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Sample records for facilitating problem-based learning

  1. Problem-based learning as a facilitator of conceptual change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loyens, Sofie M M; Jones, Suzanne H.; Mikkers, Jeroen; van Gog, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether problem-based learning (PBL) can foster conceptual change. Students were randomly assigned to a PBL, lecture-based, or self-study group, all receiving instruction about the topic of Newtonian laws. Conceptual change was measured from pre- to immediate post-test (directly

  2. Problem-based learning as a facilitator of conceptual change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loyens, Sofie M M; Jones, Suzanne H.; Mikkers, Jeroen; van Gog, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether problem-based learning (PBL) can foster conceptual change. Students were randomly assigned to a PBL, lecture-based, or self-study group, all receiving instruction about the topic of Newtonian laws. Conceptual change was measured from pre- to immediate post-test (directly afte

  3. Problem-based learning as a facilitator of conceptual change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loyens, Sofie M M; Jones, Suzanne H.; Mikkers, Jeroen; van Gog, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether problem-based learning (PBL) can foster conceptual change. Students were randomly assigned to a PBL, lecture-based, or self-study group, all receiving instruction about the topic of Newtonian laws. Conceptual change was measured from pre- to immediate post-test (directly afte

  4. Librarian-facilitated problem-based learning course in a school of dental medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasman, Linda

    2012-01-01

    While problem-based learning has been used in medical practice for several decades, dental education was slower to adapt this education model. However, as dental curricula are embracing this pedagogy, dental and other health sciences librarians are in a position to provide important curricular support. This article will detail one dental liaison librarian's experience with facilitating a problem-based, case-based studies course within the curriculum of a dental school.

  5. Facilitators' perceptions of problem-based learning and community-based education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula P du Rand

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available In 1997 the School for Nursing, University of the Orange Free State, changed from the traditional lecture method of teaching to problem-based learning and from a curative to a community-based approach. Lecturers from a traditional environment became facilitators and new skills such as listening, dialogue, negotiation, counselling and problemsolving were expected from them. Besides the role change, the environment changed from a structural classroom to an unstructured community. The aim of this research was to determine the perceptions and experiences of facilitators in problem-based learning and community-base education. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  6. Library faculty role in problem-based learning: facilitating small groups.

    OpenAIRE

    Satterthwaite, R K; Helms, M E; Nouravarsani, R; Van Antwerp, M; Woelfl, N N

    1995-01-01

    Since 1986, the library faculty of the McGoogan Library of Medicine at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) has participated in small group activities during the week-long orientation for first-year medical students. This involvement paved the way for library faculty members to act as facilitators for small groups of medical students within the new problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum introduced in 1992 by the College of Medicine. The UNMC curriculum consists of traditional PBL...

  7. Problem-based learning: facilitating multiple small teams in a large group setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyams, Jennifer H; Raidal, Sharanne L

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is often described as resource demanding due to the high staff-to-student ratio required in a traditional PBL tutorial class where there is commonly one facilitator to every 5-16 students. The veterinary science program at Charles Sturt University, Australia, has developed a method of group facilitation which readily allows one or two staff members to facilitate up to 30 students at any one time while maintaining the benefits of a small PBL team of six students. Multi-team facilitation affords obvious financial and logistic advantages, but there are also important pedagogical benefits derived from uniform facilitation across multiple groups, enhanced discussion and debate between groups, and the development of self-facilitation skills in students. There are few disadvantages to the roaming facilitator model, provided that several requirements are addressed. These requirements include a suitable venue, large whiteboards, a structured approach to support student engagement with each disclosure, a detailed facilitator guide, and an open, collaborative, and communicative environment.

  8. Library faculty role in problem-based learning: facilitating small groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, R K; Helms, M E; Nouravarsani, R; Van Antwerp, M; Woelfl, N N

    1995-10-01

    Since 1986, the library faculty of the McGoogan Library of Medicine at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) has participated in small group activities during the week-long orientation for first-year medical students. This involvement paved the way for library faculty members to act as facilitators for small groups of medical students within the new problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum introduced in 1992 by the College of Medicine. The UNMC curriculum consists of traditional PBL groups as well as Integrated Clinical Experience (ICE) small groups. The ICE groups provide opportunities for discussion of the social and behavioral issues that arise in medicine, with the majority of the sessions designed to give students interviewing practice with simulated patients. The ICE small groups meet once a week with either one or two facilitators. Several library faculty members act as facilitators for ICE groups. As a result of this involvement, librarian contacts with College of Medicine faculty have grown in number and depth, there has been a corresponding increase in related activities with the first- and second-year medical students. Participation in ICE groups has caused some difficulties with respect to library work schedules, but it has been immensely rewarding and enriching in terms of professional growth. This paper describes the UNMC curriculum, the evolution and extent of the librarians' involvement, and the future involvement, ramifications, and challenges envisioned for McGoogan faculty and their medical library colleagues.

  9. The Facilitation of Problem-Based Learning in Medical Education Through a Computer-Mediated Tutorial Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, A.; Barrows, H.S.; Koschmann, T.D.; Feltovich, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the means by which a computer-supported group interaction system known as the Computer-Mediated Tutorial Laboratory (CMTL) is used to support Problem-Based Learning Tutorials. The Problem-Based Learning Tutorial process has traditionally been solely a group process, sharing both the advantages and the disadvantages of any group process. This paper discusses the nature of Problem-Based Learning, the logistics of integrating computer mediation with the tutorial process and how computer mediation can be used to facilitate the eliciting and recording of individual input while enhancing the powerful effects of the group process.

  10. What can we learn from facilitator and student perceptions of facilitation skills and roles in the first year of a problem-based learning curriculum?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLean Michelle

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The small group tutorial is a cornerstone of problem-based learning. By implication, the role of the facilitator is of pivotal importance. The present investigation canvassed perceptions of facilitators with differing levels of experience regarding their roles and duties in the tutorial. Methods In January 2002, one year after problem-based learning implementation at the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, facilitators with the following experience were canvassed: trained and about to facilitate, facilitated once only and facilitated more than one six-week theme. Student comments regarding facilitator skills were obtained from a 2001 course survey. Results While facilitators generally agreed that the three-day training workshop provided sufficient insight into the facilitation process, they become more comfortable with increasing experience. Many facilitators experienced difficulty not providing content expertise. Again, this improved with increasing experience. Most facilitators saw students as colleagues. They agreed that they should be role models, but were less enthusiastic about being mentors. Students were critical of facilitators who were not up to date with curriculum implementation or who appeared disinterested. While facilitator responses suggest that there was considerable intrinsic motivation, this might in fact not be the case. Conclusions Even if they had facilitated on all six themes, facilitators could still be considered as novices. Faculty support is therefore critical for the first few years of problem-based learning, particularly for those who had facilitated once only. Since student and facilitator expectations in the small group tutorial may differ, roles and duties of facilitators must be explicit for both parties from the outset.

  11. Student Perceptions of Facilitators' Social Congruence, Use of Expertise and Cognitive Congruence in Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Elaine H. J.; Yong, Janice J. Y.

    2014-01-01

    In problem-based learning (PBL), the role of a tutor or facilitator is different from what is typically considered as the role of a traditional teacher. In addition to being a subject-matter expert, the facilitator is also expected to be "socially" and "cognitively congruent". In this study, we analyze the survey responses from…

  12. Implementing Problem-based Learning in Introductory Engineering Courses: A Qualitative Investigation of Facilitation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole Hunter, Deirdre-Annaliese

    Increasing pressure to transform teaching and learning of engineering is supported by mounting research evidence for the value of learner-centered pedagogies. Despite this evidence, engineering faculty are often unsuccessful in applying such teaching approaches often because they lack the necessary knowledge to customize these pedagogies for their unique contexts. My dissertation study investigated the challenges with facilitation practices in introductory PBL engineering courses and developed a pragmatic researchbased model that provides insights aimed at improving PBL facilitation practices using the Innovation Cycle of Educational Practice and Research (ICEPR) as a lens. The ICEPR is useful for investigating connections between educational practice and research for scholarly and systematic educational innovations. I conducted a three-phase sequential study to address critical gaps in the ICEPR regarding both research on and practice of PBL facilitation in engineering. I focused on identifying challenges in practice, developing a model, and disseminating the model through a typology using multiple qualitative data collection and analysis methods. In Phase 1, I studied a new PBL implementation and identified a challenge with facilitator training specifically with regard to a lack of a pragmatic model of facilitation strategies in engineering. In Phase 2, I investigated the facilitation practices of five facilitators in an established PBL engineering course. This resulted in the Model of PBL Facilitation Strategies for Introductory Engineering Courses (PBL-FIEC), where I specifically operationalized the instructional methods constructs from Collins' Cognitive Apprenticeship Framework to describe the variety of ways instructors facilitate student learning in PBL introductory engineering courses. The PBL-FIEC includes six methods and 27 strategies ways for instructors to facilitate students' learning through providing and prompting demonstrations of cognitive and

  13. Brazilian medical students’ perceptions of expert versus non-expert facilitators in a (non problem-based learning environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélio B. Couto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In problem-based learning (PBL, the facilitator plays an important role in guiding the student learning process. However, although content expertise is generally regarded as a useful but non-essential prerequisite for effective PBL facilitation, the perceived importance of content knowledge may be subject to cultural, contextual, and/or experiential influences. Aim: We sought to examine medical students’ perceptions of subject-matter expertise among PBL facilitators in a region of the world (Brazil where such active learning pedagogies are not widely used in university or pre-university settings. Results: Of the 252 Brazilian medical students surveyed, significantly (p≤0.001 greater proportions viewed content expert facilitators to be more effective than their non-expert counterparts at building knowledge (95% vs. 6%, guiding the learning process (93% vs. 7%, achieving cognitive learning (92% vs. 18%, generating learning goals (87% vs. 15%, and motivating self-study (80% vs. 15%. Discussion/conclusion: According to Brazilian medical students, subject-matter expertise among PBL facilitators is essential to the learning process. We believe this widespread perception is due, in large part, to the relative lack of prior educational exposure to such pedagogies.

  14. Implementing Problem-based Learning in Introductory Engineering Courses: A Qualitative Investigation of Facilitation Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Deirdre-Annaliese Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Increasing pressure to transform teaching and learning of engineering is supported by mounting research evidence for the value of learner-centered pedagogies. Despite this evidence, engineering faculty are often unsuccessful in applying such teaching approaches often because they lack the necessary knowledge to customize these pedagogies for their unique contexts. My dissertation study investigated the challenges with facilitation practices in introductory PBL engineering courses and develope...

  15. A model for small-group problem-based learning in a large class facilitated by one instructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholl, Tessa A; Lou, Kelvin

    2012-08-10

    To implement and evaluate a model for small-group problem-based learning (PBL) in a large class facilitated by 1 instructor. A PBL model that included weekly assignments, quizzes, peer feedback, and case wrap-up sessions was developed and implemented in the final year of the pharmacy program to allow 1 instructor to facilitate PBL for up to 16 student teams in a large classroom. Student and team scores on multiple-choice examinations confirmed achievement of learning objectives. Students reported on course evaluation surveys that they were able to engage in the learning process and were satisfied with the new PBL model. This model achieved a cost savings of $42,000 per term. A revised PBL model without individual group tutors allowed students to achieve the required learning outcomes in an interactive and engaging atmosphere, avoided classroom-scheduling conflicts, and produced a large cost savings for the university.

  16. Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Graaff, Erik; Guerra, Aida

    , the key principles remain the same everywhere. Graaff & Kolmos (2003) identify the main PBL principles as follows: 1. Problem orientation 2. Project organization through teams or group work 3. Participant-directed 4. Experiental learning 5. Activity-based learning 6. Interdisciplinary learning and 7......Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is an innovative method to organize the learning process in such a way that the students actively engage in finding answers by themselves. During the past 40 years PBL has evolved and diversified resulting in a multitude in variations in models and practices. However....... Exemplary practice. The University of Aalborg in Denmark started with PBL right from the start when the school was founded merging several educational institutes in Northern Denmark in 1974. The Aalborg PBL model is recognized around the world as an example or a source of inspiration, in particular...

  17. Problem Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Cappola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this current work, I am proposing a general close examination of Problem Based Learning as a student centered educational method in which a problem constitutes  the starting point of the learning process. Such a method provides students with the suitable knowledge for problem solving and presents numerous and significant differences compared to traditional education.In particular, I analyze the theoretic aspects of problem learning by tracing a history and presenting its structure, clarifying the role of the tutor in the various phases of the learning process. The method has found a wide diffusion since the beginning of the 70s and numerous studies have confirmed the advantages. The effectiveness of PBL is construable and is based on principles of constructivism and cognitivism.

  18. An Introduction to Enquiry/ Problem-based Learning, Maynooth: Facilitate and the All Ireland Society for Higher Education (AISHE)

    OpenAIRE

    Delaney, Yvonne; Farrell, Alison; Hack, Catherine; Lawlor, Bob; McLoone, Seamus; Meehan, Andrew; Philips, Declan; Richardson, Ita

    2015-01-01

    The booklet is organized into two sections. Part 1 provides an overview which answers the broad question of what is enquiry/problembased learning. Part 2 presents four case studies of enquiry/problem-based learning. The booklet draws on a few key texts but particularly on another publication by Barrett and Cashman (eds) entitled A Practitioner’s Guide to Enquiry and Problem-based Learning (2010

  19. Technology and Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uden, Lorna; Beaumont, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been the focus of many developments in teaching and learning facilitation in recent years. It has been claimed that PBL produces independent learners who are motivated, engaged in deep learning, work as a team, and develop effective strategies, skills and knowledge for life-long learning and professional work.…

  20. Dimensions of problem based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche; Andreasen, Lars Birch

    2013-01-01

    The article contributes to the literature on problem based learning and problem-oriented project work, building on and reflecting the experiences of the authors through decades of work with problem-oriented project pedagogy. The article explores different dimensions of problem based learning...

  1. Problem Based Learning and sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzol, Massimo; Løkke, Søren; Schmidt, Jannick Højrup

    Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is a style of active learning based on problem solving. PBL aims at providing university students with flexible knowledge, capacity to self-learning, and skills in problem solving and collaboration. In this context, the present study explores the advantages...... University (AAU), Denmark, and focuses on the teaching of Life Cycle Assessment as a method for sustainability assessment. The objective is providing recommendations for future LCA teaching and learning. PBL activites performed at AAU were evaluated critically to detemine to what extent they addressed...

  2. Problem Based Learning and sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzol, Massimo; Løkke, Søren; Schmidt, Jannick Højrup

    Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is a style of active learning based on problem solving. PBL aims at providing university students with flexible knowledge, capacity to self-learning, and skills in problem solving and collaboration. In this context, the present study explores the advantages and challe......Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is a style of active learning based on problem solving. PBL aims at providing university students with flexible knowledge, capacity to self-learning, and skills in problem solving and collaboration. In this context, the present study explores the advantages...... University (AAU), Denmark, and focuses on the teaching of Life Cycle Assessment as a method for sustainability assessment. The objective is providing recommendations for future LCA teaching and learning. PBL activites performed at AAU were evaluated critically to detemine to what extent they addressed...... of how PBL-approaches were used to develop five specific competences in sustainability. It is concluded that -for the case fo LCA teaching at AAU- the PBL model included activities to develop system thinking, interpersonal competence, and normative competence. However, the PBL approach should...

  3. Problem-Based Learning Online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Nortvig, Anne-Mette

    2017-01-01

    Problem- and Project-Based Learning (PBL) is a widely used pedagogical method in higher education. Although PBL encourages self-directed learning and works with the students’ own projects and problems, it also includes teacher presentations, discussions and group reflections, both on......-campus and online. Therefore, the teacher’s plans might be relevant to the students’ projects, but that is not always the case. This study investigates how master’s students interact with an online Problem-Based Learning design and examines how technology influences these interactions. The empirical data stem from...... lessons at an online master’s course, and they were collected and analyzed using a netnographic approach. The study finds that concepts like self-directed learning and active involvement of everyone can have very different meanings from the teachers’ and the students’ points of view. If the students do...

  4. Java problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran P, Šimić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the self-directed problem-based learning system (PBL named Java PBL. The expert module is the kernel of Java PBL. It involves a specific domain model, a problem generator and a solution generator. The overall system architecture is represented in the paper. Java PBL can act as the stand-alone system, but it is also designed to provide support to learning management systems (LMSs. This is provided by a modular design of the system. An LMS can offer the declarative knowledge only. Java PBL offers the procedural knowledge and the progress of the learner programming skills. The free navigation, unlimited numbers of problems and recommendations represent the main pedagogical strategies and tactics implemented into the system.

  5. Problem Based Learning - Linking Students and Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Flemming K.

    2006-01-01

    -oriented project work: students work in teams to solve externally defined problem areas in co-operation with businesses, organisations and public institutions. Project Organised Problem Based Learning (POPBL) has generated a high degree of cooperation with the society and private companies. There are all the time...... is essentially problem solving. The presentation looks into on campus POPBL and the Facilitated Work Based Learning (FBL) for continuing education. It also presents case examples of POPBL work.......WG2_G4 Problem based learning – linking students and industry: a case study from Aalborg, Denmark Flemming K. Flink ELITE Aalborg University In Aalborg University, Denmark, all study programmes are organised around inter-disciplinary project work in groups. Up to 50% of the study work is problem...

  6. Characteristics of Problem-Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette

    2003-01-01

    Problem BAsed LEarning (PBL) is widely regarded as a successful and innovative method for engineering education. The article highlights the Dutch approach of directing the learning process throuogh problem analysis and the Danish model of project-organised learning...

  7. Problem-based learning: rationale and description

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractProblem-based learning is an instructional method that is said to provide students with knowledge suitable for problem solving. In order to test this assertion the process of problem-based learning is described and measured against three principles of learning: activation of prior knowle

  8. Bridging disciplines through problem based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentoft, Diana

    2011-01-01

    of how a problem based approach to learning will be implemented in the programs to support students in their engagement with the complexities of amalgamating and transgressing the disciplines of technology and anthropology. The paper is concluded by a brief discussion of problem based learning...

  9. Producing and scrounging during Problem Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L. Vickery

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available When problem based learning occurs in a social context it is open to a common social behaviour, scrounging. In the animal behaviour literature, scroungers do not attempt to find resources themselves but rather exploit resources found by other group members (referred to as producers. We know from studies of animal behaviour (including humans that scrounging can be expected whenever animals exploit resources in groups. We also know that scrounging can have deleterious effects on the group. We can expect scrounging to occur during social learning because the exchange of information (which I will consider here as a resource is essential to social learning. This exchange can be seen as each individual scrounging from the other members of the group whenever the individual learns from the work of others. However, there is a danger if some individuals learn mostly through their own efforts while others indulge in “social loafing” relying heavily on colleagues to provide knowledge. Here I propose that game theory models developed to analyse feeding in animal societies may also apply to social learning. We know from studies of birds feeding in groups that scrounging behaviour depends on the extent to which resources can be shared. Further, when scrounging is prevalent groups tend to obtain fewer resources. By contrast, in social learning we attempt to facilitate sharing of knowledge. We thus encourage scrounging and run the risk of reducing learning within study groups. Here I analyse the role of scrounging in problem based learning. I argue that scrounging is inherent and necessary to any social learning process. However, it can have perverse effects if the acquisition of facts rather than understanding comes to dominate learning objectives. Further, disparities among individuals within a group can lead certain individuals to specialise in scrounging thus undermining the functioning of the group. I suggest that motivation, problem structure

  10. Problem Based Learning (PBL): a conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Samantha H; Warelow, Philip J; Jackson, Karen L

    2009-10-01

    Problem Based Learning (PBL) using minimal guided instruction is used as an educational strategy across a broad variety of disciplines in the tertiary sector. This paper includes some of the strengths and weaknesses of PBL, both in general and in relation to the health care setting, encompassing some of its philosophical underpinnings and its methodological approach. In an effort to explore some of the benefits and problems with PBL in the work setting, this account will comprise a realistic rather than idealistic focus and will include a range of perspectives from both a facilitator and student standpoint. We suggest that PBL is a useful strategy across a comprehensive nursing degree programme (as the ideal) provided the learning programme is supported financially and that its ideal creed which supports a small group approach are adhered to. What we find is that reality is often different, with individual facilitators condensing their PBL programmes to incorporate a modified PBL approach with this personalized approach often taking strength away from the original conceptions of PBL. What we suggest here is that these circumstances constitute a conundrum.

  11. Content Analysis of Student Essays after Attending a Problem-Based Learning Course: Facilitating the Development of Critical Thinking and Communication Skills in Japanese Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itatani, Tomoya; Nagata, Kyoko; Yanagihara, Kiyoko; Tabuchi, Noriko

    2017-08-22

    The importance of active learning has continued to increase in Japan. The authors conducted classes for first-year students who entered the nursing program using the problem-based learning method which is a kind of active learning. Students discussed social topics in classes. The purposes of this study were to analyze the post-class essay, describe logical and critical thinking after attended a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) course. The authors used Mayring's methodology for qualitative content analysis and text mining. In the description about the skills required to resolve social issues, seven categories were extracted: (recognition of diverse social issues), (attitudes about resolving social issues), (discerning the root cause), (multi-lateral information processing skills), (making a path to resolve issues), (processivity in dealing with issues), and (reflecting). In the description about communication, five categories were extracted: (simple statement), (robust theories), (respecting the opponent), (communication skills), and (attractive presentations). As the result of text mining, the words extracted more than 100 times included "issue," "society," "resolve," "myself," "ability," "opinion," and "information." Education using PBL could be an effective means of improving skills that students described, and communication in general. Some students felt difficulty of communication resulting from characteristics of Japanese.

  12. Implementation of Problem-Based Learning in Environmental Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Stina; So¨derstro¨m, Hanna; Andersson, Patrik L.; Nording, Malin L.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental Chemistry covers a range of topics within the discipline of chemistry, from toxicology to legislation, which warrants interdisciplinary study. Consequently, problem-based learning (PBL), a style of student-centered learning which facilitates the integration of multiple subjects, was investigated to determine if it would be a more…

  13. Implementation of Problem-Based Learning in Environmental Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Stina; So¨derstro¨m, Hanna; Andersson, Patrik L.; Nording, Malin L.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental Chemistry covers a range of topics within the discipline of chemistry, from toxicology to legislation, which warrants interdisciplinary study. Consequently, problem-based learning (PBL), a style of student-centered learning which facilitates the integration of multiple subjects, was investigated to determine if it would be a more…

  14. Problem based learning in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, D I; Kayastha, S R; Makaju, R; Dongol, M

    2012-01-01

    Problem based learning, originally introduced in the Medical School at Mc-Master University in Canada in the late 1960s, and is now being used as a learning method in many medical schools in the United Kingdom and worldwide. Problem based learning have been adapted in many medical colleges of Nepal be used either as the mainstay of an entire curriculum or for the delivery of individual courses. Institution of Medicine, Tribhuvan University in 1980, BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences at Dharan in 1999, KUSMS with the great support of faculties from Harvard University in 2001, Patan Academy of Health Sciences (PAHS), and lately all the affiliated medical colleges of Kathmandu University have adapted Problem based learning.

  15. Distance learning, problem based learning and dynamic knowledge networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giani, U; Martone, P

    1998-06-01

    This paper is an attempt to develop a distance learning model grounded upon a strict integration of problem based learning (PBL), dynamic knowledge networks (DKN) and web tools, such as hypermedia documents, synchronous and asynchronous communication facilities, etc. The main objective is to develop a theory of distance learning based upon the idea that learning is a highly dynamic cognitive process aimed at connecting different concepts in a network of mutually supporting concepts. Moreover, this process is supposed to be the result of a social interaction that has to be facilitated by the web. The model was tested by creating a virtual classroom of medical and nursing students and activating a learning session on the concept of knowledge representation in health sciences.

  16. Improving Achievement through Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungur, Semra; Tekkaya, Ceren; Geban, Omer

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the effect of problem-based learning on students' academic achievement and performance skills in a unit on the human excretory system was investigated. Sixty-one 10th grade students, from two full classes instructed by the same biology teacher, were involved in the study. Classes were randomly assigned as either the experimental or…

  17. Power, Democracy and Problem-Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Stentoft, Diana; Dahms, Mona-Lisa

    2007-01-01

      Problem Based Learning (PBL) as an educational approach has been increasingly applied in educational settings around the world. Given that PBL - as well as any other educational approach - is rooted in a given cultural context and thus carries the ‘fingerprint' of the specific context, an inter...

  18. Staff Development in Problem-based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Ian; Savin-Baden, Maggi

    2000-01-01

    Argues that, for problem-based learning (PBL) to succeed, a sound program of staff development is required and describes the introduction of PBL into Nursing and Midwifery curricula at the University of Dundee (Scotland) including key components and evaluatory evidence to support its efficacy. (DB)

  19. Producing and Scrounging during Problem Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, William L.

    2013-01-01

    When problem based learning occurs in a social context it is open to a common social behaviour, scrounging. In the animal behaviour literature, scroungers do not attempt to find resources themselves but rather exploit resources found by other group members (referred to as producers). We know from studies of animal behaviour (including humans) that…

  20. Problem Based Learning in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahms, Mona-Lisa; Sauerbier, Gabriele; Stubbe, Korinna

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a recent EU-project from five European Institutions. The aim was the development and implementation of a new international Master’s programme for staff development, directed towards the introduction of Problem Based Learning methods in the field of engineering education...

  1. Nursing students' perceptions of effective problem-based learning tutors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew-Maich, Nancy; Martin, Lynn; Hammond, Cynthia; Palma, Amy; Pavkovic, Maria; Sheremet, Darlene; Roche, Carmen

    2016-11-16

    Aim To explore baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of what makes an effective tutor in problem-based learning courses, and the influence of effective teaching on students' learning and experience. Method Students enrolled in all four years of a baccalaureate nursing programme completed online surveys (n=511) and participated in focus groups (n=19). Data were analysed and combined using content analysis. Findings The data were summarised using five themes, the '5 Ps' of effective teaching in problem-based learning. Nursing students perceived effective problem-based learning tutors to be prepared with knowledge and facilitation skills, person-centred, passionate, professional and able to prepare students for success in the nursing programme. Effective tutors adjusted their approaches to students throughout the four years of the nursing programme. Conclusion Effective teaching in problem-based learning is essential and has significant effects on nursing students' learning, motivation and experience. Important attributes, skills and strategies of effective problem-based learning tutors were identified and may be used to enhance teaching and plan professional development initiatives.

  2. Enabling Problem Based Learning through Web 2.0 Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambouris, Efthimios; Panopoulou, Eleni; Tarabanis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Advances in Information and Communications Technology (ICT), particularly the so-called Web 2.0, are affecting all aspects of our life: how we communicate, how we shop, how we socialise, and how we learn. Facilitating learning through the use of ICT, also known as eLearning, is a vital part...... of modern educational systems. Established pedagogical strategies, such as Problem Based Learning (PBL), are being adapted for online use in conjunction with modern Web 2.0 technologies and tools. However, even though Web 2.0 and progressive social-networking technologies are automatically associated...

  3. Educational Change towards Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Huichun

    at the university, depending on which strategy the mangers have employed. Further, the organizational members’ understandings of PBL are more concerned with teaching and curriculum design rather than learning, which should be highlighted within PBL context. Besides, staff members have to struggle between different......As a promising educational approach, PBL (Problem Based Learning) has been adopted by an increasing number of higher education institutions worldwide to replace the traditional lectured based educational approach. However, the organizational change towards PBL is not easy for higher education...... institutions, especially for those with a long history of Lecture Based Learning. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the challenges and obstacles for higher education institutions which are implementing PBL. In order to address the research concern, this book involves in an intensive exploration of two...

  4. Nursing problem-based learning activity: song writing and singing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2014-08-01

    The function of song is not only to deliver individual's messages, but also to serve as a learning approach to facilitate students' learning. To observe the effectiveness of songs in facilitating students' learning, a Problem-based Learning (PBL) class with twenty students was divided into four groups with five students per group. Each group was asked to write a song based on two given scenarios, to sing the song out loud, and to participate in a follow-up focus group interview afterwards. The four songs reflected the students' understanding of academic knowledge and their perspectives toward the protagonists in the presented scenarios. Two songs are presented in this paper to demonstrate how the approach was carried out in the nursing PBL class. This paper aims to show the implication of song writing and singing in PBL and shed some light on teaching and learning.

