WorldWideScience

Sample records for facility cdr review

  1. Spent nuclear fuel Canister Storage Building CDR Review Committee report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dana, W.P.

    1995-12-01

    The Canister Storage Building (CSB) is a subproject under the Spent Nuclear Fuels Major System Acquisition. This subproject is necessary to design and construct a facility capable of providing dry storage of repackaged spent fuels received from K Basins. The CSB project completed a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) implementing current project requirements. A Design Review Committee was established to review the CDR. This document is the final report summarizing that review

  2. Optical System Critical Design Review (CDR) Flight Software Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorrami, Mori

    2006-01-01

    The Mid Infrared Instrument (MIRI FSW presentation covers: (1) Optical System FSW only and Cooling System FSW is covered at its CDR (2) Requirements & Interfaces (3) Relationship with the ISIM FSW (4) FSW Design Drivers & Solutions.

  3. Thermal Analysis of Iodine Satellite (iSAT) from Preliminary Design Review (PDR) to Critical Design Review (CDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The Iodine Satellite (iSAT) is a 12U cubesat with a primary mission to demonstrate the iodine fueled Hall Effect Thruster (HET) propulsion system. The spacecraft (SC) will operate throughout a one year mission in an effort to mature the propulsion system for use in future applications. The benefit of the HET is that it uses a propellant, iodine, which is easy to store and provides a high thrust-to-mass ratio. This paper will describe the thermal analysis and design of the SC between Preliminary Design Review (PDR) and Critical Design Review (CDR). The design of the satellite has undergone many changes due to a variety of challenges, both before PDR and during the time period discussed in this paper. Thermal challenges associated with the system include a high power density, small amounts of available radiative surface area, localized temperature requirements of the propulsion components, and unknown orbital parameters. The thermal control system is implemented to maintain component temperatures within their respective operational limits throughout the mission, while also maintaining propulsion components at the high temperatures needed to allow gaseous iodine propellant to flow. The design includes heaters, insulation, radiators, coatings, and thermal straps. Currently, the maximum temperatures for several components are near to their maximum operation limit, and the battery is close to its minimum operation limit. Mitigation strategies and planned work to solve these challenges will be discussed.

  4. The Iodine Satellite (iSat) Project Development Towards Critical Design Review (CDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John W.; Selby, Michael; Polzin, Kurt A.; Kamhawi, Hani; Hickman, Tyler; Byrne, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of Small Satellites in recent years, the systems flown to date have very limited propulsion capability. SmallSats are typically secondary payloads and have significant constraints for volume, mass, and power in addition to limitations on the use of hazardous propellants or stored energy (i.e. high pressure vessels). These constraints limit the options for SmallSat maneuverability. NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate approved the iodine Satellite flight project for a rapid demonstration of iodine Hall thruster technology in a 12U configuration under the Small Spacecraft Technology Program. The project formally began in FY15 as a partnership between NASA MSFC, NASA GRC, and Busek Co, Inc., with the Air Force supporting the propulsion technology maturation. The team is in final preparation of the Critical Design Review prior to initiating the fabrication and integration phase of the project. The iSat project is on schedule for a launch opportunity in November 2017.

  5. In-facility transport code review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spore, J.W.; Boyack, B.E.; Bohl, W.R.

    1996-07-01

    The following computer codes were reviewed by the In-Facility Transport Working Group for application to the in-facility transport of radioactive aerosols, flammable gases, and/or toxic gases: (1) CONTAIN, (2) FIRAC, (3) GASFLOW, (4) KBERT, and (5) MELCOR. Based on the review criteria as described in this report and the versions of each code available at the time of the review, MELCOR is the best code for the analysis of in-facility transport when multidimensional effects are not significant. When multi-dimensional effects are significant, GASFLOW should be used

  6. Cold vacuum drying facility 90% design review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Neill, C.T.

    1997-05-02

    This document contains review comment records for the CVDF 90% design review. Spent fuels retrieved from the K Basins will be dried at the CVDF. It has also been recommended that the Multi-Conister Overpacks be welded, inspected, and repaired at the CVD Facility before transport to dry storage.

  7. Cold vacuum drying facility 90% design review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, C.T.

    1997-01-01

    This document contains review comment records for the CVDF 90% design review. Spent fuels retrieved from the K Basins will be dried at the CVDF. It has also been recommended that the Multi-Conister Overpacks be welded, inspected, and repaired at the CVD Facility before transport to dry storage

  8. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  9. Radiography Facility - Building 239 Independent Validation Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenbach, T J; Beaulieu, R A; Watson, J F; Wong, H J

    2010-02-02

    The purpose of this task was to perform an Independent Validation Review to evaluate the successful implementation and effectiveness of Safety Basis controls, including new and revised controls, to support the implementation of a new DSA/TSR for B239. This task addresses Milestone 2 of FY10 PEP 7.6.6. As the first IVR ever conducted on a LLNL nuclear facility, it was designated a pilot project. The review follows the outline developed for Milestone 1 of the PEP, which is based on the DOE Draft Guide for Performance of Independent Verification Review of Safety Basis Controls. A formal Safety Basis procedure will be developed later, based on the lessons learned with this pilot project. Note, this review is termed a ''Validation'' in order to be consistent with the PEP definition and address issues historically raised about verification mechanisms at LLNL. Validation is intended to confirm that implementing mechanisms realistically establish the ability of TSR LCO, administrative control or safety management program to accomplish its intended safety function and that the controls are being implemented. This effort should not, however, be confused with a compliance assessment against all relevant DOE requirements and national standards. Nor is it used as a vehicle to question the derivation of controls already approved by LSO unless a given TSR statement simply cannot be implemented as stated.

  10. Journal 02.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stephen

    unintended force molting, egg disposal at unit prices below break-even points, reduction of flock size through sale of live animals, dumping of stale and poorly stored eggs etc. these effects can be further compounded by lack of storage facilities and erratic power outages. The summation of these effects will further precipitate ...

  11. march issue.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    which poses a diagnostic challenge due to limited facilities for thorough investigation. This article, hope to highlight intracardiac lesion (most likely left atria myxoma) as a possible risk factor for stroke in young patients in our environment. Since high index of suspicion is the key to the diagnosis, attending clinicians therefore.

  12. Nursing home facilities in Malaysia (premise, shared facilities & individual accommodation: Space requirement): A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Nik Muhammad Faris Bin Nik; Hasbollah, Hasif Rafidee bin; Ibrahim, Mohd Asrul Hery Bin; Marican, Nor Dalila bin; Halim, Muhd Hafzal bin Abdul; Rashid, Ahmad Faezi Bin Ab.; Yasin, Nurul Hafizah Binti Mohd

    2017-10-01

    The numbers of elderly in Malaysia are increased every year. The request towards elderly care services necessitated by the Nursing Home are in demand. However, Nursing Home in Malaysia is lack of standard of facilities in order to cater the care services for the elderly. This paper intends review the minimum standard facilities for the Nursing Homes in globally. The paper also offered insights in developing standard Nursing Home facilities in Malaysia.

  13. New draft.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP USER

    Medicina Oral Patologia Oral Y Cirugia Bucal,. 13(10): 627-632. Benamer MH, Elmangoush AM (2006). Lingual osseous choristoma: case report and review of literature. Libyan Journal of Medicine, 06:9-11. Chou LS, Hansen LS & Daniels TE (1991). Choristomas of the oral cavity: a review. Oral Surgery Oral. Medicine Oral ...

  14. Review of biological monitoring programs at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, L.R.; Oakes, T.W.; Shank, K.E.

    Biological monitoring programs, as well as relevant radioecological research studies, are reviewed at specific Department of Energy facilities; the program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is discussed in detail. The biological measurements that are being used for interpreting the impact of a facility on its surrounding environment and nearby population are given. Suggestions which could facilitate interlaboratory comparison studies are presented

  15. JMBR - SEPTEMBER 2013.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    JMBR: A Peer-review Journal of Biomedical Sciences. December 2013, Vol. 12 No.2 pp 166-172. ABSTRACT. Cadmium and Lead are extremely toxic metals found in industrial workplaces. They are also found in some industrial paints and may represent hazards when sprayed. Occupational exposure is a common cause ...

  16. JMBR vol 7.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tope

    Hence, it may be necessary to use rheomodulators in the management of diabetes mellitus. INTRODUCTION. Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality represent a main challenge in diabetic. 1, 2 patients . Aggressive blood pressure control. JMBR: A Peer-review Journal of Biomedical Sciences. 2008 Edition Vol.7 Nos.1 & 2.

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facility Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-05

    This series of slides depicts the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The Center's 800-MeV linac produces H+ and H- beams as well as beams of moderated (cold to 1 MeV) and unmoderated (0.1 to 600 MeV) neutrons. Experimental facilities and their capabilities and characteristics are outlined. Among these are LENZ, SPIDER, and DANCE.

  18. Post-CDR NPOESS VIIRS sensor design and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalione, Tanya; Swenson, Hilmer W.; De Luccia, Frank; Schueler, Carl; Clement, John E.; Darnton, Lane

    2004-02-01

    This paper summarizes post-critical design review (CDR) design refinements and performance estimate updates to the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite Systems (NPOESS) Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor. The design changes reduced manufacturing and performance risk to meet VIIRS sensor performance specifications. Electro-Magnetic Compatibility (EMC) and Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI) requirements drove increased shielding and cable modifications. A telescope design modification was also required to remove modulated instrument background (MIB) discovered in the CDR optical design. Performance predictions were then generated from models and demonstration hardware based on the design refinements, and these are also reported here. VIIRS risk-reduction will continue as the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) is assembled and tested over the next year facilitating performance verification and lowering flight unit development risk.

  19. Detecting Development Pattern of Urban Business Facilities Using Reviews Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIANG Botao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reveals and utilizes the growing power of online customer reviews in the space and time context. The location of commercial facilities and online customer reviews offered by Dianping.com provide an important data source for the study of spatial and temporal dynamics of urban commercial facilities. The constraints of road network are taken into account towards computing the density of urban commercial facilities and associated online customer reviews, as well as their spatial distribution, temporal trend, and the coupling relationship between facility number and stratification level. This paper maps the spatial distribution of commercial facilities onto the nearby road network, reflecting the influences of the locations, number and satisfaction levels of other commercial facilities across various street types. Because more and more customers tend to make a final shopping decision by sorting through search results by ratings and feedback, the research conducted in this paper can provide the proof for quantitative evaluation of urban planning on commercial facility development.

  20. Operational Readiness Review: Savannah River Replacement Tritium Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The Operational Readiness Review (ORR) is one of several activities to be completed prior to introducing tritium into the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Secretary of Energy will rely in part on the results of this ORR in deciding whether the startup criteria for RTF have been met. The RTF is a new underground facility built to safely service the remaining nuclear weapons stockpile. At RTF, tritium will be unloaded from old components, purified and enriched, and loaded into new or reclaimed reservoirs. The RTF will replace an aging facility at SRS that has processed tritium for more than 35 years. RTF has completed construction and is undergoing facility startup testing. The final stages of this testing will require the introduction of limited amounts of tritium. The US Department of Energy (DOE) ORR was conducted January 19 to February 4, 1993, in accordance with an ORR review plan which was developed considering previous readiness reviews. The plan also considered the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendations 90-4 and 92-6, and the judgements of experienced senior experts. The review covered three major areas: (1) Plant and Equipment Readiness, (2) Personnel Readiness, and (3) Management Systems. The ORR Team was comprised of approximately 30 members consisting of a Team Leader, Senior Safety Experts, and Technical Experts. The ORR objectives and criteria were based on DOE Orders, industry standards, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations guidelines, recommendations of external oversight groups, and experience of the team members

  1. Review of WHO/PAHO/IAEA recommendations concerning radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    Since the mid 1960s the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have provided recommendations concerning radiotherapy services, including organization, staff requirements and facilities. These are contained in various reports of WHO, PAHO and IAEA, which are reviewed and summarized. (author). 9 refs

  2. Facilities Management Practices in Malaysia: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Nordiana Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facilities management in Malaysia has been practiced for decades. The development of its formal practice parallels the improvement of the built environment in the nation. Involvement of the public and private sectors teaming up in arranging the National Asset and Facilities Management (NAFAM in demonstrates the vital collaboration in the facilities management area in Malaysia. Facilities management is seen distinctively as indicated by diverse geographical locations, interests and schools of thought. Facilities management is delegated a service-based industry which gives proficient counsel and administration of clients’ building facilities including residential, commercial, industrial, airports terminals and offices. The aim of this paper is to review the gaps that exist, especially on how FM is being practice in comparison with the published FM body of knowledge. Very relying upon literature, this paper discovered a gap that is an unclear description of current FM applications. This research aims to give new bits of knowledge to upgrade comprehension of FM execution in Malaysia.

  3. Effects of earthquakes on underground facilities. Literature review and discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, D.W.; Chung, D.H.

    1986-06-01

    A review of literature concerning effects of ground motion on underground facilities has been completed, and an annotated bibliography has been prepared. This information provides useful background for the science and engineering of underground nuclear waste management facility development. While some conflicts are evident in the literature reviewed, the following tentative conclusions may be drawn from the available information: (1) damage is expectable if fault displacement occurs through a site, but damage from shaking alone is generally confined to facilities located within the epicentral region and may be less than to surface facilities at the same site. (2) Seismic data are mixed, but favors reduction of amplitude with depth; observations appear quite dependent upon station characteristics. (3) The frequency content of earthquake mitions is important to the stability of underground openings and the applicability of attenuation relationships developed in areas where geologic and tectonic characteristics favor high attenuation rates to mid-continental sites is questionable. (4) Model studies indicate problems for shafts and the potential for problems with waste-handling equipment in shafts. The results of the review indicate the need to assure that site-specific response spectra and attenuation relationships are developed for proposed sites, and that detailed assessments of seismic aspects of shaft designs, hoists and in-shaft waste-handling equipment are required

  4. Space syntax in healthcare facilities research: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Saif; Luo, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Space Syntax is a theory and method that has been developing for the last 40 years. Originally conceived as a theory of "society and space," it has expanded to other areas. An important aspect of this is technical; it allows the quantification of layouts, and unit spaces within a layout, so that the environment itself can produce independent variables in quantitative research. Increasingly, it is being used to study healthcare facilities. Space Syntax has thereby become relevant to healthcare facilities researchers and designers. This paper attempts to explain Space Syntax to a new audience of healthcare designers, administrators, and researchers; it provides a literature review on the use of Space Syntax in healthcare facility research and suggests some possibilities for future application.

  5. A review of sustainable facilities management knowledge and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baaki Timothy Kurannen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is seen as a far-reaching issue now, and one which the facilities management [FM] profession cannot overlook. This paper explores current sustainable facilities management [SFM] knowledge and practice with specific focus on performance as part of a research focus toward proposing a sustainable FM performance management framework for sustainable healthcare waste management in Malaysia. This paper utilized a review of extant literature on the subject of SFM, FM performance and FM development in Malaysia as source of information. Findings reflect the increasing recognition of the need for the strategic FM function, and how facilities managers are best positioned to drive organizations’ sustainability agendas. In Malaysian context, this recognition is barely evident as findings show FM practice is still immature and predominantly operational. Unlike developed FM markets, FM relevance in Malaysia is being driven by the public sector. Also findings show a disharmony between organizations’ sustainability priority areas and the responsibilities for facilities managers to execute them where the sustainability policy of organizations prioritize one FM service and the facilities managers’ responsibilities prioritize another. As most of SFM implementation is driven by legislation this seems to strengthen the position that, organizations continue to view support services as non-value-adding, as unavoidable liabilities. The implication of this is the pressure on the FM function to continually express its strategic relevance to organizations by tangible value-adding performance output. This creates a new perspective to measuring and managing facilities performance. This paper therefore elevates the importance of FM performance management in SFM context taking into account the peculiar position of the facilities manager. This is seen as a way forward for FM to better express its value to the organization

  6. The CDR subsystem of the COMPASS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kral, A.; Liska, T.

    2005-01-01

    COMPASS (COmmon Muon Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy) is a high-energy physics experiment at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The purpose of this experiment is to study the hadron structure and hadron spectrum using high intensity muon and hadron beams. A set of programs which transfer the data taken by the on-line experimental systems to the central data storage CASTOR are required. We use the software package called Central Data Recording (CDR) system. This paper briefly describes architecture of CDR system, system functionality and ongoing tasks for the future. (author)

  7. Review of C-14 inventory for the SFR facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Graham; Merino, Joan; Kerrigan, Emma

    2002-08-01

    The Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) is currently reviewing SKB's continuing assessment for disposal of radioactive waste to the SFR facility at Forsmark. Among the wastes disposed are reactor operating wastes. Among the relevant radionuclides is C-14, which is relatively difficult to measure and to control because of its mobility. This report documents a review of the C-14 inventory material submitted by SKB for the SFR-facility, to determine its validity and comment on the appropriate assumptions for C-14 content of wastes due to be disposed of to the SFR. The review is based on information provided by SSI as well as other relevant international experience. Conclusions are drawn upon: the chemical form of the C-14 in the waste from BWRs and PWRs; the production rate of C-14 in BWRs and PWRs and quantification of the source term in the IEX waste; the distribution of the C-14 in the IEX waste from BWR between the resins used for treatment of the primary cooling water and the resins used for treatment of the condensate water; quantification of the uncertainties. A suggestion is made that the C-14 inventory could be better developed based upon a mass balance assessment of all the C-14 produced in reactors, and its ultimate fate in effluent and solid wastes, taking account of the reactor specific operational factors identified in the review as relevant to C-14 inventory assessment.

  8. Review of C-14 inventory for the SFR facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Graham; Merino, Joan; Kerrigan, Emma

    2002-08-01

    The Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) is currently reviewing SKB's continuing assessment for disposal of radioactive waste to the SFR facility at Forsmark. Among the wastes disposed are reactor operating wastes. Among the relevant radionuclides is C-14, which is relatively difficult to measure and to control because of its mobility. This report documents a review of the C-14 inventory material submitted by SKB for the SFR-facility, to determine its validity and comment on the appropriate assumptions for C-14 content of wastes due to be disposed of to the SFR. The review is based on information provided by SSI as well as other relevant international experience. Conclusions are drawn upon: the chemical form of the C-14 in the waste from BWRs and PWRs; the production rate of C-14 in BWRs and PWRs and quantification of the source term in the IEX waste; the distribution of the C-14 in the IEX waste from BWR between the resins used for treatment of the primary cooling water and the resins used for treatment of the condensate water; quantification of the uncertainties. A suggestion is made that the C-14 inventory could be better developed based upon a mass balance assessment of all the C-14 produced in reactors, and its ultimate fate in effluent and solid wastes, taking account of the reactor specific operational factors identified in the review as relevant to C-14 inventory assessment

  9. SRTC criticality technical review: Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 93-18 Uranium Solidification Facility's Waste Handling Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathbun, R.

    1993-01-01

    Separate review of NMP-NCS-930058, open-quotes Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 93-18 Uranium Solidification Facility's Waste Handling Facility (U), August 17, 1993,close quotes was requested of SRTC Applied Physics Group. The NCSE is a criticality assessment to determine waste container uranium limits in the Uranium Solidification Facility's Waste Handling Facility. The NCSE under review concludes that the NDA room remains in a critically safe configuration for all normal and single credible abnormal conditions. The ability to make this conclusion is highly dependent on array limitation and inclusion of physical barriers between 2x2x1 arrays of boxes containing materials contaminated with uranium. After a thorough review of the NCSE and independent calculations, this reviewer agrees with that conclusion

  10. Serum repressing efflux pump CDR1 in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jen-Chung

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decades, the prevalence of candidemia has increased significantly and drug resistance has also become a pressing problem. Overexpression of CDR1, an efflux pump, has been proposed as a major mechanism contributing to the drug resistance in Candida albicans. It has been demonstrated that biological fluids such as human serum can have profound effects on antifungal pharmacodynamics. The aim of this study is to understand the effects of serum in drug susceptibility via monitoring the activity of CDR1 promoter of C. albicans. Results The wild-type C. albicans cells (SC5314 but not the cdr1/cdr1 mutant cells became more susceptible to the antifungal drug when the medium contained serum. To understand the regulation of CDR1 in the presence of serum, we have constructed CDR1 promoter-Renilla luciferase (CDR1p-RLUC reporter to monitor the activity of the CDR1 promoter in C. albicans. As expected, the expression of CDR1p-RLUC was induced by miconazole. Surprisingly, it was repressed by serum. Consistently, the level of CDR1 mRNA was also reduced in the presence of serum but not N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, a known inducer for germ tube formation. Conclusion Our finding that the expression of CDR1 is repressed by serum raises the question as to how does CDR1 contribute to the drug resistance in C. albicans causing candidemia. This also suggests that it is important to re-assess the prediction of in vivo therapeutic outcome of candidemia based on the results of standard in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing, conducted in the absence of serum.

  11. Experiment Simulation Configurations Used in DUNE CDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alion, T. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Black, J. J. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Bashyal, A. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Bass, M. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Bishai, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cherdack, D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Diwan, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Djurcic, Z. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Evans, J. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Fernandez-Martinez, E. [Madrid Autonama Univ. (Spain); Fields, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Fleming, B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Gran, R. [Univ. of Minnesota, Duluth, MN (United States); Guenette, R. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Hewes, J. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Hogan, M. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Hylen, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Junk, T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Kohn, S. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); LeBrun, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lundberg, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Marchionni, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Morris, C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Papadimitriou, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rameika, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rucinski, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Soldner-Rembold, S. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Sorel, M. [Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Valencia (Spain). Univ. of Valencia (UV), Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular; Urheim, J. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Viren, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Whitehead, L. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Wilson, R. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Worcester, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zeller, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-06-30

    The LBNF/DUNE CDR describes the proposed physics program and experimental design at the conceptual design phase. Volume 2, entitled The Physics Program for DUNE at LBNF, outlines the scientific objectives and describes the physics studies that the DUNE collaboration will perform to address these objectives. The long-baseline physics sensitivity calculations presented in the DUNE CDR rely upon simulation of the neutrino beam line, simulation of neutrino interactions in the far detector, and a parameterized analysis of detector performance and systematic uncertainty. The purpose of this posting is to provide the results of these simulations to the community to facilitate phenomenological studies of long-baseline oscillation at LBNF/DUNE. Additionally, this posting includes GDML of the DUNE single-phase far detector for use in simulations. DUNE welcomes those interested in performing this work as members of the collaboration, but also recognizes the benefit of making these configurations readily available to the wider community.

  12. XML Schema Guide for Primary CDR Submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document presents the extensible markup language (XML) schema guide for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics’ (OPPT) e-CDRweb tool. E-CDRweb is the electronic, web-based tool provided by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the submission of Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) information. This document provides the user with tips and guidance on correctly using the version 1.7 XML schema. Please note that the order of the elements must match the schema.

  13. JUNE 2010.for Ogidi (final).cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    clinical audit, intra-partum care, birth attendants, health facilities, quality ... of the baby at birth. Names were excluded from extracted information in order to ensure confidentiality of individual parturients and health care providers, which a study of this nature required. ... records reviewed was 23.4 ± 3.3 years (Confidence.

  14. Performance assessment review for DOE LLW disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhite, Elmer L.

    1992-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) disposes of low-level radioactive waste in near-surface disposal facilities. Safety of the disposal operations is evaluated for operational safety as well as long-term safety. Operational safety is evaluated based on the perceived level of hazard of the operation and may vary from a simple safety assessment to a safety analysis report. Long-term safety of all low-level waste disposal systems is evaluated through the conduct of a radiological performance assessment. The US DOE has established radiological performance objectives for disposal of low-level waste. They are to protect a member of the general public from receiving over 25 mrem/y, and an inadvertent intruder into the waste from receiving over 100 mrem/y continuous exposure or 500 mrem from a single exposure. For a disposal system to be acceptable, a performance assessment must be prepared which must be technically accurate and provide reasonable assurance that these performance objectives are met. Technical quality of the performance assessments is reviewed by a panel of experts. The panel of experts is used in two ways to assure the technical quality of performance assessment. A preliminary (generally 2 day) review by the panel is employed in the late stages of development to provide guidance on finalizing the performance assessment. The comments from this review are communicated to the personnel responsible for the performance assessment for consideration and incorporation. After finalizing the performance assessment, it is submitted for a formal review. The formal review is accomplished by a much more thorough analysis of the performance assessment over a multi-week time period. The panel then formally reports their recommendations to the US DOE waste management senior staff who make the final determination on acceptability of the performance assessment. A number of lessons have been learned from conducting several preliminary reviews of performance

  15. NJS July 2011 for Ogidi.cdr final.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Herrmann TR, Georgiou A, Bach T, Gross AJ,. Oelke M. Laser treatments of the prostate vs. TURP/ open prostatectomy: systematic review of urodynamic data. Minerva Urol Nefrol. 2009. Sep; 61(3):309-24. 13. Hoffman RM, Monga M, Elliot SP, Macdonald R,. Wilt TJ. Microwave thermotherapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia ...

  16. The CLIC ILD CDR Geometry for the CDR Monte Carlo Mass Production

    CERN Document Server

    Muennich, A

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC ILD CDR detector for the Monte Carlo event simulation is described in a GEANT4 application, with some parameters available in a database and XML files. This makes it difficult to quickly “look up” interesting parameters of the detector geometry used for the simulation. This note summarises the important geometrical parameters and some details of the implemented detector components.

  17. Cover Final May.cdr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    475. Classics. On tthe System and Engineering Design of the. General Purpose Electronic Digital Computer at. TIFR. R Narasimhan. 490. 440 Arithmetic and Cryptography. Michel Waldschmidt. FEATURE ARTICLES. 456 Molecule Matters. N-Heterocyclic Carbenes – The Stable Form of R2C: Anil J Elias. BOOK REVIEWS.

  18. sept 2 edition 2009.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    treatment of hyperparathyroidism and the remaining 9 cases diagnosed during the management of thyroid disorders or cervical nodules . These authors have therefore suggested that the old dictum stating that lateral aberrant thyroid represents metastatic cancer should be either modified or removed in review texts and.

  19. XML Schema Guide for Secondary CDR Submissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document presents the extensible markup language (XML) schema guide for the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics’ (OPPT) e-CDRweb tool. E-CDRweb is the electronic, web-based tool provided by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the submission of Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) information. This document provides the user with tips and guidance on correctly using the version 1.1 XML schema for the Joint Submission Form. Please note that the order of the elements must match the schema.

  20. NRAO Response to NSF Senior Review of Astronomy Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Astronomy Senior Review Committee report (pdf file), released today, made major recommendations for restructuring the NSF's ground-based astronomy efforts, including significant changes for the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The committee's report urged that leadership in radio astronomy, including millimeter- and submillimeter-wave observatories, "remain centered at NRAO as it is, by far, the largest radio astronomy organization in the world." The report praised the record of management of NRAO and the scientific capabilities of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA), the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). However, the report also recommended that some reductions and changes occur at the NRAO by 2011. Specifically, the report recommended that: (a) VLBA operations make a transition to a significant reliance on international funding or risk closure; (b) GBT operations costs be reduced; and (c) NRAO scientific staff costs be reduced. "The Senior Review Committee had the very difficult task of reconciling the needs of current facilities and funding new facilities for the future of astronomy. We appreciate their efforts and look forward to working with the NSF to ensure that the valuable and unique research capabilities of our NRAO telescopes continue to serve the astronomical community," said Dr. Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO Director. The VLBA provides the greatest angular resolution, or ability to see fine detail, of any telescope in the world, greatly exceeding the capabilities of the Hubble Space Telescope and the future Square Kilometre Array. The committee recognized that, "if the VLBA is closed, a unique capability would likely be lost for decades." "The VLBA is used by scientists from around the world because of its unique capabilities. It has produced landmark research milestones and the committee recognized in its

  1. The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Preliminary design review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document presents information about the Mixed Waste Management Facility. Topics discussed include: cost and schedule baseline for the completion of the project; evaluation of alternative options; transportation of radioactive wastes to the facility; capital risk associated with incineration; radioactive waste processing; scaling of the pilot-scale system; waste streams to be processed; molten salt oxidation; feed preparation; initial operation to demonstrate selected technologies; floorplans; baseline revisions; preliminary design baseline; cost reduction; and project mission and milestones.

  2. Incineration facilities for treatment of radioactive wastes: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, B.L.

    1976-02-01

    A description is given of incinerator installations in the US and in foreign countries. Included are descriptions of inactive incinerators, incinerator facilities currently in operation, and incinerator installations under construction. Special features of each installation and operational problems of each facility are emphasized. Problems in the incineration of radioactive waste are discussed in relation to the composition of the waste and the amount and type of radioactive contaminant.

  3. The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Preliminary design review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document presents information about the Mixed Waste Management Facility. Topics discussed include: cost and schedule baseline for the completion of the project; evaluation of alternative options; transportation of radioactive wastes to the facility; capital risk associated with incineration; radioactive waste processing; scaling of the pilot-scale system; waste streams to be processed; molten salt oxidation; feed preparation; initial operation to demonstrate selected technologies; floorplans; baseline revisions; preliminary design baseline; cost reduction; and project mission and milestones

  4. Incineration facilities for treatment of radioactive wastes: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, B.L.

    1976-02-01

    A description is given of incinerator installations in the US and in foreign countries. Included are descriptions of inactive incinerators, incinerator facilities currently in operation, and incinerator installations under construction. Special features of each installation and operational problems of each facility are emphasized. Problems in the incineration of radioactive waste are discussed in relation to the composition of the waste and the amount and type of radioactive contaminant

  5. Review and assessment of nuclear facilities by the regulatory body. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations for regulatory bodies on reviewing and assessing the various safety related submissions made by the operator of a nuclear facility at different stages (siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning or closure) in the facility's lifetime to determine whether the facility complies with the applicable safety objectives and requirements. This Safety Guide covers the review and assessment of submissions in relation to the safety of nuclear facilities such as: enrichment and fuel manufacturing plants; nuclear power plants; other reactors such as research reactors and critical assemblies; spent fuel reprocessing plants; and facilities for radioactive waste management, such as treatment, storage and disposal facilities. This Safety Guide also covers issues relating to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the closure of waste disposal facilities and site rehabilitation. Objectives, management, planning and organizational matters relating to the review and assessment process are presented in Section 2. Section 3 deals with the bases for decision making and conduct of the review and assessment process. Section 4 covers aspects relating to the assessment of this process. The Appendix provides a generic list of topics to be covered in the review and assessment process

  6. Review and assessment of nuclear facilities by the regulatory body. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations for regulatory bodies on reviewing and assessing the various safety related submissions made by the operator of a nuclear facility at different stages (siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning or closure) in the facility's lifetime to determine whether the facility complies with the applicable safety objectives and requirements. This Safety Guide covers the review and assessment of submissions in relation to the safety of nuclear facilities such as: enrichment and fuel manufacturing plants. Nuclear power plants. Other reactors such as research reactors and critical assemblies. Spent fuel reprocessing plants. And facilities for radioactive waste management, such as treatment, storage and disposal facilities. This Safety Guide also covers issues relating to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the closure of waste disposal facilities and site rehabilitation. Objectives, management, planning and organizational matters relating to the review and assessment process are presented in Section 2. Section 3 deals with the bases for decision making and conduct of the review and assessment process. Section 4 covers aspects relating to the assessment of this process. The Appendix provides a generic list of topics to be covered in the review and assessment process

  7. Review and assessment of nuclear facilities by the regulatory body. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations for regulatory bodies on reviewing and assessing the various safety related submissions made by the operator of a nuclear facility at different stages (siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning or closure) in the facility's lifetime to determine whether the facility complies with the applicable safety objectives and requirements. This Safety Guide covers the review and assessment of submissions in relation to the safety of nuclear facilities such as: enrichment and fuel manufacturing plants. Nuclear power plants. Other reactors such as research reactors and critical assemblies. Spent fuel reprocessing plants. And facilities for radioactive waste management, such as treatment, storage and disposal facilities. This Safety Guide also covers issues relating to the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, the closure of waste disposal facilities and site rehabilitation. Objectives, management, planning and organizational matters relating to the review and assessment process are presented in Section 2. Section 3 deals with the bases for decision making and conduct of the review and assessment process. Section 4 covers aspects relating to the assessment of this process. The Appendix provides a generic list of topics to be covered in the review and assessment process

  8. Proposed integrated hazardous waste disposal facility. Public environmental review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    This Public Environmental Report describes a proposal by the Health Department of Western Australia to establish a disposal facility for certain hazardous wastes and seeks comments from governments agencies and the public that will assist the EPA to make its recommendations to. The facility would only be used for wastes generated in Western Australia.The proposal specifically includes: a high temperature incinerator for the disposal of organo-chlorines (including agricultural chemicals and PCBs), and other intractable wastes for which this is the optimum disposal method; an area for the burial (after any appropriate conditioning) of low level radioactive intractable wastes arising from the processing of mineral sands (including monazite, ilmenite and zircon) and phosphate rock. Detailed information is presented on those wastes which are currently identified as requiring disposal at the facility.The proposed facility will also be suitable for the disposal of other intractable wastes including radioactive wastes (from industry, medicine and research) and other solid intractable wastes of a chemical nature including spent catalysts etc. Proposals to dispose of these other wastes at this facility in the future will be referred to the Environmental Protection Authority for separate assessment

  9. Plasma Facing Components Generic Facilities Review Panel (PFC-GFRP): Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, R.; Allen, S.; Hill, D.; Brooks, J.; Mattas, R.; Davis, J.; Lipschultz, B.; Ulrickson, M.

    1993-10-01

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFC) Facilities Review Panel was chartered by the US Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy, ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and Technology Division, to outline the program plan and identify the supporting test facilities that lead to reliable, long-lived plasma facing components for ITER. This report summarizes the panel's findings and identifies the necessary and sufficient set of test facilities required for ITER PFC development

  10. Plasma Facing Components Generic Facilities Review Panel (PFC-GFRP): Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Allen, S.; Hill, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Brooks, J.; Mattas, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Davis, J. [McDonnell Douglas, St. Louis, MO (United States); Lipschultz, B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ulrickson, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFC) Facilities Review Panel was chartered by the US Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy, ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and Technology Division, to outline the program plan and identify the supporting test facilities that lead to reliable, long-lived plasma facing components for ITER. This report summarizes the panel`s findings and identifies the necessary and sufficient set of test facilities required for ITER PFC development.

  11. 77 FR 55843 - Office of Facilities Management and Program Services; Submission for OMB Review; Background...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Office of Facilities Management and Program Services; Submission for OMB Review; Background Investigations for Child Care Workers AGENCY: Office of Facilities Management and Program Services, Public... Act, the Regulatory Secretariat will be submitting to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a...

  12. A review of the facile (FN) method in particle transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, R.D.M.

    1986-02-01

    The facile F N method for solving particle transport problems is reviewed. The fundamentals of the method are summarized, recent developments are discussed and several applications of the method are described in detail. (author) [pt

  13. Ecotoxicity of Wastewater from Medical Facilities: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cidlinová A.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater from medical facilities contains a wide range of chemicals (in particular pharmaceuticals, disinfectants, heavy metals, contrast media, and radionuclides and pathogens, therefore it constitutes a risk to the environment and human health. Many micropollutants are not efficiently eliminated during wastewater treatment and contaminate both surface water and groundwater. As we lack information about the long-term effects of low concentrations of micropollutants in the aquatic environment, it is not possible to rule out their adverse effects on aquatic organisms and human health. It is, therefore, necessary to focus on the evaluation of chronic toxicity in particular when assessing the environmental and health risks and to develop standards for the regulation of hazardous substances in wastewater from medical facilities on the basis of collected data. Wastewater from medical facilities is a complex mixture of many compounds that may have synergetic, antagonistic or additive effects on organisms. To evaluate the influence of a wide range of pollutants contained in the effluents from medical facilities on aquatic ecosystems, it is necessary to determine their ecotoxicity.

  14. Antifungal effect of Echinophora platyloba on expression of CDR1 and CDR2 genes in fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajeh, Elias; Hosseini Shokouh, Seyed Javad; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Roudbary, Maryam; Rafiei, Sajad; Aslani, Peyman; Farahnejad, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Several studies examined the effect of the Echinophora platyloba extract in treatment of azole-resistant Candida albicans clinical isolates. We investigated the effect of E. platyloba extract on expression of CDR1 and CDR2 genes in fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates of C. albicans using real-time PCR. The crude extract of E. platyloba was obtained using percolation method. Using serial dilution method, different concentrations of extract were achieved. Two hundred microlitres of fungal suspension (10(6) CFU/ml) was added to the media and cultured with different concentrations and then incubated at 37 °C for 48 h. The concentration of extract in the first tube, which inhibited the growth of C. albicans, was recorded as the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). In order to analyse the expression of CDR1 and CDR2 genes, RNA was extracted from C. albicans isolates before and after treatment with MIC of E. platyloba using glass beads and the denaturing buffer agents in an RNase-free environment and then the cDNA was synthesised and used for real-time PCR assay. Twenty of total of 148 isolates were resistant to fluconazole. The MIC and MFC for the alcoholic extract of E. Platyloba were 64 mg/ml and 128 mg/ml, respectively. Real-time PCR results revealed that the mRNA levels of CDR1 and CDR2 genes significantly declined after incubation with E. Platyloba (both p values Candida species.

  15. Uranium Production Safety Assessment Team. UPSAT. An international peer review service for uranium production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The IAEA Uranium Production Safety Assessment Team (UPSAT) programme is designed to assist Member States to improve the safe operation of uranium production facilities. This programme facilitates the exchange of knowledge and experience between team members and industry personnel. An UPSAT mission is an international expert review, conducted outside of any regulatory framework. The programme is implemented in the spirit of voluntary co-operation to contribute to the enhancement of operational safety and practices where it is most effective, at the facility itself. An UPSAT review supplements other facility and regulatory efforts which may have the same objective

  16. Costs of fuel cycle industrial facilities: an international review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    This document presents, comments, and compares economic and financial data for industrial facilities concerning different aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle. It first comments the present situation and the short term trends for the natural uranium market, the conversion market, the enrichment market, the reprocessing market, the storage market. It gives an assessment of the elementary costs of the existing facilities for the different stages and processes: reprocessing, spent fuel warehousing (example of the CLAB in Sweden and comparison with other available data), warehousing of all types of wastes (examples of Habog in Netherlands, Zwilag in Switzerland), spent fuel storage (example of Yucca Mountain in the USA, Onkalo in Finland, projects and studies in Sweden), storage of vitrified wastes in Belgium, storing of transuranic wastes in the USA, storage of low and intermediate level and short life wastes in Sweden

  17. Review of Canadian Light Source facilities for biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochulski, Pawel; Fodje, Michel; Labiuk, Shaun; Wysokinski, Tomasz W.; Belev, George; Korbas, Malgorzata; Rosendahl, Scott M.

    2017-11-01

    The newly-created Biological and Life Sciences Department at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) encompasses four sets of beamlines devoted to biological studies ranging in scope from the atomic scale to cells, tissues and whole organisms. The Canadian Macromolecular Crystallography Facility (CMCF) consists of two beamlines devoted primarily to crystallographic studies of proteins and other macromolecules. The Mid-Infrared Spectromicroscopy (Mid-IR) beamline focusses on using infrared energy to obtain biochemical, structural and dynamical information about biological systems. The Bio-Medical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility consists of two beamlines devoted to advanced imaging and X-ray therapy techniques. The Biological X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (BioXAS) facility is being commissioned and houses three beamlines devoted to X-ray absorption spectroscopy and multi-mode X-ray fluorescence imaging. Together, these beamlines provide CLS Users with a powerful array of techniques to study today's most pressing biological questions. We describe these beamlines along with their current powerful features and envisioned future capabilities.

  18. Review of Regulatory Quality Assurance Requirements for the Operation of Nuclear R and D Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hyuk Il; Lim, Nam Jin

    2005-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has many R and D facilities in operation, including HANARO research reactor, radioactive waste treatment facility (RWTF), post-irradiation examination facility (PIEF) and irradiated material test facility (IMEF). Recently, nation-wide interest is focused on the safety and security of major industrial facilities. Safe operation of nuclear facilities is imperative because of the consequence of public disaster by radiological release/ contamination, in case of an accident. Recently, Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) of the Korean government announced amendments of Atomic Energy laws to enforce requirements of the physical protection and radiological emergency. In this paper, the context of amended Atomic Energy laws were reviewed to confirm quality assurance measures and identify additional QA activities, if any, that is required by the amendment

  19. Standard Review Plan for the review of a license application for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The Standard Review Plan (SRP) (NUREG-1200) provides guidance to staff reviewers in the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards who perform safety reviews of applications to construct and operate low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The SRP ensures the quality and uniformity of the staff reviews and presents a well-defined base from which to evaluate proposed changes in the scope and requirements of the staff reviews. The SRP makes information about the regulatory licensing process widely available and serves to improve the understanding of the staff's review process by interested members of the public and the industry. Each individual SRP addresses the responsibilities of persons performing the review, the matters that are reviewed, the Commission's regulations and acceptance criteria necessary for the review, how the review is accomplished, the conclusions that are appropriate, and the implementation requirements

  20. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP) Cryosphere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) contains the AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP) product. APP is a fundamental CDR comprised of calibrated and navigated AVHRR channel...

  1. Improving the Quality of Services in Residential Treatment Facilities: A Strength-Based Consultative Review Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavkov, Thomas W.; Lourie, Ira S.; Hug, Richard W.; Negash, Sesen

    2010-01-01

    This descriptive case study reports on the positive impact of a consultative review methodology used to conduct quality assurance reviews as part of the Residential Treatment Center Evaluation Project. The study details improvement in the quality of services provided to youth in unmonitored residential treatment facilities. Improvements were…

  2. Spent Nuclear Fuel Cold Vacuum Drying facility comprehensive formal design review report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HALLER, C.S.

    1999-01-01

    The majority of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) design and construction is complete; isolated portions are still in the design and fabrication process. The project commissioned a formal design review to verify the sufficiency and accuracy of current design media to assure that: (1) the design completely and accurately reflects design criteria, (2) design documents are consistent with one another, and (3) the design media accurately reflects the current design. This review is a key element in the design validation and verification activities required by SNF-4396, ''Design Verification and Validation Plan For The Cold Vacuum Drying Facility''. This report documents the results of the formal design review

  3. Facility-Based Maternal Death in Western Africa: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Nathali; Bishwajit, Ghose; Yaya, Sanni

    2018-01-01

    For exploring maternal death, supply and demand-side factors can be characterized by the three delays model developed by Thaddeus and Maine (1994). The model comprises delay in deciding to seek care (delay 1), delay in reaching the health facility (delay 2), and delay in receiving quality care once at the health facility (delay 3). Few studies have comprehensively dealt with the health systems delays that prevent the receipt of timely and appropriate obstetric care once a woman reaches a health facility (phase III delays). The objective of the present study was to identify facility-level barriers in West African health facilities. Electronic databases (Medline, cumulative index to nursing and allied health literature, Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International Global Health, EMBASE) were searched to identify original research articles from 1996 to 2016. Search terms (and synonyms) related to (1) maternal health care (e.g., obstetric care, perinatal care, maternal health services); (2) facility level (e.g., maternity unit, health facility, phase III, hospital); and (3) Western Africa (e.g., Nigeria, Burkina Faso) were combined. This review followed the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Of the 2103 citations identified, 13 studies were eligible. Studies were conducted in Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Gambia, Guinea, Senegal, and Sierra Leone. 30 facility-level barriers were identified and grouped into 6 themes (human resources, supply and equipment, referral-related, infrastructure, cost-related, patient-related). The most obvious barriers included staff shortages, lack of maternal health services and procedures offered to patients, and lack of necessary medical equipment and supplies in the health-care facilities. This review emphasizes that phase I and phase II barriers are not the only factors preventing women from accessing proper emergency obstetric care. Health-care facilities in Western Africa are inadequately equipped to

  4. Economic evaluation of pharmacist-led medication reviews in residential aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Syed Shahzad; Thiruchelvam, Kaeshaelya; Kow, Chia Siang; Ghori, Muhammad Usman; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din

    2017-10-01

    Medication reviews is a widely accepted approach known to have a substantial impact on patients' pharmacotherapy and safety. Numerous options to optimise pharmacotherapy in older people have been reported in literature and they include medication reviews, computerised decision support systems, management teams, and educational approaches. Pharmacist-led medication reviews are increasingly being conducted, aimed at attaining patient safety and medication optimisation. Cost effectiveness is an essential aspect of a medication review evaluation. Areas covered: A systematic searching of articles that examined the cost-effectiveness of medication reviews conducted in aged care facilities was performed using the relevant databases. Pharmacist-led medication reviews confer many benefits such as attainment of biomarker targets for improved clinical outcomes, and other clinical parameters, as well as depict concrete financial advantages in terms of decrement in total medication costs and associated cost savings. Expert commentary: The cost-effectiveness of medication reviews are more consequential than ever before. A critical evaluation of pharmacist-led medication reviews in residential aged care facilities from an economical aspect is crucial in determining if the time, effort, and direct and indirect costs involved in the review rationalise the significance of conducting medication reviews for older people in aged care facilities.

  5. Information Technology in Facilities Management - A Literature Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : The aim of this paper is to present the state of the art of research in Information Technology (IT) in Facilities Management (FM). Background : Initial studies indicate that investments into IT in FM often do not add the expected value, neither to the FM department itself nor...... on IT in FM were found. Relevant articles were organized in categories according to focus on 1. technology, 2. IT layer, 3. FM process, 4. theory and research method applied, and 5. type of findings. Finally research gaps were identified. Results and practical implications : There seems to be a general belief...... in technology combinations as a way to speed up the rather slow IT diffusion process in FM. It is documented that current research into IT in FM has an unbalanced focus on few specific technologies, IT layers and FM processes, and that further research should focus more on the IT implementation process and use...

  6. Acoustical Environments. Educational Facilities Review Series Number 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Alan M.

    This review surveys documents and journal articles previously announced in RIE and CIJE that deal with the principles and techniques of sound transmission and control, particularly as they relate to school environments. School planners and administrators are advised that excessive acoustical insulation costs may be avoided by early decisions…

  7. Strategies to control odours in livestock facilities: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ubeda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Odours generated in livestock buildings constitute one of the most relevant air quality issues of intensive livestock production. Reducing nuisance episodes related to odour exposure is therefore essential for a sustainable livestock production. In this study, the state-of-the-art on odour mitigation techniques in livestock housing is critically reviewed. Scientific advances in the last decade are revised and research needs are also identified. The complex nature of livestock odours is firstly reviewed and examined. Then, the most relevant odour control strategies are analyzed in terms of present knowledge and future needs. The strategies considered are: nutritional strategies, manure additives, building design, air filtration, manure covers, manure treatment systems and windbreaks. Finally, future research needs and priorities when establishing mitigation techniques are identified. Despite important recent advances, there are still some challenges for scientists, producers and regulators, particularly related to field evaluation of odours. Therefore, to control livestock odours effectively, using standardized field assessment techniques will be required. Also, investigating measurement and model errors may be useful to better understand the limitations of the current methods, as well as to identify research priorities.

  8. Daylight strategies for architectural studio facilities: the literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Muhammad Anas Bin; Azfahani Ahmad, Nur; Ajis, Azizah Md

    2017-05-01

    The implementation of daylighting strategies in buildings is a common aspect in architecture. However, due to the availability of inexpensive electricity, natural lighting strategies became insignificant, and been overlooked by designers. With the current concern over rapid increment on electricity cost, many designers now try to revitalized daylighting strategies in buildings. This includes educational buildings. In Malaysian cases, it is a norm that universities; especially during lecture and studio sessions, used artificial lighting throughout the day. Definitely, this is not parallel with the “green” aim made by the Government in the Malaysian Plan. Therefore, this paper aims to explore the impact of daylight strategies for educational studios in universities, by maximising the penetration of natural daylight into the space towards creating a more green-conducive studio. The paper review literature about the types, criteria and benefits of daylight strategies. This paper also presented a pilot study that has been performed in one university in Perak, Malaysia, by selecting architectural studios as the main subject.

  9. The epidemiological studies of leukemia around nuclear facilities for children and young adults: critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This objective of this report is to make a review of studies relative to the risk of leukemia among children and young adults less than twenty five years old near the nuclear facilities. the nuclear facilities considered in this report are nuclear power plants (electric power generation), the nuclear research centers, the fuel or weapons fabrication plants, reprocessing plants. This report does not describe the risk analysis near the sites of nuclear weapons test, the consequences of accidents on nuclear facilities such Chernobylsk or the the population near the military and industrial site of Mayak (Ural). The same is for the mining sites and the facilities of uranium extraction that are out of this report. (N.C.)

  10. Review of the Physical Science Facility Stack Air Sampling Probe Locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2007-09-30

    This letter report reviews compliance of the current design of the Physical Science Facility (PSF) stack air sampling locations with the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard. The review was based on performance criteria used for locating air sampling probes, the design documents provided and available information on systems previously tested for compliance with the criteria. Recommendations are presented for ways to bring the design into compliance with the requirements for the sampling probe placement.

