WorldWideScience

Sample records for facility evaluation appendix

  1. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 112 - Determination and Evaluation of Required Response Resources for Facility Response Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Pt. 112, App. E Appendix E... boundary lines defined in 46 CFR part 7, except in the Gulf of Mexico. In the Gulf of Mexico, it means the...

  2. 33 CFR Appendix C to Part 154 - Guidelines for Determining and Evaluating Required Response Resources for Facility Response Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Reserve Buoyancy to Weight Ratio 2:1 2:1 2:1 3:1 to 4:1 Total Tensile Strength—lbs. 4,500 15-20,000 15-20... this appendix is to describe the procedures for identifying response resources to meet the requirements... or ranges. 2.6The requirements of subparts F, G, H and I of this part establish response resource...

  3. Materiel Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CRREL's Materiel Evaluation Facility (MEF) is a large cold-room facility that can be set up at temperatures ranging from −20°F to 120°F with a temperature change...

  4. Airborne Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — AFRL's Airborne Evaluation Facility (AEF) utilizes Air Force Aero Club resources to conduct test and evaluation of a variety of equipment and concepts. Twin engine...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix G to Part 112 - Tier I Qualified Facility SPCC Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier I Qualified Facility SPCC Plan G Appendix G to Part 112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Pt. 112, App. G Appendix G to Part 112—Tier I Qualified Facility SPCC...

  6. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 105 - Facility Vulnerability and Security Measures Summary (Form CG-6025)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Security Measures Summary (Form CG-6025) A Appendix A to Part 105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY MARITIME SECURITY: FACILITIES Pt. 105, App. A Appendix A to Part 105—Facility Vulnerability and Security Measures Summary (Form CG-6025)...

  7. Facilities evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloan, P.A.; Edinborough, C.R.

    1992-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development whose mission is to evaluate different new and existing technologies and determine how well they address DOE community waste remediation problems. Twenty-three Technical Task Plans (TTPs) have been identified to support this mission during FY-92; 10 of these have identified some support requirements when demonstrations take place. Section 1 of this report describes the tasks supported by BWID, determines if a technical demonstration is proposed, and if so, identifies the support requirements requested by the TTP Principal Investigators. Section 2 of this report is an evaluation identifying facility characteristics of existing Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facilities that may be considered for use in BWID technology demonstration activities.

  8. Precision Clock Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Tests and evaluates high-precision atomic clocks for spacecraft, ground, and mobile applications. Supports performance evaluation, environmental testing,...

  9. Construction safety program for the National Ignition Facility, Appendix B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerruti, S.J.

    1997-06-26

    This Appendix contains material from the LLNL Health and Safety Manual as listed below. For sections not included in this list, please refer to the Manual itself. The areas covered are: asbestos, lead, fire prevention, lockout, and tag program confined space traffic safety.

  10. Standoff Detection Technology Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Standoff Detection Technology Evaluation facility is the only one of its kind in the country and allows researchers to release a known amount of material while...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 112 - Facility-Specific Response Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Facility-Specific Response Plan F Appendix F to Part 112 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS...., topography, drainage); (5) Location of the material discharged (i.e., on a concrete pad or directly on the...

  12. 10 CFR 140.91 - Appendix A-Form of nuclear energy liability policy for facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix A-Form of nuclear energy liability policy for facilities. 140.91 Section 140.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL PROTECTION... other matter not within the Commission's statutory jurisdiction under the Atomic Energy Act....

  13. 10 CFR Appendix N to Part 110 - Illustrative List of Lithium Isotope Separation Facilities, Plants and Equipment Under NRC's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Plants and Equipment Under NRC's Export Licensing Authority N Appendix N to Part 110 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Pt. 110, App. N Appendix N to Part 110—Illustrative List of Lithium Isotope Separation Facilities, Plants and Equipment...

  14. Evaluation methods for hospital facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronczek-Munter, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    Initial position & background: There are various methods and tools for evaluating facilities. The focus is usually on the technical building performance, function/usability or form/beauty. Examples are: Post-Occupancy Evaluation (POE) and Usability Appraisal. Nevertheless, evaluations of buildings...... according to focus areas and proposes which evaluation methods to use in different building phases of healthcare facilities. Hospital evaluations with experts and users are also considered; their subjective view on space, function, technology, usability and aesthetics. Results & solutions: This paper...... of creating buildings with enhanced usability. Additionally various evaluation methods used in hospital cases in Denmark and Norway are presented. Involvement of users is proposed, not just in defining requirements but also in co-creation/design and evaluation of solutions. The theories and preliminary...

  15. Construction safety program for the National Ignition Facility, Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerruti, S.J.

    1997-06-26

    Topics covered in this appendix include: General Rules-Code of Safe Practices; 2. Personal Protective Equipment; Hazardous Material Control; Traffic Control; Fire Prevention; Sanitation and First Aid; Confined Space Safety Requirements; Ladders and Stairways; Scaffolding and Lift Safety; Machinery, Vehicles, and Heavy Equipment; Welding and Cutting-General; Arc Welding; Oxygen/Acetylene Welding and Cutting; Excavation, Trenching, and Shoring; Fall Protection; Steel Erection; Working With Asbestos; Radiation Safety; Hand Tools; Electrical Safety; Nonelectrical Work Performed Near Exposed High-Voltage Power-Distribution Equipment; Lockout/Tagout Requirements; Rigging; A-Cranes; Housekeeping; Material Handling and Storage; Lead; Concrete and Masonry Construction.

  16. 7 CFR Appendix C to Subpart E of... - Guidelines for Loan Guarantees for Alcohol Fuel Production Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Business and Industrial Loan Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, App. C Appendix C to Subpart E of Part 1980... only finance new facilities and will not get involved in the refinancing of existing ones. (7) Priority...

  17. Aircraft Test & Evaluation Facility (Hush House)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Aircraft Test and Evaluation Facility (ATEF), or Hush House, is a noise-abated ground test sub-facility. The facility's controlled environment provides 24-hour...

  18. National Ignition Facility Project Site Safety Program Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2001-09-30

    These rules apply to all National Ignition Facility (NIF) workers (workers), which include Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) employees, non-LLNL employees (including contract labor, supplemental labor, vendors, personnel matrixed/assigned from other national laboratories, participating guests, visitors and students) and contractors/subcontractors. The General Rules and NIF Code of Safe Practices shall be used by management to promote the prevention of incidents through indoctrination, safety and health training, and on-the-job application. As a condition for contract award, all employers shall conduct an orientation for all newly hired and rehired employees before those workers will be permitted to start work in this facility. This orientation shall include a discussion of the following information. The General Rules and NIF Code of Safe Practices must be posted at a conspicuous location at the job site office or be provided to each supervisory worker who shall have it readily available. Copies of the General Rules and NIF Code of Safe Practices can also be included in employee safety pamphlets. The Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) rules at the NIF Project site are based upon compliance with the most stringent of Department of Energy (DOE), LLNL, Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), California (Cal)/OSHA, and federal and state environmental requirements.

  19. Actinide Partitioning-Transmutation Program Final Report. V. Preconceptual designs and costs of partitioning facilities and shipping casks (appendix 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This Appendix contains cost estimate documents for the Fuels Reprocessing Plant Waste Treatment Facility. Plant costs are summarized by Code of Accounts and by Process Function. Costs contribution to each account are detailed. Process equipment costs are detailed for each Waste Treatment Process. Service utility costs are also summarized and detailed.

  20. Hanford Site Near-Facility Environmental Monitoring Data Report for Calendar Year 2007- Appendix 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, Craig J.; Dorsey, Michael; Mckinney, Stephen M.; Wilde, Justin W.; Duncan, Joanne P.

    2008-10-13

    Near-facility environmental monitoring is defined as monitoring near facilities that have the potential to discharge or have discharged, stored, or disposed of radioactive or hazardous materials. Monitoring locations are associated with nuclear facilities such as the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), Canister Storage Building (CSB), and the K Basins; inactive nuclear facilities such as N Reactor and the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility; and waste storage or disposal facilities such as burial grounds, cribs, ditches, ponds, tank farms, and trenches. Much of the monitoring consists of collecting and analyzing environmental samples and methodically surveying areas near facilities. The program is also designed to evaluate acquired analytical data, determine the effectiveness of facility effluent monitoring and controls, assess the adequacy of containment at waste disposal units, and detect and monitor unusual conditions.

  1. Final Irondale Gulch storm water evaluation : Appendix E

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report on the Irondale Gulch Storm Water Evaluation and effects of routing off-site storm water flows through Rocky Mountain Arsenal. Retention facilities for...

  2. Evaluating School Facilities in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornstein, Sheila Walbe; Moreira, Nanci Saraiva

    2008-01-01

    Brazil's Sao Paulo Metropolitan Region is conducting a performance evaluation pilot study at three schools serving disadvantaged populations. The objective is first to test methods which can facilitate Post Occupancy Evaluations (POEs) and then to carry out the evaluations. The preliminary results are provided below.

  3. Coal gasification systems engineering and analysis. Appendix C: Alternate product facility designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The study of the production of methane, methanol, gasoline, and hydrogen by an add-on facility to a Koppers-Totzek based MBG plant is presented. Applications to a Texaco facility are inferred by evaluation of delta effects from the K-T cases. The production of methane from an add-on facility to a Lurgi based MBG plant and the co-production of methane and methanol from a Lurgi based system is studied. Studies are included of the production of methane from up to 50 percent of the MBG produced in an integrated K-T based plant and the production of methane from up to 50 percent of the MBG produced from an integrated plant in which module 1 is based on K-T technology and modules 2, 3, and 4 are based on Texaco technology.

  4. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 37 - Modifications to Standards for Accessible Transportation Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Department has modified the language of the ADAAG as it applies to entities subject to 49 CFR part 37. These entities must comply with the modified language in this Appendix rather than the language of Appendices B... shall be placed to minimize the distance which wheelchair users and other persons who cannot negotiate...

  5. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark R. Cole

    2013-12-01

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA), located in Butte County, Idaho, at the Idaho National Laboratory has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non-contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell #1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell #2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell #3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5-acre land application site that uses a center-pivot irrigation sprinkler system. As flows at CFA have decreased in recent years, the amount of wastewater discharged to the land application site has decreased from 13.64 million gallons in 2004 to no discharge in 2012 and 2013. In addition to the decreasing need for land application, approximately 7.7 MG of supplemental water was added to the system in 2013 to maintain a water level and prevent the clay soil liners in the cells from drying out and “cracking.” The Idaho National Laboratory is concerned that the sewage lagoons and land application site may be oversized for current and future flows. A further concern is the sustainability of the large volumes of supplemental water that are added to the system according to current operational practices. Therefore, this study was initiated to evaluate the system capacity, operational practices, and potential improvement alternatives, as warranted.

  6. Computational evaluation oa a neutron field facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Jose Julio de O.; Pazianotto, Mauricio T., E-mail: jjfilos@hotmail.com, E-mail: mpazianotto@gmail.com [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Federico, Claudio A.; Passaro, Angelo, E-mail: claudiofederico@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: angelo@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the results of a study based on computer simulation for a realistic 3D model of Ionizing Radiation Laboratory of the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv) using the MCNP5 (Monte Carlo N-Particle) code, in order to guide the installing a neutron generator, produced by reaction {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He. The equipment produces neutrons with energy of 14.1 MeV and 2 x 10{sup 8} n/s production rate in 4 πgeometry, which can also be used for neutron dosimetry studies. This work evaluated the spectra and neutron fluence provided on previously selected positions inside the facility, chosen due to the interest to evaluate the assessment of ambient dose equivalent so that they can be made the necessary adjustments to the installation to be consistent with the guidelines of radiation protection and radiation safety, determined by the standards of National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). (author)

  7. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project. Appendix B, Waste stream engineering files, Part 1, Mixed waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

  8. Evaluation of the appendix during diagnostic laparoscopy, the laparoscopic appendicitis score : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamminga, Jenneke T. H.; Hofker, H. Sijbrand; Broens, Paul M. A.; Kluin, Philip M.; Heineman, Erik; Haveman, Jan Willem

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic laparoscopy is the ultimate diagnostic tool to evaluate the appendix. Still, according to the literature, this strategy results in a negative appendectomy rate of approximately 12-18 % and associated morbidity. Laparoscopic criteria for determining appendicitis are lacking. The goal of th

  9. Evaluation of the appendix during diagnostic laparoscopy, the laparoscopic appendicitis score : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamminga, Jenneke T. H.; Hofker, H. Sijbrand; Broens, Paul M. A.; Kluin, Philip M.; Heineman, Erik; Haveman, Jan Willem

    Diagnostic laparoscopy is the ultimate diagnostic tool to evaluate the appendix. Still, according to the literature, this strategy results in a negative appendectomy rate of approximately 12-18 % and associated morbidity. Laparoscopic criteria for determining appendicitis are lacking. The goal of

  10. Design, Evaluation and Test Technology Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of this facility, which is composed of numerous specialized facilities, is to provide capabilities to simulate a wide range of environments for component...

  11. Design, Evaluation and Test Technology Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of this facility, which is composed of numerous specialized facilities, is to provide capabilities to simulate a wide range of environments for component...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart I of... - Allowance for Facilities Planning and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... allowance under § 35.2025 for facilities planning and design. The Step 2+3, Step 3 and Step 7 grant... reimburse the grantee for costs actually incurred for facilities planning or design. Rather, the allowance... for Facilities Planning and Design Building cost Allowance as a percentage of building cost* $100,000...

  13. [Retrospective evaluation of carcinoid tumors of the appendix in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Vicente, B; Bardají, C; Rigol, S; Obiols, P; Melo, M; Bella, R

    2009-04-01

    Carcinoids of the appendix are rare in children. Usually diagnosed incidentally on histologic investigation following appendectomy for acute apendicitis. To investigate the significance of the diagnosis of appendiceal carcinoid tumors in children, we conducted a retrospective study in our institution. Between 1990 and 2007 a total of 1158 appendectomy were done. In four patients the diagnosis was appendiceal carcinoid. We studied treatment, follow-up and prognosis of this patients. Indicacion for appendectomy was acute pain in lower right quadrant. The median tumor diameter was lower than 1 cm and the appropriate treatment was appendectomy. The prognosis was excellent in all the patients.

  14. Facilities intelligence and evaluation: A multi-criteria assessment approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhen [School of the Built Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Riccarton, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    This paper presents a novel method for evaluating facilities in regard to their designed intelligence. Facilities intelligence is defined as the designed capacity of a facility to acquire and process data and information to perform its adaptability to lifecycle circumstance changes in terms of people's requirements of wellbeing and energy efficiency. This definition is then formulated to quantify the Index of Facilities Intelligence, the level of facilities intelligence, and the reliability of facilities evaluation. STEEP (social, technical, economic, environmental, and political) criteria and their sub-criteria are used to set up an ANP (analytic network process) model, and ANP result such as synthesized priority weights is then used to calculate those parameters related to facilities intelligence. An experimental case study is given to prove the effectiveness of applying the proposed method to evaluate the intelligence of facilities in practice. (author)

  15. Technical Evaluation of Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kriskovich, J R

    2002-01-01

    Two evaluations of the Oak Ridge Department of Energy (DOE) Filter Test Facility (FTF) were performed on December 11 and 12, 2001, and consisted of a quality assurance and a technical evaluation. This report documents results of the technical evaluation.

  16. TWRS HLW interim storage facility search and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmus, R.B., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-16

    The purpose of this study was to identify and provide an evaluation of interim storage facilities and potential facility locations for the vitrified high-level waste (HLW) from the Phase I demonstration plant and Phase II production plant. In addition, interim storage facilities for solidified separated radionuclides (Cesium and Technetium) generated during pretreatment of Phase I Low-Level Waste Vitrification Plant feed was evaluated.

  17. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giesbrecht, Alan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA) located in Butte County, Idaho at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell 1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell 2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell 3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5 acre land application site that utilizes a center pivot irrigation sprinkler system. The purpose of this current study is to update the analysis and conclusions of the December 2013 study. In this current study, the new seepage rate and influent flow rate data have been used to update the calculations, model, and analysis.

  18. Construction safety program for the National Ignition Facility Appendix A: Safety Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerruti, S.J.

    1997-01-14

    These rules apply to all LLNL employees, non-LLNL employees (including contract labor, supplemental labor, vendors, personnel matrixed/assigned from other National Laboratories, participating guests, visitors and students) and construction contractors/subcontractors. The General Safety and Health rules shall be used by management to promote accident prevention through indoctrination, safety and health training and on-the-job application. As a condition for contracts award, all contractors and subcontractors and their employees must certify on Form S & H A-1 that they have read and understand, or have been briefed and understand, the National Ignition Facility OCIP Project General Safety Rules.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION HANFORD GROUT LYSIMETER FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, G. A.

    1984-06-01

    The Hanford Grout Lysimeter Facility (HGLF) will be constructed to test the leaching and migration of radioactive and nonradioactive tracers embedded in a solidification agent (grout) under actual burial conditions in Hanford soil. Three different water treatment rates will be used: natural precipitation, 4 times and 8 times natural precipitation. Six lysimeters will be assembled. Each unit will measure 6 feet in diameter, 25 feet deep. Their construction and instrumentation will be performed during June-July, 1984 by J. A. Jones Construction Company and/or their subcontractor. The routine monitoring will be performed by Battelle staff over a 5.5 year period beginning in November 1984. The total estimated project cost will be approximately $200,000. The only anticipated environmental impact from this project will be a temporary nuisance-type local dust problem during the construction phase. This will not be a detriment to the environment. The results of dose calculations indicate that dose rates from the grouted waste cans will be quite low when the cans are covered by a meter or more of earth. Dose rates at or near the surface of the individual cans are not high enough to preclude their handling. The facility area will be fenced, posted as a radiation zone and operated under a radiation work procedure.

  20. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This volume contains the appendices that provide additional environment, safety, and health (ES and H) information to complement Volume 1 of this Standard. Appendix A provides a set of candidate DOE ES and H directives and external regulations, organized by hazard types that may be used to identify potentially applicable directives to a specific facility disposition activity. Appendix B offers examples and lessons learned that illustrate implementation of ES and H approaches discussed in Section 3 of Volume 1. Appendix C contains ISMS performance expectations to guide a project team in developing and implementing an effective ISMS and in developing specific performance criteria for use in facility disposition. Appendix D provides guidance for identifying potential Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) when decommissioning facilities fall under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, Liability Act (CERCLA) process. Appendix E discusses ES and H considerations for dispositioning facilities by privatization. Appendix F is an overview of the WSS process. Appendix G provides a copy of two DOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards memoranda that form the bases for some of the guidance discussed within the Standard. Appendix H gives information on available hazard analysis techniques and references. Appendix I provides a supplemental discussion to Sections 3.3.4, Hazard Baseline Documentation, and 3.3.6, Environmental Permits. Appendix J presents a sample readiness evaluation checklist.

  1. Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF). User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ARMSEF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  2. Development of an ergonomic evaluation facility for Indian tractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, R; Kumar, A; Mohan, D

    2000-06-01

    The design of tractors manufactured in low-income countries like India has not changed much in the past two decades, especially from an ergonomic point of view. Moreover, in these countries tractors are used for transportation purposes in addition to farming operations. Therefore, the design criteria for these tractors need to be different from those in high-income countries. This paper describes the development of an ergonomic facility for improvement of tractor design. An ergonomic evaluation facility has been developed consisting of a work place envelope for the Indian population, a layout measuring device and an ergonomic rig. This facility can be used for comparative evaluation of the display and control layouts of different tractors in order to develop an optimum layout. The ergonomic rig has the facility to simulate the improved layout for subjective evaluation.

  3. 49 CFR Appendix A to Subpart E of... - Explanation of Pre-Authorization Safety Audit Evaluation Criteria for Mexico-Domiciled Motor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OPERATING AUTHORITY Special Rules for Certain Mexico-domiciled Carriers Pt. 365, Subpt. E, App. A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 365—Explanation of Pre-Authorization Safety Audit Evaluation Criteria for Mexico... Evaluation Criteria for Mexico-Domiciled Motor Carriers A Appendix A to Subpart E of Part 365 Transportation...

  4. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 665 - Tests To Be Performed at the Bus Testing Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., low, and split-friction surfaces. The parking brake should be evaluated with the bus parked facing... on a two post hoist system or supporting it on jack stands should be assessed. b. Structural...

  5. Hydropower and Water Framework Directive. Appendix 2 to 4; Wasserkraftnutzung und Wasserrahmenrichtlinien. Anhang 2 bis 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keuneke, Rita; Dumont, Ulrich [Ingenieurbuero Floecksmuehle, Aachen (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    The contribution under consideration contains the appendices 2 to 4 to the environmental research plan of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany) on ''Hydropower and Water Framework Directive''. Appendix 2 reports on the fundamentals for the design of fish bypass facilities, fish protection and fish migration facilities, minimum outflow in discharge lines, water ecologic evaluation, determination of less generation of hydroelectric power plants. Appendix 3 contains illustrations. Appendix 4 presents an extract from the final report.

  6. Monitored retrievable storage facility site screening and evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1985-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy to complete a detailed study of the need for and feasibility of, and to submit to the Congress a proposal for, the construction of one or more monitored retrievable storage facilities for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.'' The Act directs that the proposal includes site specific designs. Further, the proposal is to include, for the first such facility, at least three alternative sites and at least five alternative combinations of such proposed site and facility designs...'' as well as a recommendation of the combination among the alternatives that the Secretary deems preferable.'' An MRS Site Screening Task Force has been formed to help identify and evaluated potential MRS facility sites within a preferred region and with the application of a siting process and criteria developed by the DOE. The activities of the task force presented in this report includes: site screening (Sections 3, 4, and 5), the MRS facilities which are to be sited are described; the criteria, process and outcome of the screening process is presented; and descriptions of the candidate MRS facility sites are given, and site evaluations (Sections 6 through 9) where the rational for the site evaluations are presented, along with each evaluation and findings of the Task Force.

  7. Impact evaluation for the Manufactured Housing Acquisition Program: Technical appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.D.; Taylor, Z.T.; Schrock, D.W.; Kavanaugh, D.C.; Chin, R.I.

    1995-10-01

    This document supplements the Manufactured Housing Acquisition Program (MAP) impact evaluation report, Lee et al. (1995). MAP is a voluntary energy-efficiency program for HUD-code manufactured homes conducted in the Pacific Northwest beginning in April 1992. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this and the impact evaluation reports for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville). Lee et al. (1995) presents the objectives, methodology, and findings of the program evaluation. This report presents more details about specific aspects of the analysis. The authors used a three-tier approach to analyze the energy consumption of MAP and baseline homes. Chapter 2 discusses Tier 1, the billing data and simplified regression analysis. Chapter 3 presents the details of the Tier 2 analysis, the PRInceton Scorekeeping Method (PRISM). Chapter 4 presents details of the primary analysis technique that they used, a comprehensive regression analysis. Chapter 5 and 6 review two other studies of energy savings associated with MAP. Chapter 5 discusses the simulation model analysis conducted by Ecotope, Inc. Chapter 6 reviews the analysis by Regional Economic Research conducted for three Pacific Northwest investor-owned utilities. The final chapter, Chapter 7, presents details of the Bonneville levelized cost methodology used to estimate the cost of energy savings associated with MAP. Results are presented and discussed in many cases for the three different climate zones found in the Pacific Northwest. 18 refs., 29 tabs.

  8. Test facilities for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, David F.; Allen, George C.; Shipers, Larry R.; Dobranich, Dean; Ottinger, Cathy A.; Harmon, Charles D.; Fan, Wesley C.; Todosow, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Interagency panels evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) development options have consistently recognized the need for constructing a major new ground test facility to support fuel element and engine testing. This paper summarizes the requirements, configuration, and baseline performance of some of the major subsystems designed to support a proposed ground test complex for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion fuel elements and engines being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. Some preliminary results of evaluating this facility for use in testing other NTP concepts are also summarized.

  9. Preliminary safety evaluation (PSE) for Sodium Storage Facility at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, B.R.

    1994-09-30

    This evaluation was performed for the Sodium Storage Facility (SSF) which will be constructed at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) in the area adjacent to the South and West Dump Heat Exchanger (DHX) pits. The purpose of the facility is to allow unloading the sodium from the FFTF plant tanks and piping. The significant conclusion of this Preliminary Safety Evaluation (PSE) is that the only Safety Class 2 components are the four sodium storage tanks and their foundations. The building, because of its imminent risk to the tanks under an earthquake or high winds, will be Safety Class 3/2, which means the building has a Safety Class 3 function with the Safety Class 2 loads of seismic and wind factored into the design.

  10. 23 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Guidance Criteria for Evaluating Requests for Interstate System Designations Under 23 U.S.C. 139...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... System Designations Under 23 U.S.C. 139 (a) and (b) A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 470 Highways...-aid Highway Systems Pt. 470, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 470—Guidance Criteria for Evaluating Requests for Interstate System Designations Under 23 U.S.C. 139 (a) and (b) Section 139...

  11. National Evaluation of Title III Implementation: Report on State and Local Implementation. Appendix G: Data Collection Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Courtney; Boyle, Andrea; Soga, Kay; Le Floch, Kerstin Carlson; Golden, Laura; Petroccia, Megan; Toplitz, Michele; O'Day, Jennifer; Taylor, James

    2012-01-01

    This appendix presents the data collection instruments used for the "National Evaluation of Title III Implementation: Report on State and Local Implementation" study. The purpose of this study is not to monitor Title III implementation, but to describe the implementation of Title III in states and school districts across the country. The…

  12. 23 CFR Appendix D to Subpart A of... - Guidance Criteria for Evaluating Requests for Modifications to the National Highway System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guidance Criteria for Evaluating Requests for Modifications to the National Highway System D Appendix D to Subpart A of Part 470 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND RESEARCH HIGHWAY SYSTEMS Federal-aid Highway Systems...

  13. Monitored retrievable storage facility site screening and evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1985-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy to complete a detailed study of the need for and feasibility of, and to submit to the Congress a proposal for, the construction of one or more monitored retrievable storage facilities for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.'' The Act directs that the proposal includes site specific designs. Further, the proposal is to include, for the first such facility, at least three alternative sites and at least five alternative combinations of such proposed sites and facility designs{hor ellipsis}'' as well as a recommendation of the combination among the alternatives that the Secretary deems preferable.'' An MRS Site Screening Task Force has been formed to help identify and evaluate potential MRS facility sites within a preferred region and with the application of a siting process and criteria developed by the DOE. The activities of the Task Force presented in this report include: site evaluations (sections 10 through 12) where the rationale for the site evaluations are presented, along with each evaluation and findings of the Task Force. This in Volume 2 of a three volume document.

  14. Monitored Retrievable Storage facility site screening and evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1985-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy to complete a detailed study of the need for and feasibility of, and to submit to the Congress a proposal for, the construction of one or more monitored retrievable storage facilities for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.'' The Act directs that the proposal includes site specific designs. Further, the proposal is to include, for the first such facility, at least three alternative sites and at least five alternative combinations of such proposed sites and facility designs {hor ellipsis}'' as well as a recommendation of the combination among the alternatives that the Secretary deems preferable.'' An MRS Site Screening Task Force has been formed to help identify and evaluate potential MRS facility sites within a preferred region and with the application of a siting process and criteria developed by the DOE. The activities of the Task Force presented in this report, all site evaluations (sections 13 through 16) where the rationale for the site evaluations are presented, along with each evaluation and findings of the Task Force. This is Volume 3 of a three volume document. References are also included in this volume.

  15. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure activities evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, J.G.

    1996-04-22

    This report evaluates the closure activities at the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility. The closure activities discussed include: the closure activities for the structures, equipment, soil, and gravel scrubber; decontamination methods; materials made available for recycling or reuse; and waste management. The evaluation compares these activities to the regulatory requirements and closure plan requirements. The report concludes that the areas identified in the closure plan can be clean closed.

  16. Evaluation of automated decisionmaking methodologies and development of an integrated robotic system simulation, appendix A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, D. C.; Almand, B. J.; Thomas, M. M.; Krauze, L. D.; Gremban, K. D.; Sanborn, J. C.; Kelly, J. H.; Depkovich, T. M.

    1984-01-01

    A generic computer simulation for manipulator systems (ROBSIM) was implemented and the specific technologies necessary to increase the role of automation in various missions were developed. The specific items developed were: (1) Capability for definition of a manipulator system consisting of multiple arms, load objects, and an environment; (2) Capability for kinematic analysis, requirements analysis, and response simulation of manipulator motion; (3) Postprocessing options such as graphic replay of simulated motion and manipulator parameter plotting; (4) Investigation and simulation of various control methods including manual force/torque and active compliance control; (5) Evaluation and implementation of three obstacle avoidance methods; (6) Video simulation and edge detection; and (7) Software simulation validation. This appendix is the user's guide and includes examples of program runs and outputs as well as instructions for program use.

  17. International symposium on seismic evaluation of existing nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orbovic, N.; Bouchon, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Vendel, J.; Gelain, T. [IRSN/DPEA/SERAC, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2003-10-01

    Below are summarized the works of Mrs N. Orbovic and M. Bouchon; B. Stojadinovic, N. Orbovic, M.Bouchon and J.T. Wiley; M. Bouchon, N. Orbovic and B. Foure; T. Gelain, F. Gensdarmes, R. Sestier-Carlin, J. Vendel and M. Bouchon dealing respectively with: 1) seismic assessment of existing nuclear facility: a case study position of the IRSN 2) static and dynamic evaluation of an existing nuclear facility reinforced concrete frame structure 3) experimental study of cracking of low-rise reinforced concrete shear walls 4) aeraulics study of crack networks on low-rise reinforced concrete walls subject to static cycling loading. The summaries are followed: 1) The Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has the task of evaluating the seismic safety of existing building inventory in French nuclear facilities. Some of the existing structures are reinforced concrete frame buildings with masonry or reinforced concrete in-fill walls built during the 1960's, 70's and 80's following different building codes and seismic input data applicable at the time of construction. The studied building is a laboratory that was built in 1962. The building is composed of three different and independent blocks. The structure is a reinforced concrete frame with masonry in-fills and few stiff concrete elements. Moreover, the building contains an independent massive concrete cell. Structurally, the building has a number of irregularities. From the detailing standpoint, well known deficiencies of low-ductile reinforced concrete structures are evident especially, a lack of transverse reinforcement in the structural joints of the frame. A number of sensitivity studies were conducted using 2D and 3D linear models to evaluate seismic demand. Ambient vibration and regional earthquake records were used to check the soil nature and the existence or not of a possible site effect around the installation as well as to characterize the dynamic behavior of the building. 3D models

  18. Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

    2008-10-17

    This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

  19. Evaluation of mercury in the liquid waste processing facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Vijay [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shah, Hasmukh [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Occhipinti, John E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, William R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, Richard E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-13

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  20. SHEAR STRENGTH MEASURING EQUIPMENT EVALUATION AT THE COLD TEST FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MEACHAM JE

    2009-09-09

    Retrievals under current criteria require that approximately 2,000,000 gallons of double-shell tank (DST) waste storage space not be used to prevent creating new tanks that might be susceptible to buoyant displacement gas release events (BDGRE). New criteria are being evaluated, based on actual sludge properties, to potentially show that sludge wastes do not exhibit the same BDGRE risk. Implementation of the new criteria requires measurement of in situ waste shear strength. Cone penetrometers were judged the best equipment for measuring in situ shear strength and an A.P. van den berg Hyson 100 kN Light Weight Cone Penetrometer (CPT) was selected for evaluation. The CPT was procured and then evaluated at the Hanford Site Cold Test Facility. Evaluation demonstrated that the equipment with minor modification was suitable for use in Tank Farms.

  1. Personnel Access Control System Evaluation for National Ignition Facility Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenbach, T; Brereton, S.; Hermes, G.; Singh, M.

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to analyze the baseline Access Control System for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and to assess its effectiveness at controlling access to hazardous locations during full NIF operations. It reviews the various hazards present during a NIF shot sequence, and evaluates the effectiveness of the applicable set of controls at preventing access while the hazards are present. It considers only those hazards that could potentially be lethal. In addition, various types of technologies that might be applicable at NIF are reviewed, as are systems currently in use at other facilities requiring access control for safety reasons. Recommendations on how this system might be modified to reduce risk are made.

  2. Evaluating and optimizing horticultural regimes in space plant growth facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich, Y. A.; Chetirkin, P. V.; Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    In designing innovative space plant growth facilities (SPGF) for long duration space flight, various limitations must be addressed including onboard resources: volume, energy consumption, heat transfer and crew labor expenditure. The required accuracy in evaluating onboard resources by using the equivalent mass methodology and applying it to the design of such facilities is not precise. This is due to the uncertainty of the structure and not completely understanding the properties of all associated hardware, including the technology in these systems. We present a simple criteria of optimization for horticultural regimes in SPGF: Qmax = max [ M · (EBI) 2/( V · E · T) ], where M is the crop harvest in terms of total dry biomass in the plant growth system; EBI is the edible biomass index (harvest index), V is volume occupied by the crop; E is the crop light energy supply during growth; T is the crop growth duration. The criterion reflects directly on the consumption of onboard resources for crop production.

  3. [Evaluation of street facilities I, II and III in Basel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, C; Spuhler, G; Coda, P; Schöpfer, R

    1996-01-01

    In June 1991 the city of Basel established the first low threshold centre (LTC) subsidized by the government after various private initiatives of "Live & Survive" aids. This low threshold facility which was supplemented in 1992 by two additional LTCs aimed at harm and risk reduction. The evaluation of LTCs was conducted by the institute for Social and Preventive Medicine of the University of Basel on behalf of the Federal Office of Health. Combining qualitative and quantitative research methods its structure was evaluated regarding the realization of its own objectives. The LTCs reached a great variety of drug addicts which were characterized by a remarkable heterogeneity. The majority of users were aged between 20 and 30, a quarter of them were female. Differences were found in housing conditions, subsistence and the degree of social integration. The facilities of the institutions were extensively used. In 1993 and 1994 a daily average of 250 to 300 visits was recorded in the injecting rooms only. the clientele were mainly residents of the Basel area. This lead to the conclusion that there was no attractive effect on more remote regions. As a consequence of the extensive use of the facilities a movement of the drug scene away from the street into the LTCs could be observed. In general, a stabilization or even an improvement of the physical condition of its users could be noticed. Another important feature was the improvement of the drug addicts' social integration. The main reason for this was the relationship between users and staff. Due to the shortage of personnel this promising base for further psychosocial work could not be adequately developed. The investigators not only concluded that there is a need for continuing maintenance of these facilities but also that additional efforts to improve the psychosocial services would be justified.

  4. Cost optimizing of large-scale offshore wind farms. Appendix E to J. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This Volume 3 contains reports prepared by SEAS Distribution A.m.b.A. and partly by Risoe National Laboratory. Appendix E: Grid connection. Appendix F: Review of potential offshore sites. Appendix G: Optimisation of wind farm layout. Appendix G.1: Evaluation of Power Production from Three Offshore Wind Farms. Appendix H: Investments, operation and maintenance costs. Appendix I: Authority approvals and environmental investigations. Appendix J: Outline description of demonstration project. Appendix G.1 has been prepared by Risoe National Laboratory. (au)

  5. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 385 - Explanation of Safety Audit Evaluation Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES Pt. 385, App. A Appendix A to Part 385—Explanation of Safety Audit...'s basic safety management controls. (b) The safety audit is a review of a Mexico-domiciled or new...

  6. Shielding Design and Radiation Shielding Evaluation for LSDS System Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Younggook; Kim, Jeongdong; Lee, Yongdeok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    As the system characteristics, the target in the spectrometer emits approximately 1012 neutrons/s. To efficiently shield the neutron, the shielding door designs are proposed for the LSDS system through a comparison of the direct shield and maze designs. Hence, to guarantee the radiation safety for the facility, the door design is a compulsory course of the development of the LSDS system. To improve the shielding rates, 250x250 covering structure was added as a subsidiary around the spectrometer. In this study, the evaluations of the suggested shielding designs were conducted using MCNP code. The suggested door design and covering structures can shield the neutron efficiently, thus all evaluations of all conditions are satisfied within the public dose limits. From the Monte Carlo code simulation, Resin(Indoor type) and Tungsten(Outdoor type) were selected as the shielding door materials. From a comparative evaluation of the door thickness, In and Out door thickness was selected 50 cm.

  7. DETERMINATION OF IMPORTANCE EVALUATION FOR THE SUBSURFACE EXPORATORY STUDIES FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.J. Clark

    1999-06-28

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) East-West Cross Drift Starter Tunnel (to approximate ECRB Station 0+26 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas in the TS Loop. This evaluation applies to the construction, operation, and maintenance of these excavations. A more detailed description of these items is provided in Section 6.0. Testing activities are not evaluated in this DIE. Certain construction activities with respect to testing activities are evaluated; but the testing activities themselves are not evaluated. The DIE for ESF Subsurface Testing Activities (BAJ3000000-01717-2200-00011 Rev 01) (CRWMS M&O 1998a) evaluates Subsurface ESF Testing activities. The construction, operation, and maintenance of the TS Loop niches and alcove slot cuts is evaluated herein and is also discussed in CRWMS M&O 1998a. The construction, operation, and maintenance of the Busted Butte subsurface test area in support of the Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test is evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1998a. Potential test-to-test interference and the waste isolation impacts of testing activities are evaluated in the ESF Subsurface Testing Activities DIE and other applicable evaluation(s) for the Job Package (JP), Test Planning Package (TPP), and/or Field Work Package (FWP). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether the Subsurface ESF TS Loop and associated excavations, including activities associated with their construction and operation, potentially impact site characterization testing or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified. The validity and veracity of the individual tests, including data collection, are the responsibility

  8. Technical evaluation of proposed Ukrainian Central Radioactive Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, R.; Glukhov, A.; Markowski, F.

    1996-06-01

    This technical report is a comprehensive evaluation of the proposal by the Ukrainian State Committee on Nuclear Power Utilization to create a central facility for radioactive waste (not spent fuel) processing. The central facility is intended to process liquid and solid radioactive wastes generated from all of the Ukrainian nuclear power plants and the waste generated as a result of Chernobyl 1, 2 and 3 decommissioning efforts. In addition, this report provides general information on the quantity and total activity of radioactive waste in the 30-km Zone and the Sarcophagus from the Chernobyl accident. Processing options are described that may ultimately be used in the long-term disposal of selected 30-km Zone and Sarcophagus wastes. A detailed report on the issues concerning the construction of a Ukrainian Central Radioactive Waste Processing Facility (CRWPF) from the Ukrainian Scientific Research and Design institute for Industrial Technology was obtained and incorporated into this report. This report outlines various processing options, their associated costs and construction schedules, which can be applied to solving the operating and decommissioning radioactive waste management problems in Ukraine. The costs and schedules are best estimates based upon the most current US industry practice and vendor information. This report focuses primarily on the handling and processing of what is defined in the US as low-level radioactive wastes.

  9. International symposium on seismic evaluation of existing nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orbovic, N.; Bouchon, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Vendel, J.; Gelain, T. [IRSN/DPEA/SERAC, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2003-10-01

    Below are summarized the works of Mrs N. Orbovic and M. Bouchon; B. Stojadinovic, N. Orbovic, M.Bouchon and J.T. Wiley; M. Bouchon, N. Orbovic and B. Foure; T. Gelain, F. Gensdarmes, R. Sestier-Carlin, J. Vendel and M. Bouchon dealing respectively with: 1) seismic assessment of existing nuclear facility: a case study position of the IRSN 2) static and dynamic evaluation of an existing nuclear facility reinforced concrete frame structure 3) experimental study of cracking of low-rise reinforced concrete shear walls 4) aeraulics study of crack networks on low-rise reinforced concrete walls subject to static cycling loading. The summaries are followed: 1) The Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has the task of evaluating the seismic safety of existing building inventory in French nuclear facilities. Some of the existing structures are reinforced concrete frame buildings with masonry or reinforced concrete in-fill walls built during the 1960's, 70's and 80's following different building codes and seismic input data applicable at the time of construction. The studied building is a laboratory that was built in 1962. The building is composed of three different and independent blocks. The structure is a reinforced concrete frame with masonry in-fills and few stiff concrete elements. Moreover, the building contains an independent massive concrete cell. Structurally, the building has a number of irregularities. From the detailing standpoint, well known deficiencies of low-ductile reinforced concrete structures are evident especially, a lack of transverse reinforcement in the structural joints of the frame. A number of sensitivity studies were conducted using 2D and 3D linear models to evaluate seismic demand. Ambient vibration and regional earthquake records were used to check the soil nature and the existence or not of a possible site effect around the installation as well as to characterize the dynamic behavior of the building. 3D models

  10. DETERMINATION OF IMPORTANCE EVALUATION FOR THE SURFACE EXPLORATORY STUDIES FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.J. Byrne

    2000-07-25

    This DIE applies to the surface facilities component of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (W) ESF. The ESF complex-including surface and subsurface accommodations--encompasses an area that is approximately six miles wide and nine miles long (approximately 30,000 acres total) (United States Department of Energy [DOE] 1997, p. 9.04). It is located on federally withdrawn lands, near the southwest border of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in southern Nevada (DOE 1997, p. 9.04). Site characterization activities are conducted within the subsurface ESF to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Most ESF surface facilities are located within the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB) (DOE 1997, p. 9.04), with the exception of the southeastern most portions of the H-Road and the Water Supply System. Various SBT activities are also conducted throughout the Yucca Mountain region as a part of the overall site-characterization effort. In general, the DIE for SBT Activities (Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System [CRWMS] Management and Operating Contractor [M&O] 1998a) evaluates activities associated with SBT. Potential test-to-test interference and waste isolation impacts associated with SBT activities are also evaluated in CRWMS M&O (1998a).

  11. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for fiscal year 1993. Appendix II research laboratories and facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-30

    This document contains summaries of the research facilities that support the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for FY 1993. The nine program elements are aggregated into three program clusters as follows: (1) Advanced materials sciences and technologies; chemistry and materials, explosives, special nuclear materials (SNM), and tritium. (2) Design sciences and advanced computation; physics, conceptual design and assessment, and computation and modeling. (3) Advanced manufacturing technologies and capabilities; system engineering science and technology, and electronics, photonics, sensors, and mechanical components. Section I gives a brief summary of 23 major defense program (DP) research and technology facilities and shows how these major facilities are organized by program elements. Section II gives a more detailed breakdown of the over 200 research and technology facilities being used at the Laboratories to support the Defense Programs mission.

  12. Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities: Qualitative risk evaluation for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

    1993-09-01

    This document provides a risk evaluation of the 100 and 200 Area retired, surplus facilities on the Hanford Site. Also included are the related data that were compiled by the risk evaluation team during investigations performed on the facilities. Results are the product of a major effort performed in fiscal year 1993 to produce qualitative information that characterizes certain risks associated with these facilities. The retired facilities investigated for this evaluation are located in the 100 and 200 Areas of the 1,450-km{sup 2} (570-mi{sup 2}) Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is a semiarid tract of land in southeastern Washington State. The nearest population center is Richland, Washington, (population 32,000) 30-km (20 mi) southeast of the 200 Area. During walkdown investigations of these facilities, data on real and potential hazards that threatened human health or safety or created potential environmental release issues were identified by the risk evaluation team. Using these findings, the team categorized the identified hazards by facility and evaluated the risk associated with each hazard. The factors contributing to each risk, and the consequence and likelihood of harm associated with each hazard also are included in this evaluation.

  13. Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Three - Appendix F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

    1999-04-01

    This appendix supports the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-13711/V1. This volume contains Appendix F. Appendix F is essentially a photocopy of the ORNL researchers' laboratory notebooks from the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and the Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory (RMAL).

  14. 10 CFR Appendix R to Part 50 - Fire Protection Program for Nuclear Power Facilities Operating Prior to January 1, 1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... generic issues for such facilities it sets forth fire protection features required to satisfy Criterion 3... strategies and procedures. (10) Review of the latest plant modifications and corresponding changes in fire.... Performance deficiencies of a fire brigade or of individual fire brigade members shall be remedied by...

  15. An Evaluation of Spatial Distribution of Public Parking Facilities in Huizhou Downtown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiasheng; Bai, Yang; Chen, Ying

    2016-11-01

    The survey and evaluation of existing public parking facilities were carried out, which had important practical significance to resolve conflicts over demand and supply of parking facilities. Taking Huizhou downtown as a study area, we surveyed parking facilities mainly by daily observing and recording. Parking facilities supply, characteristics, and demand were analysed by calculating parking utilization and turnover rate. Based on GIS, the distance-based and time-based accessibility of parking facilities were analysed to evaluate spatial distribution. The results indicated that a large spatial difference in supply and characteristics of parking was shown in public parking facilities of Huizhou downtown and that the parking demand was large. Furthermore, there existed imbalance in spatial distribution of parking facilities in Huizhou downtown area. Our study suggested that it was imbalanced and irrational between parking facilities supply and parking demand, that the planning of parking facilities was inadequate and that management system was incomplete.

  16. Educational Facility Evaluations of Primary Schools in Rural Honduras: Departments of Cortes and Meambar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Educational Facility Planners, International, Scottsdale, AZ.

    A team of 11 educational facility planners and architects from the United States and Canada conducted a facility evaluation of schools in the rural areas of Meambar and Cortes, Honduras. Team members were all part of the Council of Educational Facility Planners, International and traveled to Honduras under the auspices of a Christian mission…

  17. Criticality safety evaluation report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility`s process water handling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roblyer, S.D.

    1998-02-12

    This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified. The effectiveness of equipment design and operation controls in preventing criticality occurrences during normal and abnormal conditions is evaluated and documented in this report. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is removed from existing canisters in both the K East and K West Basins and loaded into a multicanister overpack (MCO) in the K Basin pool. The MCO is housed in a shipping cask surrounded by clean water in the annulus between the exterior of the MCO and the interior of the shipping cask. The fuel consists of spent N Reactor and some single pass reactor fuel. The MCO is transported to the CVDF near the K Basins to remove process water from the MCO interior and from the shipping cask annulus. After the bulk water is removed from the MCO, any remaining free liquid is removed by drawing a vacuum on the MCO`s interior. After cold vacuum drying is completed, the MCO is filled with an inert cover gas, the lid is replaced on the shipping cask, and the MCO is transported to the Canister Storage Building. The process water removed from the MCO contains fissionable materials from metallic uranium corrosion. The process water from the MCO is first collected in a geometrically safe process water conditioning receiver tank. The process water in the process water conditioning receiver tank is tested, then filtered, demineralized, and collected in the storage tank. The process water is finally removed from the storage tank and transported from the CVDF by truck.

  18. PK-12 Public Educational Facilities Master Plan Evaluation Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    21st Century School Fund, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Proper planning of school facilities is critical for all school districts no matter how large or small, whether major construction is in the works or the district is managing enrollment declines. When school districts properly plan for their school facilities they have better schools, more public use and higher value for public spending. This…

  19. Facility to evaluate street lightning solutionsin a realistic urban setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jakob Munkgaard; Thorseth, Anders; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new large scale outdoor testing facility for street lighting solutions, that has been establish in Denmark for both research and demonstration purposes. The facility is fitted with lamp posts with an array of sensors and connections to allow for monitoring and control of li...

  20. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix B : Local Generation Evaluation : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The information and data contained in this Appendix was extracted from numerous sources. The principle sources used for technical data were Bonneville Power Administration's 1990 Resource Program along with its technical appendix, and Chapter 8 of the Draft 1991 Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan. All cost data is reported 1988 dollars unless otherwise noted. This information was supplemented by other data developed by Puget Sound utilities who participated on the Local Generation Team. Identifying generating resources available to the Puget Sound area involved a five step process: (1) listing all possible resources that might contribute power to the Puget Sound area, (2) characterizing the technology/resource status, cost and operating characteristics of these resources, (3) identifying exclusion criteria based on the needs of the overall Puget Sound Electric Reliability Plan study, (4) applying these criteria to the list of resources, and (5) summarizing of the costs and characteristics of the final list of resources. 15 refs., 20 tabs.