  5. Problem Based Learning in Nursing Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. McMaster University first introduced Problem Based Learning (PBL in the mid 1960s. However, measuring the relationship between PBL for undergraduate nursing programs and students test performance has not yet been assessed in the USA. Purpose. The main purpose of this paper is to describe the effectiveness of PBL on senior student test performance on content related to PBL in a BSN program. Diabetes mellitus and renal insufficiency were taught by traditional lecture format in the previous years. This was the first year we taught this content by the problem based learning method. Method. Historical control group was used to compare the test performances between the PBL groups and the traditional group using Student’s t-test. Result. The mean of diabetes mellitus related questions missed by the PBL group was less than the traditional group (t = 4.51, and P=.00. The mean of renal insufficiency related questions missed by the PBL group was more than the traditional group (t=-6.44, and P=.00. Discussion. This study produced inconclusive findings. Factors that could be attributed to their performance will be discussed.

  6. Educational Change towards Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Huichun

    As a promising educational approach, PBL (Problem Based Learning) has been adopted by an increasing number of higher education institutions worldwide to replace the traditional lectured based educational approach. However, the organizational change towards PBL is not easy for higher education...... institutions, especially for those with a long history of Lecture Based Learning. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the challenges and obstacles for higher education institutions which are implementing PBL. In order to address the research concern, this book involves in an intensive exploration of two...... universities which are transforming their traditional educational approaches to PBL. Specifically, this book is concerned with how managers, staff members, and students interpret PBL and its implementation. It reveals that the challenges for implementing PBL are closely linked to organizational members...

  7. Is learning in problem-based learning cumulative?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.J. Yew (Elaine); E. Chng (Esther); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractProblem-based learning (PBL) is generally organized in three phases, involving collaborative and self-directed learning processes. The hypothesis tested here is whether learning in the different phases of PBL is cumulative, with learning in each phase depending on that of the previous ph

  8. Problem-Based Educational Game Becomes Student-Centered Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodkroh, Pornpimon; Suwannatthachote, Praweenya; Kaemkate, Wannee

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based educational games are able to provide a fun and motivating environment for teaching and learning of certain subjects. However, most educational game models do not address the learning elements of problem-based educational games. This study aims to synthesize and to propose the important elements to facilitate the learning process and…

  9. Knowledge formations in Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Verner

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents some of the results from a recent completed Ph.D. program about disciplinarity and inter-disciplinarity in problem based learning (PBL). Disciplinary content in PBL-programs has been questioned during recent years, so stronger concepts of how knowledge is actually organized...... and structured in PBL are needed to qualify this discussion. This paper focuses on the research question: How has the structuring/organization of knowledge in curriculum changed over time and what kinds of connections and interrelations between disciplines/subjects can be identified in current PBL......-courses? The research has aimed to conceptualize how various knowledge areas blend in two educational contexts applying PBL. Interrelationships have often been referred to as inter-cross- or trans-disciplinarity. However, these terms are ambiguous. Thus I introduce the term transversality to suggests that knowledge...

  10. Conscientization, Dialogue and Collaborative Problem Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conscientization, Dialogue and Collaborative Problem Based Learning

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that Paulo Freire’s concept of conscientization, where critical awareness and engagement are central to a problem-posing pedagogy, provides the philosophical principles to underpin Problem Based Learning (PBL. By using dialogue groups and a combination of learning strategies to discover the nature of a problem, understand its constraints, options, and multi-voiced perspectives, students can negotiate the sociological nature of its resolution and how competing perspectives may inform decision-making. This paper will first present the background of PBL, before it introduces and argues for reflective and reflexive learning environments founded within dialogical practices. It then provides tales from the field that illustrate how conscientization is enacted in the classroom, before considering implications and the Ten Principles of Critical Learning’ for reflective and reflexive practice. It concludes by arguing that conscientization and the dialogical process are central to PBL in order to engage the individual voice, foster democratic practices, and for the creation of shared meanings and understandings.

  11. Enabling Problem Based Learning through Web 2.0 Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambouris, Efthimios; Panopoulou, Eleni; Tarabanis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    of modern educational systems. Established pedagogical strategies, such as Problem Based Learning (PBL), are being adapted for online use in conjunction with modern Web 2.0 technologies and tools. However, even though Web 2.0 and progressive social-networking technologies are automatically associated...... with ideals such as collaboration, sharing, and active learning, it is also possible to use them in a very conservative, teacher-centred way limiting thus their impact. In this paper, we present a PBL 2.0 framework, i.e., a framework combining PBL practices with Web 2.0 technologies. More specifically, we (a......Advances in Information and Communications Technology (ICT), particularly the so-called Web 2.0, are affecting all aspects of our life: how we communicate, how we shop, how we socialise, and how we learn. Facilitating learning through the use of ICT, also known as eLearning, is a vital part...

  12. Using problem-based learning in a large classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastirik, Pamela J

    2006-09-01

    Although PBL (problem-based learning) has gained increasing acceptance as an alternative to teacher-centered methods in nursing education, there are challenges to implementing this method in conventional course-based curriculums due to lack of additional faculty tutors to facilitate and monitor small group process. Little is known in nursing education regarding the effectiveness of teaching PBL in large group settings. [Woods, D. 1996. Problem-based Learning for Large Classes in Chemical Engineering. In: Wilkerson, L., Gijsaers, W. (Eds.), Bringing Problem-based Learning to Higher Education: Theory And Practice. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, pp. 91-99] suggests that there are significant challenges related to student acceptance of the method, monitoring small group process and evaluating the quality of students' work. This paper will provide a description of the process and outcome of using PBL in a second year Baccalaureate nursing course using both classroom and on-line learning technology. Findings from a student survey will be included to highlight the strengths and challenges of using PBL in a large group setting with one faculty tutor. Implications for using PBL in this format will be provided.

  13. Students' Perception of Interdisciplinary, Problem-Based Learning in a Food Biotechnology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Betsy L. L.; Yap, Kueh C.; Hoh, Yin K.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Students' perception of 8 criteria (rationale of the problem; interdisciplinary learning; facilitator asked essential questions; learner's skills; assessments; facilitation procedures; team's use of resources [team collaboration], and facilitator within a problem-based learning context) were assessed for a food biotechnology course that…

  14. Students' Perception of Interdisciplinary, Problem-Based Learning in a Food Biotechnology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Betsy L. L.; Yap, Kueh C.; Hoh, Yin K.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Students' perception of 8 criteria (rationale of the problem; interdisciplinary learning; facilitator asked essential questions; learner's skills; assessments; facilitation procedures; team's use of resources [team collaboration], and facilitator within a problem-based learning context) were assessed for a food biotechnology course that…

  15. Problem-Based Learning in Higher Education: Untold Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin-Baden, Maggi

    The central argument of this book is that the potential of problem-based learning is yet to be realized in higher education. Problem-based learning is an important approach to learning, based in the experiential learning tradition, that needs to be more centrally located in higher education curricula. Part 1 of this book explores problem-based…

  16. Problem based learning - A brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Sandra; Oliveira, Teresa A.; Oliveira, Amílcar

    2017-07-01

    Teaching is a complex mission that requires not only the theoretical knowledge transmission, but furthermore requires to provide the students the necessary skills for solving real problems in their respective professional activities where complex issues and problems must be frequently faced. Over more than twenty years we have been experiencing an increase in scholar failure in the scientific area of mathematics, which means that Teaching Mathematics and related areas can be even a more complex and hard task. Scholar failure is a complex phenomenon that depends on various factors as social factors, scholar factors or biophysical factors. After numerous attempts made in order to reduce scholar failure our goal in this paper is to understand the role of "Problem Based Learning" and how this methodology can contribute to the solution of both: increasing mathematical courses success and increasing skills in the near future professionals in Portugal. Before designing a proposal for applying this technique in our institutions, we decided to conduct a survey to provide us with the necessary information about and the respective advantages and disadvantages of this methodology, so this is the brief review aim.

  17. Role-playing in the problem-based learning class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2012-01-01

    Learning and teaching have been conceptualized and executed in many styles, such as self-learning, peer learning, and interaction between the learner and mentor. Today, openness to alternative ideas and embracing innovative approaches in nursing education are encouraged in order to meet students' learning interests and needs, and to address ever-changing healthcare requests. Problem-based learning has been widely adopted in nursing education, with various positive effects on students' learning, such as motivated learning, team work, problem-solving skills and critical thinking. Role-plays have been demonstrated as an effective learning strategy that includes an active and experiential feature that facilitates students' autonomy in their health-related learning. However, there is a lack of discussion of whether and how role-play can be used in problem-based learning (PBL). This paper shows the development of a classroom-based innovation using role-play in the PBL class for higher diploma year-one nurse students (a total of 20 students, five per group). This paper consists of five sections: a) the literature on PBL and nurse education, and role-plays as the innovation; b) the PBL case scenario with the illustration of the two role-play scripts, c) student evaluation on role-play in the PBL class; d) discussions on both achievements and limitations of this innovation, and e) the conclusion. It is hoped that this paper will be an example to other nurse educators who are keen on exploring interactive and student-driven learning and teaching strategies in the PBL class.

  18. Mapping Students Use of Technologies in Problem Based Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn; Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Ryberg, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to understand how students use technology to enhance their learning in problem-based learning environments. The research methodology is based on both qualitative and quantitative studies. The results are based on students’ interviews, a survey and students’ reflections in course......-related blog posts; they show that students have positive perceptions toward using technologies in problem-based learning environments....

  19. Learning from the problems of problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epstein Richard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The last decade has witnessed a rapid expansion of biomedical knowledge. Despite this, fashions in medical education over the same period have shifted away from factual (didactic teaching and towards contextual, or problem-based, learning (PBL. This paradigm shift has been justified by studies showing that PBL improves reasoning and communication while being associated with few if any detectable knowledge deficits. Discussion Analysis of the literature indicates that the recent rapid rise of PBL has closely paralleled the timing of the information explosion. The growing dominance of PBL could thus worsen the problems of information management in medical education via several mechanisms: first, by creating the impression that a defined spectrum of core factual knowledge suffices for clinical competence despite ongoing knowledge expansion (quality cost; second, by dissuading teachers from refining the educational utility of didactic modalities (improvement cost; and third, by reducing faculty time for developing reusable resources to impart factual knowledge more efficiently (opportunity cost. Summary These costs of PBL imply a need for strengthening the knowledge base of 21st-century medical graduates. New initiatives towards this end could include the development of more integrated cognitive techniques for facilitating the comprehension of complex data; the design of differentiated medical curricula for producing graduates with defined high-priority skill sets; and the encouragement of more cost-effective faculty teaching activities focused on the prototyping and testing of innovative commercializable educational tools.

  20. Evaluating problem-based learning in a multilingual student population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, C; Seneque, M

    1999-10-01

    The University of Natal Medical School in South Africa provides training for a student body composed of two groups: one with English as a first language and the other with an African language as a first language and English as the second. A new methodology was developed to evaluate an innovative course using modified problem-based learning techniques in this heterogeneous environment. The learning model proposed required achieving a balance of three components: content, enquiry/learning process and social interaction/group process. A multidimensional system, felt to be consistent with this educational philosophy, was developed using seven different quantitative and qualitative techniques. The University of Natal Medical School. First-year multilingual medical students. The results revealed that social interaction was highly successful in reducing barriers between the student groups and between students and facilitators. However, the emphasis on group participation may have overshadowed the enquiry process, leading to superficial discussions of problems and feelings of repetitiveness. During the course students and facilitators expressed concern that the innovative assessments used did not assess the course content adequately. While the group presentations and projects were useful exercises for consolidation and group interaction, they did not enable facilitators to identify struggling students. The outcome of the evaluation stressed the need of achieving an appropriate balance both in the curriculum and assessments of the three components of the learning model, particularly in a setting where student backgrounds and language ability differ. Multidimensional methodology is needed for effective evaluation that promotes critical reflection.

  1. Problem-Based Learning in Formal and Informal Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimic, Goran; Jevremovic, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a student-centered instructional strategy in which students solve problems and reflect on their experiences. Different domains need different approaches in the design of PBL systems. Therefore, we present one case study in this article: A Java Programming PBL. The application is developed as an additional module for…

  2. Problem-Based Learning in Formal and Informal Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimic, Goran; Jevremovic, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a student-centered instructional strategy in which students solve problems and reflect on their experiences. Different domains need different approaches in the design of PBL systems. Therefore, we present one case study in this article: A Java Programming PBL. The application is developed as an additional module for…

  3. Problem-Based Learning Assessment for Information Systems Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Willie; Ghafarian, Ahmad

    A promising recent development in tertiary education involves the application of problem-based learning as a curricular vehicle to develop student talent. Problem-based learning (PBL) is common in professional education, such as in medical, law, and business schools, and is becoming increasingly common in pre-college education. However, it is less…

  4. Renewed roles for librarians in problem-based learning in the medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa

    2011-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a teaching-learning process or method of instruction that is widely used in medical education curricula. Librarians play important roles as facilitators for PBL as well as guides for information resources. Involvement in PBL activities presents unique opportunities to incorporate library resources and instruction into the medical curriculum. This article reviews the problem-based learning method within the conceptual framework of the learning theory of constructivism. It describes how a medical librarian at a U.S. medical school used emerging technologies to facilitate PBL small group case discussions, guide students to quality information resources, and enhance the learning environment for the PBL process.

  5. A problem-based learning curriculum and undergraduate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    learning.[3] Central to the approach is the use of problems, which are posed to .... collected through surveys or interviews soliciting information from .... McParland M, Noble ML, Livingston G. The effectiveness of problem based learning.

  6. Creating Problem-Based Leadership Learning across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sara E.; Couto, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores problem-based learning (PBL) as effective pedagogy to enhance leadership learning. Through institutional examples, research, and personal experiences, the authors provide a rationale for faculty and staff to utilize PBL across the curriculum.

  7. Managing the Gap between Curriculum Based and Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Buus, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    the challenges in applying problem based learning strategies in a context where several universities, with different cultures of teaching, collaboratively develop and deliver online courses. We present a pedagogical framework embracing both problem based and curriculum based strategies and show how we used....../or but rather both/and. In this paper we describe an approach to design and delivery of online courses in computer science which on the one hand is based on a specified curriculum and on the other hand gives room for different learning strategies, problem based learning being one of them. We discuss...... this as a basis for trying out various online learning strategies....

  8. A case for problem-based collaborative learning in the nursing classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Kathryn; Trudeau, Kimberlee J

    2003-01-01

    To facilitate student learning of the content in a clinical nursing course, the authors used ideas from Problem-based Learning (PBL) and collaborative learning to develop student writing assignments and group workshops. They describe the PBL-enhanced activities and student work, concluding with student feedback and future directions for this curriculum.

  9. Addressing Cultural Diversity: Effects of a Problem-Based Intercultural Learning Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Vera; Krause, Ulrike-Marie

    2015-01-01

    This article explores to what extent a problem-based learning unit in combination with cooperative learning and affectively oriented teaching methods facilitates intercultural learning. As part of the study, students reflected on critical incidents, which display misunderstandings or conflicts that arise as a result of cultural differences. In…

  10. Addressing Cultural Diversity: Effects of a Problem-Based Intercultural Learning Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Vera; Krause, Ulrike-Marie

    2015-01-01

    This article explores to what extent a problem-based learning unit in combination with cooperative learning and affectively oriented teaching methods facilitates intercultural learning. As part of the study, students reflected on critical incidents, which display misunderstandings or conflicts that arise as a result of cultural differences. In…

  11. Managing the Gap between Curriculum Based and Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Buus, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally there has been a clear distinction between curriculum based and problem based approaches to accomplish learning. Preferred approaches depend of course on conviction, culture, traditions and also on the specific learning situation. We will argue that it is not a question of either....../or but rather both/and. In this paper we describe an approach to design and delivery of online courses in computer science which on the one hand is based on a specified curriculum and on the other hand gives room for different learning strategies, problem based learning being one of them. We discuss...... the challenges in applying problem based learning strategies in a context where several universities, with different cultures of teaching, collaboratively develop and deliver online courses. We present a pedagogical framework embracing both problem based and curriculum based strategies and show how we used...

  12. Problem-Based Learning in Social Work Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monrad, Merete; Mølholt, Anne-Kirstine

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) constitutes a promising way of integrating academia and social work practice because PBL fosters engagement with real-life problems and enhances important skills needed in social work practice. However, little attention has been given to social work students......’ experiences of PBL. In this article we address this gap by exploring experiences of learning and learning preferences among master’s-level students in a Danish social work education setting where extensive problem-based project work is used. We find a discrepancy between students’ preferred learning and when...... they experience learning the most. Possible reasons for this discrepancy, and implications for teaching, are discussed....

  13. Problem-Based Learning in Social Work Education: Students’ experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monrad, Merete; Mølholt, Anne-Kirstine

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) constitutes a promising way of integrating academia and social work practice because PBL fosters engagement with real-life problems and enhances important skills needed in social work practice. However, little attention has been given to social work students......’ experiences of PBL. In this article we address this gap by exploring experiences of learning and learning preferences among master’s-level students in a Danish social work education setting where extensive problem-based project work is used. We find a discrepancy between students’ preferred learning and when...... they experience learning the most. Possible reasons for this discrepancy, and implications for teaching, are discussed....

  14. Problem-based Learning in a Competency-based World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, Gregory A.; Davidhizar, Ruth; Bradshaw, Martha J.

    1999-01-01

    Problem-based learning emphasizes critical thinking and clinical judgment. Competency-based education focuses on clinical competence. A merger of the two in nursing education could generate higher levels of inquiry and more expert clinicians. (SK)

  15. Introducing problem-based learning (PBL) into a foundation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Institute for Mathematics and Science Teaching, Stellenbosch University, South Africa ... Problem-based Learning (PBL) approach in a one-year foundation ..... An open-ended questionnaire which consisted of 7 questions targeted the 2006.

  16. Educational Data Mining and Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walldén, Sari; Mäkinen, Erkki

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the use of log data provided by learning management systems when studying whether students obey the problem-based learning (PBL) method. Log analysis turns out to be a valuable tool in measuring the use of the learning material of interest. It gives reliable figures concerning not only the number of use sessions but also the…

  17. Problem based Learning in surveying Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    The challenge of the future will be that the only constant is change. Therefore, the educational base must be flexible. The graduates must possess skills to adapt to a rapidly changing labour market and they must possess skills to deal with even the unknown problems of the future. The point is......, that professional and technical skills can be acquired and updated at a later stage in ones career while skills for problem-solving and skills for learning to learn can only be achieved through the process of academic training at he universities. The concept of project-organised education provides just...... that opportunity. The basis principles of this educational model are presented using the surveying programme at Aalborg University as an example....

  18. Teaching Critical Management Skills: The Role of Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joham, Carmen; Clarke, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores problem-based learning (PBL) as a vehicle for developing critical management skills and preparing students for their future careers. Using student reflections and facilitator observations the paper presents the nature of individuals' experiences with learning and teaching in a PBL setting in the management discipline. The study…

  19. Learner Perspectives of Online Problem-Based Learning and Applications from Cognitive Load Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) courses have historically been situated in physical classrooms involving in-person interactions. As online learning is embraced in higher education, programs that use PBL can integrate online platforms to support curriculum delivery and facilitate student engagement. This report describes student perspectives of the…

  20. Effects of tutor-related behaviours on the process of problem-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Chng (Esther); E.H.J. Yew (Elaine); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractTutors in a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) curriculum are thought to play active roles in guiding students to develop frameworks for use in the construction of knowledge. This implies that both subject-matter expertise and the ability of tutors to facilitate the learning process must be im

  1. Beliefs, Behaviours, and Professional Development of Tutors in Problem-Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Williams (Judith)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe theme of this thesis is the tutor in problem-based learning (PBL). Specifically, the objective of the five studies presented is to gain an understanding of what shapes tutors as facilitators of student learning; their beliefs about teaching, their educational intentions and goals as

  2. An Educational Approach to Problem-based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Chieh Chen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the educational framework of problem-based learning (PBL. As known and used, PBL finds its root in the Structuralism and Pragmatism schools of philosophy. In this paper, the three main requirements of PBL, namely learning by doing, learning in context, and focusing on the student, are discussed within the context of these two schools of thought. Given these attributes, PBL also seems ideally suited for use in learning bioethics.

  3. New Realities and the Implications for Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Olav Jull

    2004-01-01

    The background for this article is the big changes we have experienced since the idea of the problem based learning model was conceived at Aalborg University in the beginning of the 1970s. Assuming that no teaching model is context free, the challenge is to confront the basics of the problem......-life learning and, finally, the integrative use of ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) and the Internet. If these modifications are made, the problem-based learning model will be able to cope with the new realities to a larger extent than more conventional university models....

  4. Implementing Problem-Based Learning in an Undergraduate Psychology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Russell Searight, PhD

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Problem-based learning (PBL is a small-group pedagogical technique widely used in fields such as business, medicine, engineering, and architecture. In PBL, pre-written cases are used to teach core course content. PBL advocates state that course material is more likely to be retained and applied when presented as cases reflecting "real life" applications of class material. However, rather than traditional lecture-discussion, PBL encourages student autonomy in analyzing cases, with the instructor serving initially as a structuring facilitator before gradually becoming less active as students take more responsibility for their learning. As students proceed through each case, they address four dimensions: What they know, what they want to know, possible causal hypotheses, and questions that can be answered through library research. The PBL cases referred to herein were developed and employed for an undergraduate psychology course, "Psychology of the Exceptional Child." Students completing this course included psychology, special education, and human service majors and have positively evaluated this technique as a teaching tool.

  5. Implementing Problem-Based Learning in an Undergraduate Psychology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Russell Searight, PhD

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem-based learning (PBL is a small-group pedagogical technique widely used in fields such as business, medicine, engineering, and architecture. In PBL, pre-written cases are used to teach core course content. PBL advocates state that course material is more likely to be retained and applied when presented as cases reflecting "real life" applications of class material. However, rather than traditional lecture-discussion, PBL encourages student autonomy in analyzing cases, with the instructor serving initially as a structuring facilitator before gradually becoming less active as students take more responsibility for their learning. As students proceed through each case, they address four dimensions: What they know, what they want to know, possible causal hypotheses, and questions that can be answered through library research. The PBL cases referred to herein were developed and employed for an undergraduate psychology course, "Psychology of the Exceptional Child." Students completing this course included psychology, special education, and human service majors and have positively evaluated this technique as a teaching tool.

  6. Problem based learning in mental health nursing: the students' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Carol; Carver, Neil

    2012-04-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) is well established within the field of health-care education for professionals worldwide, although little has been done to explore the experiences of students undertaking a PBL course in mental health nursing. Without firm evidence of the benefits of PBL, educationalists in mental health might be reluctant to view it as an option in curricula design. This U.K. study examined the experiences of pre-registration post-graduate mental health student nurses undertaking a 2-year educational course in which all teaching and assessment followed a PBL philosophy. Focus groups were used throughout the course to elicit in-depth qualitative data that was analysed by applying a constant comparative method. The analysis of the data uncovered the following broad themes: 'moves to autonomy, 'surviving the groups' and 'the impact of PBL'. The findings show that participants had mainly positive experiences and gained a range of study and interpersonal skills central to mental health nursing. Participants described initial anxieties resulting from engagement in PBL. However, they increasingly gained confidence in this approach, exercising increasing control over the PBL process. Despite this increased autonomy, participants continued to value the input of skilled facilitators. A recurring issue centred on the potential for interpersonal conflict within the student group and its impact on their learning. It is suggested that more research is needed examining the use of PBL in mental health nursing. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  7. Problem effectiveness in a course using problem-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.J.M. Dolmans (Diana); W.H. Gijselaers (Wim); H.G. Schmidt (Henk); S.B. van der Meer

    1993-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Problem-based learning (PBL) emphasizes active generation of learning issues by students. Both students and reachers, however, tend to worry that not all important knowledge will be acquired. To explore this question, problem effectiveness (i.e., for each problem, the degree

  8. Problem effectiveness in a course using problem-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.J.M. Dolmans (Diana); W.H. Gijselaers (Wim); H.G. Schmidt (Henk); S.B. van der Meer

    1993-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Problem-based learning (PBL) emphasizes active generation of learning issues by students. Both students and reachers, however, tend to worry that not all important knowledge will be acquired. To explore this question, problem effectiveness (i.e., for each problem, the degree

  9. Characteristics of Problems in Problem-based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Sockalingam (Nachamma)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on characteristics of problems in Problem-based Learning (PBL). Problems initiate the students’ learning process in PBL. Several studies have shown that the quality of problems has a positive influence on students’ academic achievement and interest. In addition, the q

  10. Foundations of problem-based learning: Some explanatory notes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe present article elaborates on cognitive effects of problem-based learning put forward by Schmidt, De Volder, De Grave, Moust & Patel (1989) and Norman & Schmidt (1992). Its purpose is to discuss, in some detail, the theoretical premises of this approach to learning and instruction.

  11. Characteristics of Problems in Problem-based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Sockalingam (Nachamma)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on characteristics of problems in Problem-based Learning (PBL). Problems initiate the students’ learning process in PBL. Several studies have shown that the quality of problems has a positive influence on students’ academic achievement and interest. In addition, the

  12. Impact of Problem-Based Learning to Students and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirca, Necati

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of National Education of Turkey has decided to give up traditional methods to be used in the classes and to develop a new secondary school curriculum based on Context-Based Learning (CBL) in 2007. This paper discusses integrating Problem-Based Learning (PBL) tasks into the new physics curriculum in Turkey. A brief overview of a…

  13. The Guinea Pigs of a Problem-Based Learning Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sarasvathie; McKenna, Sioux

    2016-01-01

    Participants in a study on learning the clinical aspects of medicine in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum repeatedly referred to themselves as "Guinea pigs" at the mercy of a curriculum experiment. This article interrogates and problematises the "Guinea pig" identity ascribed to and assumed by the first cohort of…

  14. Evaluation of a Problem Based Learning Curriculum Using Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prihatiningsih, Titi Savitri; Qomariyah, Nurul

    2016-01-01

    Faculty of Medicine UGM has implemented Problem Based Learning (PBL) since 1985. Seven jump tutorial discussions are applied. A scenario is used as a trigger to stimulate students to identify learning objectives (LOs) in step five which are used as the basis for self study in step six. For each scenario, the Block Team formulates the LOs which are…

  15. From Saying to Doing Interdisciplinary Learning: Is Problem-Based Learning the Answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stentoft, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based learning is often characterised as an approach encompassing interdisciplinary learning; however, little attention has been explicitly paid to what a claim of interdisciplinary problem-based learning means in practice. Even less attention has been given to address the consequences of interdisciplinary problem-based learning for…

  16. PENERAPAN BLENDED-PROBLEM BASED LEARNING DALAM PEMBELAJARAN BIOLOGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Agus Triyanto

    2016-07-01

    Biologi abad 21 merupakan integrasi dan mengintegrasikan kembali sub disiplin ilmu biologi, serta integrasi biologi dengan disiplin ilmu lain untuk mengatasi permasalahan sosial. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui penerapan Blended-Problem Based Learning, aktivitas belajar, dan respon siswa dalam pembelajaran biologi. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian survei dengan pendekatan deskriptif kualitatif. Data hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa aktivitas positif siswa dalam pembelajaran memuaskan, sedangkan respon siswa baik terhadap pembelajaran. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian, disimpulkan bahwa Blended-Problem Based Learning dapat diterapkan dan diterima sebagai model dalam pembelajaran.