  11. The Impact of Environmental Design on Teamwork and Communication in Healthcare Facilities: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaveis, Arsalan; Hamilton, D Kirk; Pati, Debajyoti

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to investigate the current knowledge about the impact of healthcare facility design on teamwork and communication by exploring the relevant literature. Teamwork and communication are behavioral factors that are impacted by physical design. However, the effects of environmental factors on teamwork and communication have not been investigated extensively in healthcare design literature. There are no published systematic reviews on the current topic. Searches were conducted in PubMed and Google Scholar databases in addition to targeted design journals including Health Environmental Research & Design, Environment and Behavior, Environmental Psychology, and Applied Ergonomics. Inclusion criteria were (a) full-text English language articles related to teamwork and communication and (b) involving any healthcare built environment and space design published in peer-reviewed journals between 1984 and 2017. Studies were extracted using defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. In the first phase, 26 of the 195 articles most relevant to teamwork and 19 studies of the 147 were identified and reviewed to understand the impact of communication in healthcare facilities. The literature regarding the impact of built environment on teamwork and communication were reviewed and explored in detail. Eighteen studies were selected and succinctly summarized as the final product of this review. Environmental design, which involves nurses, support staff, and physicians, is one of the critical factors that promotes the efficiency of teamwork and collaborative communication. Layout design, visibility, and accessibility levels are the most cited aspects of design which can affect the level of communication and teamwork in healthcare facilities.

  12. Energy efficiency in U.S. Forest Service facilities: a multiregion review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachelle S. Meyer; David L. Nicholls; Trista M. Patterson; Rachel E. White

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed energy efficiency measures in facilities across the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, examining opportunities and obstacles, and identifying factors of project success. The adoption of energy efficiency measures at Forest Service sites was seen to be most likely when decision control was local to the site and when budget timing and structures...

  13. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

    1984-11-01

    This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  14. [Glass Development Laser (GDL) Facility upgrade.] LLE Review. Quarterly report, October-December 1984. Volume 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.

    1984-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review contains articles on the upgrade of the GDL (Glass Development) system, theoretical advances in the laser fusion effort, improved target fabrication capabilities, x-ray laser research, developments in the picosecond optics research of the LLE advanced technology program, and on the National Laser Users Facility activities for October-December 1984. 56 refs., 31 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedrossian, Karen L.

    1984-08-01

    The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

  16. 48 CFR 801.602-80 - Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. 801.602-80 Section... Responsibilities 801.602-80 Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. An Office of Construction and Facilities Management or National Cemetery...

  17. Facility-Based Maternal Death in Western Africa: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathali Gunawardena

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFor exploring maternal death, supply and demand-side factors can be characterized by the three delays model developed by Thaddeus and Maine (1994. The model comprises delay in deciding to seek care (delay 1, delay in reaching the health facility (delay 2, and delay in receiving quality care once at the health facility (delay 3. Few studies have comprehensively dealt with the health systems delays that prevent the receipt of timely and appropriate obstetric care once a woman reaches a health facility (phase III delays. The objective of the present study was to identify facility-level barriers in West African health facilities.MethodsElectronic databases (Medline, cumulative index to nursing and allied health literature, Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International Global Health, EMBASE were searched to identify original research articles from 1996 to 2016. Search terms (and synonyms related to (1 maternal health care (e.g., obstetric care, perinatal care, maternal health services; (2 facility level (e.g., maternity unit, health facility, phase III, hospital; and (3 Western Africa (e.g., Nigeria, Burkina Faso were combined. This review followed the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses.ResultsOf the 2103 citations identified, 13 studies were eligible. Studies were conducted in Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Gambia, Guinea, Senegal, and Sierra Leone. 30 facility-level barriers were identified and grouped into 6 themes (human resources, supply and equipment, referral-related, infrastructure, cost-related, patient-related. The most obvious barriers included staff shortages, lack of maternal health services and procedures offered to patients, and lack of necessary medical equipment and supplies in the health-care facilities.ConclusionThis review emphasizes that phase I and phase II barriers are not the only factors preventing women from accessing proper emergency obstetric care. Health-care facilities in Western

  18. DECEMBER JMBR 13 - 2 correction.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fine Print

    Currently in Nigeria, 51% of the population are living in household using improved sanitation facilities. This percentage. 3 is 79% in urban and 37% in rural areas. The use of non-improved sanitation facilities and the resultant improper disposal of sewage predispose household members to faeco-oral infections and children ...

  19. RJHS Vol 4(4).cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    This study examined the effect of health workers sensitization on mothers' satisfaction with immunization service provided in health care facilities in a state in North ... Methods: This is a quasi-experimental study involving sensitization of health workers on quality health ..... public and private health facilities in Tanzania,.

  20. TJOG Vol 25 No 1.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    quality of service at the facility was the most important factor which influenced the choice of ... social and medical conditions and screen for .... in their teens. Structured questionnaire was used to gather information about the respondent's. Almost all the women (97.2%) indicated that awareness of ANC and delivery facilities ...

  1. Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Public Address System Review Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUMPHRYS, K.L.

    1999-01-01

    Public address system operation at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility was reviewed. The review was based on an Operational Readiness Review finding that public address performance was not adequate in parts of the WRAP facility. Several improvements were made to the WRAP Public Address (PA) system to correct the deficiencies noted. Speaker gain and position was optimized. A speech processor was installed to boost intelligibility in high noise areas. Additional speakers were added to improve coverage in the work areas. The results of this evaluation indicate that further PA system enhancements are not warranted. Additional speakers cannot compensate for the high background sound and high reverberation levels found in the work areas. Recommendations to improve PA system intelligibility include minor speaker adjustments, enhanced PA announcement techniques, and the use of sound reduction and abatement techniques where economically feasible

  2. Southeast Alaska Acoustic Measurement Facility (SEAFAC) environmental data base review, evaluation, and upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strand, J.A.; Skalski, J.R.; Faulkner, L.L.; Rodman, C.W.; Carlile, D.W.; Ecker, R.M.; Nicholls, A.K.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Scott, M.J.

    1986-04-01

    This report summarizes the principal issues of public concern, the adequacy of the environmental data base to answer the issues of concern, and the additional data collection required to support a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review of the proposed Southeast Alaska Acoustic Measurement Facility (SEAFAC). The report is based on a review of the readily available environmental literature and a site visit. Representatives of local, state, and federal agencies were also interviewed for their personal insights and concerns not discovered during the literature review.

  3. Periodic Safety Review in Interim Storage Facilities - Current Regulation and Experiences in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neles, Julia Mareike; Schmidt, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Periodic safety reviews in nuclear power plants in Germany have been performed since the end of the 1980's as an indirect follow-up of the accident in Chernobyl and, in the meantime, are formally required by law. During this process the guidelines governing this review were developed in stages and reached their final form in 1996. Interim storage facilities and other nuclear facilities at that time were not included, so the guidelines were solely focused on the specific safety issues of nuclear power plants. Following IAEA's recommendations, the Western European Nuclear Regulator Association (WENRA) introduced PSRs in its safety reference levels for storage facilities (current version in WGWD report 2.1 as of Feb 2011: SRLs 59 - 61). Based on these formulations, Germany improved its regulation in 2010 with a recommendation of the Nuclear Waste Management Commission (Entsorgungskommission, ESK), an expert advisory commission for the federal regulatory body BMU. The ESK formulated these detailed requirements in the 'ESK recommendation for guides to the performance of periodic safety reviews for interim storage facilities for irradiated fuel elements and heat-generating radioactive waste'. Before finalization of the guideline a test phase was introduced, aimed to test the new regulation in practice and to later include the lessons learned in the final formulation of the guideline. The two-year test phase started in October 2011 in which the performance of a PSR will be tested at two selected interim storage facilities. Currently these recommendations are discussed with interested/concerned institutions. The results of the test phase shall be considered for improvements of the draft and during the final preparation of guidelines. Currently the PSR for the first ISF is in an advanced stage, the second facility just started the process. Preliminary conclusions from the test phase show that the implementation of the draft guideline requires interpretation. The aim of a

  4. Design review plan for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (Project W-236A)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renfro, G.G.

    1994-01-01

    This plan describes how the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project conducts reviews of design media; describes actions required by Project participants; and provides the methodology to ensure that the design is complete, meets the technical baseline of the Project, is operable and maintainable, and is constructable. Project W-236A is an integrated project wherein the relationship between the operating contractor and architect-engineer is somewhat different than that of a conventional project. Working together, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and ICF Karser Hanford (ICF KH) have developed a relationship whereby ICF KH performs extensive design reviews and design verification. WHC actively participates in over-the-shoulder reviews during design development, performs a final review of the completed design, and conducts a formal design review of the Safety Class I, ASME boiler and Pressure Vessel Code items in accordance with WHC-CM-6-1, Standard Engineering Practices

  5. Physical activity opportunities in Canadian childcare facilities: a provincial/territorial review of legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderloo, Leigh M; Tucker, Patricia; Ismail, Ali; van Zandvroort, Melissa M

    2012-05-01

    Preschoolers spend a substantial portion of their day in childcare; therefore, these centers are an ideal venue to encourage healthy active behaviors. It is important that provinces'/territories' childcare legislation encourage physical activity (PA) opportunities. The purpose of this study was to review Canadian provincial/territorial childcare legislation regarding PA participation. Specifically, this review sought to 1) appraise each provincial/territorial childcare regulation for PA requirements, 2) compare such regulations with the NASPE PA guidelines, and 3) appraise these regulations regarding PA infrastructure. A review of all provincial/territorial childcare legislation was performed. Each document was reviewed separately by 2 researchers, and the PA regulations were coded and summarized. The specific provincial/territorial PA requirements (eg, type/frequency of activity) were compared with the NASPE guidelines. PA legislation for Canadian childcare facilities varies greatly. Eight of the thirteen provinces/territories provide PA recommendations; however, none provided specific time requirements for daily PA. All provinces/territories did require access to an outdoor play space. All Canadian provinces/territories lack specific PA guidelines for childcare facilities. The development, implementation, and enforcement of national PA legislation for childcare facilities may aid in tackling the childhood obesity epidemic and assist childcare staff in supporting and encouraging PA participation.

  6. Performance assessment review guide for DOE low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodge, R.L.; Hansen, W.R.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Layton, D.W.; Lee, D.W.; Maheras, S.T.; Neuder, S.M.; Wilhite, E.L.; Curl, R.U.; Grahn, K.F.; Heath, B.A.; Turner, K.H.

    1991-10-01

    This report was prepared under the direction of the Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel. The intent is to help Department of Energy sites prepare performance assessments that meet the Panel's expectations in terms of detail, quality, content, and consistency. Information on the Panel review process and philosophy are provided, as well as important technical issues that will be focused on during a review. This guidance is not intended to provide a detailed review plan as in NUREG-1200, Standard Review Plan for Review of a License Application for a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (January 1988). The focus and intent of the Panel's reviews differ significantly from a regulatory review. The review of a performance assessment by the Panel uses the collective professional judgment of the members to ascertain that the approach taken the methodology used, the assumptions made, etc., are technically sound and adequately justified. The results of the Panel's review will be used by Department of Energy Headquarters in determining compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5820.2A, ''Radioactive Waste Management.''

  7. Review of Sodium and Plutonium related Technical Standards in Trans-Uranium Fuel Fabrication Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Misuk; Jeon, Jong Seon; Kang, Hyun Sik; Kim, Seoung Rae [NESS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, we would introduce and review technical standards related to sodium fire and plutonium criticality safety. This paper may be helpful to identify considerations in the development of equipment, standards, and etc., to meet the safety requirements in the design, construction and operating of TFFF, KAPF and SFR. The feasibility and conceptual designs are being examined on related facilities, for example, TRU Fuel Fabrication Facilities (TFFF), Korea Advanced Pyro-process Facility (KAPF), and Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), in Korea. However, the safety concerns of these facilities have been controversial in part because of the Sodium fire accident and Plutonium related radiation safety caused by transport and handling accident. Thus, many researches have been performed to ensure safety and various documents including safety requirements have been developed. In separating and reducing the long-lived radioactive transuranic(TRU) in the spent nuclear fuel, reusing as the potential energy of uranium fuel resources and reducing the high level wastes, TFFF would be receiving the attention of many people. Thus, people would wonder whether compliance with technical standards that ensures safety. For new facility design, one of the important tasks is to review of technical standards, especially for sodium and Plutonium because of water related highly reactive characteristics and criticality hazard respectively. We have introduced and reviewed two important technical standards for TFFF, which are sodium fire and plutonium criticality safety, in this paper. This paper would provide a brief guidance, about how to start and what is important, to people who are responsible for the initial design to operation of TFFF.

  8. DOE High Performance Computing Operational Review (HPCOR): Enabling Data-Driven Scientific Discovery at HPC Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Richard; Allcock, William; Beggio, Chris; Campbell, Stuart; Cherry, Andrew; Cholia, Shreyas; Dart, Eli; England, Clay; Fahey, Tim; Foertter, Fernanda; Goldstone, Robin; Hick, Jason; Karelitz, David; Kelly, Kaki; Monroe, Laura; Prabhat,; Skinner, David; White, Julia

    2014-10-17

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities are on the verge of a paradigm shift in the way they deliver systems and services to science and engineering teams. Research projects are producing a wide variety of data at unprecedented scale and level of complexity, with community-specific services that are part of the data collection and analysis workflow. On June 18-19, 2014 representatives from six DOE HPC centers met in Oakland, CA at the DOE High Performance Operational Review (HPCOR) to discuss how they can best provide facilities and services to enable large-scale data-driven scientific discovery at the DOE national laboratories. The report contains findings from that review.

  9. Review of operating experience at the Los Alamos Plutonium Electrorefining Facility, 1963-1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, L.J.; Morgan, A.N.

    1981-12-01

    This report reviews the operation of the Los Alamos Plutonium Electrorefining Plant at Technical Area 21 for the period 1964 through 1977. During that period, approximately 1568 kg of plutonium metal, > 99.95% pure, was produced in 653 runs from 1930 kg of metal fabrication scrap, 99% pure. General considerations of the electrorefining process and facility operation and recommendations for further improvement of the process are discussed

  10. JUNE 2010.for Ogidi (final).cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    problem of large fascia defects that make direct closure inappropriate. Many of these challenges have been surmounted in developed and developing countries with good access to modern surgical and anesthetic supports; like ventilators, synthetic mesh materials and laparoscopic expertise and facilities. Surgeons in.

  11. 2012 edition JMBR - CORRECTION.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    Malaria is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in African children including infants while the roles of exclusive ... breastfeeding on the incidence of malaria in early infancy, a facility based analytical case control study was carried out at ... respiratory infections). enhances vaccine. 5 response, protection from allergies.

  12. 2012 edition JMBR - CORRECTION.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    Abstract. The burden of neurosurgical care in West Africa, compared with established facilities in Europe and America, is immense. The reasons include preventable neurotrauma, the dearth of specialists and a lack of a regional centre for neurosurgical care. The few unevenly spread established neurosurgical units can ...

  13. JMBR VOLUME 14 Number 2.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FINEPRINT

    of the scheme. Optometry centers are regarded as secondary health care facilities under the NHIS. Optometric services are also included in the provisions of private managed care organizations and employment based. 7,. 8 health insurance in Nigeria . The optometric service provisions with. 6-8 limitations vary across the ...

  14. DECEMBER JMBR 13 - 2 correction.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fine Print

    ABSTRACT. Good utilization of health services improves the health status of the population. However, the presence of health facilities alone is not enough to guarantee use as other socio- economic factors could influence access and utilization. This study assessed the community perceptions and factors affecting the ...

  15. Guide for International Peer Reviews of Decommissioning Cost Studies for Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaGuardia, Thomas S.; Pescatore, Claudio; )

    2014-01-01

    Peer reviews are a standard co-operative OECD working tool that offer member countries a framework to compare experiences and examine best practices in a host of areas. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has developed a proven methodology for conducting peer reviews in radioactive waste management and nuclear R and D. Using this methodology, the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee's Working Party on Decommissioning and Dismantling (WPDD) developed the present guide as a framework for decommissioning cost reviewers and reviewees to prepare for and conduct international peer reviews of decommissioning cost estimate studies for nuclear facilities. It includes checklists that will help national programmes or relevant organisations to assess and improve decommissioning cost estimate practices in the future. This guide will act as the NEA reference for conducting such international peer reviews. The remainder of this guide is divided into eight chapters. Chapter 2 describes gathering the cost estimate study and underpinning documents, reviewing the study and writing a final report. Chapter 3 provides a detailed checklist approach for the review of the cost study report. Chapter 4 provides checklists to assist in reviewing benchmarked information. Chapter 5 provides comments on the approach and recommendations for use of this guide. Chapters 6 and 7 provide the background material used in developing this guide and Chapter 8 provides a list of the abbreviations and acronyms used in this guide

  16. CLICdet: The post-CDR CLIC detector model

    CERN Document Server

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar; Cure, Benoit; Dannheim, Dominik; Duarte Ramos, Fernando; Elsener, Konrad; Gaddi, Andrea; Gerwig, Hubert; Green, Steven; Grefe, Christian; Hynds, Daniel; Klempt, Wolfgang; Linssen, Lucie; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nurnberg, Andreas Matthias; Marshall, John Stuart; Petric, Marko; Redford, Sophie; Roloff, Philipp Gerhard; Sailer, Andre; Sefkow, Felix; Sicking, Eva; Siegrist, Nicolas; Simon, Frank Richard; Simoniello, Rosa; Spannagel, Simon; Sroka, Szymon Krzysztof; Strom, Lars Rickard; Weber, Matthias Artur

    2017-01-01

    A new model for the CLIC detector has been defined based on lessons learnt while working with the CDR detector models and after a series of simulation studies. The new model, dubbed "CLICdet", also incorporates the experience from various R&D activities linked to a future experiment at CLIC. This note describes the studies and thoughts leading to the new detector model, and gives details on all of its sub-detector systems.

  17. Implementation of fall prevention in residential care facilities: A systematic review of barriers and facilitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaeyen, Ellen; Stas, Joke; Leysens, Greet; Van der Elst, Elisa; Janssens, Elise; Dejaeger, Eddy; Dobbels, Fabienne; Milisen, Koen

    2017-05-01

    To identify the barriers and facilitators for fall prevention implementation in residential care facilities. Systematic review. Review registration number on PROSPERO: CRD42013004655. Two independent reviewers systematically searched five databases (i.e. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Web of Science) and the reference lists of relevant articles. This systematic review was conducted in line with the Center for Reviews and Dissemination Handbook and reported according to the PRISMA guideline. Only original research focusing on determinants of fall prevention implementation in residential care facilities was included. We used the Mixed Method Appraisal Tool for quality appraisal. Thematic analysis was performed for qualitative data; quantitative data were analyzed descriptively. To synthesize the results, we used the framework of Grol and colleagues that describes six healthcare levels wherein implementation barriers and facilitators can be identified. We found eight relevant studies, identifying 44 determinants that influence implementation. Of these, 17 were facilitators and 27 were barriers. Results indicated that the social and organizational levels have the greatest number of influencing factors (9 and 14, respectively), whereas resident and economical/political levels have the least (3 and 4, respectively). The most cited facilitators were good communication and facility equipment availability, while staff feeling overwhelmed, helpless, frustrated and concerned about their ability to control fall management, staffing issues, limited knowledge and skills (i.e., general clinical skill deficiencies, poor fall management skills or lack of computer skills); and poor communication were the most cited barriers. Successful implementation of fall prevention depends on many factors across different healthcare levels. The focus of implementation interventions, however, should be on modifiable barriers and facilitators such as communication, knowledge, and skills

  18. Review of NRC Commission Papers on Regulatory Basis for Licensing and Regulating Reprocessing Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Yeong; Shin, Hyeong Ki [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) accumulated in nuclear power plant has been a serious issue in most countries with operating nuclear power plants. Direct disposal of SNF could be a solution of the problem but many countries including the Republic of Korea have had a hard time selecting a site for high level waste repository because of low public acceptance. SNF recycling technologies consisting of reprocessing and transmutation have been developed so as to reduce the final volume of the disposed radioactive waste and to diminish the radiotoxicity of the waste. The Republic of Korea is now developing pyroprocessing and sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) technology to be used for the recycling of the wastes. KAERI has a plan to construct a pyroprocessing facility with a capacity of 30 tHM/y and a facility manufacturing TRU fuel for SFR by 2025. However, to license these facility and secure the safety, the current regulatory system related to SNF treatment needs to be improved and amended since the system has been developed focusing on facilities to examine irradiated nuclear materials. Status of reprocessing facility regulations developed by U.S.NRC was reviewed based on SECY papers. U.S.NRC has approved the development of a new rule referred to nationally as '10CFR Part 7x'. Existing 10CFR 50 and 70 has been evolved mainly for nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities whose radiological hazard is much lower than reprocessing plants respectively. U.S.NRC also derived many regulatory gaps including safety assessment methods, technical specification, general design criteria and waste classification and continue to develop the regulatory framework limited in scope to the resolution of Gap 5.

  19. SPES3 Facility RELAP5 Sensitivity Analyses on the Containment System for Design Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achilli, A.; Congiu, C.; Ferri, R.; Bianchi, F.; Meloni, P.; Grgic, D.; Dzodzo, M.

    2012-01-01

    An Italian MSE R and D programme on Nuclear Fission is funding, through ENEA, the design and testing of SPES3 facility at SIET, for IRIS reactor simulation. IRIS is a modular, medium size, advanced, integral PWR, developed by an international consortium of utilities, industries, research centres and universities. SPES3 simulates the primary, secondary and containment systems of IRIS, with 1:100 volume scale, full elevation and prototypical thermal-hydraulic conditions. The RELAP5 code was extensively used in support to the design of the facility to identify criticalities and weak points in the reactor simulation. FER, at Zagreb University, performed the IRIS reactor analyses with the RELAP5 and GOTHIC coupled codes. The comparison between IRIS and SPES3 simulation results led to a simulation-design feedback process with step-by-step modifications of the facility design, up to the final configuration. For this, a series of sensitivity cases was run to investigate specific aspects affecting the trend of the main parameters of the plant, as the containment pressure and EHRS removed power, to limit fuel clad temperature excursions during accidental transients. This paper summarizes the sensitivity analyses on the containment system that allowed to review the SPES3 facility design and confirm its capability to appropriately simulate the IRIS plant.

  20. Strategies to increase facility-based skilled birth attendance in South Asia: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Roseanna; Adegoke, Adetoro A

    2013-06-01

    Global strategies to target high maternal mortality ratios are focused on providing skilled attendance at delivery as well as access to emergency obstetric care. South Asia has the lowest rates of skilled birth attendance in the world, and Nepal is lagging behind neighbouring countries. This review looks at the demand-side barriers to seeking care as well as strategies to increase facility delivery in rural South Asia. A search was made of key databases, including PubMed and the WHO, for literature relating to utilisation of facility delivery in South Asia. The main factors found to influence facility delivery in South Asia were physical and financial barriers, socioeconomic and educational status, obstetric history and awareness of danger signs, sociocultural factors and perceived quality of care. Strategies to increase facility delivery include maternity waiting homes, demand-side financing schemes, education programmes and participatory women's groups. Increasing utilisation of delivery services in South Asia requires a multisectoral approach. Key areas are increasing education for girls as well as empowering women through women's groups and community mobilisation. Removal of user fees appears to be successful but needs to be sustainable and equitable in its delivery.

  1. SPES3 Facility RELAP5 Sensitivity Analyses on the Containment System for Design Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Achilli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An Italian MSE R&D programme on Nuclear Fission is funding, through ENEA, the design and testing of SPES3 facility at SIET, for IRIS reactor simulation. IRIS is a modular, medium size, advanced, integral PWR, developed by an international consortium of utilities, industries, research centres and universities. SPES3 simulates the primary, secondary and containment systems of IRIS, with 1:100 volume scale, full elevation and prototypical thermal-hydraulic conditions. The RELAP5 code was extensively used in support to the design of the facility to identify criticalities and weak points in the reactor simulation. FER, at Zagreb University, performed the IRIS reactor analyses with the RELAP5 and GOTHIC coupled codes. The comparison between IRIS and SPES3 simulation results led to a simulation-design feedback process with step-by-step modifications of the facility design, up to the final configuration. For this, a series of sensitivity cases was run to investigate specific aspects affecting the trend of the main parameters of the plant, as the containment pressure and EHRS removed power, to limit fuel clad temperature excursions during accidental transients. This paper summarizes the sensitivity analyses on the containment system that allowed to review the SPES3 facility design and confirm its capability to appropriately simulate the IRIS plant.

  2. Technical review and evaluation for the installation of cold neutron source facility at HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Woong; Kim, Dong Hoon; Lee, Mu Woong; Cho, Man Soon; Oh, Yun Woo; Park, Sun Hee; Park, Kuk Nam; Lee, Chang Hee

    1996-01-01

    The principle subjects of this study are to analyze the technical characteristics of cold neutron source(CNS) and take measures to cope with the matters regarding the installation of CNS facility at HANARO. This report, thus, reviews the current status of the CNS facilities that are now in operation worldwide and classifies the system and equipment to select the appropriate type for HANARO and provides advice and guidance for the future basic and detail design. As we have none of CNS facility here and very few experienced persons yet, this report provides some information for domestic users through the investigation of the utilization fields and experimental facilities of CNS, and presents the estimated total cost for the project based on JRR-3M. In addition, the work scope of the conceptual design, which will be performed in advance of the basic and detail design, and cooperative program with the countries having the advanced technology of CNS is presented in this report. 43 tabs., 57 figs., 22 refs. (Author)

  3. MJZ VOL 37 NO 2.CDR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJZ

    study type of the research published as the dissertations for the M.Med at the University of. Zambia. METHODS. We conducted a desk review of dissertations of graduates of the Master of Medicine programme at the University of Zambia. This consisted of a review of dissertations deposited in the special collections of the ...

  4. Decommissioning Lines-of-Inquiry for Design Review of New Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negin, C.A.; Urland, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    An independent review of the design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) at Savannah River included a requirement to address the ability to decommission the facility. This paper addresses the lines of inquiry (that were developed for the review and their use in future for reviews of other projects, referred to herein as 'DDLOI'. Decommissioning activities for almost any type of facility are well within the technological state-of-the-art. The major impacts for complications resulting from insufficient consideration during design of a new facility that involves radioactive processes and/or material is the cost of: a) gaining access to high radiation areas and b) dealing with high levels of contamination. For this reason, the DDLOI were developed as a way of raising the awareness of designers and design reviewers to design features that can impede or facilitate ultimate decommissioning. The intent is that this report can be used not only for review, but also by engineers in the early stages of design development when requirements are being assembled. The focus for the DDLOI is on types of facilities that contain nuclear and/or radioactive processes and materials. The level of detail is more specific than would be found in decommissioning plans prepared for regulatory purposes. In commencing this review, the author's could find no precedent for a systematic review of design for decommissioning that included results of a review. Therefore, it was decided to create a report that would provide detailed lines of inquiry along with the rationale for each. The resulting DDLOI report included 21 topical areas for design review. The DDLOI combined the authors' experience in developing baselines for facilities to be deactivated or demolished with prior publications by the U.S. Army and the International Atomic Energy Agency. These two references were found via an Internet search and were the only ones judged to be useful at a field application level. Most others

  5. ONWI [Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation] 30% design review findings report for Exploratory Shaft Facility, Deaf Smith site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This document describes a review of the standards for the design of the high-level radioactive waste facility at the Deaf Smith, Texas site. It includes public comments and the official responses to the designs produced to date

  6. Accident-induced flow and material transport in nuclear facilities: a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolstad, J.W.; Gregory, W.S.; Martin, R.A.; Tang, P.K.; Merryman, R.G.; Novat, J.; Whitmore, H.L.

    1984-04-01

    The reported investigation is part of a program that was established for deriving radiological source terms at a nuclear facility's atmospheric boundaries under postulated accident conditions. The overall program consists of three parts: (1) accident delineation and survey, (2) internal source term characterization and release, and (3) induced flow and material transport. This report is an outline of pertinent induced-flow and material transport literature. Our objectives are to develop analytical techniques and data that will permit prediction of accident-induced transport of airborne material to a plant's atmospheric boundaries. Prediction of material transport requires investigation of the areas of flow dynamics and reentrainment/deposition. A review of material transport, fluid dynamics, and reentrainment/deposition literature is discussed. In particular, those references dealing with model development are discussed with special emphasis on application to a facility's interconnected ventilation system. 176 references

  7. Risk-informing safety reviews for non-reactor nuclear facilities: an example application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubayi, V.; Yue, M.; Bari, R.A.; Azarm, M.A.; Mukaddam, W.; Good, G.; Gonzalez, F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology used to model potential accidents in fuel cycle facilities that employ chemical processes to separate and purify nuclear materials. The methodology is illustrated with an example that uses event and fault trees to estimate the frequency of a specific energetic reaction that can occur in nuclear material processing facilities. The methodology used probabilistic risk assessment (PRA)-related tools as well as information about the chemical reaction characteristics, information on plant design and operational features, and generic data about component failure rates and human error rates. The accident frequency estimates for the specific reaction can be useful to help to risk-inform a safety review process and assess compliance with regulatory requirements. (authors)

  8. Risk-Informing Safety Reviews for Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubayi, V.; Azarm, A.; Yue, M.; Mukaddam, W.; Good, G.; Gonzalez, F.; Bari, R.A.

    2011-03-13

    This paper describes a methodology used to model potential accidents in fuel cycle facilities that employ chemical processes to separate and purify nuclear materials. The methodology is illustrated with an example that uses event and fault trees to estimate the frequency of a specific energetic reaction that can occur in nuclear material processing facilities. The methodology used probabilistic risk assessment (PRA)-related tools as well as information about the chemical reaction characteristics, information on plant design and operational features, and generic data about component failure rates and human error rates. The accident frequency estimates for the specific reaction help to risk-inform the safety review process and assess compliance with regulatory requirements.

  9. Review of Transient Testing of Fast Reactor Fuels in the Transient REActor Test Facility (TREAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.; Wachs, D.; Carmack, J.; Woolstenhulme, N.

    2017-01-01

    The restart of the Transient REActor Test (TREAT) facility provides a unique opportunity to engage the fast reactor fuels community to reinitiate in-pile experimental safety studies. Historically, the TREAT facility played a critical role in characterizing the behavior of both metal and oxide fast reactor fuels under off-normal conditions, irradiating hundreds of fuel pins to support fast reactor fuel development programs. The resulting test data has provided validation for a multitude of fuel performance and severe accident analysis computer codes. This paper will provide a review of the historical database of TREAT experiments including experiment design, instrumentation, test objectives, and salient findings. Additionally, the paper will provide an introduction to the current and future experiment plans of the U.S. transient testing program at TREAT.

  10. Materials Science Experiments Under Microgravity - A Review of History, Facilities, and Future Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Materials science experiments have been a key issue already since the early days of research under microgravity conditions. A microgravity environment facilitates processing of metallic and semiconductor melts without buoyancy driven convection and sedimentation. Hence, crystal growth of semiconductors, solidification of metallic alloys, and the measurement of thermo-physical parameters are the major applications in the field of materials science making use of these dedicated conditions in space. In the last three decades a large number of successful experiments have been performed, mainly in international collaborations. In parallel, the development of high-performance research facilities and the technological upgrade of diagnostic and stimuli elements have also contributed to providing optimum conditions to perform such experiments. A review of the history of materials science experiments in space focussing on the development of research facilities is given. Furthermore, current opportunities to perform such experiments onboard ISS are described and potential future options are outlined.

  11. Suicide risk in long-term care facilities: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezuk, Briana; Rock, Andrew; Lohman, Matthew C; Choi, Moon

    2014-12-01

    Suicide risk is highest in later life; however, little is known about the risk of suicide among older adults in long-term care facilities (e.g., nursing homes and assisted living facilities). The goal of this paper is to review and synthesize the descriptive and analytic epidemiology of suicide in long-term care settings over the past 25 years. Four databases (PubMed, CINAHL Plus, Web of Knowledge, and EBSCOHost Academic Search Complete) were searched for empirical studies of suicide risk in nursing homes, assisted living, and other residential facilities from 1985 to 2013. Of the 4073 unique research articles identified, 37 were selected for inclusion in this review. Of the included reports, 21 were cross-sectional, 8 cohort, 3 qualitative, and 5 intervention studies. Most studies indicate that suicidal thoughts (active and passive) are common among residents (prevalence in the past month: 5-33%), although completed suicide is rare. Correlates of suicidal thoughts among long-term care residents include depression, social isolation, loneliness, and functional decline. Most studies examined only individual-level correlates of suicide, although there is suggestive evidence that organizational characteristics (e.g., bed size and staffing) may also be relevant. Existing research on suicide risk in long-term care facilities is limited but suggests that this is an important issue for clinicians and medical directors to be aware of and address. Research is needed on suicide risk in assisted living and other non-nursing home residential settings, as well as the potential role of organizational characteristics on emotional well-being for residents. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. JMBR VOLUME 14 Number 2.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FINEPRINT

    January 2000 to December 2009) was carried out to define the histopathological pattern of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in Nigerian patients in Edo state. Parameters included in the review where histological types of NPC according to.

  13. 16nov Sadhana broch prn.cdr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sadh/). SADHANA. ACADEMY PROCEEDINGS IN. ENGINEERING. SCIENCES ... collection. Print subscriptions within India and open online access are served from Indian Academy of Sciences. Peer review system. ISSN 0256-2499 (print). elSSN.

  14. Early site reviews for nuclear power facilities: procedures and possible technical review options. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    The document provides guidance for utility companies, State and other governmental agencies, and others who may request or may wish to participate in an early review of site suitability issues related to a site proposed for a nuclear power or test reactor. Although the emphasis of this document is on a nuclear electric generating station, the guidance provided can be used for a test reactor or other kinds of reactors. The procedures to be followed by applicants for construction permits and by others are described and the possible significant areas of technical review are delineated

  15. Radioactive Operations Committee Review of the Intermediate-Level Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 2531 February 17, 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberman, B.; Brooksbank, R.E.

    1972-01-01

    A subcommittee of the Radioactive Operations Committee met with the Operators of the Intermediate Level Waste Evaporator Facility on February 17, 1972, to discuss the status of the facility and its operations since the review of October 7, 1970, and reported in ORNL-CF-70-11-12. This review was made to determine the status of the ILWEF since the last review, to discuss compliance with previously recommended changes, and to review any new items of safety significance. Several recommendations were made.

  16. Operational readiness review for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL's) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was conducted by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., to verify the readiness of WERF to resume operations following a shutdown and modification period of more than two years. It is the conclusion of the ORR Team that, pending satisfactory resolution of all pre-startup findings, WERF has achieved readiness to resume unrestricted operations within the approved safety basis. ORR appraisal forms are included in this report

  17. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks (PERSIANN-CDR), Version 1 Revision 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — PERSIANN Precipitation Climate Data Record (PERSIANN-CDR) is a daily quasi-global precipitation product for the period of 1982 to 2011. The data covers from 60...

  18. Technical Review of Retrieval and Closure Plans for the INEEL INTEC Tank Farm Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamberger, Judith A; Burks, Barry L; Quigley, Keith D; Falter, Diedre D

    2001-09-28

    The purpose of this report is to document the conclusions of a technical review of retrieval and closure plans for the Idaho National Energy and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Tank Farm Facility. In addition to reviewing retrieval and closure plans for these tanks, the review process served as an information exchange mechanism so that staff in the INEEL High Level Waste (HLW) Program could become more familiar with retrieval and closure approaches that have been completed or are planned for underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Hanford sites. This review focused not only on evaluation of the technical feasibility and appropriateness of the approach selected by INEEL but also on technology gaps that could be addressed through utilization of technologies or performance data available at other DOE sites and in the private sector. The reviewers, Judith Bamberger of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Dr. Barry Burks of The Providence Group Applied Technology, have extensive experience in the development and application of tank waste retrieval technologies for nuclear waste remediation.

  19. IJS v10 n1.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    De Don

    sector, ... being a major role player in the West African sub- region and a front liner in Africa needs a virile and ... Oluwadare and Kayode: Binary logistic regression model for electronic banking in Akure. 4. Literature Review. Historical evolution of ...

  20. DECEMBER JMBR 13 - 2 correction.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fine Print

    JMBR: A Peer-review Journal of Biomedical Sciences. December 2014, Vol. 13 No.2 pp 5-15. KEYWORDS: Caffeine, Milk, Lung function. ABSTRACT. Caffeine has been reported to be a respiratory stimulant; there is paucity of literatures relating the effect of ingestion of a mixture of caffeine and milk on lung function. This.

  1. JUNE NJCP 2009 FINAL sp.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Utilizing the case records in the morbid anatomy department of LUTH, cases of histologically confirmed primary bone tumours over the study period were retrieved. They were reviewed and analysed for age, gender and histological types. Tumours of the marrow elements except for Ewing's. 12. MATERIALSANDMETHODS ...

  2. TJOG Vol 26 No 2.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    histologically confirmed in the period under presented with GTD had no formal education. review giving a ..... London: Hodder. 4. World Health Organisation Scientific Group. Headline Group2001; 231-237. Gestational Trophoblastic Disease 692. Geneva: 2. Howie PW. Trophoblastic disease. In: Edmunds D. World Health ...

  3. Epidemiological studies of leukaemia in children and young adults around nuclear facilities: a critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    An epidemiological study published in late 2007 described an increased risk of leukaemia in children under 5 living within 5 kilometres of German nuclear power plants. A great deal of research has been carried out on this subject since the early 1980's. The aim of this report was to provide a synthesis and critical analysis of results related to the risk of leukaemia in children and young adults aged under 25 living close to nuclear facilities. The report is structured in three sections: - a reminder of the main characteristics of childhood leukaemia and a description of the methods used to conduct epidemiological studies; - the most exhaustive review possible of epidemiological studies published in the international literature describing the frequency of leukaemia close to nuclear facilities in different countries around the world. A critical analysis is made of the published results. Some results from studies not focused on nuclear facilities are also presented. The methodological limitations associated with descriptive studies are explained and discussed; - the last section discusses the possible causes of childhood leukaemia and the main hypotheses explored to explain certain clusters of cases observed locally close to some nuclear sites. Appendices at the end of the document provide additional explanations of the concepts and methods used in epidemiology and statistics, and of the classification of malignant hemopathies. (authors)

  4. The roles of CDR1, CDR2, and MDR1 in kaempferol-induced suppression with fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jing; Zhang, MengXiang; Wang, TianMing; Li, Yue; Wang, ChangZhong

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections caused by fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans are an intractable clinical problem, calling for new efficient antifungal drugs. Kaempferol, an active flavonoid, has been considered a potential candidate against Candida species. This work investigates the resistance reversion of kaempferol in fluconazole-resistant C. albicans and the underlying mechanism. The antifungal activities of fluconazole and/or kaempferol were assessed by a series of standard procedures including broth microdilution method, checkerboard assay and time-kill (T-K) test in nine clinical strains as well as a standard reference isolate of C. albicans. Subsequently, the morphological changes, the efflux of rhodamine 6G, and the expressions of CDR 1, CDR 2, and MDR 1 were analysed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), inverted fluorescence microscope and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in C. albicans z2003. For all the tested C. albicans strains, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of fluconazole and kaempferol ranged 0.25-32 and 128-256 μg/mL with a range of fractional inhibitory concentration index of 0.257-0.531. In C. albicans z2003, the expression of both CDR 1 and CDR 2 were decreased after exposure to kaempferol alone with negligible rhodamine 6G accumulation, while the expression of CDR 1, CDR 2 and MDR 1 were all decreased when fluconazole and kaempferol were used concomitantly with notable fluorescence of rhodamine 6G observed. Kaempferol-induced reversion in fluconazole-resistant C. albicans might be likely due to the suppression of the expression of CDR1, CDR2 and MDR1.

  5. A systematic review of topical skin care in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Brent; Nay, Rhonda; Wilson, Jacinda

    2007-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to evaluate the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness of topical skin care interventions for residents of aged care facilities. Natural changes to skin, as well as increased predisposition to pressure sores and incontinence, means residents of aged care facilities readily require topical skin care. A range of interventions exist that aim to maintain or improve the integrity of skin of older adults. Pubmed, Embase, Current Contents, CINAHL and The Cochrane Library databases were searched, as well as Health Technology Assessment websites up to April 2003. Systematic reviews and randomized or non-randomized controlled trials were evaluated for quality and data were independently extracted by two reviewers. The effectiveness of topical skin interventions was variable and dependent on the skin condition being treated. Studies examined the effectiveness of washing products on incontinence irritated skin. Disposable bodyworns may prevent deterioration of skin condition better than non-disposable underpads or bodyworns. Clinisan, a no-rinse cleanser may reduce the incidence of incontinence associated pressure ulcers when compared with soap and water. In general the quality of evidence for interventions to improve or maintain the skin condition in the older person was poor and more research in this area is needed. Skin care is a major issue for nurses working with older people. On the basis of this review no clear recommendations can be made. This lack of strong evidence for nurses to base effective practice decisions is problematic. However, the 'best' evidence suggests that disposable bodyworns are a good investment in the fight against skin deterioration. No rinse cleansers are to be preferred over soap and the use of the bag bath appears to be a useful practice to reduce the risk of dry skin (a risk factor for breaches in skin integrity).

  6. A record review of reported musculoskeletal pain in an Ontario long term care facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humphreys B Kim

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal (MSK pain is one of the leading causes of chronic health problems in people over 65 years of age. Studies suggest that a high prevalence of older adults suffer from MSK pain (65% to 80% and back pain (36% to 40%. The objectives of this study were: 1. To investigate the period prevalence of MSK pain and associated subgroups in residents of a long-term care (LTC facility. 2. To describe clinical features associated with back pain in this population. 3. To identify associations between variables such as age, gender, cognitive status, ambulatory status, analgesic use, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis with back pain in a long-term care facility. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted using a purposive sampling approach of residents' clinical charts from a LTC home in Toronto, Canada. All medical records for LTC residents from January 2003 until March 2005 were eligible for review. However, facility admissions of less than 6 months were excluded from the study to allow for an adequate time period for patient medical assessments and pain reporting/charting to have been completed. Clinical data was abstracted on a standardized form. Variables were chosen based on the literature and their suggested association with back pain and analyzed via multivariate logistic regression. Results 140 (56% charts were selected and reviewed. Sixty-nine percent of the selected residents were female with an average age of 83.7 years (51–101. Residents in the sample had a period pain prevalence of 64% (n = 89 with a 40% prevalence (n = 55 of MSK pain. Of those with a charted report of pain, 6% (n = 5 had head pain, 2% (n = 2 neck pain, 21% (n = 19 back pain, 33% (n = 29 extremity pain and 38% (n = 34 had non-descriptive/unidentified pain complaint. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that osteoporosis was the only significant association with back pain from the variables studied (P = 0.001. Conclusion

  7. Review of in-place HEPA filter testing at several DOE facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokler, B.V.; Scripsick, R.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The Office of Nuclear Energy Self-Assessment recently sponsored reviews of HEPA filter systems at several DOE facilities. One aspect emphasized in these reviews was in-place filter testing practices. Although in-place testing was generally performed as required in facility specifications, we noted several areas in which improvements were possible. Examples of some common problems and approaches to their solution will be presented. Areas of suggested improvement include: (1) ensuring the validity of test results; (2) recognizing and quantifying the uncertainty in penetration measurements; (3) expanding the analysis and reporting of test results to provide more than pass/fail information; (4) addressing the special problems of multiple stage systems; and (5) increasing the technical support and training provided in-place testing personnel. Ensuring the validity of test results, for example, requires more careful attention to the operation of test equipment, checking test measurements and system operating parameters for internal consistency, and more attention to documentation of system geometry and operation. Some issues will require additional study before the results can be incorporated into decision making on filter bank testing requirements and performance specifications.

  8. Task analysis methods applicable to control room design review (CDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moray, N.P.; Senders, J.W.; Rhodes, W.

    1985-06-01

    This report presents the results of a research study conducted in support of the human factors engineering program of the Atomic Energy Control Board in Canada. It contains five products which may be used by the Atomic Enegy Control Board in relation to Task Analysis of jobs in CANDU nuclear power plants: 1. a detailed method for preparing for a task analysis; 2. a Task Data Form for recording task analysis data; 3. a detailed method for carrying out task analyses; 4. a guide to assessing alternative methods for performing task analyses, if such are proposed by utilities or consultants; and 5. an annotated bibliography on task analysis. In addition, a short explanation of the origins, nature and uses of task analysis is provided, with some examples of its cost effectiveness. 35 refs

  9. High Performance CDR Processing with MapReduce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulya Agung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A call detail record (CDR is a data record produced by telecommunication equipment consisting of call detail transaction logs. It contains valuable information for many purposes in several domains, such as billing, fraud detection and analytical purposes. However, in the real world these needs face a big data challenge. Billions of CDRs are generated every day and the processing systems are expected to deliver results in a timely manner. The capacity of our current production system is not enough to meet these needs. Therefore a better performing system based on MapReduce and running on Hadoop cluster was designed and implemented. This paper presents an analysis of the previous system and the design and implementation of the new system, called MS2. In this paper also empirical evidence is provided to demonstrate the efficiency and linearity of MS2. Tests have shown that MS2 reduces overhead by 44% and speeds up performance nearly twice compared to the previous system. From benchmarking with several related technologies in large-scale data processing, MS2 was also shown to perform better in the case of CDR batch processing.  When it runs on a cluster consisting of eight CPU cores and two conventional disks, MS2 is able to process 67,000 CDRs/second.

  10. Review of the Design, Construction, and Coming Scientific Capabilities of the New Arecibo HF Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzer, M. P.

    2010-12-01

    complete power system for planetary radar, the HF facility, and site backup. Design of the mesh is complete and the construction phase has started. One of the tower base concrete pads will sit on ground that is softer than expected and this pad is being designed by the engineering firm Amman and Whitney. The other five use the standard design provided by the tower manufacturer. Amman and Whitney are also reviewing the mesh support design and have recommended some changes in the cable support system in order to provide better temperature stability. As the project construction is completed in the next few months, we face the problems of producing a practical scientific facility. This facility is inherently a lot less complicated than the HAARP facility in Alaska. Nonetheless, a computer control and monitoring system is very desirable, both to allow the most complete control over the transmitted waveforms, and to allow the highest reliability of operation. We are currently reviewing the best ways to accomplish this. We expect that a basic system will be in place for the first couple of operational campaigns, with full flexibility coming later. The basic operation would be similar to our previous facility at Islote, vertical operation with continuous wave or a simple pulse sequence on a single frequency.

  11. Standard Review Plan for the review of a license application for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility: Safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Standard Review Plan (SRP) (NUREG-1200) provides guidance to staff reviewers in the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards who perform safety reviews of applications to construct and operate low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The SRP ensures the quality and uniformity of the staff reviews and presents a well-defined base from which to evaluate proposed changes in the scope and requirements of the staff reviews. The SRP makes information about the regulatory licensing process widely available and serves to improve the understanding of the staff's review process by interested members of the public and the industry. Each individual SRP addresses the responsibilities of persons performing the review, the matters that are reviewed, the Commission's regulations and acceptance criteria necessary for the review, how the review is accomplished, the conclusions that are appropriate, and the implementation requirements

  12. Standard Review Plan for the review of a license application for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The Standard Review Plan (SRP) (NUREG-1200) provides guidance to staff reviewers in the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards who perform safety reviews of applications to construct and operate low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The SRP ensures the quality and uniformity of the staff reviews and presents a well-defined base from which to evaluate proposed changes in the scope and requirements of the staff reviews. The SRP makes information about the regulatory licensing process widely available and serves to improve the understanding of the staff`s review process by interested members of the public and the industry. Each individual SRP addresses the responsibilities of persons performing the review, the matters that are reviewed, the Commission`s regulations and acceptance criteria necessary for the review, how the review is accomplished, the conclusions that are appropriate, and the implementation requirements.

  13. Standard review plan for the review of a license application for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility: Safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The Standard Review Plan (SRP) (NUREG-1200) provides guidance to staff reviewers in the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards who perform safety reviews of applications to construct and operate low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The SRP ensures the quality and uniformity of the staff reviews and presents a well-defined base from which to evaluate proposed changes in the scope and requirements of the staff reviews. The SRP makes information about the regulatory licensing process widely available and serves to improve the understanding of the staff's review process by interested members of the public and the nuclear power industry. Each individual SRP addresses the responsibilities of persons performing the review, the matters that are reviewed, the Commission's regulations and acceptance criteria necessary for the review, how the review is accomplished, the conclusions that are appropriate, and the implementation requirements

  14. Preventing in-facility pressure ulcers as a patient safety strategy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Nancy; Schoelles, Karen M

    2013-03-05

    Complications from hospital-acquired pressure ulcers cause 60,000 deaths and significant morbidity annually in the United States. The objective of this systematic review is to review evidence regarding multicomponent strategies for preventing pressure ulcers and to examine the importance of contextual aspects of programs that aim to reduce facility-acquired pressure ulcers. CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PreMEDLINE were searched for articles published from 2000 to 2012. Studies (any design) that implemented multicomponent initiatives to prevent pressure ulcers in adults in U.S. acute and long-term care settings and that reported pressure ulcer rates at least 6 months after implementation were selected. Two reviewers extracted study data and rated quality of evidence. Findings from 26 implementation studies (moderate strength of evidence) suggested that the integration of several core components improved processes of care and reduced pressure ulcer rates. Key components included the simplification and standardization of pressure ulcer-specific interventions and documentation, involvement of multidisciplinary teams and leadership, use of designated skin champions, ongoing staff education, and sustained audit and feedback.

