved and the scattered light remarkably dropped under uniform irradiation; then due to the decrease in laser intensity, X-ray conversion increased. This is highly advantageous to the inertial confinement fusion. However, X-ray conversion mechanism basically did not change and X-ray conversion efficiency under beam smoothing and focusing irradiation was basically the same.

  13. Trace Code Validation for BWR Spray Cooling Injection and CCFL Condition Based on GÖTA Facility Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Racca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Best estimate codes have been used in the past thirty years for the design, licensing, and safety of NPP. Nevertheless, large efforts are necessary for the qualification and the assessment of such codes. The aim of this work is to study the main phenomena involved in the emergency spray cooling injection in a Swedish-designed BWR. For this purpose, data from the Swedish separate effect test facility GÖTA have been simulated using TRACE version 5.0 Patch 2. Furthermore, uncertainty calculations have been performed with the propagation of input errors method, and the identification of the input parameters that mostly influence the peak cladding temperature has been performed.

  14. Thermal buckling and progressive ovalization of pipes: experiences at the TTS sodium test facility and their analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watashi, K. [PNC, Ibaraki (Japan). OEC; Iwata, K. [PNC, Ibaraki (Japan). OEC

    1995-01-01

    Two remarkable thermally induced deformation mechanisms of pipes which may have serious effects on structural integrity, thermal buckling and progressive ovalization, were observed on the horizontal piping of the sodium test facility, called TTS, with which cyclic thermal transient tests of structures had been conducted. The thermal buckling, which was caused by thermal stratification, occurred at a circumferentially welded region of the pipe where a noticeable geometrical imperfection existed. The buckling was analyzed comprehensively for this pipe, using both the finite element method and a simplified method based on Gellin`s analysis results. The predictions were reasonable and gave confidence in accounting for the sodium leakage encountered at the TTS. It was also demonstrated by the finite element analyses that the progressive ovalization of the pipe cross-section from a circular to a downward triangular shape can be caused by cyclic thermal stratification under the existence of cover gas in the pipe. ((orig.)).

  15. Experiments and analysis of gold disk targets irradiated by smoothing beams of Xingguang II facilities with 350 nm wavelength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG; ShaoEn

    2007-01-01

    Gold disk targets were irradiated using focusing and beam smoothing methods on Xingguang (XG-II) laser facilities with 350 nm wavelength, 0.6 ns pulse width and 20-80 Joules energies. Laser absorption, light scattering and X-ray conversion were experimentally investigated. The experimental results showed that laser absorption and scattered light were about 90% and 10%, respectively, under focusing irradiation, but the laser absorption increased 5%-10% and the scattered light about 1% under the condition of beam smoothing. Compared with the case of focusing irradiation, the laser absorption was effectively improved and the scattered light remarkably dropped under uniform irradiation; then due to the decrease in laser intensity, X-ray conversion increased. This is highly advantageous to the inertial confinement fusion. However, X-ray conversion mechanism basically did not change and X-ray conversion efficiency under beam smoothing and focusing irradiation was basically the same.……

  16. [The historical experience of medical service in cooperation with state healthcare facilities during the Great Patriotic War 1941-1945].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budko, A A; Gribovskaia, G A; Zhuravlev, D A

    2014-05-01

    Cooperation issues between military-medical service and civil healthcare in the field of delivery of medical aid to patients in the rear of country are considered in the artic. The rear is a final stage of the care by echelon and the main medical reserve force for front and army areas. Wide hospital network in the rear consisted mainly of evacuation hospitals of the People's Commissariat of the USSR healthcare. Cooperation between military-medical service and civil healthcare facilities was required. Sometimes necessary cooperation failed and made mutual helming of evacuation hospitals difficult. But despite the problems the main problem - return of maximum wounded soldiers to active duty was solved during the Great Patriotic War.

  17. Radiation safety during remediation of the SevRAO facilities: 10 years of regulatory experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneve, M K; Shandala, N; Kiselev, S; Simakov, A; Titov, A; Seregin, V; Kryuchkov, V; Shcheblanov, V; Bogdanova, L; Grachev, M; Smith, G M

    2015-09-01

    In compliance with the fundamentals of the government's policy in the field of nuclear and radiation safety approved by the President of the Russian Federation, Russia has developed a national program for decommissioning of its nuclear legacy. Under this program, the State Atomic Energy Corporation 'Rosatom' is carrying out remediation of a Site for Temporary Storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and radioactive waste (RW) at Andreeva Bay located in Northwest Russia. The short term plan includes implementation of the most critical stage of remediation, which involves the recovery of SNF from what have historically been poorly maintained storage facilities. SNF and RW are stored in non-standard conditions in tanks designed in some cases for other purposes. It is planned to transport recovered SNF to PA 'Mayak' in the southern Urals. This article analyses the current state of the radiation safety supervision of workers and the public in terms of the regulatory preparedness to implement effective supervision of radiation safety during radiation-hazardous operations. It presents the results of long-term radiation monitoring, which serve as informative indicators of the effectiveness of the site remediation and describes the evolving radiation situation. The state of radiation protection and health care service support for emergency preparedness is characterized by the need to further study the issues of the regulator-operator interactions to prevent and mitigate consequences of a radiological accident at the facility. Having in mind the continuing intensification of practical management activities related to SNF and RW in the whole of northwest Russia, it is reasonable to coordinate the activities of the supervision bodies within a strategic master plan. Arrangements for this master plan are discussed, including a proposed programme of actions to enhance the regulatory supervision in order to support accelerated mitigation of threats related to the nuclear legacy in the

  18. Post test calculation of the experiment `small break loss-of- coolant test` SBL-22 at the Finnish integral test facility PACTEL with the thermohydraulic code ATHLET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lischke, W.; Vandreier, B. [Univ. for Applied Sciences, Zittau/Goerlitz (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Technology

    1997-12-31

    At the University for Applied Sciences Zittau/Goerlitz (FH) calculations for the verification of the ATHLET-code for reactors of type VVER are carried out since 1991, sponsored by the German Ministry for Education, Science and Technology (BMBF). The special features of these reactors in comparison to reactors of western countries are characterized by the duct route of reactor coolant pipes and the horizontal steam generators. Because of these special features, a check of validity of the ATHLET-models is necessary. For further verification of the ATHLET-code the post test calculation of the experiment SBL-22 (Small break loss-of-coolant test) realized at the finnish facility PACTEL was carried out. The experiment served for the examination of the natural circulation behaviour of the loop over a continuous range of primary side water inventory. 5 refs.

  19. Simulations of beam-matter interaction experiments at the CERN HiRadMat facility and prospects of high-energy-density physics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N A; Burkart, F; Shutov, A; Schmidt, R; Wollmann, D; Piriz, A R

    2014-12-01

    In a recent publication [Schmidt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 080701 (2014)], we reported results on beam-target interaction experiments that have been carried out at the CERN HiRadMat (High Radiation to Materials) facility using extended solid copper cylindrical targets that were irradiated with a 440-GeV proton beam delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). On the one hand, these experiments confirmed the existence of hydrodynamic tunneling of the protons that leads to substantial increase in the range of the protons and the corresponding hadron shower in the target, a phenomenon predicted by our previous theoretical investigations [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 25, 051003 (2012)]. On the other hand, these experiments demonstrated that the beam heated part of the target is severely damaged and is converted into different phases of high energy density (HED) matter, as suggested by our previous theoretical studies [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. E 79, 046410 (2009)]. The latter confirms that the HiRadMat facility can be used to study HED physics. In the present paper, we give details of the numerical simulations carried out to understand the experimental measurements. These include the evolution of the physical parameters, for example, density, temperature, pressure, and the internal energy in the target, during and after the irradiation. This information is important in order to determine the region of the HED phase diagram that can be accessed in such experiments. These simulations have been done using the energy deposition code fluka and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code, big2, iteratively.

  20. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. J.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, K. H. [and others

    2002-03-01

    With starting DUPIC fuel fabrication experiment by using spent fuels, 1) operation and refurbishment for DFDF (DUPIC fuel development facility), and 2) operation and improvement of transportation equipment for radioactive materials between facilities became the objectives of this study. This report describes objectives of the project, necessities, state of related technology, R and D scope, R and D results, proposal for application etc.

  1. Simulation Prediction and Experiment Setup of Vacuum Laser Acceleration at Brookhaven National Lab-Accelerator Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, L; Ding, X; Ho, Y K; Kong, Q; Xu, J J; Pogorelsky, I; Yakimenko, V; Kusche, K

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the pre-experiment plan and prediction of the first stage of Vacuum Laser Acceleration (VLA) collaborating by UCLA, Fudan University and ATF-BNL. This first stage experiment is a Proof-of-Principle to support our previously posted novel VLA theory. Simulations show that based on ATF's current experimental conditions, the electron beam with initial energy of 15MeV can get net energy gain from intense CO2 laser beam. The difference of electron beam energy spread is observable by ATF beam line diagnostics system. Further this energy spread expansion effect increases along with the laser intensity increasing. The proposal has been approved by ATF committee and experiment will be the next project.

  2. Relap5/mod2 post-test calculation of a loss of feedwater experiment at the Pactel test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Protze, M. [Siemens-KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    Post-test calculations for verification purposes of the thermal hydraulic code RELAP5/MOD2 are of fundamental importance for the licensing procedure. The RELAP5/MOD2 code has a large international assessment base regarding western PWR. WWER-reactors are russian designed PWRs with some specific differences compared with the western PWR`s, especially the horizontal steam generators. For that reason some post-test calculations have to be performed to verify the RELAP5/MOD2 code for these WWER typical phenomena. The impact of the horizontal steam generators on the accident behaviour during transients or pipe ruptures on the secondary side is significant. The nodalization of the test facility PACTEL was chosen equally to WWER plant nodalization to verify the use of a coarse modelling of the steam generator secondary side for analyses of transient with decreasing water level in the SG secondary side. The calculational results showed a good compliance to the test results, demonstrating the correct use of a coarse nodalization. To sum up, the RELAP5/ MOD2 results met the test results appropriately thereby the RELAP5/ MOD2 code is validated for analyses of transients with decreasing water level in a horizontal steam generator secondary side. (orig.). 4 refs.

  3. Study on critical heat flux in narrow rectangular channel with repeated-rib roughness. 1. Experimental facility and preliminary experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Terada, Atsuhiko; Kaminaga, Masanori; Hino, Ryutaro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-10-01

    In the design of a spallation target system, the water cooling system, for example a proton beam window and a safety hull, is used with narrow channels, in order to remove high heat flux and prevent lowering of system performance by absorption of neutron. And in narrow channel, heat transfer enhancement using 2-D rib is considered for reduction the cost of cooling component and decrease inventory of water in the cooling system, that is, decrease of the amount of irradiated water. But few studies on CHF with rib have been carried out. Experimental and analytical studies with rib-roughened test section, in 10:1 ratio of pitch to height, are being carried out in order to clarify the CHF in rib-roughened channel. This paper presents the review of previous researches on heat transfer in channel with rib roughness, overview of the test facility and the preliminary experimental and analytical results. As a result, wall friction factors were about 3 times as large as that of smooth channel, and heat transfer coefficients are about 2 times as large as that of smooth channel. The obtained CHF was as same as previous mechanistic model by Sudo. (author)

  4. Experiments on Performance Sensitivity of SMART PRHRS using the High Temperature/High Pressure Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (VISTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Sik; Choi, Ki Yong; Cho, Seok; Lee, Sung Jae; Choi, Nam Hyun; Min, Kyong Ho; Song, Chul Hwa; Park, Chun Kyong; Chung, Moon Ki

    2005-07-15

    The VISTA (Experimental Verification by Integral Simulation of Transients and Accidents) is an experimental facility to verify the performance and safety issues of the SMART-P (Pilot plant of the System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor). The basic design of the SMART-P has been completed by KAERI. The present report describes the experimental results on the overall performance sensitivity of SMART PRHRS. During the reference test a stable flow occurs in a natural circulation loop which is composed of a steam generator secondary side, a secondary system, and a PRHRS, and it is ascertained by a repetition test. When the bypass valves of PRHRS are operated earlier than the isolation valves of secondary system, the primary system is effectively cooled but the inventory of PRHRS compensation tank is drained earlier. When the bypass valves of PRHRS are operated later than the isolation valves of secondary system, the primary system is not cooled. As the initial level of compensation tank is lowered to 16% of the full level, the steady natural circulation stops around 500 seconds. When the initial pressure of PRHRS is at 0.1 MPa, the natural circulation is not performed properly. When they are 2.5 and 3.5 MPa, it shows better performance than the reference test. Also when the isolation valve connecting the compensation tank is operated simultaneously with the PRHRS isolation valves, the primary system is more efficiently cooled but the inventory of PRHRS compensation tank is drained earlier.

  5. Prevalence and Correlates of Microalbuminuria in Children with Sickle Cell Anaemia: Experience in a Tertiary Health Facility in Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Bismarck Eke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalbuminuria is a pre-clinical marker of renal damage in children with sickle cell anaemia and can predict renal failure. Reported prevalence rates increased with age. In Nigeria, burden of disease and prevailing poor health facilities necessitate its screening, determination of prevalence and associated risk factors. It is a cross-sectional as well as descriptive study. Screening microalbuminuria used subjects’ early morning urine. Socio-demographic as well as clinical details were ascertained using semi-structured questionnaires and case files. Associations and statistical relationship of prevalence rates and clinical/epidemiological data were ascertained using chi-squared and multivariate analysis . Two hundred children with sickle cell anaemia (4–17 years in steady state and 200 age/gender-matched controls were enrolled. Prevalence of microalbuminuria was ,respectively, 18.5% and 2.5% for subjects and controls . Microalbuminuria was commoner in females (19.8% than males (17.4% , increased with age , significantly associated with haemoglobin level and hospitalizations (0.001. Subjects had normal renal function. Hospitalizations and haemoglobin levels showed statistical significance on multivariate analysis. Prevalence of microalbuminuria is 18.5%. Age, haemoglobin concentrations, and higher hospitalizations influenced microalbuminuria among subjects. Screening for microalbuminuria should be incorporated in the case management of subjects with identified risk factors.

  6. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. J.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, K. H. and others

    2000-03-01

    The objectives of this study are (1) the refurbishment for PIEF(Post Irradiation Examination Facility) and M6 hot-cell in IMEF(Irradiated Material Examination Facility), (2) the establishment of the compatible facility for DUPIC fuel fabrication experiments which is licensed by government organization, and (3) the establishment of the transportation system and transportation cask for nuclear material between facilities. The report for this project describes following contents, such as objectives, necessities, scope, contents, results of current step, R and D plan in future and etc.