  17. Problem-based learning biotechnology courses in chemical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, Charles E; Gonzalez, Ramon; Huba, Mary E; Mallapragada, Surya K; Narasimhan, Balaji; Reilly, Peter J; Saunders, Kevin P; Shanks, Jacqueline V

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a series of upper undergraduate/graduate lecture and laboratory courses on biotechnological topics to supplement existing biochemical engineering, bioseparations, and biomedical engineering lecture courses. The laboratory courses are based on problem-based learning techniques, featuring two- and three-person teams, journaling, and performance rubrics for guidance and assessment. Participants initially have found them to be difficult, since they had little experience with problem-based learning. To increase enrollment, we are combining the laboratory courses into 2-credit groupings and allowing students to substitute one of them for the second of our 2-credit chemical engineering unit operations laboratory courses.

  18. Facilitating Facilitators to Facilitate, in Problem or Enquiry Based Learning Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) has been used in dental education over the past 20 years and uses a patient case scenario to stimulate learning in a small group setting, where a trained facilitator does not teach but guides the group to bring about deep contextualized learning, to be empathetic to each other and to encourage fair and equitable…

  19. Speak Out: Dancing into Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Mila

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, Problem Based Learning (PBL) has been applied in medical and psychological areas of professional education. The PBL approach requires students to move past traditional choreographic methods toward making dances informed by real-world issues. In PBL, students work cooperatively to solve complex problems. Rather than being presented…

  20. UICEE Centre for Problem Based Learning (UCPBL) at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Flemming Kobberøe; Enemark, Stig; Moesby, Egon

    2002-01-01

    University is considered to have a strong position in Problem-Based Learning (PBL) with many years of experience. Within engineering education co-operation with industry has also always been a field of high importance for Aalborg University and part of the PBL concept. An increasing number of universities...

  1. Utilizing Problem-Based Learning in Qualitative Analysis Lab Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Randall W.; Bevsek, Holly M.

    2012-01-01

    A series of qualitative analysis (QA) laboratory experiments utilizing a problem-based learning (PBL) module has been designed and implemented. The module guided students through the experiments under the guise of cleaning up a potentially contaminated water site as employees of an environmental chemistry laboratory. The main goal was the…

  2. Problem based learning: Cognitive and metacognitive processes during problem analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.S. de Grave; H.P.A. Boshuizen (Henny); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractAn important phase of problem-based learning in a tutorial group is problem analysis. This article describes a study investigating the ongoing cognitive and metacognitive processes during problem analysis, by analysing the verbal communication among group members, and their thinking proc

  3. Designing Digital Problem Based Learning Tasks that Motivate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Anne-Marieke; Ros, Anje; Martens, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether teachers are able to apply the principles of autonomy support and structure support in designing digital problem based learning (PBL) tasks. We examine whether these tasks are more autonomy- and structure-supportive and whether primary and secondary school students experience greater autonomy, competence, and motivation…

  4. [Problem-based learning, a strategy to employ it].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillamet Lloveras, Ana; Celma Vicente, Matilde; González Carrión, Pilar; Cano-Caballero Gálvez, Ma Dolores; Pérez Ramírez, Francisca

    2009-02-01

    The Virgen de las Nieves University School of Nursing has adopted the methodology of Problem-Based Learning (ABP in Spanish acronym) as a supplementary method to gain specific transversal competencies. In so doing, all basic required/obligatory subjects necessary for a degree have been partially affected. With the objective of identifying and administering all the structural and cultural barriers which could impede the success or effectiveness of its adoption, a strategic analysis at the School was carried out. This technique was based on a) knowing the strong and weak points the School has for adopting the Problem-Based Learning methodology; b) describing the structural problems and necessities to carry out this teaching innovation; c) to discover the needs professors have regarding knowledge and skills related to Problem-Based Learning; d) to prepare students by informing them about the characteristics of Problem-Based Learning; e) to evaluate the results obtained by means of professor and student opinions, f) to adopt the improvements identified. The stages followed were: strategic analysis, preparation, pilot program, adoption and evaluation.

  5. Students' Experience of Problem-Based Learning in Virtual Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbings, Peter; Lidstone, John; Bruce, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports outcomes of a study focused on discovering qualitatively different ways students experience problem-based learning in virtual space. A well-accepted and documented qualitative research method was adopted for this study. Five qualitatively different conceptions are described, each revealing characteristics of increasingly complex…

  6. Implementing Problem-Based Learning in the Counseling Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kimberly R.

    This study examined the use of problem-based learning (PBL) in an actual counseling session and the effects on student assertiveness skills. A group of seventh-grade students, who were all victims of bullies, participated in the study. The students, two boys and one girls, were 13 and 14 years old. Teachers rated the level of assertiveness skills…

  7. Project organized Problem-based learning in Distance Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter; Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2002-01-01

    Project organized problem based learning is a successful concept for on-campus engineering education at Aalborg University. Recently this "Aalborg concept" has been used in networked distance education as well. This paper describes the experiences from two years of Internet-mediated project work...

  8. Designing Digital Problem Based Learning Tasks that Motivate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Anne-Marieke; Ros, Anje; Martens, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether teachers are able to apply the principles of autonomy support and structure support in designing digital problem based learning (PBL) tasks. We examine whether these tasks are more autonomy- and structure-supportive and whether primary and secondary school students experience greater autonomy, competence, and motivation…

  9. Problem based learning: Cognitive and metacognitive processes during problem analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.S. de Grave; H.P.A. Boshuizen (Henny); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractAn important phase of problem-based learning in a tutorial group is problem analysis. This article describes a study investigating the ongoing cognitive and metacognitive processes during problem analysis, by analysing the verbal communication among group members, and their thinking

  10. Problem-Based Learning for Production and Operations Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanet, John J.; Barut, Mehmet

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe our application of "problem-based learning" in the teaching of production/operations management. We describe a study of the effectiveness of this approach and present the results and analysis of this study. We provide a collection of our experiences in using this method and conclude with some general…

  11. Cognitive engagement in the problem-based learning classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.I. Rotgans (Jerome); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of the present study was to examine to what extent autonomy in problem-based learning (PBL) results in cognitive engagement with the topic at hand. To that end, a short self-report instrument was devised and validated. Moreover, it was examined how cognitive engagement deve

  12. "Theory repositories" via the web for problem-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Johan (CTIT); van Riemsdijk, Maarten; Jones, Valerie M.; Collis, Betty

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a series of experiments conducted at the School of Management Studies at the University of Twente designed to improve students' concentration on the theoretical study materials in a particular course. In 1997 a problem-based learning approach was introduced into a course on orga

  13. How play enhances creativity in problem based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsted, Ann Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on 20 Danish university students’ reflections in and on a Problem-based Learning process (PBL). The study showed how a more playful approach changed how the students collaborated, communicated, and approached a given task. They felt more creative, open minded and engaged compared...

  14. Implementing Problem-Based Learning in an Undergraduate Psychology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searight, H. Russell; Searight, Barbara K.

    2009-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a small-group pedagogical technique widely used in fields such as business, medicine, engineering, and architecture. In PBL, pre-written cases are used to teach core course content. PBL advocates state that course material is more likely to be retained and applied when presented as cases reflecting "real life"…

  15. Introduction to Problem Based Learning for Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesby, Egon; Rosenørn, Torben

    2003-01-01

    Documentation material and working papers for the workshop "Introduction to Problem Based Learning for Engineering Education" held at Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand, 6 - 10 October 2003. The material support the workshop where the participants go through a complete pre-planning cycle...

  16. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Tutor Training for Problem Based Learning in Undergraduate Psychology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlfelder, Manfred; Konermann, Tobias; Borchard, Linda-Marie

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe a "Train the Tutor" programme (TtT) for developing the metacognitive skills, facilitator skills, and tutor skills of students in a problem based learning (PBL) context. The purpose of the programme was to train 2nd and 3rd year undergraduate students in psychology to become effective PBL tutors for…

  17. Problem Based Learning as a Shared Musical Journey--Group Dynamics, Communication and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvang, Charlotte; Beck, Bolette

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this paper is how we can facilitate problem based learning (PBL) more creatively. We take a closer look upon the connection between creative processes and social communication in the PBL group including how difficulties in the social interplay may hinder creativity. The paper draws on group dynamic theory, and points out the…

  18. Evaluating potentialities and constrains of Problem Based Learning curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida

    2013-01-01

    encloses three methodological approaches to investigate three interrelated research questions. Phase one, a literature review; aims develop a theoretical and analytical framework. The second phase aims to investigate examples of practices that combine PBL and Education for Sustainable Development (ESD......This paper presents a research design to evaluate Problem Based Learning (PBL) curriculum potentialities and constrains for future changes. PBL literature lacks examples of how to evaluate and analyse established PBL learning environments to address new challenges posed. The research design...

  19. The patient's voice in a problem-based learning case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chur-Hansen, Anna; Koopowitz, Les

    2004-03-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) relies upon trigger material, often a paper case, to stimulate self-directed enquiry and group discussion. We describe the process of writing a PBL case based upon a patient's narrative account of her experiences of psychiatric illness, and the possible benefits of that collaboration for the patient, as well as for student learning. Real patients are under-utilized in teaching, as are their narratives, and both are believed to be resources worthy of further attention.

  20. Problem-based learning packages: considerations for neophyte package writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengstberger-Sims, C; McMillan, M A

    1993-02-01

    Adopting problem-based learning (PBL) as the major educational approach in the implementation of a nursing curriculum requires the development of numerous learning stimulus packages. When reviewing the experience of the Division of Nursing within the Faculty of Health at the University of Western Sydney, Macarthur in Australia, several considerations for package writers were identified and are discussed. These include needs assessment, integration of the curricula content strands, multi-media learning stimuli, context, role and the incorporation of ongoing client management. The need for nurturance of writers and peer review of the developed packages is also addressed, as is a review of the impact of different learning stimuli.

  1. PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING TO IMPROVE STUDENTS’ GRAMMAR COMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukminatus Zuhriyah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Grammar becomes one of the subjects studied in all Indonesian English Department. It is because grammar has the important role in all English skills. Grammar makes those four English skills meaningful. Somebody can be said as a master of English when he or she also masters grammar. Unfortunately, learning grammar is not as easy as what we think. It needs the effective method that can make the learners motivated and active in learning as well as in applying the grammar in the real life. Problem-based learning applied in this research is one of the alternatives that can help the learners learn grammar easily. This research was a collaborative action research whose general purpose to know whether or not Problem-based learning could improve the students’ grammar competence. Meanwhile, the specific purposes were to know the lecturer’s activities, the students’ activities, and the students’ responses when problem-based learning was implemented in grammar class. Nine students of the fifth semester of English department of education faculty of Hasyim Asy’ari University (UNHASY Tebuireng Jombang in the academic year of 2016/2017 became the subjects of this research. The data got was from the observation notes and the grammar test. There was an improvement on students’ grammar competence from cycle one to cycle two. It was proven by their mean score from 66.7 in cycle one to 72.8 in cycle two. Meanwhile, the percentage of students passing the minimum mastery criteria was from 44.4 in cycle one and 88.9 in cycle two. So that it can be concluded that problem-based learning could improve students’ grammar competence.

  2. Applying a Problem Based Learning Approach to Land Management Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    -world context. The combination of different disciplines can be taught through a “learning-by-doing approach”. Problem solving skills can be taught through a project-oriented approach to surveying education with a focus on developing skills for “learning to learn”. The basic principles of this educational model...... engineering focus toward adopting an interdisciplinary and problem-based approach to ensure that academic programmes can cope with the wide range of land administration functions and challenges. An interdisciplinary approach to surveying education calls for the need to address issues and problems in a real...... are presented using the surveying programme at Aalborg University as an example. This paper is work in progress and draws from previous research. The paper supports the lecture on Problem Based Learning given at NUST 3 March 2016....

  3. Motivating programming students by Problem Based Learning and LEGO robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Coto Chotto, Mayela; Mora, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    . For this reason the school is focusing on different teaching methods to help their students master these skills. This paper introduces an experimental, controlled comparison study of three learning designs, involving a problem based learning (PBL) approach in connection with the use of LEGO Mindstorms to improve...... from three groups exposed to different learning designs and through six qualitative walk-alongs collecting data from these groups by informal interviews and observations. Findings from the three studies were discussed in three focus group interviews with 10 students from the three experimental groups....

  4. Project-Organized Problem-Based Learning in Distance Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter; Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2003-01-01

    in a new Master of Information Technology education. The main conclusions are, that the project work is a strong learning motivator, enhancing peer collaboration, for off-campus students as well. However, the concept cannot be directly transferred to off-campus learning. In this paper, the main problems......Project organized problem based learning is a successful concept for on-campus engineering education at Aalborg University. Recently this "Aalborg concept" has been used in networked distance education as well. This paper describes the experiences from two years of Internet-mediated project work...

  5. A CONTENT ANALYSIS ON PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    BİBER, Mahir; Esen ERSOY; KÖSE BİBER, Sezer

    2014-01-01

    Problem Based Learning is one of the learning models that contain the general principles of active learning and students can use scientific process skills. Within this research it was aimed to investigate in detail the postgraduate thesis held in Turkey about PBL approach. The content analysis method was used in the research. The study sample was consisted of a total of 64 masters and PhD thesis made between the years 2012-2013 and reached over the web. A “Content Analysis Template” prepared ...

  6. A CONTENT ANALYSIS ON PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    BİBER, Mahir; Esen ERSOY; KÖSE BİBER, Sezer

    2015-01-01

    Problem Based Learning is one of the learning models that contain the general principles of active learning and students can use scientific process skills. Within this research it was aimed to investigate in detail the postgraduate thesis held in Turkey about PBL approach. The content analysis method was used in the research. The study sample was consisted of a total of 64 masters and PhD thesis made between the years 2012-2013 and reached over the web. A “Content Analysis Template” prepared ...

  7. Problem-based learning: Developing resilience in nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jih-Yuan Chen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A society needs mature and confident nurse practitioners, who are able to think analytically and flexibly, recognize needs for further preparation, and willing to engage in self-development. Concern is raised regarding how educators will build the capacity of resilient students with a knowledge base and a minimum set of skills in responding to various issues and for engaging in self-reflection. Drawing on the framework of nursing competencies and global standards for the education of professional nurses, resilient students may contribute through their social competence, problem-solving ability, sense of purpose, and persistence in the process to achieve the goal of the project. Educators should know how to build the resilient attribute in students by encouraging them to engage in self-reflection. This article discusses four areas that help students build resilience from project-based learning of a small group: the impact of problem-based learning at clinical practice, project/problem-based learning, resilient nursing student, and developing nursing students’ resilience. Self-assessment to check the promoting skills for teaching in a problem-based learning program helps the faculty holding the empowerment to encourage or support the students to face the challenge within the small team.

  8. Problem Based Learning and Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida

    2012-01-01

    scientific and technological knowledge but instead align it with the social, economic and environmental dimensions of the professional practice. It is agreed among ESD experts that PBL is a suitable learning approach to integrate ESD in the engineering curricula. This paper provides an overview......An engineering education that integrates education for sustainable development (ESD) perspectives claims for a learning approach centred on students, interdisciplinary and problem oriented, and this cannot be achieve through an “add on” strategy. Example of such active learning approaches...... are problem based learning (PBL), project based learning (PjBL), case study, role play, group discussion, field work, etc. These learning approaches are capable of integrating education for sustainable development (ESD) in engineering education at different levels, and do not aim to substitute the core...

  9. Development of Learning Resources to Promote Knowledge Sharing in Problem Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uden, Lorna; Page, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Problem Based Learning offers many benefits to students' learning, however, the design and implementation of effective problem based learning (PBL) is not trivial. Central to effective implementation of PBL are the problem design and group working of the students. Design of good problems requires that the learning outcomes of the subject are…

  10. Advanced prototyping tools for project- and problem-based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Bech, Michael Møller; Holm, Allan J.

    2002-01-01

    A new approach in prototyping for project- and problem-based learning is achieved by using the new Total Development Environment concept introduced by dSPACE that allows a full visual block-oriented programming of dynamic real-time systems to be achieved  using the Matlab/Simulink environment. A ....... A new laboratory called Flexible Drives System Laboratory (FDSL) as well as a matrix-converter controller which both are using dSPACE prototyping tools are described in this paper.......A new approach in prototyping for project- and problem-based learning is achieved by using the new Total Development Environment concept introduced by dSPACE that allows a full visual block-oriented programming of dynamic real-time systems to be achieved  using the Matlab/Simulink environment...

  11. Advanced prototyping tools for project- and problem-based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Bech, Michael Møller; Holm, Allan J.

    2002-01-01

    A new approach in prototyping for project- and problem-based learning is achieved by using the new Total Development Environment concept introduced by dSPACE that allows a full visual block-oriented programming of dynamic real-time systems to be achieved  using the Matlab/Simulink environment. A ....... A new laboratory called Flexible Drives System Laboratory (FDSL) as well as a matrix-converter controller which both are using dSPACE prototyping tools are described in this paper.......A new approach in prototyping for project- and problem-based learning is achieved by using the new Total Development Environment concept introduced by dSPACE that allows a full visual block-oriented programming of dynamic real-time systems to be achieved  using the Matlab/Simulink environment...

  12. Implementing Problem-Based Learning in an Undergraduate Psychology Course

    OpenAIRE

    H. Russell Searight, PhD; Barbara K. Searight, PhD

    2009-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a small-group pedagogical technique widely used in fields such as business, medicine, engineering, and architecture. In PBL, pre-written cases are used to teach core course content. PBL advocates state that course material is more likely to be retained and applied when presented as cases reflecting "real life" applications of class material. However, rather than traditional lecture-discussion, PBL encourages student autonomy in analyzing cases, with the instruc...

  13. Implementing Problem-Based Learning in an Undergraduate Psychology Course

    OpenAIRE

    H. Russell Searight, PhD; Barbara K. Searight, PhD

    2009-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a small-group pedagogical technique widely used in fields such as business, medicine, engineering, and architecture. In PBL, pre-written cases are used to teach core course content. PBL advocates state that course material is more likely to be retained and applied when presented as cases reflecting "real life" applications of class material. However, rather than traditional lecture-discussion, PBL encourages student autonomy in analyzing cases, with the i...

  14. Speak Out: Dancing into Problem-Based Learning

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, Problem Based Learning (PBL) has been applied in medical and psychological areas of professional education. The PBL approach requires students to move past traditional choreographic methods toward making dances informed by real-world issues. In PBL, students work cooperatively to solve complex problems. Rather than being presented technical dance steps, they develop critical thinking abilities, acquire problem-solving skills, and communication dexterity. PBL can be effectivel...

  15. "Hands-On Mechatronics": Problem-Based Learning for Mechatronics

    OpenAIRE

    Piguet, Yves; Mondada, Francesco; Siegwart, Roland

    2002-01-01

    The project "Hands-On Mechatronics" aims to develop a problem-based learning environment for mechatronics. This environment is based on four specific aspects: a mobile robot competition as motivation factor, a WEB environment as framework for all student, the SmartEASE robot as experimental platform and a good software environment for design and fast prototyping. The actual status of this concept is applied at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL) with participants comi...

  16. Physical assessment experience in a problem-based learning course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Justin J; Riche, Daniel M; Stover, Kayla R

    2011-10-10

    To evaluate the impact of a physical-assessment learning experience implemented in the problem-based learning (PBL) format of the third year of a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Students enrolled in a PBL course completed survey instruments to measure knowledge and confidence before and after participating in the learning experience. A simulation stethoscope was used to teach students abnormal pulmonary and cardiovascular sounds in 1-hour sessions for each of 12 PBL groups. The 92 students enrolled in the PBL course completed pre- and post-experience survey instruments. Students' scores on knowledge questions increased significantly (p experience questions. Students scored a median of 3 or 4 on a 5-point Likert scale after a learning experience on questions measuring confidence. Use of a simulation stethoscope in a physical-assessment learning experience increased pharmacy students' knowledge in performing pulmonary and cardiovascular assessment techniques.

  17. Learning facilitating leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Hansen, Mette Sanne

    2016-01-01

    This paper explains how engineering students at a Danish university acquired the necessary skills to become emergent facilitators of organisational development. The implications of this approach are discussed and related to relevant viewpoints and findings in the literature. The methodology deplo....... By connecting the literature, the authors’ and engineering students’ reflections on facilitator skills, this paper adds value to existing academic and practical discussions on learning facilitating leadership....

  18. Inquiry Teaching in Science - Problem Based Learning (PBL) in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Rosa; Teixeira, Daniel; Roxo, Áurea; Ruas, Fátima

    2015-04-01

    Problem Based Learning (PBL) is a teaching methodology based on the Inquiry Teaching approach, which consists in finding a solution to a problem that requires the use of higher-level cognitive skills. It's best carried out in small groups. The scenario or problem must lead the student to ask questions and to find solutions through research. This methodology is a research-oriented approach, because it starts with questions (asked by the students after being introduced to the problem), it encourages the search for solutions, it develops scientific reasoning, and it helps students to learn about key aspects of scientific research, such as gathering data, finding evidence, looking for solutions, discussing and presenting findings. In PBL the teacher has the role of facilitator. In the study of the Solar System, the study of the Moon's craters started with the observation of photos, which led the students to ask questions like "What determines the size and shape of the craters?". To answer this question the students hypothesized about the size, speed and distance travelled of the object that hit the Moon. The students then planned and carried out an experimental activity to validate their hypotheses, using balls of different sizes and materials. The diameter and depth of the craters were estimated using Salsa J. With the data obtained in this experiment, the students did a Gowin's V diagram. In order to determine the relation between the characteristics of the celestial bodies and the craters formed, both on the Moon and on the Earth, we studied the Earth's craters. We used Impact Calculator, a program that estimates the effects of an impact on the Earth, using several variables, such as the size and density of the meteorite, and the speed and angle at which it impacts the Earth's surface. Another problem started with the film Visions of the Cosmos. It raised questions such as "Is there a relation between the Earth's past and the origin of the Solar System?" "How are

  19. Random Group Problem-Based Learning in Engineering Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischfresser, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics problem solving is highly specific to the problem at hand and to develop the general mind framework to become an effective problem solver requires ingenuity and creativity on top of a solid grounding on theoretical and conceptual knowledge. A blended approach with prototype demo, problem-based learning, and an opinion questionnaire was used during first semester of 2013. Students working in randomly selected teams had to interact with classmates while solving a randomly selected problem. The approach helps improve awareness of what is important to learn in this class while reducing grading load. It also provides a more rewarding contact time for both pupils and instructor.

  20. Bridging Creativity and Group by Elements of Problem-Based Learning (PBL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang

    2015-01-01

    As the recent studies have discussed Problem-Based Learning (PBL) as popular model of fostering creativity, this paper aims to provide a theoretical framework bridging creativity and student group context by elements of PBL. According to the literature review, the elements at least include group...... learning, problem solving, interdisciplinary learning, project management and facilitation. The main five elements construct PBL as a suitable learning environment to develop individual creativity and to stimulate interplay of individual creativity and group creativity. Thus, a theoretical model...

  1. Deep and surface learning in problem-based learning: a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.J.M. Dolmans (Diana); S.M.M. Loyens (Sofie); H. Marcq (Hélène); D. Gijbels (David)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn problem-based learning (PBL), implemented worldwide, students learn by discussing professionally relevant problems enhancing application and integration of knowledge, which is assumed to encourage students towards a deep learning approach in which students are intrinsically interested

  2. Deep and surface learning in problem-based learning: a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.J.M. Dolmans (Diana); S.M.M. Loyens (Sofie); Marcq, H. (Hélène); D. Gijbels (David)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIn problem-based learning (PBL), implemented worldwide, students learn by discussing professionally relevant problems enhancing application and integration of knowledge, which is assumed to encourage students towards a deep learning approach in which students are intrinsically interested

  3. Motivating programming students by Problem Based Learning and LEGO robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Coto Chotto, Mayela; Mora, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Retention of first year students in Computer Science is a concern for universities internationally. Especially programming courses are regarded as difficult, and often have the highest failure and dropout rates. The Informatics School at Universidad Nacional in Costa Rica is not an exception....... For this reason the school is focusing on different teaching methods to help their students master these skills. This paper introduces an experimental, controlled comparison study of three learning designs, involving a problem based learning (PBL) approach in connection with the use of LEGO Mindstorms to improve...... students programming skills and motivation for learning in an introductory programming course. The paper reports the results related with one of the components of the study - the experiential qualities of the three learning designs. The data were collected through a questionnaire survey with 229 students...

  4. Integrated Design Process in Problem-Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudstrup, Mary-Ann

    2004-01-01

    This article reports and reflects on the learning achievements and the educational experiences in connection with the first years of the curriculum in Architecture at Aalborg University ?s Civil Engineer Education in Architecture & Design. In the article I will focus on the learning activity.......g. the computer as a tool for designing and optimising the building. I will also consider the dilemma of the Integrated Design Process in Problem Based Learning that emerges when the number of courses in the learning model, as is often the case, clashes with the demand for time and scope for reflection which...... and the method that are developed during the semester when working with an Integrated Design Process combining architecture, design, functional aspects, energy consumption, indoor environment, technology, and construction. I will emphasize the importance of working with different tools in the design process, e...

  5. Virtual patients and problem-based learning in advanced therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Neal

    2010-10-11

    To enhance student learning of a complex therapeutic concept through the incorporation of 2 case-based, active-learning strategies with lecture in a required advanced therapeutics course. A virtual patient session using a branched-outcome decision-making model and a problem-based learning (PBL) practica were developed from the course learning objectives for severe sepsis and septic shock. Following lecture of this material, students were required to complete the simulation session and attend the PBL. Student learning was assessed through review of examination scores, as well as quality and accuracy of the pharmaceutical care plan developed as part of the PBL. Satisfaction of the teaching format was assessed through a course evaluation survey. For questions pertaining to sepsis or septic shock on the final examination, the class average was 90%, despite an average of 76% on the examination as a whole. Class average for the pharmacuetical care plan was 90%. Sixty-three percent of students stated the simulation contributed to their learning, and 93% stated the PBL contributed to their learning. Using a multifaceted teaching approach, combining active- and passive-learning strategies, was well received by students and fostered an effective learning environment.

  6. Situated Cognition and Problem-Based Learning: Implications for Learning and Instruction with Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, David

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the foundational principles of situated cognition and substantiates its theoretical underpinnings with a transactional worldview; draws connections between situated cognition and problem-based learning; and draws implications from situated cognition and problem-based learning to learning and instruction with technology. Suggests that…

  7. Evaluation of problem-based learning in medical students’ education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD HADI IMANIEH

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In traditional medical education systems much interest is placed on the cramming of basic and clinical facts without considering their applicability in the future professional career. The aim of this study is to evaluate a novice medical training method (problem-based learning as compared to the contemporary teacher-based medical education or traditional methods. Methods: Selection of the study subjects was done through simple sampling and according to the division of medical students introduced from Medical Faculty to the Pediatrics Department with no personal involvement. 120 medical students were assigned to 8 groups of 15 students each. For four months, 4 groups were trained with traditional method and 4 other groups underwent problem-based learning method on selected subject materials. In each method, a pre-course test at the beginning and a post-course test at the end of each course were given to each group. The questionnaire used in this study as the instrument was composed of 39 questions, 37 multiple choice questions and two short answer questions. Three professors of pediatric gastroenterologist took part in the training. Two of these professors were responsible for solving task training method. The third professor used traditional teacher-centered methodology to eliminate any possible bias. Scores obtained from these tests were analyzed using paired t-test and independent t-test. P values of less than 0.05 were considered as significant. Results: The scores of the students undergoing the traditional method were 14.70±3.03 and 21.20±4.07 in the first and second test, respectively. In problembased learning, the scores were 15.82±3.29 in the first and 27.52±4.72 in the second test. There was a significant difference between the mean scores of post-course exams of the two groups (p=0.001, while no significant difference was observed between the mean scores of pre-course exams of the groups (p=0.550. Conclusion: It may be

  8. PROBLEM BASED LEARNING FOR EPISTEMOLOGICAL COMPETENCE: THE KNOWLEDGE ACQUISITION PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alias Masek

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the potential of Problem Based Learning (PBL for epistemological competence in< an engineering education area. The main idea is to explore how the processes in PBL promote knowledge acquisition that lead to an individual deep content learning. A review has been done from theoretical and conceptual aspect, as well as supportive evidence from several empirical findings. Within this, knowledge is constructed from the basic knowledge of concepts, principles, and procedural knowledge with integration to previous knowledge and experiences. The concepts and principles are linked and integrated with each other, forming a procedural knowledge, which promotes deep content learning. However, supportive evidence from the recent research literature indicates inconclusive findings, which called for more studies to provide more empirical evidence to investigate the effectiveness of PBL on knowledge acquisitions.