  15. Important considerations related to the construction of observation wells in radiation facilities sites: A review research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, S. A.; Salem, W. M.; Atta, E. R.

    2012-01-01

    Observation wells in radiation facility sites are considered the main sources of the required subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic data. They are the most important means to detect the radioactive and/or chemical contaminants within the ground water. Also, they are used to observe the groundwater level fluctuations and perform the different aquifer tests to understand the hydraulic properties of aquifers and the behavior of contaminants transportation. This research reviews the necessary considerations and available techniques for constructing the observation wells properly. The review process depends on the international guidelines presented in the literature and the field experience. The proper well completion is essential for the well efficiency and longevity. Three main important topics are considered and discussed briefly in this review. They are the preliminary considerations, the drilling program and the well protection procedures. The preliminary considerations included are the collection of the available geologic and hydrogeologic data and information, selection of drilling method and the legal requirements. The drilling program comprises the site preparation, drilling processes, sampling, well logging, well design, casing components and materials, gravel pack and well development. The well protection procedures include well grout, concrete slab and others requirements. Observation wells should be constructed to a high standard and should be properly maintained and protected to ensure ongoing and reliable data collection

  16. Determinants of resident autonomy in assisted living facilities: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska-Simmons, Elzbieta; Wright, James D

    2007-01-01

    Assisted living (AL) stresses the importance of resident autonomy in the provision of good quality care. Resident autonomy has been linked to better resident well-being, less reliance on supportive services, and greater participation in social activities. Little is known, however, about factors that foster resident autonomy in AL. This article reviews what is currently known about organizational determinants of resident autonomy in AL. The open-natural systems approach to organizational effectiveness, which views organizations in relation to their environment, provides a broad conceptual framework for this analysis. Factors that influence resident autonomy in AL are classified into two categories: (a) external environmental conditions (e.g., ownership status, chain membership, regulatory environment) and (b) internal organizational structures and processes (e.g., facility size, residents' functional ability, resident social resources, and staff work environment). Environmental conditions represent the most antecedent set of factors that influence resident autonomy, indirectly through their effects on internal organizational structures and processes. Internal organizational factors influence resident autonomy through their impact on policies that enable resident choice and control in the facility. More research is needed to better understand the complex mechanism(s) through which organizational factors influence resident autonomy.

  17. The Use of Bioaerosol Sampling for Airborne Virus Surveillance in Swine Production Facilities: A Mini Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin D; Lednicky, John A; Torremorell, Montserrat; Gray, Gregory C

    2017-01-01

    Modern swine production facilities typically house dense populations of pigs and may harbor a variety of potentially zoonotic viruses that can pass from one pig generation to another and periodically infect human caretakers. Bioaerosol sampling is a common technique that has been used to conduct microbial risk assessments in swine production, and other similar settings, for a number of years. However, much of this work seems to have been focused on the detection of non-viral microbial agents (i.e., bacteria, fungi, endotoxins, etc.), and efforts to detect viral aerosols in pig farms seem sparse. Data generated by such studies would be particularly useful for assessments of virus transmission and ecology. Here, we summarize the results of a literature review conducted to identify published articles related to bioaerosol generation and detection within swine production facilities, with a focus on airborne viruses. We identified 73 scientific reports, published between 1991 and 2017, which were included in this review. Of these, 19 (26.7%) used sampling methodology for the detection of viruses. Our findings show that bioaerosol sampling methodologies in swine production settings have predominately focused on the detection of bacteria and fungi, with no apparent standardization between different approaches. Information, specifically regarding virus aerosol burden in swine production settings, appears to be limited. However, the number of viral aerosol studies has markedly increased in the past 5 years. With the advent of new sampling technologies and improved diagnostics, viral bioaerosol sampling could be a promising way to conduct non-invasive viral surveillance among swine farms.

  18. The Use of Bioaerosol Sampling for Airborne Virus Surveillance in Swine Production Facilities: A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D. Anderson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern swine production facilities typically house dense populations of pigs and may harbor a variety of potentially zoonotic viruses that can pass from one pig generation to another and periodically infect human caretakers. Bioaerosol sampling is a common technique that has been used to conduct microbial risk assessments in swine production, and other similar settings, for a number of years. However, much of this work seems to have been focused on the detection of non-viral microbial agents (i.e., bacteria, fungi, endotoxins, etc., and efforts to detect viral aerosols in pig farms seem sparse. Data generated by such studies would be particularly useful for assessments of virus transmission and ecology. Here, we summarize the results of a literature review conducted to identify published articles related to bioaerosol generation and detection within swine production facilities, with a focus on airborne viruses. We identified 73 scientific reports, published between 1991 and 2017, which were included in this review. Of these, 19 (26.7% used sampling methodology for the detection of viruses. Our findings show that bioaerosol sampling methodologies in swine production settings have predominately focused on the detection of bacteria and fungi, with no apparent standardization between different approaches. Information, specifically regarding virus aerosol burden in swine production settings, appears to be limited. However, the number of viral aerosol studies has markedly increased in the past 5 years. With the advent of new sampling technologies and improved diagnostics, viral bioaerosol sampling could be a promising way to conduct non-invasive viral surveillance among swine farms.

  19. JMBR VOLUME 14 NO 1 - JUNE 2015.cdr- CORRESPONDENCE.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... care facility and the subjective meaning underlying individual patterns of illness behavior such as seeking medical advice or ... from time to time is important for how. 2 they act on it. This is particularly important in the .... scientific areas of Biology, Physics and. Chemistry. While the 'culture bound model' and ...

  20. Experiences of registered nurses as managers and leaders in residential aged care facilities: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Drew

    2011-12-01

    The phenomenon of an ageing population is being experienced globally, as countries struggle to change and improve residential models of care and provide services to the elderly. The role of the registered nurse (RN) is considered crucial to the clinical governance and management of care given. To date, however, no systematic review has examined the RN's experience in leadership and management. The objective of this review is to critically appraise, synthesise and present best available evidence on the experiences of RNs as clinical leaders and managers in residential aged care facilities. This review considered qualitative research papers that addressed the experiences of RNs as clinical leaders and managers in residential aged care facilities. Participants of interest were RNs, nurse leaders, nurses holding registration and or regulation under a board of nursing, nurses working in residential aged care and long-term care facilities. The diversity and use of language to describe nurses' roles and models of care for the elderly care environment were considered in the review. The search strategy sought to find both published studies and papers, limited to the English language and published between January 1997 and February 2011. An initial limited search was done in Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases to identify the key words contained in the title or abstract and index terms used to describe the relevant terms in the article. A second extensive search was undertaken and extended to other relevant databases using all identified keywords and index terms. The third step involved searching reference lists and bibliographies of chosen articles for additional studies. Each paper was assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological quality prior to inclusion in the review using an appropriate critical appraisal instrument from the System for the Unified Management

  1. Ontogeny of the avian intestinal immunoglobulin repertoire: modification in CDR3 length and conserved VH-pseudogene usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Gerco; Crooijmans, Richard P M A; Parmentier, Henk K; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Bos, Nicolaas A; Lammers, Aart

    2013-12-01

    Immunoglobulins play an important role in maintenance of mucosal homeostasis in the gut. The antigen binding specificity of these immunoglobulins depends for a large part on the hypervariable CDR3 region. To gain knowledge about isotype-specific development of the CDR3 repertoire we examined CDR3 spectratypes at multiple time points between 4 and 70 days post hatch. In order to identify clonal expansions deviation from the normal distribution (SS) and the average CDR3 length was calculated. IgA-CDR3 regions were studied in more detail by DNA sequence analysis at day 7 and 70 and preferential VH pseudogene usage was estimated. The SS of CDR3 repertoires of the IgM, IgG and IgA isotypes successively increased, but for each isotype this increase was transiently. The length of the CDR3 regions decreased with age for IgM becoming similar to the CDR3 length of IgA at day 70. The IgA- and IgG-CDR3 lengths did not change with age. On average, the CDR3 length of IgA was the shortest. IgA CDR3 sequences were similar between animals aged 7 and 70 days. A limited number of pseudogenes was used, and no differences in pseudogene usage were observed between animals aged 7 and 70 days. Of the identified VH pseudogenes, half of the sequences used VH15, whilst a number of the pseudogenes were not used at all. We conclude that CDR3 spectratype profiles change during aging, whilst at the CDR3-sequence level, variation in VH pseudogene usage for ileal IgA is limited suggesting conservation during ontogeny. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Review on the Regulatory Strategy of Human Factors Engineering Consideration in Pakistan Nuclear Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohail, Sabir [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong Nam [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, the legal and regulatory infrastructure available in Pakistan for HFE requirements is assessed, and the methodology for strengthening of legal infrastructure is presented. The regulatory strategy on evaluation of HFE consideration should provide reviewers with guidance on review process. Therefore, the suggested methodology is based on preparation of guidance documents such as checklist, working procedures, S and Gs etc.; incorporation of PRM elements in regulatory system; and finally the development of PRM implementation criteria. Altogether, the scheme provide the enhancement in regulatory infrastructure and also the effective and efficient review process. The Three Mile Island (TMI) accident brought the general consensus among the nuclear community on the integration of human factors engineering (HFE) principles in all phases of nuclear power. This notion has further strengthened after the recent Fukushima nuclear accident. Much effort has been put over to incorporate the lesson learned and continuous technical evolution on HFE to device different standards. The total of 174 ergonomics standards are alone identified by Dul et al. (2004) published by International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) and number of standards and HFE guidelines (S and Gs) are also published by organizations like Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineering (IEEE), International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), etc. The ambition of effective review on HFE integration in nuclear facility might be accomplished through the development of methodology for systematic implementation of S and Gs. Such kind of methodology would also be beneficial for strengthening the regulatory framework and practices for countries new in the nuclear arena and with small scale nuclear program. The objective of paper is to review the

  3. SRTC criticality safety technical review: Nuclear criticality safety evaluation 94-02, uranium solidification facility pencil tank module spacing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathbun, R.

    1994-01-01

    Review of NMP-NCS-94-0087, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 94-02: Uranium Solidification Facility Pencil Tank Module Spacing (U), April 18, 1994,'' was requested of the SRTC Applied Physics Group. The NCSE is a criticality assessment to show that the USF process module spacing, as given in Non-Conformance Report SHM-0045, remains safe for operation. The NCSE under review concludes that the module spacing as given in Non-Conformance Report SHM-0045 remains in a critically safe configuration for all normal and single credible abnormal conditions. After a thorough review of the NCSE, this reviewer agrees with that conclusion

  4. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration Climate Data Record (CDR) dataset is generated using daily gridded brightness temperatures from the Defense...

  5. A 5 Gb/s low area CDR for embedded clock serial links

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Li; Junsheng, Lü; Yumei, Zhou; Jianzhong, Zhao; Yuhu, Chen; Feng, Zhang

    2015-02-01

    A multi-standard compatible clock and data recovery circuit (CDR) with a programmable equalizer and wide tracking range is presented. Considering the jitter performance, tracking range and chip area, the CDR employs a first-order digital loop filter, two 6-bit DACs and high linearity phase interpolators to achieve high phase resolution and low area. Meanwhile the tracking range is greater than ±2200 ppm, making this proposed CDR suitable for the embedded clock serial links. A test chip was fabricated in the 55 nm CMOS process. The measurements show that the test chip can achieve BER < 10-12 and meet the jitter tolerance specification. The test chip occupies 0.19 mm2 with a 0.0486 mm2 CDR core, which only consumes 30 mW from a 1.2 V supply at 5 Gb/s.

  6. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Ocean Near Surface Atmospheric Properties, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Ocean Surface Bundle (OSB) Climate Data Record (CDR) consist of three parts: sea surface temperature; near-surface wind speed, air temperature, and specific...

  7. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), NRLSSI Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Climate Data Record (CDR) contains solar spectral irradiance (SSI) as a function of time and wavelength created with the Naval Research Laboratory model for...

  8. NOAA Fundamental Climate Data Record (CDR) of AMSU-B and MHS Brightness Temperature, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B (AMSU-B) and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) brightness temperature (Tb) in "window...

  9. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Monthly Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR), Version 2.2-1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Climate Data Record (CDR) of monthly mean High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) flux at the top of the atmosphere...

  10. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Daily Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR), Version 1.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Climate Data Record (CDR) contains the daily mean Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) time series in global 1 degree x 1 degree equal-angle gridded maps spanning...

  11. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Ocean Heat Fluxes, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Ocean Surface Bundle (OSB) Climate Data Record (CDR) consist of three parts: sea surface temperature; near-surface wind speed, air temperature, and specific...

  12. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Passive Microwave Sea Ice Concentration, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset version has been superseded by version 2. This data set provides a Climate Data Record (CDR) of passive microwave sea ice concentration based on the...

  13. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Atmospheric Layer Temperatures, Version 3.3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Atmospheric Layer Temperature Climate Data Record (CDR) dataset is a monthly analysis of the tropospheric and stratospheric data using temperature sounding...

  14. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Northern Hemisphere (NH) Snow Cover Extent (SCE), Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) is a record for the Northern Hemisphere (NH) Snow Cover Extent (SCE) spanning from October 4, 1966 to present, updated monthly...

  15. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI), NRLTSI Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Climate Data Record (CDR) contains total solar irradiance (TSI) as a function of time created with the Naval Research Laboratory model for spectral and total...

  16. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Version 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains gridded daily Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from the NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Advanced Very High Resolution...

  17. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of AVHRR Polar Pathfinder Extended (APP-X) Cryosphere

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of the extended AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP-x) cryosphere contains 19 geophysical variables over the Arctic and Antarctic for the...

  18. Chemicals Reported for the 2012 Chemical Data Reporting (CDR) in Alphabetical Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the 2012 CDR, 7,674 unique chemicals were reported by manufacturers (including importers).Chemicals are listed in alphabetical order by CA Index Name (for non-confidential chemicals) or by generic chemical name.

  19. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Sea Surface Temperature - WHOI, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Ocean Surface Bundle (OSB) Climate Data Record (CDR) consist of three parts: sea surface temperature, near-surface atmospheric properties, and heat fluxes....

  20. A method for studying the development pattern of urban commercial service facilities based on customer reviews from social media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. D.; Jiang, B. T.; Ye, X. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Urbanization is one of the most important human social activities in the 21st century (Chaolin et al., 2012). With an increasing number of people visiting cities, the provision of adequate urban service facilities, including public and commercial service facilities, in locations where people live has become an important guarantee of the success of urbanization. Exploring the commercial service facilities in a specific area of a city can help us understand the progress and trends of urban renewal in the area, provide a quantitative basis for evaluating the rationality of planning implementation, and facilitate an analysis of the effects of different factors on the regional development of a city (Schor et al. 2003). In this paper, we proposed a data processing and analysis method for studying the distribution and development pattern of urban commercial facilities based on customer reviews. In addition, based on road network constraints, we explored the patterns contained in customer reviews data, including patterns for the spatial distribution and spatial-temporal evolution of facilities as well as the number of facilities and degree of satisfaction.

  1. A method for studying the development pattern of urban commercial service facilities based on customer reviews from social media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. D. Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization is one of the most important human social activities in the 21st century (Chaolin et al., 2012. With an increasing number of people visiting cities, the provision of adequate urban service facilities, including public and commercial service facilities, in locations where people live has become an important guarantee of the success of urbanization. Exploring the commercial service facilities in a specific area of a city can help us understand the progress and trends of urban renewal in the area, provide a quantitative basis for evaluating the rationality of planning implementation, and facilitate an analysis of the effects of different factors on the regional development of a city (Schor et al. 2003. In this paper, we proposed a data processing and analysis method for studying the distribution and development pattern of urban commercial facilities based on customer reviews. In addition, based on road network constraints, we explored the patterns contained in customer reviews data, including patterns for the spatial distribution and spatial-temporal evolution of facilities as well as the number of facilities and degree of satisfaction.

  2. National Ignition Facility, High-Energy-Density and Inertial Confinement Fusion, Peer-Review Panel (PRP) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keane, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-01-28

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is operated as a National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) user facility in accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) best practices, including peer-reviewed experiments, regular external reviews of performance, and the use of a management structure that facilitates user and stakeholder feedback. NIF facility time is managed using processes similar to those in other DOE science facilities and is tailored to meet the mix of missions and customers that NIF supports. The NIF Governance Plan describes the process for allocating facility time on NIF and for creating the shot schedule. It also includes the flow of responsibility from entity to entity. The plan works to ensure that NIF meets its mission goals using the principles of scientific peer review, including transparency and cooperation among the sponsor, the NIF staff, and the various user communities. The NIF Governance Plan, dated September 28, 2012, was accepted and signed by LLNL Director Parney Albright, NIF Director Ed Moses, and Don Cook and Thomas D’Agostino of NNSA. Figure 1 shows the organizational structure for NIF Governance.

  3. A systematic review of the methodologies used to evaluate telemedicine service initiatives in hospital facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlDossary, Sharifah; Martin-Khan, Melinda G; Bradford, Natalie K; Smith, Anthony C

    2017-01-01

    The adoption of telemedicine into mainstream health services has been slower than expected. Many telemedicine projects tend not to progress beyond the trial phase; there are a large number of pilot or project publications and fewer 'service' publications. This issue has been noted since 1999 and continues to be acknowledged in the literature. While overall telemedicine uptake has been slow, some services have been successful. The reporting and evaluation of these successful services may help to improve future uptake and sustainability. The aim of this literature review was to identify peer-reviewed publications of deployed telemedicine services in hospital facilities; and to report, and appraise, the methodology used to evaluate these services. Computerised literature searches of bibliographic databases were performed using the MeSH terms for "Telemedicine" and "Hospital Services" or "Hospital", for papers published up to May 2016. A total of 164 papers were identified, representing 137 telemedicine services. The majority of reported telemedicine services were based in the United States of America (n=61, 44.5%). Almost two thirds of the services (n=86, 62.7%) were delivered by real time telemedicine. Of the reviewed studies, almost half (n=81, 49.3%) assessed their services from three different evaluation perspectives: clinical outcomes, economics and satisfaction. While the remaining half (n=83, 50.6%) described their service and its activities without reporting any evaluation measures. Only 30 (18.2%) studies indicated a two-step implementation and evaluation process. There was limited information in all reported studies regarding description of a structured planning strategy. Our systematic review identified only 137 telemedicine services. This suggests either telemedicine service implementation is still not a part of mainstream clinical services, or it is not being reported in the peer-reviewed literature. The depth and the quality of information were variable

  4. A systematic review on barriers, facilities, knowledge and attitude toward evidence-based medicine in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Ghojazadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evidence-based medicine (EBM is the ability and skill in using and integration of the best up-to-date evidences. The aim of this study was a systematic review of barriers, facilities, knowledge and attitude of EBM in Iran. Methods: In this study, database and manual search was used with keywords such as, "evidence-based, EBM, evidence-based nursing, evidence-based practice, evidence-based care, evidence-based activities, evidence-based education" and their combination with the keywords of the barrier, facilitator, attitude, awareness, prospective, knowledge, practice and Iran. The databases of SID (Scientific information database, Magiran, MEDLIB, PubMed, Google scholar, IranMedex and CINAHL (Cumulative index to nursing and allied health literature were used for data collection. Results: Finally, 28 papers were included in this study. The lack of facilities, time and skill in research methodology were the most important barriers to EBM. The most and least important factors were orderly creating ample opportunity and detecting needs and problems. The degree of familiarity with the terminology of evidence-based performance was low (44.2%. The textbooks have been considered as the most significant source of obtaining information. The level of awareness, knowledge, and evidence-based performance was less than 50.0%. Conclusion: There are many various barriers in use of EBM and healthcare providers despite the positive attitude toward EBM had a low level knowledge in EBM setting. Consideration of the importance of EBM proper planning and effective intervention are necessary to removing the barriers and increase the knowledge of healthcare providers.

  5. Evidence-based practices to increase hand hygiene compliance in health care facilities: An integrated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neo, Jun Rong Jeffrey; Sagha-Zadeh, Rana; Vielemeyer, Ole; Franklin, Ella

    2016-06-01

    Hand hygiene (HH) in health care facilities is a key component to reduce pathogen transmission and nosocomial infections. However, most HH interventions (HHI) have not been sustainable. This review aims to provide a comprehensive summary of recently published evidence-based HHI designed to improve HH compliance (HHC) that will enable health care providers to make informed choices when allocating limited resources to improve HHC and patient safety. The Medline electronic database (using PubMed) was used to identify relevant studies. English language articles that included hand hygiene interventions and related terms combined with health care environments or related terms were included. Seventy-three studies that met the inclusion criteria were summarized. Interventions were categorized as improving awareness with education, facility design, and planning, unit-level protocols and procedures, hospital-wide programs, and multimodal interventions. Past successful HHIs may not be as effective when applied to other health care environments. HH education should be interactive and engaging. Electronic monitoring and reminders should be implemented in phases to ensure cost-effectiveness. To create hospitalwide programs that engage end users, policy makers should draw expertise from interdisciplinary fields. Before implementing the various components of multimodal interventions, health care practitioners should identify and examine HH difficulties unique to their organizations. Future research should seek to achieve the following: replicate successful HHI in other health care environments, develop reliable HHC monitoring tools, understand caregiver-patient-family interactions, examine ways (eg, hospital leadership, financial support, and strategies from public health and infection prevention initiatives) to sustain HHC, and use simulated lab environments to refine study designs. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc

  6. Disulfiram is a potent modulator of multidrug transporter Cdr1p of Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Suneet; Sauna, Zuben E.; Prasad, Rajendra; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2004-01-01

    To find novel drugs for effective antifungal therapy in candidiasis, we examined disulfiram, a drug used for the treatment of alcoholism, for its role as a potential modulator of Candida multidrug transporter Cdr1p. We show that disulfiram inhibits the oligomycin-sensitive ATPase activity of Cdr1p and 2.5 mM dithiothreitol reverses this inhibition. Disulfiram inhibited the binding of photoaffinity analogs of both ATP ([α- 32 P]8-azidoATP; IC 50 = 0.76 μM) and drug-substrates ([ 3 H]azidopine and [ 125 I]iodoarylazidoprazosin; IC 50 ∼ 12 μM) to Cdr1p in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that it can interact with both ATP and substrate-binding site(s) of Cdr1p. Furthermore, a non-toxic concentration of disulfiram (1 μM) increased the sensitivity of Cdr1p expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to antifungal agents (fluconazole, miconazole, nystatin, and cycloheximide). Collectively these results demonstrate that disulfiram reverses Cdr1p-mediated drug resistance by interaction with both ATP and substrate-binding sites of the transporter and may be useful for antifungal therapy

  7. Boiling eXperiment Facility (BXF) Fluid Toxicity Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM) with the Payload Safety Review Panel (PSRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheredy, William A.

    2012-01-01

    A Technical Interchange meeting was held between the payload developers for the Boiling eXperiment Facility (BXF) and the NASA Safety Review Panel concerning operational anomaly that resulted in overheating one of the fluid heaters, shorted a 24VDC power supply and generated Perfluoroisobutylene (PFiB) from Perfluorohexane.

  8. Environmental Standard Review Plan for the review of a license application for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility: Environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    The Environmental Standard Review Plan (ESRP) (NUREG-1300) provides guidance to staff reviewers in the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards who perform environmental reviews of environmental reports prepared by applicants in support of license applications to construct and operate new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The individual ESRPs that constitute this document identify the information considered necessary to conduct the review, the purpose and scope of the review, the analysis procedure and evaluation, the formal input to the environmental statement, and the references considered appropriate for each review. The ESRP is intended to ensure quality and uniformity of approach in individual reviews as well as compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. In addition, the ESRP will make information about the environmental component of the licensing process more readily available and thereby will serve to improve the understanding of this process among the public, States and regional compacts, and the regulated community

  9. Expression of the CDR1 efflux pump in clinical Candida albicans isolates is controlled by a negative regulatory element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaur, Naseem Akhtar; Manoharlal, Raman; Saini, Preeti; Prasad, Tulika; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Hoefer, Milan; Morschhaeuser, Joachim; Prasad, Rajendra

    2005-01-01

    Resistance to azole antifungal drugs in clinical isolates of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans is often caused by constitutive overexpression of the CDR1 gene, which encodes a multidrug efflux pump of the ABC transporter superfamily. To understand the relevance of a recently identified negative regulatory element (NRE) in the CDR1 promoter for the control of CDR1 expression in the clinical scenario, we investigated the effect of mutation or deletion of the NRE on CDR1 expression in two matched pairs of azole-sensitive and resistant clinical isolates of C. albicans. Expression of GFP or lacZ reporter genes from the wild type CDR1 promoter was much higher in the azole-resistant C. albicans isolates than in the azole-susceptible isolates, reflecting the known differences in CDR1 expression in these strains. Deletion or mutation of the NRE resulted in enhanced reporter gene expression in azole-sensitive strains, but did not further increase the already high CDR1 promoter activity in the azole-resistant strains. In agreement with these findings, electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed a reduced binding to the NRE of nuclear extracts from the resistant C. albicans isolates as compared with extracts from the sensitive isolates. These results demonstrate that the NRE is involved in maintaining CDR1 expression at basal levels and that this repression is overcome in azole-resistant clinical C. albicans isolates, resulting in constitutive CDR1 overexpression and concomitant drug resistance

  10. A critical analysis of the review on antimicrobial resistance report and the infectious disease financing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, David M; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-03-22

    Over the past year, two major policy initiatives have been introduced focusing on stimulating antibiotic development for human consumption. The European Investment Bank has announced the development of the Infectious Disease Financing Facility (IDFF) and the British government commissioned the Review on Antimicrobial Resistance, led by Jim O'Neill. Each constitutes a major effort by the European community to address the evolving crisis of antimicrobial resistance. Though both have similar goals, the approaches are unique and worthy of consideration.This manuscript utilizes a previously published framework for evaluation of antibiotic incentive plans to clearly identify the strengths and weaknesses of each proposal. The merits of each proposal are evaluated in how they satisfy four key objectives: 1) Improve the overall net present value (NPV) for new antibiotic projects; 2) Enable greater participation of Small to Medium Sized Enterprises (SME); 3) Encourage participation by large pharmaceutical companies; 4) Facilitate cooperation and synergy across the antibiotic market. The IDFF seeks to make forgivable loans to corporations with promising compounds, while the O'Neill group proposes a more comprehensive framework of early stage funding, along with the creation of a stable global market.Ultimately, the proposals may prove complementary and if implemented together may form a more comprehensive plan to address an impending global crisis. Substantial progress will only be made on these efforts if action is taken at an international level, therefore we recommend consideration of these efforts at the upcoming G20 summit.

  11. School toilets: facilitating hand hygiene? A review of primary school hygiene facilities in a developed country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, L M; Priest, P C; Poore, M R

    2012-12-01

    Clean hands play an important role in preventing infectious disease transmission. The physical quality of any toilet and handwashing facilities is an important determinant of whether and how it is used, especially for school children. This study assessed the physical quality of toilet and handwashing facilities used by 9 year olds at 68 primary schools in three cities in the South Island of New Zealand. The facilities were assessed for availability, functionality and provision of hand basins, hygiene products and drying facilities. Nineteen schools (28%) followed the New Zealand Ministry of Education Code of Practice for toilet and bathroom facilities in schools, by providing warm water, liquid soap at every basin and functioning hand drying facilities. A further 25 schools (37%) would have met the standards except they provided only cold water (21 schools) or the cloth roller towels were unusable (4 schools). The other 24 schools' toilet facilities were deficient in some way, including one with no soap and six that provided no drying facilities. School socioeconomic position and toilet facility quality were not related. These results suggest that a significant number of New Zealand children do not currently have access to high quality hygiene facilities at school.

  12. Low-level liquid radioactive waste treatment at Murmansk, Russia: Technical design and review of facility upgrade and expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, R.S.; Diamante, J.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States). Office of International Activities; Duffey, R.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    The governments of Norway and the US have committed their mutual cooperation and support the Murmansk Shipping Company (MSCo) to expand and upgrade the Low-Level Liquid Radioactive Waste (LLRW) treatment system located at the facilities of the Russian company RTP Atomflot, in Murmansk, Russia. RTP Atomflot provides support services to the Russian icebreaker fleet operated by the MSCo. The objective is to enable Russia to permanently cease disposing of this waste in Arctic waters. The proposed modifications will increase the facility`s capacity from 1,200 m{sup 3} per year to 5,000 m{sup 3} per year, will permit the facility to process high-salt wastes from the Russian Navy`s Northern fleet, and will improve the stabilization and interim storage of the processed wastes. The three countries set up a cooperative review of the evolving design information, conducted by a joint US and Norwegian technical team from April through December, 1995. To ensure that US and Norwegian funds produce a final facility which will meet the objectives, this report documents the design as described by Atomflot and the Russian business organization, ASPECT, both in design documents and orally. During the detailed review process, many questions were generated, and many design details developed which are outlined here. The design is based on the adsorption of radionuclides on selected inorganic resins, and desalination and concentration using electromembranes. The US/Norwegian technical team reviewed the available information and recommended that the construction commence; they also recommended that a monitoring program for facility performance be instituted.

  13. Detecting Treatment Group Differences in Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Trials: A Comparison of Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog) and the Clinical Dementia Rating - Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, A M; Dowsett, S A; Sims, J R

    2018-01-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale's cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) has been widely used as an outcome measure in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) clinical trials. In its original form (ADAS-Cog11), the scale has been used successfully in mild-to-moderate AD dementia populations, but its use is more limited in the study of earlier disease (mild cognitive impairment [MCI] or mild dementia due to AD) owing to lack of appropriate sensitivity of some items. With recent focus on earlier treatment, efforts have focused on the development of more sensitive tools, including the Clinical Dementia Rating-Sum of Boxes (CDR-SB), a global assessment tool to evaluate both cognition and function. The ability of the ADAS-Cog and CDR-SB to detect treatment group differences in the clinical trial environment has not been systematically studied. The aim of this analysis was to compare the utility of these tools in detecting treatment group differences, by reviewing study findings identified through advanced searches of clinicaltrials.gov and Ovid, and press releases and scientific presentations. Findings from placebo-controlled studies of ≥ 6m duration and enrolling >100 participants were included; reporting of both the ADAS-Cog and CDR-SB at endpoint was also a requirement. Of the >300 records identified, 34 studies fulfilled the criteria. There were significant placebo versus active drug group differences based on findings from at least one measure for 14 studies. The ADAS-Cog detected treatment differences more frequently than the CDR-SB. Based on these and previously published findings, the ADAS-Cog appears more useful than the CDR-SB in detecting treatment group differences.

  14. LITERATURE REVIEW ON IMPACT OF GLYCOLATE ON THE 2H EVAPORATOR AND THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K.

    2012-05-10

    Glycolic acid (GA) is being studied as an alternate reductant in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. It will either be a total or partial replacement for the formic acid that is currently used. A literature review has been conducted on the impact of glycolate on two post-DWPF downstream systems - the 2H Evaporator system and the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The DWPF recycle stream serves as a portion of the feed to the 2H Evaporator. Glycolate enters the evaporator system from the glycolate in the recycle stream. The overhead (i.e., condensed phase) from the 2H Evaporator serves as a portion of the feed to the ETF. The literature search revealed that virtually no impact is anticipated for the 2H Evaporator. Glycolate may help reduce scale formation in the evaporator due to its high complexing ability. The drawback of the solubilizing ability is the potential impact on the criticality analysis of the 2H Evaporator system. It is recommended that at least a theoretical evaluation to confirm the finding that no self-propagating violent reactions with nitrate/nitrites will occur should be performed. Similarly, identification of sources of ignition relevant to glycolate and/or update of the composite flammability analysis to reflect the effects from the glycolate additions for the 2H Evaporator system are in order. An evaluation of the 2H Evaporator criticality analysis is also needed. A determination of the amount or fraction of the glycolate in the evaporator overhead is critical to more accurately assess its impact on the ETF. Hence, use of predictive models like OLI Environmental Simulation Package Software (OLI/ESP) and/or testing are recommended for the determination of the glycolate concentration in the overhead. The impact on the ETF depends on the concentration of glycolate in the ETF feed. The impact is classified as minor for feed glycolate concentrations {le} 33 mg/L or 0.44 mM. The ETF unit operations that will have

  15. Literature Review On Impact Of Glycolate On The 2H Evaporator And The Effluent Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adu-Wusu, K.

    2012-01-01

    Glycolic acid (GA) is being studied as an alternate reductant in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. It will either be a total or partial replacement for the formic acid that is currently used. A literature review has been conducted on the impact of glycolate on two post-DWPF downstream systems - the 2H Evaporator system and the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The DWPF recycle stream serves as a portion of the feed to the 2H Evaporator. Glycolate enters the evaporator system from the glycolate in the recycle stream. The overhead (i.e., condensed phase) from the 2H Evaporator serves as a portion of the feed to the ETF. The literature search revealed that virtually no impact is anticipated for the 2H Evaporator. Glycolate may help reduce scale formation in the evaporator due to its high complexing ability. The drawback of the solubilizing ability is the potential impact on the criticality analysis of the 2H Evaporator system. It is recommended that at least a theoretical evaluation to confirm the finding that no self-propagating violent reactions with nitrate/nitrites will occur should be performed. Similarly, identification of sources of ignition relevant to glycolate and/or update of the composite flammability analysis to reflect the effects from the glycolate additions for the 2H Evaporator system are in order. An evaluation of the 2H Evaporator criticality analysis is also needed. A determination of the amount or fraction of the glycolate in the evaporator overhead is critical to more accurately assess its impact on the ETF. Hence, use of predictive models like OLI Environmental Simulation Package Software (OLI/ESP) and/or testing are recommended for the determination of the glycolate concentration in the overhead. The impact on the ETF depends on the concentration of glycolate in the ETF feed. The impact is classified as minor for feed glycolate concentrations (le) 33 mg/L or 0.44 mM. The ETF unit operations that will have

  16. Significant differences in physicochemical properties of human immunoglobulin kappa and lambda CDR3 regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L Townsend

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibody variable regions are composed of a heavy and a light chain and in humans there are two light chain isotypes: kappa and lambda. Despite their importance in receptor editing, the light chain is often overlooked in the antibody literature, with the focus being on the heavy chain CDR-H3 region. In this paper, we set out to investigate the physicochemical and structural differences between human kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. We constructed a dataset containing over 29,000 - light chain variable region sequences from IgM-transcribing, newly formed B cells isolated from human bone marrow and peripheral blood. We also used a published human naïve dataset to investigate the CDR-H3 properties of heavy chains paired with kappa and lambda light chains, and probed the Protein Data Bank (PDB to investigate the structural differences between kappa and lambda antibody CDR regions. We found that kappa and lambda light chains have very different CDR physicochemical and structural properties, whereas the heavy chains with which they are paired do not differ significantly. We also observed that the mean CDR3 N nucleotide addition in the kappa, lambda and heavy chain gene rearrangements are correlated within donors, but can differ between donors. This indicates that TdT may work with differing efficiencies between different people, but the same efficiency in the different classes of immunoglobulin chain within one person. We have observed large differences in the physicochemical and structural properties of kappa and lambda light chain CDR regions. This may reflect different roles in the humoral immune response.

  17. Prerequisites concerning SSI:s review of applications for an encapsulation facility and a repository for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehlen, Elisabeth

    2006-09-01

    The report outlines some fundamental prerequisites concerning SSI:s review of SKB coming applications for an encapsulation facility (according to the act on nuclear activities) and for the complete final disposal system (according to the act on nuclear activities and the environmental code). The report summarize how the SSI look at the decision making process considering radiation protection requirements according to SSI:s regulations and general advices and earlier standpoints regarding SKB:s RandD-programme. The report also describe the present reviewing capacity of SSI and constitute therefore the basis for the planning of SSI:s review organisation in the prospect of coming applications on nuclear waste facilities (encapsulation facility and a deep disposal repository). It should be noted that the report reflects the present situation. Due to a number of factors as for example changes in SKB:s coming RandD-programme, future governmental decisions, adjustments of SSI:s financial resources or new facts in the case, will of course have an effect on how SSI finally will organise the review work. SSI:s home page will continuously be updated with the latest information in this respect

  18. CLIC CDR - physics and detectors: CLIC conceptual design report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, E.; Demarteau, M.; Repond, J.; Xia, L.; Weerts, H. (High Energy Physics); (Many)

    2012-02-10

    This report forms part of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC). The CLIC accelerator complex is described in a separate CDR volume. A third document, to appear later, will assess strategic scenarios for building and operating CLIC in successive center-of-mass energy stages. It is anticipated that CLIC will commence with operation at a few hundred GeV, giving access to precision standard-model physics like Higgs and top-quark physics. Then, depending on the physics landscape, CLIC operation would be staged in a few steps ultimately reaching the maximum 3 TeV center-of-mass energy. Such a scenario would maximize the physics potential of CLIC providing new physics discovery potential over a wide range of energies and the ability to make precision measurements of possible new states previously discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The main purpose of this document is to address the physics potential of a future multi-TeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider based on CLIC technology and to describe the essential features of a detector that are required to deliver the full physics potential of this machine. The experimental conditions at CLIC are significantly more challenging than those at previous electron-positron colliders due to the much higher levels of beam-induced backgrounds and the 0.5 ns bunch-spacing. Consequently, a large part of this report is devoted to understanding the impact of the machine environment on the detector with the aim of demonstrating, with the example of realistic detector concepts, that high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC. Since the impact of background increases with energy, this document concentrates on the detector requirements and physics measurements at the highest CLIC center-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. One essential output of this report is the clear demonstration that a wide range of high precision physics measurements can be made at CLIC with detectors which are challenging, but

  19. Communication Between Acute Care Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities During Care Transitions: A Retrospective Chart Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusela, Cheryl; Struble, Laura; Gallagher, Nancy Ambrose; Redman, Richard W; Ziemba, Rosemary A

    2017-03-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.3 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Communication Between Acute Care Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities During Care Transitions: A Retrospective Chart Review" found on pages 19-28, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until February 29, 2020. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Discuss problematic barriers during care transitions

  20. Low-level liquid radioactive waste treatment at Murmansk, Russia: Technical design and review of facility upgrade and expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, R.S.; Diamante, J.M.

    1996-07-01

    The governments of Norway and the US have committed their mutual cooperation and support the Murmansk Shipping Company (MSCo) to expand and upgrade the Low-Level Liquid Radioactive Waste (LLRW) treatment system located at the facilities of the Russian company RTP Atomflot, in Murmansk, Russia. RTP Atomflot provides support services to the Russian icebreaker fleet operated by the MSCo. The objective is to enable Russia to permanently cease disposing of this waste in Arctic waters. The proposed modifications will increase the facility's capacity from 1,200 m 3 per year to 5,000 m 3 per year, will permit the facility to process high-salt wastes from the Russian Navy's Northern fleet, and will improve the stabilization and interim storage of the processed wastes. The three countries set up a cooperative review of the evolving design information, conducted by a joint US and Norwegian technical team from April through December, 1995. To ensure that US and Norwegian funds produce a final facility which will meet the objectives, this report documents the design as described by Atomflot and the Russian business organization, ASPECT, both in design documents and orally. During the detailed review process, many questions were generated, and many design details developed which are outlined here. The design is based on the adsorption of radionuclides on selected inorganic resins, and desalination and concentration using electromembranes. The US/Norwegian technical team reviewed the available information and recommended that the construction commence; they also recommended that a monitoring program for facility performance be instituted

  1. Cdr2p contributes to fluconazole resistance in Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-05-01

    The development of resistance to azole antifungals used in the treatment of fungal infections can be a serious medical problem. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanisms associated with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole in clinical isolates of Candida dubliniensis , showing evidence of the trailing growth phenomenon. The changes in membrane sterol composition were studied in the presence of subinhibitory fluconazole concentrations. Despite lanosterol and eburicol accumulating as the most prevalent sterols after fluconazole treatment, these ergosterol precursors still support growth of Candida isolates. The overexpression of ABC transporters was demonstrated by immunoblotting employing specific antibodies against Cdr1p and Cdr2p. The presence of a full-length 170 kDa protein Cdr1p was detected in two isolates, while a truncated form of Cdr1p with the molecular mass of 85 kDa was observed in isolate 966\\/3(2). Notably, Cdr2p was detected in this isolate, and the expression of this transporter was modulated by subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole. These results suggest that C. dubliniensis can display the trailing growth phenomenon, and such isolates express similar molecular mechanisms like that of fluconazole-resistant isolates and can therefore be associated with recurrent infections.

  2. Quality of caesarean delivery services and documentation in first-line referral facilities in Afghanistan: a chart review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Young-Mi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing appropriate use and documentation of caesarean section (CS has the potential to decrease maternal and perinatal mortality in settings with low CS rates. We analyzed data collected as part of a comprehensive needs assessment of emergency obstetric and newborn care (EmONC facilities in Afghanistan to gain a greater understanding of the clinical indications, timeliness, and outcomes of CS deliveries. Methods Records were reviewed at 78 government health facilities expected to function as EmONC providers that were located in secure areas of the country. Information was collected on the three most recent CS deliveries in the preceding 12 months at facilities with at least one CS delivery in the preceding three months. After excluding 16 facilities with no recent CS deliveries, the sample includes 173 CS deliveries at 62 facilities. Results No CS deliveries were performed in the previous three months at 21% of facilities surveyed; all of these were lower-level facilities. Most CS deliveries (88% were classified as emergencies, and only 12% were referrals from another facility. General anesthesia was used in 62% of cases, and spinal or epidural anesthesia in 34%. Only 28% of cases were managed with a partograph. Surgery began less than one hour after the decision for a CS delivery in just 30% of emergency cases. Among the 173 cases, 27 maternal deaths, 28 stillbirths, and 3 early neonatal deaths were documented. In cases of maternal and fetal death, the most common indications for CS delivery were placenta praevia or abruption and malpresentation. In 62% of maternal deaths, the fetus was stillborn or died shortly after birth. In 48% of stillbirths, the fetus had a normal heart rate at the last check. Information on partograph use was missing in 38% of cases, information on parity missing in 23% of cases and indications for cesareans missing in 9%. Conclusions Timely referral within and to EmONC facilities would decrease

  3. The efficacy of complementary therapies for agitation among older people in residential care facilities: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Karen; Chang, Esther; Johnson, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Agitation is recognised by aged care literature as the most common behavioural problem in residential aged care facilities. Complementary therapies are advocated by some as a solution to reduce the effect of agitation in older people and are becoming increasingly incorporating into nursing care. Complementary therapies in nursing management, is endorsed by the Australian Nurses and Midwifery Board for nurse initiation. The review objective was to discover which types of Complementary therapies are being implemented in RACFs for agitation management and which of these therapies where effective in reducing agitation. Participants were people over the age of 65 years living permanently in a residential aged care facility and experiencing agitation, regardless of cognitive ability, gender or ethnicity and existing co-morbidities.The types of complementary therapy interventions explored in this systematic review were Aromatherapy, Exercise, Massage, Music Therapy and Therapeutic TouchThe systematic review considered randomised controlled trials of complementary therapy interventions that could be initiated by a nurseOutcomes measured were the frequency and/or severity of verbal, non-physical aggressive and physical aggressive agitation among the participants. A comprehensive search strategy was developed for eleven electronic databases with dates ranging from January 2000 to September 2010. Searches included unpublished studies and the reference lists from identified papers. Only English language papers were considered due to a lack of interpreter facilities. An adapted version of the Joanna Briggs Institute quality appraisal checklist was used to assess the methodological quality of studies. Appraisal was performed separately by two independent reviewers with any disagreement between appraisers settled by a third appraiser. Data was extracted using the standardised Joanna Briggs Institute Data Extraction Tool. Measurement tools reported different subcategories of

  4. Hippocampal volume and CDR-SB can predict conversion to dementia in MCI patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Guilherme Fiorani Borgio

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the combination of two factors: clinical dementia rating sum of boxes scores (CDR-SB and hippocampal volume (HV as predictors of conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI to dementia. METHODS: Twenty-eight individuals (9 normal and 19 with MCI were classified according to their CDR sum of boxes scores into 3 groups. RESULTS: The hippocampal volume was significantly lower in the high-risk group and in those who developed dementia after two years. The rate of conversion was crescent among the three groups. CONCLUSION: We were proposed an additional measurement of the hippocampal volume which may be helpful in the prognosis. However, we noted that the CDR-SB is a method as efficient as neuroimaging to predict dementia with the advantage of being a procedure for low cost and easy implementation, more consistent with public policy.

  5. Department of Energy review of the National Spallation Neutron Source Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    A Department of Energy (DOE) review of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) was conducted. The NSNS will be a new high-power spallation neutron source; initially, it will operate at 1 megawatt (MW), but is designed to be upgradeable to significantly higher power, at lower cost, when accelerator and target technologies are developed for higher power. The 53-member Review Committee examined the projected cost, schedule, technical scope, and management structure described in the CDR. For each of the major components of the NSNS, the Committee determined that the project team had produced credible designs that can be expected to work well. What remains to be done is to integrate the design of these components. With the exception of the liquid mercury target, the NSNS Project will rely heavily on proven technologies and, thus, will face a relatively low risk to successful project completion. The Total Project Cost (TPC) presented to the Committee in the CDR was $1.266 billion in as-spent dollars. In general, the Committee felt that the laboratory consortium had presented a credible estimate for each of the major components but that value engineering might produce some savings. The construction schedule presented to the Committee covered six years beginning in FY 1999. The Committee questioned whether all parts of the project could be completed according to this schedule. In particular, the linac and the conventional facilities appeared to have overly optimistic schedules. The NSNS project team was encouraged to reexamine these activities and to consider a more conservative seven-year schedule. Another concern of the Committee was the management structure. In summary, the Committee felt that this Conceptual Design Report was a very credible proposal, and that there is a high probability for successful completion of this major project within the proposed budget, although the six-year proposed schedule may be optimistic

  6. Department of Energy review of the National Spallation Neutron Source Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    A Department of Energy (DOE) review of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) was conducted. The NSNS will be a new high-power spallation neutron source; initially, it will operate at 1 megawatt (MW), but is designed to be upgradeable to significantly higher power, at lower cost, when accelerator and target technologies are developed for higher power. The 53-member Review Committee examined the projected cost, schedule, technical scope, and management structure described in the CDR. For each of the major components of the NSNS, the Committee determined that the project team had produced credible designs that can be expected to work well. What remains to be done is to integrate the design of these components. With the exception of the liquid mercury target, the NSNS Project will rely heavily on proven technologies and, thus, will face a relatively low risk to successful project completion. The Total Project Cost (TPC) presented to the Committee in the CDR was $1.266 billion in as-spent dollars. In general, the Committee felt that the laboratory consortium had presented a credible estimate for each of the major components but that value engineering might produce some savings. The construction schedule presented to the Committee covered six years beginning in FY 1999. The Committee questioned whether all parts of the project could be completed according to this schedule. In particular, the linac and the conventional facilities appeared to have overly optimistic schedules. The NSNS project team was encouraged to reexamine these activities and to consider a more conservative seven-year schedule. Another concern of the Committee was the management structure. In summary, the Committee felt that this Conceptual Design Report was a very credible proposal, and that there is a high probability for successful completion of this major project within the proposed budget, although the six-year proposed schedule may be optimistic.

  7. A Wide Lock-Range Referenceless CDR with Automatic Frequency Acquisition

    OpenAIRE

    Seon-Kyoo Lee; Young-Sang Kim; Hong-June Park; Jae-Yoon Sim

    2011-01-01

    A wide lock-range referenceless CDR circuit is proposed with an automatic tracking of data rate. For efficient frequency acquisition, a DLL-based loop is used with a simple phase/frequency detector to extract 1-bit period of input data stream. The CDR, implemented in a 65 nm CMOS, shows a lock range of 650 Mb/s-to-8 Gb/s and BER of less than 10-12 at 8 Gb/s with low power consumption.

  8. A Wide Lock-Range Referenceless CDR with Automatic Frequency Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon-Kyoo Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide lock-range referenceless CDR circuit is proposed with an automatic tracking of data rate. For efficient frequency acquisition, a DLL-based loop is used with a simple phase/frequency detector to extract 1-bit period of input data stream. The CDR, implemented in a 65 nm CMOS, shows a lock range of 650 Mb/s-to-8 Gb/s and BER of less than 10-12 at 8 Gb/s with low power consumption.