  7. TNO HVAC facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammink, H.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    TNO has extensive knowledge of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), and can offer its services through theoretical studies, laboratory experiments and field measurements. This complete scope, made possible through our test facilities, enables the effective development of new products,

  8. Uncertainty analysis of thermocouple measurements used in normal and abnormal thermal environment experiments at Sandia's Radiant Heat Facility and Lurance Canyon Burn Site.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakos, James Thomas

    2004-04-01

    It would not be possible to confidently qualify weapon systems performance or validate computer codes without knowing the uncertainty of the experimental data used. This report provides uncertainty estimates associated with thermocouple data for temperature measurements from two of Sandia's large-scale thermal facilities. These two facilities (the Radiant Heat Facility (RHF) and the Lurance Canyon Burn Site (LCBS)) routinely gather data from normal and abnormal thermal environment experiments. They are managed by Fire Science & Technology Department 09132. Uncertainty analyses were performed for several thermocouple (TC) data acquisition systems (DASs) used at the RHF and LCBS. These analyses apply to Type K, chromel-alumel thermocouples of various types: fiberglass sheathed TC wire, mineral-insulated, metal-sheathed (MIMS) TC assemblies, and are easily extended to other TC materials (e.g., copper-constantan). Several DASs were analyzed: (1) A Hewlett-Packard (HP) 3852A system, and (2) several National Instrument (NI) systems. The uncertainty analyses were performed on the entire system from the TC to the DAS output file. Uncertainty sources include TC mounting errors, ANSI standard calibration uncertainty for Type K TC wire, potential errors due to temperature gradients inside connectors, extension wire uncertainty, DAS hardware uncertainties including noise, common mode rejection ratio, digital voltmeter accuracy, mV to temperature conversion, analog to digital conversion, and other possible sources. Typical results for 'normal' environments (e.g., maximum of 300-400 K) showed the total uncertainty to be about {+-}1% of the reading in absolute temperature. In high temperature or high heat flux ('abnormal') thermal environments, total uncertainties range up to {+-}2-3% of the reading (maximum of 1300 K). The higher uncertainties in abnormal thermal environments are caused by increased errors due to the effects of imperfect TC attachment to

  9. Women's education level, maternal health facilities, abortion legislation and maternal deaths: a natural experiment in Chile from 1957 to 2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elard Koch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the main factors related to maternal mortality reduction in large time series available in Chile in context of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals (MDGs. METHODS: Time series of maternal mortality ratio (MMR from official data (National Institute of Statistics, 1957-2007 along with parallel time series of education years, income per capita, fertility rate (TFR, birth order, clean water, sanitary sewer, and delivery by skilled attendants were analysed using autoregressive models (ARIMA. Historical changes on the mortality trend including the effect of different educational and maternal health policies implemented in 1965, and legislation that prohibited abortion in 1989 were assessed utilizing segmented regression techniques. RESULTS: During the 50-year study period, the MMR decreased from 293.7 to 18.2/100,000 live births, a decrease of 93.8%. Women's education level modulated the effects of TFR, birth order, delivery by skilled attendants, clean water, and sanitary sewer access. In the fully adjusted model, for every additional year of maternal education there was a corresponding decrease in the MMR of 29.3/100,000 live births. A rapid phase of decline between 1965 and 1981 (-13.29/100,000 live births each year and a slow phase between 1981 and 2007 (-1.59/100,000 live births each year were identified. After abortion was prohibited, the MMR decreased from 41.3 to 12.7 per 100,000 live births (-69.2%. The slope of the MMR did not appear to be altered by the change in abortion law. CONCLUSION: Increasing education level appears to favourably impact the downward trend in the MMR, modulating other key factors such as access and utilization of maternal health facilities, changes in women's reproductive behaviour and improvements of the sanitary system. Consequently, different MDGs can act synergistically to improve maternal health. The reduction in the MMR is not related to the legal

  10. Core thermal hydraulic behavior during the reflood phase of cold-leg LBLOCA experiments using the ATLAS test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seok; Park, Hyun Sik; Choi, Ki Yong; Kang, Kyoung Ho; Baek, Won Pil; Kim, Yeon Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Several experimental tests to simulate a reflood phase of a cold-leg LBLOCA of the APR1400 have been performed using the ATLAS facility. This paper describes the related experimental results with respect to the thermal-hydraulic behavior in the core and the system-core interactions during the reflood phase of the cold-leg LBLOCA conditions. The present descriptions will be focused on the LB-CL-09, LB-CL-11, LB-CL-14, and LB-CL-15 tests performed using the ATLAS. The LB-CL-09 is an integral effect test with conservative boundary condition; the LB-CL-11 and -14 are integral effect tests with realistic boundary conditions, and the LB-CL-15 is a separated effect test. The objectives of these tests are to investigate the thermal-hydraulic behavior during an entire reflood phase and to provide reliable experimental data for validating the LBLOCA analysis methodology for the APR1400. The initial and boundary conditions were obtained by applying scaling ratios to the MARS simulation results for the LBLOCA scenario of the APR1400. The ECC water flow rate from the safety injection tanks and the decay heat were simulated from the start of the reflood phase. The simulated core power was controlled to be 1.2 times that of the ANS-73 decay heat curve for LB-CL-09 and 1.02 times that of the ANS-79 decay curve for LB-CL-11, -14, and -15. The simulated ECC water flow rate from the high pressure safety injection pump was 0.32 kg/s. The present experimental data showed that the cladding temperature behavior is closely related to the collapsed water level in the core and the downcomer

  11. Women's education level, maternal health facilities, abortion legislation and maternal deaths: a natural experiment in Chile from 1957 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Elard; Thorp, John; Bravo, Miguel; Gatica, Sebastián; Romero, Camila X; Aguilera, Hernán; Ahlers, Ivonne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the main factors related to maternal mortality reduction in large time series available in Chile in context of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Time series of maternal mortality ratio (MMR) from official data (National Institute of Statistics, 1957-2007) along with parallel time series of education years, income per capita, fertility rate (TFR), birth order, clean water, sanitary sewer, and delivery by skilled attendants were analysed using autoregressive models (ARIMA). Historical changes on the mortality trend including the effect of different educational and maternal health policies implemented in 1965, and legislation that prohibited abortion in 1989 were assessed utilizing segmented regression techniques. During the 50-year study period, the MMR decreased from 293.7 to 18.2/100,000 live births, a decrease of 93.8%. Women's education level modulated the effects of TFR, birth order, delivery by skilled attendants, clean water, and sanitary sewer access. In the fully adjusted model, for every additional year of maternal education there was a corresponding decrease in the MMR of 29.3/100,000 live births. A rapid phase of decline between 1965 and 1981 (-13.29/100,000 live births each year) and a slow phase between 1981 and 2007 (-1.59/100,000 live births each year) were identified. After abortion was prohibited, the MMR decreased from 41.3 to 12.7 per 100,000 live births (-69.2%). The slope of the MMR did not appear to be altered by the change in abortion law. Increasing education level appears to favourably impact the downward trend in the MMR, modulating other key factors such as access and utilization of maternal health facilities, changes in women's reproductive behaviour and improvements of the sanitary system. Consequently, different MDGs can act synergistically to improve maternal health. The reduction in the MMR is not related to the legal status of abortion.

  12. Planning for hybrid-cycle OTEC experiments using the HMTSTA test facility at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, C.; Rabas, T.; Genens, L.

    The U.S. Department of Energy has built an experimental apparatus for studying the open-cycle Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OC-OTEC) system. Experiments using warm and cold seawater are currently underway to validate the performance predictions for an OC-TEC flash evaporator, surface condenser, and direct-contact condenser. The hybrid cycle is another OTEC option that produces both power and desalinated water, it is comparable in capital cost to OC-OTEC, and it eliminates the problems associated with the large steam turbine. Means are presented or modifying the existing apparatus to conduct similar experiments on hybrid-cycle OTEC heat exchangers. These data are required to validate predictive methods of the components and for the system integration that were identified in an earlier study of hybrid-cycle OTEC power plants.

  13. Hard x-ray transmission curved crystal spectrometers(10–100 keV) for laser fusion experiments at the ShenGuang-Ⅲ laser facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-hai Yu; Guang-yue Hu; Ning An; Feng Qian; Yu-chi Wu; Xiao-ding Zhang; Yu-qiu Gu; Qiu-ping Wang; Jian Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Two transmission curved crystal spectrometers are designed to measure the hard x-ray emission in the laser fusion experiment of Compton radiography of implosion target on ShenGuang-III laser facility in China. Cylindrically curvedα-quartz(10–11) crystals with curvature radii of 150 and 300 mm are used to cover spectral ranges of 10–56 and17–100 ke V, respectively. The distance between the crystal and the x-ray source can be changed over a broad distance from 200 to 1500 mm. The optical design, including the integral reflectivity of the curved crystal, the sensitivity, and the spectral resolution of the spectrometers, is discussed. We also provide mechanic design details and experimental results using a Mo anode x-ray source. High-quality spectra were obtained. We confirmed that the spectral resolution can be improved by increasing the working distance, which is the distance between the recording medium and the Rowland circle.

  14. Interaction of Super Proton Synchrotron beam with solid copper target: Simulations of future experiments at HiRadMat facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Brugger, M; Assmann, R; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Fortov, V E; Piriz, A R; Deutsch, C; Hoffmann, D H H

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present numerical simulations of interaction of 450 GeV/c proton beam that is generated by Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN, with a solid copper target. These simulations have been carried out using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code, BIG2. This study has been done to assess the damage caused by these highly relativistic protons to equipment including collimators, absorbers and others in case of an uncontrolled accidental release of the beam. In fact a dedicated experimental facility named HiRadMat is under construction at CERN that will allow one to study these problems experimentally. The simulations presented in this paper will be very useful in designing these experiments and later to interpret the experimental results.

  15. Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in the Surtsey Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M.; Blanchat, T.K.; Griffith, R.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.T. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The Surtsey Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is used to perform scaled experiments that simulate hypothetical high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effect of specific phenomena associated with direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load, such as the effect of physical scale, prototypic subcompartment structures, water in the cavity, and hydrogen generation and combustion. In the Integral Effects Test (IET) series, 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion NPP structures were constructed in the Surtsey vessel. The RPV was modeled with a steel pressure vessel that had a hemispherical bottom head, which had a 4-cm hole in the bottom head that simulated the final ablated hole that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe NPP accident. Iron/alumina/chromium thermite was used to simulate molten corium that would accumulate on the bottom head of an actual RPV. The chemically reactive melt simulant was ejected by high-pressure steam from the RPV model into the scaled reactor cavity. Debris was then entrained through the instrument tunnel into the subcompartment structures and the upper dome of the simulated reactor containment building. The results of the IET experiments are given in this report.

  16. Probing the deep nonlinear stage of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in indirect drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casner, A., E-mail: alexis.casner@cea.fr; Masse, L.; Liberatore, S.; Loiseau, P.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Jacquet, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Martinez, D.; Moore, A. S.; Seugling, R.; Felker, S.; Haan, S. W.; Remington, B. A.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Farrell, M.; Giraldez, E.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Academic tests in physical regimes not encountered in Inertial Confinement Fusion will help to build a better understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities and constitute the scientifically grounded validation complementary to fully integrated experiments. Under the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Discovery Science program, recent indirect drive experiments have been carried out to study the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) in transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regime [A. Casner et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 082708 (2012)]. In these experiments, a modulated package is accelerated by a 175 eV radiative temperature plateau created by a room temperature gas-filled platform irradiated by 60 NIF laser beams. The unique capabilities of the NIF are harnessed to accelerate this planar sample over much larger distances (≃1.4 mm) and longer time periods (≃12 ns) than previously achieved. This extended acceleration could eventually allow entering into a turbulent-like regime not precluded by the theory for the RTI at the ablation front. Simultaneous measurements of the foil trajectory and the subsequent RTI growth are performed and compared with radiative hydrodynamics simulations. We present RTI growth measurements for two-dimensional single-mode and broadband multimode modulations. The dependence of RTI growth on initial conditions and ablative stabilization is emphasized, and we demonstrate for the first time in indirect-drive a bubble-competition, bubble-merger regime for the RTI at ablation front.

  17. The AMINO experiment: methane photolysis under Solar VUV irradiation on the EXPOSE-R facility of the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Nathalie; Cottin, Hervé; Cloix, Mégane; Jérome, Murielle; Bénilan, Yves; Coll, Patrice; Gazeau, Marie-Claire; Raulin, François; Saiagh, Kafila; Chaput, Didier

    2015-01-01

    The scientific aim of the present campaign is to study the whole chain of methane photo-degradation, as initiated by Solar vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation in Titan's atmosphere. For this purpose, the AMINO experiment on the EXPOSE-R mission has loaded closed cells for gas-phase photochemistry in space conditions. Two different gas mixtures have been exposed, named Titan 1 and Titan 2, involving both N2-CH4 gas mixtures, without and with CO2, respectively. CO2 is added as a source of reactive oxygen in the cells. The cell contents were analysed thanks to infrared absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Methane consumption leads to the formation of saturated hydrocarbons, with no detectable influence of CO2. This successful campaign provides a first benchmark for characterizing the whole methane photochemical system in space conditions. A thin film of tholin-like compounds appears to form on the cell walls of the exposed cells.

  18. Facility Microgrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  19. The photon tagging facility for the Crystal-Barrel/TAPS experiment at ELSA; Die Photonenmarkierungsanlage fuer das Crystal-Barrel/TAPS-Experiment an ELSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornet-Ponse, Kathrin

    2009-11-15

    With the CBELASA/TAPS experiment in the framework of the SFB/TR 16 measurements of single- and double-polarization observables in the photoporoduction were performed. The energy of the high-energetic, polarized photon beams required for this, is determined by means of a so-called tagging system. In the framework of this thesis such a tagging system was constructed. It allows the energy tagging of the photons in an energy range from 0.021.E{sub 0} to 0.871.E{sub 0} with a time resolution of {sigma}=0.240 ns and an energy resolution from 0.1%.E{sub 0} to 0.4%.E{sub 0}. The reached time resolution allows to use the tagging system as time reference for the remaining experimental components. For the calculation of cross sections the knowledge of the photon flux at the experimental target is necessary. Thereby the photon definition probability P{sub {gamma}} plays a central role, which indicates, with which probability for a signal from the tagging system the corresponding photon in the {gamma} beam at the production target is present. It could be found a prescription for the determination of P{sub {gamma}}, which yields at tagging rates from 1 MHz to 10 MHz consistent results. A relative systematic error for P{sub {gamma}} was determined. Furthermore the effects of collimation and divergence of the photon beam on the number of the really in the experiment available photons and by this on the maximally reachable P{sub {gamma}} were extensively studied and experimental observations explained. [German] Mit dem CBELSA/TAPS-Experiment werden im Rahmen des SFB/TR 16 Messungen von Einfach- und Doppelpolarisationsobservablen in der Photoproduktion durchgefuehrt. Die hochenergetischen, polarisierten Photonenstrahlen werden ueber den Bremsstrahlungsprozess erzeugt. Die Energie der Photonen bestimmt sich aus der Differenz zwischen der Elektronenergie vor (E{sub 0}) und nach (E{sub e{sup -}}) dem Bremsstrahlungsprozess. Dies erfordert den Nachweis der Sekundaerelektronen mit Hilfe

  20. An Image-Based Modeling Experience about Social Facilities, Built during the Fascist Period in Middle Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, D.