  9. A Danish Perspective on Problem Based Learning in Space Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan D. V.; Bisgaard, Morten; Alminde, Lars

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the goals of the Student Satellite Program at Aalborg University (AAU), and the means for implementing it, namely a concept called Problem Based Learning, which is the cornerstone in the education at AAU. AAU has within the last decade chosen to focus strongly on education...... in space technology, not because the country lacks aerospace engineers, but because space projects require the students to think about systems rather than individual modules, while providing problems that are technically challenging for the students to solve. This combination makes the graduates very...

  10. Using problem-based learning in staff development: strategies for teaching registered nurses and new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunta, Kristy S; Katrancha, Elizabeth D

    2010-12-01

    Problem-based learning, described as an active teaching strategy, provides a framework for the development of self-directed learning, self-evaluation, interpersonal communication, critical thinking, and access and retrieval of information. This teaching method can be modified to fit almost any situation. Problem-based learning provides an opportunity to actively engage staff members in learning situations, making it a great asset for teaching in staff development. This article describes the use of problem-based learning for teaching registered nurses and new graduate nurses. It provides a scenario and facilitator guide pertaining to a real patient situation on an inpatient telemetry unit and offers general tips for implementing problem-based learning in staff education.

  11. Innovation and learning facilitated by play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul H. Kyvsgård; O´Connor, Rory

    2008-01-01

    "This paper describes an approach to facilitate interaction between students and industrial companies in a problem based learning environment. The approach is adapted from a methodology developed at the LEGO Company and relies on an improved ability to communicate complex problems when using...

  12. Facilitating Learning at Conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib; Elsborg, Steen

    2011-01-01

    and facilitate a variety of simple learning techniques at thirty one- and two-day conferences of up to 300 participants each. We present ten of these techniques and data evaluating them. We conclude that if conference organizers allocate a fraction of the total conference time to facilitated processes......The typical conference consists of a series of PowerPoint presentations that tend to render participants passive. Students of learning have long abandoned the transfer model that underlies such one-way communication. We propose an al-ternative theory of conferences that sees them as a forum...... for learning, mutual inspiration and human flourishing. We offer five design principles that specify how conferences may engage participants more and hence increase their learning. In the research-and-development effort reported here, our team collaborated with conference organizers in Denmark to introduce...

  13. Problem-based learning in optical engineering studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voznesenskaya, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, the Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is one of the most prospective educational technologies. PBL is based on evaluation of learning outcomes of a student, both professional and personal, instead of traditional evaluation of theoretical knowledge and selective practical skills. Such an approach requires changes in the curricula development. There should be introduced projects (cases) imitating real tasks from the professional life. These cases should include a problem summary with necessary theoretic description, charts, graphs, information sources etc, task to implement and evaluation indicators and criteria. Often these cases are evaluated with the assessment-center method. To motivate students for the given task they could be divided into groups and have a contest. Whilst it looks easy to implement in social, economic or teaching fields PBL is pretty complicated in engineering studies. Examples of cases in the first-cycle optical engineering studies are shown in this paper. Procedures of the PBL implementation and evaluation are described.

  14. Problem-based learning in a health sciences librarianship course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroff, A; Ancona, A M; Beman, S B; Dodge, A M; Hutchinson, K L; LaBonte, M J; Mays, T L; Simon, D T

    1998-07-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been adopted by many medical schools in North America. Because problem solving, information seeking, and lifelong learning skills are central to the PBL curriculum, health sciences librarians have been actively involved in the PBL process at these medical schools. The introduction of PBL in a library and information science curriculum may be appropriate to consider at this time. PBL techniques have been incorporated into a health sciences librarianship course at the School of Library and Information Science (LIS) at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee to explore the use of this method in an advanced Library and Information Science course. After completion of the course, the use of PBL has been evaluated by the students and the instructor. The modified PBL course design is presented and the perceptions of the students and the instructor are discussed.

  15. Problem-Based Learning: Exploiting Knowledge of How People Learn to Promote Effective Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E. J.

    2004-01-01

    There is much information from educational psychology studies on how people learn. The thesis of this paper is that we should use this information to guide the ways in which we teach rather than blindly using our traditional methods. In this context, problem-based learning (PBL), as a method of teaching widely used in medical schools but…

  16. Problem-based learning in nurse education: An unexpected problem for students with dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Debbie; Mitchell, Duncan

    2005-11-01

    This paper is a discussion that examines the difficulties caused by problem-based learning (PBL) in nurse education to students with dyslexia. The discussion is based on the authors' experience of implementing a curriculum based on PBL in one English University. It highlights a significant issue that might easily be overlooked as problem-based learning becomes common in nurse education. In short, this is that people with dyslexia may experience difficulties in understanding parts of the process of the method of learning as well as some of the more well known difficulties with written assessment. The paper suggests ways that PBL facilitators might be able to help reduce such difficulties for students with dyslexia.

  17. Weaving a Formal Methods Education with Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J. Paul

    The idea of weaving formal methods through computing (or software engineering) degrees is not a new one. However, there has been little success in developing and implementing such a curriculum. Formal methods continue to be taught as stand-alone modules and students, in general, fail to see how fundamental these methods are to the engineering of software. A major problem is one of motivation — how can the students be expected to enthusiastically embrace a challenging subject when the learning benefits, beyond passing an exam and achieving curriculum credits, are not clear? Problem-based learning has gradually moved from being an innovative pedagogique technique, commonly used to better-motivate students, to being widely adopted in the teaching of many different disciplines, including computer science and software engineering. Our experience shows that a good problem can be re-used throughout a student's academic life. In fact, the best computing problems can be used with children (young and old), undergraduates and postgraduates. In this paper we present a process for weaving formal methods through a University curriculum that is founded on the application of problem-based learning and a library of good software engineering problems, where students learn about formal methods without sitting a traditional formal methods module. The process of constructing good problems and integrating them into the curriculum is shown to be analagous to the process of engineering software. This approach is not intended to replace more traditional formal methods modules: it will better prepare students for such specialised modules and ensure that all students have an understanding and appreciation for formal methods even if they do not go on to specialise in them.

  18. An electronic study guide for problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, G A; Bligh, J G; Leinster, S F; Warenius, H M

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes the development and structure of an Electronic Study Guide for Oncology (LETSGO) for undergraduate medical students. LETSGO is aimed at clinical students learning about cancer. The subject of the guide is breast cancer and learning objectives cover structure and function, behavioural science, public health and epidemiology and professional and personal values. LETSGO is designed to follow the steps used in problem-based learning. The student is encouraged to carry out individual brainstorming around cases with the issues identified acting as the first step in an educational audit loop. Clear definition of prior knowledge is available by way of interactive features, and hyper-text links to core text and diagrams (including microscopic sections) precede definition of both broad aims and objectives for the module and specific objectives for assessment purposes. Core knowledge is available via hyper-text links. Assessment has three components: open ended questions asking for free text responses linking to 'model' answers; extended matching items linking to 'model' answers and providing peer-referenced feedback as a bar-chart distribution, and an educational audit loop referring back to the original issues identified at the beginning of the package in brainstorming. Clear mapping throughout the guide is a major feature and the student's progress is clearly displayed at each stage of the guide. The program provides dynamic access to the student's existing knowledge base and stimulates new learning based on the student's own learning needs.

  19. PHOTON PBL: problem-based learning in photonics technology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Nicholas; Audet, Richard; Donnelly, Judith; Hanes, Fenna; Kehrhahn, Marijke

    2007-06-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an educational approach whereby students learn course content by actively and collaboratively solving real-world problems presented in a context similar to that in which the learning is to be applied. Research shows that PBL improves student learning and retention, critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and the ability to skillfully apply knowledge to new situations - skills deemed critical to lifelong learning. Used extensively in medical education since the 1970's, and widely adopted in other fields including business, law, and education, PBL is emerging as an alternative to traditional lecture-based courses in engineering and technology education. In today's ever-changing global economy where photonics technicians are required to work productively in teams to solve complex problems across disciplines as well as cultures, PBL represents an exciting alternative to traditional lecture-based photonics education. In this paper we present the PHOTON PBL project, a National Science Foundation Advanced Technology Education (NSF-ATE) project aimed at creating, in partnership with the photonics industry and university research labs from across the US, a comprehensive series of multimedia-based PBL instructional resource materials and offering faculty professional development in the use of PBL in photonics technology education. Quantitative and qualitative research will be conducted on the effectiveness of PBL in photonics technician education.

  20. Twelve tips for constructing problem-based learning cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azer, Samy A; Peterson, Ray; Guerrero, Anthony P S; Edgren, Gudrun

    2012-01-01

    One of the key elements for introducing a problem-based learning (PBL) programme is constructing good PBL cases. Good cases should reflect the educational principles of PBL including (a) integration of basic and clinical sciences together with professionalism and psychosocial components, (b) encouragement of discussion of cognitive domains such as identification of problems, generation of hypotheses, construction of an enquiry plan, weighing evidence for and against each hypothesis, interpretation of findings, construction of mechanisms, using evidence to refine the hypothesis and construction of a management plan, (c) encouragement of discussion of cases in small groups with an emphasis on student-centred learning, (d) promotion of collaborative learning and contribution of students to the case discussion and (e) encouragement of teamwork and self-directed learning strategies. Despite the importance of construction of good PBL cases to the success of a PBL programme, the art of construction of these cases is understudied or described in the literature. Based on our experience in PBL and evidence from literature, we described 12 tips for constructing good PBL cases. Constructing good PBL cases is an art that necessitates teamwork and input from several different disciplines. Cases should be constructed using a template reflecting the educational objectives of the programme. This approach will ensure optimum learning outcomes and consistency in the design and delivery of cases.

  1. Engaging Learners through Interactive Media: Findings and Implications from a Technology Enhanced Problem-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Lucas; Liu, Min; Olmanson, Justin; Toprac, Paul

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore students' engagement in a new media enhanced problem-based learning (PBL) environment and investigate the characteristics of these environments that facilitate learning. We investigated both student experiences using a new media enhanced PBL environment and the specific elements students found most supportive of their…

  2. Context Impact of Clinical Scenario on Knowledge Transfer and Reasoning Capacity in a Medical Problem-Based Learning Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, A.; Brédart, S.; Bourguignon, J.-P.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2000, the faculty of Medicine at the University of Liège has integrated problem-based learning (PBL) seminars from year two to seven in its seven-year curriculum. The PBL approach has been developed to facilitate students' acquisition of reasoning capacity. This contextualized learning raises the question of the de- and re-contextualization…

  3. "The Child's World": a creative and visual trigger to stimulate student enquiry in a problem based learning module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Carol; Lambert, Veronica; Conlon, Joy; Harrington, Tracey

    2008-11-01

    Despite the abundance of literature on problem based learning (PBL) [Murray, I., Savin-Baden, M., 2000. Staff development in problem-based learning. Teaching in Higher Education 5 (1), 107-126; Johnson, A.K., Tinning, R.S., 2001. Meeting the challenge of problem-based learning: developing the facilitators. Nurse Education Today 21 (3), 161-169; McCourt, C., Thomas, G., 2001. Evaluation of a problem based curriculum in midwifery. Midwifery 17 (4), 323-331; Cooke, M., Moyle, K., 2002. Students' evaluation of problem-based learning. Nurse Education Today 22, 330-339; Haith-Cooper, M., 2003a. An exploration of tutors' experiences of facilitating problem-based learning. Part 1--an educational research methodology combining innovation and philosophical tradition. Nurse Education Today 23, 58-64; Haith-Cooper, M., 2003b. An exploration of tutor' experiences of facilitating problem-based learning. Part 2--implications for the facilitation of problem based learning. Nurse Education Today 23, 65-75; Rowan, C.J., Mc Court, C., Beake, S., 2007. Problem based learning in midwifery--The teacher's perspective. Nurse Education Today 27, 131-138; Rowan, C.J., Mc Court, C., Beake, S., 2008. Problem based learning in midwifery--The students' perspective. Nurse Education Today 28, 93-99] few studies focus on describing "triggers", the process involved in their development and their evaluation from students' perspective. It is clearly documented that well designed, open ended, real life and challenging "triggers" are key to the success of PBL implementation [Roberts, D., Ousey, K., 2004. Problem based learning: developing the triggers. Experiences from a first wave site. Nurse Education in Practice 4, 154-158, Gibson, I., 2005. Designing projects for learning. In: Barrett, T., Mac Labhrainn, I., Fallon, H., (Eds.), Handbook of Enquiry and Problem-based Learning: Irish Case Studies and International Perspectives. AISHE & CELT: NUI Galway. , Barrett, T., 2005. Understanding problem-based

  4. Problem based learning in acoustics at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøi, Dorte; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Christensen, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    semesters, the learning objectives are distributed between courses with independent examination, and a semester project. Each semester has a theme the projects must comply with. Either supervisors, students or industry propose the problem that become the basis for the project work. Under supervision......, the students narrow down the problem, address possible solutions, and typically implement one or more of the options for further evaluation. The courses supplement the project work by adding specific and general knowledge of the subject areas of each semester. The courses either have direct application......The master program in Acoustics (M. Sc.) from Aalborg University is taught at the Department of Electronic system. The M. Sc. program consists of three semesters with course units and problem based project work organized in groups, and a final semester for a master thesis. During the first three...

  5. Problem-Based Learning and Information Literacy: A Natural Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Wenger

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to student overreliance on search engines and the time constraints of one-shot instruction sessions, librarians struggle to teach many of the information literacy skills that students need to conduct successful research. Problem-based learning (PBL provides a way to integrate information literacy naturally into an assignment or course by guiding students through the research process as they work to find a solution to a problem. This article first explains the PBL process, then describes the design and implementation of a PBL project in a required first-year general education course. Finally, it details the Association of College & Research Libraries’ (ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education addressed by the project, as well as possible future modifications.

  6. Problem-based learning and teacher training in mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Cazzola, Marina

    2008-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a constructivist learner-centered instructional approach based on the analysis, resolution and discussion of a given problem. It can be applied to any subject, indeed it is especially useful for the teaching of mathematics. When compared to ``traditional'' teaching, the PBL approach requires increased responsibility for the teachers (in addition to the presentation of mathematical knowledge, they need to engage students in gathering information and using their knowledge to solve given problems). It thus become crucial that the future teachers become aware of its effectiveness. One of the main obstacle to this awareness lies usually on the fact that future teachers did not find this methodology in their own pre-service training. In this paper we will describe the attempt to introduce PBL in University courses so to have future maths teacher ``experience mathematics'' themselves.

  7. An online doctoral education course using problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Lori; Carver, Lara; Diaz, Anne; Edmunds, Johnna; Talusan, Richard; Tarrant, Theresa A

    2009-02-01

    The number of doctoral nursing programs has greatly increased over the past several years. There has also been a shift toward delivering programs either partially or fully online. The literature lacks discussions about doctoral-level teaching methods in the online environment. This article describes the use of a semester-long problem-based learning activity in an online doctoral course focusing on nurse educator leadership. The Students-As-Faculty Experience created for this course features the use of a virtual nursing program in which students are cast as faculty members confronting issues via faculty meetings and sharing rotating roles as chairperson. Students were vested in the process by co-designing the course in terms of developing agenda items for the meetings and evaluation rubrics. Through playing the roles of faculty and chairperson, the students reported a distinct improvement in their leadership abilities and confidence at the end of the course.

  8. What Students Learn in Problem-Based Learning: A Process Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Elaine H. J.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to provide an account of how learning takes place in problem-based learning (PBL), and to identify the relationships between the learning-oriented activities of students with their learning outcomes. First, the verbal interactions and computer resources studied by nine students for an entire PBL cycle were recorded. The relevant…

  9. Use of Problem-Based Learning in the Teaching and Learning of Horticultural Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Lord; Dowsett, Eric; Sullivan, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Problem-based learning (PBL), a relatively novel teaching and learning process in horticulture, was investigated. Proper application of PBL can potentially create a learning context that enhances student learning. Design/Methodology/Approach: Students worked on two complex ill-structured problems: (1) to produce fresh baby greens for a…

  10. What students learn in problem-based learning: a process analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.J. Yew (Elaine); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis study aimed to provide an account of how learning takes place in problem-based learning (PBL), and to identify the relationships between the learning-oriented activities of students with their learning outcomes. First, the verbal interactions and computer resources studied by nine s

  11. Case study of a problem-based learning course of physics in a telecommunications engineering degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho-Stadler, Erica; Jesús Elejalde-García, Maria

    2013-08-01

    Active learning methods can be appropriate in engineering, as their methodology promotes meta-cognition, independent learning and problem-solving skills. Problem-based learning is the educational process by which problem-solving activities and instructor's guidance facilitate learning. Its key characteristic involves posing a 'concrete problem' to initiate the learning process, generally implemented by small groups of students. Many universities have developed and used active methodologies successfully in the teaching-learning process. During the past few years, the University of the Basque Country has promoted the use of active methodologies through several teacher training programmes. In this paper, we describe and analyse the results of the educational experience using the problem-based learning (PBL) method in a physics course for undergraduates enrolled in the technical telecommunications engineering degree programme. From an instructors' perspective, PBL strengths include better student attitude in class and increased instructor-student and student-student interactions. The students emphasised developing teamwork and communication skills in a good learning atmosphere as positive aspects.

  12. Concept Cartoons Supported Problem Based Learning Method in Middle School Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balim, Ali Günay; Inel-Ekici, Didem; Özcan, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Problem based learning, in which events from daily life are presented as interesting scenarios, is one of the active learning approaches that encourages students to self-direct learning. Problem based learning, generally used in higher education, requires students to use high end thinking skills in learning environments. In order to use…

  13. Using Web 2.0 Technology to Enhance, Scaffold and Assess Problem-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Hack

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Web 2.0 technologies, such as social networks, wikis, blogs, and virtual worlds provide a platform for collaborative working, facilitating sharing of resources and joint document production. They can act as a stimulus to promote active learning and provide an engaging and interactive environment for students, and as such align with the philosophy of Problem-based Learning. Furthermore, Web 2.0 technologies can provide the tutor or facilitator with an opportunity to scaffold and asses the PBL process. However, whilst it is recognised that technology has an important role in enhancing each step of a PBL exercise, academic staff can be reluctant to use it. This paper provides some illustrative examples of the technologies that have been used to enhance, scaffold and assess PBL and their evaluation by distance learning and on-campus students at the University of Ulster. The benefits and limitations of using technology for both staff and students to support PBL are discussed.

  14. Reflections on Students’ Projects with Motion Sensor Technologies in a Problem-Based Learning Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Eva; Timcenko, Olga; Triantafyllidis, George

    2014-01-01

    Game-based learning (GBL) has been applied in many fields to enhance learning motivations. In recent years, motion sensor technologies have been also introduced in GBL with the aim of using active, physical modalities to facilitate the learning process, while fostering social development...... and collaboration (when these activities involve more than one student at a time). The approaches described in literature, which used motion sensors in GBL, cover a broad spectrum of educational fields. These approaches investigated the effect of learning games using motion sensors on the development of specific...... skills or on the learning experience. This paper presents our experiences on the educational use of motion sensor technologies. Our research was conducted at the department of Medialogy in Aalborg University Copenhagen. Aalborg University applies a problem-based, project-organized model of teaching...

  15. An approach towards problem-based learning in virtual space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberg, Lutz S; Bockisch, Andreas; Beyer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an established and efficient approach to sustainable teaching. Here, we describe translation of PBL into the virtual classroom thereby offering novel teaching aspects in the field of Nuclear Medicine. Our teaching approach is implemented on a "moodle" platform and consists of 2 modules: complementary seminar teaching materials and a virtual PBL-classroom, which can be attended via Skype.Over the course of 4 semesters 539 students have accessed our teaching platform. 21 students have participated in the PBL seminar (module 2). After resolving some minor technical difficulties our virtual seminars have evolved into a forum of intense studies, whereby the participating students have learned to become more independent along the workup of the teaching cases. This was reflected in the results of the intra-group presentations and discussions.Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of our moodle-based PBL platform indicates an increasing level of acceptance and enthusiasm by the students. This has initiated discussions about opening our PBL concept to a wider audience within the university and beyond the Nuclear Medicine specialty.

  16. Problem based learning in midwifery--the students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Catherine J; McCourt, Christine; Beake, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) has been adopted in many settings for the education of health professionals. It has generally been evaluated well by students although much of the literature comes from medical education. The aim of this study was to ascertain the views of student midwives at the beginning and at the end of their programme and three months after graduation about the use of a PBL based programme in midwifery. Eight focus groups were conducted with students whilst undertaking a PBL programme from both a shortened and three year programme across two sites. A questionnaire was sent 3 months after graduation to midwives who had completed the programme. Key themes which emerged from this study were that although students gained skills in information retrieval and critique some did not always feel well prepared for practice. The focus on individual presentations in the tutorial tended to be interpreted as performance rather than discussion in a spirit of enquiry. Students reported being particularly anxious at the beginning of their programme about their learning. They felt that their experience was dependent upon the participation and motivation of the group members.

  17. Integrating Ultrasound Teaching into Preclinical Problem-based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Tumba Tshibwabwa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim is to provide students in the preclinical with ultrasound image interpretation skills. Research question: Are students in smaller groups with access to a combination of lectures and hands-on patient contact most likely to have better ultrasound image interpretation skills, than students in larger groups with only interactive didactic lectures? Methodology: First-year students at the preclinical Program of the College of Medicine, participated in two 2-h introductory interactive ultrasound sessions. The study comprised two cohorts: 2012/2013 students, who were offered large group teaching (LGT sessions (control group, and 2013/2014 students, who received the intervention in small group learning problem-based learning (PBL sessions (experimental group. The overall learning objectives were identical for both groups. The success of the module was evaluated using pre- and post-tests as well as students′ feedback. Results: The students in the experimental group showed significantly higher scores in interpretations of images than those in the control group. The experimental group showed achievement of learning outcomes along with higher levels of satisfaction with the module compared to the latter. Conclusion: Posttest knowledge of the basics of ultrasound improved significantly over the pretest in the experimental group. In addition, students′ overall satisfaction of the ultrasound module was shown to be higher for the PBL compared to the LGT groups. Small groups in an interactive and PBL setting along with opportunities for hands-on practice and simultaneous visualization of findings on a high definition screen should enhance preclinical student learning of the basics of ultrasound. Despite the potential of ultrasound as a clinical, teaching and learning tool for students in the preclinical years, standardized recommendations have yet to be created regarding its integration into the curricula within academic institutions and

  18. Integrating Ultrasound Teaching into Preclinical Problem-based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshibwabwa, Eli Tumba; Cannon, Jenifer; Rice, James; Kawooya, Michael G; Sanii, Reza; Mallin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim is to provide students in the preclinical with ultrasound image interpretation skills. Research question: Are students in smaller groups with access to a combination of lectures and hands-on patient contact most likely to have better ultrasound image interpretation skills, than students in larger groups with only interactive didactic lectures? Methodology: First-year students at the preclinical Program of the College of Medicine, participated in two 2-h introductory interactive ultrasound sessions. The study comprised two cohorts: 2012/2013 students, who were offered large group teaching (LGT) sessions (control group), and 2013/2014 students, who received the intervention in small group learning problem-based learning (PBL) sessions (experimental group). The overall learning objectives were identical for both groups. The success of the module was evaluated using pre- and post-tests as well as students’ feedback. Results: The students in the experimental group showed significantly higher scores in interpretations of images than those in the control group. The experimental group showed achievement of learning outcomes along with higher levels of satisfaction with the module compared to the latter. Conclusion: Posttest knowledge of the basics of ultrasound improved significantly over the pretest in the experimental group. In addition, students’ overall satisfaction of the ultrasound module was shown to be higher for the PBL compared to the LGT groups. Small groups in an interactive and PBL setting along with opportunities for hands-on practice and simultaneous visualization of findings on a high definition screen should enhance preclinical student learning of the basics of ultrasound. Despite the potential of ultrasound as a clinical, teaching and learning tool for students in the preclinical years, standardized recommendations have yet to be created regarding its integration into the curricula within academic institutions and clinical medicine

  19. Active teaching-learning methodologies: medical students' views of problem-based learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Costa, José Roberto Bittencourt; Romano, Valéria Ferreira; Costa, Rosane Rodrigues; Gomes, Andréia Patrícia; Siqueira-Batista, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    ...). In accordance to the new paradigm for medical training, the Centro Universitário Serra dos Órgãos (UNIFESO) established a teaching plan in 2005 using active methodologies, specifically problem-based learning...

  20. Facilitating facilitators to facilitate, in problem or enquiry based learning sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Coelho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Problem based learning (PBL has been used in dental education over the past 20 years and uses a patient case scenario to stimulate learning in a small group setting, where a trained facilitator does not teach but guides the group to bring about deep contextualized learning, to be empathetic to each other and to encourage fair and equitable contribution from individual learners. Learners are encouraged to appreciate that they individually perform better when they actively participate in the group and share resources, than when they learn in isolation (Bandura, 1977, Freire, 1972, Lave and Wenger, 1991, Kolb, 1984 and Vygotsky, 1978.

  1. Problem-Based Learning to Foster Deep Learning in Preservice Geography Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Aubrey; Raath, Schalk

    2015-01-01

    In South Africa, geography education students' approach to deep learning has received little attention. Therefore the purpose of this one-shot experimental case study was to evaluate the extent to which first-year geography education students used deep or surface learning in an embedded problem-based learning (PBL) format. The researchers measured…

  2. Deep and Surface Learning in Problem-Based Learning: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Loyens, Sofie M. M.; Marcq, Hélène; Gijbels, David

    2016-01-01

    In problem-based learning (PBL), implemented worldwide, students learn by discussing professionally relevant problems enhancing application and integration of knowledge, which is assumed to encourage students towards a deep learning approach in which students are intrinsically interested and try to understand what is being studied. This review…

  3. Problem-Based Learning to Foster Deep Learning in Preservice Geography Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Aubrey; Raath, Schalk

    2015-01-01

    In South Africa, geography education students' approach to deep learning has received little attention. Therefore the purpose of this one-shot experimental case study was to evaluate the extent to which first-year geography education students used deep or surface learning in an embedded problem-based learning (PBL) format. The researchers measured…

  4. Deep and Surface Learning in Problem-Based Learning: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Loyens, Sofie M. M.; Marcq, Hélène; Gijbels, David

    2016-01-01

    In problem-based learning (PBL), implemented worldwide, students learn by discussing professionally relevant problems enhancing application and integration of knowledge, which is assumed to encourage students towards a deep learning approach in which students are intrinsically interested and try to understand what is being studied. This review…

  5. Using Elearning techniques to support problem based learning within a clinical simulation laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, Charles; Hoy, Derek; Topp, Helena; Trinder, Kathryn

    2004-01-01

    This paper details the results of the first phase of a project that used eLearning to support students' learning within a simulated environment. The locus was a purpose built Clinical Simulation Laboratory (CSL) where the School's newly adopted philosophy of Problem Based Learning (PBL) was challenged through lecturers reverting to traditional teaching methods. The solution, a student-centred, problem-based approach to the acquisition of clinical skills was developed using learning objects embedded within web pages that substituted for lecturers providing instruction and demonstration. This allowed lecturers to retain their facilitator role, and encouraged students to explore, analyse and make decisions within the safety of a clinical simulation. Learning was enhanced through network communications and reflection on video performances of self and others. Evaluations were positive, students demonstrating increased satisfaction with PBL, improved performance in exams, and increased self-efficacy in the performance of nursing activities. These results indicate that an elearning approach can support PBL in delivering a student centred learning experience.