  9. U.S. child death review programs: assessing progress toward a standard review process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Jenelle R; Risch, Elizabeth C; Bonner, Barbara L

    2010-12-01

    Child death review (CDR) programs examine the circumstances of children's deaths to gain information on how and why children die for the purpose of promoting the health, safety, and protection of children. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the 50 states and District of Columbia CDR programs, with specific focus on the use of standardized procedures and best-practice recommendations. This included assessment of which deaths are reviewed, the model of review, team membership, and standardization of data collection and reporting. Data were collected through semistructured phone interviews with representatives of the 50 states and District of Columbia CDR programs and online sources. Data collection and analyses were conducted in 2009. Forty-eight states and the District of Columbia have active CDR programs at the state and/or local level, and the majority use a national data collection system. However, results revealed numerous inconsistencies across programs in policies, procedures, and data collection. This study reflects the minimal progress that has been made in the CDR process in the U.S. since the last systematic review of the programs in 2001. The study documents substantial discrepancies among the U.S. CDR programs, affecting the consistency of data obtained by individual states and, ultimately, prevention efforts at the national level. Information from this review can inform CDR programs as they develop and refine procedures and guide future research on the effectiveness and limitations of variations in procedures. Copyright © 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Low Prevalence of Human Pathogens on Fresh Produce on Farms and in Packing Facilities: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia E. Van Pelt

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Foodborne illness burdens individuals around the world and may be caused by consuming fresh produce contaminated with bacterial, parasite, and viral pathogens. Pathogen contamination on produce may originate at the farm and packing facility. This research aimed to determine the prevalence of human pathogens (bacteria, parasites, and viruses on fresh produce (fruits, herbs, and vegetables on farms and in packing facilities worldwide through a systematic review of 38 peer-reviewed articles. The median and range of the prevalence was calculated, and Kruskal–Wallis tests and logistic regression were performed to compare prevalence among pooled samples of produce groups, pathogen types, and sampling locations. Results indicated a low median percentage of fresh produce contaminated with pathogens (0%. Both viruses (p-value = 0.017 and parasites (p-value = 0.033, on fresh produce, exhibited higher prevalence than bacteria. No significant differences between fresh produce types or between farm and packing facility were observed. These results may help to better quantify produce contamination in the production environment and inform strategies to prevent future foodborne illness.

  11. A Review of Demand Forecast for Charging Facilities of Electric Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiming, Han; Lingyu, Kong; Yaqi, Shen; Ying, Li; Wenting, Xiong; Hao, Wang

    2017-05-01

    The demand forecasting of charging facilities is the basis of its planning and locating, which has important role in promoting the development of electric vehicles and alleviating the energy crisis. Firstly, this paper analyzes the influence of the charging mode, the electric vehicle population and the user’s charging habits on the demand of charging facilities; Secondly, considering these factors, the recent analysis on charging and switching equipment demand forecast is divided into two methods—forecast based on electric vehicle population and user traveling behavior. Then, the article analyzes the two methods and puts forward the advantages and disadvantages. Finally, in view of the defects of current research, combined with the current situation of the development of the city and comprehensive consideration of economic, political, environmental and other factors, this paper proposes an improved demand forecasting method which has great practicability and pertinence and lays the foundation for the plan of city electric facilities.

  12. A Review of Avian Monitoring and Mitigation Information at Existing Utility-Scale Solar Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walston, Leroy J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rollins, Katherine E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Smith, Karen P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); LaGory, Kirk E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sinclair, Karin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Turchi, Craig [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wendelin, Tim [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Souder, Heidi [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    There are two basic types of solar energy technology: photovoltaic and concentrating solar power. As the number of utility-scale solar energy facilities using these technologies is expected to increase in the United States, so are the potential impacts on wildlife and their habitats. Recent attention is on the risk of fatality to birds. Understanding the current rates of avian mortality and existing monitoring requirements is an important first step in developing science-based mitigation and minimization protocols. The resulting information also allows a comparison of the avian mortality rates of utility-scale solar energy facilities with those from other technologies and sources, as well as the identification of data gaps and research needs. This report will present and discuss the current state of knowledge regarding avian issues at utility-scale solar energy facilities.

  13. Detection of inhibitors of Candida albicans Cdr transporters using a diS-C3(3 fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna eSzczepaniak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a major cause of opportunistic and life-threatening, systemic fungal infections. Hence new antifungal agents, as well as new methods to treat fungal infections, are still needed. The application of inhibitors of drug-efflux pumps may increase the susceptibility of C. albicans to drugs. We developed a new fluorescence method that allows the in vivo activity evaluation of compounds inhibiting of C. albicans transporters. We show that the potentiometric dye 3,3′-dipropylthiacarbocyanine iodide diS-C3(3 is pumped out by both Cdr1 and Cdr2 transporters. The fluorescence labeling with diS-C3(3 enables a real-time observation of the activity of C. albicans Cdr1 and Cdr2 transporters. We demonstrate that enniatin A and beauvericin show different specificities toward these transporters. Enniatin A inhibits diS-C3(3 efflux by Cdr1 while beauvericin inhibits both Cdr1p and Cdr2p.

  14. Between Scylla and Charybdis: Delayed mitigation narrows the passage between large-scale CDR and high costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strefler, Jessica; Bauer, Nico; Kriegler, Elmar; Popp, Alexander; Giannousakis, Anastasis; Edenhofer, Ottmar

    2018-04-01

    There are major concerns about the sustainability of large-scale deployment of carbon dioxide removal (CDR) technologies. It is therefore an urgent question to what extent CDR will be needed to implement the long term ambition of the Paris Agreement. Here we show that ambitious near term mitigation significantly decreases CDR requirements to keep the Paris climate targets within reach. Following the nationally determined contributions (NDCs) until 2030 makes 2 °C unachievable without CDR. Reducing 2030 emissions by 20% below NDC levels alleviates the trade-off between high transitional challenges and high CDR deployment. Nevertheless, transitional challenges increase significantly if CDR is constrained to less than 5 Gt CO2 a‑1 in any year. At least 8 Gt CO2 a‑1 CDR are necessary in the long term to achieve 1.5 °C and more than 15 Gt CO2 a‑1 to keep transitional challenges in bounds.

  15. Software and Parameters for Detailed TPC Studies in the CLIC CDR

    CERN Document Server

    Killenberg, M.

    2011-01-01

    For the TPC occupancy and time stamping studies in the CLIC CDR the MarlinTPC software package has been used in combination with Mokka for the full detector simulation. This document describes the working principle of the Marlin processors used for digitisation and reconstruction, and lists the parameters for reference.

  16. How Do Scores on the ADAS-Cog, MMSE, and CDR-SOB Correspond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsis, Steve; Benge, Jared F; Lowe, Deborah A; Geraci, Lisa; Doody, Rachelle S

    2015-01-01

    Clinicians and researchers who measure cognitive dysfunction often use the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale--Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-Cog), the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), or the Clinical Dementia Rating scale (CDR-SOB). But, the use of different measures can make it difficult to compare data across patients or studies. What is needed is a simple chart that shows how scores on these three important measures correspond to each other. Using data from 1709 participants from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and item response theory-based statistics, we analyzed how scores on each measure, the ADAS-Cog, the MMSE, and the CDR-SOB, correspond. Results indicated multiple inflections in CDR-SOB and ADAS-Cog scores within a given MMSE score, suggesting that the CDR-SOB and ADAS-Cog are more precise in measuring the severity of cognitive dysfunction than the MMSE. This study shows how scores on these three popular measures of cognitive dysfunction correspond to each other, which is very useful information for both researchers and clinicians.

  17. CLIC Detector Concepts as described in the CDR: Differences between the GEANT4 and Engineering Models

    CERN Document Server

    Elsener, K; Schlatter, D; Siegrist, N

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC_ILD and CLIC_SiD detector concepts as used for the CDR Vol. 2 in 2011 exist both in GEANT4 simulation models and in engineering layout drawings. At this early stage of a conceptual design, there are inevitably differences between these models, which are described in this note.

  18. Independent Review of Siesmic Performance Assessments for the Plutonium Facility PF-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittaker, Andrew [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Buffalo, NY (United States); Goen, Lawrence Kenneth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kennedy, Robert [RPK Structural Mechanics, San Diego, CA (United States); McDonald, Brian [Exponent, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Morgan, Troy [Exponent, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wyllie, Loring [Degenkolb Engineers, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-11-25

    The Plutonium Facility, designated PF-4, is located in Technical Area 55 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The facility is a one-story rectangular structure above a complete basement; the building was constructed of cast-in-place reinforced concrete, with small interior frames of structural steel. The plan dimensions of the building are 265’×284’. The overall height of the building varies between 39’-0” at the north and south ends, and 40’-6” at the center ridge. The programmatic work performed in the building is vital to our national security and its functions and storage purposes are not replicated elsewhere in the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  19. The Use of Bioaerosol Sampling for Airborne Virus Surveillance in Swine Production Facilities: A Mini Review

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin D. Anderson; Benjamin D. Anderson; John A. Lednicky; Montserrat Torremorell; Gregory C. Gray

    2017-01-01

    Modern swine production facilities typically house dense populations of pigs and may harbor a variety of potentially zoonotic viruses that can pass from one pig generation to another and periodically infect human caretakers. Bioaerosol sampling is a common technique that has been used to conduct microbial risk assessments in swine production, and other similar settings, for a number of years. However, much of this work seems to have been focused on the detection of non-viral microbial agents ...

  20. JMBR VOLUME 15 Number 2 Decemebr 2016 - correction.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fine Print

    Nurses' communication of nursing care provision in tertiary health facilities and patient satisfaction are closely related. This has remained a yardstick for measuring success of the services provided in many health facilities. This study investigated the influence of nurses' communication of nursing care on patient satisfaction ...

  1. A review of existing model of no-notice randomized inspection and their potential application to model Pu handling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanborn, J.; Lu, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    Literature regarding two alternative safeguards concepts--randomization and zones--is reviewed. The concepts were introduced in the early 1980's to address the need to make safeguards more efficient in the light of the increasing number of facilities under safeguards and a fixed IAEA inspection budget. The paper discusses literature broadly relating these approaches to IAEA needs and objectives, reports from IAEA consultants meetings, reports of field trials, and other technical papers. The review suggests that the approaches have been extensively considered on a theoretical and practical level, and that the safeguards community endorses them on a conceptual level as potentially valid ways of achieving safeguards objectives. Actual utilization of the ideas in safeguards practice has to proceed on a case-by-case basis, but progress is being made

  2. Theoretical Modeling and Simulation of Phase-Locked Loop (PLL for Clock Data Recovery (CDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Mohamad Ashari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern communication and computer systems require rapid (Gbps, efficient  and large bandwidth data transfers. Agressive scaling of digital integrated systems  allow buses and communication controller circuits to be integrated with the microprocessor on the same chip. The  Peripheral Component Interconnect Express (PCIe protocol handles all communcation between the central processing unit (CPU and hardware devices. PCIe buses require efficient clock data recovery circuits (CDR to recover clock signals embedded in data during transmission. This paper describes the theoretical modeling and simulation of a phase-locked loop (PLL used in a CDR circuit. A simple PLL architecture for a 5 GHz CDR circuit is proposed  and elaborated in this work. Simulations were carried out using a Hardware Description Language, Verilog-AMS. The effect of jitter on the proposed design is also simulated and evaluated in this work. It was found that the proposed design is robust against both input and VCO jitter.ABSTRAK: Sistem komunikasi dan komputer moden memerlukan pemindahan data yang cekap (Gbps, dan bandwidth yang besar. Pengecilan agresif menggunakan teknik sistem digital bersepadu membenarkan bas dan litar pengawal komunikasi disatukan dengan  mikroprocessor dalam cip yang sama. Protokol persisian komponen sambung tara ekspres (PCIe mengendalikan semua komunikasi antara unit pemprosesan pusat (CPU dan peranti perkakasan. Bas PCIe memerlukan litar jam pemulihan data (CDR yang cekap untuk mendapatkan kembali isyarat jam yang tertanam dalam data semasa transmisi. Karya ini menerangkan teori pemodelan dan simulasi gelung fasa terkunci (PLL untuk CDR. Rekabentuk 5 GHz PLL yang mudah telah dicadangkan dalm kertas kerja ini. Simulasi telah dijalankan menggunakan perisian verilog-AMS. Simulasi mengunnakan kesan ketar dalam reka bentuk yang dicadangkan telah dinilai. Reka bentuk yang dicadangkan terbukti teguh mengatasi ganguan ketar di input dan VCO.KEY WORDS

  3. Limited electricity access in health facilities of sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of data on electricity access, sources, and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair-Rohani, Heather; Zukor, Karen; Bonjour, Sophie; Wilburn, Susan; Kuesel, Annette C; Hebert, Ryan; Fletcher, Elaine R

    2013-08-01

    Access to electricity is critical to health care delivery and to the overarching goal of universal health coverage. Data on electricity access in health care facilities are rarely collected and have never been reported systematically in a multi-country study. We conducted a systematic review of available national data on electricity access in health care facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. We identified publicly-available data from nationally representative facility surveys through a systematic review of articles in PubMed, as well as through websites of development agencies, ministries of health, and national statistics bureaus. To be included in our analysis, data sets had to be collected in or after 2000, be nationally representative of a sub-Saharan African country, cover both public and private health facilities, and include a clear definition of electricity access. We identified 13 health facility surveys from 11 sub-Saharan African countries that met our inclusion criteria. On average, 26% of health facilities in the surveyed countries reported no access to electricity. Only 28% of health care facilities, on average, had reliable electricity among the 8 countries reporting data. Among 9 countries, an average of 7% of facilities relied solely on a generator. Electricity access in health care facilities increased by 1.5% annually in Kenya between 2004 and 2010, and by 4% annually in Rwanda between 2001 and 2007. Energy access for health care facilities in sub-Saharan African countries varies considerably. An urgent need exists to improve the geographic coverage, quality, and frequency of data collection on energy access in health care facilities. Standardized tools should be used to collect data on all sources of power and supply reliability. The United Nations Secretary-General's "Sustainable Energy for All" initiative provides an opportunity to comprehensively monitor energy access in health care facilities. Such evidence about electricity needs and gaps would

  4. Best practices to prevent transmission and control outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease in childcare facilities: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, J Hy; Law, C K; Hamblion, E; Fung, H; Rudge, J

    2017-04-01

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease continues to cause seasonal epidemics in the Asia-Pacific Region. Since the current Enterovirus 71 vaccines do not provide cross-protection for all Enterovirus species that cause hand, foot, and mouth disease, there is an urgent need to identify appropriate detection tools and best practice to prevent its transmission and to effectively control its outbreaks. This systematic review aimed to identify characteristics of outbreak and assess the impact and effectiveness of detection tools and public health preventive measures to interrupt transmission. The findings will be used to recommend policy on the most effective responses and interventions in Hong Kong to effectively minimise and contain the spread of the disease within childcare facilities. We searched the following databases for primary studies written in Chinese or English: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Global Health, WHO Western Pacific Region Index Medicus database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure Databases, and Chinese Scientific Journals Database. Studies conducted during or retrospective to outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease caused by Enterovirus 71 from 1980 to 2012 within childcare facilities and with a study population of 0 to 6 years old were included. Sixteen studies conducted on outbreaks in China showed that hand, foot, and mouth disease spread rapidly within the facility, with an outbreak length of 4 to 46 days, especially in those with delayed notification (after 24 hours) of clustered outbreak (with five or more cases discovered within the facility) to the local Center for Disease Control and Prevention and delayed implementation of a control response. The number of classes affected ranged from 1 to 13, and the attack rate for children ranged from 0.97% to 28.18%. Communication between key stakeholders about outbreak confirmation, risk assessment, and surveillance should be improved. Effective communication facilitates timely notification (within 24 hours) of

  5. Factors associated with quality of life of people with dementia in long-term care facilities: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerens, Hanneke C; Zwakhalen, Sandra M G; Verbeek, Hilde; Ruwaard, Dirk; Hamers, Jan P H

    2013-09-01

    Quality of life has become an important outcome measure in dementia research. Currently there is no convincing evidence about which factors are associated with quality of life of people with dementia living in long-term care facilities. This study aims to investigate which factors are associated with quality of life, including factors associated with change over time, of people with dementia living in long-term care facilities. A systematic literature review was performed. Cochrane, Pubmed, CINAHL, Web of Science, and PsycINFO were searched. Three researchers independently assessed studies for eligibility. The inclusion criteria were: (1) the primary focus was on factors related to quality of life; (2) the study was performed in long-term care facilities; (3) the study regarded quality of life as multidimensional construct. Methodological quality of studies included in the review was assessed with a quality criteria checklist. Ten cross-sectional and three longitudinal articles were included in the review. In cross-sectional studies, depressive symptoms were negatively related to self-rated quality of life of people with dementia. The association between depressive symptoms and proxy-rated quality of life was less clear. Behavioural disturbances, especially agitation, appeared to be negatively related to proxy-rated quality of life. There appeared to be a negative relation between quality of life, activities of daily living and cognition, although this could not be confirmed in all studies. In longitudinal studies, depressive symptoms were negatively related and cognition was positively related to self-rated quality of life, whereas dependency and depressive symptoms were negatively related to proxy-rated quality of life. There are only few high quality studies that investigate associations of (change in) quality of life of people with dementia living in long-term care facilities. Our results suggest that depressive symptoms and agitation are related to lower

  6. Delegation of Authority to Review Leases of Property at Department of Energy Weapon Production Facilities Under the Department of Energy Organization Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this memorandum is to request that the Human Resources Staff for OSWER and OECA start the Green Border review process for the attached draft delegation of authority, which delegates the authority of the Administrator to review leases of property at Department of Energy (DOE) weapon production facilities to the Assistant Administrator for OSWER and Regional Administrators.

  7. The effect of facility characteristics on patient safety, patient experience, and service availability for procedures in non-hospital-affiliated outpatient settings: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglas, Nancy F; Battistelli, Molly F; Nicholson, Wanda K; Sobota, Mindy; Urman, Richard D; Roberts, Sarah C M

    2018-01-01

    Over recent decades, numerous medical procedures have migrated out of hospitals and into freestanding ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) and physician offices, with possible implications for patient outcomes. In response, states have passed regulations for office-based surgeries, private organizations have established standards for facility accreditation, and professional associations have developed clinical guidelines. While abortions have been performed in office setting for decades, states have also enacted laws requiring that facilities that perform abortions meet specific requirements. The extent to which facility requirements have an impact on patient outcomes-for any procedure-is unclear. We conducted a systematic review to examine the effect of outpatient facility type (ASC vs. office) and specific facility characteristics (e.g., facility accreditation, emergency response protocols, clinician qualifications, physical plant characteristics, other policies) on patient safety, patient experience and service availability in non-hospital-affiliated outpatient settings. To identify relevant research, we searched databases of the published academic literature (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science) and websites of governmental and non-governmental organizations. Two investigators reviewed 3049 abstracts and full-text articles against inclusion/exclusion criteria and assessed the quality of 22 identified articles. Most studies were hampered by methodological challenges, with 12 of 22 not meeting minimum quality criteria. Of 10 studies included in the review, most (6) examined the effect of facility type on patient safety. Existing research appears to indicate no difference in patient safety for outpatient procedures performed in ASCs vs. physician offices. Research about specific facility characteristics is insufficient to draw conclusions. More and higher quality research is needed to determine if there is a public health problem to be addressed through facility

  8. A review of experiments and results from the transient reactor test (TREAT) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitrich, L. W.

    1998-01-01

    The TREAT Facility was designed and built in the late 1950s at Argonne National Laboratory to provide a transient reactor for safety experiments on samples of reactor fuels. It first operated in 1959. Throughout its history, experiments conducted in TREAT have been important in establishing the behavior of a wide variety of reactor fuel elements under conditions predicted to occur in reactor accidents ranging from mild off normal transients to hypothetical core disruptive accidents. For much of its history, TREAT was used primarily to test liquid-metal reactor fuel elements, initially for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), then for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP), the British Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR), and finally, for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Both oxide and metal elements were tested in dry capsules and in flowing sodium loops. The data obtained were instrumental in establishing the behavior of the fuel under off-normal and accident conditions, a necessary part of the safety analysis of the various reactors. In addition, TREAT was used to test light-water reactor (LWR) elements in a steam environment to obtain fission-product release data under meltdown conditions. Studies are now under way on applications of TREAT to testing of the behavior of high-burnup LWR elements under reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) conditions using a high-pressure water loop

  9. A Review on Radiation Damage in Concrete for Nuclear Facilities: From Experiments to Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Pomaro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a relatively cheap material and easy to be cast into variously shaped structures. Its good shielding properties against neutrons and gamma-rays, due to its intrinsic water content and relatively high-density, respectively, make it the most widely used material for radiation shielding also. Concrete is so chosen as biological barrier in nuclear reactors and other nuclear facilities where neutron sources are hosted. Theoretical formulas are available in nuclear engineering manuals for the optimum thickness of shielding for radioprotection purposes; however they are restricted to one-dimensional problems; besides the basic empirical constants do not consider radiation damage effects, while its long-term performance is crucial for the safe operation of such facilities. To understand the behaviour of concrete properties, it is necessary to examine concrete strength and stiffness, water behavior, volume change of cement paste, and aggregate under irradiated conditions. Radiation damage process is not well understood yet and there is not a unified approach to the practical and predictive assessment of irradiated concrete, which combines both physics and structural mechanics issues. This paper provides a collection of the most distinguished contributions on this topic in the past 50 years. At present a remarkable renewed interest in the subject is shown.

  10. Operating experience review -- Conduct of operations at Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This research examined human error related occurrences, reported in the ORPS database, for the purpose of identifying weaknesses in the implementation of the guidance regarding the Conduct of Operations contained in DOE 5480.19. Specifically, this research examined three separate samples of occurrence reports from Defense Program facilities, which cited human error as a direct or contributing cause. These reports were evaluated using a coding scheme which incorporated the guidelines present in 5480.19, as well as a number of generic human factors concerns. The second chapter of this report summarizes the coding scheme which was used to evaluate the occurrence reports. Since the coding scheme is quite lengthy, only the parts of the scheme needed to make the remainder of the report clear are included in this chapter. Details on the development and content of the coding scheme are reported in Appendices A, B, and C. Chapter 3 presents the analysis of three different data sets. This chapter demonstrates that similar results were obtained across different data sets, collected at different points in time, and coded by different raters. The implications of the results obtained in Chapter 3 are discussed in Chapter 4. This chapter makes a number of suggestions for reducing the problems found in the occurrence reports. Chapter 5 applies the methodology that has been developed in this report to two facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Finally, Chapter 6 reiterates the major findings of this report. Several additional analyses appear in appendices at the end of this report

  11. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU)-A Brightness Temperature, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) for Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) brightness temperature in "window channels". The data cover a time period from...

  12. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Zonal Mean Ozone Binary Database of Profiles (BDBP), version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Zonal Mean Ozone Binary Database of Profiles (BDBP) dataset is a vertically resolved, global, gap-free and zonal mean dataset...

  13. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of SSM/I and SSMIS Microwave Brightness Temperatures, CSU Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) from Colorado State University (CSU) contains brightness temperatures that have been improved and quality-controlled over the...

  14. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of SSM/I and SSMIS Microwave Brightness Temperatures, RSS Version 7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Version 7 NOAA Fundamental Climate Data Record (CDR) from Remote Sensing Systems (RSS) contains brightness temperatures that have been inter-calibrated and...

  15. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of MSU and AMSU-A Mean Layer Temperatures, UAH Version 5.4 (Superseded)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Please note: this dataset has been superseded by a newer version (see below). This version is archived offline by NOAA NCEI. This Climate Data Record (CDR) includes...

  16. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Cloud Properties from AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres - Extended (PATMOS-x), Version 5.3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of cloud products was produced by the University of Wisconsin using the AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres - Extended (PATMOS-X)...

  17. MESSENGER E/V/H MLA 3/4 CDR/RDR DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract ======== This data set consists of the MESSENGER Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) Calibrated Data Record (CDR) and Reduced Data Record (RDR) products. The MLA...

  18. Radioactive waste safety appraisal. An international peer review of the licence application for the Australian near surface radioactive waste disposal facility. Report of the IAEA International Review Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-05-01

    Radioactive waste has been generated in Australia for a number of decades from the production and use of radioactive materials in medicine and industry, from the processing of various minerals containing natural radionuclides and from various research activities. It has been decided in the overall interest of safety and security to develop a radioactive waste disposal facility to accommodate the low level and short lived intermediate level waste, which make up the bulk of the waste, other than mining and minerals processing residues. A site selection process has been undertaken and environmental impact statement report prepared and approved. A licence application has been submitted to the national nuclear regulatory authority, the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) for siting, construction and operation of the facility. In order to assist the CEO of ARPANSA with his deliberations in this regard a request was made to the IAEA, in terms of its statutory mandate to establish international safety standards for radioactive waste safety and to provide for their application, to undertake an international peer review of the licence application and to advise the CEO accordingly. The outcome and recommendations of this peer review are presented in the report

  19. Epidemiological studies of leukaemia in children and young adults around nuclear facilities: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurier, D.; Jacob, S.; Bernier, M. O.; Leuraud, K.; Metz, C.; Samson, E.; Laloi, P.

    2008-01-01

    The existence of an increased risk of childhood leukaemia near nuclear installations is a recurrent issue. A review of the related epidemiological literature is presented here. Results for 198 nuclear sites throughout 10 countries were included in the review. In addition to local studies, 25 multi-site studies have been published for eight countries. A large variability was noticed in the quality of the data as well as in the definition of the study population and in the methods of analysis. Many studies present important limits that make the results difficult to interpret. The review confirms that some clusters of childhood leukaemia cases exist locally. However, results based on multi-site studies around nuclear installations do not indicate an increased risk globally. Many studies were launched to investigate possible origins of the observed clusters around specific sites, but up to now, none of the proposed hypotheses have explained them. (authors)

  20. Applicability of the 5S management method for quality improvement in health-care facilities: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Shogo; Shibanuma, Akira; Jimba, Masamine

    2016-01-01

    The 5S management method (where 5S stands for sort, set in order, shine, standardize, and sustain) was originally implemented by manufacturing enterprises in Japan. It was then introduced to the manufacturing sector in the West and eventually applied to the health sector for organizing and standardizing the workplace. 5S has recently received attention as a potential solution for improving government health-care services in low- and middle-income countries. We conducted a narrative literature review to explore its applicability to health-care facilities globally, with a focus on three aspects: (a) the context of its application, (b) its impacts, and (c) its adoption as part of government initiatives. To identify relevant research articles, we researched public health databases in English, including CINAHL, PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. We found 15 of the 114 articles obtained from the search results to be relevant for full-text analysis of the context and impacts of the 5S application. To identify additional information particularly on its adoption as part of government initiatives, we also examined other types of resources including reference books, reports, didactic materials, government documents, and websites. The 15 empirical studies highlighted its application in primary health-care facilities and a wide range of hospital areas in Brazil, India, Jordan, Senegal, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, the UK, and the USA. The review also found that 5S was considered to be the starting point for health-care quality improvement. Ten studies presented its impacts on quality improvements; the changes resulting from the 5S application were classified into the three dimensions of safety, efficiency, and patient-centeredness. Furthermore, 5S was adopted as part of government quality improvement strategies in India, Senegal, Sri Lanka, and Tanzania. 5S could be applied to health-care facilities regardless of locations. It could be not only a tool for health workers and

  1. Across the water: reviewing geographical studies of asylums and other mental health facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philo, C

    1997-06-01

    It is possible now to identify a small field of geographical studies exploring how space, place, environment and landscape are bound up in the worlds of people experiencing mental health problems. Some of these studies take seriously the institutions which have been provided to shelter, control, care for and even cure such people, and this interest has often touched upon the rise of the 'asylums' in Europe and North America (chiefly as an eighteenth- and nineteenth-century phenomenon). This paper surveys the geographical literature tackling asylums and other mental health facilities, and then offers an interpretation of the theoretical claims and substantive research undertaken in this respect by Michael Dear and various co-workers. Running through the paper is an argument about the need for studies of 'asylum geographies' to be attentive to what Gunnar Olsson terms 'ontological transformations' between thoughts and things.

  2. Physical environmental stimuli that turn healthcare facilities into healing environments through psychologically mediated effects : Systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Karin; Pieterse, Marcel E.; Pruyn, Ad

    2006-01-01

    Aim. This paper reports a systematic review to determine the effects of physical environmental stimuli in healthcare settings on the health and well-being of patients. Background. The concept of healing environments suggests that the physical environment of the healthcare setting can encourage the

  3. The importance of simulation facilities for the development of review criteria for advanced human system interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.; Wachtel, J.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced control room (ACR) concepts are being developed in the commercial nuclear industry as part of future reactor designs. The ACRs will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator's overall role (function) in the system, the method of information presentation, the ways in which the operator interacts with the system, and the requirements on the operator to understand and supervise an increasingly complex system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The NRC is developing guidelines to support their review of these advanced designs. As part of this effort, a methodology for guidance development was established, and topics in need of further research were identified. Simulators of various kinds are likely to play important roles in the development of review guidelines and in the evaluation of ACRs. This paper describes a general approach to review criteria development, and discusses the role of simulators in addressing research needs

  4. User involvement in structured violence risk management within forensic mental health facilities -- a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidhammer, Gunnar; Fluttert, Frans A J; Bjørkly, Stål

    2014-10-01

    To examine empirical literature on user involvement in collaboration between patients and nurses. The scope of the review was limited to structured violence risk management interventions in forensic mental health settings. Violence in forensic mental health settings represents a significant problem for patients and staff. Structured violence risk management interventions in forensic mental health have been reported to ignore patient participation, despite the growing attention on user involvement in clinical practice. A systematic review. Searches were conducted in six databases: the Cochrane Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, CINAHL, ProQuest, ScienceDirect and PsycINFO. Papers were assessed according to a predetermined set of inclusion and exclusion criteria. After searches of the reference lists of retrieved articles were conducted, only three papers met the inclusion criteria. This review has shown that empirical research on the topic of risk management interventions in which patients are involved is scarce. There is barely any research evidence of the clinical effect of user involvement approaches on violence risk management in forensic mental health practice. Therefore, we suggest that clinicians may learn from positive experiences concerning user involvement in general psychiatry and carefully adapt and test them out in the forensic treatment context. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Access barriers to obstetric care at health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa-a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyei-Nimakoh, Minerva; Carolan-Olah, Mary; McCann, Terence V

    2017-06-06

    Since 2000, the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals, which included a goal to improve maternal health by the end of 2015, has facilitated significant reductions in maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. However, despite more focused efforts made especially by low- and middle-income countries, targets were largely unmet in sub-Saharan Africa, where women are plagued by many challenges in seeking obstetric care. The aim of this review was to synthesise literature on barriers to obstetric care at health institutions in sub-Saharan Africa. This review was guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist. PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Scopus databases were electronically searched to identify studies on barriers to health facility-based obstetric care in sub-Saharan Africa, in English, and dated between 2000 and 2015. Combinations of search terms 'obstetric care', 'access', 'barriers', 'developing countries' and 'sub-Saharan Africa' were used to locate articles. Quantitative, qualitative and mixed-methods studies were considered. A narrative synthesis approach was employed to synthesise the evidence and explore relationships between included studies. One hundred and sixty articles met the inclusion criteria. Currently, obstetric care access is hindered by several demand- and supply-side barriers. The principal demand-side barriers identified were limited household resources/income, non-availability of means of transportation, indirect transport costs, a lack of information on health care services/providers, issues related to stigma and women's self-esteem/assertiveness, a lack of birth preparation, cultural beliefs/practices and ignorance about required obstetric health services. On the supply-side, the most significant barriers were cost of services, physical distance between health facilities and service users' residence, long waiting times at health

  6. FY2010 ANNUAL REVIEW E-AREA LOW-LEVEL WASTE FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT AND COMPOSITE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, T.; Swingle, R.; Crapse, K.; Millings, M.; Sink, D.

    2011-01-01

    The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) consists of a number of disposal units described in the Performance Assessment (PA)(WSRC, 2008b) and Composite Analysis (CA)(WSRC, 1997; WSRC, 1999): Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (IL) Vault, Trenches (Slit Trenches [STs], Engineered Trenches [ETs], and Component-in-Grout [CIG] Trenches), and Naval Reactor Component Disposal Areas (NRCDAs). This annual review evaluates the adequacy of the approved 2008 ELLWF PA along with the Special Analyses (SAs) approved since the PA was issued. The review also verifies that the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 low-level waste (LLW) disposal operations were conducted within the bounds of the PA/SA baseline, the Savannah River Site (SRS) CA, and the Department of Energy (DOE) Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS). Important factors considered in this review include waste receipts, results from monitoring and research and development (R&D) programs, and the adequacy of controls derived from the PA/SA baseline. Sections 1.0 and 2.0 of this review are a summary of the adequacy of the PA/SA and CA, respectively. An evaluation of the FY2010 waste receipts and the resultant impact on the ELLWF is summarized in Section 3.1. The results of the monitoring program, R&D program, and other relevant factors are found in Section 3.2, 3.3 and 3.4, respectively. Section 4.0 contains the CA annual determination similarly organized. SRS low-level waste management is regulated under DOE Order 435.1 (DOE, 1999a) and is authorized under a DAS as a federal permit. The original DAS was issued by the DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) on September 28, 1999 (DOE, 1999b) for the operation of the ELLWF and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The 1999 DAS remains in effect for the regulation of the SDF. Those portions of that DAS applicable to the ELLWF were superseded by revision 1 of the DAS on July 15, 2008 (DOE, 2008b). The 2008 PA and DAS were officially implemented by the facility on October 31, 2008

  7. PHENIX CDR update: An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory relativistic heavy ion collider. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report Update (CDR Update) is intended for use together with the Conceptual Design Report (CDR). The CDR Update is a companion document to the CDR, and it describes the collaboration`s progress since the CDR was submitted in January 1993. Therefore, this document concentrates on changes, refinements, and decisions that have been made over the past year. These documents together define the baseline PHENIX detector that the collaboration intends to build for operation at RHIC startup. In this chapter the current status of the detector and its motivation are briefly described. In Chapters 2 and 3 the detector and the physics performance are more fully developed. In Chapters 4 through 13 the details of the present design status, the technology choices, and the construction costs and schedules are presented. The physics goals of PHENIX collaboration have remained exactly as they were described in the CDR. Primary among these is the detection of a new phase of matter, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), and the measurement of its properties. The PHENIX experiment will measure many of the best potential QGP signatures to see if any or all of these physics variables show anomalies simultaneously due to the formation of the QGP.

  8. Impact in stability during sequential CDR grafting to construct camelid VHH antibodies against zinc oxide and gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ryota; Saito, Yutaro; Nakazawa, Hikaru; Hattori, Takamitsu; Kumagai, Izumi; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Makabe, Koki

    2018-01-22

    Biomolecules which recognize inorganic materials and metal surfaces gain much attention for creating new type of nanomaterials and sensors. 4F2, a camelid VHH antibody, recognizes ZnO surface and has been applied for sensor applications. 4F2 was constructed sequential CDR replacement on the parental VHH antibody, termed the Construction of Antibody by Integrating Grafting and Evolution Technology; CAnIGET procedure. Here, we evaluate the influence of CDR replacements during 4F2 generation using calorimetric technique. We found that the initial peptide grafting at CDR1 results in the stability reduction and subsequent CDR3 randomize and selection restore the stability during the construction of 4F2. Further examination using anti-gold VHH, AuE32, revealed that the final CDR3 randomize and selection step has little effect in stability while the initial CDR1 grafting reduces the stability as same as the case for 4F2. Our results showing here provide the detailed view of the stability alteration during the CAnIGET procedure. © The Authors 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  9. PHENIX CDR update: An experiment to be performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory relativistic heavy ion collider. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The PHENIX Conceptual Design Report Update (CDR Update) is intended for use together with the Conceptual Design Report (CDR). The CDR Update is a companion document to the CDR, and it describes the collaboration's progress since the CDR was submitted in January 1993. Therefore, this document concentrates on changes, refinements, and decisions that have been made over the past year. These documents together define the baseline PHENIX detector that the collaboration intends to build for operation at RHIC startup. In this chapter the current status of the detector and its motivation are briefly described. In Chapters 2 and 3 the detector and the physics performance are more fully developed. In Chapters 4 through 13 the details of the present design status, the technology choices, and the construction costs and schedules are presented. The physics goals of PHENIX collaboration have remained exactly as they were described in the CDR. Primary among these is the detection of a new phase of matter, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), and the measurement of its properties. The PHENIX experiment will measure many of the best potential QGP signatures to see if any or all of these physics variables show anomalies simultaneously due to the formation of the QGP

  10. Development of Risk Insights for Regulatory Review of a Near-Surface Disposal Facility for Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esh, D.W.; Ridge, A.C.; Thaggard, M.

    2006-01-01

    Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consult with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) about non-High Level Waste (HLW) determinations. In its consultative role, NRC performs technical reviews of DOE's waste determinations but does not have regulatory authority over DOE's waste disposal activities. The safety of disposal is evaluated by comparing predicted disposal facility performance to the performance objectives specified in NRC regulations for the disposal of low-level waste (10 CFR Part 61 Subpart C). The performance objectives contain criteria for protection of the public, protection of inadvertent intruders, protection of workers, and stability of the disposal site after closure. The potential radiological dose to receptors typically is evaluated with a performance assessment (PA) model that simulates the release of radionuclides from the disposal site, transport of radionuclides through the environment, and exposure of potential receptors to residual contamination for thousands of years. This paper describes NRC's development and use of independent performance assessment modeling to facilitate review of DOE's non-HLW determination for the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) at the Savannah River Site. NRC's review of the safety of near-surface disposal of radioactive waste at the SDF was facilitated and focused by risk insights developed with an independent PA model. The main components of NRC's performance assessment model are presented. The development of risk insights that allow the staff to focus review efforts on those areas that are most important to satisfying the performance objectives is discussed. Uncertainty analysis was performed of the full stochastic model using genetic variable selection algorithms. The results of the uncertainty analysis were then used to guide the development of simulations of other scenarios to understand the key risk

  11. Comparisons of Safety and Clinical Outcomes Between Multiple-level and Single-level Cervical Disk Replacement for Cervical Spondylosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lianghai; Tan, Mingsheng; Yang, Feng; Yi, Ping; Tang, Xiangsheng; Hao, Qingying

    2016-12-01

    This is a systematic review and meta-analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of multiple-level cervical disk replacement (CDR) over single-level CDR for the treatment of cervical spondylosis. Some authors advocate for the multiple-level CDR instead of anterior decompression and fusion in cervical multiple-level spondylosis. However, whether the efficacy and safety of multi-level CDR are as favorable as that of single-level CDR remains controversial. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases were searched up to November 2015 for controlled studies that compared the clinical outcomes of single-level and multiple-level CDR for the treatment of cervical spondylosis. The following outcomes were extracted and analyzed: prevalence of heterotopic ossification and reoperation, preoperative and postoperative Neck Disability Index scores, preoperative and postoperative Visual Analog Scale scores, and success rate using the Odom grading system. Ten studies involving 1402 patients were included: including 3 randomized controlled trials, 5 prospective studies, and 3 retrospective studies. No significant differences between single-level and multiple-level groups were found in terms of the prevalence of heterotopic ossification and reoperation rate, Neck Disability Index score, Visual Analog Scale score, and success rate using the Odom grading system. On the basis of this meta-analysis, clinical outcomes of multiple-level CDR are similar to those of single-level CDR for cervical spondylosis, which suggests the multiple-level CDR is as effective and safe as the single-level CDR. Nonetheless, more well-designed studies are needed for further evaluation.

  12. Comparative review of US Department of Energy CERCLA Federal Facility Agreements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, M.R.; Gephart, R.E.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Keller, J.F.; Waller, W.K.

    1989-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a comparison of the three FFAs executed by DOE and EPA. The report is intended to serve as a convenient reference guide for those responsible for drafting or reviewing future FFAs being considered by DOE. In addition, this report can provide the framework for the future analysis completed FFAs and aid in the assessment of the relative merits of approaches and provisions used for different sites. 13 tabs.

  13. Experiences of acute pain in children who present to a healthcare facility for treatment: a systematic review of qualitative evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Nicole; Tallon, Mary; McConigley, Ruth; Leslie, Gavin; Wilson, Sally

    2017-06-01

    Pain is a universal and complex phenomenon that is personal, subjective and specific. Despite growing knowledge in pediatric pain, management of children's pain remains sub-optimal and is linked to negative behavioral and physiological consequences later in life. As there is no synthesis of these studies, it was timely to undertake a systematic review. To identify, evaluate and synthesize the existing qualitative evidence on children's experiences of acute pain, including pain management, within a healthcare facility. Children aged four to 18 years (inclusive) attending a healthcare facility who experienced acute pain associated with any injury, medical condition or treatment. Children's experiences and perceptions of their acute pain, pain management and expectations of others in managing their pain. Studies on children's experiences of pain in the postoperative context were excluded as a systematic review exploring this phenomenon had previously been published. Studies reporting on children's experiences of chronic pain were also excluded. Any healthcare facility including general practitioners' surgeries, hospitals, emergency departments and outpatient clinics. Qualitative studies including phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research designs. Using a three-step search strategy, databases were searched in December 2015 to identify both published and unpublished articles from 2000 to 2015. Studies published in languages other than English were excluded. All studies that met the inclusion criteria were assessed by at least two independent reviewers for methodological quality using a standardized critical appraisal tool from the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-QARI). Data were extracted from the papers included in the review using standardized data extraction tool from JBI-QARI. Findings were pooled using JBI-QARI. Findings were rated according to their level of credibility and

  14. Educational intervention on physical restraint use in long-term care facilities – Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Huan Lan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available “Physical restraint” formerly used as a measure of protection for psychiatric patients is now widely used. However, existing studies showed that physical restraint not only has inadequate effect of protection but also has negative effects on residents. To analyzes the impact of educational program on the physical restraint use in long-term care facilities. Design: A systematic review with meta-analysis and meta-regression. Eight databases, including Cochrane Library, ProQuest, PubMed, EMBASE, EBSCO, Web of Science, Ovid Medline and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro, were searched up to January 2017. Eligible studies were classified by intervention and accessed for quality using the Quality Assessment Tool for quantitative studies. Sixteen research articles were eligible in the final review; 10 randomize control trail studies were included in the analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that the use of physical restraint was significantly less often in the experimental (education group (OR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.39 to 0.78, p < 0.001 compared to the control group. Meta-regression revealed the period of post education would have decreased the effect of the restraint educational program (β: 0.08, p = 0.002; instead, the longer education period and more times of education would have a stronger effect of reducing the use of physical restraint (β: −0.07, p < 0.001; β: −0.04, p = 0.056. The educational program had an effect on the reduced use of physical restraint. The results of meta-regression suggest that long-term care facilities should provide a continuous education program of physical restraint for caregivers.

  15. Invited review article: A 10 mK scanning probe microscopy facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Jae; Otte, Alexander F; Shvarts, Vladimir; Zhao, Zuyu; Kuk, Young; Blankenship, Steven R; Band, Alan; Hess, Frank M; Stroscio, Joseph A

    2010-12-01

    We describe the design, development and performance of a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) facility operating at a base temperature of 10 mK in magnetic fields up to 15 T. The microscope is cooled by a custom designed, fully ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible dilution refrigerator (DR) and is capable of in situ tip and sample exchange. Subpicometer stability at the tip-sample junction is achieved through three independent vibration isolation stages and careful design of the dilution refrigerator. The system can be connected to, or disconnected from, a network of interconnected auxiliary UHV chambers, which include growth chambers for metal and semiconductor samples, a field-ion microscope for tip characterization, and a fully independent additional quick access low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) system. To characterize the system, we present the cooling performance of the DR, vibrational, tunneling current, and tip-sample displacement noise measurements. In addition, we show the spectral resolution capabilities with tunneling spectroscopy results obtained on an epitaxial graphene sample resolving the quantum Landau levels in a magnetic field, including the sublevels corresponding to the lifting of the electron spin and valley degeneracies.

  16. Barriers to obstetric care at health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa--a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyei-Nimakoh, Minerva; Carolan-Olah, Mary; McCann, Terence V

    2015-04-23

    Since the launch of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by the United Nations in 2000, the global community has intensified efforts to reduce adverse maternal health outcomes, especially, in sub-Saharan Africa. Despite these efforts, there is an increasing concern that the decline in maternal deaths has been less than optimal, even for women who receive birthing care in health facilities. High maternal deaths have been attributed to a variety of issues such as poor quality of care, inadequate resources, poor infrastructure, and inaccessibility to healthcare services. In other words, even in settings where they are available, many women do not receive life-saving obstetric care, when needed, despite the fact that basic and comprehensive obstetric care is widely recognized as a key to meeting maternal health goals. It is important to understand the common challenges that this developing region is facing in order to ensure a more rapid decline in adverse maternal health outcomes. The aim of this review is to synthesize literature on barriers to obstetric care at health institutions which focuses on sub-Saharan Africa, the region that is most affected by severe maternal morbidity and mortality. This review follows guidelines by the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) checklist. An electronic search of published literature will be conducted to identify studies which examined barriers to health facility-based obstetric care in sub-Saharan Africa. PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Scopus databases will be searched. Published articles in English, dated between 2000 and 2014, will be included. Combinations of search terms such as obstetric care, access, barriers, developing countries, and sub-Saharan Africa will be used to locate related articles, and eligible ones retained for data abstraction. A narrative synthesis approach will be employed to synthesize the evidence and explore

  17. NJP VOlume 38 Number 4 PDF.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    communities. With time, the missionary societies, Catholic and. Presbyterian, provided health facilities in Lagos, ... constructed with grass thatch, bamboo and mud were built to meet military needs. Later European. Hospitals .... The Structural Adjustment Programme (SAP). Funding of the National Health System ü ü ü ü. 148 ...

  18. JMBR VOLUME 15 Number 2 Decemebr 2016 - correction.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fine Print

    eleven tertiary health facilities spread across the six geo-political ... 7 rapid HIV test kits, etc. Without specific intervention, the relatively high prevalence of HIV infection in Benin City increases risk of. MTCT of HIV infection, in Benin City. This creates an urgent ... from the Family Health International. Baseline Assessment tool ...

  19. Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Washington Facilities (Intrastate) Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howerton, Jack

    1984-11-01

    This report was prepared for BPA in fulfillment of section 1004 (b)(1) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, to review the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation program at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Projects addressed are: Merwin Dam; Swift Project; Yale Project; Cowlitz River; Boundary Dam; Box Canyon Dam; Lake Chelan; Condit Project; Enloe Project; Spokane River; Tumwater and Dryden Dam; Yakima; and Naches Project.

  20. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D. C.

    2004-12-31

    This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a

  1. The physics benchmark processes for the detector performance studies used in CLIC CDR Volume 3

    CERN Document Server

    Allanach, B.J.; Desch, K.; Ellis, J.; Giudice, G.; Grefe, C.; Kraml, S.; Lastovicka, T.; Linssen, L.; Marschall, J.; Martin, S.P.; Muennich, A.; Poss, S.; Roloff, P.; Simon, F.; Strube, J.; Thomson, M.; Wells, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    This note describes the detector benchmark processes used in volume 3 of the CLIC conceptual design report (CDR), which explores a staged construction and operation of the CLIC accelerator. The goal of the detector benchmark studies is to assess the performance of the CLIC ILD and CLIC SiD detector concepts for different physics processes and at a few CLIC centre-of-mass energies.

  2. Evaluation of PERSIANN-CDR for Meteorological Drought Monitoring over China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Guo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks–Climate Data Record (PERSIANN-CDR is analyzed for the assessment of meteorological drought. The evaluation is conducted over China at 0.5° spatial resolution against a ground-based gridded China monthly Precipitation Analysis Product (CPAP from 1983 to 2014 (32 years. The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI at various time scales (1 month to 12 months is calculated for detecting drought events. The results show that PERSIANN-CDR depicts similar drought behavior as the ground-based CPAP in terms of capturing the spatial and temporal patterns of drought events over eastern China, where the intensity of gauge networks and the frequency of droughts are high. 6-month SPI shows the best agreement with CPAP in identifying drought months. However, large differences between PERSIANN-CDR and CPAP in depicting drought patterns and identifying specific drought events are found over northwestern China, particularly in Xinjiang and Qinghai-Tibet Plateau region. Factors behind this may be due to the relatively sparse gauge networks, the complicated terrain and the performance of PERSIANN algorithm.

  3. A normal T cell receptor beta CDR3 length distribution in patients with APECED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Heikki J; Laakso, Sini; Salminen, Jukka T; Arstila, T Petteri; Tuulasvaara, Anni

    2015-06-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is caused by mutations in the AIRE gene. Murine studies suggest that AIRE controls thymic expression of tissue-restricted antigens, its absence allowing nonselected autoreactive cells to escape. We tested this in humans using the TCRβ CDR3 length repertoire as a surrogate of thymic selection, as it shortens during the process. Analysis of healthy thymuses showed an altogether 1.9 base pair shortening, starting at the CD4(+)CD8(+)CD3(low) stage and continuing until the CD4(+) subset, likely encompassing both the positive and negative selection. Comparison of five APECED patients with eight healthy controls showed a skewed repertoire with oligoclonal expansions in the patients' CD4(+) and CD8(+) populations. The average CDR3 length, however, was normal and unaffected by the skewing. This was also true of the hypothesized autoreactive CD8(+)CD45RA(+) population. We failed to detect a subset with an abnormally long CDR3 repertoire, as would be predicted by a failure in selection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of post-event avoidance behavior on commercial facilities sector venues-literature review.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samsa, M. E.; Baldwin, T. E.; Berry, M. S.; Guzowski, L. B.; Martinez-Moyano, I.; Nieves, A. L.; Ramarasad, A. (Decision and Information Sciences)

    2011-03-24

    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 (9/11), focused a great deal of interest and concern on how individual and social perceptions of risk change behavior and subsequently affect commercial sector venues. Argonne conducted a review of the literature to identify studies that quantify the direct and indirect economic consequences of avoidance behaviors that result from terrorist attacks. Despite a growing amount of literature addressing terrorism impacts, relatively little is known about the causal relationships between risk perception, human avoidance behaviors, and the economic effects on commercial venues. Nevertheless, the technical and academic literature does provide some evidence, both directly and by inference, of the level and duration of post-event avoidance behaviors on commercial venues. Key findings are summarized in this Executive Summary. Also included as an appendix is a more detailed summary table of literature findings reproduced from the full report.