  1. Culture-Independent Evaluation of the Appendix and Rectum Microbiomes in Children with and without Appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Katherine P.; Fraser, Claire M.; Sandler, Anthony D.; Zeichner, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The function of the appendix is largely unknown, but its microbiota likely contributes to function. Alterations in microbiota may contribute to appendicitis, but conventional culture studies have not yielded conclusive information. We conducted a pilot, culture-independent 16S rRNA-based microbiota study of paired appendix and rectal samples. Methods We collected appendix and rectal swabs from 21 children undergoing appendectomy, six with normal appendices and fifteen with appendicitis (nine perforated). After DNA extraction, we amplified and sequenced 16S rRNA genes and analyzed sequences using CLoVR. We identified organisms differing in relative abundance using ANOVA (pappendicitis vs. normal), and disease severity (perforated vs. non-perforated). Results We identified 290 taxa in the study's samples. Three taxa were significantly increased in normal appendices vs. normal rectal samples: Fusibacter (p = 0.009), Selenomonas (p = 0.026), and Peptostreptococcus (p = 0.049). Five taxa were increased in abundance in normal vs. diseased appendices: Paenibacillaceae (p = 0.005), Acidobacteriaceae GP4 (p = 0.019), Pseudonocardinae (p = 0.019), Bergeyella (p = 0.019) and Rhizobium (p = 0.045). Twelve taxa were increased in the appendices of appendicitis patients vs. normal appendix: Peptostreptococcus (p = 0.0003), Bilophila (p = 0.0004), Bulleidia (p = 0.012), Fusobacterium (p = 0.018), Parvimonas (p = 0.003), Mogibacterium (p = 0.012), Aminobacterium (p = 0.019), Proteus (p = 0.028), Actinomycineae (p = 0.028), Anaerovorax (p = 0.041), Anaerofilum (p = 0.045), Porphyromonas (p = 0.010). Five taxa were increased in appendices in patients with perforated vs. nonperforated appendicitis: Bulleidia (p = 0.004), Fusibacter (p = 0.005), Prevotella (p = 0.021), Porphyromonas (p = 0.030), Dialister (p = 0.035). Three taxa were increased in rectum samples of patients with

  2. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 9: Appendix C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    The appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the first quarter of calendar year 1988 (January through March). The data in this volume of Appendix C cover the following wells: 199-N-58; 199-N-59; 199-N-60; 199-N-61; 199-N-67. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  3. Evaluating an Integrated Approach to the Management of Cerebral Palsy. Appendix A: IMCP Documentation Handbook. Volume II of IV. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, Laird W.; And Others

    The appendix is a guide to the curriculum and training procedures of the Integrated Management of Cerebral Palsy project which evaluated the effectiveness of a program of conductive education. Introductory sections provide an overview of conductive education (training motorically disabled children in small, motivating groups of similarly…

  4. Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This DOE standard gives design and evaluation criteria for natural phenomena hazards (NPH) effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE 5480.28. Goal of the criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, flooding, etc. They apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities; they may also be used for modification and upgrading of the latter.

  5. Evaluation of the Netherlands' International Test Facility for Smart Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmintier, Bryan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pratt, Annabelle [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The Netherlands Enterprise Agency (Rijksdienst voor Ondernemend Nederland, or RVO) engaged the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for two primary purposes: to evaluate the International Test Facility for Smart Grids (ITF) sponsored by RVO and to learn best practices for integrated test facilities from NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF). This report covers the ITF evaluation and is largely based on a one-week visit to the Netherlands in November 2014.

  6. EVALUATION OF SERVICES' QUALITY IN UPPER SILESIA ACCOMMODATION FACILITIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iwona Cieślik; Ewa Cieślik; Agnieszka Siembida; Małgorzata Tomczyk

    2013-01-01

    ... the accommodation facilities, and making a choice of a hotel in the Upper Silesia. The study involved 200 people, taking into account their gender, age, place of residence, education and occupational status...

  7. Professional Development through Organizational Assessment: Using APPA's Facilities Management Evaluation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlin, E. Lander; Judd, R. Holly

    2013-01-01

    APPA's Facilities Management Evaluation Program (FMEP) provides an integrated system to optimize organizational performance. The criteria for evaluation not only provide a tool for organizational continuous improvement, they serve as a compelling leadership development tool essential for today's facilities management professional. The senior…

  8. Passive Safety Features Evaluation of KIPT Neutron Source Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Zhaopeng [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have cooperated on the development, design, and construction of a neutron source facility. The facility was constructed at Kharkov, Ukraine and its commissioning process is underway. It will be used to conduct basic and applied nuclear research, produce medical isotopes, and train young nuclear specialists. The facility has an electron accelerator-driven subcritical assembly. The electron beam power is 100 kW using 100 MeV electrons. Tungsten or natural uranium is the target material for generating neutrons driving the subcritical assembly. The subcritical assembly is composed of WWR-M2 - Russian fuel assemblies with U-235 enrichment of 19.7 wt%, surrounded by beryllium reflector assembles and graphite blocks. The subcritical assembly is seated in a water tank, which is a part of the primary cooling loop. During normal operation, the water coolant operates at room temperature and the total facility power is ~300 KW. The passive safety features of the facility are discussed in in this study. Monte Carlo computer code MCNPX was utilized in the analyses with ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data libraries. Negative reactivity temperature feedback was consistently observed, which is important for the facility safety performance. Due to the design of WWR-M2 fuel assemblies, slight water temperature increase and the corresponding water density decrease produce large reactivity drop, which offset the reactivity gain by mistakenly loading an additional fuel assembly. The increase of fuel temperature also causes sufficiently large reactivity decrease. This enhances the facility safety performance because fuel temperature increase provides prompt negative reactivity feedback. The reactivity variation due to an empty fuel position filled by water during the fuel loading process is examined. Also, the loading mistakes of removing beryllium reflector assemblies and

  9. Culture-independent evaluation of the appendix and rectum microbiomes in children with and without appendicitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hope T Jackson

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The function of the appendix is largely unknown, but its microbiota likely contributes to function. Alterations in microbiota may contribute to appendicitis, but conventional culture studies have not yielded conclusive information. We conducted a pilot, culture-independent 16S rRNA-based microbiota study of paired appendix and rectal samples. METHODS: We collected appendix and rectal swabs from 21 children undergoing appendectomy, six with normal appendices and fifteen with appendicitis (nine perforated. After DNA extraction, we amplified and sequenced 16S rRNA genes and analyzed sequences using CLoVR. We identified organisms differing in relative abundance using ANOVA (p<0.05 by location (appendix vs. rectum, disease (appendicitis vs. normal, and disease severity (perforated vs. non-perforated. RESULTS: We identified 290 taxa in the study's samples. Three taxa were significantly increased in normal appendices vs. normal rectal samples: Fusibacter (p = 0.009, Selenomonas (p = 0.026, and Peptostreptococcus (p = 0.049. Five taxa were increased in abundance in normal vs. diseased appendices: Paenibacillaceae (p = 0.005, Acidobacteriaceae GP4 (p = 0.019, Pseudonocardinae (p = 0.019, Bergeyella (p = 0.019 and Rhizobium (p = 0.045. Twelve taxa were increased in the appendices of appendicitis patients vs. normal appendix: Peptostreptococcus (p = 0.0003, Bilophila (p = 0.0004, Bulleidia (p = 0.012, Fusobacterium (p = 0.018, Parvimonas (p = 0.003, Mogibacterium (p = 0.012, Aminobacterium (p = 0.019, Proteus (p = 0.028, Actinomycineae (p = 0.028, Anaerovorax (p = 0.041, Anaerofilum (p = 0.045, Porphyromonas (p = 0.010. Five taxa were increased in appendices in patients with perforated vs. nonperforated appendicitis: Bulleidia (p = 0.004, Fusibacter (p = 0.005, Prevotella (p = 0.021, Porphyromonas (p = 0.030, Dialister (p = 0.035. Three taxa were

  10. Performance evaluation of the Solar Building Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The general performance of the NASA Solar Building Test Facility (SBTF) and its subsystems and components over a four year operational period is discussed, and data are provided for a typical one year period. The facility consists of a 4645 sq office building modified to accept solar heated water for operation of an absorption air conditioner and a baseboard heating system. An adjoining 1176 sq solar flat plate collector field with a 114 cu tank provides the solar heated water. The solar system provided 57 percent of the energy required for heating and cooling on an annual basis. The average efficiency of the solar collectors was 26 percent over a one year period.

  11. 33 CFR 154.1047 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group V petroleum oils. 154.1047 Section...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Oil Facilities § 154.1047 Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or...

  12. The value of 3D T1-weighted gradient-echo MR imaging for evaluation of the appendix during pregnancy: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Kyung Mi; Kim, Seong Hyun; Choi, Dongil; Lee, Soon Jin; Rhim, Hyunchul; Park, Min Jung (Depts. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)), email: kshyun@skku.edu

    2011-10-15

    Background The use of oral contrast has been essential for the identification of a normal appendix on MR imaging during pregnancy. However, stool could be used as a positive oral contrast as it is characterized by a relatively high signal on T1-weighted imaging, and 3D T1-weighted gradient-echo (T1W-GRE) MR imaging has been used to evaluate 3 mm diameter intestines in fetuses. Purpose To evaluate the added value of 3D T1W-GRE MR imaging in combination with T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) compared to T2WI alone for evaluating the appendix during pregnancy. Material and Methods Eighteen consecutive pregnant patients who were clinically suspected of having acute appendicitis underwent appendix MR imaging which included T2WI with or without spectral presaturation attenuated inversion-recovery (SPAIR) fat suppression, and 3D T1W-GRE with SPAIR fat suppression. Two radiologists reviewed the two image sets (the T2WI set and the combined set of T2WI and 3D T1W-GRE images). Pathologic and clinical results served as the reference standard. The differences in the degree of visibility of the appendix and confidence scale for diagnosing acute appendicitis between two image sets were compared by using the paired Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results For both reviewers, the degree of visibility of the appendix using the combined T2WI and 3D T1W-GRE images was significantly higher than using T2WI alone (P < 0.01), and the confidence levels for acute appendicitis using combined T2WI and 3D T1W-GRE images were significantly different from those using T2WI alone (P < 0.01). In the 13 patients with a normal appendix, both reviewers showed improved confidence levels for appendicitis using combined T2WI and 3D T1W-GRE images than T2WI alone. Conclusion Adding 3D T1W-GRE images to T2WI is helpful for identification of the appendix, as compared to T2WI alone in pregnant women without ingestion of oral contrast material. This may improve diagnostic confidence for acute appendicitis in pregnant

  13. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 4, Appendix A (contd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix A cover the following wells: 299-E33-30; 299-E34-2; 299-E34-3; 299-E34-4; 299-E34-5; 299-E34-6. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  14. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 2, Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix A cover the following wells: 299-E27-8; 299-E27-9; 299-E27-10; 299-E28-26; 299-E28-27. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  15. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Progress report, January 1-March 31, 1988: Volume 3, Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix A cover the following wells: 299-E32-2; 299-E32-3; 299-E32-4; 299-E33-28; 299-E33-29. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  16. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 7, Appendix B (contd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wwlls completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W10-14; 299-W15-15; 299-W15-16; 299-W15-17; 299-W15-18. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  17. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 5, Appendix B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-05-01

    This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W6-2; 299-W7-1; 299-W7-2; 299-W7-3; 299-W7-4. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

  18. Evaluation of natural phenomena hazards as part of safety assessments for nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kot, C.A.; Hsieh, B.J.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Shin, Y.W.

    1995-02-01

    The continued operation of existing US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and laboratories requires a safety reassessment based on current criteria and guidelines. This also includes evaluations for the effects of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH), for which these facilities may not have been designed. The NPH evaluations follow the requirements of DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation (1993) which establishes NPH Performance Categories (PCs) for DOE facilities and associated target probabilistic performance goals. These goals are expressed as the mean annual probability of exceedance of acceptable behavior for structures, systems and components (SSCs) subjected to NPH effects. The assignment of an NPH Performance Category is based on the overall hazard categorization (low, moderate, high) of a facility and on the function of an SSC under evaluation (DOE-STD-1021, 1992). Detailed guidance for the NPH analysis and evaluation criteria are also provided (DOE-STD-1020, 1994). These analyses can be very resource intensive, and may not be necessary for the evaluation of all SSCs in existing facilities, in particular for low hazard category facilities. An approach relying heavily on screening inspections, engineering judgment and use of NPH experience data (S. J. Eder et al., 1993), can minimize the analytical effort, give reasonable estimates of the NPH susceptibilities, and yield adequate information for an overall safety evaluation of the facility. In the following sections this approach is described in more detail and is illustrated by an application to a nuclear laboratory complex.

  19. Evaluation of a Low-Cost Salmon Production Facility; 1988 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, James M.; Olson, Todd

    1989-05-01

    This fiscal year 1988 study sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration evaluates an existing, small-scale salmon production facility operated and maintained by the Clatsop County Economic Development Committee's Fisheries Project.

  20. EVALUATION OF SERVICES’ QUALITY IN UPPER SILESIA ACCOMMODATION FACILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Cieślik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of study about impact of accommodation services’ quality, particularly quality of work and qualifications of staff, on the guests’ opinion, and thus promoting the accommodation facilities, and making a choice of a hotel in the Upper Silesia. The study involved 200 people, taking into account their gender, age, place of residence, education and occupational status. The research tool was a survey questionnaire. The results indicate close correlation between the quality of staff services (individual approach, aesthetics, discretion, understanding and the customer is satisfaction. Particular attention was paid to the quality of service by the guests with high professional status, and higher education.

  1. 77 FR 34950 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From the Medina Facility in San...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... decision to evaluate a petition to designate a class of employees from the Medina Facility in San Antonio... revision as warranted by the evaluation, is as follows: Facility: Medina Facility. Location: San Antonio... HUMAN SERVICES Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From the Medina...

  2. 75 FR 13542 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees for the Downey Facility in Los...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees for the Downey Facility... warranted by the evaluation, is as follows: Facility: Downey facility. Location: Los Angeles County...: Notice. SUMMARY: HHS gives notice as required by 42 CFR 83.12(e) of a decision to evaluate a petition to...

  3. A magnetic field exposure facility for evaluation of animal carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruvada, P S; Harvey, S M; Jutras, P; Goulet, D; Mandeville, R

    2000-09-01

    Several animal studies have been carried out at the Institut Armand Frappier (IAF) to determine whether chronic exposure to 60 Hz linearly polarized sinusoidal magnetic fields might increase the risk of cancer development of female Fisher rats. The magnetic field exposure facility was developed to meet the requirements of the study protocol for chronic exposure of large number of animals to field intensities of sham < 0.2 microT, 2 microT, 20 microT, 200 microT, and 2000 microT. At each exposure level, including sham, the animals are distributed in a group of four exposure units. Each exposure unit contains two exposure volumes having uniform distribution of magnetic fields for the animals, while the magnetic field external to the unit falls off rapidly due to the "figure-eight" coil topography used. A program of "shake down" tests, followed by verification and calibration of the exposure facility, was carried out prior to starting the animal experiments. Continuous monitoring of the magnetic field and other environmental parameters was an important part in the overall quality assurance program adopted.

  4. Gas Reactor International Cooperative program. Pebble bed reactor plant: screening evaluation. Volume 3. Appendix A. Equipment list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    This report consists of three volumes which describe the design concepts and screening evaluation for a 3000 MW(t) Pebble Bed Reactor Multiplex Plant (PBR-MX). The Multiplex plant produces both electricity and transportable chemical energy via the thermochemical pipeline (TCP). The evaluation was limited to a direct cycle plant which has the steam generators and steam reformers in the primary circuit. Volume 1 reports the overall plant and reactor system and was prepared by the General Electric Company. Core scoping studies were performed which evaluated the effects of annular and cylindrical core configurations, radial blanket zones, burnup, and ball heavy metal loadings. The reactor system, including the PCRV, was investigated for both the annular and cylindrical core configurations. Volume 3 is an Appendix containing the equipment list for the plant and was also prepared by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc. It tabulates the major components of the plant and describes each in terms of quantity, type, orientation, etc., to provide a basis for cost estimation.

  5. Design and evaluation guidelines for Department of Energy facilities subjected to natural phenomena hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, R.P. (Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (USA)); Short, S.A. (ABB Impell Corp., Mission Viejo, CA (USA)); McDonald, J.R. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (USA)); McCann, M.W. Jr. (Benjamin (J.R.) and Associates, Inc., Mountain View, CA (USA)); Murray, R.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Hill, J.R. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and He

    1990-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Panel have developed uniform design and evaluation guidelines for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of the guidelines is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. The guidelines apply to both new facilities (design) and existing facilities (evaluation, modification, and upgrading). The intended audience is primarily the civil/structural or mechanical engineers conducting the design or evaluation of DOE facilities. The likelihood of occurrence of natural phenomena hazards at each DOE site has been evaluated by the DOE Natural Phenomena Hazard Program. Probabilistic hazard models are available for earthquake, extreme wind/tornado, and flood. Alternatively, site organizations are encouraged to develop site-specific hazard models utilizing the most recent information and techniques available. In this document, performance goals and natural hazard levels are expressed in probabilistic terms, and design and evaluation procedures are presented in deterministic terms. Design/evaluation procedures conform closely to common standard practices so that the procedures will be easily understood by most engineers. Performance goals are expressed in terms of structure or equipment damage to the extent that: (1) the facility cannot function; (2) the facility would need to be replaced; or (3) personnel are endangered. 82 refs., 12 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. Advanced computing for evaluating facility needs and enhancing sustainable development of public facility investment plan

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Green, Cheri A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available hall investment for eThekwini municipality in South Africa is used to illustrate the methodology of matching supply and demand spatially across urban and rural areas. The GIS analysis ensures that the evaluation of backlogs and proposals for new...

  7. Engineering evaluation/cost analysis for the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The deactivated 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility (233-S Facility) is located in the 200 Area. The facility has undergone severe degradation due to exposure to extreme weather conditions. A rapid freeze and thaw cycle occurred at the Hanford Site during February 1996, which caused cracking to occur on portions of the building`s roof. This has resulted in significantly infiltration of water into the facility, which provides a pathway for potential release of radioactive material into the environment (air and/or ground). The weather caused several existing cracks in the concrete portions of the structure to lengthen, increasing the potential for failed confinement of the radioactive material in the building. Differential settlement has also occurred, causing portions of the facility to separate from the main building structure thus creating a potential for release of radioactive material t the environment. An expedited removal action is proposed to ensure that a release from the 233-S Facility does not occur. The US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), in cooperation with the EPA, has prepared this Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA) pursuant to CERCLA. Based on the evaluation, RL has determined that hazardous substances in the 233-S Facility may present a potential threat to human health and/or the environment, and that an expedited removal action is warranted. The purpose of the EE/CA is to provide the framework for the evaluation and selection of a technology from a viable set of alternatives for a removal action.

  8. Industrial cogeneration optimization program. Volume II. Appendix A. Conceptual designs and preliminary equipment specifications. Appendix B. Characterization of cogeneration systems (near-term technology). Appendix C. Optimized cogeneration systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This appendix to a report which evaluates the technical, economic, and institutional aspects of industrial cogeneration for conserving energy in the food, chemical, textile, paper, and petroleum industries contains data, descriptions, and diagrams on conceptual designs and preliminary equipment specifications for cogeneration facilities; characterization of cogeneration systems in terms of fuel utilization, performance, air pollution control, thermal energy storage systems, and capital equipment costs; and optimized cogeneration systems for specific industrial plants. (LCL)

  9. Network Performance Evaluation Model for assessing the impacts of high-occupancy vehicle facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janson, B.N.; Zozaya-Gorostiza, C.; Southworth, F.

    1986-09-01

    A model to assess the impacts of major high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) facilities on regional levels of energy consumption and vehicle air pollution emissions in urban aeas is developed and applied. This model can be used to forecast and compare the impacts of alternative HOV facility design and operation plans on traffic patterns, travel costs, model choice, travel demand, energy consumption and vehicle emissions. The model is designed to show differences in the overall impacts of alternative HOV facility types, locations and operation plans rather than to serve as a tool for detailed engineering design and traffic planning studies. The Network Performance Evaluation Model (NETPEM) combines several urban transportation planning models within a multi-modal network equilibrium framework including modules with which to define the type, location and use policy of the HOV facility to be tested, and to assess the impacts of this facility.

  10. Evaluation of Geopolymer Concrete for Rocket Test Facility Flame Deflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Montes, Carlos; Islam, Rashedul; Allouche, Erez

    2014-01-01

    The current paper presents results from a combined research effort by Louisiana Tech University (LTU) and NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) to develop a new alumina-silicate based cementitious binder capable of acting as a high performance refractory material with low heat ablation rate and high early mechanical strength. Such a binder would represent a significant contribution to NASA's efforts to develop a new generation of refractory 'hot face' liners for liquid or solid rocket plume environments. This project was developed as a continuation of on-going collaborations between LTU and SSC, where test sections of a formulation of high temperature geopolymer binder were cast in the floor and walls of Test Stand E-1 Cell 3, an active rocket engine test stand flame trench. Additionally, geopolymer concrete panels were tested using the NASA-SSC Diagnostic Test Facility (DTF) thruster, where supersonic plume environments were generated on a 1ft wide x 2ft long x 6 inch deep refractory panel. The DTF operates on LOX/GH2 propellants producing a nominal thrust of 1,200 lbf and the combustion chamber conditions are Pc=625psig, O/F=6.0. Data collected included high speed video of plume/panel area and surface profiles (depth) of the test panels measured on a 1-inch by 1-inch giving localized erosion rates during the test. Louisiana Tech conducted a microstructure analysis of the geopolymer binder after the testing program to identify phase changes in the material.

  11. Evaluation of the endocrine activity of 2,4,6-tribromophenol, benzanthrone and benzophenone-2 based on Appendix 7.8-5 of REACH guidance document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duis, Karen; Holbech, Henrik; Velasco-Santamaría, Yohana M.

    was performed for benzanthrone, 2,4,6-tribromophenol and benzophenone-2, which differ in the amount of available data. Main focus was on effects on the estrogen/androgen axis. Potential endocrine activity was evaluated based on literature data and additional in vitro and in vivo testing. In the following......, the main findings and the conclusions with regard to Appendix 7.8-5 are highlighted. (1) For benzanthrone, no binding to the estrogen receptor (ER) is predicted using QSAR methods, but potential metabolites with strong affinity to the ER were identified. At present, the endocrine activity...... of such metabolites is not considered in Appendix 7.8-5. Since many in vitro assays have limited metabolic capacity, this is a shortcoming for substances, for which no in vivo data are available. (2) Reporter gene assays indicate weak ER agonism of benzanthrone; in vitro results on androgen receptor mediated effects...

  12. 77 FR 34950 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From the Clarksville Facility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... revision as warranted by the evaluation, is as follows: Facility: Clarksville Facility. Location... HUMAN SERVICES Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From the Clarksville Facility in Clarksville, TN, To Be Included in the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for...

  13. Environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities. A MITE Program evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This report documents an evaluation of the environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities (MRFs) conducted under the Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program. The MITE Program is sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency to foster the demonstration and development of innovative technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). This project was also funded by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Material recovery facilities are increasingly being used as one option for managing a significant portion of municipal solid waste (MSW). The owners and operators of these facilities employ a combination of manual and mechanical techniques to separate and sort the recyclable fraction of MSW and to transport the separated materials to recycling facilities.

  14. DITCM roadside facilities for cooperative systems testing and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, I.; Netten, B.D.; Wedemeijer, H.; Maas, S.M.P.; Leeuwen, C.J. van; Schackmann, P.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative systems are being developed for large scale deployment in the near future. Validation of the performance of cooperative systems, and evaluation of the impact of cooperative applications is crucial before large scale deployment can proceed. The DITCM test site facilitates testing, evaluat

  15. Ground test facilities for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion engines and fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, G. C.; Beck, D. F.; Harmon, C. D.; Shipers, L. R.

    Interagency panels evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion development options have consistently recognized the need for constructing a major new ground test facility to support fuel element and engine testing. This paper summarizes the requirements, configuration, and design issues of a proposed ground test complex for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion engines and fuel elements being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program.

  16. Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued an Order 420.1 which establishes policy for its facilities in the event of natural phenomena hazards (NPH) along with associated NPH mitigation requirements. This DOE Standard gives design and evaluation criteria for NPH effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE Order 420.1 and the associated implementation Guides. These are intended to be consistent design and evaluation criteria for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of these criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. These criteria apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities. They may also be used for modification and upgrading of existing facilities as appropriate. The design and evaluation criteria presented herein control the level of conservatism introduced in the design/evaluation process such that earthquake, wind, and flood hazards are treated on a consistent basis. These criteria also employ a graded approach to ensure that the level of conservatism and rigor in design/evaluation is appropriate for facility characteristics such as importance, hazards to people on and off site, and threat to the environment. For each natural phenomena hazard covered, these criteria consist of the following: Performance Categories and target performance goals as specified in the DOE Order 420.1 NPH Implementation Guide, and DOE-STD-1 021; specified probability levels from which natural phenomena hazard loading on structures, equipment, and systems is developed; and design and evaluation procedures to evaluate response to NPH loads and criteria to assess whether or not computed response is permissible.

  17. Natural phenomena hazards design and evaluation criteria for Department of Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued an Order 420.1 which establishes policy for its facilities in the event of natural phenomena hazards (NPH) along with associated NPH mitigation requirements. This DOE Standard gives design and evaluation criteria for NPH effects as guidance for implementing the NPH mitigation requirements of DOE Order 420.1 and the associated implementation Guides. These are intended to be consistent design and evaluation criteria for protection against natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites throughout the United States. The goal of these criteria is to assure that DOE facilities can withstand the effects of natural phenomena such as earthquakes, extreme winds, tornadoes, and flooding. These criteria apply to the design of new facilities and the evaluation of existing facilities. They may also be used for modification and upgrading of existing facilities as appropriate. The design and evaluation criteria presented herein control the level of conservatism introduced in the design/evaluation process such that earthquake, wind, and flood hazards are treated on a consistent basis. These criteria also employ a graded approach to ensure that the level of conservatism and rigor in design/evaluation is appropriate for facility characteristics such as importance, hazards to people on and off site, and threat to the environment. For each natural phenomena hazard covered, these criteria consist of the following: Performance Categories and target performance goals as specified in the DOE Order 420.1 NPH Implementation Guide, and DOE-STD-1 021; specified probability levels from which natural phenomena hazard loading on structures, equipment, and systems is developed; and design and evaluation procedures to evaluate response to NPH loads and criteria to assess whether or not computed response is permissible.

  18. Evaluating Sediment Stability at Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. A.; Magalen, J.; Roberts, J.; Chang, G.

    2014-12-01

    Development of offshore alternative energy production methods through the deployment of Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices (e.g. wave, tidal, and wind generators) in the United States continues at a rapid pace, with significant public and private investment in recent years. The installation of offshore MHK systems includes cabling to the shoreline and some combination of bottom foundation (e.g., piles, gravity bases, suction buckets) or anchored floating structure. Installation of any of this infrastructure at the seabed may affect coastal sediment dynamics. It is, therefore, necessary to evaluate the interrelationships between hydrodynamics and seabed dynamics and the effects of MHK foundations and cables on sediment transport. If sufficient information is known about the physical processes and sediment characteristics of a region, hydrodynamic and sediment transport models may be developed to evaluate near and far-field sediment transport. The ultimate goal of these models and methods is to quantitatively evaluate changes to the baseline seabed stability due to the installation of MHK farms in the water. The objective of the present study is to evaluate and validate wave, current, and sediment transport models (i.e., a site analysis) that may be used to estimate risk of sediment mobilization and transport. While the methodology and examples have been presented in a draft guidance document (Roberts et al., 2013), the current report presents an overall strategy for model validation, specifically for a case study in the Santa Cruz Bight, Monterey Bay, CA. Innovative techniques to quantify the risk of sediment mobility has been developed to support these investigations. Public domain numerical models are utilized to estimate the near-shore wave climate (SWAN: Simulating Waves Near-shore) and circulation and sediment transport (EFDC: Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code) regimes. The models were validated with field hydrodynamic data. Sediment size information was

  19. Fuzzy-AHP-Based Comprehensive Evaluation on Facility Management System of High-Rise Office Buildings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Peihong; WANG Kan; WAN Huanhuan; MA Zhongjiao

    2011-01-01

    The present building facility management status in China resulted in many problems such as highenergy consumption, failure of automation control, services failure and poor indoor air quality. Based onquestionnaires and interviews to professional engineers and building users, a comprehensive evaluation index system was established on facility management of high-rise office buildings. A Fuzzy AHP based upon hierarchy criteria system was established. A Fuzzy AHP Evaluation Model on Facility Management System was set up ;α-cut analysis was introduced and incorporated with expert knowledge together, which made up the optimism index λ. The fuzzy optimum crisp weight of each criterion was resulted from data-mining. Case investigations were processed in high-rise office buildings in Shenyang. The results illustrated that indoor air quality, thermal comfort and life cycle cost were the most important indexes in the evaluation of Facility Management System of high rise office buildings. Residents in high-rise buildings in Shenyang pay less attention to maintenance management and environment protection. By comparison with the analysis result of Export Choice, Fuzzy AHP-based evaluation model could act as a scientific reference for the establishment of governmental standards in facility management area in building.

  20. Evaluation of radiological dispersion/consequence codes supporting DOE nuclear facility SARs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Kula, K.R.; Paik, I.K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States); Chung, D.Y. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Since the early 1990s, the authorization basis documentation of many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities has been upgraded to comply with DOE orders and standards. In this process, many safety analyses have been revised. Unfortunately, there has been nonuniform application of software, and the most appropriate computer and engineering methodologies often are not applied. A DOE Accident Phenomenology and Consequence (APAC) Methodology Evaluation Program was originated at the request of DOE Defense Programs to evaluate the safety analysis methodologies used in nuclear facility authorization basis documentation and to define future cost-effective support and development initiatives. Six areas, including source term development (fire, spills, and explosion analysis), in-facility transport, and dispersion/ consequence analysis (chemical and radiological) are contained in the APAC program. The evaluation process, codes considered, key results, and recommendations for future model and software development of the Radiological Dispersion/Consequence Working Group are summarized in this paper.

  1. Prioritization of natural phenomena hazards evaluations for CHG facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Graves, C E

    2001-01-01

    Natural phenomena hazards (NPH) are unexpected acts of nature that pose a threat or danger to workers, the public or to the environment by potential damage to structures, systems and components (SSCs). Earthquakes, extreme winds (hurricane and tornado), flood, volcanic eruption, lightning strike, or extreme cold or heat are examples of NPH. This document outlines the method used to prioritize buildings for inspection following an NPH event and contains the priority list for CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) buildings. Once an NPH event occurs and the Hanford Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is activated, this document will be used by the EOC to assign building inspections for the trained evaluators, barring any information from the field.

  2. Nerva fuel nondestructive evaluation and characterization equipment and facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Anthony J.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is one of the technologies that the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) has identified as essential for a manned mission to Mars. A base or prior work is available upon which to build in the development of nuclear rockets. From 1955 to 1973, the U.S Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) sponsored development and testing of a nuclear rocket engine under Project Rover. The rocket engine, called the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA), used a graphite fuel element incorporating coated particle fuel. Much of the NERVA development and manufacturing work was performed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This paper gives a general review of that work in the area of nondestructive evaluation and characterization. Emphasis is placed on two key characteristics: uranium content and distribution and thickness profile of metal carbide coatings deposited in the gas passage holes.

  3. Evaluating the Heat Pump Alternative for Heating Enclosed Wastewater Treatment Facilities in Cold Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    AD-A1uG 385 COLD RE61ONS RESEARCH AND ENGINEERING LAS HANOVER NH F/e 13/1 EVALUATING THE HEAT PUMP ALTERNATIVE FOR HEATING ENCLOSED WASTE--ETC(U) NAT...1982Enginee Cold Regions Research & Engineering Laboratory Evaluating the heat pump alternative for heating enclosed wastewater treatment facilities in...COVERED EVALUATING; THlE HEAT PUMP ALTERNATIVE FOR HEATING ENCLOSED WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACI~IITIES IN COLD REGIONS 6 PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7

  4. Preliminary project for the 'Satz' drinking-water hydropower facility in Soerenberg, Switzerland - Appendix; Vorprojekt Trinkwasser-Kraftwerksatz, Soerenberg. Programm Kleinwasserkraftwerke. Anhaenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruff, H.; Widmer, P. [RuffEngineering, Zuerich (Switzerland); Schubert, T. [Praktikant CKW, Luzern (Switzerland); Wobmann, P. [Kost und Partner AG, Sursee (Switzerland)

    2007-03-15

    This comprehensive appendix to a final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) deals with a project concerning the realisation of a small hydro-power installation using a drinking-water supply system in the UNESCO Biosphere Reserve in Entlebuch, Switzerland. Technical details of the variants for the realisation of the hydro-power installation are presented. These include schematics of the variants proposed, weighting factors for the various factors involved, topographical details of the conduits necessary, management of the reservoirs involved, factors influencing the Pelton turbines used and an overview of spring-water quantities involved. Economic aspects and costs of the variants that were examined are presented.

  5. Coal gasification systems engineering and analysis. Appendix G: Commercial design and technology evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    A technology evaluation of five coal gasifier systems (Koppers-Totzek, Texaco, Babcock and Wilcox, Lurgi and BGC/Lurgi) and procedures and criteria for evaluating competitive commercial coal gasification designs is presented. The technology evaluation is based upon the plant designs and cost estimates developed by the BDM-Mittelhauser team.

  6. 32 CFR Appendix G to Part 505 - Management Control Evaluation Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Management Control Evaluation Checklist G...—Management Control Evaluation Checklist (a) Function. The function covered by this checklist is DA Privacy... Program Coordinators in evaluating the key management controls listed below. This checklist is...

  7. Development of Test Facility for Structural Evaluation of Composite Rotor Hubs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorrell, Larry; Roach, Dennis

    1999-07-20

    The rotorcraft industry is constantly evaluating new types of lightweight composite materials that not only enhance the safety and reliability of rotor components, but also improve performance and extend operating life as well. The tests required for these evaluations are typically quite complex requiring massive test fixtures, in many cases, along with multiple actuators for loading test articles at various points simultaneously. This paper discusses the background for development of the facility, as well as hardware and overall system design and implementation. Additional topics that are covered include data acquisition, implementation of nondestructive inspection techniques during the test process, and some results from the initial test series performed in the facility.

  8. Neutron transport calculation for Activation Evaluation for Decommissioning of PET cyclotron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobuhara, Fumiyoshi; Kuroyanagi, Makoto; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Hajime; Toyoda, Akihiro; Takahashi, Katsuhiko

    2017-09-01

    In order to evaluate the state of activation in a cyclotron facility used for the radioisotope production of PET diagnostics, we measured the neutron flux by using gold foils and TLDs. Then, the spatial distribution of neutrons and induced activity inside the cyclotron vault were simulated with the Monte Calro calculation code for neutron transport and DCHAIN-SP for activation calculation. The calculated results are in good agreement with measured values within factor 3. Therefore, the adaption of the advanced evaluation procedure for activation level is proved to be important for the planning of decommissioning of these facilities.

  9. Development and evaluation of fully automated demand response in large facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Shockman, Christine; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-03-30

    This report describes the results of a research project to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage electricity costs, and ensure that customers receive signals that encourage load reduction during times when the electric grid is near its capacity. The two main drivers for widespread demand responsiveness are the prevention of future electricity crises and the reduction of electricity prices. Additional goals for price responsiveness include equity through cost of service pricing, and customer control of electricity usage and bills. The technology developed and evaluated in this report could be used to support numerous forms of DR programs and tariffs. For the purpose of this report, we have defined three levels of Demand Response automation. Manual Demand Response involves manually turning off lights or equipment; this can be a labor-intensive approach. Semi-Automated Response involves the use of building energy management control systems for load shedding, where a preprogrammed load shedding strategy is initiated by facilities staff. Fully-Automated Demand Response is initiated at a building or facility through receipt of an external communications signal--facility staff set up a pre-programmed load shedding strategy which is automatically initiated by the system without the need for human intervention. We have defined this approach to be Auto-DR. An important concept in Auto-DR is that a facility manager is able to ''opt out'' or ''override'' an individual DR event if it occurs at a time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. This project sought to improve the feasibility and nature of Auto-DR strategies in large facilities. The research focused on technology development, testing

  10. Removal site evaluation report for the Isotope Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This removal site evaluation (RmSE) report of the Isotope Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the Isotopes Facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment and if remedial site evaluations (RSEs) or removal actions are required. The scope of the project included: (1) a review of historical evidence regarding operations and use of the facility; (2) interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past operating practices; (3) a site inspection; and (4) identification of hazard areas requiring maintenance, removal, or remedial actions. The results of RmSE indicate that no substantial risks exist from contaminants present in the Isotope Facilities because adequate controls and practices exist to protect human health and the environment. The recommended correction from the RmSE are being conducted as maintenance actions; accordingly, this RmSE is considered complete and terminated.

  11. Materials problems in fluidized-bed combustion systems. Appendix 2. Test specimen preparation, handling, and posttest evaluation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, E.A.; Holder, J.C.; Minchener, A.J.; Page, A.J.; La Nauze, R.D.

    1980-05-01

    Appendix 2 presents the metallographic data compiled by the National Coal Board, Coal Research Establishment, on materials tested for the Electric Power Research Institute Contract R P 388-1 with Combustion Systems Ltd., UK. Two 1000 h tests were carried out to investigate the corrosion performance of boiler and gas turbine alloys exposed in and above a fluidised bed coal combustor. Details are given of the preparation, handling, and examination procedures. Results of metallographic examination and chemical analyses on the samples examined by CRE are provided. This appendix does not attempt to draw any conclusions from the data: such conclusions appear in the main report. Description of the tests and plant performance data are given in Appendix 1 of this report.

  12. 33 CFR 154.1325 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. 154.1325...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Other Non-Petroleum..., store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that...

  13. Appendix A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, M. S.; Brincker, Rune; Heshe, Gert

    1999-01-01

    In this appendix a brief summary of experiments on reinforced concrete beams in three-point bending performed at Aalborg University is given. The aim of the investigation is to determine the full load-deflection curves for different beam sizes, different types of concrete and different amounts an...

  14. Appendix C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, F. A.; Henriksen, M. S.; Brincker, Rune

    1999-01-01

    In this appendix a model is formulated for the rotational capacity of reinforced concrete beams assuming rebar tension failure. The model is based on a classical approach and establishes the load-deflection curve of a reinforced concrete beam. The rotational capacity is then obtained as the area ...

  15. Evaluating Treatment Efficacy in Commercial Food Facilities: Insights Gained from Small-Scale Simulated Warehouse Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although critical to a successful IPM program, it is challenging to evaluate treatment efficacy in commercial food facilities because of the inability to obtain absolute estimates of insect population levels. These populations are spatially fragmented and occupy cryptic habitats, such as equipment,...

  16. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of Category 1 fuel cycle facility physical security plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1991-10-01

    This NUREG document presents criteria developed from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for the evaluation of physical security plans submitted by Category 1 fuel facility licensees. Category 1 refers to those licensees who use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material.

  17. Solar production of industrial process hot water: Operation and evaluation of the Campbell Soup hot water solar facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kull, J. I.; Neimeyer, W. N.; Youngblood, S. B.

    1980-12-01

    The operation and evaluation of a solar hot water facility is summarized. The period of evaluation was for 12 months from October 1979 through September 1980. The objective of the work was to obtain additional, long term data on the operation and performance of the facility. Minor modifications to the facility were completed. The system was operated for 15 months, and 12 months of detailed data were evaluated. The facility was available for operation and of the time during the last 8 months of evaluation. A detailed description of the solar facility and of the operating experience is given, and a summary of system performance for the 12 month operation/evaluation period is presented. Recommendations for large scale solar facilities based on this project's experience are given, and an environmental impact assessment is provided.

  18. Part 2: Evaluation and outcomes of an evidence-based facility design project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Mary; Sanders, Carolyn; Kinney, Lisa J

    2015-02-01

    Based on the work of a TCAB facility design team at an academic hospital (part 1), an evaluation project was implemented to measure RN work environment perceptions, work activity sampling, and steps walked on 6 units moving into a new acute care pavilion. Pre and post data reported significant nurse satisfaction post move with the new work environment. Workflow sampling data did not reflect significant changes; the pedometer device used to measure nurse steps proved unreliable. Project evaluation data are reported.

  19. A facility for long term evaluation and quality assurance of LHCb Vertex Detector modules

    CERN Document Server

    Marinho, F; Dimattia, R; Doherty, F; Dumps, R; Gersabeck, M; Melone, J; Parkes, C; Saavedra, A; Tobin, M

    2007-01-01

    This note describes the facility developed for long term evaluation and quality assurance of the LHCb Vertex Detector modules, known as the 'Glasgow Burn-in System'. This facility was developed to ensure that the modules conform to stringent quality levels. The system was able to uncover any weaknesses that could be introduced during the manufacturing and assembly of the components or during the transport of the modules to CERN. The system consisted of: a high resolution microscope for visual inspections; and a burn-in system to operate cooled modules in vacuum. The main components of the burn-in system were a vacuum system, a cooling system and a DAQ system.

  20. Source term model evaluations for the low-level waste facility performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, M.S.; Su, S.I. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The estimation of release of radionuclides from various waste forms to the bottom boundary of the waste disposal facility (source term) is one of the most important aspects of LLW facility performance assessment. In this work, several currently used source term models are comparatively evaluated for the release of carbon-14 based on a test case problem. The models compared include PRESTO-EPA-CPG, IMPACTS, DUST and NEFTRAN-II. Major differences in assumptions and approaches between the models are described and key parameters are identified through sensitivity analysis. The source term results from different models are compared and other concerns or suggestions are discussed.

  1. Appendix geoecological evaluation of the area of nature reserve "Obedska bara" (Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krajić Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Special nature reserve "Obedska bara" and its protection area is geoecological evaluated by using the recreation potential indexing method for nautical tourism and recreation sports of rowing, and for aerobic and excursion tourism. Evaluation confirmed that the left bank of the river Sava from Grabovci to Kupinovo, for the needs of nautical tourism, falls into the category of high-value areas, and for recreation is characterized as mainly valuable landscapes. Valuation of the alluvial plain for the purpose of aerobics has shown that fall into the category of “mostly” valuable land. Land evaluation has concluded that the settlements Kupinovo and Obrez circumcised the category very valuable tourist destinations as opposed to Grabovci falling into the category of mostly hard-working but Ogar and Asanja are categorized as“relatively” valuable areas.

  2. Evaluation of syngas production unit cost of bio-gasification facility using regression analysis techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Yangyang; Parajuli, Prem B.

    2011-08-10

    Evaluation of economic feasibility of a bio-gasification facility needs understanding of its unit cost under different production capacities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the unit cost of syngas production at capacities from 60 through 1800Nm 3/h using an economic model with three regression analysis techniques (simple regression, reciprocal regression, and log-log regression). The preliminary result of this study showed that reciprocal regression analysis technique had the best fit curve between per unit cost and production capacity, with sum of error squares (SES) lower than 0.001 and coefficient of determination of (R 2) 0.996. The regression analysis techniques determined the minimum unit cost of syngas production for micro-scale bio-gasification facilities of $0.052/Nm 3, under the capacity of 2,880 Nm 3/h. The results of this study suggest that to reduce cost, facilities should run at a high production capacity. In addition, the contribution of this technique could be the new categorical criterion to evaluate micro-scale bio-gasification facility from the perspective of economic analysis.

  3. Multi-Detector CT Findings of the Normal Appendix in Children: Evaluation of the Position, Diameter, and Presence or Absence of Intraluminal Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Woon Ju; Kim, Jong Chul [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    To assess the usefulness of multi-detector CT (MDCT) with multiplanar reformations (MPR) for the evaluation of the position, diameter and presence or absence of intraluminal gas in the normal appendix in children. From 2007 to 2010, we retrospectively analyzed the MDCT images of normal appendices in 133 children, and evaluated the position, diameter, and presence or absence of intraluminal gas in the appendix. Among the 133 appendices, type I (postileal and medial paracecal position) was found in 64 children, type II (subcecal position) in 22, type III (retrocecal and retrocolic/laterocolic position) in 15, type IV (preileal and medial colic position) in 16, and type V (lower pelvic position) in 16 children. The mean diameter was 5.8 mm {+-} 1.2 (SD) (range; 3.2-8.7 mm). There was a high correlation between the appendiceal diameter and age (p = 0.000).There was no statistically significant difference in the appendiceal diameter between boys and girls (p = 0.470). Intraluminal gas was found in 115 appendices and there was no statistically significant correlation between the appendiceal diameter and intraluminal gas (p = 0.502). The MDCT with MPR was useful for the evaluation of the normal appendices in children. The procedure may be useful for the diagnosis of equivocal or unusual appendicitis in children.

  4. Development and evaluation of an integrated emergency response facility location model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Dong Hong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose and compare the performance of the “two” robust mathematical models, the Robust Integer Facility Location (RIFL and the Robust Continuous Facility Location (RCFL models, to solve the emergency response facility and transportation problems in terms of the total logistics cost and robustness. Design/methodology/approach: The emergency response facilities include distribution warehouses (DWH where relief goods are stored, commodity distribution points (CDP, and neighborhood locations. Authors propose two robust models: the Robust Integer Facility Location (RIFL model where the demand of a CDP is covered by a main DWH or a backup CDP; the Robust Continuous Facility Location (RCFL model where that of a CDP is covered by multiple DWHs. The performance of these models is compared with each other and to the Regular Facility Location (RFL model where a CDP is covered by one main DWH. The case studies with multiple scenarios are analyzed. Findings: The results illustrate that the RFL outperforms others under normal conditions while the RCFL outperforms others under the emergency conditions. Overall, the total logistics cost and robustness level of the RCFL outperforms those of other models while the performance of RFL and RIFL is mixed between the cost and robustness index. Originality/value: Two new emergency distribution approaches are modeled, and evaluated using case studies. In addition to the total logistics cost, the robustness index is uniquely presented and applied. The proposed models and robustness concept are hoped to shed light to the future works in the field of disaster logistics management.

  5. Evaluation of DoD Correctional Facility Compliance with Military Sex Offender Notification Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-26

    Sex Offender Notifications Appendix E - DoD and Service Policy on Notifications Concerning Changes in Inmate Status Appendix F - Victim and Witness...requesting victim and witness, at the earliest possible date, of (a) the date on which the offender will be eligible for parole and any scheduled...victim or witness, at the earliest possible date, (a) of the date on which the offender will be eligible for parole and any scheduled release hearing

  6. Evaluation and Selection of Renewable Energy Technologies for Highway Maintenance Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Taylor

    The interest in renewable energy has been increasing in recent years as attempts to reduce energy costs as well the consumption of fossil fuels are becoming more common. Companies and organizations are recognizing the increasing reliance on limited fossil fuels' resources, and as competition and costs for these resources grow, alternative solutions are becoming more appealing. Many federally run buildings and associations also have the added pressure of meeting the mandates of federal energy policies that dictate specific savings or reductions. Federal highway maintenance facilities run by the Department of Transportation fall into this category. To help meet energy saving goals, an investigation into potential renewable energy technologies was completed for the Ohio Department of Transportation. This research examined several types of renewable energy technologies and the major factors that affect their performance and evaluated their potential for implementation at highway maintenance facilities. Facilities energy usage data were provided, and a facility survey and site visits were completed to enhance the evaluation of technologies and the suitability for specific projects. Findings and technology recommendations were presented in the form of selection matrices, which were designed to help make selections in future projects. The benefits of utilization of other tools such as analysis software and life cycle assessments were also highlighted. These selection tools were designed to be helpful guides when beginning the pursuit of a renewable energy technology for highway maintenance facilities, and can be applied to other similar building types and projects. This document further discusses the research strategies and findings as well as the recommendations that were made to the personnel overseeing Ohio's highway maintenance facilities.

  7. Coal gasification systems engineering and analysis. Appendix E: Cost estimation and economic evaluation methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The cost estimation and economic evaluation methodologies presented are consistent with industry practice for assessing capital investment requirements and operating costs of coal conversion systems. All values stated are based on January, 1980 dollars with appropriate recognition of the time value of money. Evaluation of project economic feasibility can be considered a two step process (subject to considerable refinement). First, the costs of the project must be quantified and second, the price at which the product can be manufacturd must be determined. These two major categories are discussed. The summary of methodology is divided into five parts: (1) systems costs, (2)instant plant costs, (3) annual operating costs, (4) escalation and discounting process, and (5) product pricing.