  6. A Model of Small-Group Problem-Based Learning In Pharmacy Education: Teaching in the Clinical Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Jeerisuda Khumsikiew; Sisira Donsamak; Manit Saeteaw

    2015-01-01

    Problem-based Learning (PBL) is an alternate method of instruction that incorporates basic elements of cognitive learning theory. Colleges of pharmacy use PBL to aid anticipated learning outcomes and practice competencies for pharmacy student. The purpose of this study were to implement and evaluate a model of small group PBL for 5th year pharmacy students in the clinical environment that facilitated by pharmacy instructors. A PBL model was implemented in 1-day periods each wee...

  7. Dysfunctional problem-based learning curricula: resolving the problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim William K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Problem-based learning (PBL has become the most significant innovation in medical education of the past 40 years. In contrast to exam-centered, lecture-based conventional curricula, PBL is a comprehensive curricular strategy that fosters student-centred learning and the skills desired in physicians. The rapid spread of PBL has produced many variants. One of the most common is 'hybrid PBL' where conventional teaching methods are implemented alongside PBL. This paper contends that the mixing of these two opposing educational philosophies can undermine PBL and nullify its positive benefits. Schools using hybrid PBL and lacking medical education expertise may end up with a dysfunctional curriculum worse off than the traditional approach. Discussion For hybrid PBL schools with a dysfunctional curriculum, standard PBL is a cost-feasible option that confers the benefits of the PBL approach. This paper describes the signs of a dysfunctional PBL curriculum to aid hybrid PBL schools in recognising curricular breakdown. Next it discusses alternative curricular strategies and costs associated with PBL. It then details the four critical factors for successful conversion to standard PBL: dealing with staff resistance, understanding the role of lectures, adequate time for preparation and support from the administrative leadership. Summary Hybrid PBL curricula without oversight by staff with medical education expertise can degenerate into dysfunctional curricula inferior even to the traditional approach from which PBL emerged. Such schools should inspect their curriculum periodically for signs of dysfunction to enable timely corrective action. A decision to convert fully to standard PBL is cost feasible but will require time, expertise and commitment which is only sustainable with supportive leadership.

  8. Problem Based Learning (PBL) - An Effective Approach to Improve Learning Outcomes in Medical Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preeti, Bajaj; Ashish, Ahuja; Shriram, Gosavi

    2013-12-01

    As the "Science of Medicine" is getting advanced day-by-day, need for better pedagogies & learning techniques are imperative. Problem Based Learning (PBL) is an effective way of delivering medical education in a coherent, integrated & focused manner. It has several advantages over conventional and age-old teaching methods of routine. It is based on principles of adult learning theory, including student's motivation, encouragement to set goals, think critically about decision making in day-to-day operations. Above all these, it stimulates challenge acceptance and learning curiosity among students and creates pragmatic educational program. To measure the effectiveness of the "Problem Based Learning" as compared to conventional theory/didactic lectures based learning. The study was conducted on 72 medical students from Dayanand Medical College & Hospital, Ludhiana. Two modules of problem based sessions designed and delivered. Pre & Post-test score's scientific statistical analysis was done. Student feed-back received based on questionnaire in the five-point Likert scale format. Significant improvement in overall performance observed. Feedback revealed majority agreement that "Problem-based learning" helped them create interest (88.8 %), better understanding (86%) & promotes self-directed subject learning (91.6 %). Substantial improvement in the post-test scores clearly reveals acceptance of PBL over conventional learning. PBL ensures better practical learning, ability to create interest, subject understanding. It is a modern-day educational strategy, an effective tool to objectively improve the knowledge acquisition in Medical Teaching.

  9. Confidence as a barrier to the use of problem-based learning in veterinary undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlinton, Rachael E; Yon, Lisa; Klisch, Karl; Tötemeyer, Sabine; Gough, Kevin C

    2011-01-01

    Problem-based or case-based learning is a popular method of instruction in clinical degrees such as veterinary science, nursing, and medicine. It is difficult, however, for students to adapt to this learning method, and this difficulty has been well described. The present study surveyed first-year undergraduate veterinary students at the University of Nottingham about the challenges they faced upon beginning problem-based learning sessions. A surprisingly large percentage of students (36% of females and 38% of males) reported a lack of confidence in speaking in front of the other students as a concern they experienced during their first term. Conversely, only 10% of the female students (and none of the male students) reported overconfidence as a problem. This is in contrast to the perceptions of the staff members who facilitated the sessions who reported that 14% of the students exhibited underconfidence and 14% exhibited overconfidence. The difference between the female and male students' responses as well as the difference between the perceptions of students and those of facilitators is statistically significant (G-test p<.05).

  10. Challenges of Conducting Problem-Based Learning in a Large Class: A Study at Shantou University Medical College in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Ting; Qin, Danian

    2014-01-01

    One major challenge of developing problem-based learning (PBL) curricula in medical schools in China is to meet the requirements of sufficient qualified PBL tutors. Since 2011, we have developed a modified group teaching approach where an experienced faculty tutor facilitates several small PBL student groups in a large class. Although our study…

  11. Design and Evaluation of a Problem-Based Learning Environment for Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemker, Laura; Prescher, Claudia; Narciss, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based learning can have a great impact on the acquisition of practical knowledge, which is a central learning aim in the field of teacher education. Therefore, we implemented a problem-based learning approach in four seminars on educational assessment. In this paper, we outline our didactic design and discuss the results of the first…

  12. A Model for Ubiquitous Serious Games Development Focused on Problem Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorneles, Sandro Oliveira; da Costa, Cristiano André; Rigo, Sandro José

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of using serious games with problem-based learning opens up huge opportunities to connect the experiences of daily life of students with learning. In this context, this article presents a model for serious and ubiquitous games development, focusing on problem based learning methodology. The model allows teachers to create games…

  13. The use of Problem Based Learning in a Simulation Lab. How does it work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Sytter

    2013-01-01

    Litterature shows lack of studies on the outcome of simulation using high and low fidelity mannequins and Problem Based Learning as a didactic tool. We have evaluated a course in undergraduate Nursing integrating different aspects of essentials in Nursing by using the Logic Model. The course...... is organized using Problembased Learning and Low Fidelity Mannequins as a didactic strategy. The overall objective is to enhance the students´ ability to critically think and reflect upon action in a clinical setting. Our study took place among 1st year students. To explore the undergraduates´ experiences we....... It also seems that students benefit from facilitators different background and ability to act. Students relate nursing to ethics and communication and not to psycomotoric skills. In general the students´experience of the course is that this is a fun and enjoyable way of learning....

  14. Using problem-based learning in web-based components of nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Tonia R

    2011-03-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a student-centred method of teaching, and is initiated by introducing a clinical problem through which learning is fostered by active inquisition (Tavakol and Reicherter, 2003). Using this teaching and learning strategy for web-based environments is examined from the literature for potential implementation in a Bachelor of Nursing program. In view of the evidence, students accessing online nursing subjects would seem to benefit from web-based PBL as it provides flexibility, opportunities for discussion and co-participation, encourages student autonomy, and allows construction of meaning as the problems mirror the real world. PBL also promotes critical thinking and transfer of theory to practice. It is recommended that some components of practice-based subjects such as Clinical Practice or Community Health Nursing, could be implemented online using a PBL format, which should also include a discussion forum to enable group work for problem-solving activities, and tutor facilitation.

  15. "What's So Terrible About Swallowing an Apple Seed?" Problem-Based Learning in Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meilan; Parker, Joyce; Eberhardt, Jan; Passalacqua, Susan

    2011-10-01

    Problem-Based Learning (PBL), an instructional approach originated in medical education, has gained increasing attention in K-12 science education because of its emphasis on self-directed learning and real-world problem-solving. Yet few studies have examined how PBL can be adapted for kindergarten. In this study, we examined how a veteran kindergarten teacher, who was experienced with PBL in her own learning, adapted PBL to teach students earth materials, a topic emphasized in the new state curriculum standards but students had difficulty understanding. The pre-post tests showed that students improved their content understanding. Analysis of the classroom discourse showed that PBL and the teacher's facilitation strategies provided opportunities for students to develop their questioning skills. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of this study for using PBL in kindergarten classrooms.

  16. Factors Affecting Perceived Learning of Engineering Students in Problem Based Learning Supported by Business Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro-Pelaez, Julian; Iglesias-Pradas, Santiago; Pascual-Miguel, Felix J.; Hernandez-Garcia, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Although literature about problem based learning (PBL) is not scarce, there is little research on experiences about learning methodologies that combine PBL and the use of simulation tools. This lack of studies is even more notable in the case of engineering courses. The motivation for this study is to show how such a combination of PBL and…

  17. Effect of worksheet scaffolds on student learning in problem-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.S.Y. Choo (Serene); J.I. Rotgans (Jerome); E.H.J. Yew (Elaine); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of worksheets as a scaffolding tool on students' learning achievement in a problem-based learning (PBL) environment. Seventeen PBL classes (N = 241) were randomly assigned to two experimental groups-one with a worksheet provided and

  18. Redesigning Problem-Based Learning in the Knowledge Creation Paradigm for School Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jennifer; Tan, Seng Chee

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of problem-based learning into K-12 science classrooms faces the challenge of achieving the dual goal of learning science content and developing problem-solving skills. To overcome this content-process tension in science classrooms, we employed the knowledge-creation approach as a boundary object between the two seemingly…

  19. Mobile Learning for Higher Education in Problem-Based Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the PhD project on Mobile Learning for Higher Education in Problem-Based Learning Environment which aims to understand how students gain benefit from using mobile devices in the aspect of project work collaboration. It demonstrates research questions, theoretical perspective...

  20. The Effects of Computer Supported Problem Based Learning on Students' Approaches to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ak, Serife

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of computer supported problem based learning on students' approaches to learning. The research was conducted as a pre-test and posttest one-grouped design used to achieve the objectives of the study. The experimental process of study lasted 5 weeks and was carried out on 78 university…

  1. Fostering Critical Thinking Skills in Students with Learning Disabilities through Online Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    As a pedagogical approach, problem-based learning (PBL) has shown success for average and gifted students (HmeloSiver, 2004) and there are numerous incentives for its implementation in online learning environments (Savid-Baden, 2007; Chernobilsky, Nagarajan, & Hmelo-Silver, 2005). However, little research has been conducted regarding the…

  2. Mobile Learning for Higher Education in Problem-Based Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the PhD project on Mobile Learning for Higher Education in Problem-Based Learning Environment which aims to understand how students gain benefit from using mobile devices in the aspect of project work collaboration. It demonstrates research questions, theoretical perspective, research methodology, and current progression.

  3. Factors Affecting Perceived Learning of Engineering Students in Problem Based Learning Supported by Business Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro-Pelaez, Julian; Iglesias-Pradas, Santiago; Pascual-Miguel, Felix J.; Hernandez-Garcia, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Although literature about problem based learning (PBL) is not scarce, there is little research on experiences about learning methodologies that combine PBL and the use of simulation tools. This lack of studies is even more notable in the case of engineering courses. The motivation for this study is to show how such a combination of PBL and…

  4. The implementation of problem-based learning in collaborative groups in a chiropractic program in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Ni Win

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Problem-based learning (PBL is usually conducted in small-group learning sessions with approximately eight students per facilitator. In this study, we implemented a modified version of PBL involving collaborative groups in an undergraduate chiropractic program and assessed its pedagogical effectiveness. Methods: This study was conducted at the International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and involved the 2012 chiropractic student cohort. Six PBL cases were provided to chiropractic students, consisting of three PBL cases for which learning resources were provided and another three PBL cases for which learning resources were not provided. Group discussions were not continuously supervised, since only one facilitator was present. The students’ perceptions of PBL in collaborative groups were assessed with a questionnaire that was divided into three domains: motivation, cognitive skills, and perceived pressure to work. Results: Thirty of the 31 students (97% participated in the study. PBL in collaborative groups was significantly associated with positive responses regarding students’ motivation, cognitive skills, and perceived pressure to work (P<0.05. The students felt that PBL with learning resources increased motivation and cognitive skills (P<0.001. Conclusion: The new PBL implementation described in this study does not require additional instructors or any additional funding. When implemented in a classroom setting, it has pedagogical benefits equivalent to those of small-group sessions. Our findings also suggest that students rely significantly on available learning resources.

  5. Interface between problem-based learning and a learner-centered paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Reza

    2011-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has made a major shift in support of student learning for many medical school curricula around the world. Since curricular development of PBL in the early 1970s and its growth in the 1980s and 1990s, there have been growing numbers of publications providing positive and negative data in regard to the curricular effectiveness of PBL. The purpose of this study was to explore supportive data for the four core objectives of PBL and to identify an interface between the objectives of PBL and a learner-centered paradigm. The four core PBL objectives, ie, structuring of knowledge and clinical context, clinical reasoning, self-directed learning, and intrinsic motivation, were used to search MEDLINE, the Education Resources Information Center, the Educator's Reference Complete, and PsycINFO from January 1969 to January 2011. The literature search was facilitated and narrowed if the published study included the following terms: "problem-based learning", "medical education", "traditional curriculum", and one of the above four PBL objectives. Through a comprehensive search analysis, one can find supportive data for the effectiveness of a PBL curriculum in achieving the four core objectives of PBL. A further analysis of these four objectives suggests that there is an interface between PBL objectives and criteria from a learner-centered paradigm. In addition, this review indicates that promotion of teamwork among students is another interface that exists between PBL and a learner-centered paradigm. The desire of medical schools to enhance student learning and a need to provide an environment where students construct knowledge rather than receive knowledge have encouraged many medical schools to move into a learner-centered paradigm. Implementation of a PBL curriculum can be used as a prevailing starting point to develop not only a learner-centered paradigm, but also to facilitate a smooth curricular transition from a teacher-centered paradigm to a

  6. Problem solving strategies used by RN-to-BSN students in an online problem-based learning course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, Nancy L; Hung, Wei-Chen

    2010-04-01

    It is essential that nursing students develop the problem solving and critical thinking skills required in the current health care environment. Problem-based learning has been promoted as a way to help students acquire those skills; however, gaps exist in the knowledge base of the strategies used by learners. The purpose of this case study was to gain insight into the problem solving experience of a group of six RN-to-BSN students in an online problem-based learning course. Data, including discussion transcripts, reflective papers, and interview transcripts, were analyzed using a qualitative approach. Students expanded their use of resources and resolved the cases, identifying relevant facts and clinical applications. They had difficulty communicating their findings, establishing the credibility of sources, and offering challenging feedback. Increased support and direction are needed to facilitate the development of problem solving abilities of students in the problem-based learning environment.

  7. AN INDUCTIVE, INTERACTIVE AND ADAPTIVE HYBRID PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING METHODOLOGY: APPLICATION TO STATISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADA ZHENG

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an innovative hybrid problem-based learning (PBL methodology. The methodology has the following distinctive features: i Each complex question was decomposed into a set of coherent finer subquestions by following the carefully designed criteria to maintain a delicate balance between guiding the students and inspiring them to think independently. This learning methodology enabled the students to solve the complex questions progressively in an inductive context. ii Facilitated by the utilization of our web-based learning systems, the teacher was able to interact with the students intensively and could allocate more teaching time to provide tailor-made feedback for individual student. The students were actively engaged in the learning activities, stimulated by the intensive interaction. iii The answers submitted by the students could be automatically consolidated in the report of the Moodle system in real-time. The teacher could adjust the teaching schedule and focus of the class to adapt to the learning progress of the students by analysing the automatically generated report and log files of the web-based learning system. As a result, the attendance rate of the students increased from about 50% to more than 90%, and the students’ learning motivation have been significantly enhanced.

  8. Facilitating Problem-Based Learning in Teams with Scrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovesen, Nis

    2013-01-01

    is no exception: Each semester, students are divided into groups and work with various problems or issues partly defined by themselves within the frame of the semester theme. During the first year at Aalborg University, students are taught how to manage and plan projects independently with the use of common...... planning tools like Gantt charts, schedules and simple resource management practices – tools, which are used throughout the education. However, this paper argues that these common project planning and management practices – typically representing rigid “plan-your-work, then work-your-plan” approaches – do...... engineering curriculum. The outcome of the experiments supports an initial hypothesis about improved focus and team efficiency when using Scrum. But the experiments also reveal significant improvements on internal team communication and attitude. However, it also indicates possible limitations regarding...

  9. How mental health nurses improve their critical thinking through problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Tsui-Mei; Tang, Lee-Chun; Ko, Chen-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Critical thinking has been regarded as one of the most important elements for nurses to improve quality of patient care. The aim of this study was to use problem-based learning (PBL) as a method in a continuing education program to evaluate nurses' critical thinking skills. A quasiexperimental study design was carried out. The "Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory" in Chinese was used for data collection. The results indicated significant improvement after PBL continuous education, notably in the dimensions of systematic analysis and curiosity. Content analysis extracted four themes: (a) changes in linear thinking required, (b) logical and systematic thinking required performance improved, (3) integration of prior knowledge and clinical application, and (4) brainstorming learning strategy. The study supports PBL as a continuing education strategy for mental health nurses, and that systematic analysis and curiosity effectively facilitate the development of critical thinking.

  10. Problems-based learning and the Agency of mapping the contemporary city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marling, Gitte

    2004-01-01

    The article presents a problem-based workshop held at Chulalongkorn University in bangkok. The gola is to show how problembased learning can be used in an intercultural context......The article presents a problem-based workshop held at Chulalongkorn University in bangkok. The gola is to show how problembased learning can be used in an intercultural context...

  11. The Effect of Problem-Based Video Instruction on Learner Perceptions of Learning and Knowledge Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Jun

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of video and group discussion in problem-based video instruction on learner perceptions of learning and knowledge transfer. To achieve this purpose, this study compared learner perceptions of learning and knowledge transfer in problem-based video instruction (PBVI) with those in two other…

  12. Investigating Problem-Based Learning Tutorship in Medical and Engineering Programs in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servant, Virginie F. C.; Dewar, Eleanor F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Although Malaysia was the first country in Asia to adopt problem-based learning (PBL), the impact that this has had on its tutors remains largely unexplored. This paper details a qualitative study of the changing perceptions of teaching roles in two groups of problem-based learning tutors in two institutional contexts--one in medicine located in…

  13. A Problem-Based Learning Model for Teaching the Instructional Design Business Acquisition Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Karl M.; Phillips, Timothy L.; Wanner, Janice H.

    2002-01-01

    Outlines a conceptual framework for using a problem-based learning model for teaching the Instructional Design Business Acquisition Process. Discusses writing a response to a request for proposal, developing a working prototype, orally presenting the solution, and the impact of problem-based learning on students' perception of their confidence in…

  14. Problem-Based Learning: An Exercise on Vermont's Legalization of Civil Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Susan M.; Hurlbert, Janet McNeil

    2004-01-01

    The majority of literature regarding problem-based learning demonstrates its usefulness as a teaching technique in the natural sciences curriculum. The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the broad purpose is to illustrate the application of problem-based learning for instructing students about controversial issues in sociology. Within the…

  15. Effects of conventional and problem-based learning on clinical and general competencies and career development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Geertsma, Jelle; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test hypotheses regarding the longitudinal effects of problem-based learning (PBL) and conventional learning relating to students' appreciation of the curriculum, self-assessment of general competencies, summative assessment of clinical competence and indicators of career development.

  16. Learning facilitating leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Hansen, Mette Sanne

    2016-01-01

    in teaching facilitation and the literature. These types of skills are most effectively acquired by combining conceptual lectures, classroom exercises and the facilitation of groups in a real-life context. The paper also reflects certain ‘shadow sides’ related to facilitation observed by the students...

  17. The implementation of problem-based learning in collaborative groups in a chiropractic program in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Ni Ni; Nadarajah, Vishna Devi V; Win, Daw Khin

    2015-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is usually conducted in small-group learning sessions with approximately eight students per facilitator. In this study, we implemented a modified version of PBL involving collaborative groups in an undergraduate chiropractic program and assessed its pedagogical effectiveness. This study was conducted at the International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and involved the 2012 chiropractic student cohort. Six PBL cases were provided to chiropractic students, consisting of three PBL cases for which learning resources were provided and another three PBL cases for which learning resources were not provided. Group discussions were not continuously supervised, since only one facilitator was present. The students' perceptions of PBL in collaborative groups were assessed with a questionnaire that was divided into three domains: motivation, cognitive skills, and perceived pressure to work. Thirty of the 31 students (97%) participated in the study. PBL in collaborative groups was significantly associated with positive responses regarding students' motivation, cognitive skills, and perceived pressure to work (Plearning resources increased motivation and cognitive skills (Plearning resources.

  18. Balancing Design Project Supervision and Learning Facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Louise Møller

    2012-01-01

    set of demands to the design lecturer. On one hand she is the facilitator of the learning process, where the students are in charge of their own projects, and where learning happens through the students’ own experiences, successes and mistakes and on the other hand she is a supervisor, who uses her...... experiences and expertise to guide the students’ decisions in relation to the design project. This paper focuses on project supervision in the context of design education – and more specifically on how this supervision is unfolded in a Problem Based Learning culture. The paper explores the supervisor......In design there is a long tradition for apprenticeship, as well as tradition for learning through design projects. Today many design educations are positioned within the University context, and have to be aligned with the learning culture and structure, which they represent. This raises a specific...

  19. Is problem-based learning an ideal format for developing ethical decision skills?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. Harasym

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ethical decision making is a complex process, which involves the interaction of knowledge, skills, and attitude. To enhance the teaching and learning on ethics reasoning, multiple teaching strategies have to be applied. A medical ethical reasoning (MER model served as a framework of the development of ethics reasoning and their suggested instructional strategies. Problem-based learning (PBL, being used to facilitate students' critical thinking, self-directed learning, collaboration, and communication skills, has been considered effective on ethics education, especially when incorporated with experiential experience. Unlike lecturing that mainly disseminates knowledge and activates the left brain, PBL encourages “whole-brain” learning. However, PBL has several disadvantages, such as its inefficiency, lack of adequately trained preceptors, and the in-depth, silo learning within a relatively small number of cases. Because each school tends to utilize PBL in different ways, either the curriculum designer or the learning strategy, it is important to maximize the advantages of a PBL session, PBL then becomes an ideal format for refining students' ethical decisions and behaviors.

  20. Does the Extent of Problem Familiarity Influence Students' Learning in Problem-Based Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Nachamma; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between problem familiarity and students' learning in a problem-based course. Problem familiarity in this study refers to the extent to which a problem fits with students' prior knowledge and experiences. As part of regular course work, 172 students were given two problems on different occasions.…

  1. Evaluating a "Second Life" Problem-Based Learning (PBL) Demonstrator Project: What Can We Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Chris; Savin-Baden, Maggi; Conradi, Emily; Poulton, Terry

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a demonstrator project to evaluate how effectively Immersive Virtual Worlds (IVWs) could support problem-based learning. The project designed, created and evaluated eight scenarios within "Second Life" (SL) for undergraduate courses in health care management and paramedic training. Evaluation was…

  2. Evaluating a "Second Life" Problem-Based Learning (PBL) Demonstrator Project: What Can We Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Chris; Savin-Baden, Maggi; Conradi, Emily; Poulton, Terry

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a demonstrator project to evaluate how effectively Immersive Virtual Worlds (IVWs) could support problem-based learning. The project designed, created and evaluated eight scenarios within "Second Life" (SL) for undergraduate courses in health care management and paramedic training. Evaluation was…

  3. Interface between problem-based learning and a learner-centered paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimi R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Reza KarimiPacific University School of Pharmacy, Hillsboro, OR, USABackground: Problem-based learning (PBL has made a major shift in support of student learning for many medical school curricula around the world. Since curricular development of PBL in the early 1970s and its growth in the 1980s and 1990s, there have been growing numbers of publications providing positive and negative data in regard to the curricular effectiveness of PBL. The purpose of this study was to explore supportive data for the four core objectives of PBL and to identify an interface between the objectives of PBL and a learner-centered paradigm.Methods: The four core PBL objectives, ie, structuring of knowledge and clinical context, clinical reasoning, self-directed learning, and intrinsic motivation, were used to search MEDLINE, the Education Resources Information Center, the Educator’s Reference Complete, and PsycINFO from January 1969 to January 2011. The literature search was facilitated and narrowed if the published study included the following terms: “problem-based learning”, “medical education”, “traditional curriculum”, and one of the above four PBL objectives.Results: Through a comprehensive search analysis, one can find supportive data for the effectiveness of a PBL curriculum in achieving the four core objectives of PBL. A further analysis of these four objectives suggests that there is an interface between PBL objectives and criteria from a learner-centered paradigm. In addition, this review indicates that promotion of teamwork among students is another interface that exists between PBL and a learner-centered paradigm.Conclusion: The desire of medical schools to enhance student learning and a need to provide an environment where students construct knowledge rather than receive knowledge have encouraged many medical schools to move into a learner-centered paradigm. Implementation of a PBL curriculum can be used as a prevailing starting point to

  4. Ask Not Only "What Can Problem-Based Learning Do for Psychology?" but "What Can Psychology Do for Problem-Based Learning?" A Review of the Relevance of Problem-Based Learning for Psychology Teaching and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Sally; Chiriac, Eva Hammar; Abbad, Gunvor Larsson; Pauli, Regina; Worrell, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an internationally recognised pedagogical approach that is implemented within a number of disciplines. The relevance and uptake of PBL in psychology has to date, however, received very limited attention. The aim of this paper is therefore to review published accounts of how PBL is being used to deliver psychology…

  5. Diagnosing Student Learning Problems Based on Historical Assessment Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Tseng, Judy C. R.; Hwang, Gwo-Haur

    2008-01-01

    In the past decade, researchers have attempted to develop computer-assisted learning and testing systems to help students improve their learning performance. Conventional testing systems simply provide students with a score, and do not offer sufficient information in order to improve their learning performance. It would be of more benefit to…

  6. Integrating Problem-Based Learning and Simulation: Effects on Student Motivation and Life Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Sang Suk

    2015-07-01

    Previous research has suggested that a teaching strategy integrating problem-based learning and simulation may be superior to traditional lecture. The purpose of this study was to assess learner motivation and life skills before and after taking a course involving problem-based learning and simulation. The design used repeated measures with a convenience sample of 83 second-year nursing students who completed the integrated course. Data from a self-administered questionnaire measuring learner motivation and life skills were collected at pretest, post-problem-based learning, and post-simulation time points. Repeated-measures analysis of variance determined that the mean scores for total learner motivation (F=6.62, P=.003), communication (F=8.27, Pproblem solving (F=6.91, P=.001), and self-directed learning (F=4.45, P=.016) differed significantly between time points. Post hoc tests using the Bonferroni correction revealed that total learner motivation and total life skills significantly increased both from pretest to postsimulation and from post-problem-based learning test to postsimulation test. Subscales of learner motivation and life skills, intrinsic goal orientation, self-efficacy for learning and performance, problem-solving skills, and self-directed learning skills significantly increased both from pretest to postsimulation test and from post-problem-based learning test to post-simulation test. The results demonstrate that an integrating problem-based learning and simulation course elicits significant improvement in learner motivation and life skills. Simulation plus problem-based learning is more effective than problem-based learning alone at increasing intrinsic goal orientation, task value, self-efficacy for learning and performance, problem solving, and self-directed learning.

  7. EFFECT OF PROBLEM BASED LEARNING IN COMPARISION WITH LECTURE BASED LEARNING IN FORENSIC MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmakumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Problem based learning (PBL is an approach to learning and instruction in which students tackle problems in small groups under the supervision of a teacher. This style of learning assumed to foster increased retention of knowledge, improve student’s gene ral problem solving skills, enhance integration of basic science concepts in to clinical problems, foster the development of self - directed learning skills and strengthen student’s intrinsic motivation. AIM: The study was conducted to compare the effect of Problem based learning in comparison with lecture based learning. SETTING: A cross - sectional study was conducted among 2nd year MBBS students of Jubilee Mission Medical College and Research Institute, Thrissur during the period of December 2014 to March 20 15. METHODOLOGY: The batch is divided into two groups (A & B, 45 in each group. By using PBL method, blunt force injuries were taught to Group - A and sharp weapon injuries to group - B. By using lecture based learning (LBL method blunt force injuries were t aught to Group - B and sharp weapon injuries to group - A. At the end of the session a test in the form of MCQ was conducted on the students to evaluate their learning outcome. OBSERVATION AND RESU LTS: In session I, the average test score of LBL group was 8.16 and PBL group was 12. The difference was statistically significant. In session - II also 45 students has participated each in LBL and PBL classes. The average of test score of LBL group was 7.267 and PBL was 11.289, which was highly significant statistical ly . CONCLUSION: Study has proven that problem based learning is an effective teaching learning method when compared to conventional lecture based learning.