    2011-09-01

    The main focus of this article is to explain a teaching activity. This experience follows a research aimed to testing innovative systems for formal and digital analysis of architectural building. In particular, the field of investigation is the analytical drawing. An analytical draw allows to develope an interpretative and similar models of reality; these models are built using photomodeling techniques and are designed to re-write modern and contemporary architecture. The typology of the buildings surveyed belong to a cultural period, called Modern Movement, historically placed between the two world wars. The Modern Movement aimed to renew existing architectural principle and to a functional redefinition of the same one. In Italy these principles arrived during the Fascist period. Heritage made up of public social buildings (case del Balilla, G.I.L., recreation center...) built during the fascist period in middle Italy is remarkable for quantity and in many cases for architectural quality. This kind of buildings are composed using pure shapes: large cube (gyms) alternate with long rectangular block containing offices creates compositions made of big volumes and high towers. These features are perfectly suited to the needs of a surveying process by photomodeling where the role of photography is central and where there is the need to identify certain and easily distinguishable points on all picture, leaning on the edges of the volume or lininig on the texture discontinuity. The goal is the documentation to preserve and to develop buildings and urban complexes of modern architecture, directed to encourage an artistic preservation.

  1. Exposure of Plastic Track Detectors to Relativistic Pb Beam for the Purpose of Providing Calibration for the DUBLIN-ESTEC Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment Which was Exposed for Sixty-Nine Months in Earth Orbit

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % WA100 \\\\ \\\\ Solid state nuclear track detectors which formed part of the Dublin-ESTEC ultra heavy~cosmic~ray experiment aboard LDEF (Long Duration Exposure Facility) and which was deployed in Earth orbit for sixty-nine months, will be exposed to relativistic Pb ions. The experiment was the largest of its kind ever undertaken in space and has successfully accumulated more than fifteen times the world sample of cosmic ray nuclei in the region above Z~=~70. The data include the first significant sample of cosmic ray actinide elements and is of major astrophysical importance. The total number of ultra heavy nuclei (Z~$>$~70) in the Dublin-ESTEC sample is $\\sim$~2800. \\\\ \\\\The exposure will be very simple. A stack of detectors (20.5~cm~x~26~cm x~3~cm in size) will be irradiated with a low density beam of Pb ions (a few hundred per cm$^2$ would be ideal, but a wide range of densities and areas could be tolerated). The response of the detectors to these ions of known charge and velocity will be measured and the da...

  2. Influence of the training experience of Makerere University medical and nursing graduates on willingness and competence to work in rural health facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Dan K; Mwanika, Andrew; Sewankambo, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    The global human resources crisis in the rural health sector is characterized by an unwillingness or inability of health workers to locate to a rural area, and/or function effectively there. To assist in addressing this issue in Uganda, Makerere University Faculty of Medicine designed and implemented a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum in which health students underwent experiential training on community placements. This study sought to assess the influence of this training experience on students' willingness, readiness and competence to work in rural health facilities by surveying 60 recent graduates of Makerere University Faculty of Medicine, who completed their studies during the transition from traditional to PBL curriculum. During a comprehensive evaluation of the PBL curriculum conducted from 19 to 31 October 2008, 60 graduates were assessed. Their distribution between the traditional and PBL curricula was equal. Using a participatory approach and open-ended questionnaires, the 2 groups were compared for the effect of their training on willingness and readiness to work in a rural location. Influential training experience factors were compared according to whether the students were educated in the PBL curriculum or the traditional curriculum (with or without PBL influence). The community based training experience of graduates significantly influenced their choice to work in a rural and underserved area of Uganda, compared with their counterparts from the traditional curriculum. In addition, PBL/community based curriculum graduates showed greater motivation to take up employment in a rural area, and confidence about practicing there effectively. While personal values may impact on a decision to work in a rural area, training experience also shapes these personal values and choices.

  3. AN IMAGE-BASED MODELING EXPERIENCE ABOUT SOCIAL FACILITIES, BUILT DURING THE FASCIST PERIOD IN MIDDLE ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rossi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The main focus of this article is to explain a teaching activity. This experience follows a research aimed to testing innovative systems for formal and digital analysis of architectural building. In particular, the field of investigation is the analytical drawing. An analytical draw allows to develope an interpretative and similar models of reality; these models are built using photomodeling techniques and are designed to re-write modern and contemporary architecture. The typology of the buildings surveyed belong to a cultural period, called Modern Movement, historically placed between the two world wars. The Modern Movement aimed to renew existing architectural principle and to a functional redefinition of the same one. In Italy these principles arrived during the Fascist period. Heritage made up of public social buildings (case del Balilla, G.I.L., recreation center... built during the fascist period in middle Italy is remarkable for quantity and in many cases for architectural quality. This kind of buildings are composed using pure shapes: large cube (gyms alternate with long rectangular block containing offices creates compositions made of big volumes and high towers. These features are perfectly suited to the needs of a surveying process by photomodeling where the role of photography is central and where there is the need to identify certain and easily distinguishable points on all picture, leaning on the edges of the volume or lininig on the texture discontinuity. The goal is the documentation to preserve and to develop buildings and urban complexes of modern architecture, directed to encourage an artistic preservation.

  4. Modeling event building architecture for the triggerless data acquisition system for PANDA experiment at the HESR facility at FAIR/GSI

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    A novel architecture is being proposed for the data acquisition and trigger system for PANDA experiment at the HESR facility at FAIR/GSI. The experiment will run without the hardware trigger signal and use timestamps to correlate detector data from a given time window. The broad physics program in combination with high rate of 2 10^7 interactions require very selective filtering algorithms which access information from almost all detectors. Therefore the effective filtering will happen later than it used to in today's systems ie after the event building. To assess that, the complete architecture will be built of two stages: the data concentrator stage providing event building and the rate reduction stage. For the former stage, which allows to switch 100 GB/s of event fragments to perform event building, we propose two layers of ATCA crates filled with compute nodes - modules designed at University of Giessen for trigger and data acquisition systems. Each board is equipped with 5 Virtex4 FX60 FPG...

  5. Experiences in planning and response for the radiological emergencies in a radioactive facility; Experiencias en la planificacion y respuesta para las emergencias radiologicas en una instalacion radiactiva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amador B, Z.H.; Perez P, S.; Torres B, M.B.; Ayra P, F.E. [Centro de Isotopos, Ave. Monumental y Carretera La Rada, Km. 3, Guanabacoa, Apartado 3415, Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: dsr@centis.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    It is internationally recognized the importance of the planning and the assurance for the effective response to the radiological emergencies. In the work those experiences on this thematic one in the Isotopes Center (CENTIS), the radioactive facility where the biggest radioactive inventory is manipulated in Cuba are presented. Due to CENTIS is also the sender and main transport of radioactive materials, it is included this practice. The revision of the abnormal situations during the years 1997 at the 2005, starting from the classification adopted by the Regulatory Authority of the country is carried out. Its are register the details of these occurrences in the Radiological Events Database (BDSR). A correspondence among the radiological impact evaluated in the Emergency Plan for the possible events and that of the registered ones is obtained. The complete training programs and realization of the exercises are carried out. Those results of 3 mockeries made to full scale are picked up. It was concluded that the operational experience and the maintained infrastructure, determine the answer capacity for radiological emergencies in the CENTIS. (Author)

  6. Time-resolved measurements of the hot-electron population in ignition-scale experiments on the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenberger, M.; Albert, F.; Palmer, N. E.; Lee, J. J.; Döppner, T.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Bachmann, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; LaCaille, G.; Bradley, D. K.; Stoeckl, C.

    2014-11-01

    In laser-driven inertial confinement fusion, hot electrons can preheat the fuel and prevent fusion-pellet compression to ignition conditions. Measuring the hot-electron population is key to designing an optimized ignition platform. The hot electrons in these high-intensity, laser-driven experiments, created via laser-plasma interactions, can be inferred from the bremsstrahlung generated by hot electrons interacting with the target. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)], the filter-fluorescer x-ray (FFLEX) diagnostic-a multichannel, hard x-ray spectrometer operating in the 20-500 keV range-has been upgraded to provide fully time-resolved, absolute measurements of the bremsstrahlung spectrum with ˜300 ps resolution. Initial time-resolved data exhibited significant background and low signal-to-noise ratio, leading to a redesign of the FFLEX housing and enhanced shielding around the detector. The FFLEX x-ray sensitivity was characterized with an absolutely calibrated, energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector using the high-energy x-ray source at NSTec Livermore Operations over a range of K-shell fluorescence energies up to 111 keV (U Kβ). The detectors impulse response function was measured in situ on NIF short-pulse (˜90 ps) experiments, and in off-line tests.

  7. Time-resolved measurements of the hot-electron population in ignition-scale experiments on the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohenberger, M., E-mail: mhoh@lle.rochester.edu; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Albert, F.; Palmer, N. E.; Döppner, T.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Bachmann, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; LaCaille, G.; Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Lee, J. J. [National Security Technologies LLC, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    In laser-driven inertial confinement fusion, hot electrons can preheat the fuel and prevent fusion-pellet compression to ignition conditions. Measuring the hot-electron population is key to designing an optimized ignition platform. The hot electrons in these high-intensity, laser-driven experiments, created via laser-plasma interactions, can be inferred from the bremsstrahlung generated by hot electrons interacting with the target. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)], the filter-fluorescer x-ray (FFLEX) diagnostic–a multichannel, hard x-ray spectrometer operating in the 20–500 keV range–has been upgraded to provide fully time-resolved, absolute measurements of the bremsstrahlung spectrum with ∼300 ps resolution. Initial time-resolved data exhibited significant background and low signal-to-noise ratio, leading to a redesign of the FFLEX housing and enhanced shielding around the detector. The FFLEX x-ray sensitivity was characterized with an absolutely calibrated, energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector using the high-energy x-ray source at NSTec Livermore Operations over a range of K-shell fluorescence energies up to 111 keV (U K{sub β}). The detectors impulse response function was measured in situ on NIF short-pulse (∼90 ps) experiments, and in off-line tests.

  8. Proof of concept experiments of the multi-isotope process monitor: An online, nondestructive, near real-time monitor for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, Christopher R., E-mail: christopher.orton@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Fraga, Carlos G., E-mail: carlos.fraga@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Christensen, Richard N., E-mail: christensen.3@osu.edu [The Ohio State University, 201W. 19th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Schwantes, Jon M., E-mail: jon.schwantes@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2012-04-21

    Operators, national regulatory agencies and the IAEA will require the development of advanced technologies to efficiently control and safeguard nuclear material at increasingly large-scale nuclear recycling facilities. Ideally, the envisioned technologies would be capable of non-destructive, near real-time (NRT), autonomous process monitoring. This paper describes results from proof-of-principle experiments designed to test the multi-isotope process (MIP) monitor, a novel approach to monitoring and safeguarding reprocessing facilities. The MIP Monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams nondestructively and in NRT. Commercial spent nuclear fuel of various irradiation histories was dissolved and separated using a PUREX-based batch solvent extraction. Extractions were performed at various nitric acid concentrations to mimic both normal and off-normal industrial plant operating conditions. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the simulated gamma spectra to investigate pattern variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup and cooling time. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was applied to attempt to quantify both the acid concentration and burnup of the dissolved spent fuel during the initial separation stage of recycle. The MIP Monitor demonstrated sensitivity to induced variations of acid concentration, including the distinction of {+-}1.3 M variation from normal process conditions by way of PCA. Acid concentration was predicted using measurements from the organic extract and PLS resulting in predictions with <0.7 M relative error. Quantification of burnup levels from dissolved fuel spectra using PLS was demonstrated to be within 2.5% of previously measured values.

  9. Proof of Concept Experiments of the Multi-Isotope Process Monitor: An Online, Nondestructive, Near Real-Time Monitor for Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2012-04-21

    Operators, national regulatory agencies and the IAEA will require the development of advanced technologies to efficiently control and safeguard nuclear material at increasingly large-scale nuclear recycling facilities. Ideally, the envisioned technologies would be capable of non-destructive, near-real-time (NRT), autonomous process monitoring. This paper describes results from proof-of-principle experiments designed to test the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor, a novel approach to safeguarding reprocessing facilities. The MIP Monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams nondestructively and in NRT. Commercial spent nuclear fuel of various irradiation histories was dissolved and separated using a PUREX-based batch solvent extraction. Extractions were performed at various nitric acid concentrations to mimic both normal and off-normal industrial plant operating conditions. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to the simulated gamma spectra to investigate pattern variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup and cooling time. Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression was applied to attempt to quantify both the acid concentration and burnup of the dissolved spent fuel during the initial separation stage of recycle. The MIP Monitor demonstrated sensitivity to induced variations of acid concentration, including the distinction of {+-} 1.3 M variation from normal process conditions by way of PCA. Acid concentration was predicted using measurements from the organic extract and PLS resulting in predictions with <0.7 M relative error. Quantification of burnup levels from dissolved fuel spectra using PLS was demonstrated to be within 2.5% of previously measured values.

  10. Proof of concept experiments of the multi-isotope process monitor: An online, nondestructive, near real-time monitor for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard N.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2012-04-01

    Operators, national regulatory agencies and the IAEA will require the development of advanced technologies to efficiently control and safeguard nuclear material at increasingly large-scale nuclear recycling facilities. Ideally, the envisioned technologies would be capable of non-destructive, near real-time (NRT), autonomous process monitoring. This paper describes results from proof-of-principle experiments designed to test the multi-isotope process (MIP) monitor, a novel approach to monitoring and safeguarding reprocessing facilities. The MIP Monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams nondestructively and in NRT. Commercial spent nuclear fuel of various irradiation histories was dissolved and separated using a PUREX-based batch solvent extraction. Extractions were performed at various nitric acid concentrations to mimic both normal and off-normal industrial plant operating conditions. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the simulated gamma spectra to investigate pattern variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup and cooling time. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was applied to attempt to quantify both the acid concentration and burnup of the dissolved spent fuel during the initial separation stage of recycle. The MIP Monitor demonstrated sensitivity to induced variations of acid concentration, including the distinction of ±1.3 M variation from normal process conditions by way of PCA. Acid concentration was predicted using measurements from the organic extract and PLS resulting in predictions with <0.7 M relative error. Quantification of burnup levels from dissolved fuel spectra using PLS was demonstrated to be within 2.5% of previously measured values.

  11. Effects of ultra-vacuum and space environment on contact ohmic resistance: LDEF experiment AO 138-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assie, Jean-Pierre; Perotto, Alfred

    1992-01-01

    The FRECOPA experimentation of chemical resistance of electrical connector contacts, as described, has evidenced the detrimental time variations of nickel plated conductors and gilded copper contacts, irrespective of crimping storage or metal peening conditions. With a view to reorient aluminum technology a silvered aluminum conductor/gilded aluminum contact solution was evaluated.