  8. Air-kerma evaluation at the maze entrance of HDR brachytherapy facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujades, M C; Granero, D; Vijande, J; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J; Papagiannis, P; Siebert, F A

    2014-12-01

    In the absence of procedures for evaluating the design of brachytherapy (BT) facilities for radiation protection purposes, the methodology used for external beam radiotherapy facilities is often adapted. The purpose of this study is to adapt the NCRP 151 methodology for estimating the air-kerma rate at the door in BT facilities. Such methodology was checked against Monte Carlo (MC) techniques using the code Geant4. Five different facility designs were studied for (192)Ir and (60)Co HDR applications to account for several different bunker layouts.For the estimation of the lead thickness needed at the door, the use of transmission data for the real spectra at the door instead of the ones emitted by (192)Ir and (60)Co will reduce the lead thickness by a factor of five for (192)Ir and ten for (60)Co. This will significantly lighten the door and hence simplify construction and operating requirements for all bunkers.The adaptation proposed in this study to estimate the air-kerma rate at the door depends on the complexity of the maze: it provides good results for bunkers with a maze (i.e. similar to those used for linacs for which the NCRP 151 methodology was developed) but fails for less conventional designs. For those facilities, a specific Monte Carlo study is in order for reasons of safety and cost-effectiveness.

  9. A road to more and cheaper energy conservation. Evaluation of all the Danish energy saving activities. Appendix; En vej til flere og billigere energibesparelser. En evaluering af samtlige danske energispareaktiviteter. Billagsrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-12-15

    The appendix together with the main report constitutes the result of the evaluation carried out in 2008 of all Danish energy conservation activities and incentives. A brief introduction is given to the social context of the effort to promote energy conservation and the use of incentives. The main part of the appendix is a presentation of each of the present nine main incentives and activities, their effects and cost. The nine energy saving activities and incentives are: Taxes and CO{sub 2} quotas, the electric utilities' activities, energy labelling of buildings, the Electric Power Saving Trust, building codes, labelling of appliances, energy conservation requirements for public workplaces, agreement with the energy intensive industry, and the Energy Conservation Fund. Finally, the achieved effects of the present Danish energy saving efforts are presented. (ln)

  10. Numerical Evaluation of a Light-Gas Gun Facility for Impact Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rahner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental tests which match the application conditions might be used to properly evaluate materials for specific applications. High velocity impacts can be simulated using light-gas gun facilities, which come in different types and complexities. In this work different setups for a one-stage light-gas gun facility have been numerically analyzed in order to evaluate their suitability for testing materials and composites used as armor protection. A maximal barrel length of 6 m and a maximal reservoir pressure of a standard industrial gas bottle (20 MPa were chosen as limitations. The numerical predictions show that it is not possible to accelerate the projectile directly to the desired velocity with nitrogen, helium, or hydrogen as propellant gas. When using a sabot corresponding to a higher bore diameter, the necessary velocity is achievable with helium and hydrogen gases.

  11. Evaluation of mercury in liquid waste processing facilities - Phase I report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Occhipinti, J. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Wilmarth, W. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, R. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  12. Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste Processing Facilities - Phase I Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, V. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Occhipinti, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Shah, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Wilmarth, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Edwards, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report provides a summary of Phase I activities conducted to support an Integrated Evaluation of Mercury in Liquid Waste System (LWS) Processing Facilities. Phase I activities included a review and assessment of the liquid waste inventory and chemical processing behavior of mercury using a system by system review methodology approach. Gaps in understanding mercury behavior as well as action items from the structured reviews are being tracked. 64% of the gaps and actions have been resolved.

  13. Performance Evaluation of Whole Body Counting Facilities in the Marshall Islands (2002-2005)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehl, S R; Hamilton, T; Jue, T; Hickman, D

    2007-04-03

    The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands (https://eed.llnl.gov/mi/). Local atoll governments have been actively engaged in developing shared responsibilities for protecting the health and safety of resettled and resettling population at risk from exposure to elevated levels of residual fallout contamination in the environment. Under the program, whole body counting facilities have been established at three locations in the Marshall Islands. These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing technical support services including data quality assurance and performance testing. We have also established a mirror whole body counting facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as a technician training center. The LLNL facility also allows program managers to develop quality assurance and operational procedures, and test equipment and corrective actions prior to deployment at remote stations in the Marshall Islands. This document summarizes the results of external performance evaluation exercises conducted at each of the facilities (2002-2005) under the umbrella of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Intercomparison Studies Program (ISP). The ISP was specifically designed to meet intercomparison requirements of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP). In this way, the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program has attempted to establish quality assurance measures in whole body counting that are consistent with standard requirements used to monitor DOE workers in the United States. Based on ANSI N13.30, the acceptable performance criteria for relative measurement bias and precision for radiobioassay service laboratory quality control

  14. Evaluation of Low and High Frequency Sound for Enhancing Fish Screening Facilities to Protect Outmigrating Salmonids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Neitzel, Duane A.; Mavros, William V.

    1998-02-01

    The need to provide passage and protective screens at irrigation diversions has always been a necessary part of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1984, 1987, 1994). From 1985 through 1990, fish protection facilities in large irrigation diversions throughout the Columbia Basin, especially in the Yakima Basin, were updated. After 1990, fish protection efforts turned to installation of new facilities on unscreened diversions and to repair and upgrade of older facilities. The screening program also includes funds to monitor and evaluate the facilities. The screen evaluations indicate they are an effective means for protecting juvenile fish larger than 40 mm in length. As state and federal agencies change screening criteria to protect smaller fish (e.g., bull trout fry), the physical barrier may not always be effective. Screen mesh small enough to protect fish may be vulnerable to frequent plugging. Gap tolerances on side and bottom seals may be difficult to install and maintain. Physical barrier screens can be enhanced with behavioral barriers that cause fish to avoid a hazard. Behavioral barriers may consist of sound generator, strobe lights, bubble curtains, or electrical barriers. State of Oregon House Bill 3112 states that "Standards and criteria shall address the overall level of protection necessary at a given water diversion and shall not favor one technology or technique over another." Additionally, it goes on to say, "Screening device means a fish screen or behavior barrier." Other Northwest states, in particular Washington, have taken a comprehensive program to install barriers at all unscreened diversions by 1999. Protecting all fish at all water withdrawals will probably require both physical and behavioral barriers. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of using an underwater sound-generator as a behavioral barrier for possible use at fish diversion facilities. This study did not include engineering and economic

  15. Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Volume 1, The report and Appendix A, Progress report for the period October 1 to December 31, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-02-01

    This report documents recent progress on ground-water monitoring projects for four Hanford Site facilities: the 300 Area Process Trenches, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds, and the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste (NRDW) Landfill. The existing ground-water monitoring projects for the first two facilities named in the paragraph above are currently being expanded by adding new wells to the networks. During the reporting period, sampling of the existing wells continued on a monthly basis, and the analytical results for samples collected from September through November 1986 are included and discussed in this document. 8 refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. 10 CFR Appendix N to Part 50 - Standardization of Nuclear Power Plant Designs: Permits To Construct and Licenses To Operate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Construct and Licenses To Operate Nuclear Power Reactors of Identical Design at Multiple Sites N Appendix N... FACILITIES Pt. 50, App.N Appendix N to Part 50—Standardization of Nuclear Power Plant Designs: Permits To..., apply to construction permits and operating licenses subject to this appendix N. 2. Applications for...

  17. Evaluating malaria case management at public health facilities in two provinces in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucinski, Mateusz M; Ferreira, Manzambi; Ferreira, Carolina Miguel; Burns, Jordan; Gaparayi, Patrick; João, Lubaki; da Costa, Olinda; Gill, Parambir; Samutondo, Claudete; Quivinja, Joltim; Mbounga, Eliane; de León, Gabriel Ponce; Halsey, Eric S; Dimbu, Pedro Rafael; Fortes, Filomeno

    2017-05-03

    Malaria accounts for the largest portion of healthcare demand in Angola. A pillar of malaria control in Angola is the appropriate management of malaria illness, including testing of suspect cases with rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and treatment of confirmed cases with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). Periodic systematic evaluations of malaria case management are recommended to measure health facility readiness and adherence to national case management guidelines. Cross-sectional health facility surveys were performed in low-transmission Huambo and high-transmission Uíge Provinces in early 2016. In each province, 45 health facilities were randomly selected from among all public health facilities stratified by level of care. Survey teams performed inventories of malaria commodities and conducted exit interviews and re-examinations, including RDT testing, of a random selection of all patients completing outpatient consultations. Key health facility readiness and case management indicators were calculated adjusting for the cluster sampling design and utilization. Availability of RDTs or microscopy on the day of the survey was 71% (54-83) in Huambo and 85% (67-94) in Uíge. At least one unit dose pack of one formulation of an ACT (usually artemether-lumefantrine) was available in 83% (66-92) of health facilities in Huambo and 79% (61-90) of health facilities in Uíge. Testing rates of suspect malaria cases in Huambo were 30% (23-38) versus 69% (53-81) in Uíge. Overall, 28% (13-49) of patients with uncomplicated malaria, as determined during the re-examination, were appropriately treated with an ACT with the correct dose in Huambo, compared to 60% (42-75) in Uíge. Incorrect case management of suspect malaria cases was associated with lack of healthcare worker training in Huambo and ACT stock-outs in Uíge. The results reveal important differences between provinces. Despite similar availability of testing and ACT, testing and treatment rates were lower in

  18. Design of Test Facility to Evaluate Boric Acid Precipitation Following a LOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jeong-Kwan; Song, Yong-Jae [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The U.S.NRC has identified a concern that debris associated with generic safety issue (GSI) - 191 may affect the potential precipitation of boric acid due to one or more of the following phenomena: - Reducing mass transport (i.e. mixing) between the core and the lower plenum (should debris accumulate at the core inlet) - Reduced lower plenum volume (should debris settle in the lower plenum), and, - Increased potential for boric acid precipitation (BAP) in the core (should debris accumulate in suspension in the core) To address these BAP issues, KHNP is planning to conduct validation tests by constructing a BAP test facility. This paper describes the design of test facility to evaluate BAP following a LOCA. The design of BAP test facility has been developed by KHNP. To design the test facility, test requirements and success criteria were established, and scaling analysis of power-to-volume method, Ishii-Kataoka method, and hierarchical two-tiered method were investigated. The test section is composed of two fuel assemblies with half of full of prototypic FA height. All the fuel rods are heated by the electric power supplier. The BAP tests in the presence of debris, buffering agents, and boron will be performed following the test matrix.

  19. The Development of a Quality Management Framework for Evaluating Medical Device Reprocessing Practice in Healthcare Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorv, Bailey; Horodyski, Robin; Welton, Cynthia; Vail, John; Simonetto, Luca; Jokanovic, Danilo; Sharma, Richa; Mahoney, Angela Rea; Savoy-Bird, Shay; Bains, Shalu

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the importance of medical device reprocessing (MDR) for the provision of safe patient care. Although industry service standards are available to guide MDR practices, there remains a lack of published key performance indicators (KPIs) and targets that are necessary to evaluate MDR quality for feedback and improvement. This article outlines the development of an initial framework that builds on established guidelines and includes service standards, KPIs and targets for evaluating MDR operations. This framework can support healthcare facilities in strengthening existing practices and enables a platform for collaboration towards better MDR performance management.

  20. Evaluating an EPO Program in an NSF Facility: Successes and Challenges of Developing Robust Evaluation with Modest Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlevoix, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Many science and technology facilities, as well as science-focused non-profits have directorates or divisions dedicated to education, outreach, and often communications. These Education and Outreach programs typically have complex portfolios of projects and sub-programs ranging from communications and general outreach to professional training and development of key stakeholders. UNAVCO's Education and Community Engagement (ECE) Program provides outreach, education and communications services to the NSF geodetic facility. Specific areas of focus for ECE include: professional development and training, educational materials development and dissemination, community communications, and a geo-workforce development sub-program. Activities within these four areas are determined through a combination of strategic planning and resource availability. Since 2013, the ECE program has worked toward developing a robust planning and evaluation process. Annual strategic planning sessions identify the scope of work for the coming year. An annual implementation plan is developed from these sessions including specific tasks, targets and performance metrics. Quarterly review of progress and realignment of work guides the program and a formal internal evaluation of annual work progress informs the following year's scope of work. The UNAVCO ECE program has consulted with external evaluators on this process and has incorporated suggestions to improve the process after the first year. This presentation will provide an overview of the implementation plan and evaluation process. We will share with the community the successes and challenges of developing a robust evaluation plan that incorporates all program portfolio elements.

  1. Post-Occupancy Evaluation of a Mental Healthcare Facility Based on Staff Perceptions of Design Innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari, Saleh; Snell, Robin

    2017-07-01

    This study was a post-occupancy evaluation (POE) to examine the effectiveness of three specific design innovations in a mental healthcare facility. In addition to collecting data about the impact of these specific designs, the study provides a model for the broader implementation of POE approaches in the mental healthcare context. POEs in general healthcare settings have been shown to lead to better work environments and better outcomes for patients. Despite growing evidence of the value provided by POE studies, the industry has been somewhat slow to adopt their regular use, in part due to unfamiliarity with the POE process. This is particularly true in mental healthcare contexts, where POE studies remain virtually nonexistent. In-depth interviews and a widely distributed, anonymous survey were used to collect hospital staff perceptions and feedback regarding the impact of specific design features. The hospital staff were quite enthusiastic about two of the design innovations studied here (a new wayfinding strategy and the use of vibrant colors in specific areas of the facility). The third innovation, open-style communication centers, elicited more mixed evaluations. The results include extensive hypothesis testing about the effects of each innovation as well as narrative discussions of their pros and cons. The study generated new knowledge about three specific mental healthcare design innovations and provides a model for the practical implementation of a POE approach in mental healthcare contexts. The results are particularly relevant for designers who are considering innovative strategies in future mental healthcare facilities.

  2. AN INTEGRATED SERVICE EXCELLENCE MODEL FOR MILITARY TEST AND EVALUATION FACILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard De Coning

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to introduce an Integrated Service Excellence Model (ISEM for empowering the leadership core of the capital-intensive military test and evaluation facilities to provide strategic military test and evaluation services and to continuously improve service excellence by ensuring that all activities necessary to design, develop and implement a test and evaluation service are effective and efficient. In order to develop the ISEM, various management tools and productivity and quality models were identified and tested through an empirical study conducted amongst the various test and evaluation facilities’ leadership core. Solutions to financial, human resource and environmental challenges as well as quality standards were built into the ISEM. Governance principles and leadership perceptions and recommendations further contributed to the development of the ISEM.

  3. Evaluation of historical beryllium abundance in soils, airborne particulates and facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Mark; Bibby, Richard K; Eppich, Gary R; Lee, Steven; Lindvall, Rachel E; Wilson, Kent; Esser, Bradley K

    2012-10-15

    Beryllium has been historically machined, handled and stored in facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) since the 1950s. Additionally, outdoor testing of beryllium-containing components has been performed at LLNL's Site 300 facility. Beryllium levels in local soils and atmospheric particulates have been measured over three decades and are comparable to those found elsewhere in the natural environment. While localized areas of beryllium contamination have been identified, laboratory operations do not appear to have increased the concentration of beryllium in local air or water. Variation in airborne beryllium correlates to local weather patterns, PM10 levels, normal sources (such as resuspension of soil and emissions from coal power stations) but not to LLNL activities. Regional and national atmospheric beryllium levels have decreased since the implementation of the EPA's 1990 Clean-Air-Act. Multi-element analysis of local soil and air samples allowed for the determination of comparative ratios for beryllium with over 50 other metals to distinguish between natural beryllium and process-induced contamination. Ten comparative elemental markers (Al, Cs, Eu, Gd, La, Nd, Pr, Sm, Th and Tl) that were selected to ensure background variations in other metals did not collectively interfere with the determination of beryllium sources in work-place samples at LLNL. Multi-element analysis and comparative evaluation are recommended for all workplace and environmental samples suspected of beryllium contamination. The multi-element analyses of soils and surface dusts were helpful in differentiating between beryllium of environmental origin and beryllium from laboratory operations. Some surfaces can act as "sinks" for particulate matter, including carpet, which retains entrained insoluble material even after liquid based cleaning. At LLNL, most facility carpets had beryllium concentrations at or below the upper tolerance limit determined by sampling facilities

  4. Calculation of parameters for inspection planning and evaluation: low enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reardon, P.T.; Mullen, M.F.; Harms, N.L.

    1981-02-01

    As part of Task C.35 (Calculation of Parameters for Inspection Planning and Evaluation) of the US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has performed some quantitative analyses of IAEA inspection activities at low-enriched uranium (LEU) conversion and fuel fabrication facilities. This report presents the results and conclusions of those analyses. Implementation of IAEA safeguards at LEU conversion and fuel fabrication facilities must take into account a variety of practical problems and constraints. One of the key concerns is the problem of flow verification, especially product verification. The objective of this report is to help put the problem of flow verification in perspective by presenting the results of some specific calculations of inspection effort and probability of detection for various product measurement strategies. In order to provide quantitative information about the advantages and disadvantages of the various strategies, eight specific cases were examined.

  5. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3. Appendixes 1 through 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU'S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data. (CBS)

  6. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3, Appendixes 1 through 8: Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU`S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data. (CBS)

  7. 76 FR 72006 - Draft Interim Staff Guidance: Evaluations of Uranium Recovery Facility Surveys of Radon and Radon...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... COMMISSION Draft Interim Staff Guidance: Evaluations of Uranium Recovery Facility Surveys of Radon and Radon... Recovery Facility Surveys of Radon and Radon Progeny in Air and Demonstrations of Compliance with 10 CFR 20... that existing guidance does not sufficiently detail how the NRC staff reviews surveys of radon and...

  8. 75 FR 55792 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From the Wah Chang Facility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From the Wah Chang... class of employees from the Wah Chang facility, Albany, Oregon, to be included in the Special Exposure... as follows: Facility: Wah Chang. Location: Albany, Oregon. Job Titles and/or Job Duties:...

  9. Evaluating the progress of the UK's Material Recycling Facilities: a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad; Courtenay, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Over the last 15 years, the UK has made great strides in reducing the amount of waste being sent to landfill while also increasing the amount of waste being recycled. The key drivers for this change are the European Union Landfill Directive (1999/31/EC) and the UK Landfill Tax. However, also playing their part are the growing numbers of Material Recycling Facilities (MRFs), which process recyclables. This mini review evaluates the current state of MRFs in the UK, through extensive secondary research, and detailed primary data analysis focussing on MRFs located in South-East England, UK. This study also explores technologies that aim to generate energy from waste, including Waste-to-Energy (WtE) and Refuse-derived Fuel (RDF) facilities. These facilities can have a huge appetite for waste, which can be detrimental to recycling efforts as some of the waste being sent there should be recycled. It was found that the waste sent to a typical UK MRF would recycle around 92% of materials while 6% was sent to energy recovery and the remaining 2% ended up in landfill. Therefore, the total estimated rejected or non-compliance materials from MRFs are around 8%. A key recommendation from this study is to adopt a strategy to combine MRFs with a form of energy generation, such as WtE or RDF. This integrated approach would ensure any residual waste arising from the recycling process can be used as a sustainable fuel, while also increasing the recycling rates.

  10. Implementation of a hardware-in-the-loop facility for student test and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Scott B.; Ballard, Gary; Brindley, Ryan; Gareri, Jeff

    2007-04-01

    Hardware-in-the-Loop (HWIL) test facilities offer the highest degree of system functional verification and performance evaluation outside of the actual operational environment. The design and analysis of HWIL simulators involves the coordinated efforts of numerous engineering fields, whose professionals possess the technical expertise, analytical skills, and insight regarding cross-discipline collaborative relationships which foster successful simulation development. As system complexity continues to increase, and as programmatic requirements allow for shorter simulation development schedules, the existing knowledge base associated with legacy HWIL simulation development will play a key role in the preparation, readiness, and efficiency of future HWIL engineering professionals. As a result, it is crucial that basic HWIL methods and concepts be specified in a formal, academic sense, and that realistic test facilities are made available to allow potential HWIL engineering students the opportunity to become acclimated to basic HWIL components and design considerations. To address this need, the United States Army Space and Missile Defense Command (SMDC), in coordination with the Auburn University Department of Aerospace Engineering, has funded an initiative to perform initial development of a graduate-level HWIL simulation option, including the provision of a functioning HWIL simulation facility located at the university. This facility, modeled after a conceptual ballistic missile interceptor, will possess the major elements of a HWIL simulation including a Six-Degree-of-Freedom (6-DOF) simulation of the missile dynamics, an electro-optical (EO) sensor implementation, a flight motion simulator (FMS), a scene generation system, and an in-band image projection system. Architectural implementations and distributed simulation elements will be modeled after existing U.S. Army missile simulation concepts. In concert with this activity, an academic emphasis on HWIL

  11. Source term evaluation for accident transients in the experimental fusion facility ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virot, F.; Barrachin, M.; Cousin, F. [IRSN, BP3-13115, Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2015-03-15

    We have studied the transport and chemical speciation of radio-toxic and toxic species for an event of water ingress in the vacuum vessel of experimental fusion facility ITER with the ASTEC code. In particular our evaluation takes into account an assessed thermodynamic data for the beryllium gaseous species. This study shows that deposited beryllium dusts of atomic Be and Be(OH){sub 2} are formed. It also shows that Be(OT){sub 2} could exist in some conditions in the drain tank. (authors)

  12. Intake risk and dose evaluation methods for workers in radiochemistry labs of a medical cyclotron facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandrino, Riccardo; del Vecchio, Antonella; Savi, Annarita; Todde, Sergio; Belloli, Sara

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the risks and doses for the internal contamination of the radiochemistry staff in a high workload medical cyclotron facility. The doses from internal contamination derive from the inhalation of radioactive gas leakage from the cells by personnel involved in the synthesis processes and are calculated from urine sample measurements. Various models are considered for the calculation of the effective committed dose from the analysis of these urine samples, and the results are compared with data obtained from local environmental measurement of the radioactivity released inside the lab.

  13. LLNL heart valve condition classification project anechoic testing results at the TRANSDEC evaluation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J V

    1999-10-31

    This report first briefly outlines the procedures and support/activation fixture developed at LLNL to perform the heart valve tests in an anechoic-like tank at the US Navy Transducer Evaluation Facility (TransDec) located in San Diego, CA. Next they discuss the basic experiments performed and the corresponding experimental plan employed to gather meaningful data systematically. The signal processing required to extract the desired information is briefly developed along with some of the data. Finally, they show the results of the individual runs for each valve, point out any of the meaningful features and summaries.

  14. Evaluation of RayXpert® for shielding design of medical facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derreumaux, Sylvie; Vecchiola, Sophie; Geoffray, Thomas; Etard, Cécile

    2017-09-01

    In a context of growing demands for expert evaluation concerning medical, industrial and research facilities, the French Institute for radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN) considered necessary to acquire new software for efficient dimensioning calculations. The selected software is RayXpert®. Before using this software in routine, exposure and transmission calculations for some basic configurations were validated. The validation was performed by the calculation of gamma dose constants and tenth value layers (TVL) for usual shielding materials and for radioisotopes most used in therapy (Ir-192, Co-60 and I-131). Calculated values were compared with results obtained using MCNPX as a reference code and with published values. The impact of different calculation parameters, such as the source emission rays considered for calculation and the use of biasing techniques, was evaluated.

  15. Evaluation of a Virtual Citizen Science Facility: A Comprehensive Mixed-Methods Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracey, G.

    2014-07-01

    The CosmoQuest Virtual Citizen Science Facility allows the public to participate in scientific research, learning opportunities, and community activities. Evaluation efforts include an online survey of users' attitudes about and use of the CosmoQuest website and their motivations for participation. Pre/post-participation assessments examine learning of science content. Along with these quantitative assessments we seek a deeper level of understanding through qualitative methods. Formative and summative evaluations use semi-structured interviews and open-ended survey questions. Participant responses are analyzed using an iterative process of open coding, allowing patterns to emerge inductively from the data. Triangulation of data increases the validity of findings. This approach gives a more rigorous look at the motivations, behaviors, and learning of participants, and a more complete and in-depth understanding of project impact.

  16. Lustre Distributed Name Space (DNE) Evaluation at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, James S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Computational Sciences; Leverman, Dustin B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Computational Sciences; Hanley, Jesse A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Computational Sciences; Oral, Sarp [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Computational Sciences

    2016-08-22

    This document describes the Lustre Distributed Name Space (DNE) evaluation carried at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) between 2014 and 2015. DNE is a development project funded by the OpenSFS, to improve Lustre metadata performance and scalability. The development effort has been split into two parts, the first part (DNE P1) providing support for remote directories over remote Lustre Metadata Server (MDS) nodes and Metadata Target (MDT) devices, while the second phase (DNE P2) addressed split directories over multiple remote MDS nodes and MDT devices. The OLCF have been actively evaluating the performance, reliability, and the functionality of both DNE phases. For these tests, internal OLCF testbed were used. Results are promising and OLCF is planning on a full DNE deployment by mid-2016 timeframe on production systems.

  17. A Facile Approach to Evaluate Thermal Insulation Performance of Paper Cups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper cups are ubiquitous in daily life for serving water, soup, coffee, tea, and milk due to their convenience, biodegradability, recyclability, and sustainability. The thermal insulation performance of paper cups is of significance because they are used to supply hot food or drinks. Using an effective thermal conductivity to accurately evaluate the thermal insulation performance of paper cups is complex due to the inclusion of complicated components and a multilayer structure. Moreover, an effective thermal conductivity is unsuitable for evaluating thermal insulation performance of paper cups in the case of fluctuating temperature. In this work, we propose a facile approach to precisely analyze the thermal insulation performance of paper cups in a particular range of temperature by using an evaluation model based on the MISO (Multiple-Input Single-Output technical theory, which includes a characterization parameter (temperature factor and a measurement apparatus. A series of experiments was conducted according to this evaluation model, and the results show that this evaluation model enables accurate characterization of the thermal insulation performance of paper cups and provides an efficient theoretical basis for selecting paper materials for paper cups.

  18. Design Evaluation of a Piping System in the SELFA Sodium Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Seok-Kwon; Jo, Young-Chul; Lee, Hyeong-Yeon; Jeong, Ji-Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, design evaluations on the SELFA piping system has been conducted according to the ASME B31.1 and RCC-MRx RD-3600. The conservatism of the two codes was quantified based on the evaluation results. It was shown that B31.1 was more conservative for the sustained loads while less conservative for thermal expansion loads when compare with those of RD-3600. However, all the evaluation results according to the two codes were within the code allowables. There are two main piping systems in the SELFA test loop. In this study, the integrity of the SELFA piping system has been evaluated according to the two design-by-rule (DBR) codes of ASME B31.1 and RCC-MRx RD-3600. B31.1 is an industry design code for power piping while RD-3600 is a class 3 nuclear DBR code. The conservatism of the two codes was quantified based on the evaluation results as per the two DBR codes. The sodium test facility of the SELFA is under construction at KAERI for the investigation of thermo-hydraulic behavior of finned-tube sodium-to-air heat exchanger.

  19. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.J. Byrne

    2001-02-20

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas including the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. This evaluation applies specifically to site characterization testing activities ongoing and planned in the Subsurface ESF. ESF site characterization activities are being performed to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A more detailed description of these testing activities is provided in Section 6 of this DIE. Generally, the construction and operation of excavations associated with these testing activities are evaluated in the DIE for the Subsurface ESF (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the DIE for the ESF ECRB Cross Drift (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The scope of this DIE also entails the proposed Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test at Busted Butte. Although, not a part of the TS Loop or ECRB Cross Drift, the associated testing activities are Subsurface testing activities. Busted Butte is located to the south south-east of the TS Loop and is outside the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB). These activities provide access to the Calico Hills (CH) geologic structure. In the case of Busted Butte, construction and operation of excavations are evaluated herein (since this activity was not previously evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1999a). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether Subsurface ESF testing, and associated activities, could potentially impact site characterization testing and/or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified in Section 13. The validity and veracity of the individual

  20. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Site-Specific Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. [Appendix contains accromyms list and maps of waste management facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to achieving and maintaining environmental regulatory compliance at its waste sites and facilities, while responding to public concerns and emphasizing waste minimization. DOE publishes the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) annually to document its progress towards these goals. The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe the activities, planned and completed, undertaken to implement these FYP goals at the DOE Field Office-Oak Ridge (DOE/OR) installations and programs; specifically, for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), and Hazardous Waste Remedial Action Program (HAZWRAP). Activities described in this SSP address hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and sanitary wastes, along with treatment, storage, and disposal of current production waste and legacy waste from past operation. The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Corrective Activities (A), Environmental Restoration (ER), Waste Management (WM), Technology Development (TD), and Transportation; and includes descriptions of activities, resources, and milestones by installation or program. 87 tabs.

  1. White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume III, Appendix B, Fisheries Report; Appendix C, Engineering Alternative Evaluation; Appendix D, Benefit/Cost Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

    1985-06-01

    Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developd to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. This volume contains appendices of habitat survey data, potential production, resident fish population data, upstream passage designs, and benefit/cost calculations. (ACR)

  2. A comparison of metrics to evaluate the effects of hydro-facility passage stressors on fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colotelo, Alison H.; Goldman, Amy E.; Wagner, Katie A.; Brown, Richard S.; Deng, Z. Daniel; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2017-03-01

    Hydropower is the most common form of renewable energy, and countries worldwide are considering expanding hydropower to new areas. One of the challenges of hydropower deployment is mitigation of the environmental impacts including water quality, habitat alterations, and ecosystem connectivity. For fish species that inhabit river systems with hydropower facilities, passage through the facility to access spawning and rearing habitats can be particularly challenging. Fish moving downstream through a hydro-facility can be exposed to a number of stressors (e.g., rapid decompression, shear forces, blade strike and collision, and turbulence), which can all affect fish survival in direct and indirect ways. Many studies have investigated the effects of hydro-turbine passage on fish; however, the comparability among studies is limited by variation in the metrics and biological endpoints used. Future studies investigating the effects of hydro-turbine passage should focus on using metrics and endpoints that are easily comparable. This review summarizes four categories of metrics that are used in fisheries research and have application to hydro-turbine passage (i.e., mortality, injury, molecular metrics, behavior) and evaluates them based on several criteria (i.e., resources needed, invasiveness, comparability among stressors and species, and diagnostic properties). Additionally, these comparisons are put into context of study setting (i.e., laboratory vs. field). Overall, injury and molecular metrics are ideal for studies in which there is a need to understand the mechanisms of effect, whereas behavior and mortality metrics provide information on the whole body response of the fish. The study setting strongly influences the comparability among studies. In laboratory-based studies, stressors can be controlled by both type and magnitude, allowing for easy comparisons among studies. In contrast, field studies expose fish to realistic passage environments but the comparability is

  3. Tracking implementation and (un)intended consequences: a process evaluation of an innovative peripheral health facility financing mechanism in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waweru, Evelyn; Goodman, Catherine; Kedenge, Sarah; Tsofa, Benjamin; Molyneux, Sassy

    2016-03-01

    In many African countries, user fees have failed to achieve intended access and quality of care improvements. Subsequent user fee reduction or elimination policies have often been poorly planned, without alternative sources of income for facilities. We describe early implementation of an innovative national health financing intervention in Kenya; the health sector services fund (HSSF). In HSSF, central funds are credited directly into a facility's bank account quarterly, and facility funds are managed by health facility management committees (HFMCs) including community representatives. HSSF is therefore a finance mechanism with potential to increase access to funds for peripheral facilities, support user fee reduction and improve equity in access. We conducted a process evaluation of HSSF implementation based on a theory of change underpinning the intervention. Methods included interviews at national, district and facility levels, facility record reviews, a structured exit survey and a document review. We found impressive achievements: HSSF funds were reaching facilities; funds were being overseen and used in a way that strengthened transparency and community involvement; and health workers' motivation and patient satisfaction improved. Challenges or unintended outcomes included: complex and centralized accounting requirements undermining efficiency; interactions between HSSF and user fees leading to difficulties in accessing crucial user fee funds; and some relationship problems between key players. Although user fees charged had not increased, national reduction policies were still not being adhered to. Finance mechanisms can have a strong positive impact on peripheral facilities, and HFMCs can play a valuable role in managing facilities. Although fiduciary oversight is essential, mechanisms should allow for local decision-making and ensure that unmanageable paperwork is avoided. There are also limits to what can be achieved with relatively small funds in

  4. Process Evaluation of a Quality Improvement Project to Decrease Hospital Readmissions From Skilled Nursing Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Thomas P; Qazi, Daniel J; Van Hoof, Thomas J; Ho, Shih-Yieh; Eckenrode, Sheila; Spenard, Ann; Pandolfi, Michelle; Johnson, Florence; Quetti, Deborah

    2015-08-01

    To describe and evaluate the impact of quality improvement (QI) support provided to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) by a Quality Improvement Organization (QIO). Retrospective, mixed-method, process evaluation of a QI project intended to decrease preventable hospital readmissions from SNFs. Five SNFs in Connecticut. SNF Administrators, Directors of Nursing, Assistant Directors of Nursing, Admissions Coordinators, Registered Nurses, Certified Nursing Assistants, Receptionists, QIO Quality Improvement Consultant. QIO staff provided training and technical assistance to SNF administrative and clinical staff to establish or enhance QI infrastructure and implement an established set of QI tools [Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers (INTERACT) tools]. Baseline SNF demographic, staffing, and hospital readmission data; baseline and follow-up SNF QI structure (QI Committee), processes (general and use of INTERACT tools), and outcome (30-day all-cause hospital readmission rates); details of QIO-provided training and technical assistance; QIO-perceived barriers to quality improvement; SNF leadership-perceived barriers, accomplishments, and suggestions for improvement of QIO support. Success occurred in establishing QI Committees and targeting preventable hospital readmissions, as well as implementing INTERACT tools in all SNFs; however, hospital readmission rates decreased in only 2 facilities. QIO staff and SNF leaders noted the ongoing challenge of engaging already busy SNF staff and leadership in QI activities. SNF leaders reported that they appreciated the training and technical assistance that their institutions received, although most noted that additional support was needed to bring about improvement in readmission rates. This process evaluation documented mixed clinical results but successfully identified opportunities to improve recruitment of and provision of technical support to participating SNFs. Recommendations are offered for others who wish to conduct

  5. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Goodin

    2002-07-22

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas including the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. This evaluation applies specifically to site characterization testing activities ongoing and planned in the Subsurface ESF. ESF site characterization activities are being performed to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A more detailed description of these testing activities is provided in Section 6 of this DIE. Generally, the construction and operation of excavations associated with these testing activities are evaluated in the DIE for the Subsurface ESF (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the DIE for the ESF ECRB Cross Drift (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The scope of this DIE also entails the proposed Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test at Busted Butte. Although, not a part of the TS Loop or ECRB Cross Drift, the associated testing activities are Subsurface testing activities. Busted Butte is located to the south south-east of the TS Loop and is outside the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB). These activities provide access to the Calico Hills (CH) geologic structure. In the case of Busted Butte, construction and operation of excavations are evaluated herein (since this activity was not previously evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1999a). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether Subsurface ESF testing, and associated activities, could potentially impact site characterization testing and/or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified in Section 13. The validity and veracity of the individual

  6. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs, Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D: Part A, Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    Volume 1 to the Department of Energy`s Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement evaluates a range of alternatives for managing naval spent nuclear fuel expected to be removed from US Navy nuclear-powered vessels and prototype reactors through the year 2035. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) considers a range of alternatives for examining and storing naval spent nuclear fuel, including alternatives that terminate examination and involve storage close to the refueling or defueling site. The EIS covers the potential environmental impacts of each alternative, as well as cost impacts and impacts to the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program mission. This Appendix covers aspects of the alternatives that involve managing naval spent nuclear fuel at four naval shipyards and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. This Appendix also covers the impacts of alternatives that involve examining naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility in Idaho and the potential impacts of constructing and operating an inspection facility at any of the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities considered in the EIS. This Appendix also considers the impacts of the alternative involving limited spent nuclear fuel examinations at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. This Appendix does not address the impacts associated with storing naval spent nuclear fuel after it has been inspected and transferred to DOE facilities. These impacts are addressed in separate appendices for each DOE site.

  7. 75 FR 13542 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees for the De Soto Facility in Los...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... warranted by the evaluation, is as follows: Facility: De Soto facility. Location: Los Angeles County... HUMAN SERVICES Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees for the De Soto Facility in Los Angeles County, CA, To Be included in the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National...

  8. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Exploratory Shaft Facility fluids and materials evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, K.A.

    1988-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if any fluids or materials used in the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) of Yucca Mountain will make the mountain unsuitable for future construction of a nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain, an area on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada, USA, is a candidate site for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from commercial nuclear power and defense nuclear activities. To properly characterize Yucca Mountain, it will be necessary to construct an underground test facility, in which in situ site characterization tests can be conducted. The candidate repository horizon at Yucca Mountain, however, could potentially be compromised by fluids and materials used in the site characterization tests. To minimize this possibility, Los Alamos National Laboratory was directed to evaluate the kinds of fluids and materials that will be used and their potential impacts on the site. A secondary objective was to identify fluids and materials, if any, that should be prohibited from, or controlled in, the underground. 56 refs., 19 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Evaluation of energy response of neutron rem monitor applied to high-energy accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Yoshihiro; Harada, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    A neutron rem monitor was newly developed for applying to the high-intensity proton accelerator facility (J-PARC) that is under construction as a joint project between the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. To measure the dose rate accurately for wide energy range of neutrons from thermal to high-energy region, the neutron rem monitor was fabricated by adding a lead breeder layer to a conventional neutron rem monitor. The energy response of the monitor was evaluated by using neutron transport calculations for the energy range from thermal to 150 MeV. For verifying the results, the response was measured at neutron fields for the energy range from thermal to 65 MeV. The comparisons between the energy response and dose conversion coefficients show that the newly developed neutron rem monitor has a good performance in energy response up to 150 MeV, suggesting that the present study offered prospects of a practical fabrication of the rem monitor applicable to the high intensity proton accelerator facility. (author)

  10. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-02-26

    This report contains appendix 2 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, Laboratory permeability, and compaction characteristics representative of Kaolin clays from the aiken, South Carolina vicinity. Included in this report are daily field reports Nos. 1 to 54. (KJD)

  11. Methodology for evaluating Insite: Canada's first medically supervised safer injection facility for injection drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Evan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many Canadian cities are experiencing ongoing infectious disease and overdose epidemics among injection drug users (IDUs. In particular, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and hepatitis C Virus (HCV have become endemic in many settings and bacterial and viral infections, such as endocarditis and cellulitis, have become extremely common among this population. In an effort to reduce these public health concerns and the public order problems associated with public injection drug use, in September 2003, Vancouver, Canada opened a pilot medically supervised safer injecting facility (SIF, where IDUs can inject pre-obtained illicit drugs under the supervision of medical staff. The SIF was granted a legal exemption to operate on the condition that its impacts be rigorously evaluated. In order to ensure that the evaluation is appropriately open to scrutiny among the public health community, the present article was prepared to outline the methodology for evaluating the SIF and report on some preliminary observations. The evaluation is primarily structured around a prospective cohort of SIF users, that will examine risk behavior, blood-borne infection transmission, overdose, and health service use. These analyses will be augmented with process data from within the SIF, as well as survey's of local residents and qualitative interviews with users, staff, and key stakeholders, and standardised evaluations of public order changes. Preliminary observations suggest that the site has been successful in attracting IDUs into its programs and in turn helped to reduce public drug use. However, each of the indicators described above is the subject of a rigorous scientific evaluation that is attempting to quantify the overall impacts of the site and identify both benefits and potentially harmful consequences and it will take several years before the SIF's impacts can be appropriately examined.

  12. Testing and evaluation of on-farm alcohol production facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuby, W.; Markoja, R.; Nackord, S.

    1984-07-01

    Ethanol is the most important of biomass derived fuels in the short term. The bulk of the production will come from large (20 to 600M gallons/year) units with the remainder being produced on-farm in small (less than 6,000 gallons/year) units. The on-farm production of alcohol presents a unique problem in that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had no data available by which it could evaluate the possible impacts of a very large number of these facilities. This report gives the results of a sampling and analysis program conducted to characterize the air emissions, water effluents, and solid residuals from two on-farm ethanol production processes sampled in June 1980. Several recommendations, including acid neutralization and effluent ponding, are recommended to minimize the impacts.

  13. Development and use of consolidated criteria for evaluation of emergency preparedness plans for DOE facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerner, K.; Kier, P.H.; Baldwin, T.E.

    1995-07-01

    Emergency preparedness at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is promoted by development and quality control of response plans. To promote quality control efforts, DOE has developed a review document that consolidates requirements and guidance pertaining to emergency response planning from various DOE and regulatory sources. The Criteria for Evaluation of Operational Emergency Plans (herein referred to as the Criteria document) has been constructed and arranged to maximize ease of use in reviewing DOE response plans. Although developed as a review instrument, the document also serves as a de facto guide for plan development, and could potentially be useful outside the scope of its original intended DOE clientele. As regulatory and DOE requirements are revised and added in the future, the document will be updated to stay current.

  14. Experimental geothermal research facilities study (Phase O). Final report No. 26405-6001-RU-00

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-31

    This study focuses on identification of a representative liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir of moderate temperature and salinity, preliminary design of an appropriate energy conversion system, identification of critical technology and planning for the implementation of experimental facilities. Results of Phase O of the project are reported in two volumes. Volume II presents detailed results of studies and analyses arranged in nine appendices including the final report by a subcontractor on the study. The specific appendices are: Appendix A: Geothermal Resources of the Western United States; Appendix B: Site Selection Process and the East Mesa Geothermal Field; Appendix C: East Mesa Geothermal Field Reservoir Characteristics; Appendix D: Advisor's Views and Comments; Appendix E: Thermodynamic Analyses; Appendix F: Material and Corrosion Factors; Appendix G: Preliminary Reliability/Maintainability Analyses; Appendix H: Environmental Impact Analysis Guidelines; and Appendix I: Report to the National Science Foundation/TRW Systems Group by Rogers Engineering Company, Inc., San Francisco, California.

  15. EERC pilot-scale CFBC evaluation facility Project CFB test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Henderson, A.K.; Moe, T.A.

    1992-09-01

    Project CFB was initiated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in May 1988. Specific goals of the project were to (1) construct a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) facility representative of the major boiler vendors' designs with the capability of producing scalable data, (2) develop a database for use in making future evaluations of CFBC technology, and (3) provide a facility for evaluating fuels, free of vendor bias for use in the - energy industry. Five coals were test-burned in the 1-MWth unit: North Dakota and Asian lignites, a Wyoming subbituminous, and Colorado and Pennsylvania bituminous coats. A total of 54 steady-state test periods were conducted, with the key test parameters being the average combustor temperature, excess air, superficial gas velocity, calcium-to-sulfur molar ratio, and the primary air-to-secondary air split. The capture for a coal fired in a CFBC is primarily dependent upon the total alkali-to-sulfur ratio. The required alkali-to ratio for 90% sulfur retention ranged from 1.4 to 4.9, depending upon coal type. While an alkali-to-ratio of 4.9 was required to meet 90% sulfur retention for the Salt Creek coal versus 1.4 for the Asian lignite, the total amount of sorbent addition required is much less for the Salt Creek coal, 4.2 pound sorbent per million Btu coal input, versus 62 pound/million Btu for the Asian lignite. The bituminous coals tested show optimal capture at combustor temperatures of approximately 1550[degree]F, with low-rank coals having optimal sulfur capture approximately 100[degree]F lower.

  16. An evaluation of systematic tuberculosis screening at private facilities in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Creswell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Pakistan, like many Asian countries, a large proportion of healthcare is provided through the private sector. We evaluated a systematic screening strategy to identify people with tuberculosis in private facilities in Karachi and assessed the approaches' ability to diagnose patients earlier in their disease progression. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Lay workers at 89 private clinics and a large hospital outpatient department screened all attendees for tuberculosis using a mobile phone-based questionnaire during one year. The number needed to screen to detect a case of tuberculosis was calculated. To evaluate early diagnosis, we tested for differences in cough duration and smear grading by screening facility. 529,447 people were screened, 1,010 smear-positive tuberculosis cases were detected and 942 (93.3% started treatment, representing 58.7% of all smear-positive cases notified in the intervention area. The number needed to screen to detect a smear-positive case was 124 (prevalence 806/100,000 at the hospital and 763 (prevalence 131/100,000 at the clinics; however, ten times the number of individuals were screened in clinics. People with smear-positive TB detected at the hospital were less likely to report cough lasting 2-3 weeks (RR 0.66 95%CI [0.49-0.90] and more likely to report cough duration >3 weeks (RR 1.10 95%CI [1.03-1.18]. Smear-positive cases at the clinics were less likely to have a +3 grade (RR 0.76 95%CI [0.63-0.92] and more likely to have +1 smear grade (RR 1.24 95%CI [1.02-1.51]. CONCLUSIONS: Tuberculosis screening at private facilities is acceptable and can yield large numbers of previously undiagnosed cases. Screening at general practitioner clinics may find cases earlier than at hospitals although more people must be screened to identify a case of tuberculosis. Limitations include lack of culture testing, therefore underestimating true TB prevalence. Using more sensitive and specific screening and diagnostic tests such

  17. Solar production of industrial process hot water: operation and evaluation of the Campbell Soup hot water solar facility. Final report, September 1, 1979-December 10, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kull, J. I.; Niemeyer, W. N.; Youngblood, S. B.

    1980-12-01

    The operation and evaluation of a solar hot water facility designed by Acurex Corporation and installed (November 1977) at the Campbell Soup Company Sacramento, California canning plant is summarized. The period of evaluation was for 12 months from October 1979 through September 1980. The objective of the work was to obtain additional, long term data on the operation and performance of the facility. Minor modifications to the facility were completed. The system was operated for 15 months, and 12 months of detailed data were evaluated. The facility was available for operation 99% of the time during the last 8 months of evaluation. A detailed description of the solar facility and of the operating experience is given, and a summary of system performance for the 12 month operation/evaluation period is presented. Recommendations for large-scale solar facilities based on this project's experience are given, and an environmental impact assessment for the Campbell Soup solar facility is provided. (WHK)

  18. 40 CFR Appendix: Table 1 to... - List of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) for Subpart HHH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) for Subpart HHH Table Appendix: Table 1 to Subpart HHH of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Natural Gas Transmission and Storage Facilities Pt. 63, Subpt. HHH, Table 1 Appendix: Table 1 to Subpart HHH of Part 63—List of Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAP) for Subpart HHH CAS Number a Chemical name...

  19. Seismic shake table testing program for hollow clay tile wall evaluation at DOE facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walls, J.C.; Webb, D.S.; Stone, N.E. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Bennett, R.M. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    A seismic test facility located at the K-25 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been refurbished after shutdown since 1985. The facility shake table is being recertified in order to provide seismic testing capability to an extensive multi-year evaluation program of hollow clay tile walls in buildings at the DOE site in Oak Ridge. The program, directed by teh Center for Natural Phenomena Engineering at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., the managing contractor for DOE in Oak Ridge, is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the recertification efforts for the seismic test facility, and results of facility and specimen testing to data are discussed and plans for future testing are reviewed. Features and capabilities of the shake table are presented. The dynamic testing of masonry structures is reviewed, and a hollow clay tile wall testing program is projected based on the shake table capability. 13 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Re-Evaluation of the Lower San Fernando Dam. Report 1. An Investigation of the February 9, 1971 Slide. Volume 2. Appendixes A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    GROVND ELEVATO (NGVO 9 DATE START/FNIS/ " S 103 INCNATION . BEARING _ ,, TOTAL DEPTh IFT) _ _ . DRIIIED BY 5 ...*.r F5’CO! CASING 1D No! j.od CORE SIZE...racKrIll ezw " erv;rouo 5e-2t1777, { "f :f LnCtta,.’tm sarxl I V______ _ _ APPENDIX B: EXPLORATION SHAFT APPENDIX B EXPLORATION SHAFT TABLE OF

  1. Evaluation of performance indicators applied to a material recovery facility fed by mixed packaging waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellone, Maria Laura; Cremiato, Raffaele; Zaccariello, Lucio; Lotito, Roberta

    2017-06-01

    Most of the integrated systems for municipal solid waste management aim to increase the recycling of secondary materials by means of physical processes including sorting, shredding and reprocessing. Several restrictions prevent from reaching a very high material recycling efficiency: the variability of the composition of new-marketed materials used for packaging production and its shape and complexity are critical issues. The packaging goods are in fact made of different materials (aluminium, polymers, paper, etc.), possibly assembled, having different shape (flat, cylindrical, one-dimensional, etc.), density, colours, optical properties and so on. These aspects limit the effectiveness and efficiency of the sorting and reprocessing plants. The scope of this study was to evaluate the performance of a large scale Material Recovery Facility (MRF) by utilizing data collected during a long period of monitoring. The database resulted from the measured data has been organized in four sections: (1) data related to the amount and type of inlet waste; (2) amount and composition of output products and waste; (3) operating data (such as worked hours for shift, planned and unscheduled maintenance time, setting parameters of the equipment, and energy consumption for shift); (4) economic data (value of each product, disposal price for the produced waste, penalty for non-compliance of products and waste, etc.). A part of this database has been utilized to build an executive dashboard composed by a set of performance indicators suitable to measure the effectiveness and the efficiency of the MRF operations. The dashboard revealed itself as a powerful tool to support managers and engineers in their decisions in respect to the market demand or compliance regulation variation as well as in the designing of the lay-out improvements. The results indicated that the 40% of the input waste was recovered as valuable products and that a large part of these (88%) complied with the standards of

  2. An Evaluation of Long-Term Performance of Liner Systems for Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur S. Rood; Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-03-01

    during the 1) institutional control period (0-100 years), compliance period (0-1000 years) and post-compliance period (>1000 years). Evaluation of the all pathway dose included the dose from ingestion and irrigation of contaminated groundwater extracted from a well 100 meters downgradient, in addition to the dose received from direct contact of radionuclides deposited near the surface resulting from facility overflow. Depending on the disposal facility radionuclide inventory, facility design, cover performance, and the location and environment where the facility is situated, the dose from exposure via direct contact of near surface deposited radionuclides can be much greater than the dose received via transport to the groundwater and subsequent ingestion.