  8. Facilitation of learning: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Tyler; Trish, Houghton; Barry, Debbie

    2016-04-06

    This article, the fourth in a series of 11, discusses the context for the facilitation of learning. It outlines the main principles and theories for understanding the process of learning, including examples which link these concepts to practice. The practical aspects of using these theories in a practice setting will be discussed in the fifth article of this series. Together, these two articles will provide mentors and practice teachers with knowledge of the learning process, which will enable them to meet the second domain of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice on facilitation of learning.

  9. Rocket to Creativity: A Field Experience in Problem-Based and Project-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon F. Dole

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to examine the impact of a field experience in problem-based (PBL and project-based learning (PjBL on pre-service and in-service teachers’ conceptions of experiential learning. In our study, participants had been enrolled in a hybrid class that included an online component in which they learned about PBL and PjBL and an experiential component in which they facilitated PBL and PjBL with children in grades 1-9 during a one-week field experience on a university campus. The goal of the field experience is for teachers to change their practice from didactic to inquiry and to promote critical and creative thinking in their students. We used a case study method that involved data derived from six different sources: online structured interviews, follow-up telephone interviews, discussion board posts, reflections, course feedback, and observations. The main theme that emerged from the data analysis was the critical role the field experience played in applying theory to practice. Sub-themes included understanding the process of implementing PBL and PjBL, mastering the logistics of PBL and PjBL, becoming facilitators, and collaborating with partners. Results showed that the field experience gave the teachers the “courage” to experiment with a student-centered methodology.

  10. An evaluation of problem-based learning in a nursing theory and practice module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Elizabeth J; Lyte, Geraldine; Butterworth, Tony

    2002-03-01

    Interest in Problem-Based Learning (PBL) within nurse education has increased internationally in recent years. The expectations of this teaching/learning strategy are that it will enable nurses to develop skills required for professional practice including: enquiry, reasoning, interpersonal and lifelong learning skills. However, to date, there is little empirical evidence within nursing literature to support such expectations. This study evaluated the reiterative PBL approach in an undergraduate programme within one University. The Responsive Evaluation Model (Guba & Lincoln 1989) guided the design of the study, permitting multiple methods of observation, focus group interview s and a questionnaire. Findings revealed an overall positive student experience of PBL. However, many students found PBL initially stressful due to the deliberately ambiguous nature of the scenario and the requirement upon students to direct their own le arning. The tutor role was unclear to some students, while others found the facilitative approach empowering. Recommendations are offered which may be of value to students, teachers and practitioners implementing and facilitating PBL within Making A Difference curricula (Department of Health 1999).

  11. Innovative teaching: Using multimedia in a problem-based learning environment

    OpenAIRE

    Mai Neo; Ken T. K. Neo

    2001-01-01

    Presently, traditional educational approaches have resulted in a mismatch between what is taught to the students and what the industry needs. As such, many institutions are moving towards problem-based learning as a solution to producing graduates who are creative, can think critically and analytically, and are able to solve problems. In this paper, we focus on using multimedia technology as an innovative teaching and learning strategy in a problem-based learning environment by giving the stu...

  12. Balancing Design Project Supervision and Learning Facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Louise Møller

    2012-01-01

    experiences and expertise to guide the students’ decisions in relation to the design project. This paper focuses on project supervision in the context of design education – and more specifically on how this supervision is unfolded in a Problem Based Learning culture. The paper explores the supervisor......’s balance between the roles: 1) Design Project Supervisor – and 2) Learning Facilitator – with the aim to understand when to apply the different roles, and what to be aware of when doing so. This paper represents the first pilot-study of a larger research effort. It is based on a Lego Serious Play workshop......In design there is a long tradition for apprenticeship, as well as tradition for learning through design projects. Today many design educations are positioned within the University context, and have to be aligned with the learning culture and structure, which they represent. This raises a specific...

  13. PENERAPAN PROBLEM BASED LEARNING BERBASIS SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING ORIENTED ASSESSMENT TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN PEMECAHAN MASALAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Destia Wahyu Hidayati

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aims to know the effectivity of problem based learning based self-directed learning oriented assessmentto students’ problem solving ability. Sampel penelitian ini adalah siswa Keas VIII A dan VIII B SMP Empu Tantular Semarang.The samples were studentsin class  VIII A and VIII B SMP Empu Tantular Semarang.Kelas eksperimen adalah kelas VIII B yang menggunakan pembelajaran PBL berbasis SLOA.Data is collected by written test which contains mathematical problems oncircle tangent line.Hasil penelitian menunjukkan siswa di kelas eksperimen yang mempunyai rata-rata skor kemampuan pemecahan masalah matematika mencapai KKM lebih dari 75%.The results showed that students in the experimental class whose average score of mathematical problem solving passed the KKM, is more than 75%.Rata-rata nilai kemampuan pemecahan masalah matematika di kelas eksperimen lebih besar dari pada rata-rata nilai kemampuan pemecahan masalah matematika di kelas kontrol.The average score of mathematical problem solving ability in the experimental class is bigger than in the control class.Berdasarkan hasil penelitian dapat disimpulkan bahwa penggunaan PBL berbasis SLOA efektif pada pencapaian kemampuan komunikasi matematika siswa.Thus, the use of problem based learningbased on Self-directed Learning Oriented Assessmentis effective to increase students' mathematical problem solving. Keywords: problem based learning; self-directed learning oriented assessment; mathematics problem solving.

  14. What teacher education students learn about collaboration from problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind Murray-Harvey

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Group work, an essential component of learning and teaching in problem-based learning (PBL, is compromised if students’ experiences of PBL are colored by dissatisfaction with the process or outcomes. For the potential benefits of PBL to be realized PBL group work must be genuinely collaborative to address students’ personal and professional learning needs. Australian teacher education students (n=122 provided written reflections on PBL that enabled representations of their group work experience to be mapped using an Attitude, Skills, and Knowledge (ASK framework to gauge understanding of the collaborative learning process (as learners and as future teachers. Attitudes identified as necessary for collaborative learning were valuing others’ perspectives, interdependence, and learning about self. The Skills dimension characterized interpersonal, problem solving and group skills. Features of the Knowledge dimension were: generation, application, and dissemination of knowledge. Pedagogical knowledge was also evident through learning connections made by students to their future teaching practice.

  15. Working towards a scalable model of problem-based learning instruction in undergraduate engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantri, Archana

    2014-05-01

    The intent of the study presented in this paper is to show that the model of problem-based learning (PBL) can be made scalable by designing curriculum around a set of open-ended problems (OEPs). The detailed statistical analysis of the data collected to measure the effects of traditional and PBL instructions for three courses in Electronics and Communication Engineering, namely Analog Electronics, Digital Electronics and Pulse, Digital & Switching Circuits is presented here. It measures the effects of pedagogy, gender and cognitive styles on the knowledge, skill and attitude of the students. The study was conducted two times with content designed around same set of OEPs but with two different trained facilitators for all the three courses. The repeatability of results for effects of the independent parameters on dependent parameters is studied and inferences are drawn.

  16. Problem Based Learning as a Shared Musical Journey – Group Dynamics, Communication and Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Lindvang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this paper is how we can facilitate problem based learning (PBL more creatively. We take a closer look upon the connection between creative processes and social communication in the PBL group including how difficulties in the social interplay may hinder creativity. The paper draws on group dynamic theory, and points out the importance of building a reflexive milieu in the group. Musical concepts are used to illustrate the communicative and creative aspects of PBL and the paper uses the analogy between improvising together and do a project work together. We also discuss the role of the supervisor in a PBL group process. Further we argue that creativity is rooted deep in our consciousness and connected to our ability to work with a flexible mind. In order to enhance the cohesion as well as the creativity of the group a model of music listening as a concrete intervention tool in PBL processes is proposed.

  17. Organisational Problem Based Learning and Social Communities for SMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Emma; Hamburg, Ileana

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights reasons for SMEs low uptake of training and argues that current offerings are not suitable for their needs. It highlights the need to leverage the benefits of work based learning through the use of technology. Social media and web 2.0 has significantly changed the way people learn and access knowledge. The body of knowledge…

  18. Understanding the Impact of Assessment on Students in Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin-Baden, Maggi

    2004-01-01

    This article explores assessment in the context of problem-based learning (PBL) at three different levels. Firstly, it examines the position of assessment in the current system of higher education and, secondly, it examines students' experiences of assessment in problem-based programmes. The article draws on research into PBL that explored staff…

  19. Revolutions & re-iterations : An intellectual history of problem-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.F.C. Servant (Virginie)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe same year as the opening of the Woodstock music festival, a small medical school in Hamilton, Ontario, launched a daring new medical education programme in which lectures were replaced by small-group, interdisciplinary problem-based tutorials. Problem-based learning, as it became kno

  20. Facilitating Teacher Students’ Innovation Competence through Problem-Based Game Design Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanghøj, Thorkild; Hovmand Sørensen, Sia

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe how new teacher students develop innovation competence through problem-based game design processes by participating in an intro camp. The intro camp was held for 350 new teacher students at a Danish university college in 2011, which were asked to solve the real......-life problems of local schools by designing game solutions to be presented for and assessed by participating school directors and pupils. Based upon a pragmatist theoretical framework, we conceptualize the students’ development of innovation competence in relation to creative problem-solving, game frames...... the students. In the analysis, we focus on two analytical themes that relate to the teacher students’ problem-based game design processes and their experience of becoming future innovative practitioners. The paper concludes by discussing future perspectives on the use of problem-based game design...

  1. PENERAPAN PROBLEM BASED LEARNING DALAM UPAYA MENGEMBANGKAN KEMAMPUAN BERPIKIR KRITIS MAHASISWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fakhriyah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mendeskripsikan penerapan problem based learning dalam upaya mengembangkan kemampuan berpikir kritis mahasiswa PGSD FKIP UMK Kudus pada mata kuliah Pembelajaran Sains. Salah satu keunggulan dari model pembelajaran problem based learning yaitu mampu melatih mahasiswa dalam menggunakan berbagai konsep, prinsip dan keterampilan yang telah mereka pelajari untuk memecahkan permasalahan yang sedang dihadapi. Dengan penerapan problem based learning, kemampuan berpikir kritis dapat berkembang, karena pada kemampuan berpikir kritis yang diamati dalam penelitian ini berupa kemampuan mengidentifikasi, menganalisis, memecahkan masalah, berpikir logis dan membuat keputusan dengan tepat serta dapat menarik kesimpulan. This research aims to describe the application of problem based learning in developing critical thinking skills of PGSD FKIP UMK Kudus students on Science Learning courses. One of the advantages of problem-based learning  model that is able to train students in using a variety of concepts, principles and skills they have learned to solve the problems being faced. With the implementation of problem-based learning, critical thinking skills can develop, because the critical thinking skills were observed in this study is the ability to identify, analyze, solve problems, think logically and make the right decisions and to make conclusions.

  2. Problem-based learning on cell biology and ecophysiology using integrated laboratory and computational activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sousa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Since all the known biological systems require water for their basic biochemical processes, one can find several osmoregulation mechanisms on living organisms for adaptation to related environmental challenges. Osmosis is a cellular mechanism of water movement across membranes which is known to be present throughout the tree of life and occurs by either diffusion across the membrane bilayer or by a faster movement mediated by transmembrane channel proteins, called aquaporins. The expression of aquaporins is regulated at, the cellular level, by environment conditions such as hydric stress, therefore allowing the adaptation of organisms to increase salinity in soils, water deprivation and increase beverage intake.  Osmosis and diffusion concepts have been described to be difficult to learn, so, in order to promote meaningfull learning, we used a problem-based learning approach that integrates a laboratory activity and a computer simulation model of osmosis and a two phase conceptual mapping. We observed that high school students developed adequate laboratory skills and were able to communicate their results as text and using scientific drawings; and the learning environment was adequate. Therefore we presented a successful implementation case of integrated PBL, in a public portuguese school, that may constitute an example to facilitate the implementation of active inquiry strategies by other teachers, as well as the basis for future research.

  3. [Development of integrated clinical abilities by simulated patient assisted problem-based learning tutorial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norose, Takahiko

    2013-01-01

    In Hokkaido Pharmaceutical University, problem-based learning (PBL) has been introduced as a part of the laboratory and practice curriculum for all school years to promote active learning skills and enhance students' problem-solving ability. The PBL program at our school has been developed using a tutorial study based on scenarios and learning strategies, such as experiments and/or standardized patients (SPs) and role-playing, according to students' developmental stage and learning objectives. The course "Practice VIII/Principles of Clinical Communication" for the fifth-grade students is an example of the new PBL program to improve students' clinical communication skills and ability to design a care plan for patients. We divided 196 students into 49 groups (each group had 4 members). We used the large-class PBL model, in which the students had discussions with several facilitators. The students were presented with a patient-case scenario, in which they were first provided with a brief background of the patient. Afterward, students interviewed SPs to obtain detailed information, based on which a care plan was designed for each patient. Students role-played with SPs as a part of patient support, consulted using the patient care plan, and made Subjective information, Objective information, Assessment, and Plan (SOAP) notes at the end. Some students commented that the PBL program was very helpful in understanding how to design a patient care plan and that they understood the importance of communication in obtaining information for designing a patient care plan.

  4. Enhancing students' learning in problem based learning: validation of a self-assessment scale for active learning and critical thinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoiriyah, U.; Roberts, C.; Jorm, C.; Vleuten, C.P. van der

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Problem based learning (PBL) is a powerful learning activity but fidelity to intended models may slip and student engagement wane, negatively impacting learning processes, and outcomes. One potential solution to solve this degradation is by encouraging self-assessment in the PBL

  5. Enhancing students' learning in problem based learning: validation of a self-assessment scale for active learning and critical thinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoiriyah, U.; Roberts, C.; Jorm, C.; Vleuten, C.P. van der

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Problem based learning (PBL) is a powerful learning activity but fidelity to intended models may slip and student engagement wane, negatively impacting learning processes, and outcomes. One potential solution to solve this degradation is by encouraging self-assessment in the PBL tutorial

  6. Self-directed learning in problem-based learning and its relationships with self-regulated learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.M. Loyens (Sofie); J. Magda (Joshua); R.M.J.P. Rikers (Remy)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis study investigated the role of self-directed learning (SDL) in problem-based learning (PBL) and examined how SDL relates to self-regulated learning (SRL). First, it is explained how SDL is implemented in PBL environments. Similarities between SDL and SRL are highlighted. However, bo

  7. Self-directed learning in problem-based learning and its relationships with self-regulated learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.M. Loyens (Sofie); J. Magda (Joshua); R.M.J.P. Rikers (Remy)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis study investigated the role of self-directed learning (SDL) in problem-based learning (PBL) and examined how SDL relates to self-regulated learning (SRL). First, it is explained how SDL is implemented in PBL environments. Similarities between SDL and SRL are highlighted. However,

  8. The potential utility of problem-based learning in the education of clinical psychologists and others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huey, D

    2001-01-01

    Clinical psychologists, like most health professionals, are in essence clinical problem-solvers. However, dealing with mental health problems may necessitate a greater relative reliance upon inductive clinical reasoning during the problem-solving process. To develop a provisional problem formulation mental health professionals may have to make sense of the co-occurrence of complex and poorly delineated problems. Claims have been made, predominantly in the literature on medical education, regarding the utility of problem-based learning (PBL) for achieving aims central to the effective performance of this role. In this article, after characterizing clinical psychology and PBL, we briefly explore the benefits claimed for PBL and assert that the putative cognitive and interpersonal consequences of the approach may be particularly pertinent to mental health practice. Particular emphasis is placed upon the necessity of facilitating effective clinical reasoning, that is, teaching future practitioners how to, rather than what to, think about complex psychopathology. PBL is also considered in the wider context of models of experiential learning and methods for teaching problem-solving. Finally, future research questions are suggested which may provide answers relevant to the facilitation of effective clinical reasoning in all health professions.

  9. Problem-Based Learning: An Educational Strategy To Support Nurses Working in a Multicultural Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Jeanine; Street, Annette

    1999-01-01

    A group of 26 nurses working with families from non-English-speaking backgrounds collaborated in the development and testing of problem-based learning packages. Their usefulness for graduate nursing programs and inservice education was demonstrated. (SK)

  10. Problem-based learning in dentistry and interfiled comparison: a citation analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakimeh Hazrati

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion ― These findings indicate gap Problem-based learning in the fields of medical sciences and future studies need to establish differences other fields and suggest appropriate solutions to resolve the dispute.

  11. Teaching tobacco cessation to large student cohorts through train-the-trainers and problem based learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llambi, Laura; Barros, Mary; Parodi, Carolina; Cora, Mariana; Garces, Gaston

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is a leading cause of preventable deaths worldwide. Graduates of medical schools receive limited training on tobacco cessation and are ill-equipped to treat tobacco dependence. In this paper, we describe and present evidence from an educational intervention based on a train-the-trainers model and problem-based learning strategy aimed to educate a large number of first-year medical students on tobacco-related issues. A survey assessing students' knowledge, attitudes and beliefs was conducted before and after educational intervention. Tobacco experts from the faculty staff, who are trained problem-based learning tutors, served as facilitators in the problem-based learning setting with 1000 medical students. Significant changes in knowledge and beliefs were observed. Items such as need for further training in cessation, importance, and effectiveness of brief advice showed significant variations after the educational intervention. Educational intervention based on a train-the-trainers and problem-based learning approaches are feasible and effective to educate a large cohort of first-year medical students in tobacco issues. Further research is needed to find out whether this intervention improves overall patient care management.

  12. THE ROLE OF STUDENT CHARACTERISTICS IN PROBLEM BASED LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Damiyanti

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available To reach the effectiveness of study, it is recommended to work on active learning method. The learning activity must be done with emphasis on the students’ characteristics. The characteristic means internal factors (cognitive entry behavior and affective entry characteristics, which are considered important as solving problems. The previous studies have shown that there is a correlation between achievement test and students’ characteristic entry behavior. At the beginning of the academic year of 2003, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia started active learning with PBL curriculum for the BDS degree. From a study about the correlation between the achievement and students’ entry behavior (previous knowledge, self concept, attitude, and anxiety during attending the test the study showed that characteristic entry behavior contributes to the student’s achievement test. The results supported the previous study.

  13. Problem-based and project-oriented learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Teodorescu, Remus; Chen, Zhe

    2005-01-01

    . Generally, the content of the curriculum should be more expanded without extra study time. This paper presents a teaching approach, which makes it possible very fast for the students to obtain in-depth skills into new research areas, and this method is the problem-oriented and project-based learning....... In this paper the necessary skills for power electronic engineers are outlined that is followed up by a description on how the problem-oriented and project-based learning are implemented. A complete curriculum in power electronics and drives at Aalborg University is presented where different power electronics...... related projects at different study levels also are presented....

  14. Integrating Industry in Project Organized Problem Based Learning for Engineering Educations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten M.

    2006-01-01

    This abstract deals with the challenge of establishing engineering student projects in collaboration with industry. Based on empirical results a set of advices for industrial collaboration in project oriented problem based learning are formulated......This abstract deals with the challenge of establishing engineering student projects in collaboration with industry. Based on empirical results a set of advices for industrial collaboration in project oriented problem based learning are formulated...

  15. Integrating Industry in Project Organized Problem Based Learning for Engineering Educations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten M.

    2006-01-01

    This abstract deals with the challenge of establishing engineering student projects in collaboration with industry. Based on empirical results a set of advices for industrial collaboration in project oriented problem based learning are formulated......This abstract deals with the challenge of establishing engineering student projects in collaboration with industry. Based on empirical results a set of advices for industrial collaboration in project oriented problem based learning are formulated...

  16. Exploring creativity and critical thinking in traditional and innovative problem-based learning groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2013-08-01

    To explore students' attitude towards problem-based learning, creativity and critical thinking, and the relevance to nursing education and clinical practice. Critical thinking and creativity are crucial in nursing education. The teaching approach of problem-based learning can help to reduce the difficulties of nurturing problem-solving skills. However, there is little in the literature on how to improve the effectiveness of a problem-based learning lesson by designing appropriate and innovative activities such as composing songs, writing poems and using role plays. Exploratory qualitative study. A sample of 100 students participated in seven semi-structured focus groups, of which two were innovative groups and five were standard groups, adopting three activities in problem-based learning, namely composing songs, writing poems and performing role plays. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. There are three themes extracted from the conversations: 'students' perceptions of problem-based learning', 'students' perceptions of creative thinking' and 'students' perceptions of critical thinking'. Participants generally agreed that critical thinking is more important than creativity in problem-based learning and clinical practice. Participants in the innovative groups perceived a significantly closer relationship between critical thinking and nursing care, and between creativity and nursing care than the standard groups. Both standard and innovative groups agreed that problem-based learning could significantly increase their critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Further, by composing songs, writing poems and using role plays, the innovative groups had significantly increased their awareness of the relationship among critical thinking, creativity and nursing care. Nursing educators should include more types of creative activities than it often does in conventional problem-based learning classes. The results could help nurse educators design an appropriate

  17. Problem Based Learning and Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida

    2012-01-01

    scientific and technological knowledge but instead align it with the social, economic and environmental dimensions of the professional practice. It is agreed among ESD experts that PBL is a suitable learning approach to integrate ESD in the engineering curricula. This paper provides an overview...

  18. Testing a causal model for learning in a problem-based curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurk, M.M. van den; Dolmans, D.H.J.M.; Wolfhagen, H.A.P.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between elements that are important for the tutorial group process and the individual learning process in a problem-based curriculum. The variables under investigation were student-generated learning issues, individual learning process, reportin

  19. Developing Clinical Competency in Crisis Event Management: An Integrated Simulation Problem-Based Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, S. Y.; Chen, F. G.; Klainin, P.; Brammer, J.; O'Brien, A.; Samarasekera, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integration of a simulation based learning activity on nursing students' clinical crisis management performance in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. It was hypothesized that the clinical performance of first year nursing students who participated in a simulated learning activity during the PBL session…

  20. Gendered practices of constructing an engineering identity in a problem-based learning environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the learning experiences of engineering students of both genders in a problem-based and project-organized learning environment (PBL) at a Danish university. This study relates an amalgam of theories on learning and gender to the context of engineering education. Based on data...

  1. Motivational Influences of Using Peer Evaluation in Problem-Based Learning in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercrombie, Sara; Parkes, Jay; McCarty, Teresita

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the ways in which medical students' achievement goal orientations (AGO) affect their perceptions of learning and actual learning from an online problem-based learning environment, Calibrated Peer Review™. First, the tenability of a four-factor model (Elliot & McGregor, 2001) of AGO was tested with data collected from…

  2. D2.1 - An EA Active, Problem Based Learning Methodology - EAtrain2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Georgsen, Marianne; Buus, Lillian

    This deliverable reports on the work undertaken in work package 2 with the key objective to develop a learning methodology for web 2.0 mediated Enterprise Architecture (EA) learning building on a problem based learning (PBL) approach. The deliverable reports not only on the methodology but also...

  3. The Effectiveness of Problem-Based Learning on Teaching the First Law of Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Erdal; Oktay, Munir

    2011-01-01

    Background: Problem-based learning (PBL) is a teaching approach working in cooperation with self-learning and involving research to solve real problems. The first law of thermodynamics states that energy can neither be created nor destroyed, but that energy is conserved. Students had difficulty learning or misconceptions about this law. This study…

  4. "Sustainability on Earth" Webquests: Do They Qualify as Problem-Based Learning Activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Laurinda; Dourado, Luís; Morgado, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICT), namely the Internet, can play a valuable educational role in several school subjects, including science education. The same applies to problem-based learning (PBL), that is, a student-centered active learning methodology that can prepare students for lifelong learning. WebQuests (WQs) combine PBL…

  5. Problem-Based Learning in the Academic Setting: Language Teaching Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Ligija Kaminskienė; Aušra Janulienė

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with case study as the key method for problem-based learning. The authors present the case study types, transferable competencies and skills that are achieved through case studies and introduce language-related issues in interdisciplinary teaching. The difficulties that a language teacher may face are grouped in the learning sequence and some practical teaching/learning tips are suggested.

  6. The Effectiveness of Problem-Based Learning on Teaching the First Law of Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Erdal; Oktay, Munir

    2011-01-01

    Background: Problem-based learning (PBL) is a teaching approach working in cooperation with self-learning and involving research to solve real problems. The first law of thermodynamics states that energy can neither be created nor destroyed, but that energy is conserved. Students had difficulty learning or misconceptions about this law. This study…

  7. Developing Clinical Competency in Crisis Event Management: An Integrated Simulation Problem-Based Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, S. Y.; Chen, F. G.; Klainin, P.; Brammer, J.; O'Brien, A.; Samarasekera, D. D.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the integration of a simulation based learning activity on nursing students' clinical crisis management performance in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. It was hypothesized that the clinical performance of first year nursing students who participated in a simulated learning activity during the PBL session…

  8. Students' engagement with their group in a problem-based learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHarg, J; Kay, E J; Coombes, L R

    2012-02-01

    In a new enquiry-based learning dental curriculum, problem-based learning (PBL) was chosen as a central methodology because it promotes a collaborative and constructive approach to learning. However, inevitably, some groups function worse than others. This study explores the relationship between group functionality and individuals' results on knowledge-based assessment. It also sought to establish whether using the Belbin team role theory could improve group functionality. Students completed the Belbin team role inventory that assigns individuals to a team role type and were allocated to either an ideal Belbin group or a control group. To evaluate the functionality of the groups, Macgowan's group engagement measure was completed after 18 and 31 weeks for each student by their group facilitator. The scores were summed and averaged giving a group engagement score for each group. Relationships between group engagement, individual performance in assessment in weeks 18 and 31 and Belbin and non-Belbin teams were investigated. Individual group engagement scores and performance in the knowledge tests had a statistically significant positive relationship despite the small number of students involved (62). However, no correlation was shown between Belbin groups and group engagement scores. Those students who engaged most with the PBL process performed markedly better in assessments of knowledge. Using Belbin's team role theory to place students in PBL groups in an effort to increase group functionality had no effect when compared with non-Belbin control groups. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. PENGARUH PROBLEM BASED LEARNING TERHADAP KETERAMPILAN BERPIKIR KRITIS DAN REGULASI DIRI SISWA KELAS V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pricilla Anindyta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui: (1 perbedaan keterampilan berpikir kritis dan regulasi diri siswa antara kelas yang diajar dengan menggunakan problem based leaning dan kelas yang diajar dengan menggunakan pembelajaran ekspositori dan (2 pengaruh penerapan problem based learning terhadap keterampilan berpikir kritis, dan regulasi diri siswa. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian eksperimen semu. Populasi penelitian ini adalah seluruh siswa kelas V SD Santo Vincentius Jakarta. Pada kelas eksperimen, pembelajaran IPA dilaksanakan dengan model problem based learning, sedangkan pada kelas kontrol dengan  pembelajaran yang biasa digunakan oleh guru yaitu pembelajaran ekspositori. Instrumen yang digunakan adalah (1 tes untuk mengukur keterampilan berpikir kritis siswa ditinjau dari aspek kognitif, (2 skala perilaku untuk mengukur keterampilan berpikir kritis ditinjau dari aspek perilaku dan regulasi diri siswa. Analisis data menggunakan (1 statistik deskriptif untuk mendeskripsikan data keterampilan berpikir kritis dan regulasi diri siswa, dan (2 statistik infe-rensial dengan menggunakan uji t sampel bebas dan uji MANOVA untuk menguji hipotesis penelitian dengan taraf signifikansi 5% (α = 0,05. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa: (1 terdapat perbedaan keterampilan berpikir kritis siswa yang signifikan antara kelas yang diajar dengan menggunakan problem based leaning dan kelas yang diajar dengan menggunakan pembelajaran ekspositori, dengan nilai sig. 0,040; (2 terdapat perbedaan regulasi diri siswa yang signifikan antara kelas yang diajar de-ngan menggunakan problem based learning dan kelas yang diajar dengan menggunakan pembelajaran ekspositori, dengan nilai sig. 0,005; (3 penerapan problem based learning berpengaruh secara positif dan signifikan terhadap keterampilan berpikir kritis dan regulasi diri siswa, dengan nilai sig 0

  10. Creating and using industry-based problem-based learning challenges in photonics: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Judith; Dischino, Michele; Hanes, Fenna; Massa, Nicholas

    2009-06-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an educational approach whereby students learn course content by actively and collaboratively solving real-world problems presented in a context similar to that in which the learning is to be applied. Project PHOTON PBL, in collaboration with photonics industry and research university partners, created eight interdisciplinary multi-media Challenges to be used in high school and community college math, science and technology courses. Each Challenge was recorded on location and features the scientists, engineers and technicians who originally solved the problem engaged in authentic problem solving. In this paper we describe the evolution of the development of the Challenges and we provide instructions on creating a Challenge and using it in the classroom to enhance student learning.