  12. Simulation of Coin Tossing Experiment Based on Calculating Facilities%基于计算工具模拟抛硬币实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武明扬; 周诗

    2012-01-01

      本文对抛硬币实验的模拟进行研究.利用计算工具的高效和算法的合理性,给出模拟抛硬币实验的方法,分别在Casio fx-991ES PLUS科学计算器、Microsoft Visual C++6.0以及MATLAB R2012a三种环境下进行数据的获取和总结,并优化了随机数的生成方法,验证了抛硬币正反面朝上概率相同的结论.该模拟方法不仅适用于概率论教学过程中的演示,也可为历史上其他相关数学实验的模拟和验证提供思路.%  This paper researches on simulation of coin tossing experiment. Considering high- efficiency and logical arithmetic of calculating facilities, we simulate the experiments based on the environment of Casio fx-991ES PLUS scientific calculator, Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 and MATLAB R2012a. During the simulation, method of acquiring random number is optimized in order to make it more reasonable to draw the convictive conclusion that the probability of head or tow during a coin tossing is equal. These methods of simulation are not only fit for presenting in Probability Theory teaching, but can also provide thoughts on simulation and verification of relating mathematical experiments in history.

  13. The experiences of acute non-surgical pain of children who present to a healthcare facility for treatment: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Nicole; Tallon, Mary; McConigley, Ruth; Wilson, Sally

    2015-10-01

    The qualitative objective of this systematic review is to identify and synthesize the best available evidence on experiences of acute non-surgical pain, including pain management, of children (between four to 18 years) when they present to a healthcare facility for treatment.The specific objectives are to identify: The International Association for the Study of Pain defines pain as "an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage". The pain experience is multifaceted and complex, extending beyond the physiological interpretation of a noxious stimulus, encompassing other dimensions, including; psychological, cognitive, sociocultural, affective and emotional factors. Pain can be described as chronic (persisting for three months or more) or acute (a time limited response to a noxious stimuli). Over the past 50 years clinical research has made revolutionary contributions to better understanding pediatric pain. The once pervasive erroneous notion that infants do not experience pain the same way as adults has been firmly dispelled. We now know that nervous system structures associated with the physiological interpretation of pain are functional as early as fetal development. Despite this critical knowledge and the growing global commitment to improving pediatric pain management in clinical practice, evidence repeatedly suggests that pain management remains suboptimal and inconsistent, a phenomenon commonly referred to as oligoanalgesia. Research evidence has linked poorly managed pain in the pediatric population to negative behavioral and physiological consequences later in life. Effective pain management is therefore a priority area for health care professionals. Improved understanding of children's experiences of acute non-surgical pain may lead to improved pain management and a reduction in oligoanalgesia.In the 1970s and 1980s, studies began exploring the subjective experiences of

  14. Analysis of 440 GeV proton beam–matter interaction experiments at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkart, F. [CERN-AB, 1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland and Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Schmidt, R.; Wollmann, D. [CERN-AB, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Raginel, V. [CERN-AB, 1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland and TU Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Tahir, N. A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Shutov, A. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Piriz, A. R. [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2015-08-07

    In a previous paper [Schmidt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 080701 (2014)], we presented the first results on beam–matter interaction experiments that were carried out at the High Radiation Materials test facility at CERN. In these experiments, extended cylindrical targets of solid copper were irradiated with beam of 440 GeV protons delivered by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The beam comprised of a large number of high intensity proton bunches, each bunch having a length of 0.5 ns with a 50 ns gap between two neighboring bunches, while the length of this entire bunch train was about 7 μs. These experiments established the existence of the hydrodynamic tunneling phenomenon the first time. Detailed numerical simulations of these experiments were also carried out which were reported in detail in another paper [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. E 90, 063112 (2014)]. Excellent agreement was found between the experimental measurements and the simulation results that validate our previous simulations done using the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam of 7 TeV protons [Tahir et al., Phys. Rev. Spec. Top.--Accel. Beams 15, 051003 (2012)]. According to these simulations, the range of the full LHC proton beam and the hadronic shower can be increased by more than an order of magnitude due to the hydrodynamic tunneling, compared to that of a single proton. This effect is of considerable importance for the design of machine protection system for hadron accelerators such as SPS, LHC, and Future Circular Collider. Recently, using metal cutting technology, the targets used in these experiments have been dissected into finer pieces for visual and microscopic inspection in order to establish the precise penetration depth of the protons and the corresponding hadronic shower. This, we believe will be helpful in studying the very important phenomenon of hydrodynamic tunneling in a more quantitative manner. The details of this experimental work together with a comparison with the

  15. Sustainable Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Elle, Morten; Hoffmann, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    The Danish public housing sector has more than 20 years of experience with sustainable facilities management based on user involvement. The paper outlines this development in a historical perspective and gives an analysis of different approaches to sustainable facilities management. The focus...... is on the housing departments and strateies for the management of the use of resources. The research methods used are case studies based on interviews in addition to literature studies. The paper explores lessons to be learned about sustainable facilities management in general, and points to a need for new...

  16. THE PROJECT-X INJECTOR EXPERIMENT: A NOVEL HIGH PERFORMANCE FRONT-END FOR A FUTURE HIGH POWER PROTON FACILITY AT FERMILAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaitsev, S.; et al,

    2013-09-25

    A multi-MW proton facility, Project X, has been proposed and is currently under development at Fermilab. We are carrying out a program of research and development aimed at integrated systems testing of critical components comprising the front end of Project X. This program, known as the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE), is being undertaken as a key component of the larger Project X R&D program. The successful completion of this program will validate the concept for the Project X front end, thereby minimizing a primary technical risk element within Project X. PXIE is currently under construction at Fermilab and will be completed over the period FY12-17. PXIE will include an H* ion source, a CW 2.1-MeV RFQ and two superconductive RF (SRF) cryomodules providing up to 25 MeV energy gain at an average beam current of 1 mA (upgradable to 2 mA). Successful systems testing will also demonstrate the viability of novel front end technologies that are expected find applications beyond Project X.

  17. The PARIS cluster coupled to the BaFPro electronic module: data analysis from the NRF experiment at the γELBE facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewska, B.; Bednarczyk, P.; Boiano, C.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Ciemała, M.; Dorvaux, O.; Giaz, A.; Jastrzab, M.; Kihel, S.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Matea, I.; Massarczyk, R.; Mazumdar, I.; Mentana, A.; Napiorkowski, P.; Sowicki, B.; Schwengner, R.; Riboldi, S.; Ziebliński, M.; PARIS Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    The first cluster of the constructed PARIS calorimeter was assembled and tested at the γELBE facility at HZDR, Dresden, Germany. The experiment was aimed at the evaluation of the performance of each detector separately as well as the whole PARIS cluster with discrete γ-ray energies seen by the PARIS ranging up to 8.9 MeV. As the detectors use phoswich configuration, with 2" × 2" × 2" LaBr3(Ce) crystal coupled to 2" × 2" × 6" NaI(Tl) one, great care must be taken during the data analysis process to obtain the best possible values for energy resolution. Two algorithms for data transformation from matrices created with slow vs fast pulse shaping to energy spectra were tested from which one was chosen for further analysis. An algorithm for adding back energies of γ-rays scattered inside the cluster was prepared, as well. Energy resolution for γ-rays in 2-8 MeV range was estimated and is presented in this paper.

  18. Experiments on Component Effects for Performance of SMART PRHRS using the High Temperature/High Pressure Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (VISTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Sik; Choi, Ki Yong; Cho, Seok; Lee, Sung Jae; Choi, Nam Hyun; Min, Kyong Ho; Song, Chul Hwa; Park, Chun Kyong; Chung, Moon Ki

    2005-07-15

    The VISTA (Experimental Verification by Integral Simulation of Transients and Accidents) is an experimental facility to verify the performance and safety issues of the SMART-P (Pilot plant of the System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor). The basic design of the SMART-P has been completed by KAERI. The present report describes the experimental results on the effects of several components for the performance of SMART PRHRS. Four experiments are performed separately without gas cylinder system, without PRHRS compensation tank, without initial filling of PRHRS loop, and without heat loss compensation of primary system. For all four cases a stable flow occurs in a natural circulation loop which is composed of a steam generator secondary side, a secondary system, and a PRHRS, which shows the similar trend of the reference case. Especially for cases without gas cylinder system and without initial filling of PRHRS loop the unsteady flow instability, which is occurred during the reference test, does not occur. The experimental results show that the overall performance of PRHRS is enhanced without PRHRS compensation tank, without initial filling of PRHRS loop, and without heat loss compensation.

  19. Application and Analysis of the Isoelectronic Line Ratio Temperature Diagnostic in a Planar Ablating-Plasma Experiment at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, R.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Myatt, J. F.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Hohenberger, M.; Barrios, M. A.; Moody, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    The Mn/Co isoelectronic emission-line ratio from a microdot source in planar CH foil targets was measured to infer the electron temperature (Te) in the ablating plasma during two-plasmon-decay experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We examine the systematic uncertainty in the Te estimate based on the temperature and density sensitivities of the line ratio in conjunction with plausible density constraints, and its contribution to the total Te estimate uncertainty. The potential advantages of alternative microdot elements (e.g., Ti/Cr and Sc/V) are considered. The microdot mass was selected to provide ample line strength while minimizing the effect of self-absorption on the line emission, which is of particular concern, given the narrow linewidths of mid- Z emitters at subcritical electron densities. Atomic line-formation theory and detailed atomic-radiative simulations show that the straight forward interpretation of the isoelectronic ratio solely in terms of its temperature independence remains valid with lines of moderate optical thickness (up to ~ 10) at line center. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  20. Physical processes at work in sub-30 fs, PW laser pulse-driven plasma accelerators: Towards GeV electron acceleration experiments at CILEX facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, A.; Kalmykov, S. Y.; Davoine, X.; Lifschitz, A.; Shadwick, B. A.; Malka, V.; Specka, A.

    2014-03-01

    Optimal regimes and physical processes at work are identified for the first round of laser wakefield acceleration experiments proposed at a future CILEX facility. The Apollon-10P CILEX laser, delivering fully compressed, near-PW-power pulses of sub-25 fs duration, is well suited for driving electron density wakes in the blowout regime in cm-length gas targets. Early destruction of the pulse (partly due to energy depletion) prevents electrons from reaching dephasing, limiting the energy gain to about 3 GeV. However, the optimal operating regimes, found with reduced and full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, show high energy efficiency, with about 10% of incident pulse energy transferred to 3 GeV electron bunches with sub-5% energy spread, half-nC charge, and absolutely no low-energy background. This optimal acceleration occurs in 2 cm length plasmas of electron density below 1018 cm-3. Due to their high charge and low phase space volume, these multi-GeV bunches are tailor-made for staged acceleration planned in the framework of the CILEX project. The hallmarks of the optimal regime are electron self-injection at the early stage of laser pulse propagation, stable self-guiding of the pulse through the entire acceleration process, and no need for an external plasma channel. With the initial focal spot closely matched for the nonlinear self-guiding, the laser pulse stabilizes transversely within two Rayleigh lengths, preventing subsequent evolution of the accelerating bucket. This dynamics prevents continuous self-injection of background electrons, preserving low phase space volume of the bunch through the plasma. Near the end of propagation, an optical shock builds up in the pulse tail. This neither disrupts pulse propagation nor produces any noticeable low-energy background in the electron spectra, which is in striking contrast with most of existing GeV-scale acceleration experiments.

  1. Physical processes at work in sub-30 fs, PW laser pulse-driven plasma accelerators: Towards GeV electron acceleration experiments at CILEX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, A., E-mail: beck@llr.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet – École Polytechnique, CNRS-IN2P3, Palaiseau 91128 (France); Kalmykov, S.Y., E-mail: skalmykov2@unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska – Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0299 (United States); Davoine, X. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Lifschitz, A. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech-CNRS UMR7639-École Polytechnique, Palaiseau 91762 (France); Shadwick, B.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska – Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0299 (United States); Malka, V. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech-CNRS UMR7639-École Polytechnique, Palaiseau 91762 (France); Specka, A. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet – École Polytechnique, CNRS-IN2P3, Palaiseau 91128 (France)

    2014-03-11

    Optimal regimes and physical processes at work are identified for the first round of laser wakefield acceleration experiments proposed at a future CILEX facility. The Apollon-10P CILEX laser, delivering fully compressed, near-PW-power pulses of sub-25 fs duration, is well suited for driving electron density wakes in the blowout regime in cm-length gas targets. Early destruction of the pulse (partly due to energy depletion) prevents electrons from reaching dephasing, limiting the energy gain to about 3 GeV. However, the optimal operating regimes, found with reduced and full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, show high energy efficiency, with about 10% of incident pulse energy transferred to 3 GeV electron bunches with sub-5% energy spread, half-nC charge, and absolutely no low-energy background. This optimal acceleration occurs in 2 cm length plasmas of electron density below 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}. Due to their high charge and low phase space volume, these multi-GeV bunches are tailor-made for staged acceleration planned in the framework of the CILEX project. The hallmarks of the optimal regime are electron self-injection at the early stage of laser pulse propagation, stable self-guiding of the pulse through the entire acceleration process, and no need for an external plasma channel. With the initial focal spot closely matched for the nonlinear self-guiding, the laser pulse stabilizes transversely within two Rayleigh lengths, preventing subsequent evolution of the accelerating bucket. This dynamics prevents continuous self-injection of background electrons, preserving low phase space volume of the bunch through the plasma. Near the end of propagation, an optical shock builds up in the pulse tail. This neither disrupts pulse propagation nor produces any noticeable low-energy background in the electron spectra, which is in striking contrast with most of existing GeV-scale acceleration experiments.

  2. Post-test analysis of the experiment 5.2C - total loss of feed water at the BETHSY test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krepper, E.; Schaefer, F.

    1998-10-01

    The BETHSY-test facility is a 1:100 scaled thermohydraulic model of a 900 MW(el) pressurized water reactor (FRAMATOME). The test facility is mainly designed to investigate various accident scenarios and to provide an experimental data base for code validation and for the verification of accident management measures. (orig.)

  3. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. S.; Choi, J. W.; Go, W. I.; Kim, H. D.; Song, K. C.; Jeong, I. H.; Park, H. S.; Im, C. S.; Lee, H. M.; Moon, K. H.; Hong, K. P.; Lee, K. S.; Suh, K. S.; Kim, E. K.; Min, D. K.; Lee, J. C.; Chun, Y. B.; Paik, S. Y.; Lee, E. P.; Yoo, G. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, J. C.

    1997-09-01

    In the early stage of the project, a comprehensive survey was conducted to identify the feasibility of using available facilities and of interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 of IMEF could be used for the main process experiments of DUPIC fuel fabrication in regard to space adequacy, material flow, equipment layout, etc. Based on such examination, a suitable adapter system for material transfer around the M6 cell was engineered. Regarding the PIEF facility, where spent PWR fuel assemblies are stored in an annex pool, disassembly devices in the pool are retrofitted and spent fuel rod cutting and shipping system to the IMEF are designed and built. For acquisition of casks for radioactive material transport between the facilities, some adaptive refurbishment was applied to the available cask (Padirac) based on extensive analysis on safety requirements. A mockup test facility was newly acquired for remote test of DUPIC fuel fabrication process equipment prior to installation in the M6 cell of the IMEF facility. (author). 157 refs., 57 tabs., 65 figs.