  3. The care of Filipino juvenile offenders in residential facilities evaluated using the risk-need-responsivity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruit, Anouk; Wissink, Inge B; Stams, Geert Jan J M

    2016-01-01

    According to the risk-need-responsivity model of offender, assessment and rehabilitation treatment should target specific factors that are related to re-offending. This study evaluates the residential care of Filipino juvenile offenders using the risk-need-responsivity model. Risk analyses and criminogenic needs assessments (parenting style, aggression, relationships with peers, empathy, and moral reasoning) have been conducted using data of 55 juvenile offenders in four residential facilities. The psychological care has been assessed using a checklist. Statistical analyses showed that juvenile offenders had a high risk of re-offending, high aggression, difficulties in making pro-social friends, and a delayed socio-moral development. The psychological programs in the residential facilities were evaluated to be poor. The availability of the psychological care in the facilities fitted poorly with the characteristics of the juvenile offenders and did not comply with the risk-need-responsivity model. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  4. Using virtual reality in the training of security staff and evaluation of physical protection barriers in nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augusto, Silas C.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Mol, Pedro C.; Sales, Douglas S. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: silas@ien.gov.br, e-mail: mol@ien.gov.br, e-mail: pedro98@gmail.com, e-mail: dsales@ien.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    The physical security of facilities containing radioactive objects, an already important matter, now has a new aggravating factor: the existence of groups intending to obtain radioactive materials for the purpose of intentionally induce radioactive contamination incidents, as for example the explosion of dirty bombs in populated regions, damaging both people and environment. In this context, the physical security of such facilities must be reinforced so to reduce the possibilities of such incidents. This paper presents a adapted game engine used as a virtual reality system, enabling the modeling and simulation of scenarios of nuclear facilities containing radioactive objects. In these scenarios, the physical protection barriers, as fences and walls, are simulated along with vigilance screens. Using a computer network, several users can participate simultaneously in the simulation, being represented by avatars. Users can play the roles of both invaders and security staff. The invaders have as objective to surpass the facility's physical protection barriers to steal radioactive objects and flee. The security staff have as objective to prevent and stop the theft of radioactive objects from the facility. The system can be used to analysis simulated scenarios and train vigilance/security staff. A test scenario was already developed and used, and the preliminary tests had satisfactory results, as they enabled the evaluation of the physical protection barriers of the virtual facility, and the training of those who participated in the simulations in the functions of a security staff. (author)

  5. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 3: Appendixes C-H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

    1995-04-01

    This report contains the Appendices for the Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment and Storage Facilities for Waste Generated by the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. The main report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  6. Evaluation of users' satisfaction on pedestrian facilities using pair-wise comparison approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainol, R.; Ahmad, F.; Nordin, N. A.; Aripin, A. W. M.

    2014-02-01

    Global climate change issues demand people of the world to change the way they live today. Thus, current cities need to be redeveloped towards less use of carbon in their day to day operations. Pedestrianized environment is one of the approaches used in reducing carbon foot print in cities. Heritage cities are the first to be looked into since they were built in the era in which motorized vehicles were minimal. Therefore, the research explores users' satisfaction on assessment of physical attributes of pedestrianization in Melaka Historical City, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It aims to examine users' satisfaction on pedestrian facilities provided within the study area using pair wise questionnaire comparison approach. A survey of 200 respondents using random sampling was conducted in six different sites namely Jonker Street, Church Street, Kota Street, Goldsmith Street, Merdeka Street to Taming Sari Tower and Merdeka Street to River Cruise terminal. The survey consists of an assessment tool based on a nine-point scale of users' satisfaction level of pathway properties, zebra pedestrian crossing, street furniture, personal safety, adjacent to traffic flow, aesthetic and amenities. Analytical hierarchical process (AHP) was used to avoid any biasness in analyzing the data collected. Findings show that Merdeka Street to Taming Sari Tower as the street that scores the highest satisfaction level that fulfils all the required needs of a pedestrianized environment. Similar assessment elements can be used to evaluate existing streets in other cities and these criteria should also be used in planning for future cities.

  7. A facility to evaluate the focusing performance of mirrors for Cherenkov Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Canestrari, Rodolfo; Bonnoli, Giacomo; Farisato, Giancarlo; Lessio, Luigi; Rodeghiero, Gabriele; Spiga, Rossella; Toso, Giorgio; Pareschi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique in late 1980's, ground-based observations of Very High-Energy gamma rays came into reality. Since the first source detected at TeV energies in 1989 by Whipple, the number of high energy gamma-ray sources has rapidly grown up to more than 150 thanks to the second generation experiments like MAGIC, H.E.S.S. and VERITAS. The Cherenkov Telescope Array observatory is the next generation of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes, with at least 10 times higher sensitivity than current instruments. Cherenkov Telescopes have to be equipped with optical dishes of large diameter -- in general based on segmented mirrors -- with typical angular resolution of a few arc-minutes. To evaluate the mirror's quality specific metrological systems are required that possibly take into account the environmental conditions in which typically Cherenkov telescopes operate (in open air without dome protection). For this purpose a new facility for the characterization of mi...

  8. Pilot Implementation and Preliminary Evaluation of START:AV Assessments in Secure Juvenile Correctional Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarais, Sarah L; Sellers, Brian G; Viljoen, Jodi L; Cruise, Keith R; Nicholls, Tonia L; Dvoskin, Joel A

    2012-01-01

    The Short-Term Assessment of Risk and Treatability: Adolescent Version (START:AV) is a new structured professional judgment guide for assessing short-term risks in adolescents. The scheme may be distinguished from other youth risk assessment and treatment planning instruments by its inclusion of 23 dynamic factors that are each rated for both vulnerability and strength. In addition, START:AV is also unique in that it focuses on multiple adverse outcomes-namely, violence, self-harm, suicide, unauthorized leave, substance abuse, self-neglect, victimization, and general offending-over the short-term (i.e., weeks to months) rather than long-term (i.e., years). This paper describes a pilot implementation and preliminary evaluation of START:AV in three secure juvenile correctional facilities in the southern United States. Specifically, we examined the descriptive characteristics and psychometric properties of START:AV assessments completed by 21 case managers on 291 adolescent offenders (250 boys and 41 girls) at the time of admission. Results provide preliminary support for the feasibility of completing START:AV assessments as part of routine practice. Findings also highlight differences in the characteristics of START:AV assessments for boys and girls and differential associations between the eight START:AV risk domains. Though results are promising, further research is needed to establish the reliability and validity of START:AV assessments completed in the field.

  9. 2727-S Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility clean closure evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luke, S.N.

    1994-07-14

    This report presents the analytical results of 2727-S NRDWS facility closure verification soil sampling and compares these results to clean closure criteria. The results of this comparison will determine if clean closure of the unit is regulatorily achievable. This report also serves to notify regulators that concentrations of some analytes at the site exceed sitewide background threshold levels (DOE-RL 1993b) and/or the limits of quantitation (LOQ). This report also presents a Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup (MTCA) (WAC 173-340) regulation health-based closure standard under which the unit can clean close in lieu of closure to background levels or LOQ in accordance with WAC 173-303-610. The health-based clean closure standard will be closure to MTCA Method B residential cleanup levels. This report reconciles all analyte concentrations reported above background or LOQ to this health-based cleanup standard. Regulator acceptance of the findings presented in this report will qualify the TSD unit for clean closure in accordance with WAC 173-303-610 without further TSD unit soil sampling, or soil removal and/or decontamination. Nondetected analytes require no further evaluation.

  10. Facile Synthesis and Antimicrobial Evaluation of Some New Heterocyclic Compounds Incorporating a Biologically Active Sulfamoyl Moiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham S. Darwish

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A facile and convenient synthesis of new heterocyclic compounds containing a sulfamoyl moiety suitable for use as antimicrobial agents was reported. The precursor 3-oxo-3-phenyl-N-(4-sulfamoylphenylpropionamide was coupled smoothly with arenediazonium salt producing hydrazones which reacted with malononitrile or triethylorthoformate affording pyridazine and triazine derivatives, respectively. Also, the reactivity of the same precursor with DMF-DMA was followed by aminotriazole; aromatic aldehydes was followed by hydrazine hydrate, triethylorthoformate, or thiourea affording triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine, pyrazole, acrylamide, and dihydropyrimidine derivatives, respectively. On the other hand, treatment of the precursor propionamide with phenyl isothiocyanate and KOH in DMF afforded the intermediate salt which was treated with dilute HCl followed by 2-bromo-1-phenylethanone affording carboxamide derivative. While the same intermediate salt reacted in situ with chloroacetone, ethyl 2-chloroacetate, 3-(2-bromoacetyl-2H-chromen-2-one, methyl iodide, or 2-oxo-N-phenylpropane hydrazonoyl chloride afforded the thiophene, ketene N,S-acetal, and thiadiazole derivatives, respectively. The structure of the new products was established based on elemental and spectral analysis. Antimicrobial evaluation of some selected examples from the synthesized products was carried out whereby four compounds were found to have moderate activities and one compound showed the highest activity.

  11. Standard Guide for Evaluating Disposal Options for Concrete from Nuclear Facility Decommissioning

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This standard guide defines the process for developing a strategy for dispositioning concrete from nuclear facility decommissioning. It outlines a 10-step method to evaluate disposal options for radioactively contaminated concrete. One of the steps is to complete a detailed analysis of the cost and dose to nonradiation workers (the public); the methodology and supporting data to perform this analysis are detailed in the appendices. The resulting data can be used to balance dose and cost and select the best disposal option. These data, which establish a technical basis to apply to release the concrete, can be used in several ways: (1) to show that the release meets existing release criteria, (2) to establish a basis to request release of the concrete on a case-by-case basis, (3) to develop a basis for establishing release criteria where none exists. 1.2 This standard guide is based on the “Protocol for Development of Authorized Release Limits for Concrete at U.S. Department of Energy Sites,” (1) from ...

  12. A human factors engineering evaluation of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donohoo, D.T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Sarver, T.L. [ARES Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-06-05

    This report documents the methods and results of a human factors engineering (HFE) review conducted on the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Project 236A, to be constructed at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility at Hanford, Washington. This HFE analysis of the MWTF was initiated by WHC to assess how well the current facility and equipment design satisfies the needs of its operations and maintenance staff and other potential occupants, and to identify areas of the design that could benefit from improving the human interfaces at the facility. Safe and effective operations, including maintenance, is a primary goal for the MWTF. Realization of this goal requires that the MWTF facility, equipment, and operations be designed in a manner that is consistent with the abilities and limitations of its operating personnel. As a consequence, HFE principles should be applied to the MWTF design, construction, its operating procedures, and its training. The HFE review was focused on the 200-West Area facility as the design is further along than that of the 200-East Area. The review captured, to the greatest extent feasible at this stage of design, all aspects of the facility activities and included the major topics generally associated with HFE (e.g., communication, working environment). Lessons learned from the review of the 200 West facility will be extrapolated to the 200-East Area, as well as generalized to the Hanford Site.

  13. Wind Tunnel Evaluation of Vegetative Buffer Effects on Air Flow near Swine Production Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing concerns about generation and transport of swine odor constituents have substantiated wind tunnel simulation studies on air flow dynamics near swine production facilities. A possible odor mitigation strategy is a forest vegetative buffer as a windbreak barrier near swine facilities becaus...

  14. Removal site evaluation report on the bulk shielding facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This removal site evaluation report on the Bulk Shielding Facility (BSF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around BSF buildings pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment (i.e., a high probability of adverse effects) and whether remedial site evaluations or removal actions are, therefore, required. A removal site evaluation was conducted at nine areas associated with the BSF. The scope of each evaluation included (1) a search for, and review of, readily available historical records regarding operations and use of the facility (including hazardous substance usage and existing contamination); (2) interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past practices; and (3) a brief walk-through to visually inspect the facility and identify existing hazard areas requiring maintenance actions or remedial evaluation. The results of the removal site evaluation indicate that no substantial risks exist from contaminants present because adequate efforts are being made to contain and control existing contamination and hazardous substances and to protect human health and the environment. At Building 3004, deteriorated and peeling exterior paint has a direct pathway to the storm water drainage system and can potentially impact local surface water during periods of storm water runoff. The paint is assumed to be lead based, thus posing a potential problem. The paint should be sampled and analyzed to determine its lead content and to assess whether a hazard exists. If so, a maintenance action will be necessary to prevent further deterioration and dislodging of the paint. In addition, if the paint contains lead, then a remedial site evaluation should be conducted to determine whether lead from fallen chips has impacted soils in the immediate area of the building.

  15. 20th International Training Course (ITC-20) on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials evaluation report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Amanda Ann

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this evaluation report is to provide the information necessary to improve the effectiveness of the ITC provided to the International Atomic Energy Agency Member States. This report examines ITC-20 training content, delivery methods, scheduling, and logistics. Ultimately, this report evaluates whether the course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the participants needs in the protection of nuclear materials and facilities.

  16. Hazard Evaluation for Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Sludge at the Solid Waste Treatment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHULTZ, M.V.

    2000-08-22

    As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) storage basin clean-up project, sludge that has accumulated in the K Basins due to corrosion of damaged irradiated N Reactor will be loaded into containers and placed in interim storage. The Hanford Site Treatment Complex (T Plant) has been identified as the location where the sludge will be stored until final disposition of the material occurs. Long term storage of sludge from the K Basin fuel storage facilities requires identification and analysis of potential accidents involving sludge storage in T Plant. This report is prepared as the initial step in the safety assurance process described in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports and HNF-PRO-704, Hazards and Accident Analysis Process. This report documents the evaluation of potential hazards and off-normal events associated with sludge storage activities. This information will be used in subsequent safety analyses, design, and operations procedure development to ensure safe storage. The hazards evaluation for the storage of SNF sludge in T-Plant used the Hazards and Operability Analysis (HazOp) method. The hazard evaluation identified 42 potential hazardous conditions. No hazardous conditions involving hazardous/toxic chemical concerns were identified. Of the 42 items identified in the HazOp study, eight were determined to have potential for onsite worker consequences. No items with potential offsite consequences were identified in the HazOp study. Hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker or offsite consequences are candidates for quantitative consequence analysis. The hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker consequences were grouped into two event categories, Container failure due to overpressure - internal to T Plant, and Spill of multiple containers. The two event categories will be developed into accident scenarios that will be quantitatively analyzed to determine release consequences. A third category, Container failure due to

  17. Safety evaluation report related to the renewal of the facility license for the research reactor at the Dow Chemical Company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    This safety evaluation report for the application filed by the Dow Chemical Company for renewal of facility Operating License R-108 to continue to operate its research reactor at an increased operating power level has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located on the grounds of the Michigan Division of the Dow Chemical Company in Midland, Michigan. The staff concludes that the Dow Chemical Company can continue to operate its reactor without endangering the health and safety of the public.

  18. Design of a cryogenic test facility for evaluating the performance of interferometric components of the SPICA/SAFARI instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenendaal, Ian T.; Naylor, David A.; Gom, Brad G.

    2014-08-01

    The Japanese SPace Infrared telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA), a 3 m class telescope cooled to ~ 6 K, will provide extremely low thermal background far-infrared observations. An imaging Fourier transform spectrometer (SAFARI) is being developed to exploit the low background provided by SPICA. Evaluating the performance of the interferometer translation stage and key optical components requires a cryogenic test facility. In this paper we discuss the design challenges of a pulse tube cooled cryogenic test facility that is under development for this purpose. We present the design of the cryostat and preliminary results from component characterization and external optical metrology.

  19. Evaluation of alternatives for the future of facilities at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center. [State and NRC-licensed burial areas; low-level liquid waste treatment facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-08-01

    Regulatory considerations are discussed. Alternatives for the continued operation or decommissioning of the state-licensed burial area, the low-level waste treatment facilities, and the NRC licensed burial area are evaluated. Radiological impact analyses were also performed for alternatives on other facilities. (DLC)

  20. Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Facilities at Water Diversions in the Umatilla River; 1992 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Suzanne M.

    1993-03-01

    We report on our progress from October 1991 through September 1992 in evaluating juvenile fish bypass facilities at Three Mile Falls and Westland dams on the Umatilla River. We also report on our progress from October 1991 through June 1992 in evaluating adult fish passage in the lower Umatilla River and adult fish passage facilities at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). These are the study objectives addressed by ODFW and CTUIR: (1) Report A (ODFW): To evaluate the juvenile fish bypass facility in the West Extension Irrigation District Canal at Three Mile Falls Dam and document juvenile salmonid passage through the juvenile fish bypass facility and east-bank adult fish ladder. To measure velocity and develop trap designs at Westland Dam. (2) Report B (CTUIR): To examine the passage of adult salmonids at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin, including restoration of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), as well as enhancement of summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Coolant Mixing Experiments at the ROCOM, Vattenfall, and Gidropress Test Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kliem

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Coolant mixing is an important mitigative mechanism against reactivity accidents caused by local boron dilution. Experiments on coolant mixing were carried out at three different test facilities representing three different reactor types. These are the ROCOM test facility modelling a German KONVOI-type reactor, the Vattenfall test facility being a model of a Westinghouse three-loop PWR, and the Gidropress test facility modelling a VVER-1000 PWR. The scenario of the start-up of the first main coolant pump was investigated in all three facilities. The experiments were accompanied by velocity measurements in the downcomer for the same scenario in the ROCOM and the Vattenfall test facilities. A similar flow structure was found in these measurements in both cases. A maximum of the velocity is measured at the opposite side in regard to the position of the loop with the starting-up pump whilst a recirculation area was found just below this inlet nozzle in both facilities. The analysis of the slug mixing experiments showed also comparable flow behaviour. In accordance with the velocity measurements, the first part of the deboration is also found on the opposite side. In this region, the maximum deboration is measured in all three cases. These maximum values are in the same order of magnitude for nearly identical initial slug volumes.

  2. Systems Design and Experimental Evaluation of a High-Altitude Relight Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Brendan

    Novel advances in gas turbine engine combustor technology, led by endeavors into fuel efficiency and demanding environmental regulations, have been fraught with performance and safety concerns. While the majority of low emissions gas turbine engine combustor technology has been necessary for power generation applications, the push for ultra-low NOx combustion in aircraft jet engines has been ever present. Recent state-of-the-art combustor designs notably tackle historic emissions challenges by operating at fuel-lean conditions, which are characterized by an increase in the amount of air flow sent to the primary combustion zone. While beneficial in reducing NOx emissions, the fuel-lean mechanisms that characterize these combustor designs rely heavily upon high-energy and high-velocity air flows to sufficiently mix and atomize fuel droplets, ultimately leading to flame stability concerns during low-power operation. When operating at high-altitude conditions, these issues are further exacerbated by the presence of low ambient air pressures and temperatures, which can lead to engine flame-out situations and hamper engine relight attempts. To aid academic and industrial research ventures into improving the high-altitude lean blow-out and relight performance of modern gas turbine engine combustor technologies, the High-Altitude Relight Test Facility (HARTF) was designed and constructed at the University of Cincinnati (UC) Combustion and Fire Research Laboratory (CFRL). Following its construction, an experimental evaluation of its abilities to facilitate optically-accessible ignition, combustion, and spray testing for gas turbine engine combustor hardware at simulated high-altitude conditions was performed. In its evaluation, performance limit references were established through testing of the HARTF vacuum and cryogenic air-chilling capabilities. These tests were conducted with regard to end-user control---the creation and the maintenance of a realistic high

  3. Post-Occupancy Evaluation (POE) Methodologies for School Facilities: A Case Study of the V. Sue Cleveland High School Post Occupancy Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Marcel; Larroque, Andre; Maniktala, Nate

    2012-01-01

    The New Mexico Public School Facilities Authority (NMPSFA) is the agency responsible for administering state-funded capital projects for schools statewide. Post occupancy evaluation (POE) is the tool selected by NMPSFA for measuring project outcomes. The basic POE process for V. Sue Cleveland High School (VSCHS) consisted of a series of field…

  4. JOINT INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE, & RECONNAISSANCE (ISR) TEST & EVALUATION (JISR-TE) FACILITY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To meet the needs of the Warfighter, the JISR-TE facility provides the US, NATO, and Coalition members standards conformance testing of imagery capabilities across...

  5. A Fisheries Evaluation of the Richland and Wapato Canal Fish Screening Facilities, Spring 1987 : Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Abernethy, C.Scott; Lusty, E.William; Wampler, Sally J.

    1988-02-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of new fish screening facilities at the Richland and Wapato canals in south-central Washington State. The screen integrity tests at the Richland Screens indicated that 100% of fall chinook salmon fry (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) released in front of the screens were prevented from entering the canal behind the screens. Our estimate is based on a 61% catch efficiency for control fish planted behind the screens. At the Wapato Canal, we estimated that between 3% and 4% of the test fish were either impinged on the screen surface and passed over the screens or passed through faulty screen seals. Our estimate is based over the screens or passed through faulty screen seals. Our estimate is based on a greater than 90% capture of control fish released in front of the screens. At the Wapato Screens, we estimated that 0.8% of steelhead smolts (Salmo gairdneri) and 1.4% of spring chinook salmon smolts released during low canal flow tests wee descaled. During full canal flow tests, 1.6% of the steelhead and 3.1% of the spring chinook salmon released were descaled. The fish return pipe at the Wapato Canal was tested: the estimate of descaled test fish wa not different from the estimate of descaled control fish. The time required for fish to exit from the Wapato Screen forebay varied with species and with canal flow. During low canal flows, 43.2% of steelhead and 61.6% of spring chinook salmon smolts released at the trash racks were captured in the fish return within 96 hr. 11 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Evaluation of Legionella Air Contamination in Healthcare Facilities by Different Sampling Methods: An Italian Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Maria Teresa; De Giglio, Osvalda; Cristina, Maria Luisa; Napoli, Christian; Pacifico, Claudia; Agodi, Antonella; Baldovin, Tatjana; Casini, Beatrice; Coniglio, Maria Anna; D'Errico, Marcello Mario; Delia, Santi Antonino; Deriu, Maria Grazia; Guida, Marco; Laganà, Pasqualina; Liguori, Giorgio; Moro, Matteo; Mura, Ida; Pennino, Francesca; Privitera, Gaetano; Romano Spica, Vincenzo; Sembeni, Silvia; Spagnolo, Anna Maria; Tardivo, Stefano; Torre, Ida; Valeriani, Federica; Albertini, Roberto; Pasquarella, Cesira

    2017-06-22

    Healthcare facilities (HF) represent an at-risk environment for legionellosis transmission occurring after inhalation of contaminated aerosols. In general, the control of water is preferred to that of air because, to date, there are no standardized sampling protocols. Legionella air contamination was investigated in the bathrooms of 11 HF by active sampling (Surface Air System and Coriolis(®)μ) and passive sampling using settling plates. During the 8-hour sampling, hot tap water was sampled three times. All air samples were evaluated using culture-based methods, whereas liquid samples collected using the Coriolis(®)μ were also analyzed by real-time PCR. Legionella presence in the air and water was then compared by sequence-based typing (SBT) methods. Air contamination was found in four HF (36.4%) by at least one of the culturable methods. The culturable investigation by Coriolis(®)μ did not yield Legionella in any enrolled HF. However, molecular investigation using Coriolis(®)μ resulted in eight HF testing positive for Legionella in the air. Comparison of Legionella air and water contamination indicated that Legionella water concentration could be predictive of its presence in the air. Furthermore, a molecular study of 12 L. pneumophila strains confirmed a match between the Legionella strains from air and water samples by SBT for three out of four HF that tested positive for Legionella by at least one of the culturable methods. Overall, our study shows that Legionella air detection cannot replace water sampling because the absence of microorganisms from the air does not necessarily represent their absence from water; nevertheless, air sampling may provide useful information for risk assessment. The liquid impingement technique appears to have the greatest capacity for collecting airborne Legionella if combined with molecular investigations.

  7. Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Water Diversions in the Umatilla River; 1993 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Suzanne M.

    1994-03-01

    This report presents progress from October 1992 through September 1993 in evaluating juvenile fish bypass facilities at Three Mile Falls, Maxwell, Westland, and Feed Canal dams on the Umatilla River, and in evaluating adult fish passage in the lower Umatilla River. Also reported is an effort to evaluate delayed mortality and stress responses of juvenile salmonids resulting from trapping and transport at high temperatures. These studies are part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the matilla River Basin, including restoration of coho salmon and chinook salmon, as well as enhancement of summer steelhead.

  8. Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Power Burst Facility (PER-620) Final End State and PBF Vessel Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. C. Culp

    2007-05-01

    Preparation of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, (DOE and EPA 1995) which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental, Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time critical removal action process as an approach for decommissioning. The scope of this engineering evaluation/cost analysis is to evaluate alternatives and recommend a preferred alternative for the final end state of the PBF and the final disposal location for the PBF vessel.

  9. Evaluating the relative impacts of operational and financial factors on the competitiveness of an algal biofuel production facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hise, Adam M; Characklis, Gregory W; Kern, Jordan; Gerlach, Robin; Viamajala, Sridhar; Gardner, Robert D; Vadlamani, Agasteswar

    2016-11-01

    Algal biofuels are becoming more economically competitive due to technological advances and government subsidies offering tax benefits and lower cost financing. These factors are linked, however, as the value of technical advances is affected by modeling assumptions regarding the growth conditions, process design, and financing of the production facility into which novel techniques are incorporated. Two such techniques, related to algal growth and dewatering, are evaluated in representative operating and financing scenarios using an integrated techno-economic model. Results suggest that these techniques can be valuable under specified conditions, but also that investment subsidies influence cost competitive facility design by incentivizing development of more capital intensive facilities (e.g., favoring hydrothermal liquefaction over transesterification-based facilities). Evaluating novel techniques under a variety of operational and financial scenarios highlights the set of site-specific conditions in which technical advances are most valuable, while also demonstrating the influence of subsidies linked to capital intensity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Decree no. 2001-1176 of the 5 december publishing the convention on the environmental impacts evaluation in a transfrontier context (seven appendix), signed at Espoo (Finland) the 25 february 1991; Decret no. 2001-1176 du 5 decembre 2001 portant publication de la convention sur l'evaluation de l'impact sur l'environnement dans un contexte transfrontiere (ensemble sept appendices), signee a Espoo (Finlande) le 25 fevrier 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This decree concerns the transfrontier environmental impacts evaluation of all activities. The environment concerns the land, water and air and also consequences on the public health. It presents the cooperation, the research programs, the rules and the implementation of the evaluation and provides seven appendix which detail the concerned activities and a reference evaluation document contain. (A.L.B.)

  11. EVALUATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED FACILITIES WITH SCR AND FGD SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. A. Withum; S.C. Tseng; J. E. Locke

    2004-10-31

    CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) - wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on Hg speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for Hg capture. This document, the second in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on a 330 MW unit burning a bituminous coal containing 1.0% sulfur. The unit is equipped with a SCR system for NOx control and a spray dryer absorber for SO{sub 2} control followed by a baghouse unit for particulate emissions control. Four sampling tests were performed in March 2003. Flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the SCR inlet, air heater outlet (ESP inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet) using the Ontario Hydro method. Process stream samples for a mercury balance were collected to coincide with the flue gas measurements. Due to mechanical problems with the boiler feed water pumps, the actual gross output was between 195 and 221 MW during the tests. The results showed that the SCR/air heater combination oxidized nearly 95% of the elemental mercury. Mercury removal, on a

  12. Mucocele of the appendix. Radiological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Shingo; Satani, Kenichiro; Ozuki, Taizo [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan); Shindou, Hiroaki; Saguchi, Toru; Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Katsumata, Kenji [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan). Hachioji Medical Center; Kotake, Fumio [Tokyo Medical Coll., Ami, Ibaraki (Japan). Kasumigaura Hospital

    2002-04-01

    Radiological findings of CT and MRI were evaluated in 11 cases of mucocele of the appendix. Mucocele is a rare disease entity and preoperative diagnosis is very important. The radiological findings were a well defined cystic mass with a wall of variable thickness. Nodular lesion in the wall of the mucocele may be a suggestive finding of malignant case of mucocele. (author)

  13. EVALUATION OF A TURBIDITY METER FOR USE AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahannah, R.; Edwards, T.

    2013-06-04

    Savannah River Remediation’s (SRR’s) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a “peanut” vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 weight percent (wt%). A “go/no-go” decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a “go” decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a “no-go” determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. Subsequent to the

  14. Evaluation Of A Turbidity Meter For Use At The Defense Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahannah, R. N.; Edwards, T. B.

    2013-01-15

    Savannah River Remediation's (SRR's) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Laboratory currently tests for sludge carry-over into the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) by evaluating the iron concentration in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) and relating this iron concentration to the amount of sludge solids present. A new method was proposed for detecting the amount of sludge in the SMECT that involves the use of an Optek turbidity sensor. Waste Services Laboratory (WSL) personnel conducted testing on two of these units following a test plan developed by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE). Both Optek units (SN64217 and SN65164) use sensor model AF16-N and signal converter model series C4000. The sensor body of each unit was modified to hold a standard DWPF 12 cc sample vial, also known as a ''peanut'' vial. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the use of this model of turbidity sensor, or meter, to provide a measurement of the sludge solids present in the SMECT based upon samples from that tank. During discussions of the results from this study by WSE, WSL, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, an upper limit on the acceptable level of solids in SMECT samples was set at 0.14 wt%. A ''go/no-go'' decision criterion was to be developed for the critical turbidity response, which is expressed in concentration units (CUs), for each Optek unit based upon the 0.14 wt% solids value. An acceptable or a ''go'' decision for the SMECT should reflect the situation that there is an identified risk (e.g. 5%) for a CU response from the Optek unit to be less than the critical CU value when the solids content of the SMECT is actually 0.14 wt% or greater, while a ''no-go'' determination (i.e., an Optek CU response above the critical CU value, a conservative decision relative to risk) would lead to additional evaluations of the SMECT to better quantify the possible solids content of the tank. A sludge simulant was used to develop standards

  15. Radiation dose evaluation based on exposure scenario during the operation of radioactive waste disposal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeong Hyoun; Kim Chang Lak; Choi, Heui Joo; Park, Joo Wan [Korea Electric Power Corporation, Nuclear Environment Technology Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    Radiation dose to worker in disposal facility was calculated by using point kernel MICROSHIELD V5.02 computer code based on exposure scenarios. An conceptual design model for disposal vaults in disposal facility was used for object of shielding calculation model. Selected radionuclides and their activities among radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants were assumed as radiation sources for the exposure calculation. Annual radiation doses to crane workers and to people working on disposal vaults were calculated according to exposure time and distance from the sources with conservative operation scenarios. The scenarios used for this study were based on assumption for representing disposal activities in a future Korean near surface disposal facility. Calculated exposure rates to worker during normal disposal work were very low comparing with annual allowable limit for radiation worker.

  16. Accreditation status and geographic location of outpatient vascular testing facilities among Medicare beneficiaries: the VALUE (Vascular Accreditation, Location & Utilization Evaluation) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundek, Tatjana; Brown, Scott C; Wang, Kefeng; Dong, Chuanhui; Farrell, Mary Beth; Heller, Gary V; Gornik, Heather L; Hutchisson, Marge; Needleman, Laurence; Benenati, James F; Jaff, Michael R; Meier, George H; Perese, Susana; Bendick, Phillip; Hamburg, Naomi M; Lohr, Joann M; LaPerna, Lucy; Leers, Steven A; Lilly, Michael P; Tegeler, Charles; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Katanick, Sandra L

    2014-10-01

    There is limited information on the accreditation status and geographic distribution of vascular testing facilities in the US. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) provide reimbursement to facilities regardless of accreditation status. The aims were to: (1) identify the proportion of Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) accredited vascular testing facilities in a 5% random national sample of Medicare beneficiaries receiving outpatient vascular testing services; (2) describe the geographic distribution of these facilities. The VALUE (Vascular Accreditation, Location & Utilization Evaluation) Study examines the proportion of IAC accredited facilities providing vascular testing procedures nationally, and the geographic distribution and utilization of these facilities. The data set containing all facilities that billed Medicare for outpatient vascular testing services in 2011 (5% CMS Outpatient Limited Data Set (LDS) file) was examined, and locations of outpatient vascular testing facilities were obtained from the 2011 CMS/Medicare Provider of Services (POS) file. Of 13,462 total vascular testing facilities billing Medicare for vascular testing procedures in a 5% random Outpatient LDS for the US in 2011, 13% (n=1730) of facilities were IAC accredited. The percentage of IAC accredited vascular testing facilities in the LDS file varied significantly by US region, pfacilities that are IAC accredited is low and varies by region. Increasing the number of accredited vascular testing facilities to improve test quality is a hypothesis that should be tested in future research. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 266 - Health-Based Limits for Exclusion of Waste-Derived Residues*

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Waste-Derived Residues* VII Appendix VII to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. VII Appendix VII to Part 266—Health...

  18. Evaluation of replacement tritium facility (RTF) compliance with DOE safety goals using probabilistic consequence assessment methodology. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Kula, K.R.; East, J.M.; Moore, M.L.

    1993-12-31

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), is a major center for the processing of nuclear materials for national defense, deep-space exploration, and medical treatment applications in the United States. As an integral part of the DOE`s effort to modernize facilities, implement improved handling and processing technology, and reduce operational risk to the general public and onsite workers, transition of tritium processing at SRS from the Consolidated Tritium Facility to the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) began in 1993. To ensure that operation of new DOE facilities such as RTF present minimum involuntary and voluntary risks to the neighboring public and workers, indices of risk have been established to serve as target levels or safety goals of performance for assessing nuclear safety. These goals are discussed from a historical perspective in the initial part of this paper. Secondly, methodologies to quantify risk indices are briefly described. Lastly, accident, abnormal event, and normal operation source terms from RTF are evaluated for consequence assessment purposes relative to the safety targets.

  19. Optimization Evaluation, General Motors Former AC Rochester Facility, Sioux City, Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    The General Motors (GM) Former AC Rochester Facility (site) is located within the valley of the Missouri River in Sioux City, Iowa and is bounded by a steep loess bluff to the north, commercial properties to the east, and undeveloped properties to the...

  20. EVALUATION OF STYRENE EMISSIONS FROM A SHOWER STALL/BATHTUB MANUFACTURING FACILITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of emissions measurements carried out at a representative facility (Eljer Plumbingware in Wilson, NC) that manufactures polyester-resin-reinforced shower stalls and bathtubs by spraying styrene-based resins onto molds in vented, open, spray booths. Styren...

  1. Design and Evaluation of Wood Processing Facilities Using Object-Oriented Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Earl Kline; Philip A. Araman

    1992-01-01

    Managers of hardwood processing facilities need timely information on which to base important decisions such as when to add costly equipment or how to improve profitability subject to time-varying demands. The overall purpose of this paper is to introduce a tool that can effectively provide such timely information. A simulation/animation modeling procedure is described...

  2. Thermodynamic Evaluation of Floating Production Storage and Offloading Facilities with Liquefaction Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Sánchez, Yamid Alberto Carranza; Junior, Silvio de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Floating, production, storage and offloading (FPSO) plants are facilities used in upstream petroleum processing.They have gained interest because they are more flexible than conventional plants and can be used for producingoil and gas in deep-water fields. In general, gas export is challenging be...

  3. Architectural style and green spaces predict older adults' evaluations of residential facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerina, Veronica; Fornara, Ferdinando; Manca, Sara

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the effects of residential facilities' design features on older adults' psychosocial responses. Participants (N = 192) were over 65-year-old residents who were randomly exposed to different experimental scenarios concerning a hypothetical residential facility for older adults, using a 3 × 2 between-subjects design (i.e. home-like vs. hotel-like vs. usual-standard architectural style; presence vs. absence of green spaces). After the experimental session, participants were asked to fill in a questionnaire that measured their attitudes towards short- and long-term relocation, anticipated residential satisfaction with the facility, and feelings of broken home attachment. The results showed (1) more positive responses to "home-like" and "hotel-like" architectural styles than the usual-standard type and (2) the positive impact of green spaces on the assessment of the facilities. These design features should thus play a role in both reducing the stressful impact of leaving home and promoting beneficial patterns, hence fostering "successful ageing".

  4. Evaluation of environmental sampling methods and rapid detection assays for recovery and identification of Listeria spp. from meat processing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacević, Jovana; Bohaychuk, Valerie M; Barrios, Pablo Romero; Gensler, Gary E; Rolheiser, Deana L; McMullen, Lynn M

    2009-04-01

    Studies that isolated Listeria spp. from the environment of two meat processing facilities were conducted. Samples were collected in the processing environment of the facilities with three different sampling methods (cotton swab, sterile sponge, and composite-ply tissues) to evaluate their ability to recover Listeria spp. A total of 240 samples for each sampling method were collected and tested. The cotton swab method of sampling was significantly (P 0.05) in their ability to recover Listeria spp. The specificity and sensitivity of four detection methods (conventional culture, Petrifilm Environmental Listeria Plates [ELP], lateral-flow immunoprecipitation [LFI], and automated PCR) were evaluated for identification of Listeria spp. Facilities were visited until a minimum of 100 positive and 100 negative samples per detection method were collected. The LFI and PCR methods were highly sensitive (95.5 and 99.1%, respectively) and specific (100%) relative to the culture method. The ELP method was significantly less efficient (P < 0.01) than LFI and PCR in detection of Listeria spp., with lower sensitivity (50.6%) and specificity (91.5%). Kappa values indicated excellent agreement of the LFI and PCR assays and moderate agreement of the ELP method to the culture method. Overall, ELP was easy to use but less efficient in detection of Listeria spp. from environmental samples, while the LFI and PCR methods were found to be excellent alternatives to culture, considering performance and time and labor inputs.

  5. SURFACTANT-ENHANCED EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION VERSUCHSEININCHTUNG ZUR GRUNDWASSER-UND ALTLASTENSANIERUNG (VEGAS) FACILITY, STUTTGART, GERMANY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This innovative technology evaluation report (ITER) summarized the results of an evaluation of a surfactant-enhanced extraction technology. This evaluation was conducted under a bilateral agreement between the United States (U.S.) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund ...

  6. Geodesy for Evaluating the Impact of Sea Level Rise on NASA Centers and Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L. J.; Nerem, R.; Masters, D. S.; Meertens, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Sea level is rising in response to climate change. Currently the global mean rate is a little over 3 mm/year, but it is expected to accelerate significantly over this century. This will have a profound impact on coastal populations and infrastructure, including NASA centers and facilities. A detailed study proposed by the University of Colorado's Center for Astrodynamics Research on the impact of sea level rise on a few of NASA's most vulnerable facilities was recently funded by NASA. Individual surveys at several high-risk NASA centers will be conducted and used as case studies for a broader investigation that needs to be done for coastal infrastructure around the country. The first year of the study will include implementing and conducting a terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and GPS survey at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida, and potentially at Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia, and Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. We will use a broad array of geodetic tools to perform this study - much of which has been developed over the last few decades by NASA and its investigators. We will use airborne lidar data and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) data to construct detailed digital elevation models (DEMs) of the facilities that we assess. We will use GPS data to assess the rate of vertical land movement at the facilities and to tie the DEM to tide gauges and other reference points. We will use satellite altimeter data from TOPEX, Jason-1, and Jason-2 to assess the sea level changes observed near these NASA facilities over the last 20 years to see if it offers clues for the future. We will also use GRACE satellite gravity observations to predict the regional changes in sea level caused by the melting of ice complexes around the world. We will use these datasets along with sea level projections from global climate models (GCMs) and semi-empirical projections to make detailed maps of sea level inundation for the years 2050 and 2100 for

  7. Repair, Evaluation, Maintenance, and Rehabilitation Research Program. Evaluation of Existing Condition Rating Procedures for Civil Works Structures and Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    L. McCartney (DAEN-CWH-D) and Dr. Tony C. Liu (DAEN-ECE-D) se",e as the REMR Overview Committee; Mr. William F. McCleese (WESSC-A), U.S. Army...34Maintenance Management System, Parts I-IV," Plant Engineering (October 14, 1976). 13. Hoyt, William G. and Walter B. Langbein, Floods (Princeton... Obstr --uctions in channels - vegetation, debris *%. Channel encroachments f. Rems controlled facilities g. PreVquency of operation for rights (SP

  8. An Evaluation of Industrial Facilities Defects in Selected Industrial Estates in Lagos State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oseghale, G.E.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study appraised the state of industrial facilities in selected industrial estates established between 1957 and 1981 in Lagos State by examining the nature and causes of facilities’ defects in the selected industrial estates. The buildings sampled were load bearing sandcrete block wall (1%, concrete framed structure (83% and steel framed structure (16%. Data were sourced using structured questionnaire administered on the staff of maintenance department of 35 building materials and plastic manufacturing industries purposively selected and located in 18 industrial estates. Data obtained were analyzed using descriptive statistic. The study found the structural elements of the buildings, i.e. foundations, beams, walls, and floors satisfactory. Using the mean response analysis, the result showed that the most severe factors responsible for industrial facilities’ defects were combined effects of geo-climatic factors (2.35, combined effects of biological agencies (2.15, corrosion (1.98, and physical aggression on the facilities (1.71.

  9. Charging for Ambulatory Care in Military Health Care Facilities: An Evaluation and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-25

    health care facilities, with resulting income used to subsidize CHAMPUS. This proposal, calling for $5.00 per visit as submitted by Senator Daniel...Analysis of Current Methods and Their Development," Inquiry, 16, Fall 1979, 230-246. 32 Jack Hadley, John Holahan , and William Scanlon, "Can Fee-for...other) were combined into a single category called "commercial insurance". An additional category, "Do Not Know", was added to reflect those

  10. An Evaluation of Industrial Facilities Defects in Selected Industrial Estates in Lagos State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Oseghale, G.E.; Ikpo, I.J.

    2014-01-01

    The study appraised the state of industrial facilities in selected industrial estates established between 1957 and 1981 in Lagos State by examining the nature and causes of facilities’ defects in the selected industrial estates. The buildings sampled were load bearing sandcrete block wall (1%), concrete framed structure (83%) and steel framed structure (16%). Data were sourced using structured questionnaire administered on the staff of maintenance department of 35 building materials and plast...

  11. Securitization markets and central banking: an evaluation of the term asset-backed securities loan facility

    OpenAIRE

    Sean D. Campbell; Daniel M. Covitz; William R. Nelson; Karen M. Pence

    2011-01-01

    In response to the near collapse of US securitization markets in 2008, the Federal Reserve created the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility, which offered non-recourse loans to finance investors' purchases of certain highly rated asset-backed securities. We study the effects of this program and find that it lowered interest rate spreads for some categories of asset-backed securities but had little impact on the pricing of individual securities. These findings suggest that the program im...

  12. Preliminary Evaluation of PGSFR DHR Heat Exchangers Performance Using STELLA-1 Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jonggan; Eoh, Jae-Hyuk; Yeom, Sujin; Lee, Jewhan; Kim, Tae-Joon; Hwang, Inkoo; Cho, Chungho; Kim, Jong-Man; Cho, Youngil; Jung, Min-Hwan; Gam, Da-Young; Jeong, Ji-Young [Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The STELLA program for PGSFR decay heat removal (DHR) performance demonstration is in progress at KAERI. As the first phase of the program, the STELLA-1 facility has been constructed and separate effect tests for heat exchangers of DHRS have been conducted. Two kinds of heat exchangers including a shell-and-tube type sodium-to-sodium heat exchanger (DHX) and a helical-tube type sodium-to-air heat exchanger (AHX) were tested for design codes V-V, e.g. SHXSA and AHXSA. In this paper, firstly, overall characteristics of the STELLA-1 facility are described briefly. Secondly, the performance tests of the DHX and AHX rely on a steady-state result of a heat transfer experiment. Thus experimental procedures to obtain the steady-state result are described and steady-state conditions for the heat exchanger performance test are clearly defined. Lastly, experimental results and calculation results obtained from the design codes are also compared as a preliminary work for the design code V-V. The PGSFR DHR heat exchangers performance was experimentally demonstrated using the STELLA-1 facility, and the experimental results and the prediction of the design code were compared as a preliminary work for the design code V-V. The experimental results of the DHX and AHX were in good agreement with the estimation of the SHXSA and AHXSA codes, respectively.

  13. Selection and evaluation of thermal criteria for a geologic waste isolation facility in salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    Previous design efforts for geologic waste isolation facilities in bedded salt developed several limiting temperature conditions, or thermal criteria, for use in parametric studies. These criteria, along with other design parameters, must assure that the temperature variations that occur do not adversely affect operating personnel and equipment during normal operations as well as assure containment and environmental integrity. The goals of the present study are to review past analyses of thermal criteria, determine the factors that should be considered in defining thermal criteria, suggest appropriate procedures for determining thermal criteria and suggest additional experimental and computational efforts required to adequately determine thermal criteria. The approach taken was to divide consideration of the system into four categories of thermal effects and four phases of facility operation. The categories were effects on the canister and its immediate environs, effects on the operating environment experienced by personnel and equipment, effects on storage room integrity, and effects on the biosphere. The phases of facility operation were loading, storage, retrieval, and disposal. Each of the categories was further subdivided into several aspects for detailed consideration of thermal effects through the four operating phases. This comprehensive approach was taken to ensure that all conceivable thermal effects were included, and to demonstrate a systematic approach for use in developing thermal criteria for other geologic media.

  14. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations for the 600 Area facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01

    This document determines the need for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans for Westinghouse Hanford Company's 600 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (WHC 1991). Five major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 600 Area were evaluated: the Purge Water Storage Facility, 212-N, -P, and -R Facilities, the 616 Facility, and the 213-J K Storage Vaults. Of the five major facilities evaluated in the 600 Area, none will require preparation of a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan.

  15. Evaluation of the 183-D Water Filtration Facility for Bat Roosts and Development of a Mitigation Strategy, 100-D Area, Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, C. T.; Gano, K. A.; Lucas, J. G.

    2011-03-07

    The 183-D Water Filtration Facility is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site, north of Richland, Washington. It was used to provide filtered water for cooling the 105-D Reactor and supplying fire-protection and drinking water for all facilities in the 100-D Area. The facility has been inactive since the 1980s and is now scheduled for demolition. Therefore, an evaluation was conducted to determine if any part of the facility was being used as roosting habitat by bats.