  11. Problem-Based Learning: An Overview of its Process and Impact on Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine H.J. Yew

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we provide an overview of the process of problem-based learning (PBL and the studies examining the effectiveness of PBL. We also discuss a number of naturalistic and empirical studies that have examined the process of PBL and how its various components impact students’ learning. We conclude that the studies comparing the relative effectiveness of PBL are generally consistent in demonstrating its superior efficacy for longer-term knowledge retention and in the application of knowledge. Studies on the process of PBL, however, are still inconclusive as to which component(s of PBL most significantly impact students’ learning, although causal studies have demonstrated that all the phases of PBL are necessary in influencing students’ learning outcomes.

  12. Integrated problem-based learning in the neuroscience curriculum – the SUNY Downstate experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trappler Brian

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper reports the author's initial experience as Block Director in converting a Conventional Curriculum into a problem-based learning model (PBL for teaching Psychopathology. As part of a wide initiative in curriculum reform, Psychopathology, which was a six-week course in the second-year medical school curriculum, became integrated into a combined Neuroscience block. The study compares curriculum conversion at State University of New York (SUNY, Downstate, with the experiences at other medical centres that have instituted similar curricula reform. Methods Student satisfaction with the Conventional and PBL components of the Neuroscience curriculum was compared using questionnaires and formal discussions between faculty and a body of elected students. The PBL experience in Psychopathology was also compared with that of the rest of the Neuroscience Block, which used large student groups and expert facilitators, while the Psychopathology track was limited to small groups using mentors differing widely in levels of expertise. Results Students appeared to indicate a preference toward conventional lectures and large PBL groups using expert facilitators in contrast to small group mentors who were not experts. Small PBL groups with expert mentors in the Psychopathology track were also rated favorably. Conclusion The study reviews the advantages and pitfalls of the PBL system when applied to a Neuroscience curriculum on early career development. At SUNY, conversion from a Conventional model to a PBL model diverged from that proposed by Howard S. Barrows where student groups define the learning objectives and problem-solving strategies. In our model, the learning objectives were faculty-driven. The critical issue for the students appeared to be the level of faculty expertise rather than group size. Expert mentors were rated more favorably by students in fulfilling the philosophical objectives of PBL. The author, by citing the

  13. The effects of homogeneous small groups on the efficacy of problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAVAD KOJURI

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Problem-based learning (PBL as a learning style has gained a special position amongst different levels of education systems, and many different approaches, such as tutor education, proper scenario presentation, etc., are used to increase its efficiency. However, the role of homogeneous groups to facilitate team working has never been studied. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of selective group allocation in PBL efficiency. Methods: In this semi-experimental double-blinded study, 40 students of medicine during their externship in the radiology department were divided into two equivalent groups based on their grade average points. The same topics and the same instructors were chosen for both groups. In the control group, the students were randomly divided into four subgroups each with five members. The subgroups in the study group, on the other hand, were homogenized based on their grade average points. Results: The students’ rate of learning of the theoretical topics and their performance in reporting and interpreting the stereotypes in radiology were measured at the beginning and at the end of the study in both groups by two questionnaires with Alpha Krunback of 0.87 and 0.85. All students were male with the mean age of 23.7 years ± 1.19. Age, grade point average of the students in the last semester and the mean of their pre and post-test scores in both groups showed a normal pattern of distribution (p>0.05. The learning and performance scores in each group at the beginning and at the end of the course showed a statistically significant difference with a p value of 0.011 and 0.03, respectively. Conclusion: Homogenizing the PBL groups with allocation of more competent student in each group plays a complementary tutor role and boosts the level of learning by enhancing group dynamicity.

  14. How we "breathed life" into problem-based learning cases using a mobile application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Michelle; Brazil, Victoria; Johnson, Patricia

    2014-10-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been widely adopted in medical education. Learners become bored with paper-based cases as they progress through their studies. To breathe life (i.e. develop virtual patients) into paper-based PBL cases. The "patients" in paper-based PBL cases in one Year 2 were transformed into virtual patients by simulated patients role-playing and the videos and associated patient data uploaded to Bond's Virtual Hospital, a mobile Application. In unsupervised "clinical teams", second-year students undertook "ward rounds" twice a week, prompted by a virtual consultant and registered nurse. Immediately following the "ward rounds", they met with a clinician facilitator to discuss their "patients". Apart from some minor technical issues, the experience was rated positively by students and clinical facilitators. They claimed that it provided students with a sense of what happens in the real world of medicine. The group work skills students had developed during PBL stood them in good stead to self-manage their "clinical teams". This more authentic PBL experience will be extended to earlier semesters as well as later in the curriculum as the virtual hospital can be used to expose learners to a profile of patients that may not be guaranteed during hospital rounds.

  15. Using Problem Based Learning Methods from Engineering Education in company based development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Lise Busk; Jørgensen, Frances

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses how Problem-Based Learning (PBL) methods were used to support a Danish company in its efforts to become more of a 'learning organisation', characterized by sharing of knowledge and experiences. One of the central barriers to organisational learning in this company involved...... motivation for sharing of experiences across organisational boundaries. The case also emphasises the importance of management involvement and support when attempting to develop a learning environment....

  16. Learning to Facilitate (Online) Meetings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Peter; Bull, Susan; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    We describe an approach to teaching collaboration skills directly by building on competences for meeting facilitation. (Online) meetings provide a rich arena to practice collaboration since they can serve multiple purposes: learning, problem solving, decision making, idea generation and advancement......, etc.. We argue that facilitating meetings is a competence worth developing in students and describe the main knowledge and skill components that pertain to this competence. We then describe some implemented software tools that can be used in schools and colleges to provide opportunities for practicing...... and developing group facilitation skills....

  17. On Development of a Problem Based Learning System for Linear Algebra with Simple Input Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Hisashi

    2011-08-01

    Learning how to express a matrix using a keyboard inputs requires a lot of time for most of college students. Therefore, for a problem based learning system for linear algebra to be accessible for college students, it is inevitable to develop a simple method for expressing matrices. Studying the two most widely used input methods for expressing matrices, a simpler input method for expressing matrices is obtained. Furthermore, using this input method and educator's knowledge structure as a concept map, a problem based learning system for linear algebra which is capable of assessing students' knowledge structure and skill is developed.

  18. The successful use of problem-based learning in an online nurse practitioner course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Linda R; Rappaport, Bethany A

    2008-01-01

    The development of technology and online education has opened the door to creative use of new and existing teaching methodologies. The authors describe how they used problem-based learning in an online course as a method for teaching clinical decision making to nurse practitioner students. The close match between problem-based learning and the characteristics of adult learners and successful distance learners is outlined as support for use of this methodology. In addition, the authors describe the challenges, rewards, and lessons learned in this innovative approach to online education.

  19. Status of problem based learning in postgraduate anesthesia teaching: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Chilkoti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anesthesia is a specialized branch of medicine with a very narrow margin of error. Incorporation of problem-based learning (PBL in anesthesia post-graduate (PG teaching enhances the critical thinking and problem-solving skills. It also helps in developing a broader prospective of clinical case scenarios. Case based discussions (CBD are most widely practiced out of all PBL methods in anesthesia PG teaching. Materials and Methods: We conducted an anonymous questionnaire based, cross-sectional survey among 62 anesthesia residents from various medical institutions in a city of Delhi, India. We aimed to assess the current status of PBL by assessing the student satisfaction with CBD in anesthesia PG teaching, educational objectives accomplished with CBD and effectiveness of teaching curriculum in PG teaching with suggested modifications, if any. Result and Conclusion: We observed that CBD is lacking in many important key areas of PBL e.g., formulation of objectives, communication on the content and direction of PBL, facilitation skills, supplementation of inadequacies of CBD. However, CBD seems to be a valid method of PBL in terms of the educational objectives accomplished with it but increased motivation for learning is required. Majority of the students felt that PG teaching curriculum should be centralized, with increased emphasis on open interactive sessions regarding its effectiveness.

  20. A proposal for teaching undergraduate chemistry students carbohydrate biochemistry by problem-based learning activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Angela C M; Rocha, Joao B T

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to teaching elementary biochemistry to undergraduate students. The activity was based on "the foods we eat." It was used to engage students' curiosity and to initiate learning about a subject that could be used by the future teachers in the high school. The experimental activities (8-12 hours) were related to the questions: (i) what does the Benedict's Reagent detect? and (ii) What is determined by glucose oxidase (GOD)? We also ask the students to compare the results with those obtained with the Lugol reagent, which detects starch. Usually, students inferred that the Benedict reagent detects reducing sugars, while GOD could be used to detect glucose. However, in GOD assay, an open question was left, because the results could be due to contamination of the sugars (particularly galactose) with glucose. Though not stressed, GOD does not oxidize the carbohydrates tested and all the positive results are due to contamination. The activities presented here can be easily done in the high school, because they are simple and non-expensive. Furthermore, in the case of Benedict reaction, it is possible to follow the reduction of Cu (II) "macroscopically" by following the formation of the brick-orange precipitate. The concrete observation of a chemical reaction can motivate and facilitate students understanding about chemistry of life.

  1. Teachers' Assessment-Related Local Adaptations of a Problem-Based Learning Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Susan; Arslanyilmaz, Abdurrahman; Williams, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Teachers' implementation of a problem-based learning (PBL) program was examined to determine both how they assessed student learning and their reasons for these assessment practices. Ten 6th grade science teachers used Alien Rescue, a computer-based PBL module, with their students for approximately three weeks. Interviews, observations, and…

  2. Problem-Based Learning and Structural Redesign in a Choral Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the process of structural redesign of an undergraduate music education choral methods course. A framework incorporating Problem-based Learning was developed to promote individualized student learning. Ten students participated in the accompanying research study, contributing an array of written and spoken comments as well as…

  3. Age Difference and Face-Saving in an Inter-Generational Problem-Based Learning Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    This study used grounded theory methodology to investigate whether learning in a problem-based learning (PBL) group was influenced by student demographic diversity. Data comprised observations, in the form of video footage, of one first-year PBL group carried out over the period of an academic year, along with student interviews. Using the…

  4. Problem-Based Learning in the Educational Psychology Classroom: Bahraini Teacher Candidates' Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzak, Nina Abdul

    2012-01-01

    There was a concern from faculty at Bahrain Teachers' College that undergraduate Bahraini students lack the necessary competencies needed for success in educational contexts that are conducive to active, student-centered learning. It was decided that the students be introduced to a problem-based learning (PBL) strategy in one of their educational…

  5. Zoology Students' Experiences of Collaborative Enquiry in Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harland, Tony

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an action-research case study that focuses on experiences of collaboration in a problem-based learning (PBL) course in Zoology. Our PBL model was developed as a research activity in partnership with a commercial organisation. Consequently, learning was grounded in genuine situations of practice in which a high degree of…

  6. "It Actually Made Me Think": Problem-Based Learning in the Business Communications Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Michael; Miles, Libby

    2009-01-01

    We advocate for problem-based learning (PBL) as a rhetorical pedagogy for business communication. Briefly put, classic PBL inverts the typical instructional sequence; rather than presenting concepts first and then asking students to apply them, PBL creates situations in which students must learn the concepts in order to solve a "problem"…

  7. Students' Views about the Problem Based Collaborative Learning Environment Supported by Dynamic Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Erhan; Çakir, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a problem based collaborative learning environment supported by dynamic web technologies and to examine students' views about this learning environment. The study was designed as a qualitative research. Some 36 students who took an Object Oriented Programming I-II course at the department of computer…

  8. Students' Performance Awareness, Motivational Orientations and Learning Strategies in a Problem-Based Electromagnetism Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglam, Murat

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to explore problem-based learning (PBL) in conjunction with students' confidence in the basic ideas of electromagnetism and their motivational orientations and learning strategies. The 78 first-year geology and geophysics students followed a three-week PBL instruction in electromagnetism. The students' confidence was assessed…

  9. Influence of Tutor Behaviours on the Process of Problem-Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Chng (Esther)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The theme of this thesis revolves around the behaviours of the tutor in problem-based learning (PBL) and its effects on the learning in this approach. Although a substantial amount of research on PBL has been conducted over the years, it is still relatively unclear

  10. Synchronous Problem-Based e-Learning (ePBL) in Interprofessional Health Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sharla; Greidanus, Elaine; Carbonaro, Mike; Drummond, Jane; Boechler, Patricia; Kahlke, Renate

    2010-01-01

    Health Science teams are increasingly interprofessional and infused with technology. These shifts result in a need for health science students to learn online interprofessional teamwork skills early in their training. In response, one interprofessional communication skills course was remodelled from traditional Problem-based learning (PBL) to…

  11. Influence of Tutor Behaviours on the Process of Problem-Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Chng (Esther)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The theme of this thesis revolves around the behaviours of the tutor in problem-based learning (PBL) and its effects on the learning in this approach. Although a substantial amount of research on PBL has been conducted over the years, it is still relatively unclear how

  12. Countering the Pedagogy of Extremism: Reflective Narratives and Critiques of Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Chris W. H.; Laxman, Kumar

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a critique against "purist" pedagogies found in the literature of student-centred learning. The article reproves extremism in education and questions the absolutism and teleological truths expounded in exclusive problem-based learning. The paper articulates the framework of a unifying pedagogical practice through Eve…

  13. The Views of Undergraduates about Problem-Based Learning Applications in a Biochemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayyildiz, Yildizay

    2015-01-01

    The effect of problem-based learning (PBL) applications in an undergraduate biochemistry course on students' interest in this course was investigated through four modules during one semester. Students' views about active learning and improvement in social skills were also collected and evaluated. We conducted the study with 36 senior students from…

  14. Systematizing Scaffolding for Problem-Based Learning: A View from Case-Based Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Andrew A.; Kolodner, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Current theories and models of education often argue that instruction is best administered when knowledge is situated within a context. Problem-based learning (PBL) provides an approach to education that has particularly powerful affordances for learning disciplinary content and practices by solving authentic problems within a discipline. However,…

  15. Impact on the Student Experience of Extending Problem-Based and Enquiry-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Rysia; Saxon, David; Benmore, Graham

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on extended research into the use of enquiry-based learning (EBL) and problem-based learning (PBL) in a human resource management undergraduate programme. The authors have collected and analysed qualitative and quantitative data over a three-year period, some of which have been previously reported (Reynolds and Benmore, 2003,…

  16. Online Problem-Based and Enquiry-Based Learning in the Training of Educational Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, Nick; Williams, Huw

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, problem-based learning (PBL) and enquiry-based learning (EBL) approaches have been used in a variety of professional training courses. More recently online versions of these pedagogies have been developed. This paper explains how online PBL and EBL activities have been incorporated into the professional training of…

  17. Problem-Based Learning in an Online Course: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheaney, James D.; Ingebritsen, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is the use of a "real world" problem or situation as a context for learning. The present study explores the use of PBL in an online biotechnology course. In the PBL unit, student groups dealt with the ethical, legal, social, and human issues surrounding pre-symptomatic DNA testing for a genetic disease. Issues…

  18. PROBLEM BASED LEARNING: ADAPTING MODEL OF MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT TOWARDS CHANGING TO STUDENT CENTERED LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alias Masek

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Exam oriented system has long time been practiced whether in the school or at higher educational level. It is common to see that students learn to rote memorization as preparation to pass in the examination. As consequences, the graduates’ ability to apply knowledge in the workplace becomes an issue to be debated. This has led to the loud calls for the new authentic learning environment that may increase students’ ability to apply knowledge, skills and at the same time promoting students’ with higher order thinking levels such as problem solving and critical thinking skills. Within this, the need on educational revamp is seem crucial, and this should be done from the grass root levels. Therefore, student centered learning using Problem Based Learning (PBL approach is suggested to be introduced in integrated living skills subject. The model will be designed to focus on monitoring and assessment methods in fostering student continuous development in three domain areas of knowledge, technical and personal skills. Moreover, this method is believed to be able to incorporate lifelong learning and self directed learning skills that helps student to sustain in our educational system. Thus, the study aims to look into the possible ways of adapting PBL monitoring and assessment methods into existing practices in lifelong learning settings in TVET.

  19. Interactions between students and tutor in problem-based learning: the significance of deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azer, Samy A

    2009-05-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an excellent opportunity for students to take responsibility for their learning and to develop a number of cognitive skills. These include identifying problems in the trigger, generating hypotheses, constructing mechanisms, developing an enquiry plan, ranking their hypotheses on the basis of available evidence, interpreting clinical and laboratory findings, identifying their learning needs, and dealing with uncertainty. Students also need to work collaboratively in their group, communicate effectively, and take active roles in the tutorials. Therefore, interaction in the group between students and their tutor is vital to ensure deep learning and successful outcomes. The aims of this paper are to discuss the key principles for successful interaction in PBL tutorials and to highlight the major symptoms of superficial learning and poor interactions. This comprises a wide range of symptoms for different group problems, including superficial learning. By early detection of such problems, tutors will be able to explore actions with the group and negotiate changes that can foster group dynamics and enforce deep learning.

  20. Interactions Between Students and Tutor in Problem-Based Learning: The Significance of Deep Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy A. Azer

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Problem-based learning (PBL is an excellent opportunity for students to take responsibility for their learning and to develop a number of cognitive skills. These include identifying problems in the trigger, generating hypotheses, constructing mechanisms, developing an enquiry plan, ranking their hypotheses on the basis of available evidence, interpreting clinical and laboratory findings, identifying their learning needs, and dealing with uncertainty. Students also need to work collaboratively in their group, communicate effectively, and take active roles in the tutorials. Therefore, interaction in the group between students and their tutor is vital to ensure deep learning and successful outcomes. The aims of this paper are to discuss the key principles for successful interaction in PBL tutorials and to highlight the major symptoms of superficial learning and poor interactions. This comprises a wide range of symptoms for different group problems, including superficial learning. By early detection of such problems, tutors will be able to explore actions with the group and negotiate changes that can foster group dynamics and enforce deep learning.

  1. A qualitative study on using concept maps in problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2017-05-01

    The visual arts, including concept maps, have been shown to be effective tools for facilitating student learning. However, the use of concept maps in nursing education has been under-explored. The aim of this study was to explore how students develop concept maps and what these concept maps consist of, and their views on the use of concept maps as a learning activity in a PBL class. A qualitative approach consisting of an analysis of the contents of the concept maps and interviews with students. The study was conducted in a school of nursing in a university in Hong Kong. A total of 38 students who attended the morning session (20 students) and afternoon session (18 students) respectively of a nursing problem-based learning class. The students in both the morning and afternoon classes were allocated into four groups (4-5 students per group). Each group was asked to draw two concept maps based on a given scenario, and then to participate in a follow-up interview. Two raters individually assessed the concept maps, and then discussed their views with each other. Among the concept maps that were drawn, four were selected. Their four core features of those maps were: a) the integration of informative and artistic elements; b) the delivery of sensational messages; c) the use of images rather than words; and d) three-dimensional and movable. Both raters were concerned about how informative the presentation was, the composition of the elements, and the ease of comprehension, and appreciated the three-dimensional presentation and effective use of images. From the results of the interview, the pros and cons of using concept maps were discerned. This study demonstrated how concept maps could be implemented in a PBL class to boost the students' creativity and to motivate them to learn. This study suggests the use of concept maps as an initiative to motivate student to learn, participate actively, and nurture their creativity. To conclude, this study explored an alternative way

  2. Medical students' preferences for problem-based learning in relation to culture and personality: a multicultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holen, Are; Manandhar, Kedar; Pant, Devendra S; Karmacharya, Biraj M; Olson, Linda M; Koju, Rajendra; Mansur, Dil I

    2015-07-19

    The aim of this study was to explore positive and negative preferences towards problem-based learning in relation to personality traits and socio-cultural context. The study was an anonymous and voluntary cross-sectional survey of medical students (N=449) in hybrid problem-based curricula in Nepal, Norway and North Dakota. Data was collected on gender, age, year of study, cohabitation and medical school. The PBL Preference Inventory identified students' positive and negative preferences in relation to problem-based learning; the personality traits were detected by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. The determinants of the two kinds of preferences were analyzed by hierarchical multiple linear regressions. Positive preferences were mostly determined by personality; associations were found with the traits Extra-version, Openness to experience, Conscientiousness and Neuroticism; the first three are related to sociability, curiosity and orderliness, the last, to mental health. The learn-ing environments of such curricula may be supportive for some and unnerving for others who score high on Neuroticism. Negative preferences were rather determined by culture, but also, they correlated with Neuroticism and Conscientiousness. Negative preferences were lower among females and students living in symmetrical relationships. Some high on Conscientiousness disliked group work, and the negative correlation with Agreeableness indicated that less sociable students were not predisposed to this kind of learning activity. Preferences related to problem-based learning were significantly and independently determined both by personality traits and culture. More insights into the nature of students' preferences may guide aspects of curriculum modifications and the daily facilitation of groups.

  3. Efficacy of problem based learning in a high school science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissi, James Ryan

    At the high school level, the maturity of the students, as well as constraints of the traditional high school (both in terms of class time, and number of students), impedes the use of the Problem-based instruction. But with more coaching, guidance, and planning, Problem-based Learning may be an effective teaching technique with secondary students. In recent years, the State of Michigan High School Content Expectations have emphasized the importance of inquiry and problem solving in the high school science classroom. In order to help students gain inquiry and problem solving skills, a move towards a problem-based curriculum and away from the didactic approach may lead to favorable results. In this study, the problem-based-learning framework was implemented in a high school Anatomy and Physiology classroom. Using pre-tests and post-tests over the material presented using the Problem-based technique, student comprehension and long-term retention of the material was monitored. It was found that Problem-based Learning produced comparable test performance when compared to traditional lecture, note-taking, and enrichment activities. In addition, students showed evidence of gaining research and team-working skills.

  4. Facilitation of learning: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Tyler; Houghton, Trish; Barry, Debbie

    2016-04-27

    The previous article in this series of 11, Facilitation of learning: part 1, reviewed learning theories and how they relate to clinical practice. Developing an understanding of these theories is essential for mentors and practice teachers to enable them to deliver evidence-based learning support. This is important given that effective learning support is dependent on an educator who possesses knowledge of their specialist area as well as the relevent tools and methods to support learning. The second domain of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice relates to the facilitation of learning. To fulfil this domain, mentors and practice teachers are required to demonstrate their ability to recognise the needs of learners and provide appropriate support to meet those needs. This article expands on some of the discussions from part 1 of this article and considers these from a practical perspective, in addition to introducing some of the tools that can be used to support learning.

  5. Students and tutors' social representations of assessment in problem-based learning tutorials supporting change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bollela Valdes R

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical programmes that implement problem-based learning (PBL face several challenges when introducing this innovative learning method. PBL relies on small group as the foundation of study, and tutors facilitate learning by guiding the process rather than teaching the group. One of the major challenges is the use of strategies to assess students working in small groups. Self-, peer- and tutor-assessment are integral part of PBL tutorials and they're not easy to perform, especially for non experienced students and tutors. The undergraduate PBL medical programme was introduced in 2003, and after two years the curriculum committee decided to evaluate the tutorial assessment in the new program. Methods A random group of ten students, out of a cohort of sixty, and ten tutors (out of eighteen were selected for semi-structured interviews. The social representations' theory was used to explore how the students and tutors made sense of "assessment in tutorials". The data were content analyzed using software for qualitative and quantitative processing of text according to lexicological distribution patterns. Results Even though students and tutors are aware of the broader purpose of assessment, they felt that they were not enough trained and confident to the tutorial assessment. Assigning numbers to complex behaviors on a regular basis, as in tutorials, is counter productive to cooperative group learning and self assessment. Tutors believe that students are immature and not able to assess themselves and tutors. Students believe that good grades are closely related to good oral presentation skills and also showed a corporative attitude among themselves (protecting each other from poor grades. Conclusion Faculty training on PBL tutorials' assessment process and a systematic strategy to evaluate new programs is absolutely necessary to review and correct directions. It is envisaged that planners can make better-informed decisions about

  6. The Benefits of Adopting a Problem-Based Learning Approach on Students' Learning Developments in Secondary Geography Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caesar, Mohd Iqbal Mohd; Jawawi, Rosmawijah; Matzin, Rohani; Shahrill, Masitah; Jaidin, Jainatul Halida; Mundia, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) provides an appealing framework for teaching and learning not only within the subject of geography but also across other disciplines. It promotes a healthy environment for active learning with its diverse sets of activities, helping students carry out investigative inquiry in the learning processes. This study examines…

  7. Problem based learning to improve proportional reasoning of students in mathematics learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misnasanti, Utami, Ratna Widianti; Suwanto, Fevi Rahmawati

    2017-08-01

    This paper reviews about the using of Problem Based Learning (PBL) to improve proportional reasoning of students in mathematics learning. Mathematics is one of the subjects at school which generally has a goal to help students preparing themselves in this growth century. To achieve the goal of mathematics learning, student's good reasoning is needed as the base of mathematics itself. This reasoning is an ability to think through logic ideas about mathematics concept. One of reasoning mathematics ability is the proportional reasoning. Proportional reasoning is knowing the multiplicative relationship between the base ratio and the proportional situation to which it's applied. Proportional reasoning is important to have by students in learning mathematics. Many topics within the school mathematics require knowledge and understanding of ratio and proportion, for examples problem solving and calculation activities in domains involving scale, probability, percent, rate, trigonometry, equivalence, measurement, the geometry of plane shapes, algebra are assisted through ratio and proportion knowledge. But, the mastership of proportional reasoning ability, of course, can't be apart from teacher's role. In learning, a teacher has to choose and apply the right model so that it can improve the proportional reasoning ability of students. One of the alternative ways which could be applied to improve proportional reasoning ability of students is by applying PBL Model. Applying PBL which based on problem indirectly has trained students to solve every problem in front of them. Thus, applying PBL can improve mathematics proportional reasoning of students in mathematics learning.

  8. Effect of students' learning styles on classroom performance in problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghasham, Abdullah A

    2012-01-01

    Since problem-based learning (PBL) sessions require a combination of active discussion, group interaction, and inductive and reflective thinking, students with different learning styles can be expected to perform differently in the PBL sessions. Using "Learning Style Inventory Questionnaire," students were divided into separate active and reflective learner groups. Tutors were asked to observe and assess the students' behavioral performance during the PBL sessions for a period of 5 weeks. A questionnaire of 24 items was developed to assess students' behavioral performance in PBL sessions. Active students tended to use multiple activities to obtain the needed information were more adjusted to the group norms and regulation and more skillful in using reasoning and problem-solving skills and in participation in discussion. On the other hand, reflective students used independent study more, listened actively and carefully to others and used previously acquired information in the discussion more frequently. Formative assessment quizzes did not indicate better performance of either group. There were no significant gender differences in PBL behavioral performance or quizzes' scores. Active and reflective learners differ in PBL class behavioral performance but not in the formative assessment. We recommend that students should be informed about their learning style and that they should learn strategies to compensate for any lacks in PBL sessions through self-study. Also, educational planners should ensure an adequate mix of students with different learning styles in the PBL groups to achieve PBL desired objectives.