  4. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  5. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  6. Canyon Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  7. TNO HVAC facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammink, H.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    TNO has extensive knowledge of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), and can offer its services through theoretical studies, laboratory experiments and field measurements. This complete scope, made possible through our test facilities, enables the effective development of new products, i

  8. Installation of a radioactive waste disposal facility. The necessity of building up durable links between the general public and radioactive waste. Feedback from experience in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comte, Annabelle; Farin, Sebastien [Andra, Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2015-07-01

    2013 has been a banner year for Andra with widespread discussions on the question of long-term management of radioactive waste: a nationwide public discussion about the planned Cigeo deep disposal facility has been organized and national discussions on the energy source transition had inevitably brought up the question of what to do with future radioactive waste to be produced under the various scenarios put forward. In spite of an open institutional framework, with numerous legal provisions for citizen participation, 2013 showed that creation of a radioactive waste disposal facility is not, and cannot be, a question dealt with like breaking news, within a given temporal or spatial perimeter. Any attempts to bring up the subject under the spotlight of public scrutiny inevitably shift the discussions away from their central theme and abandon the underlying question - what should be done with the existing radioactive waste and the waste that is bound to be produced? - to move on to the other major question: ''Should we stop using nuclear power or not?'', which takes us away from our responsibilities towards future generations. Daring to face the question, anchor it in citizen discussions, and create awareness of our duties towards coming generations: this is the challenge that Andra had already set itself several years ago. Our position is a strong one; rather than seeking to mask the problem of radioactive waste, we must face up to our responsibilities: the waste is already there, and we have to do something with it. It will take time to be successful here. Long-term management of radioactive waste is clearly a really long-term matter. All the experience in the field has shown that it involves patience and careful listening, and requires building up a basis for solid trust among the potential neighboring population, who are the most directly concerned. Durable proximity human investment is one of the key factors of success. For over 20 years now

  9. Space environmental effects on LDEF composites: Leading graphite/epoxy panel, selected trailing edge specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursch, Harry; George, Pete; Hill, Sylvester

    1992-01-01

    The composite electronics-module cover for the leading edge (row D9) experiment M0003-8 was fabricated from T300 graphite/934 epoxy unidirectional prepreg tape in a multi-oriented layup. This panel contained thermal control coatings in three of the four quadrants with the fourth quadrant left uncoated as a control. The composite experienced different thermal cycling extremes in each quadrant due to the differing optical properties of the coatings. Results will be presented on microcracking and other Low Earth Orbital (LEO) effects on the coated panel substrate.

  10. Early uptake of HIV counselling and testing among pregnant women at different levels of health facilitiesexperiences from a community-based study in Northern Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen Thi Thuy, Hanh; Gammeltoft, Tine; Rasch, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    .0% of the women interviewed had attended antenatal care and 90.3% had been tested for HIV during their most recent pregnancy. Women who had their first antenatal checkup at primary health facilities were significantly more likely to be tested before 34 weeks of gestation (OR = 43.2, CI: 18.9-98.1). The reported......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: HIV counselling and testing for pregnant women is a key factor for successful prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV. Women's access to testing can be improved by scaling up the distribution of this service at all levels of health facilities. However, this strategy...... will only be effective if pregnant women are tested early and provided enough counselling. OBJECTIVE: To assess early uptake of HIV testing and the provision of HIV counselling among pregnant women who attend antenatal care at primary and higher level health facilities. METHODS: A community based study...

  11. Early uptake of HIV counselling and testing among pregnant women at different levels of health facilitiesexperiences from a community-based study in Northern Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen Thi Thuy, Hanh; Gammeltoft, Tine; Rasch, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: HIV counselling and testing for pregnant women is a key factor for successful prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV. Women's access to testing can be improved by scaling up the distribution of this service at all levels of health facilities. However, this strategy...... will only be effective if pregnant women are tested early and provided enough counselling. OBJECTIVE: To assess early uptake of HIV testing and the provision of HIV counselling among pregnant women who attend antenatal care at primary and higher level health facilities. METHODS: A community based study...

  12. Space environmental effects on LDEF composites: A leading edge coated graphite epoxy panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Pete E.; Dursch, Harry W.; Hill, Sylvester G.

    1993-01-01

    The electronics module cover for the leading edge (Row D 9) experiment M0003-8 was fabricated from T300 graphite/934 epoxy unidirectional prepreg tape in a (O(sub 2), +/- 45, O(sub 2), +/- 45, 90, 0)(sub s) layup. This 11.75 in x 16.75 in panel was covered with thermal control coatings in three of the four quadrants with the fourth quadrant uncoated. The composite panel experienced different thermal cycling extremes in each quadrant due to the different optical properties of the coatings and bare composite. The panel also experienced ultraviolet (UV) and atomic oxygen (AO) attack as well as micrometeoroid and space debris impacts. An AO reactivity of 0.99 x 10(exp -24) cm(sup 3)/atom was calculated for the bare composite based on thickness loss. The white urethane thermal control coatings (A276 and BMS 1060) prevented AO attack of the composite substrate. However, the black urethane thermal control coating (Z306) was severely eroded by AO, allowing some AO attack of the composite substrate. An interesting banding pattern on the AO eroded bare composite surface was investigated and found to match the dimensions of the graphite fiber tow widths as prepregged. Also, erosion depths were greater in the darker bands. Five micrometeoroid/space debris impacts were cross sectioned to investigate possible structural damage as well as impact/AO interactions. Local crushing and delaminations were found to some extent in all of the impacts. No signs of coating undercutting were observed despite the extensive AO erosion patterns seen in the exposed composite material at the impact sites. An extensive microcrack study was performed on the panel along with modeling of the thermal environment to estimate temperature extremes and thermal shock. The white coated composite substrate displayed almost no microcracking while the black coated and bare composite showed extensive microcracking. Significant AO erosion was seen in many of the cracks in the bare composite.

  13. Issues related to the construction and operation of a geological disposal facility for nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock - the Canadian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, C.J.; Baumgartner, P.; Ohta, M.M.; Simmons, G.R.; Whitaker, S.H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs

    1997-12-31

    This paper covers the overview of the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program, the general approach to the siting, design, construction, operation and closure of a geological disposal facility, the implementing disposal, and the public involvement in implementing geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste. And two appendices are included. 45 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  14. Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.

    2001-07-09

    poor facility and infrastructure drawings. The assessment team believes that the information, experience, and insight gained through FEVA will help in the planning and prioritization of ongoing efforts to resolve environmental vulnerabilities at UT-Battelle--managed ORNL facilities.

  15. Design and construction of a spectrometer facility and experiment for intermediate energy proton scattering on helium. [Wave functions, preliminary experimental techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolfe, R.M.

    1976-12-01

    The goal of the research was to investigate proton scattering on nuclei at intermediate energies and in particular to investigate proton scattering on helium. A theoretical investigation of the helium nucleus and the nature of the intermediate energy interaction, design and optimization of an energy-loss spectrometer facility for proton-nucleus scattering, and the unique superfluid helium target and experimental design are discussed.

  16. First experiences in the implementation of biometric technology to link data from Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems with health facility data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adwoa Serwaa-Bonsu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In developing countries, Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems (HDSSs provide a framework for tracking demographic and health dynamics over time in a defined geographical area. Many HDSSs co-exist with facility-based data sources in the form of Health Management Information Systems (HMIS. Integrating both data sources through reliable record linkage could provide both numerator and denominator populations to estimate disease prevalence and incidence rates in the population and enable determination of accurate health service coverage. Objective: To measure the acceptability and performance of fingerprint biometrics to identify individuals in demographic surveillance populations and those attending health care facilities serving the surveillance populations. Methodology: Two HDSS sites used fingerprint biometrics for patient and/or surveillance population participant identification. The proportion of individuals for whom a fingerprint could be successfully enrolled were characterised in terms of age and sex. Results: Adult (18–65 years fingerprint enrolment rates varied between 94.1% (95% CI 93.6–94.5 for facility-based fingerprint data collection at the Africa Centre site to 96.7% (95% CI 95.9–97.6 for population-based fingerprint data collection at the Agincourt site. Fingerprint enrolment rates in children under 1 year old (Africa Centre site were only 55.1% (95% CI 52.7–57.4. By age 5, child fingerprint enrolment rates were comparable to those of adults. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of fingerprint-based individual identification for population-based research in developing countries. Record linkage between demographic surveillance population databases and health care facility data based on biometric identification systems would allow for a more comprehensive evaluation of population health, including the ability to study health service utilisation from a population perspective, rather than the

  17. Development, simulation and test of transition radiation detector prototypes for the compressed baryonic matter experiment at the facility for antiproton and ion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, Cyrano S.H.

    2014-07-01

    prototype materials were chosen with special focus on performance and mechanical stability. All eligible materials have been simulated in full radiator parameter space (γ, l{sub 1}, l{sub 2} and N{sub f}) to find optimal materials and parameters with respect to the TR-photon absorption characteristic of the chamber. The best candidates were built in small scales and the simulations were compared to measurements. It was found that the regular radiator model is sufficient to describe all measurements between 2 and 8 GeV/c, if extended by a material dependent constant scaling factor. At the same time, this model is inadequate in case of irregular radiators. The two best radiator candidates for CBM TRD are a micro-structured self-supporting POKALON foil radiator and a foam foil radiator, reaching the PID design goal with at least five to six detector hits per track. The chamber geometry was implemented in the simulation framework (CbmRoot) of the CBM experiment. The measured charge spectra for electrons including TR-photons were reproduced based on a regular radiator model for all tested prototypes, in order to provide a realistic input for the TRD in the simulation. For the first time the TRD simulation includes a realistic detector response simulation and clusterization. In summary, the new real-size TRD prototype providing electron/pion discrimination and tracking of charged particles in high counting rate environments was developed. It was demonstrated that they fulfill the requirements of the CBM experiment at the FAIR facility in terms of particle identification. A final test with respect to the performance in a high counting rate environment has still to be performed. The results encourage the further development of this new design principle for a TRD for the CBM experiment. Based on the prototype performance demonstrated in this thesis, a new generation of TRD prototypes has been developed and is currently under construction.

  18. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted. (DLC)

  19. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  20. The National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, G H; Moses, E I; Wuest, C R

    2004-06-03

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that, when completed in 2008, will contain a 192-beam, 1.8- Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter-diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system and will provide a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} bar; conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules in 23-ns pulses of infrared light and over 16 kJ in 3.5- ns pulses at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper provides a detailed look the NIF laser systems, laser and optical performance, and results from recent laser commissioning shots. We follow this with a discussion of NIF's high-energy-density and inertial fusion experimental capabilities, the first experiments on NIF, and plans for future capabilities of this unique facility.

  1. Raman facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raman scattering is a powerful light scattering technique used to diagnose the internal structure of molecules and crystals. In a light scattering experiment, light...

  2. The impact of improvement of water supply and sanitation facilities on diarrhea and intestinal parasites: a Brazilian experience with children in two low-income urban communities

    OpenAIRE

    Rainer Gross; Bernd Schell; Maria Carmen Bisi Molina; Maria Antonia Cuelho Leão; Ulrike Strack

    1989-01-01

    During the second half of 1986 the impact of the improvement of water supply and excreta disposal facilities on diarrheal diseases and intestinal parasitosis was studied in 254 children up to six years of age from two favelas (shanty towns) of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The estimated incidence of diarrhea was 6.2 episodes/child year and the estimated period prevalence reached 31.0 episode days/ child/ year. The point prevalence of parasitosis was 70.7% (Ascaris lumbricoides: 55.4%, Trichuris tri...

  3. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other facilities...

  4. Theme: Laboratory Facilities Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Glen M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Laboratory Facilities Improvement" (Miller); "Remodeling Laboratories for Agriscience Instruction" (Newman, Johnson); "Planning for Change" (Mulcahy); "Laboratory Facilities Improvement for Technology Transfer" (Harper); "Facilities for Agriscience Instruction" (Agnew et al.); "Laboratory Facility Improvement" (Boren, Dwyer); and…

  5. Experiments for heat transfer characteristics and natural circulation performance of PRHRS of the high temperature/high pressure thermal-hydraulic test facility(VISTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Sik; Choi, Ki Yong; Cho, Seok; Lee, Sung Jae; Song, Chul Hwa; Park, Chun Kyong; Chung, Moon Ki

    2004-01-01

    The VISTA (Experimental Verification by Integral Simulation of Transients and Accidents) is an experimental facility to verify the performance and safety issues of the SMART-P (Pilot plant of the System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor). The basic design of the SMART-P has been completed by KAERI. The present report describes the experimental results on the heat transfer characteristics and the natural circulation performance of the PRHRS of the VISTA facility. A stable flow occurs in a natural circulation loop which is composed of a steam generator secondary side, a secondary system, and a PRHRS, and its flow rate corresponds to 12% of the rated feedwater flowrate of the secondary system. The heat transfers through the PRHRS heat exchanger and the emergency cooldown tank are sufficient enough to enable stable natural circulation. In the primary loop the natural circulation occurs due to the core decay heat and the heat removal of the steam generator. Although the flow rate in the primary loop fluctuates a little, the decay heat is removed easily.

  6. Improved hard x-ray (50-80 keV) imaging of hohlraum implosion experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, B.; Chow, R.; Palmer, N. E.; Hoover, M.; Huffman, E.; Lee, J. J.; Romano, E.; Kumar, C.; Hulbert, R. D.; Albert, F.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Hohenberger, M.; Landen, O. L.; Warrick, A.; Döppner, T.

    2016-09-01

    We recently designed, built and commissioned a new pinhole / filter assembly for the equatorial hard x-ray imager (eHXI) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this paper we describe the design and metrology of the new diagnostic as well as the spectral and spatial response of the hard x-ray detector. The new eHXI assembly has improved the photon collection efficiency along with spectral and spatial resolution by making use of 1D imaging channels and various hard x-ray filters. In addition we added a Ross pair filter set for Au K-alpha emission (67-69 keV). The new eHXI design will improve our understanding of the sourcing of hot electrons, generated in laser-plasma-instabilities, along the vertical hohlraum axis. This information is an important input for simulating and eventually limiting the DT fuel preheat in ICF implosions.