  16. Annual Report for 2008 - 2009 Detection Monitoring at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker J.R.

    2010-03-01

    This annual Environmental Monitoring Report (EMR) presents results of environmental monitoring performed during fiscal year (FY) 2009 (October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2009) at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The EMWMF is an operating state-of-the-art hazardous waste landfill located in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Appendix A, Fig. A.1). Opened in 2002 and operated by a DOE prime contractor, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC), the EMWMF was built specifically to accommodate disposal of acceptable solid wastes generated from Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) remedial actions for former waste sites and buildings that have been impacted by past DOE operations on the ORR and at DOE sites off the ORR within the state of Tennessee. Environmental monitoring at the EMWMF is performed to detect and monitor the impact of facility operations on groundwater, surface water, stormwater, and air quality and to determine compliance with applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) specified in governing CERCLA decision documents. Annually, the EMR presents an evaluation of the groundwater, surface water, stormwater, and air monitoring data with respect to the applicable EMWMF performance standards. The purpose of the evaluation is to: (1) identify monitoring results that indicate evidence of a contaminant release from the EMWMF to groundwater, surface water, stormwater, or air, and (2) recommend appropriate changes to the associated sampling and analysis requirements, including sampling locations, methods, and frequencies; field measurements; or laboratory analytes that may be warranted in response to the monitoring data. Sect. 2 of this annual EMR provides background information relevant to environmental monitoring at the landfill, including

  17. The Development and Trial Evaluation of Alternate Programs for Unit Training Managers and Trainers. Appendix D. Directed Practice Program for the TO and E Unit Training Manager Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-01

    APPENDIX P. DIRECTED PRACTICE PROGRAM FOR THE; TO&E UNIT TRAINING MANAGER COURSE! William H. Welching Mark F. Brennani Jacklyn E...Controlling Otllct) rjJ William H./Melching, Mark F./Brennan, [^ Jacklyn E./Hungerla.id, Morris/Showel,! : ei John E.; Taylor RE,\\D...obstacle Barbed wire obst £.ole w/noiser.akers attached Rifle and helmet for each student 1 instructor 1/2 hour Put a telephone TA 312/PT into

  18. Research on common methods for evaluating the operation effect of integrated wastewater treatment facilities of iron and steel enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingsheng, Xu

    2017-04-01

    Considering the large quantities of wastewater generated from iron and steel enterprises in China, this paper is aimed to research the common methods applied for evaluating the integrated wastewater treatment effect of iron and steel enterprises. Based on survey results on environmental protection performance, technological economy, resource & energy consumption, services and management, an indicator system for evaluating the operation effect of integrated wastewater treatment facilities is set up. By discussing the standards and industrial policies in and out of China, 27 key secondary indicators are further defined on the basis of investigation on main equipment and key processes for wastewater treatment, so as to determine the method for setting key quantitative and qualitative indicators for evaluation indicator system. It is also expected to satisfy the basic requirements of reasonable resource allocation, environmental protection and sustainable economic development, further improve the integrated wastewater treatment effect of iron and steel enterprises, and reduce the emission of hazardous substances and environmental impact.

  19. Evaluation of an international, perpetual, and retrievable facility for storage of vitrified radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libby, L.M.; Whipple, C.G.; Wurtele, M.G.

    1982-10-01

    It is technically feasible to site a retrievable but permanent surface storage facility for vitrified radioactive wastes in the northwestern Egyptian desert. Present-day commercial vitrification plants are in England and France and produce glass cylinders in the shape of an annulus, about 9 ft high, clad in a stainless steel can, containing about 25% of fission product and actinide oxides, weighing about 10 tonnes, having a volume of about 70 ft/sup 3/, releasing about 1.8 X 10/sup 5/ Btu heat/h. The high-level waste (HLW) glass cylinders, in lead shipping casks, are to be shipped to European ports by truck, sent to Mersa Matruh on the Egyptian coast, about ten at a time in small barges, then offloaded and sent by train a short distance inland to the site. The storage facility envisaged at the site is a concrete-walled round house with a radial crane, equipped with recanning facilities in case of breakage of stainless steel canisters, with a shop for repair of the train as needed, and with a turntable for the engine. Cooling is provided by natural air draft resulting from the canister surface temperature of about 100/sup 0/C. If needed, backup cooling is provided by equipment for forced-air drafts and by tanks of water. The canister arrangement is that produced by coaxial vertical stacking; horizontal coaxial arrangements are yet to be analyzed. The site chosen is exposed hard rock close to the Mediterranean in the northwest corner of the Egyptian desert. Groundwater is found at about 100 m. The rainfall is about 4 in./yr so that flash floods sometimes occur and surface drains are needed. Meteorology, seismicity, agriculture, and wildlife are all favorable factors, and plane studies show no thermal or radioactive threat.

  20. Evaluation of the location and recency of faulting near prospective surface facilities in Midway Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Angell, M.M.; Thomas, A.P.; Whitney, J.W.; Gibson, J.D.

    2002-01-17

    Evaluation of surface faulting that may pose a hazard to prospective surface facilities is an important element of the tectonic studies for the potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository in southwestern Nevada. For this purpose, a program of detailed geologic mapping and trenching was done to obtain surface and near-surface geologic data that are essential for determining the location and recency of faults at a prospective surface-facilities site located east of Exile Hill in Midway Valley, near the eastern base of Yucca Mountain. The dominant tectonic features in the Midway Valley area are the north- to northeast-trending, west-dipping normal faults that bound the Midway Valley structural block-the Bow Ridge fault on the west side of Exile Hill and the Paint-brush Canyon fault on the east side of the valley. Trenching of Quaternary sediments has exposed evidence of displacements, which demonstrate that these block-bounding faults repeatedly ruptured the surface during the middle to late Quaternary. Geologic mapping, subsurface borehole and geophysical data, and the results of trenching activities indicate the presence of north- to northeast-trending faults and northwest-trending faults in Tertiary volcanic rocks beneath alluvial and colluvial sediments near the prospective surface-facilities site. North to northeast-trending faults include the Exile Hill fault along the eastern base of Exile Hill and faults to the east beneath the surficial deposits of Midway Valley. These faults have no geomorphic expression, but two north- to northeast-trending zones of fractures exposed in excavated profiles of middle to late Pleistocene deposits at the prospective surface-facilities site appear to be associated with these faults. Northwest-trending faults include the West Portal and East Portal faults, but no disruption of Quaternary deposits by these faults is evident. The western zone of fractures is associated with the Exile Hill fault. The eastern

  1. A retrospective evaluation of the quality of malaria case management at twelve health facilities in four districts in Zambia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pascalina Chanda-Kapata; Emmanuel Chanda; Freddie Masaninga; Annette Habluetzel; Felix Masiye; Ibrahima Soce Fall

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish the appropriateness of malaria case management at health facility level in four districts in Zambia. Methods: This study was a retrospective evaluation of the quality of malaria case management at health facilities in four districts conveniently sampled to represent both urban and rural settings in different epidemiological zones and health facility coverage. The review period was from January to December 2008. The sample included twelve lower level health facilities from four districts. The Pearson Chi-square test was used to identify characteristics which affected the quality of case management.Results:Out of 4891 suspected malaria cases recorded at the 12 health facilities, more than 80% of the patients had a temperature taken to establish their fever status. About 67% (CI95 66.1-68.7) were tested for parasitemia by either rapid diagnostic test or microscopy, whereas the remaining 22.5% (CI95 21.3.1-23.7) were not subjected to any malaria test. Of the 2247 malaria cases reported (complicated and uncomplicated), 71% were parasitologically confirmed while 29% were clinically diagnosed (unconfirmed). About 56% (CI95 53.9-58.1) of the malaria cases reported were treated with artemether-lumefantrine (AL), 35% (CI95 33.1-37.0) with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, 8% (CI95 6.9-9.2) with quinine and 1% did not receive any anti-malarial. Approximately 30% of patients WHO were found negative for malaria parasites were still prescribed an anti-malarial, contrary to the guidelines. There were marked inter-district variations in the proportion of patients in WHOm a diagnostic tool was used, and in the choice of anti-malarials for the treatment of malaria confirmed cases. Association between health worker characteristics and quality of case malaria management showed that nurses performed better than environmental health technicians and clinical officers on the decision whether to use the rapid diagnostic test or not. Gender, in service training on malaria

  2. Evaluation of the Location and Recency of Faulting Near Prospective Surface Facilities in Midway Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, F.H.; Wesling, J.R.; Angell, M.M.; Thomas, A.P.; Whitney, J.W.; Gibson, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of surface faulting that may pose a hazard to prospective surface facilities is an important element of the tectonic studies for the potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository in southwestern Nevada. For this purpose, a program of detailed geologic mapping and trenching was done to obtain surface and near-surface geologic data that are essential for determining the location and recency of faults at a prospective surface-facilities site located east of Exile Hill in Midway Valley, near the eastern base of Yucca Mountain. The dominant tectonic features in the Midway Valley area are the north- to northeast-trending, west-dipping normal faults that bound the Midway Valley structural block-the Bow Ridge fault on the west side of Exile Hill and the Paint-brush Canyon fault on the east side of the valley. Trenching of Quaternary sediments has exposed evidence of displacements, which demonstrate that these block-bounding faults repeatedly ruptured the surface during the middle to late Quaternary. Geologic mapping, subsurface borehole and geophysical data, and the results of trenching activities indicate the presence of north- to northeast-trending faults and northwest-trending faults in Tertiary volcanic rocks beneath alluvial and colluvial sediments near the prospective surface-facilities site. North to northeast-trending faults include the Exile Hill fault along the eastern base of Exile Hill and faults to the east beneath the surficial deposits of Midway Valley. These faults have no geomorphic expression, but two north- to northeast-trending zones of fractures exposed in excavated profiles of middle to late Pleistocene deposits at the prospective surface-facilities site appear to be associated with these faults. Northwest-trending faults include the West Portal and East Portal faults, but no disruption of Quaternary deposits by these faults is evident. The western zone of fractures is associated with the Exile Hill fault. The eastern

  3. Evaluation of the Deployable Seismic Verification System at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, D.B.

    1993-08-01

    The intent of this report is to examine the performance of the Deployable Seismic Verification System (DSVS) developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) through its national laboratories to support monitoring of underground nuclear test treaties. A DSVS was installed at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility (PSRF) near Boulder, Wyoming during 1991 and 1992. This includes a description of the system and the deployment site. System performance was studied by looking at four areas: system noise, seismic response, state of health (SOH) and operational capabilities.

  4. Evaluating Fidelity to a Modified NIATx Process Improvement Strategy for Improving HIV Services in Correctional Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, Jennifer; Willett, Jennifer; Yang, Yang; Swan, Holly; Dembo, Richard; Burdon, William M; Patterson, Yvonne; Pearson, Frank S; Belenko, Steven; Frisman, Linda K

    2017-04-24

    In a study aimed at improving the quality of HIV services for inmates, an organizational process improvement strategy using change teams was tested in 14 correctional facilities in 8 US states and Puerto Rico. Data to examine fidelity to the process improvement strategy consisted of quantitative ratings of the structural and process components of the strategy and qualitative notes that explicate challenges in maintaining fidelity to the strategy. Fidelity challenges included (1) lack of communication and leadership within change teams, (2) instability in team membership, and (3) issues with data utilization in decision-making to implement improvements to services delivery.

  5. Southeast Alaska Acoustic Measurement Facility (SEAFAC) environmental data base review, evaluation, and upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, J.A.; Skalski, J.R.; Faulkner, L.L.; Rodman, C.W.; Carlile, D.W.; Ecker, R.M.; Nicholls, A.K.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Scott, M.J.

    1986-04-01

    This report summarizes the principal issues of public concern, the adequacy of the environmental data base to answer the issues of concern, and the additional data collection required to support a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review of the proposed Southeast Alaska Acoustic Measurement Facility (SEAFAC). The report is based on a review of the readily available environmental literature and a site visit. Representatives of local, state, and federal agencies were also interviewed for their personal insights and concerns not discovered during the literature review.

  6. Evaluation of seals and lubricants used on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursch, H. W.; Keough, B. K.; Pippin, H. G.

    1994-01-01

    This report described results from testing and analysis of seals and lubricants subsequent to the 69-month low-earth-orbit (LEO) exposure on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Results show that if the materials were shielded from exposure to LDEF's external environment, the 69-month exposure to LEO resulted in minimal changes to material properties. However, if the materials were exposed to LDEF's exterior environments (atomic oxygen, solar radiation, meteoroids, and/or space debris), a variety of events occurred, ranging from no material change, to changes in properties, to significant erosion of the material.

  7. Evaluation of initial collector field performance at the Langley Solar Building Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, R. J.; Knoll, R. H.; Jensen, R. N.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal performance of the solar collector field for the NASA Langley Solar Building Test Facility is given for October 1976 through January 1977. An 1180 square meter solar collector field with seven collector designs helped to provide hot water for the building heating system and absorption air conditioner. The collectors were arranged in 12 rows with nominally 51 collectors per row. Heat transfer rates for each row are calculated and recorded along with sensor, insolation, and weather data every 5 minutes using a mini-computer. The agreement between the experimental and predicted collector efficiencies was generally within five percentage points.

  8. Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

    2010-09-01

    The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50–100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

  9. Status of stack gas control technology. Final report. Part I. [Comparative evaluation of 19 facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, H.S.; Ball, D.A.; Engdahl, R.B.; Bloom, S.G.; Anastas, M.Y.; Genco, J.M.; Slack, A.V.; Oxley, J.H.

    1975-08-01

    During 1974, Battelle's Columbus Laboratories (BCL) established a Stack Gas Pollution Control Coordination Center under the sponsorship of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the American Petroleum Institute (API), and a number of individual companies. One of the specific tasks funded by EPRI was a survey of full-scale operating SO/sub 2/ scrubbing installations in the United States. BCL's experienced chemical and mechanical engineers visited as many of these installations as possible within the constraints of budgetary limitations and of gaining the required permission to inspect the facilities. In fact, all but one or two of the currently operating full-scale SO/sub 2/ scrubbing facilities were visited during 1974, as well as several pilot plants. BCL engineers also visited several power plants which are practicing new methods of particulate control including wet scrubbers, baghouses, and hot electrostatic precipitators. A comprehensive trip report in a standardized format was prepared for each visit. This volume is a compendium of the trip reports.

  10. Targeted proteomics coming of age - SRM, PRM and DIA performance evaluated from a core facility perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockmann, Tobias; Trachsel, Christian; Panse, Christian; Wahlander, Asa; Selevsek, Nathalie; Grossmann, Jonas; Wolski, Witold E; Schlapbach, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative mass spectrometry is a rapidly evolving methodology applied in a large number of omics-type research projects. During the past years, new designs of mass spectrometers have been developed and launched as commercial systems while in parallel new data acquisition schemes and data analysis paradigms have been introduced. Core facilities provide access to such technologies, but also actively support the researchers in finding and applying the best-suited analytical approach. In order to implement a solid fundament for this decision making process, core facilities need to constantly compare and benchmark the various approaches. In this article we compare the quantitative accuracy and precision of current state of the art targeted proteomics approaches single reaction monitoring (SRM), parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) and data independent acquisition (DIA) across multiple liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) platforms, using a readily available commercial standard sample. All workflows are able to reproducibly generate accurate quantitative data. However, SRM and PRM workflows show higher accuracy and precision compared to DIA approaches, especially when analyzing low concentrated analytes.

  11. Shielding evaluation and acceptance testing of a prefabricated, modular, temporary radiation therapy treatment facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzell, Gary A

    2004-01-01

    We have recently commissioned a temporary radiation therapy facility that is novel in two aspects: it was constructed using modular components, and the LINAC was installed in one of the modular sections before it was lifted into position. Additional steel and granular fill was added to the modular sections on-site during construction. The building will be disassembled and removed when no longer needed. This paper describes the radiation shielding specifications and survey of the facility, as well as the ramifications for acceptance testing occasioned by the novel installation procedure. The LINAC is a Varian 21EX operating at 6 MV and 18 MV. The radiation levels outside the vault satisfied the design criteria, and no anomalous leakage was detected along the joints of the modular structure. At 18 MV and 600 monitor units (MU) per minute, the radiation level outside the primary barrier walls was 8.5 micro Sv/h of photons; there were no detectable neutrons. Outside the direct-shielded door, the levels were 0.4 micro Sv/h of photons and 3.0 micro Sv/h of neutrons. The isocentricity of the accelerator met the acceptance criteria and was not affected by its preinstallation into an integrated baseframe and subsequent transport to the building site.

  12. Microwave irradiation and instrumental behavior in rats: unitized irradiation and behavioral evaluation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebovitz, R.M.; Seaman, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    A facility for the exposure of small animals to pulse-modulated microwave radiation (PM MWR) concurrent with their performance of operant behavioral tasks is described. The computer-managed facility comprises an array of 32 individual waveguide exposure cells, each enclosing instrumental conditioning apparatus within a plastic subhousing. The distribution of the microwave electric field intensity within the waveguide was measured by a nonperturbing probe and the modifications induced by the behavioral apparatus and animal within the waveguide determined. Input and interior voltage standing-wave ratios are presented to characterize the design of the chambers and to demonstrate the suitability of the chambers for whole-body irradiation of rat. The specific absorption rate (SAR) is presented utilizing data derived from incremental thermometric examination of saline loads and of selected sites in rat carcasses. This is compared with the whole-body SAR derived from the input/output energy balance equation for the waveguide. The results of continuous monitoring of the SAR by the latter method, while unrestrained rats were engaged in operant and exploratory behavior within the waveguide, are utilized to derive a relationship between chamber input power and the dose rate for adult rats behaviorally active within the waveguide. From these data, we conclude that the experimental array provides a practical method for exposing a large number of animals to PM MWR for long periods of time and coincident with the establishment and/or performance of complex operant behavior.

  13. Fuel Cell Transit Bus Evaluations: Joint Evaluation Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy and the Federal Transit Administration (Report and Appendix)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2010-11-01

    This document describes the fuel cell transit bus evaluations performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration (FTA). This document provides a description of the demonstration sites, funding sources, and data collection activities for fuel cell transit bus evaluations currently planned from FY10 through FY12.

  14. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  15. Armament Technology Facility (ATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Armament Technology Facility is a 52,000 square foot, secure and environmentally-safe, integrated small arms and cannon caliber design and evaluation facility....

  16. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to: Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  17. Testing and evaluation of an alcohol production facility utilizing potatoes as a feedstock. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuby, W.; Nackord, S.; Wyss, W.

    1984-05-01

    This study presents the sampling and analysis results for the characterization of liquid effluents and solid residuals from a culled potato feedstock process for the production of ethanol for use as fuel. The facility tested produces approximately 1 million gallons per year of ethanol and is located in eastern Idaho. Liquid and solid samples were taken throughout the process from the following locations: sluice/flume water, chopper product, makeup water, cooker product, fermenter product, beer tank, stillage, interim and final product, washwater, fuel oil, bath and 'Sparkle' bath. Analytical results for the ethanol plant effluents include: ethanol and sugar content, conventional parameters, metals, cyanide, phenols, nutrients, oil and grease, priority pollutant organics, and selected pesticides. The most significant characteristics of concern were the BOD and COD levels.

  18. Evaluation of the effective dose during BNCT at TRR thermal column epithermal facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarahi, Hossein; Kasesaz, Yaser; Saleh-Koutahi, Seyed Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    An epithermal neutron beam has been designed for Boron neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) at the thermal column of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) recently. In this paper the whole body effective dose, as well as the equivalent doses of several organs have been calculated in this facility using MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. The effective dose has been calculated by using the absorbed doses determined for each individual organ, taking into account the radiation and tissue weighting factors. The ICRP 110 whole body male phantom has been used as a patient model. It was found that the effective dose during BNCT of a brain tumor is equal to 0.90Sv. This effective dose may induce a 4% secondary cancer risk.

  19. Safeguards performance model for evaluation of potential safeguards strategies applied to pyroprocessing facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, T.R., E-mail: riletony@isu.edu; Pope, C.L.; Benedict, R.W.

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • A model was created for simulating safeguards strategies for a pyroprocessing facility. • The model is flexible and simulates process monitoring during steady state operations. • A sensitivity study revealed input spent fuel and storage mass measures most limiting. - Abstract: Electrochemical reprocessing has been proposed as a spent fuel disposition technique. If implemented on a commercial scale, traditional safeguards approaches used to satisfy IAEA requirements may be insufficient. To aid in testing safeguard strategies, a new tool was developed: the Pyroprocessing Safeguards Performance Model, a MATLAB/Simulink simulation of plant operations capable of calculating inventory differences for a specified balance period as well as sensitivity studies of detection measurements. This paper discusses the development of the model and a measurement uncertainty study performed using the model.

  20. Evaluation for status and utilization of neutron activation analysis facility of HANARO research reactor (1996-2003)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong Sam; Moon, Jong Hwa; Chung, Young Ju; Kim, Sun Ha; Baek, Sung Ryel; Cho, Hyun Je; Park, Kwang Won; Kang, Sang Hun; Lim, Jong Myoung; Kim, Young Jin

    2004-05-01

    This report is written for the evaluation of the utilization and the status of Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) facility of HANARO research reactor (1996-2003) which is accomplished by NAA user supporting system ; (i) the results by the number of sample is classified the research and development and analytical service, each item which is divided into the type of supporting (component analysis, nuclide analysis, neutron irradiation) and the field of utilization (environment, human health, industrial materials, standard materials, social and culture and others) are summarized with relevant contents in detail, (ii) The trends of the utilization is evaluated with a technology, a field, an organization of utilization, (iii) the results of training and education for students and users, the survey of user's demand, the investigation of self-satisfaction for NAA user supporting system.

  1. Evaluation of the impact and the releases of operating nuclear facilities; Evaluation de l'impact et des rejets des installations nucleaires en fonctionnement normal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The monitoring of nuclear installations releases, the associated impacts evaluation and the radiation monitoring of the environment are of an increase interest since the last ten years. Theses two days, organized by the environment section of the SFRP (French Society of Radiation Protection), aim to discuss the following topics: the development of the methods to improve radioactive elements and toxic substances releases in the environment; the structure of the environment control and the objectives of this control; the association of the local actors to the releases monitoring and to the environment control; the perspectives of evolution in matter of nuclear facilities releases management. (A.L.B.)

  2. Global Spent Fuel Logistics Systems Study (GSFLS). Volume 2A. GSFLS visit findings (appendix). Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-31

    This appendix is a part of the interim report documentation for the Global Spent Fuel Logistics System (GSFLS) study. This appendix provides the legal/regulatory reference material, supportive of Volume 2 - GSFLS Visit Finding and Evaluations; and certain background material on British Nuclear Fuel Limited (BNFL).

  3. Calculation code evaluating the confinement of a nuclear facility in case of fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laborde, J.C.; Prevost, C.; Vendel, J. [and others

    1995-02-01

    Accident events involving fire are quite frequent and could have a severe effect on the safety of nuclear facilities. As confinement must be maintained, the ventilation and filtration systems have to be designed to limit radioactive release to the environment. To determine and analyse the consequences of a fire on the contamination confinement, IPSN, COGEMA and SGN are participating in development of a calculation code based on introduction, in the SIMEVENT ventilation code, of various models associated to fire risk and mass transfer in the ventilation networks. This calculation code results from the coupling of the SIMEVENT code with several models describing the temperature in a room resulting of a fire, the temperatures along the ventilation ducts, the contamination transfers through out the ventilation equipments (ducts, dampers, valves, air cleaning systems) and the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters clogging. The paper proposed presents the current level of progress in development of this calculation code. It describes, in particular, the empirical model used for the clogging of HEPA filters by the aerosols derived from the combustion of standard materials used in the nuclear industry. It describes, also, the specific models used to take into account the mass transfers and resulting from the basic mechanisms of aerosols physics. In addition, an assessment of this code is given using the example of a simple laboratory installation.

  4. Evaluation of Optimal Distribution of Wind Power Facilities in Iowa for 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Factor, T. (Iowa Wind Energy Institute); Milligan, M. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    1999-08-05

    By the end of June 1999, about 250 megawatts of wind generation will have been dedicated in the state of Iowa. This represents the beginning of what is likely to be significant wind capacity development during the next 20 years in the state, as a result of possible public and governmental mandates and consumers' desire for sustainable sources of energy. As the utility industry in the United States moves towards a new structure, renewable energy sources continue to be an important part of new resource development. In this paper, we consider the predicted trends in load growth in Iowa. After accounting for the retirement of nuclear and older fossil fuel facilities over the next 15 years, we estimate Iowa's potential renewable generating capacity through the year 2015 and anticipate the contribution of wind energy to Iowa's portfolio. The Iowa Wind Energy Institute (IWEI) has been monitoring the wind resource in Iowa since June 1994 to obtain wind speed averages at 10, 33 and 50 meters above ground at fourteen geographically dispersed potential wind farm sites. Winds in the Midwest are primarily generated by fronts moving through the region. The Northwest Buffalo Ridge area of Iowa typically has wind speed averages of 7-8 m/s. Central Iowa may have typical winds slightly below this mean value. However, as a front passes through the state, there will be times when a wind farm in Central Iowa will produce more energy than one on Buffalo Ridge.

  5. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery Furnaces XII Appendix XII to Part 266... FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. XII Appendix XII to Part 266—Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may...

  6. 10 CFR Appendix G to Part 20 - Requirements for Transfers of Low-Level Radioactive Waste Intended for Disposal at Licensed Land...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Intended for Disposal at Licensed Land Disposal Facilities and Manifests G Appendix G to Part 20 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Pt. 20, App. G Appendix G to Part... 1985 (e.g., waste generated as a result of decontamination or recycle activities). High...

  7. Evaluation of a Radiation Worker Safety Training Program at a nuclear facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, J.E.

    1993-05-01

    A radiation safety course was evaluated using the Kirkpatrick criteria of training evaluation as a guide. Thirty-nine employees were given the two-day training course and were compared with 15 employees in a control group who did not receive the training. Cognitive results show an immediate gain in knowledge, and substantial retention at 6 months. Implications of the results are discussed in terms of applications to current radiation safety training was well as follow-on training research and development requirements.

  8. Early Impacts of a Human-in-the-Loop Evaluation in a Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Vicky; Vos, Gordon; Whitmore, Mihriban

    2008-01-01

    The development of a new space vehicle, the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), provides Human Factors engineers an excellent opportunity to have an impact early in the design process. This case study highlights a Human-in-the-Loop (HITL) evaluation conducted in a Space Vehicle Mock-Up Facility and will describe the human-centered approach and how the findings are impacting design and operational concepts early in space vehicle design. The focus of this HITL evaluation centered on the activities that astronaut crewmembers would be expected to perform within the functional internal volume of the Crew Module (CM) of the space vehicle. The primary objective was to determine if there are aspects of a baseline vehicle configuration that would limit or prevent the performance of dynamically volume-driving activities (e.g. six crewmembers donning their suits in an evacuation scenario). A second objective was to step through concepts of operations for known systems and evaluate them in integrated scenarios. The functional volume for crewmember activities is closely tied to every aspect of system design (e.g. avionics, safety, stowage, seats, suits, and structural support placement). As this evaluation took place before the Preliminary Design Review of the space vehicle with some designs very early in the development, it was not meant to determine definitely that the crewmembers could complete every activity, but rather to provide inputs that could improve developing designs and concepts of operations definition refinement.

  9. [Combined hepatitis A/B vaccination: evaluation of a vaccination schedule in facilities for handicapped people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, B; Müller, T; Ross, R S; Kundt, R; Roggendorf, M; Roggendorf, H

    2014-02-01

    People with mental and physical disabilities have a higher risk of infection with hepatitis viruses. Studies conducted so far show contradictory results on the success of vaccination in this population. These people live and work under special conditions and sometimes have immune defects. We investigated the antibody response after combined vaccination against hepatitis A and B in facilities for handicapped people in the city of Essen/Germany. Antibodies were determined in people with disabilities (n=949) and also in social workers taking care of handicapped people (n=115). Protective antibodies against hepatitis A were detected in 98.9% in people with disabilities and social workers. The seroconversion rate against hepatitis B in handicapped people was 90.2% and was comparable to the seroconversion rate in social workers (91.3%). Re-vaccinations were offered to all people with anti-HBs titres below 100 IU/L (28% of handicapped and 23.5% of social workers). In the group of low responders in handicapped people about 50% developed anti-HBs concentration above 100 IU/L. Non-responders showed 30-40% seroconversion rate after re-vaccination. Based on this study we would recommend serological tests about 4-8 weeks after vaccination to confirm seroconversion. By this procedure people who need a booster vaccination will be recognized and non-responders should be offered another HBV vaccination. In about 20% of the non-responders included in this study HBs antigen was detected. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Evaluation of CFETR as a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility using multiple system codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, V. S.; Costley, A. E.; Wan, B. N.; Garofalo, A. M.; Leuer, J. A.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents the results of a multi-system codes benchmarking study of the recently published China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) pre-conceptual design (Wan et al 2014 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 42 495). Two system codes, General Atomics System Code (GASC) and Tokamak Energy System Code (TESC), using different methodologies to arrive at CFETR performance parameters under the same CFETR constraints show that the correlation between the physics performance and the fusion performance is consistent, and the computed parameters are in good agreement. Optimization of the first wall surface for tritium breeding and the minimization of the machine size are highly compatible. Variations of the plasma currents and profiles lead to changes in the required normalized physics performance, however, they do not significantly affect the optimized size of the machine. GASC and TESC have also been used to explore a lower aspect ratio, larger volume plasma taking advantage of the engineering flexibility in the CFETR design. Assuming the ITER steady-state scenario physics, the larger plasma together with a moderately higher BT and Ip can result in a high gain Qfus ˜ 12, Pfus ˜ 1 GW machine approaching DEMO-like performance. It is concluded that the CFETR baseline mode can meet the minimum goal of the Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) mission and advanced physics will enable it to address comprehensively the outstanding critical technology gaps on the path to a demonstration reactor (DEMO). Before proceeding with CFETR construction steady-state operation has to be demonstrated, further development is needed to solve the divertor heat load issue, and blankets have to be designed with tritium breeding ratio (TBR) >1 as a target.

  11. Evaluating the effectiveness of wildlife detection and observation technologies at a solar power tower facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Robert H.; Valdez, Ernest W.; Preston, Todd M.; Wellik, Mike J.; Cryan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Solar power towers produce electrical energy from sunlight at an industrial scale. Little is known about the effects of this technology on flying animals and few methods exist for automatically detecting or observing wildlife at solar towers and other tall anthropogenic structures. Smoking objects are sometimes observed co-occurring with reflected, concentrated light (“solar flux”) in the airspace around solar towers, but the identity and origins of such objects can be difficult to determine. In this observational pilot study at the world’s largest solar tower facility, we assessed the efficacy of using radar, surveillance video, and insect trapping to detect and observe animals flying near the towers. During site visits in May and September 2014, we monitored the airspace surrounding towers and observed insects, birds, and bats under a variety of environmental and operational conditions. We detected and broadly differentiated animals or objects moving through the airspace generally using radar and near solar towers using several video imaging methods. Video revealed what appeared to be mostly small insects burning in the solar flux. Also, we occasionally detected birds flying in the solar flux but could not accurately identify birds to species or the types of insects and small objects composing the vast majority of smoking targets. Insect trapping on the ground was somewhat effective at sampling smaller insects around the tower, and presence and abundance of insects in the traps generally trended with radar and video observations. Traps did not tend to sample the larger insects we sometimes observed flying in the solar flux or found dead on the ground beneath the towers. Some of the methods we tested (e.g., video surveillance) could be further assessed and potentially used to automatically detect and observe flying animals in the vicinity of solar towers to advance understanding about their effects on wildlife.

  12. Evaluation of Antidiabetic Prescriptions from Medical Reimbursement Applications at Banaras Hindu University Health Care Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dev Priya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is on rapid increase in third world countries undergoing rapid transition in terms of development particularly in India, which is often being referred as Diabetic capital. It is a disease more prevalent at latter part of life of human beings when finances dwindle and social care gets neglected. The medication continues till the whole life on a regular basis. In present study, the objective has been to provide pharmacoeconomic medication to the diabetic pensioners in the backdrop as mentioned in above background.Methods: The data was collected at the medical reimbursement section of pensioners of the University. The data was examined to answer issues of therapeutic decisions in the light of the pharmacoeconomic considerations. In this paper essentially data on choice of prescriptions with the angle of pharmacoeconomic prudence were included. The dichotomy of specialist versus non specialist prescribers at the tertiary center (i.e. medical college hospital was compared. Effort was made to define merit of the prescription based on comprehensive considerations of patient profile, disease profile and therapeutic choice.Results: Total 72 prescriptions were analyzed for the study in which 475 drugs were prescribed to the patients.  Total antidiabetic drugs prescribed to the patients were 169. Out of 72 cases 39 were males and 33 were females with mean age 66.04 ± 5.80 (Mean ± SEM. The average number of drugs per prescription was 6.59 which was very high as per guidelines. Most commonly prescribed antidiabetic drug was Metformin (63.89% followed by Glimepiride (31.95%.Conclusion: This study reflects that there is need to make available the standard therapeutic optionat University Health Care Facility based upon pharmacoeconomic considerations.

  13. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Wildlife Detection and Observation Technologies at a Solar Power Tower Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Robert H; Valdez, Ernest W; Preston, Todd M; Wellik, Michael J; Cryan, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Solar power towers produce electrical energy from sunlight at an industrial scale. Little is known about the effects of this technology on flying animals and few methods exist for automatically detecting or observing wildlife at solar towers and other tall anthropogenic structures. Smoking objects are sometimes observed co-occurring with reflected, concentrated light ("solar flux") in the airspace around solar towers, but the identity and origins of such objects can be difficult to determine. In this observational pilot study at the world's largest solar tower facility, we assessed the efficacy of using radar, surveillance video, and insect trapping to detect and observe animals flying near the towers. During site visits in May and September 2014, we monitored the airspace surrounding towers and observed insects, birds, and bats under a variety of environmental and operational conditions. We detected and broadly differentiated animals or objects moving through the airspace generally using radar and near solar towers using several video imaging methods. Video revealed what appeared to be mostly small insects burning in the solar flux. Also, we occasionally detected birds flying in the solar flux but could not accurately identify birds to species or the types of insects and small objects composing the vast majority of smoking targets. Insect trapping on the ground was somewhat effective at sampling smaller insects around the tower, and presence and abundance of insects in the traps generally trended with radar and video observations. Traps did not tend to sample the larger insects we sometimes observed flying in the solar flux or found dead on the ground beneath the towers. Some of the methods we tested (e.g., video surveillance) could be further assessed and potentially used to automatically detect and observe flying animals in the vicinity of solar towers to advance understanding about their effects on wildlife.

  14. 40 CFR 93.161 - Conformity evaluation for Federal installations with facility-wide emission budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conformity evaluation for Federal... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DETERMINING CONFORMITY OF FEDERAL ACTIONS TO STATE OR FEDERAL IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Determining Conformity of General Federal Actions to State or...

  15. Performance evaluation of orthotopic bladder reconstruction with ileocecum-appendix evaluated by imaging urodynamics%老年男性原位膀胱重建术患者尿动力学功能评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王绍勇; 宋鸿彬; 周春文; 林海群

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the urinary reservoir constructed with ileocecum-appendix in the elderly with bladder cancer. Methods From March 2002 to June 2008, 12 cases were treated using ileocecum-appendix as the reservoir after radical cystectomy. They all received the imaging urodynamics examination and were followed up for 1 year. Results The 11 of 12 patients had urinary continence completely. Only 1 case had incontinence and 3 cases had incontinentia urinae at night. Times of uresis were 8-10/day and 3-5/night within 3 months after surgery, and 4-6/day and 0-2/night 6 months after surgery. The urinary output was 150-350 ml/time. Urodynamics showed that mean urinary flow rate was 10.5 ml/s, mean initial bladder pressure was 27 cm H2O, the maximum filling pressure was 35 cm H2O. The average reservoir capacity was 152 ml and 420 ml, respectively. The out let pressure of posterior urethra was 52 cm H2O. The volume of residual urine was 0-65 ml. No evidence of ureteral reflux occurred, no hyperchloremic acidosis was observed. Conclusions Orthotopic bladder reconstruction is considered as an ideal form of urinary diversion characterized by low pressure, larger capacity and continence.%目的 探讨应用尿动力学方法评估回盲结肠膀胱原位重建术在老年膀胱癌患者中的应用价值.方法 应用回盲肠及部分升结肠作储尿囊,以阑尾根部与后尿道吻合原位排尿的方法治疗膀胱肿瘤患者12例,应用尿动力学方法对其近期疗效进行随访.结果 12例中11例患者能达到完全控尿,1例有尿失禁,3例有夜间尿失禁.多数患者能达到控尿目的.术后3个月内白天排尿次数8~10次,夜间3~5次;6个月后白天平均4~6次,夜间0~2次.每次量约150~350 ml.术后6个月~1年分别随访12例患者.尿动力学结果显示:平均尿流率10.5 ml/s,平均膀胱初始感觉压力27 cm H2O(1 cm H2O=0.098 kPa),最大充盈压35 cm H2O,其储尿囊容量分别为152 ml、420 ml

  16. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1, Appendix B: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to assist its management in making two decisions. The first decision, which is programmatic, is to determine the management program for DOE spent nuclear fuel. The second decision is on the future direction of environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1 of the EIS, which supports the programmatic decision, considers the effects of spent nuclear fuel management on the quality of the human and natural environment for planning years 1995 through 2035. DOE has derived the information and analysis results in Volume 1 from several site-specific appendixes. Volume 2 of the EIS, which supports the INEL-specific decision, describes environmental impacts for various environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management alternatives for planning years 1995 through 2005. This Appendix B to Volume 1 considers the impacts on the INEL environment of the implementation of various DOE-wide spent nuclear fuel management alternatives. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is a joint Navy/DOE program, is responsible for spent naval nuclear fuel examination at the INEL. For this appendix, naval fuel that has been examined at the Naval Reactors Facility and turned over to DOE for storage is termed naval-type fuel. This appendix evaluates the management of DOE spent nuclear fuel including naval-type fuel.

  17. After Action Report:Idaho National Laboratory (INL) 2014 Multiple Facility Beyond Design Basis (BDBE) Evaluated Drill October 21, 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, V. Scott [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    On October 21, 2014, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in coordination with local jurisdictions, and Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office (DOE ID) conducted an evaluated drill to demonstrate the ability to implement the requirements of DOE O 151.1C, “Comprehensive Emergency Management System” when responding to a beyond design basis event (BDBE) scenario as outlined in the Office of Health, Safety, and Security Operating Experience Level 1 letter (OE-1: 2013-01). The INL contractor, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA), in coordination with CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI), and Idaho Treatment Group LLC (ITG), successfully demonstrated appropriate response measures to mitigate a BDBE event that would impact multiple facilities across the INL while protecting the health and safety of personnel, the environment, and property. Offsite response organizations participated to demonstrate appropriate response measures.

  18. Economic and Environmental Evaluation of Flexible Integrated Gasification Polygeneration Facilities Equipped with Carbon Capture and Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, M.; Yelverton, W. H.; Dodder, R. S.; Loughlin, D. H.

    2014-12-01

    Among the diverse menu of technologies for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, one option involves pairing carbon capture and storage (CCS) with the generation of synthetic fuels and electricity from co-processed coal and biomass. In this scheme, the feedstocks are first converted to syngas, from which a Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process reactor and combined cycle turbine produce liquid fuels and electricity, respectively. With low concentrations of sulfur and other contaminants, the synthetic fuels are expected to be cleaner than conventional crude oil products. And with CO2 as an inherent byproduct of the FT process, most of the GHG emissions can be eliminated by simply compressing the CO2 output stream for pipeline transport. In fact, the incorporation of CCS at such facilities can result in very low—or perhaps even negative—net GHG emissions, depending on the fraction of biomass as input and its CO2 signature. To examine the potential market penetration and environmental impact of coal and biomass to liquids and electricity (CBtLE), which encompasses various possible combinations of input and output parameters within the overall energy landscape, a system-wide analysis is performed using the MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) model. With resource supplies, energy conversion technologies, end-use demands, costs, and pollutant emissions as user-defined inputs, MARKAL calculates—using linear programming techniques—the least-cost set of technologies that satisfy the specified demands subject to environmental and policy constraints. In this framework, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed both national and regional databases to characterize assorted technologies in the industrial, commercial, residential, transportation, and generation sectors of the U.S. energy system. Here, the EPA MARKAL database is updated to include the costs and emission characteristics of CBtLE using figures from the literature. Nested sensitivity analysis is then

  19. EERC pilot-scale CFBC evaluation facility Project CFB test results. Topical report, Task 7.30

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Henderson, A.K.; Moe, T.A.

    1992-09-01

    Project CFB was initiated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in May 1988. Specific goals of the project were to (1) construct a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) facility representative of the major boiler vendors` designs with the capability of producing scalable data, (2) develop a database for use in making future evaluations of CFBC technology, and (3) provide a facility for evaluating fuels, free of vendor bias for use in the - energy industry. Five coals were test-burned in the 1-MWth unit: North Dakota and Asian lignites, a Wyoming subbituminous, and Colorado and Pennsylvania bituminous coats. A total of 54 steady-state test periods were conducted, with the key test parameters being the average combustor temperature, excess air, superficial gas velocity, calcium-to-sulfur molar ratio, and the primary air-to-secondary air split. The capture for a coal fired in a CFBC is primarily dependent upon the total alkali-to-sulfur ratio. The required alkali-to ratio for 90% sulfur retention ranged from 1.4 to 4.9, depending upon coal type. While an alkali-to-ratio of 4.9 was required to meet 90% sulfur retention for the Salt Creek coal versus 1.4 for the Asian lignite, the total amount of sorbent addition required is much less for the Salt Creek coal, 4.2 pound sorbent per million Btu coal input, versus 62 pound/million Btu for the Asian lignite. The bituminous coals tested show optimal capture at combustor temperatures of approximately 1550{degree}F, with low-rank coals having optimal sulfur capture approximately 100{degree}F lower.

  20. Design, fabrication, and evaluation of a partially melted ice particle cloud facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltis, Jared T.

    High altitude ice crystal clouds created by highly convective storm cells are dangerous to jet transport aircraft because the crystals are ingested into the compressor section, partially melt, accrete, and cause roll back or flame out. Current facilities to test engine particle icing are not ideal for fundamental mixed-phase ice accretion experiments or do not generate frozen droplet clouds under representative conditions. The goal of this research was to develop a novel facility capable of testing fundamental partially melted ice particle icing physics and to collect ice accretion data related to mixed-phase ice accretion. The Penn State Icing Tunnel (PSIT) has been designed and fabricated to conduct partially melted ice particle cloud accretion. The PSIT generated a cloud with air assisted atomizing nozzles. The water droplets cool from the 60psi pressure drop as the water exited the nozzle and fully glaciate while flowing in the -11.0°C tunnel air flow. The glaciated cloud flowed through a duct in the center of the tunnel where hot air was introduced. The temperature of the duct was regulated from 3.3°C to 24°C which melted particle the frozen particle from 0% to 90%. The partially melted particle cloud impinged on a temperature controlled flat plate. Ice accretion data was taken for a range of duct temperature from 3.3°C to 24°C and plate temperature from -4.5°C to 7.0°C. The particle median volumetric diameter was 23mum, the total water content was 4.5 g/m 3, the specific humidity was 1.12g/kg, and the wet bulb temperature ranged from 1.0°C to 7.0°C depending on the duct temperature. The boundaries between ice particle bounce off, ice accretion, and water run off were determined. When the particle were totally frozen and the plate surface was below freezing, the ice particle bounced off as expected. Ice accretion was seen for all percent melts tested, but the plate temperature boundary between water runoff and ice accretion increased from 0°C at 8

  1. Materials problems in fluidized-bed combustion systems. Appendix 3. Evaluation of boiler alloy specimens at Foster Wheeler Development Corporation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoruso, G.V.; Apblett, A.R. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC) portion of a metallurgical investigation conducted to assess the corrosion behavior of various ferritic, austenitic, and nickel-base alloys which were exposed in a coal-burning fluidized bed test facility at nominal temperatures of 1000/sup 0/F, 1200/sup 0/F, 1400/sup 0/F, 1550/sup 0/F, and 1650/sup 0/F for 1000 and 2000 hour test exposure periods. The alloys included Corten, 2-1/4Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, 405 SS, E-Brite 26-1, 310 SS, 329 SS, 347 SS, 22-13-5, 21-6-9, Incoloy 800, Manaurite 36X, Inconel 690, and RA 333. The investigation included material precharacterization studies and post-test metallurgical evaluations involving deposit/scale thickness measurements, selective chemical/microprobe analyses, specimen surface recession measurements, determination of depths of dealloying and corrosive constituent penetrations, grain-size determinations, hardness surveys, macro and microscopic examinations and study/recording of microstructural changes resulting as a consequence of test exposure.

  2. Universal Drive Train Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This vehicle drive train research facility is capable of evaluating helicopter and ground vehicle power transmission technologies in a system level environment. The...

  3. Engine Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center's Engine Test Facility (ETF) test cells are used for development and evaluation testing of propulsion systems for...

  4. Transonic Experimental Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Experimental Research Facility evaluates aerodynamics and fluid dynamics of projectiles, smart munitions systems, and sub-munitions dispensing systems;...

  5. Evaluation of reactivity monitoring techniques at the Yalina - Booster sub-critical facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becares Palacios, V.

    2014-07-01

    The management of long-lived radioactive wastes produced by nuclear reactors constitutes one of the main challenges of nuclear technology nowadays. A possible option for its management consists in the transmutation of long lived nuclides into shorter lived ones. Accelerator Driven Subcritical Systems (ADS) are one of the technologies in development to achieve this goal. An ADS consists in a subcritical nuclear reactor maintained in a steady state by an external neutron source driven by a particle accelerator. The interest of these systems lays on its capacity to be loaded with fuels having larger contents of minor actinides than conventional critical reactors, and in this way, increasing the transmutation rates of these elements, that are the main responsible of the long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear waste. One of the key points that have been identified for the operation of an industrial-scale ADS is the need of continuously monitoring the reactivity of the subcritical system during operation. For this reason, since the 1990s a number of experiments have been conducted in zero-power subcritical assemblies (MUSE, RACE, KUCA, Yalina, GUINEVERE/FREYA) in order to experimentally validate these techniques. In this context, the present thesis is concerned with the validation of reactivity monitoring techniques at the Yalina-Booster subcritical assembly. This assembly belongs to the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research (JIPNR-Sosny) of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus. Experiments concerning reactivity monitoring have been performed in this facility under the EUROTRANS project of the 6th EU Framework Program in year 2008 under the direction of CIEMAT. Two types of experiments have been carried out: experiments with a pulsed neutron source (PNS) and experiments with a continuous source with short interruptions (beam trips). For the case of the first ones, PNS experiments, two fundamental techniques exist to measure the reactivity, known as the prompt

  6. A human factors evaluation of advanced control facilities in Korea Next Generation Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Seong Nam; Lee, Dong Hoon; Chung, Sung Hak; Kim, Dong Nam; Hwang, Sang Ho [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-15

    The objectives of this study are as follows: to evaluate the impacts of advanced MMIs on operator performance; to identify new types of human errors; to present Human Factors Engineering (HFE) issues to support the safety reviews performed by the Korea Institute for Nuclear Safety. General trends in the performance measures of cognitive task demand, mental workload, and situation awareness were analyzed. The results showed that the conventional plant was superior to KNGR on the operator performance. The results of the questionnaire revealed that WDS was the most frequently used MMI resource, followed by CPS, LDP, SC, and AS. The evaluation of operator's satisfaction showed that WDS was the most satisfactory resource, followed by LDP, SC, CPS', and AS, AS was rated as the most worst resource due to inappropriate functional organization and lack of operator's visibility. Stepwise regression analyses showed that human errors of SRO and RO were mainly dominated by the cognitive behavior of 'interpretation' with WDS, while the cognitive behavior of TO was mainly dominated by 'observation' with WDS and AS. The ten HFE issues for the KNGR MCR were presented to address important design deficiencies identified in this study. The issues should be resolved to improve safety of KNGR at least up to the level of the conventional NPPs. Verification and validation activities after implementing those resolutions should be also performed to reach optimal plant safety and other operational goals.

  7. Air Force Research Laboratory Spacecraft Cryocooler Endurance Evaluation Facility Closing Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J.; Martin, K. W.; Fraser, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Spacecraft Component Thermal Research Group has been devoted to evaluating lifetime performance of space cryocooler technology for over twenty years. Long-life data is essential for confirming design lifetimes for space cryocoolers. Continuous operation in a simulated space environment is the only accepted method to test for degradation. AFRL has provided raw data and detailed evaluations to cryocooler developers for advancing the technology, correcting discovered deficiencies, and improving cryocooler designs. At AFRL, units of varying design and refrigeration cycles were instrumented in state-of-the-art experiment stands to provide spacelike conditions and were equipped with software data acquisition to track critical cryocooler operating parameters. This data allowed an assessment of the technology's ability to meet the desired lifetime and documented any long-term changes in performance. This paper will outline a final report of the various flight cryocoolers tested in our laboratory. The data summarized includes the seven cryocoolers tested during 2014-2015. These seven coolers have a combined total of 433,326 hours (49.5 years) of operation.