  5. Color coding of televised task elements in remote work: a literature review with practical recommendations for a fuel reprocessing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M.M.; Preston-Anderson, A.

    1981-11-01

    The experimental literature on the effects of color visual displays was reviewed with particular reference to the performance of remote work in a Hot Experimental Facility (HEF) using real scene closed-circult television systems. It was also reviewed with more general reference to the broader range of work-related issues of operator learning and preference, and display specifications. Color has been shown to enhance the performance of tasks requiring search and location and may also enhance tracking/transportation tasks. However, both HEF large-volume searching and tracking can be computer augmented, alleviating some of the necessity for a color code to assist an operator. Although color enhances long-term memory and is preferred to black and white displays, it has not been shown to have a specific advantage in the performance of unique tasks (where computer augmentation is more problematic and visual input to operator is critical). Practical display specifications are discussed with reference to hue and size of color code, target size, ambient illumination, multiple displays, and coatings. The authors conclude that the disadvantages to color television in the HEF far outweigh any possible advantages and recommend the use of high-resolution black and white systems, unless future experiments unequivocally indicate that (1) color is superior to black and white for in-situ task performance or (2) it is imperative in terms of long-range psychological well-being

  6. Review of project definition studies of possible on-site uses of superconducting super collider assets and facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This document reports on the results of a peer review and evaluation of studies made of potential uses of assets from the terminated Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. These project definition studies focused on nine areas of use of major assets and facilities at the SSC site near Waxahachie, Texas. The studies were undertaken as part of the effort to maximize the value of the investment made in the SSC and were supported by two sets of grants, one to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNRLC) and the second to various universities and other institutions for studies of ideas raised by a public call for expressions of interest. The Settlement Agreement, recently signed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and TNRLC, provides for a division of SSC property. As part of the goal of maximizing the value of the SSC investment, the findings contained in this report are thus addressed to officials in both the Department and TNRLC. In addition, this review had several other goals: to provide constructive feedback to those doing the studies; to judge the benefits and feasibility (including funding prospects) of the projects studied; and to help worthy projects become reality by matching projects with possible funding sources.

  7. Review of project definition studies of possible on-site uses of superconducting super collider assets and facilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    This document reports on the results of a peer review and evaluation of studies made of potential uses of assets from the terminated Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. These project definition studies focused on nine areas of use of major assets and facilities at the SSC site near Waxahachie, Texas. The studies were undertaken as part of the effort to maximize the value of the investment made in the SSC and were supported by two sets of grants, one to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNRLC) and the second to various universities and other institutions for studies of ideas raised by a public call for expressions of interest. The Settlement Agreement, recently signed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and TNRLC, provides for a division of SSC property. As part of the goal of maximizing the value of the SSC investment, the findings contained in this report are thus addressed to officials in both the Department and TNRLC. In addition, this review had several other goals: to provide constructive feedback to those doing the studies; to judge the benefits and feasibility (including funding prospects) of the projects studied; and to help worthy projects become reality by matching projects with possible funding sources

  8. Review of project definition studies of possible on-site uses of superconducting super collider assets and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    This document reports on the results of a peer review and evaluation of studies made of potential uses of assets from the terminated Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. These project definition studies focused on nine areas of use of major assets and facilities at the SSC site near Waxahachie, Texas. The studies were undertaken as part of the effort to maximize the value of the investment made in the SSC and were supported by two sets of grants, one to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNRLC) and the second to various universities and other institutions for studies of ideas raised by a public call for expressions of interest. The Settlement Agreement, recently signed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and TNRLC, provides for a division of SSC property. As part of the goal of maximizing the value of the SSC investment, the findings contained in this report are thus addressed to officials in both the Department and TNRLC. In addition, this review had several other goals: to provide constructive feedback to those doing the studies; to judge the benefits and feasibility (including funding prospects) of the projects studied; and to help worthy projects become reality by matching projects with possible funding sources

  9. Review of project definition studies of possible on-site uses of superconducting super collider assets and facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This document reports on the results of a peer review and evaluation of studies made of potential uses of assets from the terminated Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. These project definition studies focused on nine areas of use of major assets and facilities at the SSC site near Waxahachie, Texas. The studies were undertaken as part of the effort to maximize the value of the investment made in the SSC and were supported by two sets of grants, one to the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNRLC) and the second to various universities and other institutions for studies of ideas raised by a public call for expressions of interest. The Settlement Agreement, recently signed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and TNRLC, provides for a division of SSC property. As part of the goal of maximizing the value of the SSC investment, the findings contained in this report are thus addressed to officials in both the Department and TNRLC. In addition, this review had several other goals: to provide constructive feedback to those doing the studies; to judge the benefits and feasibility (including funding prospects) of the projects studied; and to help worthy projects become reality by matching projects with possible funding sources.

  10. Complications in cosmetic laser surgery: a review of 494 Food and Drug Administration Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelickson, Zachary; Schram, Sarah; Zelickson, Brian

    2014-04-01

    Complications in cosmetic laser and energy based surgery affect a number of patients every year and may cause scars, burns, blisters, and pigmentation damage. To evaluate documented complications in cosmetic laser- and energy-based surgeries, determine the most common errors, and recommend a simple procedural sequence to reduce patient complications. U.S. Food and Drug Administration Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience Adverse Event Reports after cosmetic laser- and energy-based procedures with varied devices were reviewed (N = 494). The laser manufacturer, device used, event type, injury type, cause, operator, and indication for treatment for each case were identified. In the 494 cases reviewed between 2006 and 2011, the most common complications were burns, scarring, blistering, pigmentation damage, and infection. The most common cause of these complications was user error by a healthcare provider (30%), followed by laser device malfunction (20%) and patient error (4%). Indications for treatment were unknown for 69% of cases, and 38% of the cases were an unknown cause of complication. User error was a major factor in laser surgery complications. To improve safety and reduce errors, we propose the implementation of a procedural sequence for cosmetic laser surgery. © 2014 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Oral health care in older people in long term care facilities: a systematic review of implementation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weening-Verbree, L; Huisman-de Waal, G; van Dusseldorp, L; van Achterberg, T; Schoonhoven, L

    2013-04-01

    Oral hygiene is necessary to maintain oral health and quality of life. However, the oral hygiene and the oral health care of older people in long term care facilities are poor. This indicates that care is not in compliance with the available guidelines and protocols, and stresses the importance of a clear evidence-based implementation strategy to improve oral health care. The aim of this study is to review implementation strategies used to promote or improve oral health care for older people in long term care facilities from the perspective of behaviour change, to code strategy content at the level of determinants, and to explore their effectiveness. Systematic review of literature. The digital databases of the Cochrane Library, PubMed and Cinahl have been searched up to September 2011 for relevant articles. After a systematic selection process, included studies were quality assessed by three researchers. We extracted the study characteristics using the EPOC Data Collection Checklist and Data Abstraction Form. Strategy content was extracted and coded by using the Coding Manual for Behavioural Change Techniques. This manual groups the behaviour change techniques under relevant behavioural determinants. Twenty studies were included in this review. Implementation strategies were delivered by dental hygienists or dentists. Oral health care was performed by nurses and nurse assistants in all studies. All studies addressed knowledge, mostly operationalized as one educational session. Knowledge was most often combined with interventions addressing self efficacy. Implementation strategies aimed at knowledge (providing general information), self-efficacy (modelling) or facilitation of behaviour (providing materials to facilitate behaviour) were most often identified as successful in improving oral health. Knowledge, self-efficacy and facilitation of behaviour are determinants that are often addressed in implementation strategies for successful improvement of oral health

  12. Regulatory review and confidence building in post-closure safety assessments and safety cases for near surface disposal facilities, IAEA ASAM coordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belfadhel, M.B.; Bennett, D.G.; Gonzales, A.; Metcalf, P.; Nys, V.; Simeonov, G.; Zeleznik, N.

    2006-01-01

    The IAEA successfully concluded a Coordinated Research Program (CRP) called ISAM, which focused on the development of an Improved Safety Assessment Methodology for near-surface radioactive waste disposal facilities (1997-2002). In November 2002, and as an extension of ISAM, the IAEA launched a new CRP called ASAM, designed to test the Application of the Safety Assessment Methodology by considering a range of near surface disposal facilities. The ASAM work programme is being implemented by three application working groups and two cross-cutting working groups. The application working groups are testing the applicability of the ISAM methodology by assessing an existing disposal facility in Hungary, a copper mine in South Africa, and a hypothetical facility containing heterogenous wastes, such as disused sealed sources. The first cross-cutting working group is addressing a number of technical issues that are common to all near-surface disposal facilities, while the second group, the Regulatory Review Working Group (RRWG) is developing guidance on how to gain confidence in safety assessments and safety cases, and on how to conduct regulatory reviews of safety assessments. This paper provides a brief overview of the work being conducted by the Regulatory Review Working Group. (author)

  13. Regulatory review and confidence building in post-closure safety assessments and safety cases for near surface disposal facilities-IAEA ASAM coordinated research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, A.; Simeonov, G.; Bennett, D.G.; Nys, V.; Ben Belfadhel, M.

    2005-01-01

    Some years ago, the IAEA successfully concluded a Coordinated Research Program (CRP) called Islam, which focussed on the development of an Improved Safety Assessment Methodology for near-surface radioactive waste disposal facilities. In November 2002, and as an extension of ISAM, the IAEA launched a new CRP called ASAM, designed to test the Application of the Safety Assessment Methodology by considering a range of near-surface disposal facilities. The ASAM work programme is being implemented by three application working groups and two cross-cutting working groups. The application working groups are testing the applicability of the ISAM methodology by assessing an existing disposal facility in Hungary, a copper mine in South Africa, and a hypothetical facility containing heterogenous wastes, such as disused sealed sources. The first cross-cutting working group is addressing a number of technical issues that are common to all near-surface disposal facilities, while the second group, the Regulatory Review Working Group (RRWG) is developing guidance on how to gain confidence in safety assessments and safety cases, and on how to conduct regulatory reviews of safety assessments. This paper provides a brief overview of the work being conducted by the Regulatory Review Working Group. (author)

  14. Review of analytical results from the proposed agent disposal facility site, Aberdeen Proving Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, K.L.; Reed, L.L.; Myers, S.W.; Shepard, L.T.; Sydelko, T.G.

    1997-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory reviewed the analytical results from 57 composite soil samples collected in the Bush River area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. A suite of 16 analytical tests involving 11 different SW-846 methods was used to detect a wide range of organic and inorganic contaminants. One method (BTEX) was considered redundant, and two {open_quotes}single-number{close_quotes} methods (TPH and TOX) were found to lack the required specificity to yield unambiguous results, especially in a preliminary investigation. Volatile analytes detected at the site include 1, 1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene, all of which probably represent residual site contamination from past activities. Other volatile analytes detected include toluene, tridecane, methylene chloride, and trichlorofluoromethane. These compounds are probably not associated with site contamination but likely represent cross-contamination or, in the case of tridecane, a naturally occurring material. Semivolatile analytes detected include three different phthalates and low part-per-billion amounts of the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. The pesticide could represent residual site contamination from past activities, and the phthalates are likely due, in part, to cross-contamination during sample handling. A number of high-molecular-weight hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon derivatives were detected and were probably naturally occurring compounds. 4 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  15. Review on chemical processes around the facilities in deep underground and study on numerical approach to evaluate them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Masataka

    2003-01-01

    The facilities for radioactive waste repositories are constructed in deep underground. Various chemical reactions including microbial activities may affect the long-term performance of the barrier system. An advancement of the evaluation method for the long-term behavior of barrier materials is desired. One of the efficient approaches is numerical simulation based on modeling of chemical processes. In the first part of this report, chemical processes and microbial reactions that can affect the performance of facilities in deep underground are reviewed. For example, dissolution and precipitation of minerals composing bentonite and rock are caused by highly alkaline water from cementitious materials. Numerical approaches to the chemical processes are also studied. Most chemical processes are reactions between groundwater (or solutes in it) and minerals composing barrier materials. So they can be simulated by coupled reaction rate transport analyses. Some analysis codes are developed and applied to problems in radioactive waste disposal. Microbial reaction rate can be modeled using the growth equation of microorganisms. In order to evaluate the performance of the barrier system after altered by chemical processes, not only the change in composition but also properties of altered materials is required to be obtained as output of numerical simulation. If the relationships between reaction rate and material properties are obtained, time history and spatial distribution of material properties can also be obtained by the coupled reaction rate transport analysis. At present, modeling study on the relationships between them is not sufficient, and obtaining such relationships using both theoretical and experimental approaches are also an important research target. (author)

  16. Hysterectomy at a Canadian tertiary care facility: results of a one year retrospective review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorwill R Hugh

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the indications for and approach to hysterectomy at Kingston General Hospital (KGH, a teaching hospital affiliated with Queen's University at Kingston, Ontario. In particular, in light of current literature and government standards suggesting the superiority of vaginal versus abdominal approaches and a high number of concurrent oophorectomies, the aim was to examine the circumstances in which concurrent oophorectomies were performed and to compare abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy outcomes. Methods A retrospective chart audit of 372 consecutive hysterectomies performed in 2001 was completed. Data regarding patient characteristics, process of care and outcomes were collected. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests and linear and logistic regression. Results Average age was 48.5 years, mean body mass index (BMI was 28.6, the mean length of stay (LOS was 5.2 days using an abdominal approach and 3.0 days using a vaginal approach without laparoscopy. 14% of hysterectomies were performed vaginally, 5.9% were laparoscopically assisted vaginal hysterectomies and the rest were abdominal hysterectomies. The most common indication was dysfunctional or abnormal uterine bleeding (37%. The average age of those that had an oophorectomy (removal of both ovaries was 50.8 years versus 44.3 years for those that did not (p Conclusions A significant reduction in LOS was found using the vaginal approach. Both the patient and the health care system may benefit from the tendency towards an increased use of vaginal hysterectomies. The audit process demonstrated the usefulness of an on-going review mechanism to examine trends associated with common surgical procedures.

  17. Limited electricity access in health facilities of sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of data on electricity access, sources, and reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair-Rohani, Heather; Zukor, Karen; Bonjour, Sophie; Wilburn, Susan; Kuesel, Annette C; Hebert, Ryan; Fletcher, Elaine R

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Access to electricity is critical to health care delivery and to the overarching goal of universal health coverage. Data on electricity access in health care facilities are rarely collected and have never been reported systematically in a multi-country study. We conducted a systematic review of available national data on electricity access in health care facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: We identified publicly-available data from nationally representative facility surveys through a systematic review of articles in PubMed, as well as through websites of development agencies, ministries of health, and national statistics bureaus. To be included in our analysis, data sets had to be collected in or after 2000, be nationally representative of a sub-Saharan African country, cover both public and private health facilities, and include a clear definition of electricity access. Results: We identified 13 health facility surveys from 11 sub-Saharan African countries that met our inclusion criteria. On average, 26% of health facilities in the surveyed countries reported no access to electricity. Only 28% of health care facilities, on average, had reliable electricity among the 8 countries reporting data. Among 9 countries, an average of 7% of facilities relied solely on a generator. Electricity access in health care facilities increased by 1.5% annually in Kenya between 2004 and 2010, and by 4% annually in Rwanda between 2001 and 2007. Conclusions: Energy access for health care facilities in sub-Saharan African countries varies considerably. An urgent need exists to improve the geographic coverage, quality, and frequency of data collection on energy access in health care facilities. Standardized tools should be used to collect data on all sources of power and supply reliability. The United Nations Secretary-General's “Sustainable Energy for All” initiative provides an opportunity to comprehensively monitor energy access in health care

  18. ATBUJET VOLUME 7 NO. 1 Final.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sharpe. Index, Treynor Index ... namely income and capital gain. The rate of returns for each REITS was calculated, the return on the ..... Corporate income taxes and the cost of capital; a correction. American. Economic Review, 53(3), 433 - 43 .

  19. Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 9. Methodologies for review of the health and safety aspects of proposed nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel sites and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V.; Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    This report sets forth methodologies for review of the health and safety aspects of proposed nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel sites and facilities for electric power generation. The review is divided into a Notice of Intention process and an Application for Certification process, in accordance with the structure to be used by the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, the first emphasizing site-specific considerations, the second examining the detailed facility design as well. The Notice of Intention review is divided into three possible stages: an examination of emissions and site characteristics, a basic impact analysis, and an assessment of public impacts. The Application for Certification review is divided into five possible stages: a review of the Notice of Intention treatment, review of the emission control equipment, review of the safety design, review of the general facility design, and an overall assessment of site and facility acceptability

  20. Safety cases for radioactive waste disposal facilities: guidance on confidence building and regulatory review IAEA-ASAM co-ordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Belfadhel, M.; Bennett, D.G.; Metcalf, P.; Nys, V.; Goldammer, W.

    2008-01-01

    The IAEA has been conducting two co-ordinated research programmes (CRPs) projects to develop and apply improved safety assessment methodologies for near-surface radioactive waste disposal facilities. The more recent of these projects, ASAM (application of safety assessment methodologies), included a Regulatory Review Working Group (RRWG) which has been working to develop guidance on how to gain confidence in safety assessments and safety cases, and on how to conduct regulatory reviews of safety assessments. This paper provides an overview of the ASAM project, focusing on the safety case and regulatory review. (authors)

  1. vol. 11 no 1 june 2012 - correction article 7.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    2012-06-01

    Jun 1, 2012 ... JMBR: A Peer-review Journal of Biomedical Sciences. June 2012, Vol. .... He apparently tolerated the procedure well initially, only ... common ventricular chamber via a common mildly regurgitant atrio- ventricular valve (Fig V). The common ventricle has fine trabeculations. There is a smaller subaortic right- ...

  2. NJP Volume 38 Number 1 PDF.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    progress. While authors need the visibility and the academic points which publications in journals provide, they (authors) must at all times consider the greater interest of the larger society. Editors and reviewers have limited capacity to pick up duplicate, redundant or even plagiarized papers so that, ultimately, the integrity of ...

  3. Assessment of the proportion of neonates and children in low and middle income countries with access to a healthcare facility: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandran Aruna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comprehensive antenatal, perinatal and early postnatal care has the potential to significantly reduce the 3.58 million neonatal deaths that occur annually worldwide. This paper systematically reviews data on the proportion of neonates and children Methods For this paper, "utilization" was used as a proxy for "access" to a healthcare facility, and the term "facility" was used for any clinic or hospital outside of a person's home staffed by a "medical professional". A systematic literature search was conducted for published studies of children up to 5 years of age that included the neonatal age group with an illness or illness symptoms in which health facility utilization was quantified. In addition, information from available Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS was extracted. Results The initial broad search yielded 2,239 articles, of which 14 presented relevant data. From the community-based neonatal studies conducted in the Southeast Asia region with the goal of enhancing care-seeking for neonates with sepsis, the 10-48% of sick neonates in the studies' control arms utilized a healthcare facility. Data from cross-sectional surveys involving young children indicate that 12 to 86% utilizing healthcare facilities when sick. From the DHS surveys, a global median of 58.1% of infants Conclusions There is a scarcity of data regarding the access to facility-based care for sick neonates/young children in many areas of the world; it was not possible to generalize an overall number of neonates or young children that utilize a healthcare facility when showing signs and symptoms of illness. The estimate ranges were broad, and there was a paucity of data from some regions. It is imperative that researchers, advocates, and policy makers join together to better understand the factors affecting health care utilization/access for newborns in different settings and what the barriers are that prevent children from being taken to a facility in a

  4. Turkish Cloud-Radiation Database (CRD) and Its Application with CDR Bayesian Probability Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztopal, A.; Mugnai, A.; Casella, D.; Formenton, M.; Sano, P.; Sonmez, I.; Sen, Z.; Hsaf Team

    2010-12-01

    ABSTRACT It is rather a very difficult task to determine ground rainfall amounts from few Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMI/S) channels. Although ground rainfall cannot be observed from the space directly, but knowledge about the cloud physics helps to estimate the amound of ground rainfall. SSMI/S includes so much information about the atmospheric structure, however it cannot provide cloud micro-physical structural information. In such a situation, in the rainfall algorithm, besides the SSMI/S data, it is necessary to incorporate cloud micro-physical properties from an external data source. These properties can be obtained quite simply by the help of Cloud Resolving Model (CRM). Later, in addition to all available data, also micro-physical properties obtained from Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) help to determine the SSMI/S brightness temperatures (Brightness temperatures - TBs), which can then be correlated with Cloud-Radiation Database (CRD) data generation. SSMI/S satellite data and CDR provide a common basis for rainfall prediction procedure through CDR Bayesian probability algorithm, which combines the two sets of data in a scientific manner. The first applications of this algorithm, which is being used up today, is due to various researchers. In this work, in order to establish a reflection of available data processing CDR CRM University of Wisconsin - Non-hydrostatic Modeling System (UW-NMS) model is employed, which is first developed by Prof. Gregory J. Tripoli. It is also used by Turkish Meteorological Service by benefiting from radar network data, and finally 14 simulations are realized in this study. Moreover, one case study is fulfilled by using a 3X3 spatial filtering, and then radar data and result of CDR Bayesian probability algorithm are compared with each other. On 9 September 2009 at 03:40 GMT rainfall event on comparatively flat area matches far better with the retrieval values and hence the spatial rainfall occurrence extent and

  5. Review on conformance of JMTR reactor facility to safety design examination guides for water-cooled reactors for test and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Naka, Michihiro; Sakuta, Yoshiyuki; Hori, Naohiko; Matsui, Yoshinori; Miyazawa, Masataka

    2009-03-01

    The safety design examination guides for water-cooled reactors for test and research are formulated as fundamental judgements on the basic design validity for licensing from a viewpoint of the safety. Taking the refurbishment opportunity of the JMTR, the conformance of the JMTR reactor facility to current safety design examination guides was reviewed with licensing documents, annexes and related documents. As a result, it was found that licensing documents fully satisfied the requirements of the current guides. Moreover, it was found that the JMTR reactor facility itself also satisfied the guides requirements as well as the safety performance, since the facility with safety function such as structure, systems, devices had been installed based on the licensing documents under the permission by the regulation authority. Important devices for safety have been produced under authorization of regulating authority. Therefore, it was confirmed that the licensing was conformed to guides, and that the JMTR has enough performance. (author)

  6. HIV policy implementation in two health and demographic surveillance sites in Uganda: findings from a national policy review, health facility surveys and key informant interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRobie, Ellen; Wringe, Alison; Nakiyingi-Miiro, Jessica; Kiweewa, Francis; Lutalo, Tom; Nakigozi, Gertrude; Todd, Jim; Eaton, Jeffrey William; Zaba, Basia; Church, Kathryn

    2017-04-05

    Successful HIV testing, care and treatment policy implementation is essential for realising the reductions in morbidity and mortality those policies are designed to target. While adoption of new HIV policies is rapid, less is known about the facility-level implementation of new policies and the factors influencing this. We assessed implementation of national policies about HIV testing, treatment and retention at health facilities serving two health and demographic surveillance sites (HDSS) (10 in Kyamulibwa, 14 in Rakai). Ugandan Ministry of Health HIV policy documents were reviewed in 2013, and pre-determined indicators were extracted relating to the content and nature of guidance on HIV service provision. Facility-level policy implementation was assessed via a structured questionnaire administered to in-charge staff from each health facility. Implementation of policies was classified as wide (≥75% facilities), partial (26-74% facilities) or minimal (≤25% facilities). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with key informants (policy-makers, implementers, researchers) to identify factors influencing implementation; data were analysed using the Framework Method of thematic analysis. Most policies were widely implemented in both HDSS (free testing, free antiretroviral treatment (ART), WHO first-line regimen as standard, Option B+). Both had notable implementation gaps for policies relating to retention on treatment (availability of nutritional supplements, support groups or isoniazid preventive therapy). Rakai implemented more policies relating to provision of antiretroviral treatment than Kyamulibwa and performed better on quality of care indicators, such as frequency of stock-outs. Factors facilitating implementation were donor investment and support, strong scientific evidence, low policy complexity, phased implementation and effective planning. Limited human resources, infrastructure and health management information systems were perceived as major

  7. BCR CDR3 length distributions differ between blood and spleen and between old and young patients, and TCR distributions can be used to detect myelodysplastic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickman, Yishai; Mehr, Ramit; Dunn-Walters, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) is the most hyper-variable region in B cell receptor (BCR) and T cell receptor (TCR) genes, and the most critical structure in antigen recognition and thereby in determining the fates of developing and responding lymphocytes. There are millions of different TCR Vβ chain or BCR heavy chain CDR3 sequences in human blood. Even now, when high-throughput sequencing becomes widely used, CDR3 length distributions (also called spectratypes) are still a much quicker and cheaper method of assessing repertoire diversity. However, distribution complexity and the large amount of information per sample (e.g. 32 distributions of the TCRα chain, and 24 of TCRβ) calls for the use of machine learning tools for full exploration. We have examined the ability of supervised machine learning, which uses computational models to find hidden patterns in predefined biological groups, to analyze CDR3 length distributions from various sources, and distinguish between experimental groups. We found that (a) splenic BCR CDR3 length distributions are characterized by low standard deviations and few local maxima, compared to peripheral blood distributions; (b) healthy elderly people's BCR CDR3 length distributions can be distinguished from those of the young; and (c) a machine learning model based on TCR CDR3 distribution features can detect myelodysplastic syndrome with approximately 93% accuracy. Overall, we demonstrate that using supervised machine learning methods can contribute to our understanding of lymphocyte repertoire diversity. (paper)

  8. Conceptual design of the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paisner, J.A.; Kumpan, S.A.; Lowdermilk, W.H.; Boyes, J.D.; Sorem, M.

    1995-01-01

    DOE commissioned a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in January 1993 as part of a Key Decision Zero (KDO), justification of Mission Need. Motivated by the progress to date by the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program in meeting the Nova Technical Contract goals established by the National Academy of Sciences in 1989, the Secretary requested a design using a solid-state laser driver operating at the third harmonic (0.35 μm) of neodymium (Nd) glass. The participating ICF laboratories signed a Memorandum of Agreement in August 1993, and established a Project organization, including a technical team from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics at the University of Rochester. Since then, we completed the NIF conceptual design, based on standard construction at a generic DOE Defense Program's site, and issued a 7,000-page, 27-volume CDR in May 1994.2 Over the course of the conceptual design study, several other key documents were generated, including a Facilities Requirements Document, a Conceptual Design Scope and Plan, a Target Physics Design Document, a Laser Design Cost Basis Document, a Functional Requirements Document, an Experimental Plan for Indirect Drive Ignition, and a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) Document. DOE used the PHA to categorize the NIF as a low-hazard, non-nuclear facility. On October 21, 1994 the Secretary of Energy issued a Key Decision One (KD1) for the NIF, which approved the Project and authorized DOE to request Office of Management and Budget-approval for congressional line-item FY 1996 NIF funding for preliminary engineering design and for National Environmental Policy Act activities. In addition, the Secretary declared Livermore as the preferred site for constructing the NIF. The Project will cost approximately $1.1 billion and will be completed at the end of FY 2002

  9. CMDT E.G.M. ALEXANDER, CMDT G.K.B. BARREN AND CDR A.A. ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CMDT E.G.M. ALEXANDER, CMDT G.K.B.. BARREN AND CDR A.A. BATEMAN: SOUTH. AFRICAN ORDERS DECORATIONS AND. MEDALS (160pp). This book was written by authors representing the SA Army, Air Force and Navy each an auth- ority in his field, and is the standard reference on the subject of South Africa's ...

  10. Review of emergency obstetric care interventions in health facilities in the Upper East Region of Ghana: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyei-Onanjiri, Minerva; Carolan-Olah, Mary; Awoonor-Williams, John Koku; McCann, Terence V

    2018-03-15

    Maternal morbidity and mortality is most prevalent in resource-poor settings such as sub-Saharan Africa and southern Asia. In sub-Saharan Africa, Ghana is one of the countries still facing particular challenges in reducing its maternal morbidity and mortality. Access to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) interventions has been identified as a means of improving maternal health outcomes. Assessing the range of interventions provided in health facilities is, therefore, important in determining capacity to treat obstetric emergencies. The aim of this study was to examine the availability of emergency obstetric care interventions in the Upper East Region of Ghana. A cross-sectional survey of 120 health facilities was undertaken. Status of emergency obstetric care was assessed through an interviewer administered questionnaire to directors/in-charge officers of maternity care units in selected facilities. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Eighty per cent of health facilities did not meet the criteria for provision of emergency obstetric care. Comparatively, private health facilities generally provided EmOC interventions less frequently than public health facilities. Other challenges identified include inadequate skill mix of maternity health personnel, poor referral processes, a lack of reliable communication systems and poor emergency transport systems. Multiple factors combine to limit women's access to a range of essential maternal health services. The availability of EmOC interventions was found to be low across the region; however, EmOC facilities could be increased by nearly one-third through modest investments in some existing facilities. Also, the key challenges identified in this study can be improved by enhancing pre-existing health system structures such as Community-based Health Planning and Services (CHPS), training more midwifery personnel, strengthening in-service training and implementation of referral audits as part of health service

  11. Device-Related Adverse Events During Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: Review of the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neel H; Schulman, Ariel A; Bloom, Jonathan B; Uppaluri, Nikil; Phillips, John L; Konno, Sensuke; Choudhury, Muhammad; Eshghi, Majid

    2017-10-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) is an established technique for removal of large stones from the upper urinary tract. It is a complex multistep procedure requiring several classes of instruments that are subject to operator misuse and device malfunction. We report device-related adverse events during PCNL from the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database using a recently developed standardized classification system. The MAUDE database was queried for "percutaneous nephrolithotomy" from 2006 to 2016. The circumstances and patient complications associated with classes of devices used during PCNL were identified. We then utilized a novel MAUDE classification system to categorize clinical events. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify associations between device classes and severe adverse events. A total of 218 device-related events were reported. The most common classes included: lithotripter 53 (24.3%), wires 43 (19.7%), balloon dilators 30 (13.8%), and occlusion balloons 28 (12.8%). Reported patient complications included need for a second procedure 12 (28.6%), bleeding 8 (19.0%), retained fragments 7 (16.7%), prolonged procedure 4 (9.5%), ureteral injury 2 (4.8%), and conversion to an open procedure 3 (7.1%). Using a MAUDE classification system, 176 complications (81%) were Level I (mild/none), 26 (12%) were Level II (moderate), 15 (7%) were Level III (severe), and 1 (0.5%) was Level IV (life threatening). On univariate analysis, balloon dilators had the highest risk of Level II-IV complications compared with the other device classes [odds ratio: 4.33, confidence interval: 1.978, 9.493, p < 0.001]. The device was evaluated by the manufacturer in 93 (42.7%) cases, with 54.8% of reviewed cases listing the source of malfunction as misuse by the operator. PCNL is subject to a wide range of device-related adverse events. A MAUDE classification system is useful for standardized, clinically-relevant reporting of events. Our

  12. New Ideas on Facilities Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, James C.

    1986-01-01

    Examines trends in facilities management relating to products and people. Reviews new trends in products, including processes, techniques, and programs that are being expounded by business and industry. Discusses the "people factors" involved in facilities management. (ABB)

  13. A ‘Social Form Of Knowledge’ in Practice: Unofficial Compiling of 1960s Pop Music on CD-R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Martin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article I explore the ‘unofficial’ (and technically illegal compiling of marginally known 1960s pop records on Compact Disc Recordable (CD-R. I do so by situating it within the proposition by the late Raphael Samuel, that history is ‘social knowledge’ and a practice rather than a profession. I propose that this compiling activity exemplifies this proposition. The core of the paper is centred on a 2007 survey which I conducted via three on-line 1960s music enthusiast discussion forums. I draw on the sixteen responses to demonstrate how the motivations, values and intentions of those respondents engaging in the practice of CD-R compiling are historically and socially centred. In doing so, I seek to problematise the music industry’s undifferentiated condemnation of all copying as theft. I do so by showing how, far from stealing, these CD-R compilers are adding to the musical social knowledge of 1960s pop and rock music. I further situate them within a longer lineage of ‘unofficial listening’ dating back to at least the 1930s. In using the term ‘unofficial’ in both a legal and public historical sense (eg to take issue with a received narrative, I point to wider definitions of what historically has or has not been musically ‘official’ to listen to. I seek also to point to the practice of CD-R compiling as a historical ‘moment’ in technological change, which might otherwise go unremarked upon as the CD-R itself heads towards utilitarian obsolescence. Although, the issues and concepts raised in the paper can be little more than pointed to, it is hoped it might act as one platform for the historical engagement with a subject more commonly discussed in sociological terms. As public historians we should be reflexive and inter-disciplinary and it is with this mind set that this article is written.

  14. Kaiser Engineers Hanford internal position paper -- Project W-236A, Multi-function Waste Tank Facility -- Peer reviews of selected activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stine, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a proposed position on the performance of independent peer reviews on selected design and analysis components of the Title 1 [Preliminary] and Title 2 [Final] design phases of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility [MWTF] project. An independent, third-party peer review is defined as a documented critical review of documents, data, designs, design inputs, tests, calculations, or related materials. The peer review should be conducted by persons independent of those who performed the work, but who are technically qualified to perform the original work. The peer review is used to assess the validity of assumptions and functional requirements, to assess the appropriateness and logic of selected methodologies and design inputs, and to verify calculations, analyses and computer software. The peer review can be conducted at the end of the design activity, at specific stages of the design process, or continuously and concurrently with the design activity. This latter method is often referred to as ''Continuous Peer Review.''

  15. Improving obstetric care in low-resource settings: implementation of facility-based maternal death reviews in five pilot hospitals in Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fournier Pierre

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sub-Saharan Africa, maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity are major problems. Service availability and quality of care in health facilities are heterogeneous and most often inadequate. In resource-poor settings, the facility-based maternal death review or audit is one of the most promising strategies to improve health service performance. We aim to explore and describe health workers' perceptions of facility-based maternal death reviews and to identify barriers to and facilitators of the implementation of this approach in pilot health facilities of Senegal. Methods This study was conducted in five reference hospitals in Senegal with different characteristics. Data were collected from focus group discussions, participant observations of audit meetings, audit documents and interviews with the staff of the maternity unit. Data were analysed by means of both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Results Health professionals and service administrators were receptive and adhered relatively well to the process and the results of the audits, although some considered the situation destabilizing or even threatening. The main barriers to the implementation of maternal deaths reviews were: (1 bad quality of information in medical files; (2 non-participation of the head of department in the audit meetings; (3 lack of feedback to the staff who did not attend the audit meetings. The main facilitators were: (1 high level of professional qualifications or experience of the data collector; (2 involvement of the head of the maternity unit, acting as a moderator during the audit meetings; (3 participation of managers in the audit session to plan appropriate and realistic actions to prevent other maternal deaths. Conclusion The identification of the barriers to and the facilitators of the implementation of maternal death reviews is an essential step for the future adaptation of this method in countries with few resources. We

  16. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  17. Hospital Palliative Care Teams and Postacute Care Focused on Nursing Facilities: An Integrative Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Although palliative care consultation teams are common in U.S. hospitals, the follow-up and outcomes of consultation for frail older adults discharged to nursing facilities are unclear. To summarize and critique research on the care of patients discharged to nursing facilities following a hospital-based palliative care consult, a systematic search of PubMED, CINAHL, Ageline, and PSYCINFO was conducted in February 2016. Data from the articles (n = 12) were abstracted and analyzed. The results of 12 articles reflecting research conducted in five countries are presented in narrative form. Of the studies, two focused on nurse perceptions only, three described patient/family/caregiver experiences and needs, and seven described patient-focused outcomes. Collectively, these articles demonstrate that disruption in palliative care service upon hospital discharge and nursing facility admission may result in high symptom burden, poor communication, and inadequate coordination of care. High mortality was also noted. PMID:28112355

  18. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  19. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Reflectance and Brightness Temperatures from AVHRR Pathfinder Atmospheres - Extended (PATMOS-x), Version 5.3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of AVHRR reflectance and brightness temperatures was produced by the University of Wisconsin using the AVHRR Pathfinder...

  20. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of GPS RO-Calibrated AMSU Channel 7 (Temperatures of Troposphere / Stratosphere, TTS), Version 1.0 (Version Superseded)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Climate Data Records (CDR) for Channel 7 contains Radio Occulation (RO) calibrated brightness temperatures from AMSU-A channel 7 measurements at 54.9 GHz from...

  1. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of AVHRR Daily and Monthly Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) over Global Oceans, Version 3.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The product is the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 0.63 micron, which is retrieved from NOAA PATMOS-x level-2B orbital radinace and cloud CDR products. The...

  2. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Intersatellite Calibrated Clear-Sky HIRS Channel 12 Brightness Temperature, Version 2.6 (Superseded)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Inter-Satellite Calibrated Clear-Sky High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) Channel 12 brightness temperatures...

  3. Oral health care in older people in long term care facilities: A systematic review of implementation strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weening-Verbree, L.; Huisman-de Waal, G.J.; Dusseldorp, L. van; Achterberg, T. van; Schoonhoven, L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Oral hygiene is necessary to maintain oral health and quality of life. However, the oral hygiene and the oral health care of older people in long term care facilities are poor. This indicates that care is not in compliance with the available guidelines and protocols, and stresses the

  4. Oral health care in older people in long term care facilities : A systematic review of implementation strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weening-Verbree, L.; Huisman-de Waal, G.; van Dusseldorp, L.; van Achterberg, T.; Schoonhoven, L.

    Objectives: Oral hygiene is necessary to maintain oral health and quality of life. However, the oral hygiene and the oral health care of older people in long term care facilities are poor. This indicates that care is not in compliance with the available guidelines and protocols, and stresses the

  5. Expression of cold and drought regulatory protein (CcCDR) of pigeonpea imparts enhanced tolerance to major abiotic stresses in transgenic rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunitha, Mellacheruvu; Srinath, Tamirisa; Reddy, Vudem Dashavantha; Rao, Khareedu Venkateswara

    2017-06-01

    Transgenic rice expressing pigeonpea Cc CDR conferred high-level tolerance to different abiotic stresses. The multiple stress tolerance observed in CcCDR -transgenic lines is attributed to the modulation of ABA-dependent and-independent signalling-pathway genes. Stable transgenic plants expressing Cajanus cajan cold and drought regulatory protein encoding gene (CcCDR), under the control of CaMV35S and rd29A promoters, have been generated in indica rice. Different transgenic lines of CcCDR, when subjected to drought, salt, and cold stresses, exhibited higher seed germination, seedling survival rates, shoot length, root length, and enhanced plant biomass when compared with the untransformed control plants. Furthermore, transgenic plants disclosed higher leaf chlorophyll content, proline, reducing sugars, SOD, and catalase activities, besides lower levels of MDA. Localization studies revealed that the CcCDR-GFP fusion protein was mainly present in the nucleus of transformed cells of rice. The CcCDR transgenics were found hypersensitive to abscisic acid (ABA) and showed reduced seed germination rates as compared to that of control plants. When the transgenic plants were exposed to drought and salt stresses at vegetative and reproductive stages, they revealed larger panicles and higher number of filled grains compared to the untransformed control plants. Under similar stress conditions, the expression levels of P5CS, bZIP, DREB, OsLEA3, and CIPK genes, involved in ABA-dependent and-independent signal transduction pathways, were found higher in the transgenic plants than the control plants. The overall results amply demonstrate that the transgenic rice expressing CcCDR bestows high-level tolerance to drought, salt, and cold stress conditions. Accordingly, the CcCDR might be deployed as a promising candidate gene for improving the multiple stress tolerance of diverse crop plants.

  6. The role of compensation in nuclear waste facility siting. A literature review and real life examples. Deliverable D16b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojo, Matti (Univ. of Tampere, Tampere (Finland)); Richardson, P.J. (Galson Sciences Ltd, Oakham, Rutland (United Kingdom))

    2009-10-15

    The main objective of this report is to introduce and analyse the local decision-making process in the Eurajoki municipality, Finland regarding the siting of the SNF facility, within the framework of compensation theory. The compensation case Eurajoki offers excellent empirical data for analyzing how the negotiations on compensation were implemented at the local level. The successful siting process is particularly interesting as a number of survey studies have suggested that compensation for a radioactive waste repository does not change the percentage of individuals supporting the facility. On the contrary, some compensation proposals have even decreased the existing support. Even among hazardous waste facilities radioactive waste facilities seem to be an exception. The explanation offered is that radioactive waste is regarded with a greater sense of dread than is the case for other hazardous waste. Although monetary incentives and other benefits have been widely applied in the field of nuclear waste management in many countries the conclusion drawn is that compensation-based siting has to date experienced little success. However, two recent examples, one from Finland and the other from Korea, indicate that compensation can play a decisive role in decision-making during the siting of radioactive waste facilities. Furthermore, in Sweden a local benefit package was agreed between the nuclear waste management company SKB AB and the two candidate municipalities, Oskarshamn and Oesthammar in 2009 before the company announced the site. The novel aspect of this arrangement is that the municipality in which the facility is not located (now known to be Oskarshamn) will receive 75% of the total benefit package (around Euro 200 million) given that Oesthammar will receive all the attendant benefits associated with facility development. The main questions posed in this report are as follows: Why was the compensation package a success in the case of Eurajoki? What were the

  7. The role of compensation in nuclear waste facility siting. A literature review and real life examples. Deliverable D16b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojo, Matti; Richardson, P.J.

    2009-10-01

    The main objective of this report is to introduce and analyse the local decision-making process in the Eurajoki municipality, Finland regarding the siting of the SNF facility, within the framework of compensation theory. The compensation case Eurajoki offers excellent empirical data for analyzing how the negotiations on compensation were implemented at the local level. The successful siting process is particularly interesting as a number of survey studies have suggested that compensation for a radioactive waste repository does not change the percentage of individuals supporting the facility. On the contrary, some compensation proposals have even decreased the existing support. Even among hazardous waste facilities radioactive waste facilities seem to be an exception. The explanation offered is that radioactive waste is regarded with a greater sense of dread than is the case for other hazardous waste. Although monetary incentives and other benefits have been widely applied in the field of nuclear waste management in many countries the conclusion drawn is that compensation-based siting has to date experienced little success. However, two recent examples, one from Finland and the other from Korea, indicate that compensation can play a decisive role in decision-making during the siting of radioactive waste facilities. Furthermore, in Sweden a local benefit package was agreed between the nuclear waste management company SKB AB and the two candidate municipalities, Oskarshamn and Oesthammar in 2009 before the company announced the site. The novel aspect of this arrangement is that the municipality in which the facility is not located (now known to be Oskarshamn) will receive 75% of the total benefit package (around Euro 200 million) given that Oesthammar will receive all the attendant benefits associated with facility development. The main questions posed in this report are as follows: Why was the compensation package a success in the case of Eurajoki? What were the

  8. A Climate Data Record (CDR for the global terrestrial water budget: 1984–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Closing the terrestrial water budget is necessary to provide consistent estimates of budget components for understanding water resources and changes over time. Given the lack of in situ observations of budget components at anything but local scale, merging information from multiple data sources (e.g., in situ observation, satellite remote sensing, land surface model, and reanalysis through data assimilation techniques that optimize the estimation of fluxes is a promising approach. Conditioned on the current limited data availability, a systematic method is developed to optimally combine multiple available data sources for precipitation (P, evapotranspiration (ET, runoff (R, and the total water storage change (TWSC at 0.5° spatial resolution globally and to obtain water budget closure (i.e., to enforce P − ET − R − TWSC =  0 through a constrained Kalman filter (CKF data assimilation technique under the assumption that the deviation from the ensemble mean of all data sources for the same budget variable is used as a proxy of the uncertainty in individual water budget variables. The resulting long-term (1984–2010, monthly 0.5° resolution global terrestrial water cycle Climate Data Record (CDR data set is developed under the auspices of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA Earth System Data Records (ESDRs program. This data set serves to bridge the gap between sparsely gauged regions and the regions with sufficient in situ observations in investigating the temporal and spatial variability in the terrestrial hydrology at multiple scales. The CDR created in this study is validated against in situ measurements like river discharge from the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC and the United States Geological Survey (USGS, and ET from FLUXNET. The data set is shown to be reliable and can serve the scientific community in understanding historical climate variability in water cycle fluxes and stores, benchmarking

  9. A Climate Data Record (CDR) for the global terrestrial water budget: 1984–2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu; Pan, Ming; Sheffield, Justin; Siemann, Amanda L.; Fisher, Colby K.; Liang, Miaoling; Beck, Hylke E.; Wanders, Niko; MacCracken, Rosalyn F.; Houser, Paul R.; Zhou, Tian; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Pinker, Rachel T.; Bytheway, Janice; Kummerow, Christian D.; Wood, Eric F.

    2018-01-01

    Closing the terrestrial water budget is necessary to provide consistent estimates of budget components for understanding water resources and changes over time. Given the lack of in situ observations of budget components at anything but local scale, merging information from multiple data sources (e.g., in situ observation, satellite remote sensing, land surface model, and reanalysis) through data assimilation techniques that optimize the estimation of fluxes is a promising approach. Conditioned on the current limited data availability, a systematic method is developed to optimally combine multiple available data sources for precipitation (P), evapotranspiration (ET), runoff (R), and the total water storage change (TWSC) at 0.5° spatial resolution globally and to obtain water budget closure (i.e., to enforce P-ET-R-TWSC = 0) through a constrained Kalman filter (CKF) data assimilation technique under the assumption that the deviation from the ensemble mean of all data sources for the same budget variable is used as a proxy of the uncertainty in individual water budget variables. The resulting long-term (1984–2010), monthly 0.5° resolution global terrestrial water cycle Climate Data Record (CDR) data set is developed under the auspices of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) program. This data set serves to bridge the gap between sparsely gauged regions and the regions with sufficient in situ observations in investigating the temporal and spatial variability in the terrestrial hydrology at multiple scales. The CDR created in this study is validated against in situ measurements like river discharge from the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and ET from FLUXNET. The data set is shown to be reliable and can serve the scientific community in understanding historical climate variability in water cycle fluxes and stores, benchmarking the

  10. A Climate Data Record (CDR) for the global terrestrial water budget: 1984-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Pan, Ming; Sheffield, Justin; Siemann, Amanda L.; Fisher, Colby K.; Liang, Miaoling; Beck, Hylke E.; Wanders, Niko; MacCracken, Rosalyn F.; Houser, Paul R.; Zhou, Tian; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Pinker, Rachel T.; Bytheway, Janice; Kummerow, Christian D.; Wood, Eric F.

    2018-01-01

    Closing the terrestrial water budget is necessary to provide consistent estimates of budget components for understanding water resources and changes over time. Given the lack of in situ observations of budget components at anything but local scale, merging information from multiple data sources (e.g., in situ observation, satellite remote sensing, land surface model, and reanalysis) through data assimilation techniques that optimize the estimation of fluxes is a promising approach. Conditioned on the current limited data availability, a systematic method is developed to optimally combine multiple available data sources for precipitation (P), evapotranspiration (ET), runoff (R), and the total water storage change (TWSC) at 0.5° spatial resolution globally and to obtain water budget closure (i.e., to enforce P - ET - R - TWSC = 0) through a constrained Kalman filter (CKF) data assimilation technique under the assumption that the deviation from the ensemble mean of all data sources for the same budget variable is used as a proxy of the uncertainty in individual water budget variables. The resulting long-term (1984-2010), monthly 0.5° resolution global terrestrial water cycle Climate Data Record (CDR) data set is developed under the auspices of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) program. This data set serves to bridge the gap between sparsely gauged regions and the regions with sufficient in situ observations in investigating the temporal and spatial variability in the terrestrial hydrology at multiple scales. The CDR created in this study is validated against in situ measurements like river discharge from the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS), and ET from FLUXNET. The data set is shown to be reliable and can serve the scientific community in understanding historical climate variability in water cycle fluxes and stores, benchmarking the current climate, and

  11. Licensing an assured isolation facility for low-level radioactive waste. Volume 2: Recommendations on the content and review of an application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, D.J.; Bauser, M.A.; Baird, R.D.

    1998-07-01

    This report provides a detailed set of proposed criteria and guidance for the preparation of a license application for an assured isolation facility (AIF). The report is intended to provide a detailed planning basis upon which a prospective applicant may begin pre-licensing discussions with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and initiate development of a license application. The report may also be useful to the NRC or to state regulatory agencies that may be asked to review such an application. Volume 1 of this report provides background information, and describes the licensing approach and methodology. Volume 2 identifies specific information that is recommended for inclusion in a license application

  12. Licensing an assured isolation facility for low-level radioactive waste. Volume 2: Recommendations on the content and review of an application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, D.J.; Bauser, M.A. [Morgan, Lewis and Bockius, Washington, DC (United States); Baird, R.D. [Rogers and Associates Engineering Corp., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1998-07-01

    This report provides a detailed set of proposed criteria and guidance for the preparation of a license application for an assured isolation facility (AIF). The report is intended to provide a detailed planning basis upon which a prospective applicant may begin pre-licensing discussions with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and initiate development of a license application. The report may also be useful to the NRC or to state regulatory agencies that may be asked to review such an application. Volume 1 of this report provides background information, and describes the licensing approach and methodology. Volume 2 identifies specific information that is recommended for inclusion in a license application.