  7. Issues related to the construction and operation of a geological disposal facility for nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock - the Canadian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allan, C.J.; Baumgartner, P.; Ohta, M.M.; Simmons, G.R.; Whitaker, S.H

    1997-12-01

    The siting, design, construction, operation, decommissioning, and closure of a geological facility for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste is a complex undertaking that will span many decades. Both technical and social issues must be taken into account simultaneously and many factors must be considered. Based on studies carried out in Canada and elsewhere, it appears that these factors can be accommodated and that geological disposal is both technically and socially feasible. But throughout the different stages of implementing disposal, technical and social issues will continue to arise and these will have to be dealt with successfully if progress is to continue. This paper discusses these issues and a proposed approach for dealing with them. (author)

  8. Exploring how different modes of governance act across health system levels to influence primary healthcare facility managers' use of information in decision-making: experience from Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Vera; Gilson, Lucy

    2017-09-15

    Governance, which includes decision-making at all levels of the health system, and information have been identified as key, interacting levers of health system strengthening. However there is an extensive literature detailing the challenges of supporting health managers to use formal information from health information systems (HISs) in their decision-making. While health information needs differ across levels of the health system there has been surprisingly little empirical work considering what information is actually used by primary healthcare facility managers in managing, and making decisions about, service delivery. This paper, therefore, specifically examines experience from Cape Town, South Africa, asking the question: How is primary healthcare facility managers' use of information for decision-making influenced by governance across levels of the health system? The research is novel in that it both explores what information these facility managers actually use in decision-making, and considers how wider governance processes influence this information use. An academic researcher and four facility managers worked as co-researchers in a multi-case study in which three areas of management were served as the cases. There were iterative cycles of data collection and collaborative analysis with individual and peer reflective learning over a period of three years. Central governance shaped what information and knowledge was valued - and, therefore, generated and used at lower system levels. The central level valued formal health information generated in the district-based HIS which therefore attracted management attention across the levels of the health system in terms of design, funding and implementation. This information was useful in the top-down practices of planning and management of the public health system. However, in facilities at the frontline of service delivery, there was a strong requirement for local, disaggregated information and experiential

  9. Using penumbral imaging to measure micrometer size plasma hot spots in Gbar equation of state experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, B., E-mail: bachmann2@llnl.gov; Kritcher, A. L.; Benedetti, L. R.; Glenn, S.; Hawreliak, J.; Izumi, N.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Pérez, F.; Swift, D.; Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Falcone, R. W. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kraus, D. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    We have developed an experimental platform for absolute equation of state measurements up to Gbar pressures on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) within the Fundamental Science Program. We use a symmetry-tuned hohlraum drive to launch a spherical shock wave into a solid CH sphere. Streaked radiography is the primary diagnostic to measure the density change at the shock front as the pressure increases towards smaller radii. At shock stagnation in the center of the capsule, we observe a short and bright x-ray self emission from high density (∼50 g/cm{sup 3}) plasma at ∼1 keV. Here, we present results obtained with penumbral imaging which has been carried out to characterize the size of the hot spot emission. This allows extending existing NIF diagnostic capabilities for spatial resolution (currently ∼10 μm) at higher sensitivity. At peak emission we find the hot spot radius to be as small as 5.8 +/− 1 μm, corresponding to a convergence ratio of 200.

  10. The National Ignition Facility: Transition to a User Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, E. I.; Atherton, J.; Lagin, L.; Larson, D.; Keane, C.; MacGowan, B.; Patterson, R.; Spaeth, M.; Van Wonterghem, B.; Wegner, P.; Kauffman, R.

    2016-03-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been operational since March 2009 and has been transitioning to a user facility supporting ignition science, high energy density science (HEDS), national security applications, and fundamental science. The facility has achieved its design goal of 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of 3ω light on target, and has performed target experiments with 1.9 MJ at peak powers of 410 TW. The facility is on track to perform over 200 target shots this year in support of all of its user communities. The facility has nearly 60 diagnostic systems operational and has shown flexibility in laser pulse shape and performance to meet the requirements of its multiple users. Progress continues on its goal of demonstrating thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. It has performed over 40 indirect-drive experiments with cryogenic-layered capsules. New platforms are being developed for HEDS and fundamental science. Equation-of-state and material strength experiments have been done on a number of materials with pressures of over 50 MBars obtained in diamond, conditions never previously encountered in the laboratory and similar to those found in planetary interiors. Experiments are also in progress investigating radiation transport, hydrodynamic instabilities, and direct drive implosions. NIF continues to develop as an experimental facility. Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) is now being installed on NIF for producing high-energy radiographs of the imploded cores of ignition targets and for short pulse laser-plasma interaction experiments. One NIF beam is planned for conversion to two picosecond beams in 2014. Other new diagnostics such as x-ray Thomson scattering, low energy neutron spectrometer, and multi-layer reflecting x-ray optics are also planned. Incremental improvements in laser performance such as improved optics damage performance, beam balance, and back reflection control are being pursued.

  11. Utilisation of the magnetic sensor in a smartphone for facile magnetostatics experiment: magnetic field due to electrical current in straight and loop wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septianto, R. D.; Suhendra, D.; Iskandar, F.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the result of a research into the utilisation of a smartphone for the study of magnetostatics on the basis of experiments. The use of such a device gives great measurement result and thus it can replace magnetic sensor tools that are relatively expensive. For the best experimental result, firstly the position of the magnetic sensor in the smartphone has to be considered by way of value mapping of a magnetic field due to permanent magnet. The magnetostatics experiment investigated in this research was the measurement of magnetic field due to electrical currents in two shapes of wire, straight and looped. The current flow, the distance between the observation point and the wire, and the diameter of the loop were the variable parameters investigated to test the smartphone’s capabilities as a measurement tool. To evaluate the experimental results, the measured data were compared with theoretical values that were calculated by using both an analytical and a numerical approach. According to the experiment results, the measured data had good agreement with the results from the analytical and the numerical approach. This means that the use of the magnetic sensor in a smartphone in physics experiments is viable, especially for magnetic field measurement.

  12. Analysis of system thermal hydraulic responses for passive safety injection experiment at ROSA-IV Large Scale Test Facility. Using JAERI modified version of RELAP5/MOD2 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaka, Hideaki; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Kukita, Yutaka (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment)

    1994-12-01

    An experiment was conducted at the ROSA-IV/Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) on the performance of a gravity-driven emergency core coolant (ECC) injection system attached to a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Such a gravity-driven injection system, though not used in the current-generation PWRs, is proposed for future reactor designs. The experiment was performed to identify key phenomena peculiar to the operation of a gravity injection system and to provide data base for code assessment against such phenomena. The simulated injection system consisted of a tank which was initially filled with cold water of the same pressure as the primary system. The tank was connected at its top and bottom, respectively, to the cold leg and the vessel downcomer. The injection into the downcomer was driven primarily by the static head difference between the cold water in the tank and the hot water in the pressure balance line (PBL) connecting the cold leg to the tank top. The injection flow was oscillatory after the flow through the PBL became two-phase flow. The experiment was post-test analyzed using a JAERI modified version of the RELAP5/MOD2 code. The code calculation simulated reasonably well the system responses observed in the experiment, and suggested that the oscillations in the injection flow was caused by oscillatory liquid holdup in the PBL connecting the cold leg to tank top. (author).

  13. The Zwicky Transient Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bellm, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) is a next-generation optical synoptic survey that builds on the experience and infrastructure of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Using a new 47 deg$^2$ survey camera, ZTF will survey more than an order of magnitude faster than PTF to discover rare transients and variables. I describe the survey and the camera design. Searches for young supernovae, fast transients, counterparts to gravitational-wave detections, and rare variables will benefit from ZTF's high cadence, wide area survey.

  14. Medical Image Analysis Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    To improve the quality of photos sent to Earth by unmanned spacecraft. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a computerized image enhancement process that brings out detail not visible in the basic photo. JPL is now applying this technology to biomedical research in its Medical lrnage Analysis Facility, which employs computer enhancement techniques to analyze x-ray films of internal organs, such as the heart and lung. A major objective is study of the effects of I stress on persons with heart disease. In animal tests, computerized image processing is being used to study coronary artery lesions and the degree to which they reduce arterial blood flow when stress is applied. The photos illustrate the enhancement process. The upper picture is an x-ray photo in which the artery (dotted line) is barely discernible; in the post-enhancement photo at right, the whole artery and the lesions along its wall are clearly visible. The Medical lrnage Analysis Facility offers a faster means of studying the effects of complex coronary lesions in humans, and the research now being conducted on animals is expected to have important application to diagnosis and treatment of human coronary disease. Other uses of the facility's image processing capability include analysis of muscle biopsy and pap smear specimens, and study of the microscopic structure of fibroprotein in the human lung. Working with JPL on experiments are NASA's Ames Research Center, the University of Southern California School of Medicine, and Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey, California.

  15. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  16. A novel influenza A (H1N1 outbreak experience among residents of a long term-care facility in Saudi Arabia during 2010 seasonal flu circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf M. Afifi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to describe and analyze an outbreak of novel 2009 influenza A (H1N1 among residents of a long-term care facility (LTCF in Prince Mansour Military Hospital (PMMH, Taif, Saudi Arabia. These patients had been admitted to the LTCF months or years before the outbreak for several reasons, e.g. cerebral palsy, neurological deficits due to road traffic accidents with resultant handicap, chronic diseases associated with old age. An observational study was carried out to demonstrate and analyze the epidemiological characteristics (demographic factors, risk factors, and outcomes associated with the outbreak in order to clarify which prevention and control measures had been taken and which recommendations were followed. During the period October 28 to November 11 2010, 21 LTCF residents were suspected to be clinically involved: fever ≥38ºC with influenza-like illness (ILI. Age ranged from 9-91 years (mean 46±24.13; 62% were males. Among them, 12 (57% were influenza A (H1N1 positive by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR. Mortality involved 2 (17% of the A (H1N1 laboratory confirmed individuals. Implementation of the recommended infection control measures mitigated the transmission of infection to new individuals. The fulfillment of strict infection control measures could limit H1N1 infection among LTCFPMMH patients. Routine influenza, including specific H1N1 immunization of all LTCF residents together with their healthcare staff, should be mandatory in those settings serving immunocompromised patients.

  17. Development of a Single-Pass Amplifier for an Optical Stochastic Cooling Proof-of-Principle Experiment at Fermilab's IOTA Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andorf, M. B. [NICADD, DeKalb; Lebedev, V. A. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [NIU, DeKalb

    2015-06-01

    Optical stochastic cooling (OSC) is a method of beam cooling which is expected to provide cooling rates orders of magnitude larger than ordinary stochastic cooling. Light from an undulator (the pickup) is amplified and fed back onto the particle beam via another undulator (the kicker). Fermilab is currently exploring a possible proof-of-principle experiment of the OSC at the integrable-optics test accelerator (IOTA) ring. To implement effective OSC a good correction of phase distortions in the entire band of the optical amplifier is required. In this contribution we present progress in experimental characterization of phase distortions associated to a Titanium Sapphire crystal laser-gain medium (a possible candidate gain medium for the OSC experiment to be performed at IOTA). We also discuss a possible option for a mid-IR amplifier

  18. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  19. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  20. Full scale calcium bromide injection with subsequent mercury oxidation and removal within wet flue gas desulphurization system: Experience at a 700 MW coal-fired power facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Mark Simpson

    for existing boilers. The use of calcium bromide injection as an alternative to activated carbon approaches could save millions of dollars. The technology application described herein has the potential to reduce compliance cost by $200M for a 700 MW facility burning PRB coal.

  1. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Facility Registry Service (FRS) provides an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities across EPA,...

  2. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  3. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  4. Aperture area measurement facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST has established an absolute aperture area measurement facility for circular and near-circular apertures use in radiometric instruments. The facility consists of...

  5. Environmental Toxicology Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Fully-equipped facilities for environmental toxicology research The Environmental Toxicology Research Facility (ETRF) located in Vicksburg, MS provides over 8,200 ft...

  6. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  7. The utah beacon experience: integrating quality improvement, health information technology, and practice facilitation to improve diabetes outcomes in small health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennison, Janet; Rajeev, Deepthi; Woolsey, Sarah; Black, Jeff; Oostema, Steven J; North, Christie

    2014-01-01

    The Utah Improving Care through Connectivity and Collaboration (IC3) Beacon community (2010-2013) was spearheaded by HealthInsight, a nonprofit, community-based organization. One of the main objectives of IC(3) was to improve health care provided to patients with diabetes in three Utah counties, collaborating with 21 independent smaller clinics and two large health care enterprises. This paper will focus on the use of health information technology (HIT) and practice facilitation to develop and implement new care processes to improve clinic workflow and ultimately improve patients' diabetes outcomes at 21 participating smaller, independent clinics. Early in the project, we learned that most of the 21 clinics did not have the resources needed to successfully implement quality improvement (QI) initiatives. IC(3) helped clinics effectively use data generated from their electronic health records (EHRs) to design and implement interventions to improve patients' diabetes outcomes. This close coupling of HIT, expert practice facilitation, and Learning Collaboratives was found to be especially valuable in clinics with limited resources. Through this process we learned that (1) an extensive readiness assessment improved clinic retention, (2) clinic champions were important for a successful collaboration, and (3) current EHR systems have limited functionality to assist in QI initiatives. In general, smaller, independent clinics lack knowledge and experience with QI and have limited HIT experience to improve patient care using electronic clinical data. Additionally, future projects like IC(3) Beacon will be instrumental in changing clinic culture so that QI is integrated into routine workflow. Our efforts led to significant changes in how practice staff optimized their EHRs to manage and improve diabetes care, while establishing the framework for sustainability. Some of the IC(3) Beacon practices are currently smoothly transitioning to new models of care such as Patient

  8. Low-adiabat rugby hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility: Comparison with high-flux modeling and the potential for gas-wall interpenetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, Peter, E-mail: amendt1@llnl.gov; Ross, J. Steven; Milovich, Jose L.; Schneider, Marilyn; Storm, Erik; Callahan, Debra A.; Hinkel, Denise; Lasinski, Barbara; Meeker, Don; Michel, Pierre; Moody, John; Strozzi, David [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Rugby-shaped gold hohlraums driven by a nominal low-adiabat laser pulse shape have been tested on the National Ignition Facility. The rugby affords a higher coupling efficiency than a comparably sized cylinder hohlraum or, alternatively, improved drive symmetry and laser beam clearances for a larger hohlraum with similar cylinder wall area and laser energy. A first (large rugby hohlraum) shot at low energy (0.75 MJ) to test laser backscatter resulted in a moderately oblate CH capsule implosion, followed by a high energy shot (1.3 MJ) that gave a highly oblate compressed core according to both time-integrated and –resolved x-ray images. These implosions used low wavelength separation (1.0 Å) between the outer and inner cones to provide an alternative platform free of significant cross-beam energy transfer for simplified hohlraum dynamics. Post-shot 2- and 3-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the high-flux model [M. D. Rosen et al., High Energy Density Phys. 7, 180 (2011)], however, give nearly round implosions for both shots, in striking contrast with observations. An analytic assessment of Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability growth on the gold–helium gas-fill interface shows the potential for significant linear growth, saturation and transition to a highly nonlinear state. Candidate seeds for instability growth include laser speckle during the early-time laser picket episode in the presence of only partial temporal beam smoothing (1-D smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing) and intensity modulations from quad-to-quad and beam overlap. Radiation-hydrodynamic 2-D simulations adapted to include a dynamic fall-line mix model across the unstable Au-He interface show good agreement with the observed implosion symmetry for both shots using an interface-to-fall-line penetration fraction of 100%. Physically, the potential development of an instability layer in a rugby hohlraum is tantamount to an enhanced wall motion leading to