  8. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

  9. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 2, Chemical constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

  10. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

  11. Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 1, Waste streams and treatment technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

  12. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  13. Evaluating Defoaming Agents for the Stripping Columns at the In-Tank Precipitation Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGlynn, J.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-06-30

    The In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process will concentrate the Tank 48 contents to approximately 10 wt. percent tetraphenylborate solids by filtration. The filtrate produced during the process flows to the ITP stripping columns where the soluble benzene is removed from the solution. It has been observed that a large pressure differential occurs across the column packing when the filtrate is processed in the column. One potential explanation for the pressure differential is that the filtrate is foaming in the column. Small scale stripping tests have verified that the salt solution foams. Waste Management requested assistance from SRTC in solving the foaming problem through technical task requests HLE-TTR-93013A/B (Benzene Stripper Performance Evaluation) and HLE-TTR-93044 (Kinetics of Benzene and Dissolution). Various tests were completed to determine an effective defoaming agent for use in the stripping columns. This document discusses the tests and the conclusions.

  14. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 264 - Political Jurisdictions 1 in Which Compliance With § 264.18(a) Must Be Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Pt. 264, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 264... Powell Sanders Silver Bow Stillwater Sweet Grass Teton Wheatland Nevada All New Mexico Bernalillo Catron...

  15. The Appendix on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitley, S. [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Barts and the Royal London, Royal London Hospital, Whitechapel, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: siobhanwhitley@yahoo.co.uk; Sookur, P.; McLean, A.; Power, N. [Barts and the Royal London, Royal London Hospital, Whitechapel, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15

    Appendicitis can be a difficult clinical diagnosis to make. A negative appendicectomy rate of 20% has traditionally been accepted as the consequences of appendiceal perforation can be grave. Cross-sectional imaging is increasingly being employed in the investigation of adults with suspected appendicitis. This review will demonstrate the appearance of the normal appendix on computed tomography (CT) and its appearance in a range of inflammatory and neoplastic processes including appendicitis, Crohn's disease, infections, and benign and malignant tumour000.

  16. Evaluation of a single column model at the Southern Great Plains climate research facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Aaron D.

    Despite recent advancements in global climate modeling, models produce a large range of climate sensitivities for the Earth. This range of sensitivities results in part from uncertainties in modeling clouds. To understand and to improve cloud parameterizations in Global Climate Models (GCMs), simulations should be evaluated using observations of clouds. Detailed studies can be conducted at Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) sites which provide adequate observations and forcing for Single Column Model (SCM) studies. Unfortunately, forcing for SCMs is sparse and not available for many locations or times. This study had two main goals: (1) evaluate clouds from the GISS Model E AR5 SCM at the ARM Southern Great Plains site and (2) determine whether reanalysis-based forcing was feasible at this location. To accomplish these goals, multiple model runs were conducted from 1999--2008 using forcing provided by ARM and forcing developed from the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR). To better understand cloud biases and differences in the forcings, atmospheric states were classified using Self Organizing Maps (SOMs). Although model simulations had many similarities with the observations, there were several noticeable biases. Deep clouds had a negative bias year-round and this was attributed to clouds being too thin during frontal systems and a lack of convection during the spring and summer. These results were consistent regardless of the forcing used. During August, SCM simulations had a positive bias for low clouds. This bias varied with the forcing suggesting that part of the problem was tied to errors in the forcing. NARR forcing had many favorable characteristics when compared to ARM observations and forcing. In particular, temperature and wind information were more accurate than ARM when compared to balloon soundings. During the cool season, NARR forcing produced results similar to ARM with reasonable precipitation and a similar cloud field. Although NARR

  17. Evaluation of an aged care nurse practitioner service: quality of care within a residential aged care facility hospital avoidance service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Trudy; Craswell, Alison; Rossi, Dolene; Holzberger, Darren

    2017-01-13

    Reducing avoidable hospitialisation of aged care facility (ACF) residents can improve the resident experience and their health outcomes. Consequently many variations of hospital avoidance (HA) programs continue to evolve. Nurse practitioners (NP) with expertise in aged care have the potential to make a unique contribution to hospital avoidance programs. However, little attention has been dedicated to service evaluation of this model and the quality of care provided. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of an aged care NP model of care situated within a HA service in a regional area of Australia. Donabedian's structure, process and outcome framework was applied to evaluate the quality of the NP model of care. The Australian Nurse Practitioner Study standardised interview schedules for evaluating NP models of care guided the semi-structured interviews of nine health professionals (including ACF nurses, medical doctors and allied health professionals), four ACF residents and their families and two NPs. Theory driven coding consistent with the Donabedian framework guided analysis of interview data and presentation of findings. Structural dimensions identified included the 'in-reach' nature of the HA service, distance, limitations of professional regulation and the residential care model. These dimensions influenced the process of referring the resident to the NP, the NPs timely response and interactions with other professionals. The processes where the NPs take time connecting with residents, initiating collaborative care plans, up-skilling aged care staff and function as intra and interprofessional boundary spanners all contributed to quality outcomes. Quality outcomes in this study were about timely intervention, HA, timely return home, partnering with residents and family (knowing what they want) and resident and health professional satisfaction. This study provides valuable insights into the contribution of the NP model of care within an aged care

  18. Evaluation of an integrated care service facility for people living with hepatitis C in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn Horwitz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People living with hepatitis C are a highly marginalised population who may not readily access health care.  Existing models of hepatitis C care may not meet the needs of these patients. This research evaluates the experiences of patients attending an innovative hepatitis C clinic that offers integrated care and service delivery.  Method: Surveys were completed by 120 clients and comprised of questions relating to changes in lifestyle habits since attending the clinic, hepatitis C knowledge, hepatitis C treatment and experiences with health care staff at the clinic.  Results: The majority of respondents indicated that attendance at the clinic has provided them with the information to better manage their hepatitis C and had given them confidence to make lifestyle changes.  Participants demonstrated a very high knowledge of hepatitis C and reported experiencing a less discriminatory environment at the clinic compared to other health care settings.  Respondents who had been attending the clinic for more than 6 months were significantly more likely to indicate a desire to commence hepatitis C treatment over the next 5 years. Discussion: The findings point to the importance of integrated care in the community setting in providing clients with a positive experience of health care, which appears to increase their skills and desire to better manage their hepatitis C.

  19. Evaluation of an integrated care service facility for people living with hepatitis C in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Treloar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People living with hepatitis C are a highly marginalised population who may not readily access health care.  Existing models of hepatitis C care may not meet the needs of these patients. This research evaluates the experiences of patients attending an innovative hepatitis C clinic that offers integrated care and service delivery. Method: Surveys were completed by 120 clients and comprised of questions relating to changes in lifestyle habits since attending the clinic, hepatitis C knowledge, hepatitis C treatment and experiences with health care staff at the clinic. Results: The majority of respondents indicated that attendance at the clinic has provided them with the information to better manage their hepatitis C and had given them confidence to make lifestyle changes.  Participants demonstrated a very high knowledge of hepatitis C and reported experiencing a less discriminatory environment at the clinic compared to other health care settings.  Respondents who had been attending the clinic for more than 6 months were significantly more likely to indicate a desire to commence hepatitis C treatment over the next 5 years.Discussion: The findings point to the importance of integrated care in the community setting in providing clients with a positive experience of health care, which appears to increase their skills and desire to better manage their hepatitis C. 

  20. EVALUATION OF BRACHYTHERAPY FACILITY SHIELDING STATUS IN KOREA OBTAINED FROM RADIATION SAFETY REPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MI HYUN KEUM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-eight radiation safety reports for brachytherapy equipment were evaluated to determine the current status of brachytherapy units in Korea and to assess how radiation oncology departments in Korea complete radiation safety reports. The following data was collected: radiation safety report publication year, brachytherapy unit manufacturer, type and activity of the source that was used, affiliation of the drafter, exposure rate constant, the treatment time used to calculate workload and the HVL values used to calculate shielding design goal values. A significant number of the reports (47.4% included the personal information of the drafter. The treatment time estimates varied widely from 12 to 2,400 min/week. There was acceptable variation in the exposure rate constant values (ranging between 0.469 and 0.592 (R-m2/Ci·hr, as well as in the HVLs of concrete, steel and lead for Iridium-192 sources that were used to calculate shielding design goal values. There is a need for standard guidelines for completing radiation safety reports that realistically reflect the current clinical situation of radiation oncology departments in Korea. The present study may be useful for formulating these guidelines.

  1. Use of the event tree method for evaluate the safety of radioactive facilities; Utilizacion del metodo de arboles de eventos para evaluar la seguridad de instalaciones radiactivas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez S, A.; Cornejo D, N.; Callis F, E. [CPHR, Calle 20 No. 4113, e/41 y 47 Playa, CP 11300, La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: ale@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    The work shows the validity of the use of Trees of Events like a quantitative method appropriate to carry out evaluations of radiological safety. Its were took like base the evaluations of safety of five Radiotherapy Departments, carried out in the mark of the process of authorization of these facilities. The risk values were obtained by means of the combination of the probabilities of occurrence of the events with its consequences. The use of the method allowed to suggest improvements to the existent safety systems, as well as to confirm that the current regulator requirements for this type of facilities to lead to practices with acceptable risk levels. (Author)

  2. System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O' Brien; Michael G. McKellar

    2012-05-01

    This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the

  3. Chemical Risk Evaluation: A Case Study in an Automotive Air Conditioner Production Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengku Hanidza T.I.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been limited knowledge on worker’s exposure to chemicals used in the automotive industries. The purpose of this study is to assess chemical risk and to determine the adequacy of the existing control measures to reduce chemical exposure. A cross sectional survey was conducted in a factory involving installation and servicing of automotive air conditioner units. Qualitative exposure assessment was carried out following the Malaysian Chemical Health Risk Assessment Manual (CHRA. There were 180 employees, 156 workers worked in the production line, which constitutes six work units Tube fin pressed, Brazing, Welding, Final assembly, Piping and Kit II. From the chemical risk evaluation for each work unit, 26 chemical compounds were used. Most of the chemicals were irritants (eye and skin and some were asphyxiants and sensitizers. Based on the work assignment, 93 out of 180 (51.67% of the workers were exposed to chemicals. The highest numbers of workers exposed to chemicals were from the Brazing section (22.22% while the Final Assembly section was the lowest (1.67%. Health survey among the workers showed occurrence of eye irritation, skin irritation, and respiratory irritation, symptoms usually associated with chemical exposure. Using a risk rating matrix, several work process were identified as having ‘significant risk’. For these areas, the workers are at risk of adverse health effects since chemical exposure is not adequately controlled. This study recommends corrective actions be taken in order to control the level of exposure and to provide a safe work environment for workers.

  4. Facile synthesis and stereochemical investigation of Mannich base derivatives: evaluation of antioxidant property and antituberculostic potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthiban, Paramasivam; Subalakshmi, Viswalingam; Balasubramanian, Krishnamurthy; Islam, Md Nurul; Choi, Jae Sue; Jeong, Yeon Tae

    2011-04-15

    A mini-library of diversely substituted 2,4-diaryl-3-azabicyco[3.3.1]nonan-9-one O-methyloximes and their N-methyl analogs were synthesized by a non-laborious, modified and an optimized Mannich condensation in good yields. Both the ring N-methylation and oxime O-methylation were employed by various methods; of them, the usage of (t)BuOK was found to be the superior in terms of good yield in short time. Stereochemistry of all the synthesized compounds was unambiguously established by their NMR spectral ((1)H, (13)C, (1)H-(1)H COSY, (1)H-(13)C one and multiple bond COSY and NOESY) as well as single-crystal XRD studies. Irrespective of the nature and position of the substituents, all the synthesized oxime ethers of the bicyclic Mannich bases as well as their N-methyl analogs adopted the twin-chair conformation with equatorial orientations of all the substituents. All the synthesized oxime ethers were evaluated for their antioxidant property by DPPH radical scavenging method. According to the structure-activity correlations, compound 4y was found to be a lead molecule with the IC(50) of 0.187 mg/mL. Thus, the present study exploits the scope of finding more active analogs by further optimization with the incorporation of more electron enriched alkoxy/amino and/or phenolic groups on the heterocycle as well as oxime ether pharmacophore. Most of the synthesized molecules were screened for their antituberculostic potency against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H(37)Rv by zone of inhibition method. Of them, 4w/5d and 4x showed very promising inhibition zones of 21 and 23 mm, respectively, which leads to the optimization of 4x by introducing various substituents on the O-benzyl moiety to enhance the antituberculostic potency.

  5. A case of a horseshoe appendix

    OpenAIRE

    Takabatake, Kazuya; Ikeda, Jun; Furuke, Hirotaka; Kato, Chikage; Kishimoto, Takuya; Kumano, Tatsuya; Imura, Kenichiro; Shimomura, Katsumi; Kubota, Takeshi; Taniguchi, Fumihiro; Shioaki, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Anomalies of the appendix are extremely rare, and a horseshoe appendix is even rarer. A literature search has revealed only five reported cases. In this report, we present a case of a horseshoe appendix. A 78-year-old man was referred for further examination following a positive fecal occult blood test. A mass in his ascending colon was detected on colonoscopy, while computed tomography showed that it was connected to the appendix. Tumor invasion derived from the ascending colon or appendix w...

  6. Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratoriers: User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaschl, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users. The Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware developers. It is intended to assist their project engineering personnel in materials analysis planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the analysis process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, products, and inputs necessary to define scope of analysis, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  7. Improving district facility readiness: a 12-month evaluation of a data-driven health systems strengthening intervention in rural Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari S. Iyer

    2015-07-01

    Results: We found significant improvements among intervention facilities from baseline to 12 months across several domains [infrastructure (+4, p=0.0001, clinical services (+1.2, p=0.03, infection and sanitation control (+0.6, p=0.03, medical equipment (+1.0, p=0.02, information use (+2, p=0.002]. Composite score across domains improved from 6.2 at baseline to 7.4 at 12 months (p=0.002. Across facilities, 50% had composite scores greater than the average score among reference facilities (7.4 at 12 months compared to none at baseline. Conclusions: Rapid facility surveys, stakeholder engagement, and information feedback can be used for gap analysis and resource allocation. This approach can achieve effective use of limited resources, improve facility readiness, and ensure consistency of facility capacity to provide quality care at the district level.

  8. Evaluation of the Initial Isothermal Physics Measurements at the Fast Flux Test Facility, a Prototypic Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2010-03-01

    experiments were of particular importance because they provide extensive information which can be directly applied to the design of large LMFBR’s. It should be recognized that the data presented in the initial report were evaluated only to the extent necessary to ensure that adequate data were obtained. Later reports provided further interpretation and detailed comparisons with prediction techniques. The conclusion of the isothermal physics measurements was that the FFTF nuclear characteristics were essentially as designed and all safety requirements were satisfied. From a nuclear point of view, the FFTF was qualified to proceed into power operation mode. The FFTF was completed in 1978 and first achieved criticality on February 9, 1980. Upon completion of the isothermal physics and reactor characterization programs, the FFTF operated for ten years from April 1982 to April 1992. Reactor operations of the FFTF were terminated and the reactor facility was then defueled, deactivated, and placed into cold standby condition. Deactivation of the reactor was put on hold from 1996 to 2000 while the U.S. Department of Energy examined alternative uses for the FFTF but then announced the permanent deactivation of the FFTF in December 2001. Its core support basket was later drilled in May 2005, so as to remove all remaining sodium coolant. On April 17, 2006, the American Nuclear Society designated the FFTF as a “National Nuclear Historic Landmark”.

  9. An Evaluation of the United States Coast Guard’s Enlisted Dining Facility Accounting and Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    three or more SS in their authorized personnel allowance ( APA ) and which have adequate market facilities from which to obtain provisions. 3. Class C...Units with two SS in their APA and have adequate market facilities; also includes units with three or more SS without adequate market facilities. 4...1.1500 t0 % 3tandard Class -r Inaresse (subparagapb )....... n Norma Class IO ratian allolance ................ ............ (2) BaBi

  10. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  11. Outpatient evaluation, recognition, and initial management of pediatric overweight and obesity in U.S. military medical treatment facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Wayne; Arday, David R; Kelly, Joseph; Carnahan, Col David

    2017-02-01

    As childhood obesity is a concern in many communities, this study investigated outpatient evaluation and initial management of overweight and obese pediatric patients in U.S. military medical treatment facilities (MTFs). Samples of 579 overweight and 341 obese patients (as determined by body mass index [BMI]) aged 3-17 years were drawn from MTFs. All available FY2011 outpatient records were searched for documentation of BMI assessment, overweight/obesity diagnosis, and counseling. Administrative data for these patients were merged to assess coded diagnostic and counseling rates and receipt of recommended laboratory screenings. Generic BMI documentation was high, but BMI percentile assessments were found among fewer than half the patients. Diagnostic recording or recognition totaled 10.9% of overweight and 32.0% of obese. Counseling rates were higher, with 46.4% and 61.0% of overweight and obese patients, respectively, receiving weight related counseling. Among patients 10 years of age or older, rates of recommended lab screenings for diabetes, liver abnormality, and dyslipidemia were not greater than 33%. BMI percentile recording was strongly associated with diagnostic recording, and diagnostic recording was strongly associated with counseling. Improvements to electronic health records or implementation of local procedures to facilitate better diagnostic recording would likely improve adherence to clinical practice guidelines. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  12. Radiation damage evaluation on concrete within a facility for Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES Project), Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomaro, B; Salomoni, V A; Gramegna, F; Prete, G; Majorana, C E

    2011-10-30

    Concrete is commonly used as a biological shield against nuclear radiation. As long as, in the design of nuclear facilities, its load carrying capacity is required together with its shielding properties, changes in the mechanical properties due to nuclear radiation are of particular significance and may have to be taken into account in such circumstances. The study presented here allows for reaching first evidences on the behavior of concrete when exposed to nuclear radiation in order to evaluate the consequent effect on the mechanical field, by means of a proper definition of the radiation damage, strictly connected with the strength properties of the building material. Experimental evidences on the decay of the mechanical modulus of concrete have allowed for implementing the required damage law within a 3D F.E. research code which accounts for the coupling among moisture, heat transfer and the mechanical field in concrete treated as a fully coupled porous medium. The development of the damage front in a concrete shielding wall is analyzed under neutron radiation and results within the wall thickness are reported for long-term radiation spans and several concrete mixtures in order to discuss the resulting shielding properties.

  13. Evaluation of economical efficiency of the Osaki large hydroponic facilities; Osaki ogata suiko shisetsu no keizaisei hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonezawa, K. [Chugoku Electric Power Co. Inc., Hiroshima (Japan)

    1996-03-25

    A demonstrative test was conducted to verify economical efficiency of practical scale hydroponic horticulture under structure making use of a part of the Osaki thermal power plant to be constructed. In the test, the hydroponic culture of leek and tomatoes was carried out for six years starting 1989 to study its economical efficiency. Using the M-type hydroponic culture facilities, the structures are 1200m wide, 29m long, and 21 tons in the culture liquid level in case of leek, and 350m wide, 29m long, and 10 tons in the culture liquid level in case of tomatoes. The evaluation was made estimating the crop amount of leek as about 35 tons and that of tomatoes as about 60 tons and regarding that the sales amount is equal to the crop amount. The sales amount of leek is 28 million yen, and when seeking income/expenditure from expenses, deficit of 1 million yen per 30 a cannot be avoided excluding the equipment depreciation cost. As to tomatoes, the shipment cost is approximately 14 million yen without the equipment depreciation cost, but the sales amount is approximately 13-19 million yen largely affected by the unit price. A study on the sale method is needed. 7 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Preliminary evaluation of the gaseous effluent sampling and monitoring systems at the 291-Z-1 and 296-Z-3 stacks. Plutonium finishing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwendiman, L.C.; Glissmeyer, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    The 291-Z-1 and 296-Z-3 stack effluent particulate sampling and monitoring systems are being evaluated for compliance with Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company`s Interim Criteria for such systems. This evaluation is part of a study by Battelle-Northwest of gaseous effluent sampling systems in ARHCO facilities. This letter report presents a preliminary evaluation of the mentioned facilities and the indicated improvements needed to meet the Interim Criteria so that conceptual design work for improved systems can be initiated. There is currently underway a detailed study at the two stacks including a series of sampling experiments, the findings of which will not be included in this report. The gaseous effluent sampling system at the 291-Z-1 and 296-Z-3 stacks are very dissimilar and will be treated in separate sections of this report. The discussions for each sampling system will include a brief description and a preliminary evaluation of the systems.

  15. Evaluation technology for burnup and generated amount of plutonium by measurement of xenon isotopic ratio in dissolver off-gas at reprocessing facility (Joint research)

    OpenAIRE

    岡野 正紀; 久野 剛彦; 高橋 一朗; 白水 秀知; Charlton, W. S.; Wells, C. A.; Hemberger, P. H.; 山田 敬二; 酒井 敏雄

    2006-01-01

    The amount of Pu in the spent fuel was evaluated from Xe isotopic ratio in off-gas in reprocessing facility, is related to burnup. Six batches of dissolver off-gas at spent fuel dissolution process were sampled from the main stack in Tokai Reprocessing Plant during BWR fuel reprocessing campaign. Xenon isotopic ratio was determined with GC/MS. Burnup and generated amount of Pu were evaluated with Noble Gas Environmental Monitoring Application code (NOVA), developed by Los Alamos National Labo...

  16. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  17. Sanitary evaluation of domestic water supply facilities with storage tanks and detection of Aeromonas, enteric and related bacteria in domestic water facilities in Okinawa Prefecture of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Kazufumi; Sano, Kouichi; Hirai, Itaru

    2017-08-01

    To provide for temporary restrictions of the public water supply system, storage tanks are commonly installed in the domestic water systems of houses and apartment buildings in Okinawa Prefecture of Japan. To learn more about the sanitary condition and management of these water supply facilities with storage tanks (hereafter called "storage tank water systems") and the extent of bacterial contamination of water from these facilities, we investigated their usage and the existence of Aeromonas, enteric and related bacteria. Verbal interviews concerning the use and management of the storage tank water systems were carried out in each randomly sampled household. A total of 54 water samples were collected for bacteriological and physicochemical examinations. Conventional methods were used for total viable count, fecal coliforms, identification of bacteria such as Aeromonas, Enterobacteriaceae and non-fermentative Gram-negative rods (NF-GNR), and measurement of residual chlorine. On Aeromonas species, tests for putative virulence factor and an identification using 16S rRNA and rpoB genes were also performed. Water from the water storage systems was reported to be consumed directly without boiling in 22 of the 54 houses (40.7%). 31 of the sampled houses had installed water storage tanks of more than 1 cubic meter (m(3)) per inhabitant, and in 21 of the sampled houses, the tank had never been cleaned. In all samples, the total viable count and fecal coliforms did not exceed quality levels prescribed by Japanese waterworks law. Although the quantity of bacteria detected was not high, 23 NF-GNR, 14 Enterobacteriaceae and 5 Aeromonas were isolated in 42.6%, 7.4% and 3.7% of samples respectively. One isolated A. hydrophila and four A. caviae possessed various putative virulence factors, especially A. hydrophila which had diverse putative pathogenic genes such as aer, hlyA, act, alt, ast, ser, and dam. Many bacteria were isolated when the concentration of residual chlorine

  18. Based on the Characteristics of Respondents and the Voice of the Urban Neighborhood Public Space Business Facilities Noise Environment Evaluation Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JunYan Dong; Wen Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Comfort is one of the important indicators evaluation of voice. In order to understand the urban neighborhood public space environment of comfort, this paper is to explore characteristics of consumer society on the public space environment evaluation of the effect, and using the questionnaire survey method, to evaluate the Harbin city neighborhood area public space as the typical case analysis. Based on one of the main sound source in neighborhood public space, environment, business facilities environment as the breakthrough point, it is to consider neighborhood public space environment evaluation and social characteristics.

  19. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Pt. 265, App. III Appendix III to Part 265—EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards Parameter Maximum level (mg/l) Arsenic 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium 0.01 Chromium...

  20. Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned, Volume 2 of 3: Appendixes A - C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libby, R.A.; Davis, C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Segal, J.E.; Stanbro, W.D.

    1995-08-01

    This document is the 2nd volume of the three volume set from the Special Nuclear Materials Cutoff Exercise held at Hanford in 1994. Volume 2 contains Appendices A-C, with Appendices A and B containing a discussion of the design of the PUREX process and Appendix C containing a discussion of the safeguards measures for the PUREX facility.

  1. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 266 - Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. II Appendix II to Part 266—Tier I Feed Rate Screening Limits for Total Chlorine Terrain-adjusted effective stack height (m) Noncomplex Terrain Urban (g...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix A-1 to Part 60 - Test Methods 1 through 2F

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... cyclonic flow at the sampling location must be determined. The following techniques are acceptable for this... Velocity and Volumetric Flow Rate With Three-Dimensional Probes The test methods in this appendix are... facility. Such instructions (for example, establish sampling rates, volumes, or temperatures) are to be...

  3. 25 CFR Appendix B to Subpart D - Design Standards for the IRR Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Transportation Landscape and Environmental Design. 3. AASHTO Roadside Design Guide, latest edition. 4. AASHTO... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Design Standards for the IRR Program B Appendix B to... ROADS PROGRAM Planning, Design, and Construction of Indian Reservation Roads Program Facilities Pt. 170...

  4. 10 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Earthquake Engineering Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Earthquake Engineering Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants S... FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. S Appendix S to Part 50—Earthquake Engineering Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants..., as specified in § 50.54(ff), nuclear power plants that have implemented the earthquake...

  5. PAPER STUDY EVALUATIONS OF THE INTRODUCTION OF SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE WASTE STREAMS TO THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Stone, M.; Koopman, D.

    2010-06-29

    The objective of this paper study is to provide guidance on the impact of Monosodium Titanate (MST) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) streams from the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet and glass waste form. A series of waste processing scenarios was evaluated, including projected compositions of Sludge Batches 8 through 17 (SB8 through SB17), MST additions, CST additions to Tank 40 or to a sludge batch preparation tank (Tank 42 or Tank 51, referred to generically as Tank 51 in this report), streams from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), and two canister production rates. A wide array of potential glass frit compositions was used to support this assessment. The sludge and frit combinations were evaluated using the predictive models in the current DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). The results were evaluated based on the number of frit compositions available for a particular sludge composition scenario. A large number of candidate frit compositions (e.g., several dozen to several hundred) is typically a good indicator of a sludge composition for which there is flexibility in forming an acceptable waste glass and meeting canister production rate commitments. The MST and CST streams will significantly increase the concentrations of certain components in glass, such as Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, TiO{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2}, to levels much higher than have been previously processed at DWPF. Therefore, several important assumptions, described in detail in the report, had to be made in performing the evaluations. The results of the paper studies, which must be applied carefully given the assumptions made concerning the impact of higher Ti, Zr, and Nb concentrations on model validity, provided several observations: (1) There was difficulty in identifying a reasonable number of candidate frits (and in some cases an inability to identify any candidate frits) when a waste loading of 40% is

  6. A 'mystery client' evaluation of adolescent sexual and reproductive health services in health facilities from two regions in Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaina Mchome

    Full Text Available Unwelcoming behaviours and judgemental attitudes have long been recognised as a barrier to young people's access to reproductive health services. Over the last decade youth friendly reproductive health services have been promoted and implemented world-wide. However, long term evidence of the impact of these programmes is lacking. We report the results of a large mystery client evaluation of adolescent sexual and reproductive health services in Tanzania, a country that has had a long established youth friendly policy. Forty-eight visits made to thirty-three health facilities were conducted by twelve young people (six in each region trained to perform three different scripted scenarios (i.e., condom request, information on sexually transmitted infections and family planning. The study revealed barriers in relation to poor signage and reception for services. In addition health workers demonstrated paternalistic attitudes as well as lack of knowledge about adolescent sexual and reproductive health services. In some cases, health workers discouraged young people from using services such as condoms and family planning methods. Lack of confidentiality and privacy were also noted to be common challenges for the young people involved. Intervention strategies that focus on changing health workers' mind-set in relation to adolescent sexual and reproductive health are crucial for ensuring quality provision of sexual and reproductive health services to young people. The study identified the importance of reception or signs at the health units, as this can facilitate young people's efforts in seeking sexual and reproductive health services. Likewise, improvement of health workers knowledge of existing policy and practice on sexual and reproductive health services and youth friendly services is much needed.

  7. A 'mystery client' evaluation of adolescent sexual and reproductive health services in health facilities from two regions in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mchome, Zaina; Richards, Esther; Nnko, Soori; Dusabe, John; Mapella, Elizabeth; Obasi, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Unwelcoming behaviours and judgemental attitudes have long been recognised as a barrier to young people's access to reproductive health services. Over the last decade youth friendly reproductive health services have been promoted and implemented world-wide. However, long term evidence of the impact of these programmes is lacking. We report the results of a large mystery client evaluation of adolescent sexual and reproductive health services in Tanzania, a country that has had a long established youth friendly policy. Forty-eight visits made to thirty-three health facilities were conducted by twelve young people (six in each region) trained to perform three different scripted scenarios (i.e., condom request, information on sexually transmitted infections and family planning). The study revealed barriers in relation to poor signage and reception for services. In addition health workers demonstrated paternalistic attitudes as well as lack of knowledge about adolescent sexual and reproductive health services. In some cases, health workers discouraged young people from using services such as condoms and family planning methods. Lack of confidentiality and privacy were also noted to be common challenges for the young people involved. Intervention strategies that focus on changing health workers' mind-set in relation to adolescent sexual and reproductive health are crucial for ensuring quality provision of sexual and reproductive health services to young people. The study identified the importance of reception or signs at the health units, as this can facilitate young people's efforts in seeking sexual and reproductive health services. Likewise, improvement of health workers knowledge of existing policy and practice on sexual and reproductive health services and youth friendly services is much needed.

  8. Evaluating facility-based antiretroviral therapy programme effectiveness: a pilot study comparing viral load suppression and retention rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duber, Herbert C; Roberts, D Allen; Ikilezi, Gloria; Fullman, Nancy; Gasasira, Anne; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Haakenstad, Annie; J Levine, Aubrey; Achan, Jane

    2016-06-01

    Increased demand for antiretroviral therapy (ART) services combined with plateaued levels of development assistance for HIV/AIDS requires that national ART programmes monitor programme effectiveness. In this pilot study, we compared commonly utilised performance metrics of 12- and 24-month retention with rates of viral load (VL) suppression at 15 health facilities in Uganda. Retrospective chart review from which 12- and 24-month retention rates were estimated, and parallel HIV RNA VL testing on consecutive adult patients who presented to clinics and had been on ART for a minimum of six months. Rates of VL suppression were then calculated at each facility and compared to retention rates to assess the correlation between performance metrics. Multilevel logistic regression models predicting VL suppression and 12- and 24-month retention were constructed to estimate facility effects. We collected VL samples from 2961 patients and found that 88% had a VL ≤1000 copies/ml. Facility rates of VL suppression varied between 77% and 96%. When controlling for patient mix, a significant variation in facility performance persisted. Retention rates at 12 and 24 months were 91% and 79%, respectively, with a comparable facility-level variation. However, neither 12-month (ρ = 0.16) nor 24-month (ρ = -0.19) retention rates were correlated with facility rates of VL suppression. Retaining patients in care and suppressing VL are both critical outcomes. Given the lack of correlation noted in this study, the utilisation of VL monitoring may be necessary to truly assess the effectiveness of health facilities delivering ART services. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Thermal distortion test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapp, James L.

    1995-02-01

    The thermal distortion test facility (TDTF) at Phillips Laboratory provides precise measurements of the distortion of mirrors that occurs when their surfaces are heated. The TDTF has been used for several years to evaluate mirrors being developed for high-power lasers. The facility has recently undergone some significant upgrades to improve the accuracy with which mirrors can be heated and the resulting distortion measured. The facility and its associated instrumentation are discussed.

  10. Screening study for waste biomass to ethanol production facility using the Amoco process in New York State. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This report evaluates the economic feasibility of locating biomass-to-ethanol waste conversion facilities in New York State. Part 1 of the study evaluates 74 potential sites in New York City and identifies two preferred sites on Staten, the Proctor Gamble and the Arthur Kill sites, for further consideration. Part 2 evaluates upstate New York and determines that four regions surrounding the urban centers of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse provide suitable areas from which to select specific sites for further consideration. A separate Appendix provides supplemental material supporting the evaluations. A conceptual design and economic viability evaluation were developed for a minimum-size facility capable of processing 500 tons per day (tpd) of biomass consisting of wood or paper, or a combination of the two for upstate regions. The facility would use Amoco`s biomass conversion technology and produce 49,000 gallons per day of ethanol and approximately 300 tpd of lignin solid by-product. For New York City, a 1,000-tpd processing facility was also evaluated to examine effects of economies of scale. The reports evaluate the feasibility of building a biomass conversion facility in terms of city and state economic, environmental, and community factors. Given the data obtained to date, including changing costs for feedstock and ethanol, the project is marginally attractive. A facility should be as large as possible and located in a New York State Economic Development Zone to take advantage of economic incentives. The facility should have on-site oxidation capabilities, which will make it more financially viable given the high cost of energy. 26 figs., 121 tabs.

  11. Horseshoe Appendix: An Extremely Rare Appendiceal Anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ch Gyan; Nyuwi, Kuotho T; Rangaswamy, Raju; Ezung, Yibenthung S; Singh, H Manihar

    2016-03-01

    Appendiceal anomalies are extremely rare malformations that are usually found incidentally. Agenesis and duplication of the appendix has been well documented however, the cases of horseshoe appendix reported is very limited, only four cases reported so far. Here, we report a four and half-year-old who underwent interval appendectomy. Intraoperatively both the ends of the appendix were found to be communicating with the cecum with two separate base or stump located at a sagital disposal- the so called "horseshoe appendix".

  12. Phase II Audit Report - Energy & Water Audits of LLNL Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horst, B I; Jacobs, P C; Pierce, S M

    2005-08-03

    This report describes Phase II of a project conducted for the Mechanical Utilities Division (UTel), Energy Management Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by Architectural Energy Corporation (AEC). The overall project covers energy efficiency and water conservation auditing services for 215 modular and prefabricated buildings at LLNL. The primary goal of this project is to demonstrate compliance with DOE Order 430.2A, Contractor Requirements Document section 2.d (2) Document, to demonstrate annual progress of at least 10 percent toward completing energy and water audits of all facilities. Although this project covers numerous buildings, they are all similar in design and use. The approach employed for completing audits for these facilities involves a ''model-similar building'' approach. In the model-similar building approach, similarities between groups of buildings are established and quantified. A model (or test case) building is selected and analyzed for each model-similar group using a detailed DOE-2 simulation. The results are extended to the group of similar buildings based on careful application of quantified similarities, or ''extension measures''. This approach leverages the relatively minor effort required to evaluate one building in some detail to a much larger population of similar buildings. The facility wide energy savings potential was calculated for a select set of measures that have reasonable payback based on the detailed building analysis and are otherwise desirable to the LLNL facilities staff. The selected measures are: (1) HVAC Tune-up. This is considered to be a ''core measure'', based on the energy savings opportunity and the impact on thermal comfort. All HVAC units in the study are assumed to be tuned up under this measure. See the Appendix for a detailed calculation by building and HVAC unit. (2) HVAC system scheduling. This is also considered to be a &apos

  13. Development of Novel Decontamination Techniques for Chemical Agents (GB, VX, HD) Contaminated Facilities. Phase I. Identification and Evaluation of Novel Decontamination Concepts. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    evaluation were the use of hot gases, :: "vapor circulation and chemical methods, using either monoethanol amine , ¶’ n-octyl-pyridinium aldoxime bromide...ntambor) Chemical Agents Decontamination Concepts Thermal Oximes GB Installation Restoration Facilities Amines VX Structures Concrete Abrasive Ammonia...steam, ammonia, oximes and amines either alone or in series. ** V- nil- -- m- 4’- t. -U °.% INSp 119CURIlY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGElfW~on Date

  14. Advanced system demonstration for utilization of biomass as an energy source. Technical Appendix J: alternatives studies. Environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCollom, M. [ed.

    1979-01-01

    A comprehensive review of a wide range of alternatives to the proposed action, the commercial demonstration of an industrial cogenerating facility fired with wood fuels is provided. An extensive effort has been devoted to the evaluation of all reasonable alternatives to this project. A number of possible actions were also briefly considered, but, for various reasons, they were found not to be appropriate at present for a commercial-scale demonstration of an alternative energy source. The critical characteristics of the wood-fueled commercial demonstration project at Westbrook are considered to be: industrial cogeneration of power; the production of 510,000 pounds per hour of industrial process steam; the production of approximately twenty-five megawatts of electric generating capacity, some of which would be available to a public utility in southern Maine; and the consumption of 2,000 tons of wood fuel per day. Each of the alternatives examined in this appendix offers a different option for one or several of the characteristics of the project listed above. As a whole, the appendix describes the range of possible actions that the US Department of Energy and its contractors have considered.

  15. HUMAN MACHINE INTERFACE (HMI) EVALUATION OF ROOMS TA-50-1-60/60A AT THE RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY (RLWTF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Walter E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stender, Kerith K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-29

    This effort addressed an evaluation of human machine interfaces (HMIs) in Room TA-50-1-60/60A of the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). The evaluation was performed in accordance with guidance outlined in DOE-STD-3009, DOE Standard Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, 2006 [DOE 2006]. Specifically, Chapter 13 of DOE 2006 highlights the 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, 2012, [CFR 2012] and DOE G 421.1-2 [DOE 2001a] requirements as they relate to the human factors process and, in this case, the safety of the RLWTF. The RLWTF is a Hazard Category 3 facility and, consequently, does not have safety-class (SSCs). However, safety-significant SSCs are identified. The transuranic (TRU) wastewater tanks and associated piping are the only safety-significant SSCs in Rooms TA-50-1-60/60A [LANL 2010]. Hence, the human factors evaluation described herein is only applicable to this particular assemblage of tanks and piping.

  16. Evaluation and redesign of radiation shielding in a radionuclide production facility at a particle accelerator / Onalenna Kegopotsemang

    OpenAIRE

    Kegopotsemang, Onalenna

    2004-01-01

    iThemba LABS is a particle accelerator facility housing a radionuclide production facility that uses a 66 MeV proton beam to produce radionuclides for medical and industrial use. Ionising radiation is produced by a variety of sources at Themba LABS. Ionising is a health hazard. High doses can cause acute radiation syndrome, i.e. "radiation sickness". Lower doses cannot cause acute symptom, but carry a risk of radiation-related cancer. Ionising radiation is also detrimental to materials, and c...

  17. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  18. Better antiretroviral therapy outcomes at primary healthcare facilities: an evaluation of three tiers of ART services in four South African provinces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Fatti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are conflicting reports of antiretroviral therapy (ART effectiveness comparisons between primary healthcare (PHC facilities and hospitals in low-income settings. This comparison has not been evaluated on a broad scale in South Africa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted including ART-naïve adults from 59 facilities in four provinces in South Africa, enrolled between 2004 and 2007. Kaplan-Meier estimates, competing-risks Cox regression, generalised estimating equation population-averaged models and logistic regression were used to compare death, loss to follow-up (LTFU and virological suppression (VS between PHC, district and regional hospitals. 29 203 adults from 47 PHC facilities, nine district hospitals and three regional hospitals were included. Patients at PHC facilities had more advanced WHO stage disease when starting ART. Retention in care was 80.1% (95% CI: 79.3%-80.8%, 71.5% (95% CI: 69.1%-73.8% and 68.7% (95% CI: 67.0%-69.7% at PHC, district and regional hospitals respectively, after 24 months of treatment (P<0.0001. In adjusted regression analyses, LTFU was independently increased at regional hospitals (aHR 2.19; 95% CI: 1.94-2.47 and mortality was independently elevated at district hospitals (aHR 1.60; 95% CI: 1.30-1.99 compared to PHC facilities after 12 months of ART. District and regional hospital patients had independently reduced probabilities of VS, aOR 0.76 (95% CI: 0.59-0.97 and 0.64 (95% CI: 0.56-0.75 respectively compared to PHC facilities over 24 months of treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ART outcomes were superior at PHC facilities, despite PHC patients having more advanced clinical stage disease when starting ART, suggesting that ART can be adequately provided at this level and supporting the South African government's call for rapid up-scaling of ART at the primary level of care. Further prospective research is required to determine the degree to which

  19. Evaluation of the impact of a simple hand-washing and water-treatment intervention in rural health facilities on hygiene knowledge and reported behaviours of health workers and their clients, Nyanza Province, Kenya, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, N; Gotestrand, S A; Ombeki, S; Oluoch, G; Fischer, T K; Quick, R

    2015-03-01

    Many clinics in rural western Kenya lack access to safe water and hand-washing facilities. To address this problem, in 2005 a programme was initiated to install water stations for hand washing and drinking water in 109 health facilities, train health workers on water treatment and hygiene, and motivate clients to adopt these practices. In 2008, we evaluated this intervention's impact by conducting observations at facilities, and interviewing staff and clients about water treatment and hygiene. Of 30 randomly selected facilities, 97% had water stations in use. Chlorine residuals were detectable in at least one container at 59% of facilities. Of 164 interviewed staff, 79% knew the recommended water-treatment procedure. Of 298 clients, 45% had received training on water treatment at a facility; of these, 68% knew the recommended water-treatment procedure. Use of water stations, water treatment, and client training were sustained in some facilities for up to 3 years.

  20. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992. Appendixes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-07

    This report contains the following appendices: Appendix A - Requirements for Undergraduate Level; Appendix B - Requirements for Graduate Level; Appendix C - Graduate Degree In Environmental Engineering; Appendix D - Non-degree Certificate Program; Appendix E - Curriculum for Associate Degree Program; Appendix F - Curriculum for NCC Program; Appendix G - Information 1991 Teleconference Series; Appendix H - Information on 1992 Teleconference Series; Appendix I - WERC interactive Television Courses; Appendix J - WERC Research Seminar Series; Appendix K - Sites for Hazardous/Radioactive Waste Management Series; Appendix L- Summary of Technology Development of the Second Year; Appendix M - List of Major Publications Resulting from WERC; Appendix N - Types of Equipment at WERC Laboratories.

  1. Facility Microgrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  2. Development and evaluation of a full-scale spray scrubber for ammonia recovery and production of nitrogen fertilizer at poultry facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadlocon, Lara Jane S; Manuzon, Roderick B; Zhao, Lingying

    2015-01-01

    Significant ammonia emissions from animal facilities need to be controlled due to its negative impacts on human health and the environment. The use of acid spray scrubber is promising, as it simultaneously mitigates and recovers ammonia emission for fertilizer. Its low pressure drop contribution on axial fans makes it applicable on US farms. This study develops a full-scale acid spray scrubber to recover ammonia emissions from commercial poultry facilities and produce nitrogen fertilizer. The scrubber performance and economic feasibility were evaluated at a commercial poultry manure composting facility that released ammonia from exhaust fans with concentrations of 66-278 ppmv and total emission rate of 96,143 kg yr(-1). The scrubber consisted of 15 spray scrubber modules, each equipped with three full-cone nozzles that used dilute sulphuric acid as the medium. Each nozzle was operated at 0.59 MPa with a droplet size of 113 μm and liquid flow rate of 1.8 L min(-1). The scrubber was installed with a 1.3-m exhaust fan and field tested in four seasons. Results showed that the scrubber achieved high NH3 removal efficiencies (71-81%) and low pressure drop (fertilizer. Preliminary economic analysis indicated that the break-even time is one year. This study demonstrates that acid spray scrubbers can economically and effectively recover NH3 from animal facilities for fertilizer.

  3. Laser Guidance Analysis Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility, which provides for real time, closed loop evaluation of semi-active laser guidance hardware, has and continues to be instrumental in the development...

  4. Evaluation of the Color Me Healthy Program in Influencing Nutrition and Physical Activity in Mississippi Preschool Child Care Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huye, Holly F.; Bankston, Sarah; Speed, Donna; Molaison, Elaine F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the level of implementation and perceived value in creating knowledge and behavior change from the Color Me Healthy (CMH) training program in child care centers, family day carehomes, or Head Start facilities throughout Mississippi. Methods: A two-phase survey was used to initially…

  5. Evaluating Potential Human Health Risks Associated with the Development of Utility-Scale Solar Energy Facilities on Contaminated Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, J. -J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chang, Y. -S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hartmann, H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wescott, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kygeris, C. [Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania, PA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    This report presents a general methodology for obtaining preliminary estimates of the potential human health risks associated with developing a utility-scale solar energy facility on a contaminated site, based on potential exposures to contaminants in soils (including transport of those contaminants into the air).

  6. Assessment and documentation of non-healing, chronic wounds in inpatient health care facilities in the Czech Republic: an evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorná, Andrea; Leaper, David

    2015-04-01

    The foundation of health care management of patients with non-healing, chronic wounds needs accurate evaluation followed by the selection of an appropriate therapeutic strategy. Assessment of non-healing, chronic wounds in clinical practice in the Czech Republic is not standardised. The aim of this study was to analyse the methods being used to assess non-healing, chronic wounds in inpatient facilities in the Czech Republic. The research was carried out at 77 inpatient medical facilities (8 university/faculty hospitals, 63 hospitals and 6 long- term hospitals) across all regions of the Czech Republic. A mixed model was used for the research (participatory observation including creation of field notes and content analysis of documents for documentation and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data). The results of this research have corroborated the suspicion of inconsistencies in procedures used by general nurses for assessment of non-healing, chronic wounds. However, the situation was found to be more positive with regard to evaluation of basic/fundamental parameters of a wound (e.g. size, depth and location of a wound) compared with the evaluation of more specific parameters (e.g. exudate or signs of infection). This included not only the number of observed variables, but also the action taken. Both were significantly improved when a consultant for wound healing was present (P = 0·047). The same applied to facilities possessing a certificate of quality issued by the Czech Wound Management Association (P = 0·010). In conclusion, an effective strategy for wound management depends on the method and scope of the assessment of non-healing, chronic wounds in place in clinical practice in observed facilities; improvement may be expected following the general introduction of a 'non-healing, chronic wound assessment' algorithm.

  7. Hazardous Waste Land Disposal Facility Assessment. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    Facilities ( DALF ) at RVA" (USATHANA, 1984) provided the basis for the volume estimates for siting a disposal facility as discussed in Appendix 1.3. The... DALF also addressed on-site disposal options in addition to other technologies. This study supported the on-site disposal option by stating that a...impermeable bedrock do not exist at RMA. The DALF , drawing on the conclusions of the earlier WES 1983 report, recoumended a site in the northeast quarter of

  8. Auditing radiation sterilization facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jeffrey A.

    The diversity of radiation sterilization systems available today places renewed emphasis on the need for thorough Quality Assurance audits of these facilities. Evaluating compliance with Good Manufacturing Practices is an obvious requirement, but an effective audit must also evaluate installation and performance qualification programs (validation_, and process control and monitoring procedures in detail. The present paper describes general standards that radiation sterilization operations should meet in each of these key areas, and provides basic guidance for conducting QA audits of these facilities.

  9. Antenna Test Facility (ATF): User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  10. Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility (VATF): User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantasia, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the VATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  11. An evaluation of Snoezelen(®) compared to 'common best practice' for allaying the symptoms of wandering and restlessness among residents with dementia in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael; Rayner, Jo-Anne; Tang, Judy; Koch, Susan; While, Christine; O'Keefe, Fleur

    2015-01-01

    Snoezelen has become an increasingly popular therapy in residential aged care facilities in Australia and elsewhere, despite no conclusive evidence of its clinical efficacy. This paper reports on an evaluation of the use of Snoezelen compared to 'common best practice' for allaying the dementia related behaviors of wandering and restlessness in two residential aged care facilities in Victoria, Australia. Sixteen residents had their behavior and responses to Snoezelen or 'common best practice' observed and recorded over three time periods. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed there was a significant improvement in behaviors immediately after the intervention and after 60 min. However, no significant differences were found between residents receiving Snoezelen and 'common best practice' interventions for the reduction of the dementia related behaviors.