  13. Stakeholders' opinions on the implementation of Child Death Review in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijzen, Sandra; L'Hoir, Monique P; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M; Need, Ariana

    2016-04-21

    The death of a child is an enormous tragedy for both the family and others involved. A child's death appeals to everyone's responsibility to take measures to prevent similar deaths in the future. Child Death Review (CDR) is an interagency approach in which a child's death is systematically analyzed by a multidisciplinary team. The aim of CDR is to identify avoidable factors that give direction to prevention and to improve death statistics. CDR is not yet implemented in the Netherlands. The purpose of this study is to determine Dutch stakeholders' opinions regarding the facilitating and impeding factors in the implementation of CDR in the Netherlands. Four focus groups were conducted: three with professionals who are involved in children's deaths and one with parents who have lost a child under the age of 2 years. The recorded discussions were transcribed and analyzed using Atlas ti. The facilitating and impeding factors were measured using the measurement instrument for determinants of innovations (MIDI). The MIDI identifies facilitating and impeding determinants associated with the innovation, user, organization and social-political context. Improvement of the quality of (health) care and obtaining a clear explanation for the child's death (user and innovation) were identified as benefits of CDR. The emotional burden for professionals and parents and the time implications were considered to be drawbacks of CDR (user and innovation). The multidisciplinary approach (innovation), parental consent and the use of anonimyzed data (user) were considered as facilitators to implementation. Insufficient information (innovation), potential legal consequences for professionals and organizations (user), insufficient ratification by organizations (organization) and confidentiality (social-political context) were identified as impeding implementation. The determinants identified as facilitating and the recommendations provided to overcome the barriers can be used as input for

  14. JOPATW~1.cdr 08.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tablets, the mechanism and kinetics of drug delivery were studied. Aminophyline was the prototype ... The mechanism of release of aminophyline from ADM as in Cp and HPMC was by diffusion. Key words: Adansonia .... cohesive and adhesive forces between polymerspolymer and polymer-drug or lactose particles (14).

  15. JOPATW~1.cdr 08.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were conducted among the traditional medical practitioners and herbal traders in both urban and rural areas of the state. ..... 1N. Araliaceae. 193. Cussonia arborea Hochst ex. A.Rich. (Syn:.Cussonia barteri). Barters cussunia,. Cork – bark tree. Kpawu/Efokoci (N), Takandargiwa. (H), Shigo (Y) sb;m. 1N. Asclepiaceae. 369.

  16. JOPATW~1.cdr 08.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV serial and parallel serologic testing algorithms in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire. AIDS 13:109-. 117. 10. Palmer, C. J., J. M. Dubon, E. Koenig, E. Perez, A. Ager, D. Jayaweera, R. R. Cuadrado, A. Rivera, A. Rubido, and D. A. Palmer (1999): Field evaluation of the Determine rapid human immunodeficiency virus diagnostic test in ...

  17. Overcoming the heterologous bias: An in vivo functional analysis of multidrug efflux transporter, CgCdr1p in matched pair clinical isolates of Candida glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puri, Nidhi; Manoharlal, Raman; Sharma, Monika [Membrane Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Sanglard, Dominique [Institut de Microbiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Prasad, Rajendra, E-mail: rp47jnu@gmail.com [Membrane Biology Laboratory, School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110 067 (India)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} First report to demonstrate an in vivo expression system of an ABC multidrug transporter CgCdr1p of C. glabrata. {yields} First report on the structure and functional characterization of CgCdr1p. {yields} Functional conservation of divergent but typical residues of CgCdr1p. {yields} CgCdr1p elicits promiscuity towards substrates and has a large drug binding pocket with overlapping specificities. -- Abstract: We have taken advantage of the natural milieu of matched pair of azole sensitive (AS) and azole resistant (AR) clinical isolates of Candida glabrata for expressing its major ABC multidrug transporter, CgCdr1p for structure and functional analysis. This was accomplished by tagging a green fluorescent protein (GFP) downstream of ORF of CgCDR1 and integrating the resultant fusion protein at its native chromosomal locus in AS and AR backgrounds. The characterization confirmed that in comparison to AS isolate, CgCdr1p-GFP was over-expressed in AR isolates due to its hyperactive native promoter and the GFP tag did not affect its functionality in either construct. We observed that in addition to Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) and Fluconazole (FLC), a recently identified fluorescent substrate of multidrug transporters Nile Red (NR) could also be expelled by CgCdr1p. Competition assays with these substrates revealed the presence of overlapping multiple drug binding sites in CgCdr1p. Point mutations employing site directed mutagenesis confirmed that the role played by unique amino acid residues critical to ATP catalysis and localization of ABC drug transporter proteins are well conserved in C. glabrata as in other yeasts. This study demonstrates a first in vivo novel system where over-expression of GFP tagged MDR transporter protein can be driven by its own hyperactive promoter of AR isolates. Taken together, this in vivo system can be exploited for the structure and functional analysis of CgCdr1p and similar proteins wherein the arte-factual concerns

  18. ONWI [Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation] 30% design review findings report for Exploratory Shaft Facility, Deaf Smith site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Based on the performance of a TMP-05 Design Review with integration into the review, via TMP-22, of comments by SRP contractors other than ONWI, the Design Review Board has developed conclusions and recommendations with respect to the 30% design effort submitted by PB/PB-KBB for interim design review. A number of comments were submitted on the design basis criteria and requirements furnished as guidance to PB/PB-KBB. These comments are forwarded to SRPO for disposition and resolution. Additionally, comments whose resolution by PB/PB-KBB require input from other SRP contractors are included. All comments forwarded to SRPO are compiled and subdivided by appropriate category in Section 11.0 of this Findings Report

  19. Using the NASA EOS A-Train to Probe the Performance of the NOAA PATMOS-x Cloud Fraction CDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Heidinger

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An important component of the AVHRR PATMOS-x climate date record (CDR—or any satellite cloud climatology—is the performance of its cloud detection scheme and the subsequent quality of its cloud fraction CDR. PATMOS-x employs the NOAA Enterprise Cloud Mask for this, which is based on a naïve Bayesian approach. The goal of this paper is to generate analysis of the PATMOS-x cloud fraction CDR to facilitate its use in climate studies. Performance of PATMOS-x cloud detection is compared to that of the well-established MYD35 and CALIPSO products from the EOS A-Train. Results show the AVHRR PATMOS-x CDR compares well against CALIPSO with most regions showing proportional correct values of 0.90 without any spatial filtering and 0.95 when a spatial filter is applied. Values are similar for the NASA MODIS MYD35 mask. A direct comparison of PATMOS-x and MYD35 from 2003 to 2014 also shows agreement over most regions in terms of mean cloud amount, inter-annual variability, and linear trends. Regional and seasonal differences are discussed. The analysis demonstrates that PATMOS-x cloud amount uncertainty could effectively screen regions where PATMOS-x differs from MYD35.

  20. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  1. Waste Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset was developed from the Vermont DEC's list of certified solid waste facilities. It includes facility name, contact information, and the materials...

  2. Nuclear facilities siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, P.

    1979-01-01

    A review of the status of requirements for the selection of sites for the facilities comprising the nuclear fuel cycle for electric power production. The report includes a summary of the legal and regulatory constraints that have resulted in complex and lengthy process for licensing of nuclear facilities. The nuclear fuel cycle, including the post-reactor operations of spent fuel reprocessing and waste disposal, is reviewed. Site evaluation factors for each major activity in the fuel cycle include geology, hydrology, demography, geography, meteorology, ecology, and institutional and social aspects. An analysis of current methods available for site evaluation are described. The report concludes with analysis of current issues affecting the ability of the nation's industry to license suitable sites for the many types of facility needed in the nuclear fuel cycle. The report should be of interest to civil engineers concerned with the resolution of technical problems of facility site selection. 36 refs

  3. Decommissioning nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Jenkins, C.E.; Waite, D.A.; Brooksbank, R.E.; Lunis, B.C.; Nemec, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the currently accepted alternatives for decommissioning retired light water reactor fuel cycle facilities and the current state of decommissioning technology. Three alternatives are recognized: Protective Storage; Entombment; and Dismantling. Application of these alternatives to the following types of facilities is briefly described: light water reactors; fuel reprocessing plants, and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants. Brief descriptions are given of decommissioning operations and results at a number of sites, and recent studies of the future decommissioning of prototype fuel cycle facilities are reviewed. An overview is provided of the types of operations performed and tools used in common decontamination and decommissioning techniques and needs for improved technology are suggested. Planning for decommissioning a nuclear facility is dependent upon the maximum permitted levels of residual radioactive contamination. Proposed guides and recently developed methodology for development of site release criteria are reviewed. 21 fig, 32 references

  4. REVIEW OF INDUSTRIES AND GOVERNMENT AGENCIES FOR TECHNOLOGIES APPLICABLE TO DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reilkoff, T. E.; Hetland, M. D.; O' Leary, E. M.

    2002-02-25

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area's (DDFA's) mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy improved deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) technologies. This mission requires that emphasis be continually placed on identifying technologies currently employed or under development in other nuclear as well as nonnuclear industries and government agencies. In support of DDFA efforts to clean up the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) radiologically contaminated surplus facilities using technologies that improve worker safety, reduce costs, and accelerate cleanup schedules, a study was conducted to identify innovative technologies developed for use in nonnuclear arenas that are appropriate for D&D applications.

  5. 36 CFR 1260.42 - What are the procedures for agency personnel to review records at a NARA facility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... handling of archival materials. (b) Agency reviewers must: (1) Follow NARA security regulations and abide by NARA procedures for handling archival materials; (2) Follow NARA procedures for identifying and... damage to archival materials. See 36 CFR part 1254 for more information on acceptable equipment. ...

  6. Peer review CALMET/CALPUFF dispersion modelling analysis : Proposed Duke Point generation facility Georgia Strait Crossing pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    A peer review of the air quality dispersion modeling analysis for the proposed gas-fired plant at Duke Point in the vicinity of Nanaimo, British Columbia was required, and SENES Consultants Limited (SENES) was commissioned to perform it. British Columbia Hydro had requested that Levelton Engineering Ltd. prepare an air quality impact assessment, and it was submitted to be included in Vancouver Island Generation Project (VIGP) permit application. This permit application was for the Joint Panel Review of the Georgia Strait Crossing Pipeline (GSX) Project and the British Columbia Environmental Assessment Office. The CALMET/CALPUFF Modelling System had been used by Levelton to conduct the air quality dispersion modelling analysis. Copies of the input and output files that had been used for the conduct of the modelling analysis were provided to SENES. The ability for SENES to reproduce the modelling results that had been published in the GSX application represented the first step in the peer review. This was accomplished by running the files received from Levelton into the CALMET/CALPUFF models. A detailed review of the methodology selected by Levelton during the conduct of the dispersion modelling analysis was then initiated by SENES. Some deficiencies were identified by SENES, despite concurrence with the overall conceptual approach adopted by Levelton. The deficiencies concerned meteorological data; startup, partial load and upset conditions; pollutant emissions; health risk assessment; cumulative impact on ambient particulate matter 10 concentrations; and collateral environmental impacts. refs., 2 tabs., 21 figs

  7. Conceptual design report for Central Waste Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The permanent facilities are defined, and cost estimates are provided for the disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Wastes (LLW) at the Central Waste Disposal Facility (CWDF). The waste designated for the Central Waste Disposal Facility will be generated by the Y-12 Plant, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The facility will be operated by ORNL for the Office of Defense Waste and By-Products Management of the Deparment of Energy. The CWDF will be located on the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation, west of Highway 95 and south of Bear Creek Road. The body of this Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the permanent facilities required for the operation of the CWDF. Initial facilities, trenches, and minimal operating equipment will be provided in earlier projects. The disposal of LLW will be by shallow land burial in engineered trenches. DOE Order 5820 was used as the performance standard for the proper disposal of radioactive waste. The permanent facilities are intended for beneficial occupancy during the first quarter of fiscal year 1989. 3 references, 9 figures, 7 tables

  8. ECOSYSTEM IMPACTS OF GEOENGINEERING: A Review for Developing a Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Mace, Georgina; Jackson, Robert B.; Shepherd, John; Liss, Peter; Leinen, Margaret; Schimel, David; Vaughan, Naomi E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Boyd, Philip W.; Norby, Richard J.; Caldeira, Ken; Merikanto, Joonas; Artaxo, Paulo; Melillo, Jerry; Morgan, M. Granger

    2012-06-01

    Geoengineering methods are intended to reduce the magnitude of climate change. Climate change in some regions is already having demonstrable effects on ecosystem structure and functioning. Two different types of geoengineering activities have been proposed: carbon dioxide removal (CDR), which includes a range of engineered and biological processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, and solar radiation management (SRM, or sunlight reflection methods), whereby a small percentage of sunlight is reflected back into space to offset warming from greenhouse gases. In this review, we evaluate some of the possible impacts of CDR and SRM on the physical climate and their subsequent influence on ecosystems, including the risks and uncertainties associated with new kinds of purposeful perturbations to Earth. Specifically, we find evidence that, if implemented successfully, some CDR methods and continue use of some SRM methods) could alleviate some of the deleterious ecosystem impacts associated with climate changes that might occur in the foreseeable future.

  9. Review Facility Design Drawings M3FT-16LA040105011 - Safeguards and Security by Design for Used Fuel Extended Storage: 1.02.04.01.05 FT – 16LA04010501

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Carolynn P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rauch, Eric Benton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-14

    This work package focuses on developing Best Practices for the design of security for, and domestic safeguarding (e.g. MC&A) of, a pilot-scale independent spent/used fuel storage facility consistent with conceptual design efforts in Nuclear Fuels Storage and Transportation (NFST) and Used Fuel Disposal (UFD) campaigns. This is a review of the basic design of the facility to determine a candidate list of accounting and control requirements that could be considered for safeguards and security purposes.

  10. ALARA Review of the Activation/Repair of Fire Detectors in Zone Three at the 233-S Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornish, M.J.

    1998-07-01

    A formal as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review is required by BHI-SH-02, Vol. 1, Procedure 1.22, 'Planning Radiological Work', when radiological conditions exceed trigger levels. The level of contamination inside the viewing room meets this criterion. This ALARA review is for task instruction 1997-03-18-005-8.3.3 (mini task instruction to a living work package), 'Instructions for D ampersand D Support of Fire Detector Troubleshooting and Minor Maintenance Work at 233-S,' and DynCorp 2G-98-7207C, '233-S Reconnect Smoke Detectors Zone 3.' The Radiological Work Permit (RWP) request broke these two task instructions into four separate tasks. The four tasks identified in the RWP request were used to estimate airborne concentrations and the total exposure

  11. The management of scabies outbreaks in residential care facilities for the elderly in England: a review of current health protection guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, L C J; Lanza, S; Middleton, J; Hewitt, K; Freire-Moran, L; Edge, C; Nicholls, M; Rajan-Iyer, J; Cassell, J A

    2016-11-01

    Commonly thought of as a disease of poverty and overcrowding in resource-poor settings globally, scabies is also an important public health issue in residential care facilities for the elderly (RCFE) in high-income countries such as the UK. We compared and contrasted current local Health Protection Team (HPT) guidelines for the management of scabies outbreaks in RCFE throughout England. We performed content analysis on 20 guidelines, and used this to create a quantitative report of their variation in key dimensions. Although the guidelines were generally consistent on issues such as the treatment protocols for individual patients, there was substantial variation in their recommendations regarding the prophylactic treatment of contacts, infection control measures and the roles and responsibilities of individual stakeholders. Most guidelines did not adequately address the logistical challenges associated with mass treatment in this setting. We conclude that the heterogeneous nature of the guidelines reviewed is an argument in favour of national guidelines being produced.

  12. Review of nuclear data improvement needs for nuclear radiation measurement techniques used at the CEA experimental reactor facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Destouches Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant improvement of the neutron and gamma calculation codes used in experimental nuclear reactors goes hand in hand with that of the associated nuclear data libraries. The validation of these calculation schemes always requires the confrontation with integral experiments performed in experimental reactors to be completed. Nuclear data of interest, straight as cross sections, or elaborated ones such as reactivity, are always derived from a reaction rate measurement which is the only measurable parameter in a nuclear sensor. So, in order to derive physical parameters from the electric signal of the sensor, one needs specific nuclear data libraries. This paper presents successively the main features of the measurement techniques used in the CEA experimental reactor facilities for the on-line and offline neutron/gamma flux characterizations: reactor dosimetry, neutron flux measurements with miniature fission chambers and Self Power Neutron Detector (SPND and gamma flux measurements with chamber ionization and TLD. For each technique, the nuclear data necessary for their interpretation will be presented, the main identified needs for improvement identified and an analysis of their impact on the quality of the measurement. Finally, a synthesis of the study will be done.

  13. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and radiation: findings among workers at five US nuclear facilities and a review of the recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Daniels, Robert D; Fleming, Donald A; Markey, Andrea M; Couch, James R; Ahrenholz, Steven H; Burphy, Jenneh S; Anderson, Jeri L; Tseng, Chih-Yu

    2007-12-01

    The aetiology of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is largely unknown. Despite compelling evidence for ionising radiation as a cause of most forms of leukaemia, CLL was not found to be radiogenic in early studies. Herein we describe the recent evidence for causation of CLL by ionising and non-ionising radiation, including a nested case-control study conducted within a cohort of 94 517 US workers at four nuclear weapons facilities and a nuclear naval shipyard. Forty-three cases of CLL deaths and 172 age-matched controls were identified with follow-up up to between 1990 and 1996. Radiation exposure from external sources and plutonium (lagged 10 years) was assessed for each worker, based on monitoring records. The excess relative rate (ERR) was estimated for workers receiving elevated doses compared to unexposed workers, controlling for possible risk factors. The ERR per 10 mSv was -0.020 (95% confidence interval: <0, 0.14) based on all exposed workers. However, for workers receiving <100 mSv, the ERR per 10 mSv was 0.20 (-0.035, 0.96). Recent studies of uranium miners and other populations have shown elevations of CLL possibly associated with ionising and non-ionising radiation. New studies should use incident cases and sufficient latency to account for the expected lengthy induction period for CLL.

  14. Effectiveness of professional oral health care intervention on the oral health of residents with dementia in residential aged care facilities: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi Mohammadi, Joanna Jin; Franks, Kay; Hines, Sonia

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this review is to critically appraise and synthesize evidence on the effectiveness of professional oral health care intervention on the oral health of aged care residents with dementia.More specifically the objectives are to identify the efficacy of professional oral health care interventions on general oral health, the presence of plaque and the number of decayed or missing teeth. Dementia poses a significant challenge for health and social policy in Australia. The quality of life of individuals, their families and friends is impacted by dementia. Older people with dementia often have other health comorbidities resulting in the need for a higher level of care. From 2009 to 2010, 53% of permanent residents in Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs) had dementia on admission. Older Australians are retaining more of their natural teeth, therefore residents entering RACFs will have more of their natural teeth and require complex dental work than they did in previous generations. Data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare showed that more than half the residents in RACFs are now partially dentate with an average of 12 teeth each. Furthermore, coronal and root caries are significant problems, especially in older Australians who are cognitively impaired.Residents in aged care facilities frequently have poor oral health and hygiene with moderate to high levels of oral disease and overall dental neglect. This is reinforced by aged care staff who acknowledge that the demands of feeding, toileting and behavioral issues amongst residents often take precedence over oral health care regimens. Current literature shows that there is a general reluctance on the part of aged care staff to prioritize oral care due to limited knowledge as well as existing psychological barriers to working on another person's mouth. Although staff routinely deal with residents' urinary and faecal incontinence, deep psychological barriers exist when working on someone

  15. Conceptual design for the Waste Receiving And Processing facility Module 2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 2A facility. The mission of the WRAP Module 2A facility is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities those contact handled (CH) low-level radioactive mixed wastes (LLMW) that: (1) are currently in retrievable storage at the Hanford Central Waste Complex (HCWC) awaiting a treatment capability to permit permanent disposal compliant with the Land Disposal Restrictions and; (2) are forecasted to be generated over the next 30 years. This volume provides the detailed cost estimate for the WRAP 2A facility. Included in this volume is the project construction schedule

  16. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This ACDR was performed following completed of the Conceptual Design Report in July 1992; the work encompassed August 1992 to January 1994. Mission of the WRAP Module 2A facility is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage at Hanford and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford from about DOE sites. This volume provides an introduction to the ACDR process and the scope of the task along with a project summary of the facility, treatment technologies, cost, and schedule. Major areas of departure from the CDR are highlighted. Descriptions of the facility layout and operations are included.

  17. Stakeholders' opinions on the implementation of Child Death Review in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijzen, S.; Hoir, M.P. L; Boere-Boonekamp, M.M.; Need, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The death of a child is an enormous tragedy for both the family and others involved. A child’s death appeals to everyone’s responsibility to take measures to prevent similar deaths in the future. Child Death Review (CDR) is an interagency approach in which a child’s death is

  18. Stakeholders’ opinions on the implementation of Child Death Review in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoeff-Gijzen, Sandra; L'Hoir, Monique P.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magdalena M.; Need, Ariana

    2016-01-01

    Background The death of a child is an enormous tragedy for both the family and others involved. A child’s death appeals to everyone’s responsibility to take measures to prevent similar deaths in the future. Child Death Review (CDR) is an interagency approach in which a child’s death is

  19. Procedures in child deaths in The Netherlands: a comparison with child death review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijzen, S.; Petter, J.; L'Hoir, M.P.; Boere-Boonekamp, M.M.; Need, A.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Child Death Review (CDR) is a method in which every child death is systematically and multidisciplinary examined to (1) improve death statistics, (2) identify factors that give direction for prevention, (3) translate the results into possible interventions, and (4) support families. The aim of

  20. Rationally designed transmembrane peptide mimics of the multidrug transporter protein Cdr1 act as antagonists to selectively block drug efflux and chemosensitize azole-resistant clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Indresh Kumar; Thota, Chaitanya Kumar; Verma, Sachin Dev; Sharma, Jyotsna; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Ravikumar, Balaguru; Sen, Sobhan; Chauhan, Neeraj; Lynn, Andrew M; Chauhan, Virander Singh; Prasad, Rajendra

    2013-06-07

    Drug-resistant pathogenic fungi use several families of membrane-embedded transporters to efflux antifungal drugs from the cells. The efflux pump Cdr1 (Candida drug resistance 1) belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters. Cdr1 is one of the most predominant mechanisms of multidrug resistance in azole-resistant (AR) clinical isolates of Candida albicans. Blocking drug efflux represents an attractive approach to combat the multidrug resistance of this opportunistic human pathogen. In this study, we rationally designed and synthesized transmembrane peptide mimics (TMPMs) of Cdr1 protein (Cdr1p) that correspond to each of the 12 transmembrane helices (TMHs) of the two transmembrane domains of the protein to target the primary structure of the Cdr1p. Several FITC-tagged TMPMs specifically bound to Cdr1p and blocked the efflux of entrapped fluorescent dyes from the AR (Gu5) isolate. These TMPMs did not affect the efflux of entrapped fluorescent dye from cells expressing the Cdr1p homologue Cdr2p or from cells expressing a non-ABC transporter Mdr1p. Notably, the time correlation of single photon counting fluorescence measurements confirmed the specific interaction of FITC-tagged TMPMs with their respective TMH. By using mutant variants of Cdr1p, we show that these TMPM antagonists contain the structural information necessary to target their respective TMHs of Cdr1p and specific binding sites that mediate the interactions between the mimics and its respective helix. Additionally, TMPMs that were devoid of any demonstrable hemolytic, cytotoxic, and antifungal activities chemosensitize AR clinical isolates and demonstrate synergy with drugs that further improved the therapeutic potential of fluconazole in vivo.

  1. Intercomparison of PERSIANN-CDR and TRMM-3B42V7 precipitation estimates at monthly and daily time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiraie-Boroujerdy, Pari-Sima; Akbari Asanjan, Ata; Hsu, Kuo-lin; Sorooshian, Soroosh

    2017-09-01

    In the first part of this paper, monthly precipitation data from Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks-Climate Data Record (PERSIANN-CDR) and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42 algorithm Version 7 (TRMM-3B42V7) are evaluated over Iran using the Generalized Three-Cornered Hat (GTCH) method which is self-sufficient of reference data as input. Climate Data Unit (CRU) is added to the GTCH evaluations as an independent gauge-based dataset thus, the minimum requirement of three datasets for the model is satisfied. To ensure consistency of all datasets, the two satellite products were aggregated to 0.5° spatial resolution, which is the minimum resolution of CRU. The results show that the PERSIANN-CDR has higher Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) than TRMM-3B42V7 for the monthly rainfall estimation, especially in the northern half of the country. All datasets showed low SNR in the mountainous area of southwestern Iran, as well as the arid parts in the southeast region of the country. Additionally, in order to evaluate the efficacy of PERSIANN-CDR and TRMM-3B42V7 in capturing extreme daily-precipitation amounts, an in-situ rain-gauge dataset collected by the Islamic Republic of the Iran Meteorological Organization (IRIMO) was employed. Given the sparsity of the rain gauges, only 0.25° pixels containing three or more gauges were used for this evaluation. There were 228 such pixels where daily and extreme rainfall from PERSIANN-CDR and TRMM-3B42V7 could be compared. However, TRMM-3B42V7 overestimates most of the intensity indices (correlation coefficients; R between 0.7648-0.8311, Root Mean Square Error; RMSE between 3.29mm/day-21.2mm/5day); PERSIANN-CDR underestimates these extremes (R between 0.6349-0.7791 and RMSE between 3.59mm/day-30.56mm/5day). Both satellite products show higher correlation coefficients and lower RMSEs for the annual mean of consecutive dry spells than wet spells. The results show that TRMM-3B42V7

  2. Multidrug ABC transporter Cdr1 of Candida albicans harbors specific and overlapping binding sites for human steroid hormones transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghel, Pratima; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Sen, Sobhan; Siddiqui, Mohammed Haris; Chaptal, Vincent; Falson, Pierre; Prasad, Rajendra

    2017-10-01

    The present study examines the kinetics of steroids efflux mediated by the Candida drug resistance protein 1 (Cdr1p) and evaluates their interaction with the protein. We exploited our in-house mutant library for targeting the 252 residues forming the twelve transmembrane helices (TMHs) of Cdr1p. The screening revealed 65 and 58 residues critical for β-estradiol and corticosterone transport, respectively. Notably, up to 83% critical residues for corticosterone face the lipid interface compared to 54% for β-estradiol. Molecular docking identified a possible peripheral corticosterone-binding site made of 8/14 critical/non-critical residues between TMHs 3, 4 and 6. β-estradiol transport was severely hampered by alanine replacements of Cdr1p core residues involving TMHs 2, 5 and 8, in a binding site made of 10/14 critical residues mainly shared with rhodamine 6G with which it competes. By contrast, TMH11 was poorly impacted, although being part of the core domain. Finally, we observed the presence of several contiguous stretches of 3-5 critical residues in TMHs 2, 5 and 10 that points to a rotation motion of these helices during the substrate transport cycle. The selective structural arrangement of the steroid-binding pockets in the core region and at the lipid-TMD interface, which was never reported before, together with the possible rotation of some TMHs may be the structural basis of the drug-transport mechanism achieved by these type II ABC transporters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Facilities Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, Robert V.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for physical facilities management written 17 years ago is still worth following today. Each of the steps outlined for planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and evaluating must be accomplished if school facilities are to be properly planned and constructed. However, lessons have been learned about energy consumption and proper…

  4. The Circular RNA Cdr1as Promotes Myocardial Infarction by Mediating the Regulation of miR-7a on Its Target Genes Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Hua Geng

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated the role of Cdr1as (or CiRS-7, one of the well-identified circular RNAs (circRNAs, as a miR-7a/b sponge or inhibitor in brain tissues or islet cells. This study aimed to investigate the presence of Cdr1as/miR-7a pathway in cardiomyocytes, and explore the mechanism underlying the function of miR-7a in protecting against myocardial infarction (MI-induced apoptosis.Mouse MI injury model was established and evaluated by infarct size determination. Real-time PCR was performed to quantify the expression of Cdr1as and miR-7a in cardiomyocytes. Cell apoptosis was determined by caspase-3 activity analysis and flow cytometry assays with Annexin V/PI staining. Transfection of Cdr1as overexpressing plasmid and miR-7a mimic were conducted for gain-of-function studies. Luciferase reporter assay and western blot analysis were performed to verity potential miR-7a targets.Cdr1as and miR-7a were both upregulated in MI mice with increased cardiac infarct size, or cardiomyocytes under hypoxia treatment. Cdr1as overexpression in MCM cells promoted cell apoptosis, but was then reversed by miR-7a overexpression. The SP1 was identified as a new miR-7a target, in line with previously identified PARP, while miR-7a-induced decrease of cell apoptosis under hypoxia treatment was proven to be inhibited by PARP-SP1 overexpression. Moreover, Cdr1as overexpression in vivo increased cardiac infarct size with upregulated expression of PARP and SP1, while miR-7a overexpression reversed these changes.Cdr1as also functioned as a powerful miR-7a sponge in myocardial cells, and showed regulation on the protective role of miR-7a in MI injury, involving the function of miR-7a targets, PARP and SP1.

  5. Group Education and Multidisciplinary Management for Chronic Headaches Among Adolescents in a Military Treatment Facility: A Retrospective Chart Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormond, Andrew; Faux, Brian M; Zickefoose, Betty A; Aden, James; Kapunan, Patricia E; Roberts, Timothy A

    2018-02-07

    To assess the effect of group education on the frequency of chronic headaches among adolescents. Chronic headaches are a common problem among adolescents with significant psychosocial morbidity. Brief education on lifestyle interventions to decrease headache frequency has established benefits among adult patients but is less proven among adolescents. This study is a chart review examining our experience with a group education program for 155 adolescents, aged 12-17 years old, enrolled in the U.S. military medical system with at least 3 months of chronic headaches who were referred to a headache evaluation clinic. The primary outcome of our study was self-reported number of days with a headache in the previous 30 days based on patient recall. We used a paired samples t-test to measure the change in headache frequency between the frequency reported at the headache class and follow-up more than 6 months after the class. Most of the adolescents seen in the program were female (114/155 [73.5%]) and suffered from migraine headaches (108/155 [69.8%]). Severe headache-related disability was reported by 40.6% of subjects (63/155). Subjects reported an average of 19 days with headache during the previous 30 days. Females and patients with higher headache-related disability reported a higher number of days with headache. Participation in the group education was associated with an 11.5 (SD 11.9, P < .001) day decrease in the frequency of headaches during the previous 30 days at follow-up at least 6 months after the class, with largest decline seen in patients with the highest level of migraine-related disability at baseline. Based on our retrospective chart review study, group education on headache evaluation and lifestyle management has potential as an effective, low-cost intervention for treatment of chronic headaches among adolescents. Published 2018. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Project W-519 CDR supplement: Raw water and electrical services for privatization contractor, AP tank farm operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    This supplement to the Project W-519 Conceptual Design will identify a means to provide RW and Electrical services to serve the needs of the TWRS Privatization Contractor (PC) at AP Tank Farm as directed by DOE-RL. The RW will serve the fire suppression and untreated process water requirements for the PC. The purpose of this CDR supplement is to identify Raw Water (RW) and Electrical service line routes to the TWRS Privatization Contractor (PC) feed delivery tanks, AP-106 and/or AP-108, and establish associated cost impacts to the Project W-519 baseline

  7. Project W-519 CDR supplement: Raw water and electrical services for privatization contractor, AP tank farm operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1998-07-31

    This supplement to the Project W-519 Conceptual Design will identify a means to provide RW and Electrical services to serve the needs of the TWRS Privatization Contractor (PC) at AP Tank Farm as directed by DOE-RL. The RW will serve the fire suppression and untreated process water requirements for the PC. The purpose of this CDR supplement is to identify Raw Water (RW) and Electrical service line routes to the TWRS Privatization Contractor (PC) feed delivery tanks, AP-106 and/or AP-108, and establish associated cost impacts to the Project W-519 baseline.

  8. Pre-clinical studies with CDR-grafted humanised anti-colorectal monoclonal antibody A33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, A.M.; Lee, F.T.; Hutchinson, D.; Cebon, J. [Ludwig Inst. for Cancer Research, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, VIC (Australia); Sturrock, S.; Pollock, D.; Armes, J.; Sinclair, R. [Austin Hospital, Heilderberg, VIC (Australia). Dept. of Anatomical Pathology; Welt, S.; Old, L.J. [Ludwig Inst. for Cancer Research, New York, NY (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Full text: Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be raised to selected antigens preferentially expressed on cancer cells compared to normal tissues, and therefore have attractive properties for targeting of cancers for therapy. Numerous strategies can be employed for cell kill, including conjugation of isotopes or toxins, and utilisation of intrinsic immune effector function of mAbs. To date, immunogenicity of murine antibodies (HAMA) has been a major limitation in effectiveness of mAb therapy. The anticolorectal mAb A33 in its murine form has been studied in Phase l/ll trials. A CDR-grafted humanised versions of A33 (huA33) has been developed, and we are evaluating this for clinical trials. The intact mAb huA33 has been radiolabelled and shown to have retained immunoreactivity of 80% specific binding to SW-1222 colon cells (Ka of 1.4 x 10{sup -9} M). An F(ab``)2 fragment has been produced, and demonstrates similar affinity to the intact version with immunoreactivity of 74% specific binding, a Ka of 2 x 10{sup -9} M, and similar molar displacement by intact huA33 in in-vitro displacement assays. Immunohistochemistry with biotinylated huA33 has demonstrated similar normal tissue and colon cancer specificity to the murine A33. Biodistribution studies with {sup 125}I labelled huA33 and {sup 125}I-F(ab``)2 huA33 have been performed in SW-1222 xenografted balb-c nude mice, and have demonstrated excellent targeting to tumours with maximal tumour: blood and tumour: liver ratios ranging from 37:1 and 62:1, respectively. Clinical trials with intact and F(ab``)2 huA33 are planned based on the results of these pre-clinical studies.

  9. Pre-clinical studies with CDR-grafted humanised anti-colorectal monoclonal antibody A33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, A.M.; Lee, F.T.; Hutchinson, D.; Cebon, J.; Sturrock, S.; Pollock, D.; Armes, J.; Sinclair, R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be raised to selected antigens preferentially expressed on cancer cells compared to normal tissues, and therefore have attractive properties for targeting of cancers for therapy. Numerous strategies can be employed for cell kill, including conjugation of isotopes or toxins, and utilisation of intrinsic immune effector function of mAbs. To date, immunogenicity of murine antibodies (HAMA) has been a major limitation in effectiveness of mAb therapy. The anticolorectal mAb A33 in its murine form has been studied in Phase l/ll trials. A CDR-grafted humanised versions of A33 (huA33) has been developed, and we are evaluating this for clinical trials. The intact mAb huA33 has been radiolabelled and shown to have retained immunoreactivity of 80% specific binding to SW-1222 colon cells (Ka of 1.4 x 10 -9 M). An F(ab'')2 fragment has been produced, and demonstrates similar affinity to the intact version with immunoreactivity of 74% specific binding, a Ka of 2 x 10 -9 M, and similar molar displacement by intact huA33 in in-vitro displacement assays. Immunohistochemistry with biotinylated huA33 has demonstrated similar normal tissue and colon cancer specificity to the murine A33. Biodistribution studies with 125 I labelled huA33 and 125 I-F(ab'')2 huA33 have been performed in SW-1222 xenografted balb-c nude mice, and have demonstrated excellent targeting to tumours with maximal tumour: blood and tumour: liver ratios ranging from 37:1 and 62:1, respectively. Clinical trials with intact and F(ab'')2 huA33 are planned based on the results of these pre-clinical studies

  10. A systematic review of the effects of euthanasia and occupational stress in personnel working with animals in animal shelters, veterinary clinics, and biomedical research facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotney, Rebekah L; McLaughlin, Deirdre; Keates, Helen L

    2015-11-15

    The study of occupational stress and compassion fatigue in personnel working in animal-related occupations has gained momentum over the last decade. However, there remains incongruence in understanding what is currently termed compassion fatigue and the associated unique contributory factors. Furthermore, there is minimal established evidence of the likely influence of these conditions on the health and well-being of individuals working in various animal-related occupations. To assess currently available evidence and terminology regarding occupational stress and compassion fatigue in personnel working in animal shelters, veterinary clinics, and biomedical research facilities. Studies were identified by searching the following electronic databases with no publication date restrictions: ProQuest Research Library, ProQuest Social Science Journals, PsycARTICLES, Web of Science, Science Direct, Scopus, PsychINFO databases, and Google Scholar. Search terms included (euthanasia AND animals) OR (compassion fatigue AND animals) OR (occupational stress AND animals). Only articles published in English in peer-reviewed journals that included use of quantitative or qualitative techniques to investigate the incidence of occupational stress or compassion fatigue in the veterinary profession or animal-related occupations were included. On the basis of predefined criteria, 1 author extracted articles, and the data set was then independently reviewed by the other 2 authors. 12 articles met the selection criteria and included a variety of study designs and methods of data analysis. Seven studies evaluated animal shelter personnel, with the remainder evaluating veterinary nurses and technicians (2), biomedical research technicians (1), and personnel in multiple animal-related occupations (2). There was a lack of consistent terminology and agreed definitions for the articles reviewed. Personnel directly engaged in euthanasia reported significantly higher levels of work stress and lower

  11. Disrespectful intrapartum care during facility-based delivery in sub-Saharan Africa: A qualitative systematic review and thematic synthesis of women's perceptions and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Susan; McCourt, Christine; Rayment, Juliet; Parmar, Divya

    2016-11-01

    The psycho-social elements of labour and delivery are central to any woman's birth experience, but international efforts to reduce maternal mortality in low-income contexts have neglected these aspects and focused on technological birth. In many contexts, maternity care is seen as dehumanised and disrespectful, which can have a negative impact on utilisation of services. We undertook a systematic review and meta-synthesis of the growing literature on women's experiences of facility-based delivery in sub-Saharan Africa to examine the drivers of disrespectful intrapartum care. Using PRISMA guidelines, databases were searched from 1990 to 06 May 2015, and 25 original studies were included for thematic synthesis. Analytical themes, that were theoretically informed and cognisant of the cultural and social context in which the dynamics of disrespectful care occur, enabled a fresh interpretation of the factors driving midwives' behaviour. A conceptual framework was developed to show how macro-, meso- and micro-level drivers of disrespectful care interact. The synthesis revealed a prevailing model of maternity care that is institution-centred, rather than woman-centred. Women's experiences illuminate midwives' efforts to maintain power and control by situating birth as a medical event and to secure status by focusing on the technical elements of care, including controlling bodies and knowledge. Midwives and women are caught between medical and social models of birth. Global policies encouraging facility-based delivery are forcing women to swap the psycho-emotional care they would receive from traditional midwives for the technical care that professional midwives are currently offering. Any action to change the current performance and dynamic of birth relies on the participation of midwives, but their voices are largely missing from the discourse. Future research should explore their perceptions of the value and practice of interpersonal aspects of maternity care and the

  12. Integration technique of digital I and C replacement and its Critical Digital Review procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Hui-Wen; Yang, Wen-Long

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A digital I and C replacement integration technique have been developed. ► Establishment of Nuclear Power Plant Digital Replacement Integration Guideline. ► Preliminary Investigation on I and C System Digitalization. ► Evaluation on I and C System Digitalization. ► Establishment of I and C System Digitalization Architectures. -- Abstract: Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) developed a digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C) replacement integration technique on the basis of requirement of the three existing nuclear power plants (NPPs), which are Chin–Shan (CS) NPP, Kuo–Sheng (KS) NPP, and Maanshan (MS) NPP, in Taiwan, and also developed the related Critical Digital Review (CDR) procedure. The digital I and C replacement integration technique includes: (1) Establishment of Nuclear Power Plant Digital Replacement Integration Guideline, (2) Preliminary Investigation on I and C System Digitalization, (3) Evaluation on I and C System Digitalization, and (4) Establishment of I and C System Digitalization Architectures. These works can be a reference for performing I and C system digital replacement integration of the three existing NPPs of Taiwan Power Company (TPC). A CDR is the review for a critical system digital I and C replacement. The major reference of this procedure is EPRI TR-1011710 (2005) “Handbook for Evaluating Critical Digital Equipment and Systems” which was published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). With this document, INER developed a TPC-specific CDR procedure. Currently, CDR becomes one of the policies for digital I and C replacement in TPC. The contents of this CDR procedure include: Scope, Responsibility, Operation Procedure, Operation Flow Chart, CDR review items. The CDR review items include the comparison of the design change, Software Verification and Validation (SV and V), Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Evaluation of Diversity and Defense-in-depth (D3), Evaluation of

  13. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  14. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  15. Canyon Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  16. Human TCR-MHC coevolution after divergence from mice includes increased nontemplate-encoded CDR3 diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojing; Poncette, Lucia; Blankenstein, Thomas

    2017-11-06

    For thymic selection and responses to pathogens, T cells interact through their αβ T cell receptor (TCR) with peptide-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on antigen-presenting cells. How the diverse TCRs interact with a multitude of MHC molecules is unresolved. It is also unclear how humans generate larger TCR repertoires than mice do. We compared the TCR repertoire of CD4 T cells selected from a single mouse or human MHC class II (MHC II) in mice containing the human TCR gene loci. Human MHC II yielded greater thymic output and a more diverse TCR repertoire. The complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) length adjusted for different inherent V-segment affinities to MHC II. Humans evolved with greater nontemplate-encoded CDR3 diversity than did mice. Our data, which demonstrate human TCR-MHC coevolution after divergence from rodents, explain the greater T cell diversity in humans and suggest a mechanism for ensuring that any V-J gene combination can be selected by a single MHC II. © 2017 Chen et al.

  17. A gp41 MPER-specific llama VHH requires a hydrophobic CDR3 for neutralization but not for antigen recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lutje Hulsik

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The membrane proximal external region (MPER of the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp41 is targeted by the broadly neutralizing antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. To date, no immunization regimen in animals or humans has produced HIV-1 neutralizing MPER-specific antibodies. We immunized llamas with gp41-MPER proteoliposomes and selected a MPER-specific single chain antibody (VHH, 2H10, whose epitope overlaps with that of mAb 2F5. Bi-2H10, a bivalent form of 2H10, which displayed an approximately 20-fold increased affinity compared to the monovalent 2H10, neutralized various sensitive and resistant HIV-1 strains, as well as SHIV strains in TZM-bl cells. X-ray and NMR analyses combined with mutagenesis and modeling revealed that 2H10 recognizes its gp41 epitope in a helical conformation. Notably, tryptophan 100 at the tip of the long CDR3 is not required for gp41 interaction but essential for neutralization. Thus bi-2H10 is an anti-MPER antibody generated by immunization that requires hydrophobic CDR3 determinants in addition to epitope recognition for neutralization similar to the mode of neutralization employed by mAbs 2F5 and 4E10.

  18. The long-term radiological safety of a surface disposal facility for low-level waste in Belgium - An international Peer review of key aspects of ONDRAF/NIRAS' safety report of November 2011 in preparation for the license

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    An important activity of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in the field of radioactive waste management is the organisation of independent, international peer reviews of national studies and projects. This report provides an international peer review of the long-term safety strategy and assessment being developed by the Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials, ONDRAF/NIRAS, as part of the licence application for the construction and operation of a surface disposal facility for short-lived, low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste in the municipality of Dessel, Belgium. The review was carried out by an International Review Team comprised of seven international specialists, all of whom were free of conflict of interest and chosen to bring complementary expertise to the review. To be accessible to both specialist and non-specialist readers, the review findings are provided at several levels of detail

  19. Navigating emotions and relationship dynamics: family life review as a clinical tool for older adults during a relocation transition into an assisted living facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hora, Kendra A; Roberto, Karen A

    2018-01-16

    Relocation for the purpose of receiving care may be one of the more challenging transitions for older adults. The purpose of this study was to facilitate a family life review (FLR) session aimed at enhancing family relationships and assisting older adults in coping with the challenges associated with a relocation. Fourteen dyads comprised of older adults who relocated to an assisted living facility (ALF) and a chosen family member or friend participated in a FLR session and semi-structured follow up interview. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method and triangulated with descriptive statistics. Emergent themes suggested participating in FLR influenced families by raising emotions, systemically thinking, and navigating the relocation. FLR facilitated positive connections, enhanced existing relationships, and promoted self-acceptance. Families indicated mutual storytelling was enjoyable and reminded them of the urgency to share their story. FLR allowed dyads to reflect and thus prompted a renewed perspective on some of the more challenging components of the relocation transition. Study findings provide insight into how families organize individual and interpersonal narratives and use these narratives during transitional times. FLR can aid families in making a smoother and fulfilling move to an ALF and other late life transitions.

  20. Systemic lupus erythematosus: molecular mimicry between anti-dsDNA CDR3 idiotype, microbial and self peptides as antigens for Th cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin eAas-Hanssen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is marked by a T helper (Th cell dependent B cell hyperresponsiveness, with frequent germinal center reactions, and gammaglobulinemia. A hallmark of SLE is the finding of IgG autoantibodies specific for dsDNA. The specificity of the Th cells that drive the expansion of anti-dsDNA B cells is unresolved. However, anti-microbial, anti-histone and anti-idiotype Th cell responses have been hypothesized to play a role. It has been entirely unclear if these seemingly disparate Th cell responses and hypotheses could be related or unified. Here we describe that H chain CDR3 idiotypes from IgG+ B cells of lupus mice have sequence similarities with both microbial and other self peptides, matched sequences were increased within the mutated CDR3 repertoire and when sequences were derived from lupus mice with expanded anti-dsDNA B cells. Analyses of histone sequences showed that particular histone peptides were similar to VDJ junctions. Moreover, lupus mice had Th cell responses towards histone peptides similar to anti-dsDNA CDR3 sequences. The results suggest that Th cell in lupus may have multiple cross-reactive specificities linked to the IgVH CDR3 Id-peptide sequences as well as similar DNA-associated protein motifs.