  9. Low-adiabat rugby hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility: Comparison with high-flux modeling and the potential for gas-wall interpenetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, Peter; Ross, J. Steven; Milovich, Jose L.; Schneider, Marilyn; Storm, Erik; Callahan, Debra A.; Hinkel, Denise; Lasinski, Barbara; Meeker, Don; Michel, Pierre; Moody, John; Strozzi, David

    2014-11-01

    Rugby-shaped gold hohlraums driven by a nominal low-adiabat laser pulse shape have been tested on the National Ignition Facility. The rugby affords a higher coupling efficiency than a comparably sized cylinder hohlraum or, alternatively, improved drive symmetry and laser beam clearances for a larger hohlraum with similar cylinder wall area and laser energy. A first (large rugby hohlraum) shot at low energy (0.75 MJ) to test laser backscatter resulted in a moderately oblate CH capsule implosion, followed by a high energy shot (1.3 MJ) that gave a highly oblate compressed core according to both time-integrated and -resolved x-ray images. These implosions used low wavelength separation (1.0 Å) between the outer and inner cones to provide an alternative platform free of significant cross-beam energy transfer for simplified hohlraum dynamics. Post-shot 2- and 3-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the high-flux model [M. D. Rosen et al., High Energy Density Phys. 7, 180 (2011)], however, give nearly round implosions for both shots, in striking contrast with observations. An analytic assessment of Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability growth on the gold-helium gas-fill interface shows the potential for significant linear growth, saturation and transition to a highly nonlinear state. Candidate seeds for instability growth include laser speckle during the early-time laser picket episode in the presence of only partial temporal beam smoothing (1-D smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing) and intensity modulations from quad-to-quad and beam overlap. Radiation-hydrodynamic 2-D simulations adapted to include a dynamic fall-line mix model across the unstable Au-He interface show good agreement with the observed implosion symmetry for both shots using an interface-to-fall-line penetration fraction of 100%. Physically, the potential development of an instability layer in a rugby hohlraum is tantamount to an enhanced wall motion leading to hindered

  10. Experience with the use of modafinil in the treatment of narcolepsy in a outpatient facility specialized in diurnal excessive sleepiness in São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilce Sanny Costa da Silva Behrens

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy is a chronic neurological disease characterized by diurnal excessive sleepiness and catapleaxy. It affects 1 in every 2000 to 4000 individuals with personal, social and familiar significant repercussions. The treatment of narcolepsy is mainly based on the use of stimulants for the control of the diurnal excessive sleepiness, in conjunction with behavioral measures and sleep hygiene. Among the stimulants, modafinil has presently been the drug of choice for the treatment of the diurnal excessive sleepiness in patients with narcolepsy. In the worldwide experience, its use is better tolerated and the majority of its side effects is considered light or moderate. However, the clinical use in Brazil was initiated at the end of 2008, with little experience on the narcolepsy population of this country. In this context, the objective of this study was the evaluation of the use of modafinil, verifying the indication of use, causes for discontinuation, daily dosage, efficiency of the treatment in a patient sample of narcoleptics consulted in a specialized center in Brazil. In this study, modafinil was effective for the control of the symptoms related do narcolepsy in 66% of the studied patients. The side effects such as headache, parestesias and diarrhea were the main reasons for the discontinuation of treatment with modafinil. It is important to clinically follow up the patients for a long period to evaluate symptomatology, control of use, tolerability and re-evaluation of the more effective therapeutic dosage able to control narcolepsy. Due to its high cost and clinical benefits, this drug should be on the government׳s list of free drugs for the treatment of these patients.

  11. Guide to research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  12. ASACUSA facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    Photo 1-6 : view of the RFQ - RFQ of the ASACUSA experiment. It allows to slow down antiprotons coming from the AD from 5 MeV to 100 KeV with high efficiency. -------------- Photo 7 - 16 : view of the TRAP - The ASACUSA Cusp trap. Thanks to its special magnetic field configuration, it enables the extraction of an anti-hydrogen beam, thus allowing a high precision microwave spectroscopy outside the magnetic field of the trap. This new method opens a new path to make a stringent test of CPT symmetry between matter and antimatter. #mypanoviewer { height:480px; width: 800px; margin:auto} var viewer=new PTGuiViewer(); viewer.setSwfUrl("/record/1331558/files/PTGuiViewer.swf"); viewer.preferFlashViewer(); viewer.setVars({ pano: "/record/1331558/files/panoA_", format: "14faces", pan: 0, minpan: -180, maxpan: 180, tilt:0, mintilt: -75.60468140442133, maxtilt: 75.60468140442133, fov: 90, minfov: 10, maxfov: 120, autorotatespeed: 5, autorotatedelay: 1...

  13. Searches for beyond the Standard Model physics with boosted topologies in the ATLAS experiment using the Grid-based Tier-3 facility at IFIC-Valencia

    CERN Document Server

    Villaplana Pérez, Miguel; Vos, Marcel

    Both the LHC and ATLAS have been performing well beyond expectation since the start of the data taking by the end of 2009. Since then, several thousands of millions of collision events have been recorded by the ATLAS experiment. With a data taking efficiency higher than 95% and more than 99% of its channels working, ATLAS supplies data with an unmatched quality. In order to analyse the data, the ATLAS Collaboration has designed a distributed computing model based on GRID technologies. The ATLAS computing model and its evolution since the start of the LHC is discussed in section 3.1. The ATLAS computing model groups the different types of computing centers of the ATLAS Collaboration in a tiered hierarchy that ranges from Tier-0 at CERN, down to the 11 Tier-1 centers and the nearly 80 Tier-2 centres distributed world wide. The Spanish Tier-2 activities during the first years of data taking are described in section 3.2. Tier-3 are institution-level non-ATLAS funded or controlled centres that participate presuma...

  14. PERMCAT experiments with tritium at high helium flow rates relevant for the tritium extraction systems using the CAPER facility at TLK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bükki-Deme, András, E-mail: andras.buekki-deme@kit.edu; Demange, David; Le, Thanh-Long; Fanghänel, Eleonore; Simon, Karl-Heinz

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We examined PERMCAT reactor efficiency processing tritiated water at high Helium carrier flow rates. • We have found that – as expected from previous studies – that the swamping ratio (ratio between the impurity and purge side flow rates) has a key effect on the decontamination factors. • On the other hand, some rather unexpected effects tend to show that the limiting phenomena of such specific operation of PERMCAT reactors (at high impurity flow rates, thus short residence time) lies on the kinetics of the isotope exchange reactions. - Abstract: Experiments are still necessary to consolidate the processes retained for the Tritium Extraction Systems of the European ITER Test Blanket Modules (TBM). A PERMCAT reactor combines a catalyst promoting isotope exchange reactions and a Pd/Ag membrane allowing tritium recovery from complex gaseous mixtures containing tritium in different chemical forms. Originally developed for the Tokamak Exhaust Processing, the PERMCAT process is also candidate to detritiate the water arising from an adsorption column installed in the TBM ancillary systems. We discuss the results of an extensive experimental campaign using a PERMCAT reactor to process Q{sub 2}O containing impurity gas mixtures at high flow rates. Two different experimental configurations were studied, namely PERMCAT stand-alone, and PERMCAT in combination with a zeolite molecular sieve bed (MSB, previously loaded with Q{sub 2}O) under regeneration. On the one hand, many expected behaviors were observed, such as the key influence of the swamping ratio (ratio between the impurity and purge side flow rates) on the decontamination factors. On the other hand, some rather unexpected effects tend to show that the limiting phenomena of such specific operation of PERMCAT reactors (at high flow rates, thus short residence time) lies on the kinetics of the isotope exchange reactions.

  15. DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4π array of BaF2 crystals installed at LANSCE, Lujan Center. Neutron capture measurements on ^157Gd and ^89Y nuclei were conducted using this facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyzh, A.; Mitchell, G.; Vieira, D.; Bredeweg, T.; Ullmann, J.; Jandel, M.; Couture, A.; Keksis, A.; Rundberg, R.; Wilhelmy, J.; O'Donnell, J.; Baramsai, B.; Haight, R.; Wouters, J.; Krticka, M.; Parker, W.; Becker, J.; Agvaanlusan, U.

    2009-10-01

    DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4π array of BaF2 crystals installed at LANSCE, Lujan Center. Neutron capture measurements on ^157Gd and ^89Y nuclei were conducted using this facility. The absolute cross sections of the ^89Y(n,γ) reaction was measured for the first time ever in the neutron energy range of 10 eV -- 10 keV and improvements were made in the 10 -- 300 keV range. The error bars were significantly reduced and number of cross section points was increased since the past ^89Y(n,γ) experiments. The ^157Gd(n,γ) cross section was determined at En = 20 eV -- 300 keV by normalizing the experimental DANCE data to a well known resonance taken from the ENDF/B-VII library. Computer simulations of the ^157Gd(n,γ) cascades and DANCE pulse height function were made using DICEBOX and GEANT4 codes and simulated Esum and Eγ spectra are compared to the experimental DANCE data. Values of spin and photon strength function (PSF) of the ^157Gd(n,γ) resonances are provided in the range of En = 2 -- 300 eV using spin dependence upon a γ-ray multiplicity.

  16. Tandem mirror technology demonstration facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-01

    This report describes a facility for generating engineering data on the nuclear technologies needed to build an engineering test reactor (ETR). The facility, based on a tandem mirror operating in the Kelley mode, could be used to produce a high neutron flux (1.4 MW/M/sup 2/) on an 8-m/sup 2/ test area for testing fusion blankets. Runs of more than 100 h, with an average availability of 30%, would produce a fluence of 5 mW/yr/m/sup 2/ and give the necessary experience for successful operation of an ETR.

  17. Trisonic Gas-Dynamics Facility (TGF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The TGF is a two-foot square, continuous-flow, closed-circuit wind tunnel which is optimal for conducting research experiments. The facility provides a...

  18. Development, simulation and test of transition radiation detector prototypes for the compressed baryonic matter experiment at the facility for antiproton and ion research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmann, Cyrano S.H.

    2014-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the development of a Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR. The TRD sub-detector will contribute to the global particle identification and track reconstruction of charged particles. The technical design goal for the TRD is to identify 90% electrons with a maximum pion contamination of 1%. The TRD and Ring Image CHerenkov (RICH) detector should reach a common pion rejection of 10{sup 4}, in order to measure charmonium and low-mass vector mesons. The position resolution should be between 200 and 300 μm in the anode wire direction. The most demanding aspect of the CBM TRD design is the high interaction rate of up to 10{sup 7} Hz resulting in a charged particle rate of up to 100 kHz/cm{sup 2} in the central part of the detector planes at SIS300 conditions. It is crucial to find the optimal radiator detector combination with a minimum material budget to limit scattering and background due to conversions and at the same time reach a sufficient pion rejection and position resolution. In this thesis it is confirmed that a Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (MWPC) with a Xe/CO{sub 2} gas thickness of 12mm provides sufficient absorption probability for TR-photons in combination with self-supporting low density PE foam or micro-structured foil radiators. A continuous investigation aiming at an optimal wire and pad-plane geometry, as well as a minimization of the material budget between active gas and radiator has been presented in hard- and software. A minimum photon absorption cross-section of the entrance window was realized with a thermally stretched aluminized Kapton foil, glued to a G11 support grid support frame. This structure limits the mechanical deformation of the entire window to 1mm/mbar. All MWPC prototypes include two wire planes. A symmetric amplification region of 2 x (3, 3.5 or 4)mm is followed by a short drift region of 6, 5 or 4 mm. The drift region reduces the gain

  19. Test Facility for Volumetric Absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, M.; Dibowski, G.; Pfander, M.; Sack, J. P.; Schwarzbozl, P.; Ulmer, S.

    2006-07-01

    Long-time testing of volumetric absorber modules is an inevitable measure to gain the experience and reliability required for the commercialization of the open volumetric receiver technology. While solar tower test facilities are necessary for performance measurements of complete volumetric receivers, the long-term stability of individual components can be tested in less expensive test setups. For the qualification of the aging effects of operating cycles on single elements of new absorber materials and designs, a test facility was developed and constructed in the framework of the KOSMOSOL project. In order to provide the concentrated solar radiation level, the absorber test facility is integrated into a parabolic dish system at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA) in Spain. Several new designs of ceramic absorbers were developed and tested during the last months. (Author)

  20. Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2009-01-31

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, has routinely demonstrated gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This final report summarizes the results of the technology development work conducted at the PSDF through January 31, 2009. Twenty-one major gasification test campaigns were completed, for a total of more than 11,000 hours of gasification operation. This operational experience has led to significant advancements in gasification technologies.

  1. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  2. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  3. Dialysis Facility Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dialysis Facility Compare helps you find detailed information about Medicare-certified dialysis facilities. You can compare the services and the quality of care that...

  4. Explosive Components Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  5. Materiel Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CRREL's Materiel Evaluation Facility (MEF) is a large cold-room facility that can be set up at temperatures ranging from −20°F to 120°F with a temperature change...

  6. Armament Technology Facility (ATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Armament Technology Facility is a 52,000 square foot, secure and environmentally-safe, integrated small arms and cannon caliber design and evaluation facility....

  7. Integrated Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the center of the 586-square-mile Hanford Site is the Integrated Disposal Facility, also known as the IDF.This facility is a landfill similar in concept...

  8. Facilities for US Radioastronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaddeus, Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Discusses major developments in radioastronomy since 1945. Topics include proposed facilities, very-long-baseline interferometric array, millimeter-wave telescope, submillimeter-wave telescope, and funding for radioastronomy facilities and projects. (JN)

  9. Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Individual permits for municipal, industrial, and semi-public wastewater treatment facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)...

  10. Facility Response Plan (FRP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A Facility Response Plan (FRP) demonstrates a facility's preparedness to respond to a worst case oil discharge. Under the Clean Water Act, as amended by the Oil...

  11. Financing Professional Sports Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Baade, Robert A.; Victor A. Matheson

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines public financing of professional sports facilities with a focus on both early and recent developments in taxpayer subsidization of spectator sports. The paper explores both the magnitude and the sources of public funding for professional sports facilities.

  12. FDA Certified Mammography Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Consumer Information (MQSA) Search for a Certified Facility Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Email Print This list of FDA Certified Mammography Facilities is updated weekly. If you click on Search ...

  13. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  14. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  15. Environmental Toxicology Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Fully-equipped facilities for environmental toxicology researchThe Environmental Toxicology Research Facility (ETRF) located in Vicksburg, MS provides over 8,200 ft...

  16. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to: Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  17. Projectile Demilitarization Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Projectile Wash Out Facility is US Army Ammunition Peculiar Equipment (APE 1300). It is a pilot scale wash out facility that uses high pressure water and steam...