  12. Dynamic pilot plant facility for applications in CSP: Evaluation of corrosion resistance of A516 in a nitrate molten salt mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Francisco Javier; Encinas-Sánchez, Víctor; García-Martín, Gustavo; Lasanta, María Isabel; de Miguel, María Teresa

    2017-06-01

    This paper evaluates the corrosion of A516 carbon steel in the binary Solar Salt (60 wt.% NaNO3/40 wt.% KNO3) by immersion tests with continuous salt flow at 500 °C. To this end, a novel patented experimental facility enabling dynamic degradation tests of materials in contact with molten mediums was developed and used. Experimental results showed greater corrosion rates and thicker oxide layers in samples subjected to tests with continuous salt flow than the static ones. The dynamic test facility simulates real conditions (flux, thermocycling, etc.) of a CSP plant. The patented experimental pilot plant is a great step forward in learning about the physicochemical properties and behavior of molten salts and also behavior of substrates in contact with them under realistic working conditions.

  13. Operation, Maintenance and Evaluation of the Bonifer and Minthorn Springs Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facilities, 1988 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lofy, Peter T.

    1989-12-01

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife are cooperating in a joint effort to increase steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding adult steelhead and acclimation and release of juvenile steelhead and salmon. This report details the projects and maintenance done during 1988.

  14. Better visualization of vermiform appendix with tissue harmonic imaging compared to conventional sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inal, Mikail; Unal, Birsen; Bilgili, Yasemin Karadeniz

    2014-12-01

    Surgery of appendicitis carries 7-11% negative appendectomy rates. Sonographically visualized normal appendix precludes unnecessary computed tomography (CT) examination and may reduce negative appendectomy rates. Tissue harmonic imaging (THI) has been reported to improve the overall image quality. We aimed to assess whether THI is more successful than conventional ultrasonography (US) in detecting normal and pathologic appendices. The study was performed on 185 patients who applied for routine US examinations in whom clinical findings of appendicitis were detected in 25. We searched for the appendix; applying both THI and conventional US to each patient, one before and the other after the routine US examinations. Patients were divided into two groups; one was evaluated first with conventional US and the other first with THI. When the appendix was found, localization, diameter and time spent for visualization were recorded. Twelve patients were operated; all of whom had appendicitis pathologically. Two methods were compared for: 1. Success rates in all patients; female, male and child groups separately; 2. Visualization of pathologic and normal appendices; 3. Time for visualization of appendix; 4. Comparison of success rates in the adult and child population. The relationship between the rate of visualization and body mass index was evaluated. The appendix was visualized better by THI in all patients, and in the female and male groups (P imaging). THI visualizes appendix better than conventional US. It is a simple and time saving method that may eliminate further diagnostic imaging, and it may decrease negative appendectomy rates and related complications.

  15. Computed tomography localization of the appendix in the pediatric population relative to the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, John; Kopelman, Tammy R. [Maricopa Integrated Health System, Maricopa Medical Center Department of Surgery, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Roh, Albert T.; Matz, Samantha L.; Gridley, Daniel G.; Connell, Mary J. [Maricopa Integrated Health System, Maricopa Medical Center Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Petterson, Matthew B. [University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is commonly used to evaluate suspected acute appendicitis. Although very effective, CT uses ionizing radiation, exposing patients to an increased risk of cancer. This study assessed the potential for decreasing the field of view of the CT (and therefore the dose to the patient) in the evaluation of suspected acute appendicitis in children. This study was a retrospective review of prospectively collected data from 212 consecutive patients who underwent CT for suspected acute appendicitis. The most superior aspect of the appendix with respect to vertebral bodies was recorded. Age, gender and diagnosis (negative, acute appendicitis or alternative diagnosis) were noted. The appendix was visualized in 190 of 212 subjects (89.6%). Overall, all visualized appendixes were located at or below the level of L1. Sixty-three of the subjects (29.7%) were diagnosed with acute appendicitis via CT imaging. All appendixes in patients with acute appendicitis were located at or below the level of the L3 vertebral body, predominating at the level of L5. Six subjects (3.1%) received alternative diagnoses, including pneumonia, pyelonephritis, small bowel obstruction and infected urachal cyst. There were no differences in appendix location with regard to diagnosis, gender, or age (P=0.664, 0.748 and 0.705, respectively). CT field of view may be decreased to the level of L1 or L3 superiorly, decreasing radiation dose without affecting the rate of appendix visualization. (orig.)

  16. Streptococcus milleri in the appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, P M; Wilson, G

    1977-10-01

    The appendix was investigated as a possible habitat of Streptococcus milleri. Both normal and inflamed appendices were examined and the isolation rates compared. S. milleri was present in a quarter of the normal appendices and more than half of those associated with apendicitis--a difference that was statistically highly significant. The isolation rates throughout were indepencent of age. There was a pronounced connection between the presence of S. milleri in the appendix and the purulent manifestations of appendicitis. S. milleri was isolated from other abdominal sites associated with appendicitis. The frequency of isolation was increased by culture in an enrichment broth containing nalidixic acid and sulphadimidine.

  17. Fast Flux Test Facility final safety analysis report. Amendment 73

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantt, D.A.

    1993-08-01

    This report provides Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Amendment 73 for incorporation into the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTR) FSAR set. This page change incorporates Engineering Change Notices (ECNs) issued subsequent to Amendment 72 and approved for incorparoration before May 6, 1993. These changes include: Chapter 3, design criteria structures, equipment, and systems; chapter 5B, reactor coolant system; chapter 7, instrumentation and control systems; chapter 9, auxiliary systems; chapter 11, reactor refueling system; chapter 12, radiation protection and waste management; chapter 13, conduct of operations; chapter 17, technical specifications; chapter 20, FFTF criticality specifications; appendix C, local fuel failure events; and appendix Fl, operation at 680{degrees}F inlet temperature.

  18. Fast Flux Test Facility final safety analysis report. Amendment 73

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantt, D.A.

    1993-08-01

    This report provides Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Amendment 73 for incorporation into the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTR) FSAR set. This page change incorporates Engineering Change Notices (ECNs) issued subsequent to Amendment 72 and approved for incorparoration before May 6, 1993. These changes include: Chapter 3, design criteria structures, equipment, and systems; chapter 5B, reactor coolant system; chapter 7, instrumentation and control systems; chapter 9, auxiliary systems; chapter 11, reactor refueling system; chapter 12, radiation protection and waste management; chapter 13, conduct of operations; chapter 17, technical specifications; chapter 20, FFTF criticality specifications; appendix C, local fuel failure events; and appendix Fl, operation at 680{degrees}F inlet temperature.

  19. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1998 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-01-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Snake River stock) yearling fall chinook salmon that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1998. The three fall chinook acclimation facilities are operated by the Nez Perce Tribe and located at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Yearlings at the Big Canyon facility consisted of two size classes that are referred to in this report as 9.5 fish per pound (fpp) and 30 fpp. The Big Canyon 9.5 fpp were comparable to the yearlings at Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. A total of 9,942 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Pittsburg Landing. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.19. Of the 9,942 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 6,836 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary). A total of 4,926 9.5 fpp and 2,532 30 fpp yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Big Canyon. PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 156.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.13. PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 113.1 mm and mean condition factor of 1.18. Of the 4,926 PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released, a total of 3,042 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. Of the 2,532 PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released, a total of 1,130 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 1,253 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Captain John Rapids. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 147.5 mm and mean condition factor of 1.09. Of

  20. Evaluating an Integrated Approach to the Management of Cerebral Palsy. Appendix B: Field Test Report of the Eau Claire Functional Abilities Test and the Wolfe-Bluel Socialization Inventory. Volume III of IV. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heal, Laird W.

    The appendix examined the measurement instruments developed in the course of the Integrated Management of Cerebral Palsy project to measure functional movements and socialization skills of severly handicapped, nonambulatory cerebral palsied children who had limited speech. The field test sample consisted of 51 cases for the Eau Claire Functional…

  1. Topical report: Natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) evaluation for generating additional reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Tzanos, C.P.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Pointer, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2005-09-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Generation IV roadmapping activity, the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) has been selected as the principal concept for hydrogen production and other process-heat applications such as district heating and potable water production. On this basis, the DOE has selected the VHTR for additional R&D with the ultimate goal of demonstrating emission-free electricity and hydrogen production with this advanced reactor concept. One of the key passive safety features of the VHTR is the potential for decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-cooled RCCS concept is notably similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that was developed for the General Electric PRISM sodium-cooled fast reactor. As part of the DOE R&D program that supported the development of this fast reactor concept, the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) was developed at ANL to provide proof-of-concept data for the RVACS under prototypic natural convection flow, temperature, and heat flux conditions. Due to the similarity between RVACS and the RCCS, current VHTR R&D plans call for the utilization of the NSTF to provide RCCS model development and validation data, in addition to supporting design validation and optimization activities. Both air-cooled and water-cooled RCCS designs are to be included. In support of this effort, ANL has been tasked with the development of an engineering plan for mechanical and instrumentation modifications to NSTF to ensure that sufficiently detailed temperature, heat flux, velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained to adequately qualify the codes under the expected range of air-cooled RCCS flow conditions. Next year, similar work will be carried out for the alternative option of a water-cooled RCCS design. Analysis activities carried out in support of this experiment planning task have shown that: (a) in the RCCS, strong

  2. Development of Novel Decontamination Techniques for Chemical Agents (GB, VX, HD) Contaminated Facilities. Phase II. Laboratory Evaluation of Novel Agent Decontamination Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-21

    Frijlink, C., "Degradation of S-2-di-isopropyla- minoethyl O-ethyl Methylphosphonothioate in Soil:Sulphur Containing Products", Pestic . Science, 8, 510-514...Soil:Phosphorus Containing Products", Pestic . Science, 7, 355-362 (1976). 586 ............ APPENDIX VIII SUBTASK 10. JACADS DECONTAMINANT DATA BASE 587

  3. Progress report on evaluation of potential impact of /sup 14/C releases from an HTGR reprocessing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killough, G.G.; Dixon, K.R.; Edwards, N.T.; Murphy, B.D.; Rohwer, P.S.; Harris, W.F.; Kaye, S.V.

    1976-07-01

    The potential radiological impacts of atmospheric releases of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ are assessed for a model HTGR reprocessing facility. Two off-gas systems were considered: (1) a 300-ft stack with no thermal output, and (2) a 1000-ft stack with a stack gas temperature of 80/sup 0/C and heat output of 4.2 x 10/sup 7/ Btu/hr. Meteorological data for the Oak Ridge area were used with an assumed annual release rate of 5000 Ci as input to an atmospheric transport model, which in turn was used to predict air concentrations of /sup 14/C at points of habitation and food production in the local area (within 50 miles) of the facility. The total-body dose rates estimated for the average resident living in the local area were 0.107 mrem/yr for the 300-ft stack and 0.063 mrem/yr for the 1000-ft stack. Population doses were computed for a population of 10/sup 6/ individuals uniformly distributed within the 50-mile local area of the facility; these were 110 man-rem for the 300-ft stack and 63 man-rem for the 1000-ft stack. The results of these dose calculations suggest that a 1000-ft stack would be very effective in reducing the estimated doses. Plant growth carbon assimilation model was derived in order to investigate the adequacy of the assumption of tissue equilibration with time-averaged ambient specific activity as a basis for dose estimates. Simulation runs with these models suggest that in the presence of frequent fluctuations of large amplitude in the ambient air /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ concentrations, specific activity in plant tissue can exceed conventionally calculated time-averaged specific activity.

  4. Geologic evaluation of six nonwelded tuff sites in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada for a surface-based test facility for the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broxton, D.E.; Chipera, S.J.; Byers, F.M. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rautman, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Outcrops of nonwelded tuff at six locations in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, were examined to determine their suitability for hosting a surface-based test facility for the Yucca Mountain Project. Investigators will use this facility to test equipment and procedures for the Exploratory Studies Facility and to conduct site characterization field experiments. The outcrops investigated contain rocks that include or are similar to the tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills, an important geologic and hydrologic barrier between the potential repository and the water table. The tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills at the site of the potential repository consist of both vitric and zeolitic tuffs, thus three of the outcrops examined are vitric tuffs and three are zeolitic tuffs. New data were collected to determine the lithology, chemistry, mineralogy, and modal petrography of the outcrops. Some preliminary data on hydrologic properties are also presented. Evaluation of suitability of the six sites is based on a comparison of their geologic characteristics to those found in the tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills within the exploration block.

  5. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2 -- Appendix A: Characterization methods and data summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5. This appendix presents background regulatory and technical information regarding the solid waste management units (SWMUs) at WAG 5 to address requirements established by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The US Department of Energy (DOE) agreed to conduct remedial investigations (RIs) under the FFA at various sites at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including SWMUs and other areas of concern on WAG 5. The appendix gives an overview of the regulatory background to provide the context in which the WAG 5 RI was planned and implemented and documents how historical sources of data, many of which are SWMU-specific, were evaluated and used.

  6. Use of international data sets to evaluate and validate pathway assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities. Progress report, August 1993--January 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

    1994-03-01

    This project, ``Use of International Data Sets to Evaluate and Validate Pathway Assessment Models Applicable to Exposure and Dose Reconstruction at DOE Facilities,`` grew out of several activities being conducted by the Principal Investigator Dr. F Owen Hoffman. One activity was originally part of the Chernobyl Studies Project and began as Task 7.1D, ``Internal Dose From Direct Contamination of Terrestrial Food Sources.`` The objective of Task 7.1D was to (1) establish a collaborative US USSR effort to improve and validate our methods of forecasting doses and dose commitments from the direct contamination of food sources, and (2) perform experiments and validation studies to improve our ability to predict rapidly and accurately the long-term internal dose from the contamination of agricultural soil. The latter was to include the consideration of remedial measures to block contamination of food grown on contaminated soil. The current objective of this project is to evaluate and validate pathway-assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities through use of international data sets. This project incorporates the activity of Task 7.1D into a multinational effort to evaluate data used for the prediction of radionuclide transfer through agricultural and aquatic systems to humans. It also includes participation in two multinational studies, BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) with the Swedish National Institute for Radiation Protection and VAMP (VAlidation of Model Predictions) with the International Atomic Energy Agency, that address testing the performance of models of radionuclide transport through foodchains.

  7. Evaluation of Structural Treatment Efficacy against Tribolium castaneum and Tribolium confusum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) Using Meta-Analysis of Multiple Studies Conducted in Food Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James F; Buckman, Karrie A; Fields, Paul G; Subramanyam, Bhadriraju

    2015-10-01

    The phase out of methyl bromide for the treatment of structures where grain is milled or processed has triggered a need to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative structural treatments such as sulfuryl fluoride and heat. Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (red flour beetle) and Tribolium confusum Jacquelin du Val (confused flour beetle) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) are primary targets for structural treatments, and impact of treatments on these species was evaluated in this study. Efficacy was measured by comparing beetle captures in pheromone- and kairomone-baited traps immediately before and immediately after treatments. Studies were conducted primarily in commercial wheat mills and rice mills, with the treatments conducted by commercial applicators. A meta-analysis approach was used to evaluate efficacy data collected from 111 treatments applied in 39 facilities. Findings confirm that structural fumigations and heat treatments greatly reduce pest populations within food facilities, but there was significant variation in the efficacy of individual treatments. Generally, the different treatment types (sulfuryl fluoride, methyl bromide, and heat) provided similar reductions in beetle capture using multiple metrics of beetle activity. The novel application of meta-analysis to structural treatment efficacy assessment generated a robust estimate of overall treatment efficacy, provided insights into factors potentially impacting efficacy, and identified data gaps that need further research. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  8. Skylab experiment performance evaluation manual. Appendix T: Experiment T027/S073 contamination measurement, photometer and Gegenschein/zodiacal light (MSFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A series of analyses for Experiment T027/S073, contamination measurement, photometer and gegenschein/zodiacal light (MSFC), to be used for evaluating the performance of the Skylab corollary experiments under preflight, inflight, and post-flight conditons is presented. Experiment contingency plan workaround procedure and malfunction analyses are presented in order to assist in making the experiment operationally successful.

  9. Evaluation of the thermal-hydraulic response and fuel rod thermal and mechanical deformation behavior during the power burst facility test LOC-3. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yackle, T.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Broughton, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of the results from the LOC-3 nuclear blowdown test conducted in the Power Burst Facility is presented. The test objective was to examine fuel and cladding behavior during a postulated cold leg break accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Separate effects of rod internal pressure and the degree of irradiation were investigated in the four-rod test. Extensive cladding deformation (ballooning) and failure occurred during blowdown. The deformation of the low and high pressure rods was similar; however, the previously irradiated test rod deformed to a greater extent than a similar fresh rod exposed to identical system conditions.

  10. Growth hormone secretion during space flight and evaluation of the physiological responses of animals held in the research animal holding facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Thomas N.; Grindeland, Richard; Mehler, William; Oyama, Jiro

    1987-01-01

    The spaceflight of the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF) on the Space Laboratory 3 (SL 3) provided the opportunity to evaluate the suitability of the RAHF for housing and maintaining experimental animals during spaceflight, and to determine changes in the secretion of growth hormone during spaceflight. Using ground-based studies the following were investigated: the optimum conditions for creating gravitational force on space flight animals; neural pathways that may play a role in the space flight syndrome; and the time course of muscle atrophy due to hypodynamia and hypokenesia in hindlimb-suspended animals and the role of growth hormone in these processes.

  11. [Pinworm infestation of the appendix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, L; Berghenti, M; Cocuzza, C; Manfredini, A; Sciascia, V; Salmi, R

    2006-01-01

    The Authors present 2 cases of enterobiasis of appendix observed on a total of 186 appendicectomies. Enterobius infestation is an uncommon cause of acute appendicitis. Preoperative diagnosis of pinworm infestation is almost impossible without clinical suspect. Parasites may produce symptoms which resemble acute appendicitis but parasitic infection rarely causes it. It is also important considered in the differential diagnosis cases that mimic Crohn's disease.

  12. Evaluation of an initiative to reduce radiation exposure from CT to children in a non-pediatric-focused facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumfield, Einat; Zember, Jonathan; Guelfguat, Mark; Blumfield, Amit; Goldman, Harold

    2015-12-01

    We would like to share our experience of reducing pediatric radiation exposure. Much of the recent literature regarding successes of reducing radiation exposure has come from dedicated children's hospitals. Nonetheless, over the past two decades, there has been a considerable increase in CT imaging of children in the USA, predominantly in non-pediatric-focused facilities where the majority of children are treated. In our institution, two general hospitals with limited pediatric services, a dedicated initiative intended to reduce children's exposure to CT radiation was started by pediatric radiologists in 2005. The initiative addressed multiple issues including eliminating multiphase studies, decreasing inappropriate scans, educating referring providers, training residents and technologists, replacing CT with ultrasound or MRI, and ensuring availability of pediatric radiologists for consultation. During the study period, the total number of CT scans decreased by 24 %. When accounting for the number of scans per visit to the emergency department (ED), the numbers of abdominal and head CT scans decreased by 37.2 and 35.2 %, respectively. For abdominal scans, the average number of phases per scan decreased from 1.70 to 1.04. Upon surveying the pediatric ED staff, it was revealed that the most influential factors on ordering of scans were daily communication with pediatric radiologists, followed by journal articles and lectures by pediatric radiologists. We concluded that a non-pediatric-focused facility can achieve dramatic reduction in CT radiation exposure to children; however, this is most effectively achieved through a dedicated, multidisciplinary process led by pediatric radiologists.

  13. Evaluation of radioactive facilities safety using event trees; Evaluacion de la seguridad de instalaciones radiactivas utilizando arboles de evento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Saiz, A.; Cornejo Diaz, N.; Callis Fernandez, E.

    2004-07-01

    The validity of using the Event Trees as an adequate quantitative analysis model for doing radiological safety assessments of radioactive facilities is presented in this work. The radiological safety assessments made for four Departments of Radiotherapy (Teletherapy with Co-60 and High Dose Rate afterloading brachytherapy with Ir-192) from different hospitals were taken as the base for the analysis. By the use of this model were obtained quantitative results. The probabilities to reach a typical scenario in a first stage, and then, based on previously doses calculations in the same scenario, the total risk values, were obtained. The unauthorized entry into a radiation room while the source is in its fully exposed position was the main scenario identified. The numerical values obtained using this model supported the radiological safety assessments made during the licensing process of those installations. The analysis of the intrinsic safety systems of the radiotherapy equipments was not included in the study because it's design was accepted by the Regulatory Authority and also meet the criterion of proven effectiveness. The use of this model let us suggest modifications such as the adding of any component to the system and/or the change of its position in order to minimize the probability of reaching the mentioned scenario. The model is also useful to confirm that the present international requirements for the safety systems in this type of facilities lead to practices with better or similar total risk levels than others considered as safe. (Author)

  14. Evaluation of the effects of underground water usage and spillage in the Exploratory Studies Facility; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, E.; Sobolik, S.R.

    1993-12-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level radioactive waste repository. Analyses reported herein were performed to support the design of site characterization activities so that these activities will have a minimal impact on the ability of the site to isolate waste and a minimal impact on underground tests performed as part of the characterization process. These analyses examine the effect of water to be used in the underground construction and testing activities for the Exploratory Studies Facility on in situ conditions. Underground activities and events where water will be used include construction, expected but unplanned spills, and fire protection. The models used predict that, if the current requirements in the Exploratory Studies Facility Design Requirements are observed, water that is imbibed into the tunnel wall rock in the Topopah Springs welded tuff can be removed over the preclosure time period by routine or corrective ventilation, and also that water imbibed into the Paintbrush Tuff nonwelded tuff will not reach the potential waste storage area.

  15. Post-test thermal-hydraulic analysis of two intermediate LOCA tests at the ROSA facility including uncertainty evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freixa, J., E-mail: jordi@freixa.net [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kim, T.-W. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Manera, A. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    The OECD/NEA ROSA-2 project aims at addressing thermal-hydraulic safety issues relevant for light water reactors by building up an experimental database at the ROSA Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The ROSA facility simulates a PWR Westinghouse design with a four-loop configuration and a nominal power of 3423 MWth. Two intermediate break loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) experiments (Tests 1 and 2) have been carried out during 2010. The two tests were analyzed by using the US-NRC TRACE best estimate code, employing the same nodalization previously used for the simulation of small-break LOCA experiments of the ROSA-1 programme. A post-test calculation was performed for each test along with uncertainty analysis providing uncertainty bands for each relevant time trend. Uncertainties in the code modelling capabilities as well as in the initial and boundary conditions were taken into account, following the guidelines and lessons learnt through participation in the OECD/NEA BEMUSE programme. Two different versions of the TRACE code were used in the analysis, providing a qualitatively good prediction of the tests. However, the uncertainty analysis revealed differences between the performances of some models in the two versions. The most relevant parameters of the two experimental tests were falling within the computed uncertainty bands.

  16. Post-test thermal-hydraulic analysis of two intermediate LOCA tests at the ROSA facility including uncertainty evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freixa, J.; Kim, T-W.; Manera, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    The OECD/NEA ROSA-2 project aims at addressing thermal-hydraulic safety issues relevant for light water reactors by building up an experimental database at the ROSA Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The ROSA facility simulates a PWR Westinghouse design with a four-loop configuration and a nominal power of 3423 MWth. Two intermediate break loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) experiments (Test 1 and 2) have been carried out during 2010. The two tests were analyzed by using the US-NRC TRACE best estimate code, employing the same nodalization previously used for the simulation of small-break LOCA experiments of the ROSA-1 program. A post-test calculation was performed for each test along with uncertainty analysis providing uncertainty bands for each relevant time trend. Uncertainties in the code modeling capabilities as well as in the initial and boundary conditions were taken into account, following the guidelines and lessons learnt through participation in the OECD/NEA BEMUSE program. Two different versions of the TRACE code were used in the analysis, providing a qualitatively good prediction of the tests. However, both versions showed deficiencies that need to be addressed. The most relevant parameters of the two experimental tests were falling within the computed uncertainty bands. (author)

  17. 29 CFR Appendix B to Part 1 - Appendix B to Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Appendix B to Part 1 B Appendix B to Part 1 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PROCEDURES FOR PREDETERMINATION OF WAGE RATES Pt. 1, App. B Appendix B to Part... Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Utah and Wyoming: Regional Administrator, Wage and...

  18. 43 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 17 A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 17 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior... Race, Color, or National Origin Pt. 17, Subpt. A, App. A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 17...

  19. 24 CFR Appendix Ms-2 to Part 3500 - Appendix MS-2 to Part 3500

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE SETTLEMENT PROCEDURES ACT Pt. 3500, App. MS-2 Appendix MS-2 to... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Appendix MS-2 to Part 3500 MS Appendix MS-2 to Part 3500 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and...

  20. 24 CFR Appendix Ms-1 to Part 3500 - Appendix MS-1 to Part 3500

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT REAL ESTATE SETTLEMENT PROCEDURES ACT Pt. 3500, App. MS-1 Appendix MS-1 to... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Appendix MS-1 to Part 3500 MS Appendix MS-1 to Part 3500 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and...

  1. Screening study for waste biomass to ethanol production facility using the Amoco process in New York State. Appendices to the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The final report evaluates the economic feasibility of locating biomass-to-ethanol waste conversion facilities in New York State. Part 1 of the study evaluates 74 potential sites in New York City and identifies two preferred sites on Staten Island, the Proctor and Gamble and the Arthur Kill sites for further consideration. Part 2 evaluates upstate New York and determines that four regions surrounding the urban centers of Albany, Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse provide suitable areas from which to select specific sites for further consideration. A conceptual design and economic viability evaluation were developed for a minimum-size facility capable of processing 500 tons per day (tpd) of biomass consisting of wood or paper, or a combination of the two for upstate regions. The facility would use Amoco`s biomass conversion technology and produce 49,000 gallons per day of ethanol and approximately 300 tpd of lignin solid by-product. For New York City, a 1,000-tpd processing facility was also evaluated to examine effects of economies of scale. The reports evaluate the feasibility of building a biomass conversion facility in terms of city and state economic, environmental, and community factors. Given the data obtained to date, including changing costs for feedstock and ethanol, the project is marginally attractive. A facility should be as large as possible and located in a New York State Economic Development Zone to take advantage of economic incentives. The facility should have on-site oxidation capabilities, which will make it more financially viable given the high cost of energy. This appendix to the final report provides supplemental material supporting the evaluations.

  2. 28 CFR Appendix C to Part 61 - Immigration and Naturalization Service Procedures Relating to the Implementation of the National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Immigration and Naturalization Service... ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Pt. 61, App. C Appendix C to Part 61—Immigration and Naturalization Service Procedures..., construction, and maintenance of new and existing INS facilities. All activities concerning the Immigration...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. III Appendix III...-adjusted effective stack height (m) Noncomplex terrain Values for urban areas Cl2 (g/hr) HCl (g/hr) Values...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 266 - Tier I and Tier II Feed Rate and Emissions Screening Limits for Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. I Appendix I to Part 266... Complex Terrain Values for urban and rural areas Terrain adjusted eff. stack ht. (m) Antimony (g/hr...

  5. Feasibility study for biomass power plants in Thailand. Volume 2. appendix: Detailed financial analysis results. Export trade information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    This study, conducted by Black & Veatch, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report presents a technical and commercial analysis for the development of three nearly identical electricity generating facilities (biomass steam power plants) in the towns of Chachgoengsao, Suphan Buri, and Pichit in Thailand. Volume 2 of the study contains the following appendix: Detailed Financial Analysis Results.

  6. 7 CFR Appendix I to Subpart E of... - Instructions for Loan Guarantees for Drought and Disaster Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... Ineligible loan purposes. See § 1980.412. Except for hotels, motels, tourist and recreation facilities... Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE... Business and Industrial Loan Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, App. I Appendix I to Subpart E of Part 1980...

  7. Criticality Safety Evaluation for Small Sample Preparation and Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) Operations in Wing 7 Basement of the CMR Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunkle, Paige Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zhang, Ning [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-02

    Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) has reviewed the fissionable material small sample preparation and NDA operations in Wing 7 Basement of the CMR Facility. This is a Level-1 evaluation conducted in accordance with NCS-AP-004 [Reference 1], formerly NCS-GUIDE-01, and the guidance set forth on use of the Standard Criticality Safety Requirements (SCSRs) [Reference 2]. As stated in Reference 2, the criticality safety evaluation consists of both the SCSR CSED and the SCSR Application CSED. The SCSR CSED is a Level-3 CSED [Reference 3]. This Level-1 CSED is the SCSR Application CSED. This SCSR Application (Level-1) evaluation does not derive controls, it simply applies controls derived from the SCSR CSED (Level-3) for the application of operations conducted here. The controls derived in the SCSR CSED (Level-3) were evaluated via the process described in Section 6.6.5 of SD-130 (also reproduced in Section 4.3.5 of NCS-AP-004 [Reference 1]) and were determined to not meet the requirements for consideration of elevation into the safety basis documentation for CMR. According to the guidance set forth on use of the SCSRs [Reference 2], the SCSR CSED (Level-3) is also applicable to the CMR Facility because the process and the normal and credible abnormal conditions in question are bounded by those that are described in the SCSR CSED. The controls derived in the SCSR CSED include allowances for solid materials and solution operations. Based on the operations conducted at this location, there are less-than-accountable (LTA) amounts of 233U. Based on the evaluation documented herein, the normal and credible abnormal conditions that might arise during the execution of this process will remain subcritical with the following recommended controls.

  8. Facility effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the facility effluent monitoring programs and provides an evaluation of effluent monitoring data. These evaluations are useful in assessing the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control systems, as well as management practices.

  9. Consolidated Incineration Facility, Savannah River Site. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential impacts associated with the siting, construction, and operation of the proposed Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF), at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina. The text of the document is unchanged from the EA issued in June 1992, with the following three exceptions: (1) Section 2.1 refers to recent solid waste forecast information; (2) Section 4.5.1 deletes the reference to dioxin emission standards; and (3) a footnote to Section 4.6.2 includes the results of a morr, conservative risk factor. An additional appendix has also been added to the EA. Appendix B presents comments received on the June 1992 EA and the Proposed FONSI from federal, state, and local agencies, interest groups, and individuals. Appendix B also contains both general and specific DOE responses to these comments.

  10. Remedial site evaluation report for the waste area grouping 10 wells associated with the new hydrofracture facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Evaluation, interpretation, and data summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Lockheed Martin Energy System (Energy Systems). ORNL has pioneered waste disposal technologies since World War II as part of its DOE mission. In the late 1950s, at the request of the National Academy of Sciences, efforts were made to develop a permanent disposal alternative to the surface and tanks at ORNL. One such technology, the hydrofracture process, involved inducing fractures in a geologic host formation (a low-permeability shale) at depths of up to 1100 ft and injecting a radioactive grout slurry containing low-level liquid or tank sludge waste, cement, and other additives at an injection pressure of 2000 to 8500 psi. The objective of the effort was to develop a grout dig could be injected as a slurry and would solidify after injection, thereby entombing the radioisotopes contained in the low-level liquid or tank sludge waste. Four sites at ORNL were used: two experimental (HF-1 and HF-2); one developmental, later converted to batch process [Old Hydrofracture Facility (BF-3)]; and one production facility [New Hydrofracture Facility (BF-4)]. This document provides the environmental, restoration program with information about the the results of an evaluation of WAG 10 wells associated with the New Hydrofracture Facility at ORNL.

  11. Evaluation of nuclear facility decommissioning projects: Summary status report: Three Mile Island Unit 2. Radioactive waste and laundry shipments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerge, D. H.; Haffner, D. R.

    1988-06-01

    This document summarizes information concerning radioactive waste and laundry shipments from the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station Unit 2 to radioactive waste disposal sites and to protective clothing decontamination facilities (laundries) since the loss of coolant accident experienced on March 28, 1979. Data were collected from radioactive shipment records, summarized, and placed in a computerized data information retrieval/manipulation system which permits extraction of specific information. This report covers the period of April 9, 1979 through April 19, 1987. Included in this report are: waste disposal site locations, dose rates, curie content, waste description, container type and number, volumes and weights. This information is presented in two major categories: protective clothing (laundry) and radioactive waste. Each of the waste shipment reports is in chronological order.

  12. Evaluation of a performance assessment methodology for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities: Validation needs. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, M.W.; Olague, N.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-02-01

    In this report, concepts on how validation fits into the scheme of developing confidence in performance assessments are introduced. A general framework for validation and confidence building in regulatory decision making is provided. It is found that traditional validation studies have a very limited role in developing site-specific confidence in performance assessments. Indeed, validation studies are shown to have a role only in the context that their results can narrow the scope of initial investigations that should be considered in a performance assessment. In addition, validation needs for performance assessment of low-level waste disposal facilities are discussed, and potential approaches to address those needs are suggested. These areas of topical research are ranked in order of importance based on relevance to a performance assessment and likelihood of success.

  13. Assessment of very high-temperature reactors in process applications. Appendix III. Engineering evaluation of process heat applications for very-high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, D.S.; Williams, J.J.

    1977-04-01

    An engineering and economic evaluation is made of coal conversion processes that can be coupled to a very high-temperature nuclear reactor heat source. The basic system developed by General Atomic/Stone and Webster (GA/S and W) is similar to the H-coal process developed by Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., but is modified to accommodate a nuclear heat source and to produce synthetic natural gas (SNG), synthesis gas, and hydrogen in addition to synthetic crude liquids. The synthetic crude liquid production is analyzed by using the GA/S and W process coupled to either a nuclear- or fossil-heat source. Four other processes are included for comparison: (1) the Lurgi process for production of SNG, (2) the Koppers-Totzek process for production of either hydrogen or synthesis gas, (3) the Hygas process for production of SNG, and (4) the Westinghouse thermal-chemical water splitting process for production of hydrogen. The production of methanol and iron ore reduction are evaluated as two potential applications of synthesis gas from either the GA/S and W or Koppers-Totzek processes. The results indicate that the product costs for each of the gasification and liquefaction processes did not differ significantly, with the exception that the unproven Hygas process was cheaper and the Westinghouse process considerably more expensive than the others.

  14. Increasing the Rate of Return of Resident Rotation Evaluations by Their Attending Physicians in an In-Patient Psychiatric Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nurun; Thompson, Britta; Averill, Patricia; Searle, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatrist's evaluations of residents are the primary means of determining whether the residents are ready to be promoted. However, the return rate for evaluations is quite low. The purpose of this study was to increase the return rates. Methods: Feedback from two surveys and open discussion was utilized to develop and implement a…

  15. Criticality Safety Evaluation Report CSER-96-019 for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Processing and Storage Facilities Multi Canister Overpack (MCO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KESSLER, S.F.

    1999-10-20

    This criticality evaluation is for Spent N Reactor fuel unloaded from the existing canisters in both KE and KW Basins, and loaded into multiple canister overpack (MCO) containers with specially built baskets containing a maximum of either 54 Mark IV or 48 Mark IA fuel assemblies. The criticality evaluations include loading baskets into the cask-MCO, operation at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility,a nd storage in the Canister Storage Building. Many conservatisms have been built into this analysis, the primary one being the selection of the K{sub eff} = 0.95 criticality safety limit. This revision incorporates the analyses for the sampling/weld station in the Canister Storage Building and additional analysis of the MCO during the draining at CVDF. Additional discussion of the scrap basket model was added to show why the addition of copper divider plates was not included in the models.

  16. Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Three-Mile Falls Dam; Umatilla River, Oregon, 1989 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigro, Anthony A.

    1990-09-01

    We report on our progress from October 1989 through September 1990 on evaluating juvenile fish bypass and adult fish passage facilities at Three Mile Falls Dam on the Umatilla River. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). Study objectives addressed by ODFW and CTUIR are: (1) ODFW (Report A): Operate and evaluate the juvenile fish bypass system in the West Extension Irrigation District canal at Three Mile Falls Dam; and (2) CTUIR (Report 8): Examine the passage of adult salmonids at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin that includes restorations of coho salmon Oncorhynchus Wsutch and chinook salmon 0. tshawytscha and enhancement of summer steelhead 0. mytiss.

  17. Evaluation questions ''E'' concerning the enterprises employing personnel of A or B category working in nuclear facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Int. At. Energy Agency, Wien

    2002-01-01

    This document is a reference evaluation of a list of questions on the following subject: management, organization, medical survey, formation and information of the personnel, radiation protection, contract dispositions, CEFRI demands respect control. (A.L.B.)

  18. Evaluation questions ''I'' concerning the interim job enterprises proposing personnel of A or B category to work in nuclear facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Int. At. Energy Agency, Wien

    2002-01-01

    This document is a reference evaluation of a list of questions on the following subject: management, organization, medical survey, formation and information of the personnel, contract dispositions, CEFRI demands respect control. (A.L.B.)

  19. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  20. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  1. Canyon Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  2. Criteria report intermediate storage facility. Criteria for the evaluation of potential sites for an intermediate above-ground-storage facility for retrieves radioactive waste from the Asse II cavern; Kriterienbericht Zwischenlager. Kriterien zur Bewertung potenzieller Standorte fuer ein uebertaegiges Zwischenlager fuer die rueckgeholten radioaktiven Abfaelle aus der Schachtanlage Asse II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-01-10

    The BfS judged that the retrieval of the radioactive wastes from the Schacht Asse II is the best option for decommissioning. The recovered radioactive wastes shall be transported in special containers and conditioned in facilities near the site for the transport in a final repository. The criteria for the site selection for the required intermediate above-ground intermediate storage facility are defined including the criteria for the evaluation procedure.

  3. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the fast flux test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J M; Dahl, N R

    1992-11-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in US Department of Energy Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determination was performed during calendar year 1991 and the evaluation requires the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  4. Anesthetic management in an appendix tumor patient undergoing hyperthermic chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonca Yanlı

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytoreductive surgery combined with hyperthermic intraperitonealchemotherapy (HIPEC is a complex and multidisciplinerprocedure that is being used increasingly forperitoneal and appendix malignency. First of all the macroscopictumor tissues are extracted after that peritonealperfusion is started with giving heated 42°C chemotherapeuticsolution via abdominal drains. It is important tomaintain normovolemia, to regulate coagulation and renalparameters during perioperative period, to compansatehypothermia during cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermiaduring HIPEC and to regulate hemodynamic changesdue to increased abdominal pressure during HIPEC.In this case report, we aimed to share anaesthetic experienceand to evaluate anaesthetic problems in 45 yearsold ASA I patient undergoing cytoreductive surgery andhypertermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy in which newlyestablished in our hospital for appendix tumor. J Clin ExpInvest 2013; 4 (2: 234-237Key words: Anaesthesia, general, hyperthermic intraperitonealchemotherapy, cytoreductive surgery.

  5. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2002. This was the seventh year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 479,358 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities exceeded the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,545 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,482 from Big Canyon and 2,487 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium to high with 43-62% of fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 146.7 mm (146.2-147.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.8 mm (163.5-166.1 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.14 at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 88.6% (86.0-91.1%) for Pittsburg Landing to 97.0% (92.4-101.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 54.3% (50.2-58.3%) for Big Canyon to 70.5% (65.4-75.5%) for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 8.1 river kilometers per

  6. Facile fabrication and characterization of chitosan-based zinc oxide nanoparticles and evaluation of their antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Gurpreet Singh; Kaur, Surinder; Brar, Satinder Kaur

    2014-06-01

    The present investigation deals with the facile synthesis and characterization of chitosan (CTS)-based zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) and their antimicrobial activities against pathogenic microorganisms. ZnO-CTS NPs were synthesized through two different methods: nano spray drying and precipitation, using various organic compounds (citric acid, glycerol, starch and whey powder) as stabilizers. Both the synthesis methods were simple and were devoid of any chemical usage. The detailed characterization of the NPs was carried out using UV-Vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering particle size analysis, zeta potential measurements and scanning electron microscopy, which confirmed the fabrication of NPs with different shapes and sizes. Antimicrobial assay of synthesized ZnO-CTS NPs was carried out against different pathogenic microbial strains ( Candida albicans, Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus). The significant ( p < 0.05) inhibition of growth was observed for both M. luteus and S. aureus with ZnO-CTS NPs (with a concentration ranging from 0.625 to 0.156 mg/ml) as compared to control treatment. ZnO-CTS NPs also showed significant biofilm inhibition activity ( p < 0.05) against M. luteus and S. aureus. The study demonstrated the potential of ZnO-CTS NPs as antimicrobial and antibiofilm agents.

  7. Evaluation of Membrane Ultrafiltration and Residual Chlorination as a Decentralized Water Treatment Strategy for Ten Rural Healthcare Facilities in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Huttinger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a critical need for safe water in healthcare facilities (HCF in low-income countries. HCF rely on water supplies that may require additional on-site treatment, and need sustainable technologies that can deliver sufficient quantities of water. Water treatment systems (WTS that utilize ultrafiltration membranes for water treatment can be a useful technology in low-income countries, but studies have not systematically examined the feasibility of this technology in low-income settings. We monitored 22 months of operation of 10 WTS, including pre-filtration, membrane ultrafiltration, and chlorine residual disinfection that were donated to and operated by rural HCF in Rwanda. The systems were fully operational for 74% of the observation period. The most frequent reasons for interruption were water shortage (8% and failure of the chlorination mechanism (7%. When systems were operational, 98% of water samples collected from the HCF taps met World Health Organization (WHO guidelines for microbiological water quality. Water quality deteriorated during treatment interruptions and when water was stored in containers. Sustained performance of the systems depended primarily on organizational factors: the ability of the HCF technician to perform routine servicing and repairs, and environmental factors: water and power availability and procurement of materials, including chlorine and replacement parts in Rwanda.

  8. An engineering and economic evaluation of quick germ-quick fiber process for dry-grind ethanol facilities: analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Luis F; Li, Changying; Khanna, Madhu; Spaulding, Aslihan D; Lin, Tao; Eckhoff, Steven R

    2010-07-01

    An engineering economic model, which is mass balanced and compositionally driven, was developed to compare the conventional corn dry-grind process and the pre-fractionation process called quick germ-quick fiber (QQ). In this model, documented in a companion article, the distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) price was linked with its protein and fiber content as well as with the long-term average relationship with the corn price. The detailed economic analysis showed that the QQ plant retrofitted from conventional dry-grind ethanol plant reduces the manufacturing cost of ethanol by 13.5 cent/gallon and has net present value of nearly $4 million greater than the conventional dry-grind plant at an interest rate of 4% in 15years. Ethanol and feedstock price sensitivity analysis showed that the QQ plant gains more profits when ethanol price increases than conventional dry-grind ethanol plant. An optimistic analysis of the QQ process suggests that the greater value of the modified DDGS would provide greater resistance to fluctuations in corn price for QQ facilities. This model can be used to provide decision support for ethanol producers.

  9. Construction Safety for the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Predmore, R

    2000-09-01

    This Construction Safety Program (CSP) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) presents safety protocols and guidelines that management and workers shall follow to assure a safe and healthful work environment. Appendix A, a separate companion document, includes further applicable environmental, safety, and health requirements for the NIF Project. Specifically this document: {sm_bullet} Defines the fundamental site safety philosophy, {sm_bullet} Identifies management roles and responsibilities, {sm_bullet} Defines core safety management processes, {sm_bullet} Identifies LLNL institutional requirements, and {sm_bullet} Defines the functional areas and facilities accrued by the program and the process for transition of facilities, functional areas, and/or systems from construction to activation. Anyone willfully or thoughtlessly disregarding standards will be subject to immediate removal from the site. Thorough job planning will help ensure that these standards are met.

  10. Establishing nuclear facility drill programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of DOE Handbook, Establishing Nuclear Facility Drill Programs, is to provide DOE contractor organizations with guidance for development or modification of drill programs that both train on and evaluate facility training and procedures dealing with a variety of abnormal and emergency operating situations likely to occur at a facility. The handbook focuses on conducting drills as part of a training and qualification program (typically within a single facility), and is not intended to included responses of personnel beyond the site boundary, e.g. Local or State Emergency Management, Law Enforcement, etc. Each facility is expected to develop its own facility specific scenarios, and should not limit them to equipment failures but should include personnel injuries and other likely events. A well-developed and consistently administered drill program can effectively provide training and evaluation of facility operating personnel in controlling abnormal and emergency operating situations. To ensure the drills are meeting their intended purpose they should have evaluation criteria for evaluating the knowledge and skills of the facility operating personnel. Training and evaluation of staff skills and knowledge such as component and system interrelationship, reasoning and judgment, team interactions, and communications can be accomplished with drills. The appendices to this Handbook contain both models and additional guidance for establishing drill programs at the Department`s nuclear facilities.

  11. Mucinous adenocarcinona of the appendix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Roberto Furst Crenitte

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of malignancy in the vermiform appendix is quite rare. The most common histological malignant neoplasia found in this tiny portion of the gastrointestinal tract is represented by the mucinous adenocarcinoma. This entity predominates in males around 50 years of age, and clinical presentation usually mimics or occurs along with an acute appendicitis. Early diagnosis is outside the rule since most cases at this stage are symptomless. The authors present the case of a 59-year-old female patient who looked for medical attention complaining of abdominal pain. Physical examination and laboratory workup were poor in diagnostic findings. The computed tomography images were compatible with the diagnosis of appendicitis and/or appendiceal neoplasia. The patient underwent a laparotomy and right hemicolectomy. The histological examination disclosed a moderately differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma of the appendix stage T4a, N0, M0. The patient outcome was uneventful and was referred to an oncological center.

  12. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2008-01-01

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP – U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection – Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

  13. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. Matthew

    2011-05-13

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

  14. Creep-Fatigue Damage Evaluation of a Model Reactor Vessel and Reactor Internals of Sodium Test Facility according to ASME-NH and RCC-MRx Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Dong-Won; Lee, Hyeong-Yeon; Eoh, Jae-Hyuk; Son, Seok-Kwon; Kim, Jong-Bum; Jeong, Ji-Young [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The objective of the STELLA-2 is to support the specific design approval for PGSFR by synthetic reviews of key safety issues and code validations through the integral effect tests. Due to its high temperature operation in SFRs (and in a testing facility) up to 550 °C, thermally induced creep-fatigue damage is very likely in components including a reactor vessel, reactor internals (interior structures), heat exchangers, pipelines, etc. In this study, structural integrity of the components such as reactor vessel and internals in STELLA-2 has been evaluated against creep-fatigue failures at a concept-design step. As 2D analysis yields far conservative results, a realistic 3D simulation is performed by a commercial software. A design integrity guarding against a creep-fatigue damage failure operating at high temperature was evaluated for the reactor vessel with its internal structure of the STELLA-2. Both the high temperature design codes were used for the evaluation, and results were compared. All the results showed the vessel as a whole is safely designed at the given operating conditions, while the ASME-NH gives a conservative evaluation.

  15. Novel object recognition as a facile behavior test for evaluating drug effects in AβPP/PS1 Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ru; Xue, Guizhen; Wang, Shaodeng; Zhang, Lihong; Shi, Changjie; Xie, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the AβPP/PS1 transgenic mouse model is a commonly used experimental model to mimic the pathological and cognitive impairments in AD. As a classic method to evaluate spatial learning and memory, the Morris water maze is widely applied to study the cognitive deficits in rodent AD models. However, the assay procedure is relatively complicated and requires a properly equipped environment. The novel object recognition test is a relatively simple and straightforward method to test working memory in rodents. However, whether the latter can be used as a common tool for evaluating the therapeutic effects of drugs in the AβPP/PS1 transgenic AD mouse model remains unclear. In the present study, we assessed the cognitive impairment of AβPP/PS1 AD mice with the novel object recognition test. In parallel, Morris water maze was performed and compared with the novel object recognition study. Both assays worked equally well in evaluating the cognitive defect of AβPP/PS1 mice. Furthermore, we drew similar conclusions from the novel object recognition assay as from the Morris water maze in assessing the therapeutic effects of two previously reported compounds, donepezil and naltrindole, on AD. We found the novel object recognition to be a facile assay with almost no stress to mice and think it could be used as an ideal primary screening assay to evaluate drug effects on AβPP/PS1 AD model.