  1. Radiotherapy : the neutron therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The neutron therapy facility at the National Accelerator Centre has operated most reliably during the period under review (July 1990 - March 1991). Apart from routine servicing, a number of repairs and developments were undertaken, inter alia: the cable to the control pedestal in the treatment vault was replaced; the proximity detector in the treatment head was repaired, and the test mode facility has been reinstated. The therapy computer system, which supervises all aspects of the operation of the treatment system, has been used dependably since the commissioning of the facility. The neutron therapy facility has been heavily utilized during the review period for calibration and research projects. Extra care has been taken to protect personnel involved in the operation of the fast neutron therapy facility, both from prompt neutron and gamma radiation and from induced activity in the equipment and in the treatment room. 3 tabs., 4 refs., 5 figs

  2. Comparison of GPM IMERG, TMPA 3B42 and PERSIANN-CDR satellite precipitation products over Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mou Leong; Santo, Harrif

    2018-04-01

    The launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission has prompted the assessment of the newly released satellite precipitation products (SPPs) in different parts of the world. This study performed an initial comparison of three GPM IMERG products (IMERG_E, IMERG_L and IMERG_F) with its predecessor, the TMPA 3B42 and 3B42RT products, and a long-term PERSIANN-CDR product over Malaysia. The performance of six SPPs was evaluated using 501 precipitation gauges from 12 March 2014 to 29 February 2016. The annual, seasonal, monthly and daily precipitation measurements were validated using three widely used statistical metrics (CC, RMSE and RB). The precipitation detection capability (POD, FAR and CSI), probability density function (PDF) and the 2014-2015 flood event analysis were also considered in this assessment. The results show that all the SPPs perform well in annual and monthly precipitation measurements. The spatial variability of the total annual precipitation in 2015 is well captured by all six SPPs, with high precipitation amount in southern East Malaysia, and low precipitation amount in the middle part of Peninsular Malaysia. In contrast, all the SPPs show moderate correlation at daily precipitation estimations, with better performance during the northeast monsoon season. The performance of all the SPPs is better in eastern Peninsular Malaysia, but poorer in northern Peninsular Malaysia. All the SPPs have good precipitation detection ability, except the PERSIANN-CDR. All the SPPs underestimate the light (0-1 mm/day) and violent (> 50 mm/day) precipitation classes, but overestimate moderate and heavy (1-50 mm/day) precipitation classes. The IMERG is shown to have a better capability in detecting light precipitation (0-1 mm/day) compared to the other SPPs. The PERSIANN-CDR has the worst performance in capturing all the precipitation classes, with significant underestimation of light precipitation (0-1 mm/day) class and overestimation of moderate and

  3. Hospice care delivered at home, in nursing homes and in dedicated hospice facilities: A systematic review of quantitative and qualitative evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, B; Holman, A; Leurent, B; Davis, S; Jones, L

    2011-01-01

    Hospice care supports patients and their families physically and emotionally through the dying phase. In many countries a substantial portion of specialised end-of-life care is provided through hospices. Such care has developed outside of general healthcare and is commonly provided in a patient's home or in dedicated facilities. Hospice provision may need to increase in the future due to an ageing population with a greater need for access to end-of-life care. In this systematic review we sought to identify the current evidence on (1) the effectiveness, including cost-effectiveness, of hospices, and hospice care in a patient's home and in nursing homes and (2) the experiences of those who use and of those who provide such services. We included quantitative and qualitative studies on hospice care that was provided in a patient's home, nursing home or hospice. We did not include studies on end-of-life care that was provided as part of general healthcare provision, such as by general practitioners in primary care, community nurses or within general hospitals. For quantitative evaluations we included only those that compared hospice care with usual generalist healthcare. The databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library were searched from 2003 to 2009. Evidence was assessed for quality and data extractions double-checked. For quantitative studies we present the outcome data comparing hospice versus usual care. For qualitative evaluations we organise findings thematically. Eighteen comparative evaluations and four thematic papers were identified. Quantitative evidence, mostly of limited quality in design, showed that hospice care at home reduced general health care use and increased family and patient satisfaction with care. Main themes in the qualitative literature revealed that home hospice services support families to sustain patient care at home and hospice day care services generate for the patient a renewed sense of meaning and purpose. Although

  4. Review on colonization of residents and staff in Italian long-term care facilities by multidrug-resistant bacteria compared with other European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Aschbacher

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rates of colonization and infection with multidrug-resistant (MDR bacteria are increasing worldwide, in both acute care hospitals and long-term care facilities (LTCFs. Italy has one of the highest prevalence of MDR bacteria in European countries, especially with regard to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL or carbapenemase producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE. Method Review of studies on colonization by MDR bacteria from Italian LTCFs, risk factors for colonization and molecular characteristics of surveillance and clinical isolates, compared with other European countries. Results High variability of MDR colonization has been reported within and especially between European countries. Only a few surveillance studies have been performed in Italian LTCFs; these show MRSA colonization prevalence of 7.8–38.7 % for residents and 5.2–7.0 % for staff members, ESBL prevalence of 49.0–64.0 % for residents and 5.2–14.5 % for staff and prevalence of CPE of 1.0–6.3 % for residents and 0.0–1.5 % for staff. In Italian LTCFs, as well as in other European countries, the most prevalent ESBLs from surveillance or clinical Escherichia coli isolates were found to be CTX-M-type enzymes, particularly CTX-M-15, expressed by the pandemic ST131 clonal group; this lineage also expresses carbapenemase genes of the bla VIM and bla KPC types. Various risk factors for colonization of residents by MDR bacteria were identified. Conclusions The limited data from Italian LTCFs confirms these settings as important reservoirs for MDR organisms, allowing important considerations regarding the infection risk by these organisms. Nevertheless, more extended and countrywide screening studies for MDR colonization in Italian LTCFs are required. To promote further studies of various microbiological aspects related to LTCFs, the Association of Italian Clinical Microbiologists (Associazione Microbiologi

  5. Comprehensive facilities plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Facilities Plan (CFP) document provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly future development of land and capital assets at the Berkeley Lab site. The CFP directly supports Berkeley Lab`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The CFP is revised annually on Berkeley Lab`s Facilities Planning Website. Major revisions are consistent with DOE policy and review guidance. Facilities planing is motivated by the need to develop facilities for DOE programmatic needs; to maintain, replace and rehabilitate existing obsolete facilities; to identify sites for anticipated programmatic growth; and to establish a planning framework in recognition of site amenities and the surrounding community. The CFP presents a concise expression of the policy for the future physical development of the Laboratory, based upon anticipated operational needs of research programs and the environmental setting. It is a product of the ongoing planning processes and is a dynamic information source.

  6. Large mass storage facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, Arnold M.

    1978-08-01

    This is the final report of a study group organized to investigate questions surrounding the acquisition of a large mass storage facility. The programatic justification for such a system at Brookhaven is reviewed. Several candidate commercial products are identified and discussed. A draft of a procurement specification is developed. Some thoughts on possible new directions for computing at Brookhaven are also offered, although this topic was addressed outside of the context of the group's deliberations. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Côte D’Ivoire; Fifth Review Under the Three-Year Arrangement Under the Extended Credit Facility and Requests for Modification of Performance Criteria and Extension of the Current Arrangement

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses Côte d’Ivoire’s Fifth Review Under the Three-Year Arrangement Under the Extended Credit Facility (ECF) and Requests for Modification of Performance Criteria (PC) and Extension of the Current Arrangement. Program performance has been strong. All end-December PCs and all but one indicative target were met. On the downside, fiscal discipline and structural reform momentum could be adversely affected during the run-up to the October 2015 presidential elections. The IMF staff ...

  8. Support facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, F.S.; Blomquist, J.A.; Fox, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    Computer support is centered on the Remote Access Data Station (RADS), which is equipped with a 1000 lpm printer, 1000 cpm reader, and a 300 cps paper tape reader with 500-foot spools. The RADS is located in a data preparation room with four 029 key punches (two of which interpret), a storage vault for archival magnetic tapes, card files, and a 30 cps interactive terminal principally used for job inquiry and routing. An adjacent room provides work space for users, with a documentation library and a consultant's office, plus file storage for programs and their documentations. The facility has approximately 2,600 square feet of working laboratory space, and includes two fully equipped photographic darkrooms, sectioning and autoradiographic facilities, six microscope cubicles, and five transmission electron microscopes and one Cambridge scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray energy dispersive analytical system. Ancillary specimen preparative equipment includes vacuum evaporators, freeze-drying and freeze-etching equipment, ultramicrotomes, and assorted photographic and light microscopic equipment. The extensive physical plant of the animal facilities includes provisions for holding all species of laboratory animals under controlled conditions of temperature, humidity, and lighting. More than forty rooms are available for studies of the smaller species. These have a potential capacity of more than 75,000 mice, or smaller numbers of larger species and those requiring special housing arrangements. There are also six dog kennels to accommodate approximately 750 dogs housed in runs that consist of heated indoor compartments and outdoor exercise areas

  9. Mixed Waste Management Facility monthly report, May 1994. WBS 1.3.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streit, R.

    1994-06-01

    During May, after delivering the Conceptual Design (CD) Report in April, the MWMF Project continued to support the DOE decision and planning process for the MWMF. A ful1-day briefing was provided for the DOE Independent Cost Verification (ICV) committee, which was charted to review the CD Report (CDR), along with many subsequent individual meetings to review detailed cost estimates. Project options and impact information for a number of scope and funding scenarios was provided in support of the FY96 budget validation process. The Project continues to operate under the guidance provided in February to maintain, essentially, the January spending rate. Work on high-priority and critical-path items continued to the extent possible. Key activities included the Environmental Assessment (EA), Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR), and Permitting Actions. An in-depth programmatic review of the EA was completed, and the Laboratory review and approval process was initiated. A meeting was held with State permitting officials to clarify required actions and schedule planning. Although preliminary discussions have been held previously, sufficient technical information and manpower were not available to productively move out in this area until the CDR was complete. The meeting helped firm up the structure of permit applications and identify specific actions for State, Project, and DOE representatives.

  10. Preliminary design of a leadership academy for the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, report to management, reviews and discussions : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    All organizations, including such technicallyoriented organizations as the Alaska Department of : Transportation and Public Facilities (AK DOT&PF), have continuing needs for training of many types. : Opportunities for selfimprovement are essent...

  11. Hazard Baseline Downgrade Effluent Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    1998-01-01

    This Hazard Baseline Downgrade reviews the Effluent Treatment Facility, in accordance with Department of Energy Order 5480.23, WSRC11Q Facility Safety Document Manual, DOE-STD-1027-92, and DOE-EM-STD-5502-94. It provides a baseline grouping based on the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the facility. The Determination of the baseline grouping for ETF will aid in establishing the appropriate set of standards for the facility

  12. The bovine T cell receptor alpha/delta locus contains over 400 V genes and encodes V genes without CDR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinink, Peter; Van Rhijn, Ildiko

    2009-07-01

    Alphabeta T cells and gammadelta T cells perform nonoverlapping immune functions. In mammalian species with a high percentage of very diverse gammadelta T cells, like ruminants and pigs, it is often assumed that alphabeta T cells are less diverse than gammadelta T cells. Based on the bovine genome, we have created a map of the bovine TRA/TRD locus and show that, in cattle, in addition to the anticipated >100 TRDV genes, there are also >300 TRAV or TRAV/DV genes. Among the V genes in the TRA/TRD locus, there are several genes that lack a CDR2 and are functionally rearranged and transcribed and, in some cases, have an extended CDR1. The number of bovine V genes is a multiple of the number in mice and humans and may encode T cell receptors that use a novel way of interacting with antigen.

  13. Concrete structures for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The detailed requirements for the design and fabrication of the concrete structures for nuclear facilities and for the documents to be submitted to the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) are given in the guide. It also sets the requirements for the inspection of concrete structures during the construction and operation of facilities. The requirements of the guide primarily apply to new construction. As regards the repair and modification of nuclear facilities built before its publication, the guide is followed to the extent appropriate. The regulatory activities of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety during a nuclear facility's licence application review and during the construction and operation of the facility are summarised in the guide YVL 1.1

  14. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  15. The National Ignition Facility Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paisner, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Hogan, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of the National Ignition Facility is to achieve ignition and gain in inertial confinement fusion targets in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects testing, and for civilian applications such as fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high temperatures and densities. This paper reviews the design, schedule, and costs associated with the construction project

  16. The National Ignition Facility Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paisner, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Hogan, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of the National Ignition Facility is to achieve ignition and gain in ICF targets in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effect testing, and for civilian applications such as fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high temperatures and densities. This paper reviews the design, schedule and costs associated with the construction project

  17. 105-C Facility characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    This facility characterization plan is a site-specific document that describes how quantification and qualification of the radiological sources and the radioactive contamination in the 105-C Building will be accomplished. Characterization of hazardous materials will be addressed in a separate plan. This plan was developed from review of video tapes, photographs, and records. The purpose of this characterization plan is to provide an efficient and cost-effective method for determining the distribution of radioactive contamination at the 105-C Facility

  18. Relativistic heavy ion facilities: worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1986-05-01

    A review of relativistic heavy ion facilities which exist, are in a construction phase, or are on the drawing boards as proposals is presented. These facilities span the energy range from fixed target machines in the 1 to 2 GeV/nucleon regime, up to heavy ion colliders of 100 GeV/nucleon on 100 GeV/nucleon. In addition to specifying the general features of such machines, an outline of the central physics themes to be carried out at these facilities is given, along with a sampling of the detectors which will be used to extract the physics. 22 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee Reports on Review of the Fusion Materials Research Program, Review of the Proposed Proof-of-Principle Programs, Review of the Possible Pathways for Pursuing Burning Plasma Physics, and Comments on the ER Facilities Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1998-07-01

    The Fusion Energy Science Advisory Committee was asked to conduct a review of Fusion Materials Research Program (the Structural Materials portion of the Fusion Program) by Dr. Martha Krebs, Director of Energy Research for the Department of Energy. This request was motivated by the fact that significant changes have been made in the overall direction of the Fusion Program from one primarily focused on the milestones necessary to the construction of successively larger machines to one where the necessary scientific basis for an attractive fusion energy system is. better understood. It was in this context that the review of current scientific excellence and recommendations for future goals and balance within the Program was requested.

  20. Updated systematic review and meta-analysis of the performance of risk prediction rules in children and young people with febrile neutropenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S Phillips

    Full Text Available Febrile neutropenia is a common and potentially life-threatening complication of treatment for childhood cancer, which has increasingly been subject to targeted treatment based on clinical risk stratification. Our previous meta-analysis demonstrated 16 rules had been described and 2 of them subject to validation in more than one study. We aimed to advance our knowledge of evidence on the discriminatory ability and predictive accuracy of such risk stratification clinical decision rules (CDR for children and young people with cancer by updating our systematic review.The review was conducted in accordance with Centre for Reviews and Dissemination methods, searching multiple electronic databases, using two independent reviewers, formal critical appraisal with QUADAS and meta-analysis with random effects models where appropriate. It was registered with PROSPERO: CRD42011001685.We found 9 new publications describing a further 7 new CDR, and validations of 7 rules. Six CDR have now been subject to testing across more than two data sets. Most validations demonstrated the rule to be less efficient than when initially proposed; geographical differences appeared to be one explanation for this.The use of clinical decision rules will require local validation before widespread use. Considerable uncertainty remains over the most effective rule to use in each population, and an ongoing individual-patient-data meta-analysis should develop and test a more reliable CDR to improve stratification and optimise therapy. Despite current challenges, we believe it will be possible to define an internationally effective CDR to harmonise the treatment of children with febrile neutropenia.

  1. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other facilities...

  2. A Representative Survey of U.S. Space Systems and Methods for Estimating Their Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Collector Facility CDD Cosmic Dust Detector (Mariner) CDOS Customer Data and Operations System CDR Critical Design Review CELV Complementary...Release Observation Experiment CRRES Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite CRT Cosmic Ray Telescope (Mariner) CSAT Combined Systems Acceptance

  3. The experiences of acute non-surgical pain of children who present to a healthcare facility for treatment: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Nicole; Tallon, Mary; McConigley, Ruth; Wilson, Sally

    2015-10-01

    The qualitative objective of this systematic review is to identify and synthesize the best available evidence on experiences of acute non-surgical pain, including pain management, of children (between four to 18 years) when they present to a healthcare facility for treatment.The specific objectives are to identify: The International Association for the Study of Pain defines pain as "an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage". The pain experience is multifaceted and complex, extending beyond the physiological interpretation of a noxious stimulus, encompassing other dimensions, including; psychological, cognitive, sociocultural, affective and emotional factors. Pain can be described as chronic (persisting for three months or more) or acute (a time limited response to a noxious stimuli). Over the past 50 years clinical research has made revolutionary contributions to better understanding pediatric pain. The once pervasive erroneous notion that infants do not experience pain the same way as adults has been firmly dispelled. We now know that nervous system structures associated with the physiological interpretation of pain are functional as early as fetal development. Despite this critical knowledge and the growing global commitment to improving pediatric pain management in clinical practice, evidence repeatedly suggests that pain management remains suboptimal and inconsistent, a phenomenon commonly referred to as oligoanalgesia. Research evidence has linked poorly managed pain in the pediatric population to negative behavioral and physiological consequences later in life. Effective pain management is therefore a priority area for health care professionals. Improved understanding of children's experiences of acute non-surgical pain may lead to improved pain management and a reduction in oligoanalgesia.In the 1970s and 1980s, studies began exploring the subjective experiences of

  4. SU-E-P-55: The Reaserch of Cervical Cancer Delivered with Constant Dose Rate and Gantry Speed Arc Therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) On Conventional Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R; Bai, W; Chi, Z; Gao, C; Xiaomei, F [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China); Gao, Y [Hebei General Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Postoperative cervical cancer patients with large target volume and the target shape is concave, treatmented with static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is time consuming. The purpose of this study is to investigate using constant dose rate and gantry speed arc therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) on conventional linear accelrator, by comparing with the IMRT technology to evaluate the performance of CDR-CAS-IMAT on postoperative cervical cancer patients. Methods: 18 cervical cancer patients treated with IMRT on Varian 23IX were replanted using CDR-CAS-IMAT. The plans were generated on Oncentra v4.1 planning system, PTV was prescribed to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on the ability to meet the dose volume histogram. The homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI) of target volume, the dose of organs at risk, radiation delivery time and monitor units were also compared. SPSS 19.0 software paired T-test analysis was carried out on the two sets of data. Results: Compared with the IMRT plans PTV’s CI (t= 3.85, P =0.001), CTV’s CI, HI, D90, D95, D98, V95, V98, V100 (t=4.21, −3.18, 2.13, 4.65, 7.79, 2.29, 6.00, 2.13, p=0.001, 0.005, 0.049, 0.000, 0.000, 0.035, 0.000, 0.049), and cord D2 and rectum V40 (t=−2.65, −2.47, p= P =0.017, 0.025), and treatment time and MU (t=−36.0, −6.26, P =0.000, 0.000) were better than that of IMRT group. But the IMRT plans in terms of decreasing bladder V50, bowel V30 (t=2.14, 3.00, P =0.048, 0.008) and low dose irradiation volume were superior to that of CDR-CAS-IMAT plans. There were no significant differences in other statistical index. Conclusion: Cervical cancer patients with CDR-CAS-IMAT on Varian Clinical 23IX can get equivalent or superior dose distribution compared with the IMRT technology. IMAT have much less treatment time and MU can reduce the uncertainty factor and patient discomfort in treatment. This work was supported by the Medical Science Foundation of the health department of Hebei

  5. Identifying gaps in HIV policy and practice along the HIV care continuum: evidence from a national policy review and health facility surveys in urban and rural Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, Caoimhe; McRobie, Ellen; Oti, Samuel; Njamwea, Brian; Nyaguara, Amek; Odhiambo, Frank; Otieno, Fredrick; Njage, Muthoni; Shoham, Tara; Church, Kathryn; Mee, Paul; Todd, Jim; Zaba, Basia; Reniers, Georges; Wringe, Alison

    2017-11-01

    The last decade has seen rapid evolution in guidance from the WHO concerning the provision of HIV services along the diagnosis-to-treatment continuum, but the extent to which these recommendations are adopted as national policies in Kenya, and subsequently implemented in health facilities, is not well understood. Identifying gaps in policy coverage and implementation is important for highlighting areas for improving service delivery, leading to better health outcomes. We compared WHO guidance with national policies for HIV testing and counselling, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, HIV treatment and retention in care. We then investigated implementation of these national policies in health facilities in one rural (Kisumu) and one urban (Nairobi) sites in Kenya. Implementation was documented using structured questionnaires that were administered to in-charge staff at 10 health facilities in Nairobi and 34 in Kisumu. Policies were defined as widely implemented if they were reported to occur in > 70% facilities, partially implemented if reported to occur in 30-70% facilities, and having limited implementation if reported to occur in care and treatment policies were well aligned with WHO guidance. Policies promoting access to treatment and retention in care were widely implemented, but there was partial or limited implementation of several policies promoting access to HIV testing, and the more recent policy of Option B+ for HIV-positive pregnant women. Efforts are needed to improve implementation of policies designed to increase rates of diagnosis, thus facilitating entry into HIV care, if morbidity and mortality burdens are to be further reduced in Kenya, and as the country moves towards universal access to antiretroviral therapy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

  6. INDICTORS OF RESTORATION OF PROGRAM FACILITY OF MECHATRONICS SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Frolov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The determination of reliability indictors of program facilities of mechatronic systems are offered. The defaillance modes of program facilities are represent. A short review of model reliability of program facility is presented. The indictors of restoration, their mathematical determinations and application for the characteristics of program facility restoration are offered.

  7. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE): Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1: The LBNF and DUNE Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciarri, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); et al.

    2016-01-22

    This document presents the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) put forward by an international neutrino community to pursue the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment at the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF/DUNE), a groundbreaking science experiment for long-baseline neutrino oscillation studies and for neutrino astrophysics and nucleon decay searches. The DUNE far detector will be a very large modular liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) located deep underground, coupled to the LBNF multi-megawatt wide-band neutrino beam. DUNE will also have a high-resolution and high-precision near detector.

  8. Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) and Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) Conceptual Design Report Volume 1: The LBNF and DUNE Projects

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, R.; Adamowski, M.; Adams, C.; Adamson, P.; Adhikari, S.; Ahmad, Z.; Albright, C.H.; Alion, T.; Amador, E.; Anderson, J.; Anderson, K.; Andreopoulos, C.; Andrews, M.; Andrews, R.; Anghel, I.; Anjos, J. d.; Ankowski, A.; Antonello, M.; Aranda Fernandez, A.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Aristizabal, D.; Arrieta-Diaz, E.; Aryal, K.; Asaadi, J.; Asner, D.; Athar, M.S.; Auger, M.; Aurisano, A.; Aushev, V.; Autiero, D.; Avila, M.; Back, J.J.; Bai, X.; Baibussinov, B.; Baird, M.; Balantekin, B.; Baller, B.; Ballett, P.; Bambah, B.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Barker, G.J.; Barletta, W.A.; Barr, G.; Barros, N.; Bartosz, B.; Bartoszek, L.; Bashyal, A.; Bass, M.; Bay, F.; Beacom, J.; Behera, B.R.; Bellettini, G.; Bellini, V.; Beltramello, O.; Benekos, N.; Benetti, P.A.; Bercellie, A.; Bergevin, M.; Berman, E.; Berns, H.; Bernstein, R.; Bertolucci, S.; Bhandari, B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bian, J.; Biery, K.; Bishai, M.; Blackburn, T.; Blake, A.; Blaszczyk, F. d. M.; Blaufuss, E.; Bleakley, B.; Blucher, E.; Bocean, V.; Boffelli, F.; Boissevain, J.; Bolognesi, S.; Bolton, T.; Bonesini, M.; Boone, T.; Booth, C.; Bordoni, S.; Borysova, M.; Bourguille, B.; Boyd, S.B.; Brailsford, D.; Brandt, A.; Bremer, J.; Brice, S.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brown, G.; Brown, R.; Brunetti, G.; Bu, X.; Buchanan, N.; Budd, H.; Bugg, B.; Calafiura, P.; Calligarich, E.; Calvo, E.; Camilleri, L.; Campanelli, M.; Cantini, C.; Carls, B.; Carr, R.; Cascella, M.; Castromonte, C.; Mur, E.Catano; Cavanna, F.; Centro, S.; Cervera Villanueva, A.; Chalifour, M.; Chandratre, V.B.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chaussard, L.; Chembra, S.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, M.; Cherdack, D.; Chi, C.; Childress, S.; Choubey, S.; Choudhary, B.C.; Christodoulou, G.; Christofferson, C.; Church, E.; Cianci, D.; Cline, D.; Coan, T.; Cocco, A.; Coelho, J.; Cole, P.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Convery, M.; Corey, R.; Corwin, L.; Cranshaw, J.; Crivelli, P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Curioni, A.; Cushing, J.; Adams, D.L.; Dale, D.; Das, S.R.; Davenne, T.; Davies, G.S.; Davies, J.; Dawson, J.; De, K.; de Gouvea, A.; de Jong, J.K.; de Jong, P.; De Lurgio, P.; Decowski, M.; Delbart, A.; Densham, C.; Dharmapalan, R.; Dhingra, N.; Di Luise, S.; Diamantopoulou, M.; Diaz, J.S.; Diaz Bautista, G.; Diwan, M.; Djurcic, Z.; Dolph, J.; Drake, G.; Duchesneau, D.; Duvernois, M.; Duyang, H.; Dwyer, D.A.; Dye, S.; Dytman, S.; Eberly, B.; Edgecock, R.; Edmunds, D.; Elliott, S.; Elnimr, M.; Emery, S.; Endress, E.; Eno, S.; Ereditato, A.; Escobar, C.O.; Evans, J.; Falcone, A.; Falk, L.; Farbin, A.; Farnese, C.; Farzan, Y.; Fava, A.; Favilli, L.; Felde, J.; Felix, J.; Fernandes, S.; Fields, L.; Finch, A.; Fitton, M.; Fleming, B.; Forest, T.; Fowler, J.; Fox, W.; Fried, J.; Friedland, A.; Fuess, S.; Fujikawa, B.; Gago, A.; Gallagher, H.; Galymov, S.; Gamble, T.; Gandhi, R.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Gardiner, S.; Garvey, G.; Gehman, V.M.; Gendotti, A.; Geronimo, G. d.; Ghag, C.; Ghoshal, P.; Gibin, D.; Gil-Botella, I.; Gill, R.; Girardelli, D.; Giri, A.; Glavin, S.; Goeldi, D.; Golapinni, S.; Gold, M.; Gomes, R.A.; Gomez Cadenas, J.J.; Goodman, M.C.; Gorbunov, D.; Goswami, S.; Graf, N.; Graf, N.; Graham, M.; Gramelini, E.; Gran, R.; Grant, C.; Grant, N.; Greco, V.; Greenlee, H.; Greenler, L.; Greenley, C.; Groh, M.; Grullon, S.; Grundy, T.; Grzelak, K.; Guardincerri, E.; Guarino, V.; Guarnaccia, E.; Guedes, G.P.; Guenette, R.; Guglielmi, A.; Habig, A.T.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hackenburg, A.; Hadavand, H.; Haenni, R.; Hahn, A.; Haigh, M.D.; Haines, T.; Hamernik, T.; Handler, T.; Hans, S.; Harris, D.; Hartnell, J.; Hasegawa, T.; Hatcher, R.; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Hays, S.; Hazen, E.; Headley, M.; Heavey, A.; Heeger, K.; Heise, J.; Hennessy, K.; Hewes, J.; Higuera, A.; Hill, T.; Himmel, A.; Hogan, M.; Holanda, P.; Holin, A.; Honey, W.; Horikawa, S.; Horton-Smith, G.; Howard, B.; Howell, J.; Hurh, P.; Huston, J.; Hylen, J.; Imlay, R.; Insler, J.; Introzzi, G.; Ioanisyan, D.; Ioannisian, A.; Iwamoto, K.; Izmaylov, A.; Jackson, C.; Jaffe, D.E.; James, C.; James, E.; Jediny, F.; Jen, C.; Jhingan, A.; Jimenez, S.; Jo, J.H.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, R.; Johnstone, J.; Jones, B.J.; Joshi, J.; Jostlein, H.; Jung, C.K.; Junk, T.; Kaboth, A.; Kadel, R.; Kafka, T.; Kalousis, L.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Karagiorgi, G.; Karasavvas, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, P.; Kayser, B.; Kazaryan, N.; Kearns, E.; Keener, P.; Kemboi, S.; Kemp, E.; Kettell, S.H.; Khabibullin, M.; Khandaker, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kirby, B.; Kirby, M.; Klein, J.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kohn, S.; Koizumi, G.; Kopylov, A.; Kordosky, M.; Kormos, L.; Kose, U.; Kostelecky, A.; Kramer, M.; Kreslo, I.; Kriske, R.; Kropp, W.; Kudenko, Y.; Kudryavtsev, V.A.; Kulagin, S.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, G.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kutter, T.; Laminack, A.; Lande, K.; Lane, C.; Lang, K.; Lanni, F.; Learned, J.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, D.; Lee, H.; Lee, K.; Lee, W.M.; Leigui de Oliveira, M.A.; Li, Q.; Li, S.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Libo, J.; Lin, C.S.; Lin, S.; Ling, J.; Link, J.; Liptak, Z.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N.; Loew, T.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, K.; Lopes, M.D.L.; Lopez, J.P.; Losecco, J.; Louis, W.; Lowery, J.; Luethi, M.; Luk, K.; Lundberg, B.; Lundin, T.; Luo, X.; Lux, T.; Lykken, J.; Machado, A.A.; Macier, J.R.; Magill, S.; Mahler, G.; Mahn, K.; Malek, M.; Malhotra, S.; Malon, D.; Mammoliti, F.; Mancina, S.; Mandal, S.K.; Mandodi, S.; Manly, S.L.; Mann, A.; Marchionni, A.; Marciano, W.; Mariani, C.; Maricic, J.; Marino, A.; Marshak, M.; Marshall, C.; Marshall, J.; Marteau, J.; Martin-Albo, J.; Martinez, D.; Matsuno, S.; Matthews, J.; Mauger, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; Mayilyan, D.; Mazzucato, E.; McCauley, N.; McCluskey, E.; McConkey, N.; McDonald, K.; McFarland, K.S.; McGowan, A.M.; McGrew, C.; McKeown, R.; McNulty, D.; McTaggart, R.; Mefodiev, A.; Mehrian, M.; Mehta, P.; Mei, D.; Mena, O.; Menary, S.; Mendez, H.; Menegolli, A.; Meng, G.; Meng, Y.; Mertins, D.; Merritt, H.; Messier, M.; Metcalf, W.; Mewes, M.; Meyer, H.; Miao, T.; Milincic, R.; Miller, W.; Mills, G.; Mineev, O.; Miranda, O.; Mishra, C.S.; Mishra, S.R.; Mitrica, B.; Mladenov, D.; Mocioiu, I.; Mohanta, R.; Mokhov, N.; Montanari, C.; Montanari, D.; Moon, J.; Mooney, M.; Moore, C.; Morfin, J.; Morgan, B.; Morris, C.; Morse, W.; Moss, Z.; Mossey, C.; Moura, C.A.; Mousseau, J.; Mualem, L.; Muether, M.; Mufson, S.; Murphy, S.; Musser, J.; Musser, R.; Nakajima, Y.; Naples, D.; Napolitano, J.; Navarro, J.; Navas, D.; Nelson, J.; Nessi, M.; Newcomer, M.; Ng, Y.; Nichol, R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Nikolics, K.; Niner, E.; Norris, B.; Noto, F.; Novakova, P.; Novella, P.; Nowak, J.; Nunes, M.S.; O'Keeffe, H.; Oldeman, R.; Oliveira, R.; Olson, T.; Onishchuk, Y.; Osta, J.; Ovsjannikova, T.; Page, B.; Pakvasa, S.; Pal, S.; Palamara, O.; Palazzo, A.; Paley, J.; Palomares, C.; Pantic, E.; Paolone, V.; Papadimitriou, V.; Park, J.; Parke, S.; Parsa, Z.; Pascoli, S.; Patterson, R.; Patton, S.; Patzak, T.; Paulos, B.; Paulucci, L.; Pavlovic, Z.; Pawloski, G.; Peeters, S.; Pennacchio, E.; Perch, A.; Perdue, G.N.; Periale, L.; Perkin, J.D.; Pessard, H.; Petrillo, G.; Petti, R.; Petukhov, A.; Pietropaolo, F.; Plunkett, R.; Pordes, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potenza, R.; Potukuchi, B.; Poudyal, N.; Prokofiev, O.; Pruthi, N.; Przewlocki, P.; Pushka, D.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J.L.; Raboanary, R.; Radeka, V.; Radovic, A.; Raffelt, G.; Rakhno, I.; Rakotondramanana, H.T.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramachers, Y.A.; Rameika, R.; Ramsey, J.; Rappoldi, A.; Raselli, G.; Ratoff, P.; Rebel, B.; Regenfus, C.; Reichenbacher, J.; Reitzner, D.; Remoto, A.; Renshaw, A.; Rescia, S.; Richardson, M.; Rielage, K.; Riesselmann, K.; Robinson, M.; Rochester, L.; Rodrigues, O.B.; Rodrigues, P.; Roe, B.; Rosen, M.; Roser, R.M.; Ross-Lonergan, M.; Rossella, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rubbia, C.; Rucinski, R.; von Rohr, C.Rudolph; Russell, B.; Ruterbories, D.; Saakyan, R.; Sahu, N.; Sala, P.; Samios, N.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez, M.; Sands, B.; Santana, S.; Santorelli, R.; Santucci, G.; Saoulidou, N.; Scaramelli, A.; Schellman, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmitt, R.; Schmitz, D.; Schneps, J.; Scholberg, K.; Schukraft, A.; Schwehr, J.; Segreto, E.; Seibert, S.; Sepulveda-Quiroz, J.A.; Sergiampietri, F.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shahi, J.; Shahsavarani, S.; Shanahan, P.; Shankar, S.U.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, R.K.; Shaw, T.; Shrock, R.; Shyrma, I.; Simos, N.; Sinev, G.; Singh, I.; Singh, J.; Singh, J.; Singh, V.; Sinnis, G.; Sippach, W.; Smargianaki, D.; Smy, M.; Snider, E.; Snopok, P.; Sobczyk, J.; Sobel, H.; Soderberg, M.; Solomey, N.; Sondheim, W.; Sorel, M.; Sousa, A.; Soustruznik, K.; Spitz, J.; Spooner, N.J.; Stancari, M.; Stancu, I.; Stefan, D.; Steiner, H.M.; Stewart, J.; Stock, J.; Stoica, S.; Stone, J.; Strait, J.; Strait, M.; Strauss, T.; Striganov, S.; Sulej, R.; Sullivan, G.; Sun, Y.; Suter, L.; Sutera, C.M.; Svoboda, R.; Szczerbinska, B.; Szelc, A.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Talaga, R.; Tamsett, M.; Tariq, S.; Tatar, E.; Tayloe, R.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, D.; Terao, K.; Thiesse, M.; Thomas, J.; Thompson, L.F.; Thomson, M.; Thorn, C.; Thorpe, M.; Tian, X.; Tiedt, D.; Timm, S.C.; Tonazzo, A.; Tope, T.; Topkar, A.; Torres, F.R.; Torti, M.; Tortola, M.; Tortorici, F.; Toups, M.; Touramanis, C.; Tripathi, M.; Tropin, I.; Tsai, Y.; Tsang, K.V.; Tsenov, R.; Tufanli, S.; Tull, C.; Turner, J.; Tzanov, M.; Tziaferi, E.; Uchida, Y.; Urheim, J.; Usher, T.; Vagins, M.; Vahle, P.; Valdiviesso, G.A.; Valerio, L.; Vallari, Z.; Valle, J.; Van Berg, R.; Van de Water, R.; Van Gemmeren, P.; Varanini, F.; Varner, G.; Vasseur, G.; Vaziri, K.; Velev, G.; Ventura, S.; Verdugo, A.; Viant, T.; Vieira, T.V.; Vignoli, C.; Vilela, C.; Viren, B.; Vrba, T.; Wachala, T.; Wahl, D.; Wallbank, M.; Walsh, N.; Wang, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, L.; Wang, T.; Warburton, T.K.; Warner, D.; Wascko, M.; Waters, D.; Watson, T.B.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wei, W.; Weinstein, A.; Wells, D.; Wenman, D.; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; Whitehead, L.; Whittington, D.; Wilking, M.; Willhite, J.; Wilson, P.; Wilson, R.J.; Winslow, L.; Wittich, P.; Wojcicki, S.; Wong, H.H.; Wood, K.; Worcester, E.; Worcester, M.; Wu, S.; Xin, T.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, T.; Yarritu, K.; Ye, J.; Yeh, M.; Yershov, N.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, B.; Yu, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zalewska, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zang, L.; Zani, A.; Zani, A.; Zavala, G.; Zeller, G.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C.; Zimmerman, E.D.; Zito, M.; Zwaska, R.

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) put forward by an international neutrino community to pursue the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment at the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF/DUNE), a groundbreaking science experiment for long-baseline neutrino oscillation studies and for neutrino astrophysics and nucleon decay searches. The DUNE far detector will be a very large modular liquid argon time-projection chamber (LArTPC) located deep underground, coupled to the LBNF multi-megawatt wide-band neutrino beam. DUNE will also have a high-resolution and high-precision near detector.

  9. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greager, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan will ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, at a minimum, every 3 years

  10. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the uranium trioxide facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L.; De Lorenzo, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years

  11. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  12. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years

  13. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the uranium trioxide facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); De Lorenzo, D.S. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., NM (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  14. Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-05-24

    viii). Improvement of staff incentives and facilities for research activities, (ix). Health systems research proposals. (Table 1,Table 2,Table 3,Table 4). It is of interest to note that up to. 11 of the 20 studies targeted both researchers ...

  15. Nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    During September and October 2001, 15 events were recorded on the first grade and 1 on the second grade of the INES scale. The second grade event is in fact a re-classification of an incident that occurred on the second april 2001 at Dampierre power plant. This event happened during core refueling, a shift in the operation sequence led to the wrong positioning of 113 assemblies. A preliminary study of this event shows that this wrong positioning could have led, in other circumstances, to the ignition of nuclear reactions. Even in that case, the analysis made by EDF shows that the consequences on the staff would have been limited. Nevertheless a further study has shown that the existing measuring instruments could not have detected the power increase announcing the beginning of the chain reaction. The investigation has shown that there were deficiencies in the control of the successive operations involved in refueling. EDF has proposed a series of corrective measures to be implemented in all nuclear power plants. The other 15 events are described in the article. During this period 121 inspections have been made in nuclear facilities. (A.C.)

  16. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  17. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.

    2009-01-01

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  18. Facility safeguards at an LEU fuel fabrication facility in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroi, H.; Osabe, T.

    1984-01-01

    A facility description of a Japanese LEU BWR-type fuel fabrication plant focusing on safeguards viewpoints is presented. Procedures and practices of MC and A plan, measurement program, inventory taking, and the report and record system are described. Procedures and practices of safeguards inspection are discussed and lessons learned from past experiences are reviewed

  19. Review of the geological and structural setting near the site of the proposed Transuranic Waste Facility (TRUWF) Technical Area 52 (TA-52), Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Gardner, Jamie N.

    2007-10-01

    Because of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s proximal location to active geologic structures, assessment of seismic hazards, including the potential for seismic surface rupture, must occur before construction of any facilities housing nuclear or other hazardous materials. A transuranic waste facility (TRUWF) planned for construction at Technical Area 52 (TA-52) provides the impetus for this report. Although no single seismic hazards field investigation has focused specifically on TA-52, numerous studies at technical areas surrounding TA-52 have shown no significant, laterally continuous faults exhibiting activity in the last 10 ka within 3,000 ft of the proposed facility. A site-specific field study at the footprint of the proposed TRUWF would not yield further high-precision data on possible Holocene faulting at the site because post-Bandelier Tuff sediments are lacking and the shallowest subunit contacts of the Bandelier Tuff are gradational. Given the distal location of the proposed TRUWF to any mapped structures with demonstrable Holocene displacement, surface rupture potential appears minimal at TA-52.

  20. Department of Energy's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), October 20--24, 1980: A special report prepared for the Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training Committee: An independent on-site safety review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    The intent of this on-site safety review was to make a broad management assessment of HFIR operations, rather than conduct a detailed in-depth audit. The result of the review should only be considered as having identified trends or indications. The Team's observations and recommendations are based upon licensed reactor facility practices used to meet industry standards. For the most part, these standards form the basis for many of the comments in this report. The Team believes that a uniform minimum standard of performance should be achieved in the operation of DOE reactors. In order to assure that this is accomplished, clear standards are necessary. Consistent with the provisions of past AEC and ERDA policy, the Team has used the standards of the commercial nuclear power industry. It is recognized that this approach is conservative in that the HFIR reactor has a significantly greater degree of inherent safety (low temperature, low pressure, low power) than a licensed reactor

  1. Physics at the proposed National Underground Science Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    The scientific, technical, and financial reasons for building a National Underground Science Facility are discussed. After reviewing examples of other underground facilities, we focus on the Los Alamos proposal and the national for its choice of site

  2. Review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Review. J. Astrophys. Astr., Vol. 36, No. 4, December 2015, pp. 433–445. Line Shape Variability in a Sample of AGN with Broad Lines. D. Ilic1,∗, L. ˇC. Popovic1,2 ... ing from. We give here a comparative review of the line shape variability ..... using the mean continuum flux at 5100 Å and the online calculator for luminosity.

  3. Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    BOOK REVIEWS (99) Complete A-Z Physics Handbook Science Magic in the Kitchen The Science of Cooking Science Experiments You Can Eat WEB WATCH (101) These journal themes are pasta joke Microwave oven Web links CD REVIEW (104) Electricity and Magnetism, KS3 Big Science Comics

  4. [Interventions based on exercise and physical environment for preventing falls in cognitively impaired older people living in long-term care facilities: A systematic review and meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Román, Loreto; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat; Urrútia-Cuchí, Gerard; Garrido-Pedrosa, Jèssica

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review aims to report the effectiveness of interventions based on exercise and/or physical environment for reducing falls in cognitively impaired older adults living in long-term care facilities. In July 2014, a literature search was conducted using main databases and specialised sources. Randomised controlled trials assessing the effectiveness of fall prevention interventions, which used exercise or physical environment among elderly people with cognitive impairment living in long-term care facilities, were selected. Two independent reviewers checked the eligibility of the studies, and evaluated their methodological quality. If it was adequate, data were gathered. Fourteen studies with 3,539 participants using exercise and/or physical environment by a single or combined approach were included. The data gathered from studies that used both interventions showed a significant reduction in fall rate. Further research is needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of those interventions for preventing falls in the elderly with cognitive impairment living in long-term care establishments. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Irradiation Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, Blerina; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Fabich, Adrian; Garcia, Alia, Ruben; Glaser, Maurice; Gorine, Georgi; Jaekel, Martin, Richard; Mateu,Suau, Isidre; Pezzullo, Giuseppe; Pozzi, Fabio; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-01-01

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in many scientific fields. This paper summarizes the facilities currently operating for proton, gamma, mixed-field and electron irradiations, including their main usage, characteristics and information about their operation. The new CERN irradiation facilities database is also presented. This includes not only CERN facilities but also irradiation facilities available worldwide.

  6. Cameroon; Sixth Review Under the Three-Year Arrangement Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility, Request for Waiver of Performance Criterion, and Financing Assurances Review: Staff Report; Press Release on the Executive Board Discussion; and Statement by the Executive Director for Cameroon.

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2009-01-01

    The staff report examines Cameroon’s Sixth Review Under the Three-Year Arrangement Under the Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility and Request for Waiver of Performance Criterion. The authorities stressed their interest in a successor IMF program to support Cameroon’s medium-term economic objectives. Sound oil revenue management helped contain money growth, and inflation remained generally low. The government significantly lowered its indebtedness to the banking system, which helped to contai...

  7. Conceptual design for the Waste Receiving and Processing facility Module 2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This is part of a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 2A facility at the Hanford Reservation. The mission of the facility is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities those contact handled (CH) low-level radioactive mixed wastes (LLMW) that: (1) are currently in retrievable storage at the Hanford Central Waste Complex (HCWC) awaiting a treatment capability to permit permanent disposal compliant with the Land Disposal Restrictions and; (2) are forecasted to be generated over the next 30 years. The primary sources of waste to be treated include the currently stored waste from the 183-H solar basin evaporators, secondary solids from the future Hanford site liquid effluent treatment facilities, thermal treatment facility ash, other WRAP modules, and other miscellaneous waste from storage and onsite/offsite waste generators consisting of compactible and non-compactible solids, contaminated soils, and metals. This volume, Volume III is a compilation of the outline specifications that will form the basis for development of the Title design construction specifications. This volume contains abbreviated CSI outline specifications for equipment as well as non-equipment related construction and material items. For process and mechanical equipment, data sheets are provided with the specifications which indicate the equipment overall design parameters. This volume also includes a major equipment list

  8. Conceptual design for the Waste Receiving and Processing facility Module 2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This is a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 2A facility at Hanford Reservation. The mission of the WRAP Module 2A facility is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities those contact handled (CH) low-level radioactive mixed wastes (LLMW) that: (1) are currently in retrievable storage at the Hanford Central Waste Complex (HCWC) awaiting a treatment capability to permit permanent disposal compliant with the Land Disposal Restrictions and; (2) are forecasted to be generated over the next 30 years. The primary sources of waste to be treated at WRAP Module 2A include the currently stored waste from the 183-H solar basin evaporators, secondary solids from the future Hanford site liquid effluent treatment facilities, thermal treatment facility ash, other WRAP modules, and other, miscellaneous waste from storage and onsite/offsite waste generators consisting of compactible and non-compactible solids, contaminated soils, and metals. This volume, Volume 1 provides a narrative of the project background, objective and justification. A description of the WRAP 2A mission, operations and project scope is also included. Significant project requirements such as security, health, safety, decontamination and decomissioning, maintenance, data processing, and quality are outlined. Environmental compliance issues and regulatory permits are identified, and a preliminary safety evaluation is provided

  9. Conceptual design for the Waste Receiving and Processing facility Module 2A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This is part of a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 2A facility at Hanford Reservation. The mission of the WRAP Module 2A facility is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities those contact handled (CH) low-level radioactive mixed wastes (LLMW) that: (1) are currently in retrievable storage at the Hanford Central Waste Complex (HCWC) awaiting a treatment capability to permit permanent disposal compliant with the Land Disposal Restrictions and; (2) are forecasted to be generated over the next 30 years. The primary sources of waste to be treated at WRAP Module 2A include the currently stored waste from the 183-H solar basin evaporators, secondary solids from the future Hanford site liquid effluenttreatment facilities, thermal treatment facility ash, other WRAP modules, and other miscellaneous waste from storage and onsite/offsite waste generators consisting of compactible and non-compactible solids, contaminated soils, and metals. This volume, Volume V, provides a comprehensive conceptual design level narrative description of the process, utility, ventilation, and plant control systems. The feeds and throughputs, design requirements, and basis for process selection are provided, as appropriate. Key DOE/WHC criteria and reference drawings are delineated

  10. Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years

  11. Facility effluent monitoring plan for 242-A evaporator facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crummel, G.M.; Gustavson, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the U.S. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could affect employee or public safety or the environment. A facility effluent monitoring plan determination was performed during Calendar Year 1991 and the evaluation showed the need for a facility effluent monitoring plan. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-1. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, as a minimum, every three years.

  12. Reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Revista alicantina de estudios ingleses

    1996-01-01

    Contiene: Jan Pilditch, ed. The Critical Response to Katherine Mansfield. Critical Responses in Arts and Letters. 21. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1996 / reviewed by Ana Belén López Pérez; Edith Wharton. Cartas a Morton Fullerton (1907-1931), (Barcelona, Grijalbo Mondadori, 1995). Ed. Marina Premoli. Translation: Esther Gómez / reviewed by Teresa Gómez Reus; Elizabeth Deeds Ermarth. The English Novel in History: 1840-1895. London and New York: Routledge, 1997 / reviewed by Ángel Pé...

  13. INCIDENCE.CDR NEW 1.CDR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and Asia . In most high-income countries, cars make up the largest proportion of the road traffic, while in low- income and middle-income countries pedestrians and riders of bicycles, motorcycles and mopeds are more common. These differences in road users have an important impact on the occurrence of injuries among ...

  14. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  15. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  16. Traffic impacts of bicycle facilities : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Engineers need information about interactions between vehicles and bicyclists to design efficient, safe transportation systems. This study involved a review of design guidelines for bicycle facilities, observation of bicycle-vehicle interactions at n...

  17. Review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-04-18

    jbiosci. J. Biosci. 42(2), June 2017, 345–353 * Indian Academy of Sciences. 345. DOI: 10.1007/s12038-017-9681-x. Keywords. Angiogenesis; FRG1; FSHD; neuromuscular disorder; RNA biogenesis. Review. Published online: ...

  18. Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, George; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reviews three software packages: 1) a package containing 68 programs covering general topics in chemistry; 2) a package dealing with acid-base titration curves and allows for variables to be changed; 3) a chemistry tutorial and drill package. (MVL)

  19. Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, Floyd; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews eight textbooks, readers, and books. Topics include Latin America, colonial America, the Carolinians, women in French textbooks, the Vikings, the Soviet Union, nineteenth-century Black America, and Ernest Rutherford. (TRS)

  20. Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , complications are relatively common and this needs to be considered in patient counseling and clinical decision making. Review: Fertility generally returns after renal transplantation. Approximately 74% of pregnancies in kidney transplant ...

  1. Reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Revista alicantina de estudios ingleses

    2000-01-01

    Contiene: Villalba, Estefanía. Claves para interpretar la literatura inglesa. Madrid: Alianza Editorial, 1999,211 p. / reviewed by Eva M. Pérez Rodríguez; Dieter Stein & Rosanna Sornicola (ed.) The Virtues of Language. History in Language, Linguistics and Texts. Number 87. Amsterdam: John Benjamin Pub. Co., 1998 / reviewed by José Manuel Belda Medina; Antonia Sánchez-Macarro and R. Carter (eds.) (1998): Linguistic Choice across Genres: Variation in Spoken and Written English. Amsterd...

  2. Readiness Assessment Plan, Hanford 200 areas treated effluent disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulmer, F.J.

    1995-01-01

    This Readiness Assessment Plan documents Liquid Effluent Facilities review process used to establish the scope of review, documentation requirements, performance assessment, and plant readiness to begin operation of the Treated Effluent Disposal system in accordance with DOE-RLID-5480.31, Startup and Restart of Facilities Operational Readiness Review and Readiness Assessments

  3. Assessing the state of the art in biomedical relation extraction: overview of the BioCreative V chemical-disease relation (CDR) task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chih-Hsuan; Peng, Yifan; Leaman, Robert; Davis, Allan Peter; Mattingly, Carolyn J; Li, Jiao; Wiegers, Thomas C; Lu, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Manually curating chemicals, diseases and their relationships is significantly important to biomedical research, but it is plagued by its high cost and the rapid growth of the biomedical literature. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in developing computational approaches for automatic chemical-disease relation (CDR) extraction. Despite these attempts, the lack of a comprehensive benchmarking dataset has limited the comparison of different techniques in order to assess and advance the current state-of-the-art. To this end, we organized a challenge task through BioCreative V to automatically extract CDRs from the literature. We designed two challenge tasks: disease named entity recognition (DNER) and chemical-induced disease (CID) relation extraction. To assist system development and assessment, we created a large annotated text corpus that consisted of human annotations of chemicals, diseases and their interactions from 1500 PubMed articles. 34 teams worldwide participated in the CDR task: 16 (DNER) and 18 (CID). The best systems achieved an F-score of 86.46% for the DNER task--a result that approaches the human inter-annotator agreement (0.8875)--and an F-score of 57.03% for the CID task, the highest results ever reported for such tasks. When combining team results via machine learning, the ensemble system was able to further improve over the best team results by achieving 88.89% and 62.80% in F-score for the DNER and CID task, respectively. Additionally, another novel aspect of our evaluation is to test each participating system's ability to return real-time results: the average response time for each team's DNER and CID web service systems were 5.6 and 9.3 s, respectively. Most teams used hybrid systems for their submissions based on machining learning. Given the level of participation and results, we found our task to be successful in engaging the text-mining research community, producing a large annotated corpus and improving the results of

  4. The LapG protein plays a role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by controlling the presence of the CdrA adhesin on the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Berthelsen, Jens; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    formation and biofilm dispersal. The P. aeruginosa LapG protein is shown to be a functional homolog of the Pseudomonas putida LapG protein which has previously been shown to function as a periplasmic protease that targets the surface adhesin LapA. Transposon mutagenesis and characterization of defined......Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a clinically relevant species involved in biofilm-based chronic infections. We provide evidence that the P. aeruginosa LapG protein functions as a periplasmic protease that can cleave the protein adhesin CdrA off the cell surface, and thereby plays a role in biofilm...