  18. The LIL facility quadruplet commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di-Nicola, J.M.; Fleurot, N.; Lonjaret, T.; Julien, X.; Bordenave, E.; Le Garrec, B.; Mangeant, M.; Behar, G.; Chies, T.; Feral, C.; Graillot, H.; Luttmann, M.; Jequier, F.; Journot, E.; Lutz, O.; Thiell, G. [CEA - Centre d' Etudes Scientifiques et Techniques d' Aquitaine, DLP, 33 - Le Barp (France)

    2006-06-15

    The laser integration line (LIL) facility is currently a 4-beam prototype for the laser Megajoule (LMJ). Following LIL single beamline commissioning in 2003, where performance in terms of power and energy required for LMJ was demonstrated, we spent year 2004 to qualify the quadruplet (or quad) performance at 1{omega}/3{omega}. Over that year, the first quad high power and high energy laser experiments took place on LIL facility. A careful set of test campaigns were conducted to safely ramp up laser performance. The main goal was to measure quad-specific features such as beam synchronization and focal spot (size, smoothing contrast ratio or irradiation nonuniformity {sigma}(rms) versus the LMJ requirements. LIL Quad beam waist was recorded for various pulse durations, smoothing techniques and for a wide range of laser intensities up to LMJ-nominal ones. Now, LIL quad has been commissioned to the center of the target chamber and the first plasma experiments are made. (authors)

  19. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described.

  20. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

  1. Study of fast reactor safety test facilities. Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.I.; Boudreau, J.E.; McLaughlin, T.; Palmer, R.G.; Starkovich, V.; Stein, W.E.; Stevenson, M.G.; Yarnell, Y.L.

    1975-05-01

    Included are sections dealing with the following topics: (1) perspective and philosophy of fast reactor safety analysis; (2) status of accident analysis and experimental needs; (3) experiment and facility definitions; (4) existing in-pile facilities; (5) new facility options; and (6) data acquisition methods. (DG)

  2. Pressurized burner test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.J.; Norton, T.S.; Hadley, M.A. [Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is currently fabricating a high-pressure burner test facility. The facility was designed to support the development of gas turbine combustion systems fired on natural gas and coal-derived gaseous fuels containing fuel-bound nitrogen. Upon completion of fabrication and shake-down testing in October 1993, the facility will be available for use by industrial and university partners through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) or through other cooperative arrangements. This paper describes the burner test facility and associated operating parameter ranges and informs interested parties of the availability of the facility.

  3. NWFSC OA facility water chemistry - Ocean acidification species exposure experimental facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — We have developed a unique facility for conducting high-quality experiments on marine organisms in seawater with controlled carbon chemistry conditions. The...

  4. Sandia's Z-Backlighter Laser Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambo, P.; Schwarz, J.; Schollmeier, M.; Geissel, M.; Smith, I.; Kimmel, M.; Speas, C.; Shores, J.; Armstrong, D.; Bellum, J.; Field, E.; Kletecka, D.; Porter, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Z-Backlighter Laser Facility at Sandia National Laboratories was developed to enable high energy density physics experiments in conjunction with the Z Pulsed Power Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, with an emphasis on backlighting. Since the first laser system there became operational in 2001, the facility has continually evolved to add new capability and new missions. The facility currently has several high energy laser systems including the nanosecond/multi-kilojoule Z-Beamlet Laser (ZBL), the sub-picosecond/kilojoule- class Z-Petawatt (ZPW) Laser, and the smaller nanosecond/100 J-class Chaco laser. In addition to these, the backlighting mission requires a regular stream of coated consumable optics such as debris shields and vacuum windows, which led to the development of the Sandia Optics Support Facility to support the unique high damage threshold optical coating needs described.

  5. Ukraine experimental neutron source facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.; Bolshinsky, I.; Nekludov, I.; Karnaukhov, I. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (INL); (Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology)

    2008-01-01

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine has a plan to construct an experimental neutron source facility. The facility has been developed for producing medical isotopes, training young nuclear professionals, supporting the Ukraine nuclear industry, providing capability for performing reactor physics, material research, and basic science experiments. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA is collaborating with KIPT on developing this facility. A driven subcritical assembly utilizing the KIPT electron accelerator with a target assembly is used to generate the neutron source. The target assembly utilizes tungsten or uranium for neutron production through photonuclear reactions with 100-KW of electron beam power. The neutron source intensity, spectrum, and spatial distribution have been studied to maximize the neutron yield and satisfy different engineering requirements. The subcritical assembly is designed to obtain the highest possible neutron flux intensity with a subcriticality of 0.98. Low enrichment uranium is used for the fuel material because it enhances the neutron source performance. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. Horizontal neutron channels are incorporated for performing basic research including cold neutron source. This paper describes the conceptual design and summarizes some of the related analyses.

  6. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations for the 600 Area facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01

    This document determines the need for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans for Westinghouse Hanford Company's 600 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (WHC 1991). Five major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 600 Area were evaluated: the Purge Water Storage Facility, 212-N, -P, and -R Facilities, the 616 Facility, and the 213-J K Storage Vaults. Of the five major facilities evaluated in the 600 Area, none will require preparation of a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan.

  7. Biotechnology System Facility: Risk Mitigation on Mir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R., III; Galloway, Steve R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA is working with its international partners to develop space vehicles and facilities that will give researchers the opportunity to conduct scientific investigations in space. As part of this activity, NASA's Biotechnology Cell Science Program (BCSP) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is developing a world-class biotechnology laboratory facility for the International Space Station (ISS). This report describes the BCSP, including the role of the BTS. We identify the purpose and objectives of the BTS and a detailed description of BTS facility design and operational concept, BTS facility and experiment-specific hardware, and scientific investigations conducted in the facility. We identify the objectives, methods, and results of risk mitigation investigations of the effects of microgravity and cosmic radiation on the BTS data acquisition and control system. These results may apply to many other space experiments that use commercial, terrestrial-based data acquisition technology. Another focal point is a description of the end-to-end process of integrating and operating biotechnology experiments on a variety of space vehicles. The identification of lessons learned that can be applied to future biotechnology experiments is an overall theme of the report. We include a brief summary of the science results, but this is not the focus of the report. The report provides some discussion on the successful 130-day tissue engineering experiment performed in BTS on Mir and describes a seminal gene array investigation that identified a set of unique genes that are activated in space.

  8. Synchrotron radiation facilities

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Particularly in the past few years, interest in using the synchrotron radiation emanating from high energy, circular electron machines has grown considerably. In our February issue we included an article on the synchrotron radiation facility at Frascati. This month we are spreading the net wider — saying something about the properties of the radiation, listing the centres where synchrotron radiation facilities exist, adding a brief description of three of them and mentioning areas of physics in which the facilities are used.

  9. Thermal distortion test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapp, James L.

    1995-02-01

    The thermal distortion test facility (TDTF) at Phillips Laboratory provides precise measurements of the distortion of mirrors that occurs when their surfaces are heated. The TDTF has been used for several years to evaluate mirrors being developed for high-power lasers. The facility has recently undergone some significant upgrades to improve the accuracy with which mirrors can be heated and the resulting distortion measured. The facility and its associated instrumentation are discussed.

  10. Materials Characterization Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Materials Characterization Facility enables detailed measurements of the properties of ceramics, polymers, glasses, and composites. It features instrumentation...

  11. Mobile Solar Tracker Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST's mobile solar tracking facility is used to characterize the electrical performance of photovoltaic panels. It incorporates meteorological instruments, a solar...

  12. Universal Drive Train Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This vehicle drive train research facility is capable of evaluating helicopter and ground vehicle power transmission technologies in a system level environment. The...

  13. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  14. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  15. Catalytic Fuel Conversion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility enables unique catalysis research related to power and energy applications using military jet fuels and alternative fuels. It is equipped with research...

  16. Heated Tube Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Heated Tube Facility at NASA GRC investigates cooling issues by simulating conditions characteristic of rocket engine thrust chambers and high speed airbreathing...

  17. Engine Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center's Engine Test Facility (ETF) test cells are used for development and evaluation testing of propulsion systems for...

  18. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  19. Region 9 NPDES Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point geospatial dataset representing locations of NPDES Facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA permit program that regulates...

  20. Geospatial Data Analysis Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Geospatial application development, location-based services, spatial modeling, and spatial analysis are examples of the many research applications that this facility...

  1. Geodynamics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This GSL facility has evolved over the last three decades to support survivability and protective structures research. Experimental devices include three gas-driven...

  2. Imagery Data Base Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Imagery Data Base Facility supports AFRL and other government organizations by providing imagery interpretation and analysis to users for data selection, imagery...

  3. Pavement Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Comprehensive Environmental and Structural Analyses The ERDC Pavement Testing Facility, located on the ERDC Vicksburg campus, was originally constructed to provide...

  4. Nonlinear Materials Characterization Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Nonlinear Materials Characterization Facility conducts photophysical research and development of nonlinear materials operating in the visible spectrum to protect...

  5. Geophysical Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geophysical Research Facility (GRF) is a 60 ft long qaodmasdkwaspemas5ajkqlsmdqpakldnzsdfls 22 ft wide qaodmasdkwaspemas4ajkqlsmdqpakldnzsdfls 7 ft deep concrete...

  6. Transonic Experimental Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Experimental Research Facility evaluates aerodynamics and fluid dynamics of projectiles, smart munitions systems, and sub-munitions dispensing systems;...

  7. Flexible Electronics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Flexible Electronics Research Facility designs, synthesizes, tests, and fabricates materials and devices compatible with flexible substrates for Army information...

  8. Textiles Performance Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textiles Performance Testing Facilities has the capabilities to perform all physical wet and dry performance testing, and visual and instrumental color analysis...

  9. Joint Computing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raised Floor Computer Space for High Performance Computing The ERDC Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) provides a robust system of IT facilities to develop and...

  10. GPS Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Global Positioning System (GPS) Test Facility Instrumentation Suite (GPSIS) provides great flexibility in testing receivers by providing operational control of...

  11. Magnetics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetics Research Facility houses three Helmholtz coils that generate magnetic fields in three perpendicular directions to balance the earth's magnetic field....

  12. Target Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  13. Facility Environmental Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is the Web site of the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) facility Environmental Management System (EMS)....

  14. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  15. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Department of Energy Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a collaborative, shared infrastructure to...

  16. Pavement Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Comprehensive Environmental and Structural AnalysesThe ERDC Pavement Testing Facility, located on the ERDC Vicksburg campus, was originally constructed to provide an...

  17. Overview of the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brereton, Sandra

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is the world's largest and most energetic laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. The NIF is a 192-beam, Nd-glass laser facility that is capable of producing 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light, and over 50 times more energetic than other existing ICF facilities. The NIF construction began in 1997, and the facility, which was completed in 2009, is now fully operational. The facility is capable of firing up to 192 laser beams onto a target placed at the center of a 10-m-diameter spherical target chamber. Experiments involving the use of tritium have been underway for some time. These experiments present radiological issues: prompt neutron/gamma radiation, neutron activation, fission product generation, and decay radiation. This paper provides an introduction to the NIF facility and its operation, describes plans for the experimental program, and discusses radiological issues associated with the NIF's operations.

  18. The IRMA gamma irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, L.; Raboin, M.; Corbiere, J. [IRSN, Fontenat-aux-roses (France)

    2011-07-01

    The IRMA cobalt-60 irradiation cell has been installed at the Saclay research centre (25 km from Paris) for 40 years. IRMA is a facility with a maximum authorized capacity of 1, 700 TBq (i.e. approx. 46, 000 Ci). It is a test facility intended primarily for research and development studies on how equipment and materials respond to dose or dose rate exposure. Cobalt-60 gamma photons are the reference in this field. Irradiation is panoramic and achieved using 4, independent, cylindrical sealed sources (11 mm in diameter and 452 mm in length). When not in use, the sources are stored in a lead cask with 0.30 m thick walls to allow safe access inside the cell (uncontaminated environment). With an internal volume of 24 m{sup 3}, it can accommodate a very wide variety of geometric configurations for exposure to gamma radiation. Available dose rates range from 5 {mu}Gy/h (which is the background radiation in the cell when the sources are enclosed in their lead cask) to 25 kGy/h (value obtained 10 cm from a source holder containing all four sources). The resulting doses can be used in experiments representing relatively extreme situations (reactor accidents, dose after x years for equipment in hot cells, reprocessing plants, and so on).The IRMA facility has performed several irradiation tests on new components for EPR and LWR. The IRMA facility is also adapted to check the performance of new biological shieldings and protections for reactors and reprocessing plants. In several other fields of nuclear applications, this facility is useful to characterize and calibrate radiation detectors for the nuclear, space, and military industries

  19. Facility design, construction, and operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    France has been disposing of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Centre de Stockage de la Manche (CSM) since 1969 and now at the Centre de Stockage de l`Aube (CSA) since 1992. In France, several agencies and companies are involved in the development and implementation of LLW technology. The Commissariat a l`Energie Atomic (CEA), is responsible for research and development of new technologies. The Agence National pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs is the agency responsible for the construction and operation of disposal facilities and for wastes acceptance for these facilities. Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires provides fuel services, including uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, and fuel reprocessing, and is thus one generator of LLW. Societe pour les Techniques Nouvelles is an engineering company responsible for commercializing CEA waste management technology and for engineering and design support for the facilities. Numatec, Inc. is a US company representing these French companies and agencies in the US. In Task 1.1 of Numatec`s contract with Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Numatec provides details on the design, construction and operation of the LLW disposal facilities at CSM and CSA. Lessons learned from operation of CSM and incorporated into the design, construction and operating procedures at CSA are identified and discussed. The process used by the French for identification, selection, and evaluation of disposal technologies is provided. Specifically, the decisionmaking process resulting in the change in disposal facility design for the CSA versus the CSM is discussed. This report provides` all of the basic information in these areas and reflects actual experience to date.

  20. National Ignition Facility (NIF) FY2015 Facility Use Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folta, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wisoff, Jeff [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Major features of the FY2015 NIF Use Plan include: • Performing a record number of layered DT experiments with 28 planned compared with 15 in FY2014. Executing the first plutonium experiments on the NIF in support of the Science Campaigns. • Over 300 targets shots, a 57% increase compared to FY14. This is a stretch goal defined in the 120-Day Study document, and relies upon the success of many shot-rate improvement actions, as well as on the distribution of shot type selected by the users. While the Plan is consistent with this goal, the increased proportion of layered DT experiments described above reduces the margin against this goal. • Commissioning of initial ARC capability, which will support both SSP-HED and SSPICF programs. • Increase in days allocated to Discovery Science to a level that supports an ongoing program for academic use of NIF and an annual solicitation for new proposals. • Six Facility Maintenance and Reconfiguration (FM&R) periods totaling 30 days dedicated to major facility maintenance and modifications. • Utilization of the NIF Facility Advisory Schedule Committee (FASC) to provide stakeholder review and feedback on the NIF schedule. The Use Plan assumes a total FY2015 LLNL NIF Operations funding in MTE 10.7 of $229.465M and in MTE 10.3 of 47.0M. This Use Plan will be revised in the event of significant changes to the FY2015 funding or if NNSA provides FY2016 budget guidance significantly reduced compared to FY2015.