  16. Experimental Evaluation for the Microvibration Performance of a Segmented PC Method Based High Technology Industrial Facility Using 1/2 Scale Test Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijun Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The precast concrete (PC method used in the construction process of high technology industrial facilities is limited when applied to those with greater span lengths, due to the transport length restriction (maximum length of 15~16 m in Korea set by traffic laws. In order to resolve this, this study introduces a structural system with a segmented PC system, and a 1/2 scale model with a width of 9000 mm (hereafter Segmented Model is manufactured to evaluate vibration performance. Since a real vibrational environment cannot be reproduced for vibration testing using a scale model, a comparative analysis of their relative performances is conducted in this study. For this purpose, a 1/2 scale model with a width of 7200 mm (hereafter Nonsegmented Model of a high technology industrial facility is additionally prepared using the conventional PC method. By applying the same experiment method for both scale models and comparing the results, the relative vibration performance of the Segmented Model is observed. Through impact testing, the natural frequencies of the two scale models are compared. Also, in order to analyze the estimated response induced by the equipment, the vibration responses due to the exciter are compared. The experimental results show that the Segmented Model exhibits similar or superior performances when compared to the Nonsegmented Model.

  17. Reconfigured, close-coupled reconfigured, and Wyodak coal integrated two-stage coal liquefaction process materials from the Wilsonville facility: Chemical and toxicological evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, C.W.

    1987-03-01

    This document reports the results of the chemical analysis and toxicological testing of process materials sampled during the operation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility (Wilsonville, AL) in the reconfigured, integrated (RITSL run No. 247), the close-coupled, reconfigured, integrated (CCRITSL run No. 249), and the Wyodak coal integrated (ITSL run No. 246) two-stage liquefaction operating modes. Chemical methods of analysis included proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, adsorption column chromatography, high resolution gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and low-voltage probe-inlet mass spectrometry. Toxicological evaluation of the process materials included a histidine reversion assay for microbial mutagenicity, an initiation/promotion assay for tumorigenicity in mouse skin, and an aquatic toxicity assay using Daphnia magna. The results of these analyses and tests are compared to the previously reported results derived from the Illinois No. 6 coal ITSL and nonintegrated two-stage liquefaction (NTSL) process materials from the Wilsonville facility. 21 refs., 13 figs., 21 tabs.

  18. Photometric Evaluation of Photo-luminescent Materials for Multi-Egress Guidance Placards: Lighting Environment Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate several photo luminescent (PL) materials being considered for construction of emergency egress placards in the International Space Station (ISS). The use of PL material is intended to allow the placards to be read by ISS crew members in the event of an extensive power failure resulting in the loss of interior illumination.

  19. A case of a horseshoe appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabatake, Kazuya; Ikeda, Jun; Furuke, Hirotaka; Kato, Chikage; Kishimoto, Takuya; Kumano, Tatsuya; Imura, Kenichiro; Shimomura, Katsumi; Kubota, Takeshi; Taniguchi, Fumihiro; Shioaki, Yasuhiro

    2016-12-01

    Anomalies of the appendix are extremely rare, and a horseshoe appendix is even rarer. A literature search has revealed only five reported cases. In this report, we present a case of a horseshoe appendix.A 78-year-old man was referred for further examination following a positive fecal occult blood test. A mass in his ascending colon was detected on colonoscopy, while computed tomography showed that it was connected to the appendix. Tumor invasion derived from the ascending colon or appendix was suspected. We diagnosed ascending colon cancer prior to laparoscopic ileocecal resection. Macroscopic findings showed that the appendix connected to the back side of the mass, while microscopic findings showed that the mucosa and submucosa were continuous from the appendiceal orifice in the cecum to the other orifice in the ascending colon, where a type 1 tumor was observed on the orifice. We eventually diagnosed the patient with tubulovillous adenoma and a horseshoe appendix.A horseshoe appendix communicates with the colon at both ends and is supplied by a single fan-shaped mesentery. Cases are classified by the disposal of the mesentery and the location of the orifice. Anatomical anomalies should be considered despite the rarity of horseshoe appendices.

  20. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1999 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1999. This was the fourth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 453,117 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities not only slightly exceeded the 450,000 fish quota, but a second release of 76,386 yearlings (hereafter called Surplus) were acclimated at the Big Canyon facility and released about two weeks after the primary releases. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 9,941 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 9,583 from Big Canyon, 2,511 Big Canyon Surplus and 2,494 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 983 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low and did not appear to increase after transport to the acclimation facilities. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery and relatively high at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the release groups ranged from 147.4 mm (146.7-148.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 163.7 mm (163.3-164.1 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.04 at

  1. Evaluation of the cone-shaped pickup performance for low charge sub-10 fs arrival-time measurements at free electron laser facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Angelovski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of the cone-shaped pickup performance as a part of the high bandwidth bunch arrival-time monitors (BAMs for a low charge sub-10 fs arrival-time measurements is presented. Three sets of pickups are installed at the free electron laser FLASH at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, the quasi-cw SRF accelerator ELBE at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf and the SwissFEL injector test facility at Paul Scherrer Institute. Measurements and simulations are in good agreement and the pickups fulfill the design specifications. Utilizing the high bandwidth BAM with the cone-shaped pickups, an improvement of the signal slope by a factor of 10 is demonstrated at ELBE compared to the BAM with a low bandwidth.

  2. Facile water-stability evaluation of metal-organic frameworks and the property of selective removal of dyes from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhao-Peng; Yang, Ji-Min; Kang, Yan-Shang; Guo, Fan; Sun, Wei-Yin

    2016-06-07

    A facile and universal method was developed to evaluate the relative water stability of porous MOFs and morphological evolution was achieved by controlling the volume ratio of DMF and H2O. The relative water stability of the studied MOFs is in the order HKUST-1 > MOF-505 ∼ UMCM-150 > NOTT-101 > DUT-23(Cu) > [Zn2(BPnDC)2(DABCO)] ∼ [Cu3(TPTrC)2(DABCO)] > MOF-5. In addition, DUT-23(Cu) [Cu6(BTB)4(BPY)3] (H3BTB = 4,4',4''-benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tribenzoic acid, BPY = 4,4'-bipyridine) nanoparticles obtained with a volume ratio of DMF and H2O of 18 : 2 show excellent adsorption capacity for methylene blue (MB) (814 mg g(-1)) with high selectivity compared with methyl orange, rhodamine B, and acid chrome blue K dyes due to the size and the electrostatic repulsion effects in aqueous solution.

  3. Combined electron-beam and coagulation purification of molasses distillery slops. Features of the method, technical and economic evaluation of large-scale facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikaev, A.K. E-mail: pikaev@ipc.rssi.ru; Ponomarev, A.V.; Bludenko, A.V.; Minin, V.N.; Elizar' eva, L.M

    2001-04-01

    The paper summarizes the results obtained from the study on combined electron-beam and coagulation method for purification of molasses distillery slops from distillery produced ethyl alcohol by fermentation of grain, potato, beet and some other plant materials. The method consists in preliminary mixing of industrial wastewater with municipal wastewater, electron-beam treatment of the mixture and subsequent coagulation. Technical and economic evaluation of large-scale facility (output of 7000 m{sup 3} day{sup -1}) with two powerful cascade electron accelerators (total maximum beam power of 400 kW) for treatment of the wastewater by the above method was carried out. It was calculated that the cost of purification of the wastes is equal to 0.25 US$ m{sup -3} that is noticeably less than in the case of the existing method.

  4. Combined electron-beam and coagulation purification of molasses distillery slops. Features of the method, technical and economic evaluation of large-scale facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikaev, A. K.; Ponomarev, A. V.; Bludenko, A. V.; Minin, V. N.; Elizar'eva, L. M.

    2001-04-01

    The paper summarizes the results obtained from the study on combined electron-beam and coagulation method for purification of molasses distillery slops from distillery produced ethyl alcohol by fermentation of grain, potato, beet and some other plant materials. The method consists in preliminary mixing of industrial wastewater with municipal wastewater, electron-beam treatment of the mixture and subsequent coagulation. Technical and economic evaluation of large-scale facility (output of 7000 m 3 day -1) with two powerful cascade electron accelerators (total maximum beam power of 400 kW) for treatment of the wastewater by the above method was carried out. It was calculated that the cost of purification of the wastes is equal to 0.25 US$ m -3 that is noticeably less than in the case of the existing method.

  5. MRI of the normal appendix in children: data toward a new reference standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swenson, David W. [Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Providence, RI (United States); Schooler, Gary R. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Stamoulis, Catherine; Lee, Edward Y. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) might prove useful in the diagnostic evaluation of pediatric appendicitis in the effort to avoid exposing children to the ionizing radiation of CT, yet there is a paucity of literature describing the normal range of appearances of the pediatric appendix on MRI. To investigate MRI characteristics of the normal appendix to aid in establishing a reference standard in the pediatric population. We conducted a retrospective study of children and young adults (≤18 years of age) who underwent lumbar spine or pelvis MRI between Jan. 1, 2013, and Dec. 31, 2013, for indications unrelated to appendicitis. Two board-certified radiologists independently reviewed all patients' MRI examinations for appendix visualization, diameter, intraluminal content signal, and presence of periappendiceal inflammation or free fluid. We used the Cohen kappa statistic and Spearman correlation coefficient to assess reader agreement on qualitative and quantitative data, respectively. Three hundred forty-six patients met inclusion criteria. Both readers visualized the appendix in 192/346 (55.5%) patients (kappa = 0.88, P < 0.0001). Estimated median appendix diameter was 5 mm for reader 1 and 6 mm for reader 2 ([25th, 75th] quartiles = [5, 6] mm; range, 2-11 mm; r = 0.81, P < 0.0001). Appendix intraluminal signal characteristics were variable. Periappendiceal inflammation was present in 0/192 (0%) and free fluid in 6/192 (3.1%) MRI examinations (kappa = 1.0). The normal appendix was seen on MRI in approximately half of pediatric patients, with a mean diameter of ∝5-6 mm, variable intraluminal signal characteristics, no adjacent inflammatory changes, and rare surrounding free fluid. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of dose equivalent by the electronic personal dosemeter for neutron 'Saphydose-N' at different workplaces of nuclear facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Q; Lahaye, T

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements made with the electronic personal neutron Saphydose-N during the four campaigns of the European contract EVIDOS (EValuation of Individual DOSimetry in mixed neutron and photon radiation fields). These measurements were performed at Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) in France (C0), at the Krümmel Nuclear Power Plant in Germany (C1), at the VENUS Research Reactor and the Belgonucléaire fuel processing plant in Belgium (C2) and at the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant in Sweden (C3). The results for Saphydose-N are compared with reference values for dose equivalent.

  7. Thermal Radiation Source Test Facility,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    KEY WORDS (Continu on revers side I eesr and identify by block nuMb.,) Thermal Radiation Source Thermal Test Facility 20 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse...SECTION 1 INTRODUCTION 1-1 GENERAL Defense Nuclear Agency’s Field Command, located at Kirtland AFB in New Mexico, has recently upgraded its thermal test facility...is used to evaluate damage and survivability in a nuclear environment. The thermal test facility was first established in 1979 and used O large

  8. Preliminary evaluation of 30 potential granitic rock sites for a radioactive waste storage facility in southern Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boardman, C.R.; Knutson, C.F.

    1978-02-15

    Results of preliminary study are presented which was performed under subtask 2.7 of the NTS Terminal Waste Storage Program Plan for 1978. Subtask 2.7 examines the feasibility of locating a nuclear waste repository in a granitic stock or pluton in southern Nevada near the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is assumed for the purposes of this study that such a repository cannot be located at NTS. This assumption may or may not be correct. This preliminary report does not identify a particular site as being a suitable location for a repository. Nor does it absolutely eliminate a particular site from further consideration. It does, however, answer the basic question of probable suitability of some of the sites and present a systematic method for site evaluation. Since the findings of this initial study have been favorable, it will be followed by more exhaustive and detailed studies of the original 30 sites and perhaps others. In future studies some of the evaluation criteria used in the preliminary study may be modified or eliminated, and new criteria may be introduced.

  9. Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.

    2001-07-09

    From mid-April through the end of June 2001, a Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment (FEVA) was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary goal of this FEVA was to establish an environmental vulnerability baseline at ORNL that could be used to support the Laboratory planning process and place environmental vulnerabilities in perspective. The information developed during the FEVA was intended to provide the basis for management to initiate immediate, near-term, and long-term actions to respond to the identified vulnerabilities. It was expected that further evaluation of the vulnerabilities identified during the FEVA could be carried out to support a more quantitative characterization of the sources, evaluation of contaminant pathways, and definition of risks. The FEVA was modeled after the Battelle-supported response to the problems identified at the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This FEVA report satisfies Corrective Action 3A1 contained in the Corrective Action Plan in Response to Independent Review of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Tritium Leak at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) ORNL Site Office Manager on April 16, 2001. This assessment successfully achieved its primary goal as defined by Laboratory management. The assessment team was able to develop information about sources and pathway analyses although the following factors impacted the team's ability to provide additional quantitative information: the complexity and scope of the facilities, infrastructure, and programs; the significantly degraded physical condition of the facilities and infrastructure; the large number of known environmental vulnerabilities; the scope of legacy contamination issues [not currently addressed in the Environmental Management (EM) Program]; the lack of facility process and environmental pathway analysis performed by the accountable line management or facility owner; and

  10. Asian Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahata, M.

    2011-04-01

    Asian underground facilities are reviewed. The YangYang underground Laboratory in Korea and the Kamioka observatory in Japan are operational and several astrophysical experiments are running. Indian Neutrino Observatory(INO) and China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL) are under construction and underground experiments are being prepared. Current activities and future prospects at those underground sites are described.

  11. Evaluation of an intervention for staff in a long-term care facility using a retrospective pretest design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, R B

    1993-06-01

    It has been previously established that human service workers often suffer from emotional exhaustion, which has been conceptualized by Maslach and Jackson as burnout. Burnout may be a particularly great risk in workers providing long-term geriatric care. The current study evaluated the effects of a series of three 3-hour sessions designed to address team building, communication skills, self-esteem, and stress management on a random sample of 51 of the 188 long-term care staff who participated. Using a retrospective pretest design, a statistically significant improvement from "then" to "today" was found for the three components of burnout: Depersonalization, Emotional Exhaustion, and Personal Accomplishment. Responses to an open-ended question about workshop effects corroborated the quantitative data, and effects noted were highly related to the defined objectives of the workshops.

  12. The Design Fabrication Installation & Evaluation of the Balance Probe Monitor for Large Centrifuges at a National Laboratory Facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, Jonathan Michael [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Balance Probe Monitors were designed, fabricated, installed, and evaluated at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the 22,600 g kg (50,000 g lb) direct drive electromotor driven large centrifuges. These centrifuges provide a high onset/decay rate g environment. The Balance Probe Monitor is physically located near a centrifuge’s Capacitance Probe, a crucial sensor for the centrifuge’s sustainability. The Balance Probe Monitor will validate operability of the centrifuge. Most importantly, it is used for triggering a kill switch under the condition that the centrifuge displacement value exceeds allowed tolerances. During operational conditions, the Capacitance Probe continuously detects the structural displacement of the centrifuge and an adjoining AccuMeasure 9000 translates this displacement into an output voltage.

  13. Evaluation of mitigation strategies in Facility Group 1 double-shell flammable-gas tanks at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, C.; Sadasivan, P.; Kubic, W.L.; White, J.R.

    1997-11-01

    Radioactive nuclear waste at the Hanford Site is stored in underground waste storage tanks at the site. The tanks fall into two main categories: single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). There are a total of 149 SSTs and 28 DSTs. The wastes stored in the tanks are chemically complex. They basically involve various sodium salts (mainly nitrite, nitrate, carbonates, aluminates, and hydroxides), organic compounds, heavy metals, and various radionuclides, including cesium, strontium, plutonium, and uranium. The waste is known to generate flammable gas (FG) [hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, hydrocarbons] by complex chemical reactions. The process of gas generation, retention, and release is transient. Some tanks reach a quasi-steady stage where gas generation is balanced by the release rate. Other tanks show continuous cycles of retention followed by episodic release. There currently are 25 tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL). The objective of this report is to evaluate possible mitigation strategies to eliminate the FG hazard. The evaluation is an engineering study of mitigation concepts for FG generation, retention, and release behavior in Tanks SY-101, AN-103, AN 104, An-105, and Aw-101. Where possible, limited quantification of the effects of mitigation strategies on the FG hazard also is considered. The results obtained from quantification efforts discussed in this report should be considered as best-estimate values. Results and conclusions of this work are intended to help in establishing methodologies in the contractor`s controls selection analysis to develop necessary safety controls for closing the FG unreviewed safety question. The general performance requirements of any mitigation scheme are discussed first.

  14. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2003. This was the eighth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 437,633 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,492 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,494 from Big Canyon and 2,497 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium with 37-83% of the fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 153.7 mm (153.2-154.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.2 mm (163.9-164.5 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.22 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 83.1% (80.7-85.5%) for Big Canyon to 91.7% (87.7-95.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 59.9% (54.6-65.2%) for Big Canyon to 69.4% (60.5-78.4%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.8 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain

  15. Reducing Operating Costs by Optimizing Space in Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    consolidation. Until the S-File can talk to other systems and pull the data this analysis must be accomplished manually . 6) Incorporate space efficiency...Reference Manual . Public Works and Government Services Canada. British Columbia. McGregor, Wes. (2000). Facilities Management and the Business of...floor plans listed in Appendix B. AutoCAD 2010 was the software used. Other software suites may differ slightly in method or terminology. Although

  16. Stockbridge Antenna Measurement and Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Stockbridge Antenna Measurement Facility is located 23 miles southwest of AFRL¹s Rome Research Site. This unique measurement facility is designed to evaluate the...

  17. EVA Training and Development Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupples, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Overview: Vast majority of US EVA (ExtraVehicular Activity) training and EVA hardware development occurs at JSC; EVA training facilities used to develop and refine procedures and improve skills; EVA hardware development facilities test hardware to evaluate performance and certify requirement compliance; Environmental chambers enable testing of hardware from as large as suits to as small as individual components in thermal vacuum conditions.

  18. Facile, Regio- and Diastereoselective Synthesis of Spiro-Pyrrolidine and Pyrrolizine Derivatives and Evaluation of Their Antiproliferative Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman I. Almansour

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A number of novel spiro-pyrrolidines/pyrrolizines derivatives were synthesized through [3+2]-cycloaddition of azomethine ylides with 3,5-bis[(E-arylmethylidene]tetrahydro-4(1H-pyridinones 2a–n. Azomethine ylides were generated in situ from the reaction of 1H-indole-2,3-dione (isatin, 3 with N-methylglycine (sarcosine, phenylglycine, or proline. All compounds (50 μM were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity against human breast carcinoma (MDA-MB-231, leukemia lymphoblastic (CCRF-CEM, and ovarian carcinoma (SK-OV-3 cells. N-α-Phenyl substituted spiro-pyrrolidine derivatives (5a–n showed higher antiproliferative activity in MDA-MB-231 than other cancer cell lines. Among spiro-pyrrolizines 6a–n, a number of derivatives including 6a–c and 6i–m showed a comparable activity with doxorubicin in all three cell lines. Among all compounds in three classes, 6a, 6b, and 6m, were found to be the most potent derivatives showing 64%, 87%, and 74% antiproliferative activity in MDA-MB-231, SK-OV-3, and CCRF-CEM cells, respectively. Compound 6b showed an IC50 value of 3.6 mM in CCRF-CEM cells. These data suggest the potential antiproliferative activity of spiro-pyrrolidines/pyrrolizines.

  19. Deep learning for evaluating difficult-to-detect incomplete repairs of high fluence laser optics at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhenk, T. Nathan; Kegelmeyer, Laura M.; Trummer, Scott K.

    2017-03-01

    Two machine-learning methods were evaluated to help automate the quality control process for mitigating damage sites on laser optics. The mitigation is a cone-like structure etched into locations on large optics that have been chipped by the high fluence (energy per unit area) laser light. Sometimes the repair leaves a difficult to detect remnant of the damage that needs to be addressed before the optic can be placed back on the beam line. We would like to be able to automatically detect these remnants. We try Deep Learning (convolutional neural networks using features autogenerated from large stores of labeled data, like ImageNet) and find it outperforms ensembles of decision trees (using custom-built features) in finding these subtle, rare, incomplete repairs of damage. We also implemented an unsupervised method for helping operators visualize where the network has spotted problems. This is done by projecting the credit for the result backwards onto the input image. This shows regions in an image most responsible for the networks decision. This can also be used to help understand the black box decisions the network is making and potentially improve the training process.

  20. Case study : evaluation of oilfield and water well disposal well designs for oil sands facility in northern Alberta, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champollion, Y.; Gleixner, M.R.; Wozniewicz, J. [Golder Associates Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); MacFarlane, W.D.; Skulski, L. [Nexen Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Large volumes of wastewater disposal capacity will be required for the production of bitumen at the Long Lake Project, located in northeastern Alberta. An unconsolidated sand aquifer is the target formation for disposal. An evaluation of two disposal well designs, perforated casing (standard oil and gas approach), and wire-wound telescopic screen (standard water well approach) was performed. Skin, transmissivity and storability were the hydraulic parameters quantified. Full superposition type curves were used to conduct the transient analysis, along with the use of pressure derivative data. The results from the injection tests revealed that the sand aquifer at the Long Lake Project had suitable aquifer disposal capacity. The test results also revealed that clogging takes place in the vicinity of the wellbore, probably because of suspended solids in the injection water and the degassing effects. The water well design, as opposed to the standard oilfields well, makes provision for less costly re-development during operations, something that might be required if clogging problems occur. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  1. A micro-environmental intervention to reduce the harms associated with drug-related overdose: evidence from the evaluation of Vancouver's safer injection facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Thomas; Small, Will; Moore, David; Wood, Evan

    2007-01-01

    Conventional drug overdose prevention strategies have been criticised for failing to address the macro- and micro-environmental factors that shape drug injecting practices and compromise individual ability to reduce the risks associated with drug-related overdose. This in turn has led to calls for interventions that address overdose risks by modifying the drug-using environment, including the social dynamics within them. Safer injection facilities (SIFs) constitute one such intervention, although little is known about the impact of such facilities on factors that mediate risk for overdose. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with fifty individuals recruited from a cohort of SIF users in Vancouver, the Scientific Evaluation Of Supervised Injecting (SEOSI). Audio recorded interviews elicited injection drug users' (IDU) accounts of overdoses as well as perspectives regarding the impact of SIF use on overdose risk and experiences of overdose. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis was conducted. Fifty IDU, including 21 women, participated in this study. The perspectives of participants suggest that the Vancouver SIF plays an important role in mediating various risks associated with overdose. In particular, the SIF addresses many of the unique contextual risks associated with injection in public spaces, including the need to rush injections due to fear of arrest. Further, SIF use appears to enable overdose prevention by simultaneously offsetting potential social risks associated with injecting alone and injecting in the presence of strangers. The immediate emergency response offered by nurses at the SIF was also valued highly, especially when injecting adulterated drugs and drugs of unknown purity and composition. The perspectives of IDU participating in this study suggest that SIFs can address many of the micro-environmental factors that drive overdose risk and limit individual ability to employ overdose prevention practices

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of Cranberry Capsules to Prevent Urinary Tract Infection in Long-Term Care Facilities: Economic Evaluation with a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hout, Wilbert B; Caljouw, Monique A A; Putter, Hein; Cools, Herman J M; Gussekloo, Jacobijn

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether the preventive use of cranberry capsules in long-term care facility (LTCF) residents is cost-effective depending on urinary tract infection (UTI) risk. Design Economic evaluation with a randomized controlled trial. Setting Long-term care facilities. Participants LTCF residents (N = 928, 703 female, median age 84), stratified according to UTI risk. Measurements UTI incidence (clinically or strictly defined), survival, quality of life, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and costs. Results In the weeks after a clinical UTI, participants showed a significant but moderate deterioration in quality of life, survival, care dependency, and costs. In high-UTI-risk participants, cranberry costs were estimated at €439 per year (1.00 euro = 1.37 U.S. dollar), which is €3,800 per prevented clinically defined UTI (95% confidence interval = €1,300–infinity). Using the strict UTI definition, the use of cranberry increased costs without preventing UTIs. Taking cranberry capsules had a 22% probability of being cost-effective compared with placebo (at a willingness to pay of €40,000 per QALY). In low-UTI-risk participants, use of cranberry capsules was only 3% likely to be cost-effective. Conclusion In high-UTI-risk residents, taking cranberry capsules may be effective in preventing UTIs but is not likely to be cost-effective in the investigated dosage, frequency, and setting. In low-UTI-risk LTCF residents, taking cranberry capsules twice daily is neither effective nor cost-effective. PMID:25180379

  3. Evaluation of substituted methyl cyclohexanone hybrids for anti-tubercular, anti-bacterial and anti-fungal activity: Facile syntheses under catalysis by ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatole, Ajay M; Lanjewar, Kushal R; Gaidhane, Mahesh K; Hatzade, Kishor M

    2015-01-01

    An library of unresolved racemic Mannich bases incorporating two stereogenic carbon centers was evaluated for antibacterial activity against clinically isolated Gram-positive bacteria i.e. Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and for antifungal activity against Candida albicans strains. Additionally, the susceptibility of microorganisms to Mannich bases prompted us to evaluate the potential for anti-tubercular activity against clinically isolated Mycobacterium tuberculosis and virulent H37Rv strains. All compounds showed potent activity against M. tuberculosis strains at MIC ranging from 50 μg/mL to 6.25 μg/mL of concentration. Facile one pot Mannich type syntheses of rac-(2S)-2-[(R)-[(4-substituted phenyl){[4-(4-substituted phenyl)-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]amino}methyl]cyclohexanone derivatives were achieved by reactions of various 2-amino-4-aryl-thiazoles, appropriately substituted aromatic aldehydes and cyclohexanone in Bronsted acidic quaternary ammonium sulfated ionic liquids serving as dual solvents and catalysts.

  4. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor appendix with concomitant mucosal dysplasia, simulating pseudomyxoma on preoperative aspiration cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Majumdar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT has been described as a pseudosarcomatous proliferation of spindled myofibroblasts admixed with lymphoplasmacytic cells. The various terminologies like inflammatory pseudotumor, plasma cell granuloma, and inflammatory myofibrohistiocytic proliferation, used to describe this entity, highlight the controversial etiopathogenesis of this relatively indolent neoplasm. IMT has now been described in different anatomic locations. However, cases occurring in the gastrointestinal tract are rare with very few cases described in the appendix. We present a case of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor appendix with mucosal dysplasia in a 41-year-old male, presenting with abdominal pain and lump in the right iliac fossa. Aspiration cytology yielded few atypical epithelial cells and spindle cells in a mucinous background, suggesting the possibility of pseudomyxoma peritonei. Awareness of IMT appendix with rare presence of mucosal dysplasia may help in preventing overzealous resection, especially in situations that on preoperative evaluation may suggest malignancy.

  5. PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH IMPACTS OF SEDIMENT DECONTAMINATION FACILITIES FOR NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY HARBOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROWE,M.D.; KLEIN,R.C.; JONES,K.W.

    1999-07-31

    elsewhere. This report provides a preliminary evaluation, or ``screening assessment,'' of potential occupational, public, and environmental health risks from dredging, transporting, and treating contaminated harbor sediments with thermal treatment methods to render them suitable for disposal or beneficial use. The assessment was done in stages as the project advanced and data became available from other tasks on characteristics of sediments and treatment processes.

  6. Modernizing sports facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dustin, R. [McKenney`s, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Modernization and renovation of sports facilities challenge the design team to balance a number of requirements: spectator and owner expectations, existing building and site conditions, architectural layouts, code and legislation issues, time constraints and budget issues. System alternatives are evaluated and selected based on the relative priorities of these requirements. These priorities are unique to each project. At Alexander Memorial Coliseum, project schedules, construction funds and facility usage became the priorities. The ACC basketball schedule and arrival of the Centennial Olympics dictated the construction schedule. Initiation and success of the project depended on the commitment of the design team to meet coliseum funding levels established three years ago. Analysis of facility usage and system alternative capabilities drove the design team to select a system that met the project requirements and will maximize the benefits to the owner and spectators for many years to come.

  7. Hanford Site Near-Facility Environmental Monitoring Data Report for Calendar Year 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, Craig J.; Dorsey, Michael C.; Mckinney, Stephen M.; Mitchell, Ronald M.

    2006-09-28

    This Appendix contains brief discussions, specific sampling location information, and complete analytical data results for the various near-facility environmental monitoring efforts for 2005. Detailed discussions and summarized analytical results are provided in PNNL-15892, Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2005.

  8. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 236 - Independent Review of Verification and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... assessment is to provide an independent evaluation of the product manufacturer's utilization of safety design... Product Safety Plan (PSP) for processor based systems developed under subpart H or, (2) PTC Product... (c) through (g) of this appendix. However, the reviewer shall not engage in any design...

  9. 49 CFR Appendix E to Part 40 - SAP Equivalency Requirements for Certification Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false SAP Equivalency Requirements for Certification... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Pt. 40, App. E Appendix E to Part 40—SAP Equivalency... of knowledge must be of sufficient quantity to ensure a high quality of SAP evaluation and referral...

  10. Fast Flux Test Facility final safety analysis report. Amendment 72

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantt, D. A.

    1992-08-01

    This document provides the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Amendment 72 for incorporation into the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) FSAR set. This amendment change incorporates Engineering Change Notices issued subsequent to Amendment 71 and approved for incorporation before June 24, 1992. These include changes in: Chapter 2, Site Characteristics; Chapter 3, Design Criteria Structures, Equipment, and Systems; Chapter 5B, Reactor Coolant System; Chapter 7, Instrumentation and Control Systems; Chapter 8, Electrical Systems - The description of the Class 1E, 125 Vdc systems is updated for the higher capacity of the newly installed, replacement batteries; Chapter 9, Auxiliary Systems - The description of the inert cell NASA systems is corrected to list the correct number of spare sample points; Chapter 11, Reactor Refueling System; Chapter 12, Radiation Protection and Waste Management; Chapter 13, Conduct of Operations; Chapter 16, Quality Assurance; Chapter 17, Technical Specifications; Chapter 19, FFTF Fire Specifications for Fire Detection, Alarm, and Protection Systems; Chapter 20, FFTF Criticality Specifications; and Appendix B, Primary Piping Integrity Evaluation.

  11. Characterization of emergency preparedness at DOE contractor facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillings, J.C.; Murphy, B.L.; Corbit, C.D.; MacLellan, J.A.; Essig, T.H.; Higby, D.P.; Hooker, C.D.; Laughlin, G.J.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Swinth, K.L.

    1984-07-01

    A study of emergency preparedness capabilities at DOE facilities was initiated following the incident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) Nuclear Power Station. It was designed to parallel but expand on a study on emergency preparedness instrumentation that was conducted in 1970 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The 1970 survey findings led to the publication of four reports on performance criteria for radiological emergency instrumentation. Three of these reports - BNWL-1635 (Selby et al. 1972), BNWL-1742 (Anderson et al. 1974) and BNWL-1857 (Andersen et al. 1976) - addressed the criteria for emergency instrumentation at reactors, mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants, and fuel reprocessing plants, respectively. The fourth report, BNWL-1991 (Bramson et al. 1976), addressed evaluation testing and calibration methodology for these instruments. This report is presented in three parts. Part One is a review of the BNWL documents to determine whether they are applicable to state-of-the-art instrument capabilities. The Appendix to Part One provides a comparison between the instrument performance criteria established in BNWL-1991 to applicable American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards for portable survey and contamination meters, installed radiation and area monitors, effluent monitors, calibration techniques, criticality detection systems, alarm systems, and direct reading dosimeters. Part Two compares the 1970 survey results with the 1980 survey results to identify trends in emergency preparedness. Part Three is a discussion of the results of the 1980 emergency preparedness survey and the supporting data for each of the 15 modules. 8 references. (ACR)

  12. Submarine Escape Set Test Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S.N. Murthy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Submarine Escape Set (SES is used by submariners to escape from a sunken submarine. This set caters for breathing needs of the submariner under water, until he reaches the surface. Evaluation of such life-saving equipment is of paramount importance. This paper describes the submarine escape set and various constructional features and schedules of operation of test facilities designed indegenously and which can evaluate the SES. The test facility is divided into two parts: the reducer test facility, and the breathing bag test facility. The equipment has been rigorously tested and accepted by Indian Navy. Two such test facilities have been developed, one of which is installed at INS Satavahana, Visakhapatnam, and are working satisfactorily.

  13. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-17

    Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

  14. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  15. Facility Modernization Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, D; Ackley, R

    2007-05-10

    Modern and technologically up-to-date facilities and systems infrastructure are necessary to accommodate today's research environment. In response, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a continuing commitment to develop and apply effective management models and processes to maintain, modernize, and upgrade its facilities to meet the science and technology mission. The Facility Modernization Pilot Study identifies major subsystems of facilities that are either technically or functionally obsolete, lack adequate capacity and/or capability, or need to be modernized or upgraded to sustain current operations and program mission. This study highlights areas that need improvement, system interdependencies, and how these systems/subsystems operate and function as a total productive unit. Although buildings are 'grandfathered' in and are not required to meet current codes unless there are major upgrades, this study also evaluates compliance with 'current' building, electrical, and other codes. This study also provides an evaluation of the condition and overall general appearance of the structure.

  16. Villous adenoma of the distal appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J V; Thomas, M G; Kelly, S; Sutton, R

    1997-04-01

    Villous adenoma confined to the distal appendix has not been previously reported in conjunction with acute apendicitis. The presence of an adenoma indicates a need for further investigation due to an association with neoplasia elsewhere.

  17. Heat plan Denmark 2010. Appendix report; Varmeplan Danmark 2010. Bilagsrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyrelund, A.; Fafner, K.; Ulbjerg, F. (and others)

    2010-09-15

    Heat Plan Denmark 2010 is an update of Heat Plan Denmark 2008 and confirms how the sector has reduced the CO{sub 2} emission in Denmark since 1980 and how this development can continue in a cost effective way to an almost CO{sub 2} neutral heating sector in 2030. The study is based on an overall least cost evaluation of the best existing technology taking into account the interaction between buildings, district heating and the power system with a large share of wind energy. The present appendix report contains the technical and economical documentation for the main report. (ln)

  18. Radiological features of mucocele of the appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaane, P.

    1988-12-01

    The clinical features of mucocele of the appendix are nonspecific, and a correct preoperative diagnosis based on abdominal pain, a palpable mass in the right lower quadrant, and conventional radiography is rare. The diagnosis of appendiceal mucocele has become easier with the utilisation of the recent imaging techniques ultrasonography and computed tomography. Six patients with mucocele of the appendix are presented, and the characteristic radiological features and differential diagnosis are discussed.

  19. Accurate Analysis and Evaluation of Acidic Plant Growth Regulators in Transgenic and Nontransgenic Edible Oils with Facile Microwave-Assisted Extraction-Derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengge; Chen, Guang; Guo, Hailong; Fan, Baolei; Liu, Jianjun; Fu, Qiang; Li, Xiu; Lu, Xiaomin; Zhao, Xianen; Li, Guoliang; Sun, Zhiwei; Xia, Lian; Zhu, Shuyun; Yang, Daoshan; Cao, Ziping; Wang, Hua; Suo, Yourui; You, Jinmao

    2015-09-16

    Determination of plant growth regulators (PGRs) in a signal transduction system (STS) is significant for transgenic food safety, but may be challenged by poor accuracy and analyte instability. In this work, a microwave-assisted extraction-derivatization (MAED) method is developed for six acidic PGRs in oil samples, allowing an efficient (<1.5 h) and facile (one step) pretreatment. Accuracies are greatly improved, particularly for gibberellin A3 (-2.72 to -0.65%) as compared with those reported (-22 to -2%). Excellent selectivity and quite low detection limits (0.37-1.36 ng mL(-1)) are enabled by fluorescence detection-mass spectrum monitoring. Results show the significant differences in acidic PGRs between transgenic and nontransgenic oils, particularly 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (1-NAA), implying the PGRs induced variations of components and genes. This study provides, for the first time, an accurate and efficient determination for labile PGRs involved in STS and a promising concept for objectively evaluating the safety of transgenic foods.

  20. White Oak Creek watershed: Melton Valley area Remedial Investigation report, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 2, Appendixes A and B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This document contains Appendixes A ``Source Inventory Information for the Subbasins Evaluated for the White Oak Creek Watershed`` and B ``Human Health Risk Assessment for White Oak Creek / Melton Valley Area`` for the remedial investigation report for the White Oak Creek Watershed and Melton Valley Area. Appendix A identifies the waste types and contaminants for each subbasin in addition to the disposal methods. Appendix B identifies potential human health risks and hazards that may result from contaminants present in the different media within Oak Ridge National Laboratory sites.

  1. 13 CFR Appendix A to Part 1171 - Appendix A to Part 1171

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... International Trade Program Small Business Act, section 22. Technical and Management Assistance Small Business... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix A to Part 1171 A Appendix A to Part 1171 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart A of... - Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 750

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 750 A Appendix A to Subpart A of Part 750 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... ACT Procedures for Rulemaking Under Section 6 of the Toxic Substances Control Act Pt. 750, Subpt....

  3. 40 CFR Appendix I to Subpart B of... - Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205 I Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks...

  4. Organizational context associated with time spent evaluating language and cognitive-communicative impairments in skilled nursing facilities: Survey results within an implementation science framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Natalie F

    2016-01-01

    The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) was developed to merge research and practice in healthcare by accounting for the many elements that influence evidence-based treatment implementation. These include characteristics of the individuals involved, features of the treatment itself, and aspects of the organizational culture where the treatment is being provided. The purpose of this study was to apply the CFIR to a measurement of current practice patterns of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) working in the skilled nursing facility (SNF) environment. In an effort to inform future evidence-based practice implementation interventions, research questions addressed current practice patterns, clinician treatment use and preferences, and perceptions of the organizational context including leadership, resources, and other staff. Surveys were mailed to each SLP working in a SNF in the state of Michigan. Participants (N=77, 19% response rate) completed a survey mapping on to CFIR components impacting evidence-based practice implementation. Quantitative descriptive and nonparametric correlational analyses were completed. Use of evidence-based treatments by SLPs in SNFs was highly variable. Negative correlations between treating speech and voice disorders and treating swallowing disorders (rs=-.35, planguage and cognitive-communicative disorders and treating swallowing disorders (rs=-.30, planguage and cognitive-communicative disorders and treating swallowing disorders (rs=-.67, planguage and cognitive-communicative disorders (rs=-.37, ptime spent evaluating language and other cognitive-communicative disorders (rs=.27, planguage or other cognitive-communicative disorders. Further, SLPs in this sample spent more time evaluating language and cognitive-communicative impairments if they perceived their organizational context in a more positive way. The CFIR may guide treatment and implementation research to increase the uptake of evidence-based practices for

  5. 14 CFR Appendix F to Part 23 - Test Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... prescribed in paragraph (f) of this appendix, the specimen must be mounted in metal frame so that all four...) of this appendix, the specimen must be mounted in a metal frame so that (1) in the vertical tests...

  6. A comparison of MCNP6-1.0 and GEANT 4-10.1 when evaluating the neutron output of a complex real world nuclear environment: The thermal neutron facility at the Tri Universities Meson facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monk, S.D., E-mail: s.monk@lancaster.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW (United Kingdom); Shippen, B.A. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW (United Kingdom); Colling, B.R. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW (United Kingdom); Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Cheneler, D.; Al Hamrashdi, H.; Alton, T. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Comparison of the use of MCNP6 and GEANT4 Monte Carlo software when large distances and thicknesses are considered. • The Thermal Neutron Facility (TNF) at TRIUMF used as an example real life example location. • The effects of water, aluminium, iron and lead considered over various thicknesses up to 3 m. - Abstract: A comparison of the Monte Carlo based simulation codes MCNP6-1.0 and GEANT4-10.1 as used for modelling large scale structures is presented here. The high-energy neutron field at the Tri Universities Meson Facility (TRIUMF) in Vancouver, British Columbia is the structure modelled in this work. Work with the emphasis on the modelling of the facility and comparing with experimental results has been published previously, whereas this work is focussed on comparing the performance of the codes over relatively high depths of material rather than the accuracy of the results themselves in comparison to experimental data. Comparisons of three different locations within the neutron facility are modelled and presented using both codes as well as analysis of the transport of typical neutrons fields through large blocks of iron, water, lead and aluminium in order to determine where any deviations are likely to have occurred. Results indicate that over short distances, results from the two codes are in broad agreement – although over greater distances and within more complex geometries, deviation increases dramatically. The conclusions reached are that it is likely the deviations between the codes is caused by both the compounding effect of slight differences between the cross section files used by the two codes to determine the neutron transport through iron, and differences in the processes used by both codes.

  7. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other facilities...

  8. Theme: Laboratory Facilities Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Glen M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Laboratory Facilities Improvement" (Miller); "Remodeling Laboratories for Agriscience Instruction" (Newman, Johnson); "Planning for Change" (Mulcahy); "Laboratory Facilities Improvement for Technology Transfer" (Harper); "Facilities for Agriscience Instruction" (Agnew et al.); "Laboratory Facility Improvement" (Boren, Dwyer); and…

  9. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2001. This was the sixth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 318,932 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,503 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,499 from Big Canyon and 2,518 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 991 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 155.4 mm (154.7-156.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 171.6 mm (170.7-172.5 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.02 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.4% (73.2-75.5%) for Big Canyon to 85.2% (83.5-87.0%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release

  10. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2000 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2000. This was the fifth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 397,339 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,477 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,421 from Big Canyon and 2,488 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 980 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 157.7 mm (157.3-158.1 mm) at Big Canyon to 172.9 mm (172.2-173.6 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.12 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.0% (84.7-89.4%) for Pittsburg Landing to 95.2% (91.5-98.9%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to

  11. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapawi, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2004. This was the ninth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 414,452 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 4,983 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 4,984 from Big Canyon and 4,982 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered low with 53-94% rating not detected to low. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 154.6 mm (154.0-155.2 mm) at Pittsburg Landing to 163.0 mm (162.6-163.4 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.7% (72.9-76.5%) for Big Canyon to 88.1% (85.7-90.6%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 45.3% (39.2-51.5%) for Pittsburg Landing to 52.1% (42.9-61.2%) for Big Canyon. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.5 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 12.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration

  12. 45 CFR 63.37 - Leasing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Leasing facilities. 63.37 Section 63.37 Public... OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PLANNING AND EVALUATION Special Provisions § 63.37 Leasing facilities. In the case of a project involving the leasing of a facility, the grantee shall demonstrate...

  13. Primary marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of appendix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary lymphomas of appendix are extremely rare tumors. The first case of primary lymphoma of appendix was reported by Warren in the year 1898. Incidence of primary lymphoma of appendix is 0.015% of all gastrointestinal lymphomas. This is a report of primary marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of appendix which presented as appendicular mass. As some cases are incidentally discovered, this case emphasizes that histological examination of all appendicectomy specimens is mandatory.

  14. North Adams State College Institutional Self-Evaluation Study Report, Vol. 2. Appendix 1: Agreement Between the Board of Trustees of State Colleges and North Adams State College Association, Massachusetts; Appendix 2: Agreement Between The Board of Trustees of State Colleges and the North Adams State College Mark Hopkins Faculty Association-MTA/NEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massachusetts State Coll. System, Boston.

    The two agreements included in this document are in effect until June 30, 1976 and June 30, 1977, respectively. Articles cover: recognition and definitions, relationship between the board and the association, use of college facilities, faculty fringe benefits, statement on academic freedom, responsibilities of department chairmen, participation in…

  15. 14 CFR Appendix C to Part 147 - Airframe Curriculum Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airframe Curriculum Subjects C Appendix C... Appendix C to Part 147—Airframe Curriculum Subjects This appendix lists the subjects required in at least 750 hours of each airframe curriculum, in addition to at least 400 hours in general curriculum...

  16. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 147 - Powerplant Curriculum Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant Curriculum Subjects D Appendix D... Appendix D to Part 147—Powerplant Curriculum Subjects This appendix lists the subjects required in at least 750 hours of each powerplant curriculum, in addition to at least 400 hours in general curriculum...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 66 - Instruction Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Instruction Manual B Appendix B to Part 66 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Manual Note: For text of appendix B see appendix B to part 67....

  18. EVALUATION OF THE IMPACT OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF) LABORATORY GERMANIUM OXIDE USE ON RECYCLE TRANSFERS TO THE H-TANK FARM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.; Laurinat, J.

    2011-08-15

    implemented to attain an annual canister production goal of 400 canisters. Since no Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) exists for germanium in the Tank Farm, the Effluent Treatment Project, or the Saltstone Production Facility, DWPF has requested an evaluation of the fate of the germanium in the caustic environment of the RCT, the 2H evaporator, and the tank farm. This report evaluates the effect of the addition of germanium to the tank farm based on: (1) the large dilution of Ge in the RCT and tank farm; (2) the solubility of germanium in caustic solutions (pH 12-13); (3) the potential of germanium to precipitate as germanium sodalites in the 2H Evaporator; and (4) the potential of germanium compounds to precipitate in the evaporator feed tank. This study concludes that the impacts of transferring up to 4 kg/yr germanium to the RCT (and subsequently the 2H evaporator feed tank and the 2H evaporator) results in <2 ppm per year (1.834 mg/L) which is the maximum instantaneous concentration expected from DWPF. This concentration is insignificant as most sodium germanates are soluble at the high pH of the feed tank and evaporator solutions. Even if sodium aluminosilicates form in the 2H evaporator, the Ge will likely substitute for some small amount of the Si in these structures and will be insignificant. It is recommended that the DWPF continue with their strategy to add germanium as a laboratory chemical to Attachment 8.2 of the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan (WCP).

  19. Microwave-Assisted Facile Synthesis, Anticancer Evaluation and Docking Study of N-((5-(Substituted methylene amino-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-ylmethyl Benzamide Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailee V. Tiwari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, 12 novel Schiff’s bases containing a thiadiazole scaffold and benzamide groups coupled through appropriate pharmacophore were synthesized. These moieties are associated with important biological properties. A facile, solvent-free synthesis of a series of novel 7(a–l N-((5-(substituted methylene amino-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-ylmethyl benzamide was carried out under microwave irradiation. Structures of the synthesized compounds were confirmed by IR, NMR, mass spectral study and elemental analysis. All the synthesized hybrids were evaluated for their in vitro anticancer activity against a panel of four human cancer cell lines, viz. SK-MEL-2 (melanoma, HL-60 (leukemia, HeLa (cervical cancer, MCF-7 (breast cancer and normal breast epithelial cell (MCF-10A using 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay method. Most of the synthesized compounds exhibited promising anticancer activity, showed comparable GI50 values comparable to that of the standard drug Adriamycin. The compounds 7k, 7l, 7b, and 7a were found to be the most promising anticancer agents in this study. A molecular docking study was performed to predict the probable mechanism of action and computational study of the synthesized compounds 7(a–l was performed to predict absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET properties, by using QikProp v3.5 (Schrödinger LLC. The results showed the good oral drug-like behavior of the synthesized compounds 7(a–l.

  20. Evaluation of a barrier to inhibit lesser mealworm (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) and dermestidae movement in high-rise, caged-layer poultry facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Phillip E; Reasor, Colleen; Murray, Kathleen D; Waldron, J Keith; Rutz, Donald A

    2005-10-01

    An evaluation of a mechanical barrier to prevent movement of adult and larval lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer); larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius L.; and hide beetle, Dermestes maculatus De Geer was conducted in caged-layer poultry facilities in New York and Maine. The barrier, a plastic collar wrapped around building support posts, proved highly effective at preventing movement of adult lesser mealworms. Significantly more lesser mealworm larvae were recovered from cardboard collar beetle traps placed below both washed and unwashed barriers than from traps placed above washed and unwashed barriers. Similarly, significantly more adult Dermestes were recovered from traps placed below washed barriers than from above both washed and unwashed barriers. The level of fly specking on the barrier was found to have no significant impact on the numbers of adult lesser mealworms and adult and larval Dermestes recovered either above or below barriers. Fly specking level did significantly impact the numbers of lesser mealworm larvae recovered above the barrier. Although washed barriers provided the greatest deterrent to adult lesser mealworms, the presence of the barrier, regardless of the level of fly specking, provided a significant deterrent to beetle climbing success. Washed barriers further reduced climbing success by lesser mealworm larvae by 17%, Dermestes adults by 7-28%, and Dermestes larvae by 33-38%. The high level of climbing observed by adult lesser mealworms suggests that the impact of adult beetle movement toward birds should be considered in its importance in building damage, disease transmission, feed infestation, and bird productivity and health. Observations on cost and maintenance of the barrier are discussed.