  5. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  6. Aperture area measurement facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST has established an absolute aperture area measurement facility for circular and near-circular apertures use in radiometric instruments. The facility consists of...

  7. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  8. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  9. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Facility Registry Service (FRS) provides an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities across EPA,...

  10. Barriers to access and utilization of emergency obstetric care at health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa-a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geleto, Ayele; Chojenta, Catherine; Mussa, Abdulbasit; Loxton, Deborah

    2018-04-16

    Nearly 15% of all pregnancies end in fatal perinatal obstetric complications including bleeding, infections, hypertension, obstructed labor, and complications of abortion. Between 1990 and 2015, an estimated 10.7 million women died due to obstetric complications. Almost all of these deaths (99%) happened in developing countries, and 66% of maternal deaths were attributed to sub-Saharan Africa. The majority of cases of maternal mortalities can be prevented through provision of evidence-based potentially life-saving signal functions of emergency obstetric care. However, different factors can hinder women's ability to access and use emergency obstetric services in sub-Saharan Africa. Therefore, the aim of this review is to synthesize current evidence on barriers to accessing and utilizing emergency obstetric care in sub-Saharan African. Decision-makers and policy formulators will use evidence generated from this review in improving maternal healthcare particularly the emergency obstetric care. Electronic databases including MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, and Maternity and Infant Care will be searched for studies using predefined search terms. Articles published in English language between 2010 and 2017 with quantitative and qualitative design will be included. The identified papers will be assessed for meeting eligibility criteria. First, the articles will be screened by examining their titles and abstracts. Then, two reviewers will review the full text of the selected articles independently. Two reviewers using a standard data extraction format will undertake data extraction from the retained studies. The quality of the included papers will be assessed using the mixed methods appraisal tool. Results from the eligible studies will be qualitatively synthesized using the narrative synthesis approach and reported using the three delays model. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses checklist will be employed to present the findings. This

  11. Design, fabrication and installation of irradiation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Bong Shick; Kim, Y. S.; Lee, C. Y. and others

    1999-03-01

    The principal contents of this project are to design, fabricate and install the steady-state fuel test loop in HANARO for nuclear technology development. Procurement and fabrication of main equipment, licensing and technical review for fuel test loop have been performed during 2 years(1997, 1998) for this project. Following contents are described in the report. - Procurement and fabrication of the equipment, piping for OPS - IPS manufacture - License - Technical review and evaluation of the FTL facility. As besides, as these irradiation facilities will be installed in HANARO, review of safety concern, discussion with KINS for licensing and review ofHANARO interface have been performed respectively. (author)

  12. Post-cold war United Nations peacekeeping operations: a review of the case for a hybrid level 2+ medical treatment facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ralph Jay

    2015-01-01

    Post-Cold War, UN peacekeeping operations (UN PKOs) have become larger, more mobile, multi-faceted and conducted over vast areas of remote, rugged, and harsh geography. They have been increasingly involved in dangerous areas with ill-defined boundaries, simmering internecine armed conflict, and disregard on the part of some local parties for peacekeepers' security and role. Yet progressively there have been expectations of financial restraint and austerity. Additionally, UN PKOs have become more "robust," that is, engaged in preemptive, assertive operations. A statistically positive and significant relationship exists between missions' size, complexity, remoteness, and aggressive tenor and a higher probability of trauma or death, especially as a result of hostile actions or disease. Therefore, in the interest of "force protection" and optimizing operations, a key component of UN PKOs is health care and medical treatment. The expectation is that UN PKO medical support must conform to the general intent and structure of current UN PKOs to become more streamlined, portable, mobile, compartmentalized, and specialized, but also more varied and complex to address the medical aspects of these missions cost-efficiently. This article contends that establishing a hybrid level 2-a level 2 with level 3 modules and components (i.e., level 2+)-is a viable course of action when considering trends in the medical aspects of Post-Cold War UN PKOs. A level 2 medical treatment facility has the potential to provide needed forward mobile medical treatment, especially trauma care, for extended, complex, large-scale, and comprehensive UN PKOs. This is particularly the case for missions that include humanitarian outreach, preventive medicine, and psychiatry. The level 2 treatment facility is flexible enough to expand into a hybrid level 2+ with augmentation of modules based on changes in mission requirements and variation in medical aspects.

  13. Guide to research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  14. A Review of the Decommissioning Plan and Cost Estimate for the Studsvik Rock Facility (AM) for the Storage of Low and Intermediate Level Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varley, Geoff

    2004-03-01

    The AM facility is a storage facility for packaged wastes that have been conditioned at the Studsvik site. It is located inside a rock mass on the Studsvik industrial site. The task of the facility is to store the wastes on an interim basis before dispatch to a repository. The waste packages sentenced for storage in AM include: Low-level waste (LLW) packages that do not need any special protection against ionising radiation; Intermediate-level waste (ILW) packages that must be handled with a protective shield and using remote controlled equipment. In all cases the waste packages delivered to AM do not have any surface radioactive contamination. To date no release of contamination has been known to occur. The AM decommissioning cost estimate prepared for SVAFO addresses a Main Case (all wastes removed) and an Alternate Case (in which the scope of removal of equipment is unclear). The cost estimates for the Main Case and the Alternate case are MSEK 16.8 and MSEK 10.0 respectively. The overall program, comprising preparation, dismantling and concluding work, is projected to take 24 months. There are a number of aspects of the program that are not clear in the AB SVAFO report. For example, the assumed route for the disposition of wastes generated in dismantling process equipment and building materials is unclear. In addition, the detailed schedule of program items (Section A items in cost estimate) is somewhat confusing with the possibility that several cost elements have been omitted. AM normalised unit costs for selected, individual decommissioning activities have been derived and compared with relevant benchmark data from other recent decommissioning cost estimate analyses performed for SKI. Taking into account that there is very good access at AM, the results of these analyses give some comfort that the AM equipment dismantling estimate is in the correct ballpark. Regarding resources needed for project planning and management, the AM ratio of man-hours to project

  15. Toward computerized morphometric facilities: a review of 58 software packages for computer-aided three-dimensional reconstruction, quantification, and picture generation from parallel serial sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijsmans, D. P.; Lamers, W. H.; Los, J. A.; Strackee, J.

    1986-01-01

    This review gives an inventory of 58 computer-aided three-dimensional reconstruction applications in the domain of biomedical research. It is devoted to the formulation of a set of recommendations thought to be necessary for improved performance of software packages in this field. These

  16. Health Facility Staff Training for Improving Breastfeeding Outcome: A Systematic Review for Step 2 of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, Olukunmi O; Dagvadorj, Amarjargal; Yourkavitch, Jennifer; da Silva Lopes, Katharina; Suto, Maiko; Takemoto, Yo; Mori, Rintaro; Rayco-Solon, Pura; Ota, Erika

    2017-11-01

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) implemented through the "Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding" has been widely promoted as an intervention that improves breastfeeding rates. Step 2 requires the training of all healthcare staff in skills that are necessary to implement the policy. This systematic review provides evidence about the effect of training healthcare staff in hospitals and birth centers on breastfeeding outcomes. Randomized controlled trials (RCT), quasi-RCT, and controlled before and after (CBA) studies comparing training of healthcare staff on breastfeeding and supportive feeding practices with no training were included in this review. We searched CENTRAL PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and the British Nursing Index for studies. Studies were screened against predetermined criteria, and risk of bias of included studies was assessed using the Risk of Bias Assessment tool for Non-Randomized Studies for non-RCT studies and the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions for RCT studies. Of the six studies included in this review, three were RCT whereas three were CBA studies. The studies were conducted in 5 countries and involved 390 healthcare staff. Provision of educational interventions aimed at increasing knowledge and practice of BFHI and support was found to improve health worker's knowledge, attitude, and compliance with the BFHI practices. In one study, the rate of exclusive breastfeeding increased at the intervention site but no differences were found for breastfeeding initiation rates. All included studies had methodological limitations, and study designs and methodologies lacked comparability.

  17. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farms facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

    1995-05-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using specific guidelines. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated as a minimum every three years

  18. Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Warren

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Europe in the Rotmdis a hypertextuall hypergraphical database of facts about Europe, biased towards education and training, but taking in its stride many peripheral areas relevant to anyone considering living and/or working in, or even visiting, a member state of the EU - population, economy, institutions, geography, climate and so forth - all making up thousands of interconnected screens. These screens contain maps with a selection of zooms and hotspots, all kinds of facts and figures about available educational and vocational courses (presented both textually and, where appropriate, as graphs, bar charts and such like, details of life in each EU member state, details of cities and what they have to offer, and a lot more. There are also extra facilities, such as being able to set currency exchange rates or to create customized notebooks.

  19. Plum Brook facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: the Spacecraft Propulsion Research Research Facility (B-2); the Hydrogen Heat Transfer Facility (HHTF); the Rocket Dynamics and Control Facility (B-3); the Cryogenic Propellant Tank Site (K-Site); and the Space Power Facility (SPF).

  20. Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prud’homme van Reine, W.F.

    1998-01-01

    The two published parts of the Desmid Flora of Austria are well-illustrated review volumes on a group of precious freshwater microalgae. Volume 1 contains a pretty, visual key to the genera, completed by figures of one or more characteristic species. In all keys of the separate genera many visual

  1. Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, C.

    1996-01-01

    The first volume of this series was published in 1991, and reviewed in Blumea 38, p. 216. The treatments of volumes 2 and 3 are each based on a doctor’s thesis by the first author, elaborated under supervision of Dr. Panigrahi. Volume 2 contains regional revisions of six genera: Prunus, Prinsepia,

  2. Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Den Hazel, H B; Kielland-Brandt, Morten; Winther, Jakob R.

    1996-01-01

    The yeast vacuole, which is equivalent to the lysosome of higher eukaryotes, is one of the best characterized degradative organelles. This review describes the biosynthesis and function of yeast vacuolar proteases. Most of these enzymes are delivered to the vacuole via the early compartments...

  3. Reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, Frits

    1995-01-01

    This is the second volume of a revision of Tabernaemontana (Apocynaceae). The volume covers the New World species (44) and the genus Stemmadenia (10 species). This part of the revision of Tabernaemontana comes up to the high standards set in the first volume [see the review by Leenhouts, Blumea 38

  4. Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-19

    Dave Richards and Brian Finch. March 19, 2016, Penguin Random House South Africa, ISBN 978-1775842514, pp. 64, full colour. Price US$10.00/GB£6.70. In this review, I shall attempt to convince readers that ... head and slams her book down as the memory arrives. “Oh no. That bird still sends shivers through me!

  5. Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalkman, C.; Adema, F.

    1998-01-01

    This book intends (according to the preface) to afford at once a review, a general outline of what has been accomplished, and a set of signposts for the future. It attempts to do so in three sections on Origin and Diversification of Primitive Land Plants (4 papers), Origin and Diversification of

  6. Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, de W.J.J.O.

    1994-01-01

    This review marks the appearance of Volume II, after the publication of Volume I, Pteridophytes and Gymnosperms, in 1990; several more volumes are expected in the future before completion of the Vascular plants as a whole. The present volume contains 73 families out of some 250-500 families which

  7. Systematic review of the evidence for a liberalized diet in the management of diabetes mellitus in older adults residing in aged care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrer, Olivia; Yaxley, Alison; Walton, Karen; Healy, Erin; Miller, Michelle

    2015-04-01

    A systematic review of the literature was conducted to review and evaluate the evidence supporting a liberalized diet for the management of diabetes mellitus in aged care homes and examine the effect of this on glycaemia, nutritional status and diabetes comorbidity risk factors. A 3 step search of eight databases followed by independent data extraction and quality assessment by two authors was undertaken. Studies which compared therapeutic diets to a liberalized diet or observation studies reviewing the effects of therapeutic diets on glycaemia and nutritional status were included. Of the 546 studies identified, six met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality of the studies was rated poor and the majority concluded no statistically significant change in diabetes management outcomes with a liberalized diet, but modest increases in glycaemia were observed. Inadequate data was available to determine effects of diet change on nutritional status or diabetes risk factors. Overall studies were in support of a liberalized diet but due to the low quality of the evidence and a lack of significant findings it may not be appropriate to extrapolate these conclusions to inform dietetic practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of hydrological changes and flood increase in Niamey based on the PERSIANN-CDR satellite rainfall estimate and hydrological simulations over the 1983–2013 period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Casse

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A dramatic increase in the frequency and intensity of floods due to the Niger River in the city of Niamey (Niger has been observed in the last decade. Previous studies highlighted the role of the land use changes on the flood increase since 1970s. In the last decade, observations have raised the issue of a possible increase in extreme rainfall in the Sahel, which may have caused the recent and extreme floods in Niamey in 2010, 2012 and 2013. The study focuses on the 125 000 km2 basin between Ansongo and Niamey. This is the drainage area of the monsoon rainfall that leads to the rapid flow rise occurring between June and October. To understand the possible role of rainfall in flood intensification, satellite rainfall estimate is attractive in a region where the operational gauge network is sparse. This paper analyses the evolution of the Niger hydrograph in Niamey based on discharge observations, hydrological modelling and the satellite product PERSIANN-CDR, over the 1983–2013 period. PERSIANN-CDR is first compared with four other rainfall products. The salient features of the observed changes, i.e. a marked change in the mean decadal hydrograph, is well mimicked by the simulations, implying that rainfall is the first driver to the observed changes. The increase of flooded years over the period is also well reproduced but with some uncertainties in the exact number of flood days per year.

  9. Preliminary report: NIF laser bundle review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tietbohl, G.L.; Larson, D.W.; Erlandson, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    As requested in the guidance memo 1 , this committe determined whether there are compelling reasons to recommend a change from the NIF CDR baseline laser. The baseline bundle design based on a tradeoff between cost and technical risk, which is replicated four times to create the required 192 beams. The baseline amplifier design uses bottom loading 1x4 slab and flashlamp cassettes for amplifier maintenance and large vacuum enclosures (2.5m high x 7m wide in cross-section for each of the two spatial filters in each of the four bundles. The laser beams are arranged in two laser bays configured in a u-shape around the target area. The entire bundle review effort was performed in a very short time (six weeks) and with limited resources (15 personnel part-time). This should be compared to the effort that produced the CDR design (12 months, 50 to 100 personnel). This committee considered three alternate bundle configurations (2x2, 4x2, and 4x4 bundles), and evaluated each bundle against the baseline design using the seven requested issues in the guidance memo: Cost; schedule; performance risk; maintainability/operability; hardware failure cost exposure; activation; and design flexibility. The issues were reviewed to identify differences between each alternate bundle configuration and the baseline

  10. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: peer review of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation's plan to decommission and reclaim exploratory shafts and related facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenster, D.F.; Schubert, J.P.; Zellmer, S.D.; Harrison, W.; Simpson, D.G.; Busch, J.S.

    1984-07-01

    The following recommendations are made for improving the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation's plan for decommissioning and reclaiming exploratory shafts and other facilities associated with site characterization: (1) Discuss more comprehensively the technical aspects of activities related to decommissioning and reclamation. More detailed information will help convince the staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and others that the activities as outlined in the plan are properly structured and that the stated goals can be achieved. (2) Address in considerably greater detail how the proposed activities will satisfy specific federal, state, and local laws and regulations. (3) State clearly the precise purpose of the plan, preferably at the beginning and under an appropriate heading. (4) Also under an appropriate heading and immediately after the section on purpose, describe the scope of the plan. The tasks covered by this plan and closely related tasks covered by other appropriate plans should be clearly differentiated. (5) Discuss the possible environmental effects of drilling the exploratory shaft, excavating drifts in salt, and drilling boreholes as part of site characterization. Mitigation activities should be designed to counter specific potential impacts. High priority should be given to minimizing groundwater contamination and restoring the surface to a condition consistent with the proposed land use following completion of characterization activities at sites not chosen for repository construction. (6) Define ambiguous technical terms, either in the text when first introduced or in an appended glossary

  11. Melt onset dates for Arctic regions derived from satellite passive microwave data for 1979-2010; a comparison between the operational CDR and research level ESDR data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M. R.; Bliss, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    The rapid nature and extent of the sea ice loss during recent summers have shown the importance of monitoring melt during the spring and summer transition. Using remotely sensed brightness temperatures, snow overlying sea ice can be identified. The purpose of this presentation is to show the usefulness of the new NOAA CDR for melt onset dates and the new NASA MEaSURES ESDR for melt onset dates records. The NOAA CDR melt onset algorithm is designed as an operational algorithm and uses the daily brightness temperature differences between the 37H and 19H Ghz channels from the special sensor microwave imager (SSMI) and special sensor microwave imager and sounder (SSMIS) on board the Defense Meteorology Satellite Program (DMSP) platform for the years 1987-2007 to determine the melt onset date. The melt onset dates are archived as part of the NOAA CDR for sea ice. The NASA MEaSURES ESDR melt onset date algorithm uses the same brightness temperature differences between the 37H and 19H Ghz channels, however, a ten day window and different thresholds are used to determine melt onset dates. The ESDR melt onset dates are also calculated for the scanning multi-channel microwave sensor (SMMR) on board the NASA Nimbus-7 platform. Therefore ESDR melt onset dates are calculated from 1979-2010. Comparisons are made between the NOAA CDR melt onset date data and the NASA MEaSURES ESDR melt onset date data. For the most part, the two data sets are comparable, indicating melt occurring at roughly the same time during spring. However, there are instances when the two algorithms differ, producing different melt onset dates. The main difference occurs during the earlier part of spring when spurious brightness temperatures are observed. For example, there may be low level clouds containing liquid water passing over the area, affecting the brightness temperature data for a single day, however, there is no change in the snow crystals which the algorithm should identify as melt. To account

  12. Sequence similarities of protein kinase substrates and inhibitors with immunoglobulins and model immunoglobulin homologue: cell adhesion molecule from the living fossil sponge Geodia cydonium. Mapping of coherent database similarities and implications for evolution of CDR1 and hypermutation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubrycht, J.; Borecký, Jiří; Souček, P.; Ježek, Petr

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2004), s. 219-246 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA MZd NJ6747 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : CDR1 * immunoglobulin Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.034, year: 2004

  13. From the 'Le Blayais NPP' flooding in 1999 to the review of French regulation for the protection of nuclear facilities against external flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuy, P.

    2011-01-01

    On 27 December 1999, a severe storm occurred in the vicinity of the 'Le Blayais' Nuclear Power Plant located on the banks of the Gironde estuary. The severe storm-driven waves coincident with high water levels in the Gironde estuary exceeded the worst-case scenario considered at the design of the site protection against flooding, resulting in the scram of three out of four units and severe nuclear island flooding. Several underground rooms sheltering equipment important to safety were flooded. This partial flooding incident has called into question the design bases defined in the French Basic Safety Rule (BSR) I.2.e for the protection of French NPPs against external flooding in particular in terms of flood events and combinations of flood events considered for the design. It has also revealed some weaknesses in the existing measures implemented, especially the site protection dykes, the protection of equipment important to safety, the warning systems and the emergency organization. Following this incident, in addition to the rush through protection measures undertaken on Le Blayais NPP, the utility Electricity De France (EDF) has launched a wide review of the protection of all French NPPs against external flooding. This review is based on a new and more comprehensive methodology for the protection of NPPs against external flooding (called 'REX Blayais methodology'), including a reassessment of flood events and their combinations and of all protection measures. This review has led EDF to carry out a large number of modifications and improvements at all NPP sites. 'REX Blayais methodology' and its application to all French NPPs were submitted to the approval of the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) in 2001 and then in 2007 after being analyzed by its technical support IRSN (French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety). The methodology and the level of protection of the NPPs thanks to all the improvements and modifications performed by the utility were

  14. 42 CFR 476.78 - Responsibilities of health care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS UTILIZATION AND QUALITY CONTROL REVIEW Review Responsibilities of Utilization and Quality Control Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs) General Provisions § 476.78 Responsibilities of health care facilities. (a) Every hospital seeking payment for services...

  15. Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Den Hazel, H B; Kielland-Brandt, Morten; Winther, Jakob R.

    1996-01-01

    The yeast vacuole, which is equivalent to the lysosome of higher eukaryotes, is one of the best characterized degradative organelles. This review describes the biosynthesis and function of yeast vacuolar proteases. Most of these enzymes are delivered to the vacuole via the early compartments...... of the secretory pathway and the endosome, while one of them is directly imported from the cytoplasm. The proteases are synthesized as precursors which undergo many post-translational modifications before the final active form is generated. Proteolytic activation by developments in the analysis of the functions...

  16. Characterization of the CDR3 structure of the Vβ21 T cell clone in patients with P210(BCR-ABL)-positive chronic myeloid leukemia and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Xianfeng; Chen, Shaohua; Yang, Lijian; Li, Bo; Chen, Yu; Yan, Xiaojuan; Li, Yangqiu

    2011-10-01

    The clonally expanded T cells identified in most cancer patients that respond to tumor-associated antigen such as P210(BCR-ABL) protein have definite, specific antitumor cytotoxicity. T cell receptor (TCR) Vβ CDR3 repertoire diversity was analyzed in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and BCR-ABL(+) B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) by GeneScan. A high frequency of oligoclonal expansion of the TCR Vβ21 subfamily was observed in the peripheral blood of CML and B-ALL patients. These clonally expanded Vβ21 T cells were correlated with the pathophysiologic process of CML. A conserved amino acid motif (SLxxV) was observed within the CDR3 region in only 3 patients with CML. Preferential usage of the Jβ segments was also observed in a minority of patients. The 3-dimensional structures of the CDR3 region containing the same motif or using the same Jβ segment displayed low similarity; on the contrary, the conformation of the CDR3 region containing no conserved motif in some T cell clones was highly similar. In conclusion, our findings indicate a high frequency of TCR Vβ21 subfamily expansion in p210(BCR-ABL)-positive CML and B-ALL patients. The characterization of the CDR3 structure was complex. Regrettably, at this time it was not possible to confirm that the Vβ21 T cell clones were derived from the stimulation of p210(BCR-ABL) protein. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Failure to Obtain Computed Tomography Imaging in Head Trauma: A Review of Relevant Case Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindor, Rachel A; Boie, Eric T; Campbell, Ronna L; Hess, Erik P; Sadosty, Annie T

    2015-12-01

    The objectives were to describe lawsuits against providers for failing to order head computed tomography (CT) in cases of head trauma and to determine the potential effects of available clinical decision rules (CDRs) on each lawsuit. The authors collected jury verdicts, settlements, and court opinions regarding alleged malpractice for failure to order head CT in the setting of head trauma from 1972 through February 2014 from an online legal research tool (WestlawNext). Data were abstracted onto a standardized data form. The performance of five CDRs was evaluated. Sixty relevant cases were identified (52 adult, eight children). Of 48 cases with known outcomes, providers were found negligent in 10 cases (six adult, four pediatric), settled in 11 cases (nine adult, two pediatric), and were found not liable in 27 cases. In all 10 cases in which providers were found negligent, every applicable CDR studied would have indicated the need for head CT. In all eight cases involving children, the applicable CDR would have suggested the need for head CT or observation. A review of legal cases reported in a major online legal research system revealed 60 lawsuits in which providers were sued for failing to order head CTs in cases of head trauma. In all cases in which providers were found negligent, CT imaging or observation would have been indicated by every applicable CDR. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  18. Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    WE RECOMMEND When Physics Became King This book delves into the history of science since the 18th century. The History of the Laser An interesting read that will teach you far more than its title suggests. History of Physics Selected Reprints A fascinating collection of physics papers spanning four decades. Datalogging set-ups Five great products from Leybold Didactic’s CASSY range. Videocom Measure motion and convert it to graphs with this great device. Basic Raybox This simple piece of equipment offers great performance. WORTH A LOOK Virtual Physics Lab John Nunn’s software demystifies science using clear illustrations. HANDLE WITH CARE Microchem Electricity Kit This box of equipment for introducing electricity lacks quality. Raymond the Raybox A disappointing raybox. The basic version reviewed on p389 is better. WEB WATCH A rough guide to e-learning.

  19. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  20. Lesotho - Health Facility Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The main objective of the 2011 Health Facility Survey (HFS) was to establish a baseline for informing the Health Project performance indicators on health facilities,...

  1. Integrated Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the center of the 586-square-mile Hanford Site is the Integrated Disposal Facility, also known as the IDF.This facility is a landfill similar in concept...

  2. Neighbourhood facilities for sustainability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy T

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available . In this paper these are referred to as ‘Neighbourhood Facilities for Sustainability’. Neighbourhood Facilities for Sustainability (NFS) are initiatives undertaken by individuals and communities to build local sustainable systems which not only improve...

  3. Materiel Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CRREL's Materiel Evaluation Facility (MEF) is a large cold-room facility that can be set up at temperatures ranging from −20°F to 120°F with a temperature change...

  4. Dialysis Facility Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dialysis Facility Compare helps you find detailed information about Medicare-certified dialysis facilities. You can compare the services and the quality of care that...

  5. Explosive Components Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  6. Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Individual permits for municipal, industrial, and semi-public wastewater treatment facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)...

  7. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  8. Environmental Toxicology Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Fully-equipped facilities for environmental toxicology researchThe Environmental Toxicology Research Facility (ETRF) located in Vicksburg, MS provides over 8,200 ft...

  9. Projectile Demilitarization Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Projectile Wash Out Facility is US Army Ammunition Peculiar Equipment (APE 1300). It is a pilot scale wash out facility that uses high pressure water and steam...

  10. Armament Technology Facility (ATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Armament Technology Facility is a 52,000 square foot, secure and environmentally-safe, integrated small arms and cannon caliber design and evaluation facility....

  11. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  12. Rocketball Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This test facility offers the capability to emulate and measure guided missile radar cross-section without requiring flight tests of tactical missiles. This facility...

  13. The mixed waste management facility. Monthly report, January 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streit, R.

    1995-02-01

    During January, technical progress continued in general accordance with the MWMF FY95 Plan. Engineering development and design continued in support of preliminary design of MWMF major subsystems. Certain activities are being delayed due to DOE guidance for reduced funding profiles that would not warrant new hiring, early procurements, etc. Peer reviews and system preliminary design reviews are now being scheduled for project elements. We continued pursuing integration of MWMF and DWTF functions maximize cost savings. We also expended considerable engineering effort to provide technical and cost tradeoff information for the FY97 Validation. Management focus during January centered upon addressing the rebaseline for MWMF for FY97 Validation in March, and upon progressing with the RD&D permit. Funding baselines for preparing for FY97 Validation in March were obtained from DOE; based on the baseline, detailed scope, schedule, and budget guidance was issued to the project staff to develop Validation information. For reasons of cost-effectiveness, Validation cost estimates will be based on revised CDR estimates, since bottom-up estimates will be completed in July as part of Preliminary Design. We have directed Significant effort toward meeting the TPC and fiscal year profile costs while still maintaining the essential elements of the project. Final review and editorial changes were completed for the RD&D permit application. Based on the meeting with DTSC in December and revised operational requirements, we held a review of the overall permitting strategy prior to routing for signature approval. A simplified strategy is under review. The revised Environmental Assessment (EA) is ready for release to DOE, but is being held up pending results of the permitting strategy review.

  14. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a User Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Christopher; NIF Team

    2013-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has made significant progress towards operation as a user facility. Through June 2013, NIF conducted over 1200 experiments in support of ICF, HED science, and development of facility capabilities. The NIF laser has met or achieved all specifications and a wide variety of diagnostic and target fabrication capabilities are in place. A NIF User Group and associated Executive Board have been formed. Two User Group meetings have been conducted since formation of the User Group. NIF experiments in fundamental science have provided important new results. NIF ramp compression experiments have been conducted using diamond and iron, with EOS results obtained at pressures up to approximately 50 Mbar and 8 Mbar, respectively. Initial experiments in supernova hydrodynamics, the fundamental physics of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and equation of state in the Gbar pressure regime have also been conducted. This presentation will discuss the fundamental science program at NIF, including the proposal solicitation and scientific review processes and other aspects of user facility operation. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. CLEAR test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2017-01-01

    A new user facility for accelerator R&D, the CERN Linear Electron Accelerator for Research (CLEAR), started operation in August 2017. CLEAR evolved from the former CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) used by the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The new facility is able to host and test a broad range of ideas in the accelerator field.

  16. Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale facility implementation -- excavation -- storage technology -- safety analysis and review statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, H.R.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Koperna, G.J. Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the state-of-the-art of excavation technology as related to environmental remediation applications. A further purpose is to determine which of the excavation technologies reviewed could be used by the US Corp of Engineers in remediating contaminated soil to be excavated in the near future for construction of a new Lock and Dam at Winfield, WV. The study is designed to identify excavation methodologies and equipment which can be used at any environmental remediation site but more specifically at the Winfield site on the Kanawha River in Putnam County, West Virginia. A technical approach was determined whereby a functional analysis was prepared to determine the functions to be conducted during the excavation phase of the remediation operations. A number of excavation technologies were identified from the literature. A set of screening criteria was developed that would examine the utility and ranking of the technologies with respect to the operations that needed to be conducted at the Winfield site. These criteria were performance, reliability, implementability, environmental safety, public health, and legal and regulatory compliance. The Loose Bulk excavation technology was ranked as the best technology applicable to the Winfield site. The literature was also examined to determine the success of various methods of controlling fugitive dust. Depending upon any changes in the results of chemical analyses, or prior remediation of the VOCs from the vadose zone, consideration should be given to testing a new ''Pneumatic Excavator'' which removes the VOCs liberated during the excavation process as they outgas from the soil. This equipment however would not be needed on locations with low levels of VOC emissions

  17. Assessment of technologies for hazardous waste site remediation: Non-treatment technologies and pilot scale facility implementation -- excavation -- storage technology -- safety analysis and review statement. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, H.R.; Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Koperna, G.J. Jr.

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the state-of-the-art of excavation technology as related to environmental remediation applications. A further purpose is to determine which of the excavation technologies reviewed could be used by the US Corp of Engineers in remediating contaminated soil to be excavated in the near future for construction of a new Lock and Dam at Winfield, WV. The study is designed to identify excavation methodologies and equipment which can be used at any environmental remediation site but more specifically at the Winfield site on the Kanawha River in Putnam County, West Virginia. A technical approach was determined whereby a functional analysis was prepared to determine the functions to be conducted during the excavation phase of the remediation operations. A number of excavation technologies were identified from the literature. A set of screening criteria was developed that would examine the utility and ranking of the technologies with respect to the operations that needed to be conducted at the Winfield site. These criteria were performance, reliability, implementability, environmental safety, public health, and legal and regulatory compliance. The Loose Bulk excavation technology was ranked as the best technology applicable to the Winfield site. The literature was also examined to determine the success of various methods of controlling fugitive dust. Depending upon any changes in the results of chemical analyses, or prior remediation of the VOCs from the vadose zone, consideration should be given to testing a new ``Pneumatic Excavator`` which removes the VOCs liberated during the excavation process as they outgas from the soil. This equipment however would not be needed on locations with low levels of VOC emissions.

  18. Landfill gas management facilities design guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-03-15

    In British Columbia, municipal solid waste landfills generate over 1000 tonnes of methane per year; landfill gas management facilities are required to improve the environmental performance of solid waste landfills. The aim of this document, developed by the British Columbia Ministry of the Environment, is to provide guidance for the design, installation, and operation of landfill gas management facilities to address odor and pollutant emissions issues and also address health and safety issues. A review of technical experience and best practices in landfill gas management facilities was carried out, as was as a review of existing regulations related to landfill gas management all over the world. This paper provides useful information to landfill owners, operators, and other professionals for the design of landfill gas management facilities which meet the requirements of landfill gas management regulations.

  19. Facility equipment performance evaluation using microcomputer simulation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chockie, A.D.; Hostick, C.J.

    1985-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) recently developed a facility performance assessment model as part of the US Department of Energy-sponsored monitored retrievable storage (MRS) program at PNL. The objective in the development of this model was to assist in the evaluation of the operational performance of the MRS facility design alternatives. The microcomputer-based simulation model provided a technique for the analysis of the design and performance of alternative MRS facility systems. The model was applied to the analysis of the material flow, equipment capability, and facility layout of various designs for a facility to receive and canister spent fuel from commercial nuclear power plants. Programs were also developed that evaluated alternative facility operating schedules and facility-equipment designs. The paper is a review of the facility performance assessment model and its advantages and benefits in the analysis of alternative facility designs employing varying degrees of remote handling capability.

  20. Lead Coolant Test Facility Development Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul A. Demkowicz

    2005-06-01

    A workshop was held at the Idaho National Laboratory on May 25, 2005, to discuss the development of a next generation lead or lead-alloy coolant test facility. Attendees included representatives from the Generation IV lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) program, Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, and several universities. Several participants gave presentations on coolant technology, existing experimental facilities for lead and lead-alloy research, the current LFR design concept, and a design by Argonne National Laboratory for an integral heavy liquid metal test facility. Discussions were focused on the critical research and development requirements for deployment of an LFR demonstration test reactor, the experimental scope of the proposed coolant test facility, a review of the Argonne National Laboratory test facility design, and a brief assessment of the necessary path forward and schedule for the initial stages of this development project. This report provides a summary of the presentations and roundtable discussions.

  1. Earthquake damage to underground facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, H.R.; Hustrulid, W.A. Stephenson, D.E.

    1978-11-01

    The potential seismic risk for an underground nuclear waste repository will be one of the considerations in evaluating its ultimate location. However, the risk to subsurface facilities cannot be judged by applying intensity ratings derived from the surface effects of an earthquake. A literature review and analysis were performed to document the damage and non-damage due to earthquakes to underground facilities. Damage from earthquakes to tunnels, s, and wells and damage (rock bursts) from mining operations were investigated. Damage from documented nuclear events was also included in the study where applicable. There are very few data on damage in the subsurface due to earthquakes. This fact itself attests to the lessened effect of earthquakes in the subsurface because mines exist in areas where strong earthquakes have done extensive surface damage. More damage is reported in shallow tunnels near the surface than in deep mines. In mines and tunnels, large displacements occur primarily along pre-existing faults and fractures or at the surface entrance to these facilities.Data indicate vertical structures such as wells and shafts are less susceptible to damage than surface facilities. More analysis is required before seismic criteria can be formulated for the siting of a nuclear waste repository.

  2. Earthquake damage to underground facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, H.R.; Hustrulid, W.A.; Stephenson, D.E.

    1978-11-01

    The potential seismic risk for an underground nuclear waste repository will be one of the considerations in evaluating its ultimate location. However, the risk to subsurface facilities cannot be judged by applying intensity ratings derived from the surface effects of an earthquake. A literature review and analysis were performed to document the damage and non-damage due to earthquakes to underground facilities. Damage from earthquakes to tunnels, s, and wells and damage (rock bursts) from mining operations were investigated. Damage from documented nuclear events was also included in the study where applicable. There are very few data on damage in the subsurface due to earthquakes. This fact itself attests to the lessened effect of earthquakes in the subsurface because mines exist in areas where strong earthquakes have done extensive surface damage. More damage is reported in shallow tunnels near the surface than in deep mines. In mines and tunnels, large displacements occur primarily along pre-existing faults and fractures or at the surface entrance to these facilities.Data indicate vertical structures such as wells and shafts are less susceptible to damage than surface facilities. More analysis is required before seismic criteria can be formulated for the siting of a nuclear waste repository

  3. The National Ignition Facility Project. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paisner, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Hogan, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    The mission of the National Ignition Facility is to achieve ignition and gain in inertial confinement fusion targets in the laboratory. The facility will be used for defense applications such as weapons physics and weapons effects testing, and for civilian applications such as fusion energy development and fundamental studies of matter at high temperatures and densities. This paper reviews the design, schedule, and costs associated with the construction project

  4. Perimeter security for Minnesota correctional facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crist, D. [Minnesota Department of Corrections, St. Paul, MN (United States); Spencer, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    For the past few years, the Minnesota Department of Corrections, assisted by Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a set of standards for perimeter security at medium, close, and maximum custody correctional facilities in the state. During this process, the threat to perimeter security was examined and concepts about correctional perimeter security were developed. This presentation and paper will review the outcomes of this effort, some of the lessons learned, and the concepts developed during this process and in the course of working with architects, engineers and construction firms as the state upgraded perimeter security at some facilities and planned new construction at other facilities.

  5. nvj 36 3.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRAPHICS DEPT

    Fig 1: Phylogenetic tree based on amino acid sequences of haemagglutinin (A) and neuraminidase (B) genes of selected pandemic influenza A/H1N1 strains from Africa. 1257. ISSN 0331-3026. Meseko et al ...

  6. Valid Journal.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dialectical and at the same time eclectic. The regenerative essence of culture deifies and housed .... within the dialectic of new historicism is but a reconstruction of an existing culture. To answer the question of what ..... Same method was adopted for the choice of costumes and props. Dense myths inherent in our history and ...

  7. Oyesiku (1).cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    The mechanism of water condition in the Musci considered in relation to habitat. III. Mosses growing in dry environments. Annals of Botany 47: 889-912. Clausen, E. 1952.Hepatics and humidity. Dansk. Botany Arkive15 (1): 80. Dilks, T.J.K. &Proctor, M.C.F. 1979. Photosynthesis, respiration and water content in bryophytes.

  8. sept edition 2008.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    To determine the pattern of clinical presentation of carcinoma of the cervix in Nnewi Southeast. Nigeria with a view to ... presented with the advanced form of the disease with 20 (46.5%) and 14 (32.6%) presenting in stage III and IV respectively. ... from lack of established and effective screening protocol, most of the ...

  9. Journal 02.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stephen

    Deficiency of calcium causes blossom end rot and can be treated by adding lime to the soil or spraying the leaves with a calcium solution. Maintaining adequate .... NPK (15:15:15) fertilizer was applied by spot placement at the rate of 5 g/stand two weeks after transplanting. Manual weeding and staking were done as at ...

  10. march issue.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    To determine the incidence and risk of hospital-related TB amongst the health care workers and trainee students of this institution. ... varied from half a year to 11.5 years and the rate of diagnosis of cases varied from nil to 3 per year. Identified risks for .... related TB; it ranged from the security officer at the hospital gate to the ...

  11. Ogolo (5).cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    ABSTRACT. 191. INTRODUCTION. Evapotranspiration (ET) is an essential component of water balance and hydrological cycles. It is a key variable in yield models, water balance, drought prediction, irrigation scheduling and soil traffic ability estimates (karim, 1991; Tyagi et al., 2003; Sabziparvar et al., 2009, 2011). It is also.

  12. Valid Journal.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nation”. Today, this motto reads thus “Radio Nigeria;. Uplifting the people and uniting the Nation” On February th. 28 1978, a decree was promulgated establishing the Federal. Radio Corporation of Nigeria. (FRCN). In 1992, the. Government established the National Broadcasting. Commission (NBC) a body whose sole aim ...

  13. nvj 36 3.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRAPHICS DEPT

    thick, 1 µm sections were cut, stained with toluidine blue and viewed under the light microscope (Olympus. BH2) for tissue ... diamond or glass knife on the ultramicrotome. (Vienna, Austria) .... musculature lead to grinding, pressing and rubbing ...

  14. Fadiya SL (13).cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    sidewall of a well by a wireline tool or gun after the well has been drilled. Percussion sidewall cores are obtained by firing a hollow core recovery bullet into the sidewall ...... African Earth Sciences, pp. 283-286. Bankole, S. I.; Schrak, E.; Erdtmann, B. D. and akande, S. O. 2005. Palynostratigraphic and paleoenvironments of ...

  15. JMBR APRIL.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    ABSTRACT. Objective: To determine the association between maternal gingivitis and pregnancy outcome, including low birth weight (LBW) and preterm delivery. This prospective study was conducted among 300 randomly selected pregnant women aged 20-34 years attending the antenatal clinic, University of Benin.

  16. nvj 36 3.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRAPHICS DEPT

    extremities in domestic poultry was a serious problem in the ... brought in to the Poultry Clinic of the Veterinary. Teaching Hospital ... disease. The affected quails that were unable to move eventually died, probably due to inability to access feed and water as described by. McNamee and Smyth (2000). Fig 1:Photograph of a ...

  17. sept edition 2008.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    We report the case of a 16 year old boy who presented with 8 months history of weight loss, 3 months history of polydypsia, polyuria and polyphagia. The child had poor growth since age of 5 years, during which time he developed recurrent abdominal pain for 4 years. A diagnosis of chronic calcific pancreatitis complicated ...

  18. JMBR - SEPTEMBER 2013.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    relationship between body mass index and relative plasma viscosity in normal young Nigerian adults. A total of 22 normal undergraduate students (8 male and 14 females) of both sexes and between the ages of 18 and 27 years participated in the study. The age, weight and height of each subject was obtained and BMI was.

  19. New draft.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP USER

    morphology. Pictures of the cysts were captured using digital Camera (Sony, Carl Zeisis, Optical Zoom 4X, 7.2 megapixels), modified and resized using computer program Microsoft office (2007 version). Results. Post mortem inspection of 261 sheep carcasses at. Sokoto abattoir revealed Cysticercus tenuicollis cysts in.

  20. Bamgbose (2).cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    biodegradability, safety and cost (Li et al. 1997). A wide range of hydrophilic polymers have been examined for preparing hydrogels and chitosan is one of them. Chitosan is biodegradable and biocompatible. It exhibits bio-adhesive .... solutions were cast into films in plastic petri dishes and air dried for 24 h. The dry films ...

  1. nvj 36 3.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRAPHICS DEPT

    Twenty non-pregnant, non-lactating female albino wistar rats weighing between. 156.4±12.8 grams wereused in this study. They were assigned to four groups ..... (2007).Melatonin and estradiol effects on food intake, body weight, and leptin in ovariectomized rats.Maturitas.58: 91–101. UDEGBUNAM R.I., AGU, N.N., and.

  2. nvj 36 3.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRAPHICS DEPT

    Nigerian Veterinary Journal. A R T I C L E. Vol 36 (3) 1222-1225. ABSTRACT. There is paucity of information on the incidence and haematological changes associated with trypanosome infection in Nigerian fishes. This investigation examined randomly buffy coat and blood smears of Tilapia in the wild by direct microscopy ...

  3. sept edition 2008.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    hypercalcaemia, hyperlipoproteinamia type- I, IV, V, cystic fibrosis, viral infections like mumps and hepatitis, ascaris infestation, as well as biliary and pancreatic duct anomalies. Studies have shown that there is some evidence of permanent pancreatic damage after recovery from malnutrition. Fibrosis follows atrophy of the.

  4. MATERNAL BELIEFS.CDR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maternal beliefs about infant teething. 1. 2. 3. OG Uti , KO Savage ... Nigeria. 3Department of Community Health, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos. Nigeria. KEY WORDS: Infant teething. Maternal beliefs. Lagos. Nigeria now accurately .... the questions into the appropriate language or Pidgin. English. Analysis.

  5. Valid Journal.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hospital in the outskirt of Port Harcourt, Banji Falegan, a lawyer, Papa the Old educationist, Tekena Dokubo, a. Professor of medicine, Chinwe Ejindu with a first class honours degree in mathematics, and of course, the young. Onyema. The playwright has in the play tried to make the electorate choose their leader through ...

  6. Valid Journal.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pre-colonial and Islamic era” (Omojola 16). For better understanding of dance development in Africa as stated .... quasi-informal national cultural policy. Some independent African nations gave dance no ... School Umunze and began to teach them the rudiments of traditional Igbo dance. The exercise was aborted when Mr.

  7. sept edition 2008.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Sixty-nine cases of neonatal bacterial meningitis were encountered, (25 were early-onset, and 44 late- onset); the incidence was 6.5/1000 live births. 22 Positive CSF cultures were grown in early-onset meningitis, and 28 in late-onset disease. Low birth weight showed higher risk of bacterial meningitis and it was.

  8. JMBR APRIL.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    cholesterol (LDLc) ≥ 150mg/dL. (3.89mmol/dL). Hypertension was present if systolic blood pressure ≥ 140mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90mmHg, or if subject was on antihypertensive medication. Abdominal obesity was defined as WC. >88cm in women and WC > 102 cm in men while generalized obesity was BMI.

  9. JMBR APRIL.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    90mmHg6. All the information which included ethnicity, age, marital status, occupation, highest level of education attained, number of drugs taken, number of drugs prescribed, reason for dosage omissions or discontinuation of drugs were obtained ...

  10. sept edition 2008.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    history of throat pain, hoarseness of the voice and cough, unconscious or sedated patients, patients too ..... acupuncture point. Anaesthesia 2004; 59: 647-. 651. 10. Post-thyroidectomy sorethroat following endotracheal intubation. ANZ J. Surg. 2001;. 71:669-671. 11. Tracheal intubation and sorethroat: a mechanical ...

  11. Odukoya Abiodun (12).cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    Keywords: Soil, Dumpsites, Trace Elements, Contamination, Lagos. ABSTRACT. 351. INTRODUCTION. Soil is not only a medium for plants growth or waste disposal but also a transmitter of many pollutants to surface water, ground water, atmosphere and food. Soil pollution may threaten human health not only through its ...

  12. Omafuvbe (18).cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    Food Technical Biotechnol. 41 (3), 243-246. Rohde, B. and Hartman, G. 1980. Introducing. Mycology by Example. Schering Akti- engesellschaft, Hamburg, 111pp. Santos M., Jimenez, J.J., Bartolome, B., Gomez-. Cordoves, C., Del Nozal ,M.J. 2003. Variability of brewers' spent grain within a brewery. Food Chem. 80, 17-21.

  13. Ukpebor (15).cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    conditions were chosen that provided the optimum analyte resolution on a C reverse-phase LC column, along. 18 with optimum ... water and methanol with the addition of 0.1% formic acid (to aid protonation) provided the optimum resolution and ionization of .... to a mass spectrometer (Model LDP00360) was used for this ...

  14. JMBR - SEPTEMBER 2013.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    Poyser NJ, Kelleher MC, Briggs PFA. Managing discolored non vital teeth. The inside/ outside bleaching technique. Dental Update 2004; 31: 204-210. 3. Osuji OO. Traumatized primary teeth in. Nigerian children attending University. Hospital: the delay in seeking treatment. Int. Dent J 1996; 46:165-170. 4. Attin T, Paque´ F, ...

  15. JMBR - SEPTEMBER 2013.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    with 180µl of the Lysis buffer (ATL) containing 200ng/m lysostaphin; 20mM. Tris Hel; pH 8:0; 2Mm EDTA; 1.2% Triton o and incubated at 37 C for 30mins before proteinase K treatment. The mixture was o then vortexed and incubated at 56 C for 3 hours, with occasional vortexing in between. The tube was briefly centrifuged.

  16. JMBR APRIL.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    environmental sanitation, poor health hygiene, overpopulation and poverty constitute major risk factors to ill-health. Whereas, all these risk factors have been ... lymphadenitis in their study. Yet again, studies by Gupta in India also show that granulomatous lymphadenopathy was the. 2 most common lesions encountered.

  17. JMBR APRIL.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    Aim: To determine the factors affecting the choice of surgery as a future career specialty among medical interns in a regional hospital in ... personal interest and career ambitions . In our setting however, the views of fresh medical ... using Graph pad instat software (2012). P value less than 0.05 was considered significant.

  18. JMBR APRIL.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    acute problems. Furthermore, all children with CVA were newly diagnosed HbSS. It is concluded that sickle cell anaemia related morbidities contribute significantly to paediatric ... Sickle cell disease is a problem of major public health significance as it is a major ... birthday from malaria, bacterial infections. 3,5 and anaemia.

  19. Akinsanya (9).cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    The parasitic helminth fauna of a fish Synodontis filamentosus and Calamoichthys calabaricus was investigated. A total of 100 ..... paper, 31: 220pp. Patrlcio, T., and Eileen, R., Walter, G., and Aldo, M. 1991. Gastrointestinal Helminths of Fish. Eating Birds from Chiloe Island,. Chile.Journal of Wildlife Diseases 27(1):178-. 179.

  20. march issue.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    suspicion and to thoroughly evaluate cases of stroke in individuals below age 45, especially in the absence of cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension or hyperlipidemia. 9,10. 5,6,9. 16,17,18. 17,18. 18. 18. 19. REFERENCE. 1. Kappelle IJ, Adas HP Jr, Heffner ML,. Torner JC, Gomez F, Biller J. 2.