  9. Problem-Based Learning: Formation of Material Environment Design in Urban Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Jakaitis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to achieve environmental, economic and social sustainability, is important to explore the interaction between integrated management of policy issues concerning urban architecture and the development of the design for material environment. Innovative teaching methods are important for achieving coexistence and harmony. The problem-based learning (PBL method is analysed to understand its peculiarities and applications. The goal is to reveal practical applications of problem-based learning using a variety of concepts for developing urban structures on the macro level and creating a material environment design on the local level. Based on the attitude of the academic community, the problem-based learning method can be an effective and meaningful tool, which would help us develop urban spatial structures and material environment design.

  10. Using Problem-Based Case Studies to Learn about Knowledge Translation Interventions: An Inside Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhogal, Sanjit K.; Murray, Mary Ann; McLeod, Katherine M.; Bergen, Anne; Bath, Brenna; Menon, Anita; Kho, Michelle E.; Stacey, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge translation (KT) interventions can facilitate the successful implementation of best practices by engaging and actively involving various stakeholders in the change process. However, for novices, the design of KT interventions can be overwhelming. In this article, we describe our experience as participants in a problem-based case study on…

  11. BRINGING CULTURAL CONTENT AND AUTHENTIC MATERIALS TO ENHANCE PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING IN EFL CLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In a class where elements and filters of Problem-Based Learning are used, students are engaged in language learning through organied and purposeful activities with authentic materials and collaborative learning models. Research has shown that this approach is effective in raising student’s motivation, enhancing their problem solving and critical thinking skills, and deepening their understanding of the subject contents. This paper aims to answer the questions of when and how authentic materia...

  12. A comparison of problem-based learning and conventional teaching in nursing ethics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Fen; Lu, Meei-Shiow; Chung, Chun-Chih; Yang, Che-Ming

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the learning effectiveness of peer tutored problem-based learning and conventional teaching of nursing ethics in Taiwan. The study adopted an experimental design. The peer tutored problem-based learning method was applied to an experimental group and the conventional teaching method to a control group. The study sample consisted of 142 senior nursing students who were randomly assigned to the two groups. All the students were tested for their nursing ethical discrimination ability both before and after the educational intervention. A learning satisfaction survey was also administered to both groups at the end of each course. After the intervention, both groups showed a significant increase in ethical discrimination ability. There was a statistically significant difference between the ethical discrimination scores of the two groups (P nursing ethics education, but problem-based learning was shown to be more effective. Peer tutored problem-based learning has the potential to enhance the efficacy of teaching nursing ethics in situations in which there are personnel and resource constraints.

  13. Innovative teaching: Using multimedia in a problem-based learning environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Neo

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Presently, traditional educational approaches have resulted in a mismatch between what is taught to the students and what the industry needs. As such, many institutions are moving towards problem-based learning as a solution to producing graduates who are creative, can think critically and analytically, and are able to solve problems. In this paper, we focus on using multimedia technology as an innovative teaching and learning strategy in a problem-based learning environment by giving the students a multimedia project to train them in this skill set. The purpose of this project was to access the students’ skills in framing and solving problems using multimedia technologies. The students worked in groups and each group had to pick a topic for their project, develop, design and present it in a CD-ROM. They were then surveyed on their attitudes toward the project and their skills as a team. Results showed that the students were very positive toward the project, enjoyed teamwork, able to think critically and became active participants in their learning process. Therefore, multimedia-oriented projects, like many other problem-based learning solutions, can be used alternatively as an innovative and effective tool in a problem-based learning environment for the acquisition of problem-solving skills.

  14. Problem-based learning and task-based learning: a practical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuzo

    2008-03-01

    The author of this article attended the International PBL Workshop in Kaohsiung Medical University in 2007 as an international tutor. Based on his personal experiences in the workshop and at his own medical school, he finds there are frequent problems in PBL programs related to the difficulty in providing expert tutors. Students in PBL tutorials may fear they are unable to get sufficient guidance from tutors in terms of learning the issues they should research; moreover, PBL case writers fear their cases are less effective, because non-expert tutors may misdirect students in the step 1 tutorial discussion. The author proposes that combining standard problem-based learning (PBL) methods with elements of task-based learning (TBL) can be effective at addressing both of these problems. The TBL method he proposes involves providing students with an additional sheet at the end of PBL tutorials. This sheet is written by the case writer and details key learning issues, questions and perspectives the students should investigate during their research process. This reduces the need to have expert tutors who know the full range of facts about the case, and leaves students feeling supported and less concerned they will miss important learning issues.

  15. Problem-based Learning and Task-based Learning: A Practical Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzo Takahashi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The author of this article attended the International PBL Workshop in Kaohsiung Medical University in 2007 as an international tutor. Based on his personal experiences in the workshop and at his own medical school, he finds there are frequent problems in PBL programs related to the difficulty in providing expert tutors. Students in PBL tutorials may fear they are unable to get sufficient guidance from tutors in terms of learning the issues they should research; moreover, PBL case writers fear their cases are less effective, because non-expert tutors may misdirect students in the step 1 tutorial discussion. The author proposes that combining standard problem-based learning (PBL methods with elements of task-based learning (TBL can be effective at addressing both of these problems. The TBL method he proposes involves providing students with an additional sheet at the end of PBL tutorials. This sheet is written by the case writer and details key learning issues, questions and perspectives the students should investigate during their research process. This reduces the need to have expert tutors who know the full range of facts about the case, and leaves students feeling supported and less concerned they will miss important learning issues.

  16. Antibiotic exposure and bacterial resistance in human and veterinary medicine: a problem-based learning topic for Master's students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eveillard, Matthieu; Pouliquen, Hervé; Ruvoen, Nathalie; Couvreur, Sébastien; Krempf, Michel; Magras, Catherine; Lepelletier, Didier

    2017-03-01

    This report describes a problem-based learning activity concerning antibiotic exposure and bacterial resistance in human and veterinary medicine. In addition, learning outcomes and satisfaction of students were recorded by the supervisors of the activity. The students all participated actively in the group work and considered that the small size of the group facilitated interpersonal communication. They believed that working in an interdisciplinary group helped them learn better than if they were following specific courses. They also reported that their mid-term meeting with one of the supervisors was a catalyst for the initiation of a real work group. Concerning the evaluation of the activity itself, the supervisors considered that the group provided a relevant analysis of the issue. These characteristics should encourage teachers to test this method of learning certain aspects of microbiology and infectious diseases with their students. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. [General practice continuing education--initial experiences with problem-based learning in a continuing education program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiegler, I; Falck-Ytter, Y; Hupe, K

    1995-08-01

    In May 1994, the regional chamber of physicians of Westfalia/Lippe, Germany, introduced their qualifying course in family medicine with a new didactic approach: It changed from a more traditional lecture-based style to the emphasis of problem-based learning. The decision to do this was mainly driven by two reasons: firstly, the common experience of a declining attendance during regular whole day lectures and, secondly, the goal to implement regional quality-seminars following the course. In addition, the federal chamber of physicians published a guidebook with recommendations favoring a more problem-based approach to family medicine in order to implement changes. Although there is still much hesitance in Germany towards the implementation of problem-based learning, we think that this approach cannot only facilitate factual learning but also stimulates other important goals of medical education. Because of time restrictions, it was not possible to assess the outcome. However, participants valued their experience relatively high in a process-evaluation conducted during and after the course.

  18. Integration of study material in the problem-based learning method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Becker

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the world educators are starting to realise that integrated curricula reflect the “real world”. Students learn how to integrate theory appropriately with practice and it stimulates higher order thinking skills. Problem-based learning (PBL was used as a learning strategy in an integrated undergraduate programme. A quantatative non-experimental design, a survey, was used to determine how problem-based learning influences integration of learning by the students. Using a purposive sampling method all the first-year nursing students (43 at the University of the Free State participating in the programme were included in the study. Data was collected by means of a student perception questionnaire (SPQ.

  19. Using Problem Based Learning and Game Design to motivate Non-technical Students to engage in Technical Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reng, Lars; Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    of Medialogy, we employ problem based learning and game design to engage these students in learning the technical elements. This paper will describe our approach and exemplify the method by introducing various examples of student projects, where the interest in game design combined with problem based learning...... technology, a broader segment of students are consequently enrolled. One of the challenges of these new educations is to motivate the artistic minded students in learning the technical aspects of the curriculum, as they need these qualifications to work in the industry. At Aalborg University’s department...... have engaged and motivated artistic students to learn technical topics on their own....

  20. Thai nursing students' adaption to problem-based learning: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klunklin, Areewan; Subpaiboongid, Pornpun; Keitlertnapha, Pongsri; Viseskul, Nongkran; Turale, Sue

    2011-11-01

    Student-centred forms of learning have gained favour internationally over the last few decades including problem based learning, an approach now incorporated in medicine, nursing and other disciplines' education in many countries. However, it is still new in Thailand and being piloted to try to offset traditional forms of didactic, teacher-centred forms of teaching. In this qualitative study, 25 undergraduate nursing students in northern Thailand were interviewed about their experiences with problem-based learning in a health promotion subject. Content analysis was used to interrogate interview data, which revealed four categories: adapting, seeking assistance, self-development, and thinking process development. Initially participants had mixed emotions of confusion, negativity or boredom in the adaption process, but expressed satisfaction with creativity in learning, group work, and leadership development. They described increased abilities to problem solve and think critically, but struggled to develop questioning behaviours in learning. Socio-culturally in Thai education, students have great respect for teachers, but rarely question or challenge them or their learning. We conclude that problem-based learning has great potential in Thai nursing education, but educators and systems need to systematically prepare appropriate learning environments, their staff and students, to incorporate this within curricula. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Using problem-based learning for occupational and environmental health nursing education: pesticide exposures among migrant agricultural workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivicek, Kristy; de Castro, A B; Salazar, Mary K; Murphy, Helen H; Keifer, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    Problem-based learning, which emphasizes group collaboration to solve real-world case scenarios, is an instructional approach that is well suited to occupational and environmental health nursing education. Learners actively work through case studies rather than passively receive information presented through lectures. Problem-based learning methods promote critical thinking skills and motivate learning, preparing learners for professional practice in complex, ever-changing environments. Despite these advantages, problem-based learning is under-utilized in nursing education compared to more traditional lecture methods. This article presents key concepts of problem-based learning, discusses problem-based learning in educating occupational and environmental health nurses, and describes the development of a problem-based learning case aimed at increasing occupational and environmental health nurses capacity to address pesticide exposure among migrant and seasonal agricultural workers.

  2. A longitudinal analysis of the self-directed learning readiness level of nursing students enrolled in a problem-based curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaman, Gülseren; Dicle, Aklime; Ugur, Aysen

    2009-05-01

    Self-directed learning is an important outcome of nursing education. Although problem-based learning is believed to facilitate self-directed learning, previous studies have reported conflicting results. This longitudinal survey explored the perceived changes in self-directed learning for 4 years in a baccalaureate nursing education program with an integrated problem-based learning curriculum. Fifty of 59 students (response rate, 85%) completed the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale at five different time points: at the beginning of each academic year and at program completion. Scores were significantly lower during the first academic year compared with other years, and fourth-year scores were significantly higher than in previous years. Scores on the three subscales (i.e., self-management, desire for learning, and self-control) increased significantly during the 4 years of the program. These findings support self-directed learning as a maturational process. Implications for nursing faculty and curriculum development are discussed.

  3. The student tutor experience in a problem-based learning course: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tricia Susan

    This case study, conducted from an interpretive paradigm, illuminates contextual factors related to the tutor experience when senior undergraduate dental hygiene students served as tutors for beginning undergraduate dental hygiene students, or sophomores, in a 1-semester, 2-hour long problem-based learning (PBL) course in a Baccalaureate Dental Hygiene (BDH) curriculum during the spring semester of 2008. Data were collected using various sources and methods. Six tutors and three administrators were interviewed, tutees completed an anonymous questionnaire, the tutorial process and tutor training sessions were observed, and related documents were examined. Data analysis included open and axial coding, creation of tutor profiles, and identification of patterns. Tutor behaviors varied with respect to the nature of intervention (e.g., telling, asking, clarifying, acknowledging), emphasis (process, content, social), and facilitation style (directive, suggestive, empowering). Patterns in tutor behavior and attitudes emerged related to comfort and growth, persistence and lenience, and compliance, resistance, and innovation. Differences in tutor understanding and perception of their role and the purpose of PBL influenced the role the tutor assumed. Other factors that influenced tutor behavior included tutor intentions, tutor training, and environmental factors such as the nature of problems, allotted time, and tutorial group characteristics. The influence of these factors can be understood by applying Fishbein's integrated model of behavior prediction (Fishbein, 2008). Tutor training included experiencing the PBL student role, attending class, and sharing experiences with other tutors in weekly seminar sessions facilitated by a tutor supervisor. Tutor's gained confidence, knowledge, skills, and friendship. They also had the opportunity to see things from a new perspective, that of a teacher encouraging self-direction rather than a student depending on others for direction

  4. How to Enhance Interdisciplinary Competence--Interdisciplinary Problem-Based Learning versus Interdisciplinary Project-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassler, Mirjam; Dettmers, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Interdisciplinary competence is important in academia for both employability and sustainable development. However, to date, there are no specific interdisciplinary education models and, naturally, no empirical studies to assess them. Since problem-based learning (PBL) and project-based learning (PjBL) are learning approaches that emphasize…

  5. Analysis of an Interactive Technology Supported Problem-Based Learning STEM Project Using Selected Learning Sciences Interest Areas (SLSIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, David Devraj

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports an analysis of an interactive technology-supported, problem-based learning (PBL) project in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) from a Learning Sciences perspective using the Selected Learning Sciences Interest Areas (SLSIA). The SLSIA was adapted from the "What kinds of topics do ISLS [International…

  6. The relationship between student-generated learning issues and self-study in problem-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.J.M. Dolmans (Diana); H.G. Schmidt (Henk); W.H. Gijselaers (Wim)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractA major assumption of problem-based learning (PBL) is that learning issues, generated by students while discussing a problem, are used as guides for self-directed learning activities. This assumption, though basic to PBL, has never been tested. At the University of Limburg, the Netherlan

  7. PENERAPAN MODEL PROBLEM BASED LEARNING UNTUK MENINGKATKAN KEMAMPUAN BERPIKIR KRITIS SISWA SMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Setyorini

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Model (PBL mengajak siswa agar mampu melatih kemampuan siswa dalam memecahkan masalah sehingga dapatmeningkatkan kemampuan berpikir kritis siswa. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui penerapan model Problem BasedLearning pada sub pokok bahasan gerak lurus berubah beraturan yang dapat meningkatkan kempuan berpikir kritis siswa.Pengambilan sampel dengan teknik simple random sampling. Data penelitian berupa kemampuan berpikir kritis siswa diambildengan teknik tes dan praktikum, dengan tes diperoleh hasil 75% siswa memiliki kemampuan berpikir kritis dan 7,5% memilikikemampuan sangat kritis. Sedangkan pada praktikum diperoleh hasil sebesar 82,5%. Aspek psikomotorik memiliki rerata 82,75dalam kategori sangat aktif kemudian untuk aspek afektif nilai rerata sebesar 73,38 yang termasuk dalam kategori baik. Simpulanpenelitian ini yaitu model pembelajaran Problem Based Learning dapat meningkatkan kemampuan berpikir kritis siswa pada subpokok bahasan gerak lurus berubah beraturan. The goal of the research is to gain whether or not an application of Problem Based Learning (PBL model can improve students'critical thinking. It is because PBL provides a problem solving activity. Fact, this model can improve the students' capability in criticalthinking. The sample of this study was chosen by using simple random sampling technique and the data were collected using testand students' activities observation in laboratory. From the data analysis, it is found that 75% students have the critical thinkingability and 7.5% are very critical the thinking. Based on the students' activities in the laboratory observation, it is found that 82.75%students are categorized as very active ones and 73.38% students are categorized as enthusiastic ones. It can be concluded thatProblem Based Learning (PBL model can increase the students' critical thinking in learning ununiformly accelerated motion.Keywords: critical thinking; problem solving; Problem Based Learning

  8. Faculty Perceptions of Problem-Based Learning in a Veterinary College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been embraced by several veterinary colleges as one approach to manage the ever-growing body of knowledge in the profession. The goal is to foster the development of problem-solving and critical thinking skills in students, enabling them to make logical and informed decisions, rather than rely on the rote…

  9. Bringing Lean Six Sigma to the Supply Chain Classroom: A Problem-Based Learning Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Keith E.; Hill, Craig; Miller, Antoinette R.

    2016-01-01

    The article describes a project that employs problem-based learning (PBL) to teach the Lean Six Sigma (LSS) methodology as part of an undergraduate or graduate business course. It is scalable to a variety of course delivery and schedule formats, and uses data sets that can create distinct problem-solving scenarios for up to 16 student teams. It…

  10. Students' Perspectives on Problem-Based Learning in a Transitional Doctorate of Physical Therapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Helene M.; Buccieri, Kathleen M.; Wessel, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Doctor of physical therapy (DPT) graduates are expected to be competent in professional behaviors, communication, critical inquiry, clinical decision making, and evidence-based practice. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the experience of students enrolled in a single, problem-based learning (PBL) course within a conventional…

  11. Extended Problem-Based Learning Improves Scientific Communication in Senior Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolber, Benedict J.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a model of extended problem-based learning that instructed upper-level undergraduate students to focus on a single biological problem while improving their critical thinking, presentation, and scientific-writing skills. This course was developed in response to students' requests for formal training in oral presentation…

  12. Examining How Middle School Science Teachers Implement a Multimedia-Enriched Problem-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Wivagg, Jennifer; Geurtz, Renata; Lee, Shih-Ting; Chang, Hyeseung Maria

    2012-01-01

    This study examined how a group of ten middle school teachers implemented a technology enriched problem-based learning (PBL) environment. The goal was to understand their motivation, document their implementation techniques, and identify factors that teachers considered important in using technology-based PBL tools in their teaching. The analysis…

  13. Gender Differences in Mathematics Achievement and Retention Scores: A Case of Problem-Based Learning Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajai, John T.; Imoko, Benjamin I.

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess gender differences in mathematics achievement and retention by using Problem-Based Learning (PBL). The design of the study was pre-posttest quasi-experimental. Four hundred and twenty eight senior secondary one (SS I) students using multistage sampling from ten grant-aided and government schools were involved in…

  14. Teaching Psychosomatic Medicine Using Problem-Based Learning and Role-Playing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heru, Alison M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Problem-based learning (PBL) has been implemented in medical education world-wide. Despite its popularity, it has not been generally considered useful for residency programs. The author presents a model for the implementation of PBL in residency programs. Method: The author presents a description of a PBL curriculum for teaching…

  15. The Effects of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) on the Academic Achievement of Students Studying "Electrochemistry"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günter, Tugçe; Alpat, Sibel Kilinç

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of problem-based learning (PBL) on students' academic achievements in studying "Electrochemistry" within a course on Analytical Chemistry. The research was of a pretest-posttest control group quasi-experimental design and it was conducted with second year students in the Chemistry Teaching Program at…

  16. EA Training 2.0 Newsletter #3 - EA Active, Problem Based Learning Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian; Ryberg, Thomas; Sroga, Magdalena

    2010-01-01

    The main products of the project are innovative, active problem-based learning methodology for EA education and training, EA courses for university students and private and public sector employees, and an Enterprise Architecture competence ontology including a complete specification of skills...

  17. Faculty Perceptions of Problem-Based Learning in a Veterinary College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been embraced by several veterinary colleges as one approach to manage the ever-growing body of knowledge in the profession. The goal is to foster the development of problem-solving and critical thinking skills in students, enabling them to make logical and informed decisions, rather than rely on the rote…

  18. Experimental Evidence of the Relative Effectiveness of Problem-Based Learning for Knowledge Acquisition and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnen, Marit; Loyens, Sofie M. M.; Schaap, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of problem-based learning (PBL) on knowledge acquisition and knowledge retention in a controlled experiment in a lab setting. Eighty-eight first-year psychology students were randomly assigned to either a PBL condition, a lecture condition, or a self-study condition. All participants had the opportunity to study…

  19. Social Issues and Problem-Based Learning in Sociology: Opportunities and Challenges in the Undergraduate Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglitis, Daina S.; Buntman, Fran L.; Alexander, Dameon V.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the use of problem-based learning (PBL) in the undergraduate sociology classroom. PBL shifts students from the role of passive listeners and learners to active knowledge builders and communicators through the use of concise and engaging social problem cases. PBL creates opportunities for building substantive area knowledge,…

  20. Mixing Problem Based Learning And Conventional Teaching Methods In An Analog Electronics Course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podges, J.M.; Kommers, P.A.M.; Winnips, K.; Joolingen, van W.R.

    2014-01-01

    This study, undertaken at the Walter Sisulu University of Technology (WSU) in South Africa, describes how problem-based learning (PBL) affects the first year ‘analog electronics course’, when PBL and the lecturing mode is compared. Problems were designed to match real-life situations. Data betwee

  1. An Antipodean Evaluation of Problem-Based Learning by Clinical Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison F.

    1999-01-01

    The use of problem-based learning in an Australian nursing education program was evaluated through interviews with 14 clinical teachers. They saw improvement in students' self-direction and holistic views of patients, but felt students lacked psychomotor skills and fundamental knowledge of anatomy and physiology. (SK)

  2. Knowledge Acquisition in Biochemistry, Physiology and Anatomy within the Context of Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S.

    2013-01-01

    The existing literature on Problem-based learning (PBL) mostly paints a positive picture. If there were more evidence of the limitations of PBL, more could be done to apply the appropriate interventions to optimize the experience of PBL for students. The purpose of this article is to discuss second year medical students' perceptions of the…

  3. ADOPTING THE PROBLEM BASED LEARNING APPROACH IN A GIS PROJECT MANAGEMENT CLASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Problem Based Learning (PBL) is a process that emphasizes the need for developing problem solving skills through hands-on project formulation and management. A class adopting the PBL method provides students with an environment to acquire necessary knowledge to encounter, unders...

  4. EFFECT OF PROBLEM BASED LEARNING AND MODEL CRITICAL THINKING ABILITY TO PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unita S. Zuliani Nasution

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research were to analyze the different between physic resolving problem ability by using problem based learning model and direct instruction model, the different of physic resolving problem ability between the students that have critical thinking ability upper the average and the students that have critical thinking ability under the average, and the interaction of problem based learning model toward critical thinking ability and students’ physic resolving problem ability. This research was quasy experimental research that use critical thinking ability tests and physic resolving problem ability tests as the instruments. Result of the research showed that the students’ physic resolving problem ability by using problem based learning model was better than by using direct instruction model, students’ physic resolving problem ability and critical thinking ability upper the average showed better different and result than students’ critical thinking ability under the average, besides there was an interaction between problem based learning model and critical thinking ability in improving students’ physic resolving problem ability.

  5. Problem-Based Learning in an Eleventh Grade Chemistry Class: "Factors Affecting Cell Potential"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, Leman; Acar, Burcin

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to examine the effectiveness of problem-based learning (PBL) on eleventh grade students' understanding of "The effects of temperature, concentration and pressure on cell potential" and also their social skills. Stratified randomly selected control and experimental groups with 20 students each were used in…

  6. The Eyes Have It: A Problem-Based Learning Exercise in Molecular Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harold B.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular evolution provides an interesting context in which to use problem-based learning because it integrates a variety of topics in biology, biochemistry, and molecular biology. This three-stage problem for advanced students deals with the structure, multiple functions, and properties of lactate dehydrogenase isozymes, and the related…

  7. Students Advise Fortune 500 Company: Designing a Problem-Based Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzovic, Kathy; Matz, S. Irene

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the process of planning and implementing a problem-based learning community. Business and communication students from a large university in the Western United States competed in teams to solve an authentic business problem posed by a Fortune 500 company. The company's willingness to adopt some of their recommendations…

  8. An Antipodean Evaluation of Problem-Based Learning by Clinical Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison F.

    1999-01-01

    The use of problem-based learning in an Australian nursing education program was evaluated through interviews with 14 clinical teachers. They saw improvement in students' self-direction and holistic views of patients, but felt students lacked psychomotor skills and fundamental knowledge of anatomy and physiology. (SK)

  9. Mixing Problem Based Learning And Conventional Teaching Methods In An Analog Electronics Course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podges, J.M.; Kommers, Petrus A.M.; Winnips, K.; van Joolingen, Wouter

    2014-01-01

    This study, undertaken at the Walter Sisulu University of Technology (WSU) in South Africa, describes how problem-based learning (PBL) affects the first year ‘analog electronics course’, when PBL and the lecturing mode is compared. Problems were designed to match real-life situations. Data between

  10. Forging Rhetorical Subjects: Problem-Based Learning in the Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Paula; Peeples, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Following a brief introduction to problem-based learning (PBL) as one type of highly-engaged pedagogy, this article examines how PBL activities in a first-year writing class and an upper-level professional writing and rhetoric class led students to develop rhetorical subjectivities. We conclude that highly engaged pedagogies, like PBL, that…

  11. The Effects of Modeling Expert Cognitive Strategies during Problem-Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Susan; Liu, Min

    This study examined the potential of a hypermedia-based expert tool to scaffold 66 regular education sixth graders engaged in a problem-based learning (PBL) program. Participants completed "Alien Rescue," a hypermedia PBL environment on the solar system. The tool under investigation offered students interactive video of an expert…

  12. Hydrostatic Pressure Project: Linked-Class Problem-Based Learning in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Freddie J.; Lockwood-Cooke, Pamela; Hunt, Emily M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the last few years, WTAMU Mathematics, Engineering and Science faculty has used interdisciplinary projects as the basis for implementation of a linked-class approach to Problem-Based Learning (PBL). A project that has significant relevance to engineering statics, fluid mechanics, and calculus is the Hydrostatic Pressure Project. This project…

  13. Problem-Based Learning in Geography: Towards a Critical Assessment of Its Purposes, Benefits and Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawson, Eric; Fournier, Eric; Haigh, Martin; Muniz, Osvaldo; Trafford, Julie; Vajoczki, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This paper makes a critical assessment of problem-based learning (PBL) in geography. It assesses what PBL is, in terms of the range of definitions in use and in light of its origins in specific disciplines such as medicine. It considers experiences of PBL from the standpoint of students, instructors and managers (e.g. deans), and asks how well…

  14. Problem-Based Learning in Wind Energy Using Virtual and Real Setups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Martin, D.; Alonso-Martinez, J.; Eloy-Garcia Carrasco, J.; Arnaltes, S.

    2012-01-01

    The use of wind energy is now an established fact, and many educational institutions are introducing this topic into their engineering studies. Problem-based learning (PBL), as a student-centered instructional approach, has contributed to important developments in engineering education over the last few years. This paper presents the experience of…

  15. Using Problem-Based Learning: New Constellations for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin-Baden, Maggi

    2014-01-01

    The author argues that there is still too much teaching to the test, and the consequence is growing "constellations" of problem-based learning (PBL), some of which are useful, and some of which are not. Today, what passes for PBL practice often seems more like guidelines than any kind of reasoned pedagogy. While at one level the range of…

  16. Problem-Based Learning and High School Macroeconomics: A Comparative Study of Instructional Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Nan L.; Mergendoller, John R.; Bellisimo, Yolanda

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined the potential differences between problem-based learning (PBL) and traditional instructional approaches in building knowledge of macroeconomic concepts and principles in high school students. Using data from 252 economics students at 11 high schools and controlling for individual characteristics, most notably verbal ability,…

  17. Large Group Problem-Based Learning: A Revision from Traditional to Pharmaceutical Care-Based Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslade, Nancy

    1994-01-01

    The process of revising a University of Toronto (Canada) final-year undergraduate pharmacy therapeutics course to incorporate the principles of pharmaceutical care and problem-based learning is detailed. The final course outline and results of a course evaluation are also included. (MSE)

  18. Social Issues and Problem-Based Learning in Sociology: Opportunities and Challenges in the Undergraduate Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglitis, Daina S.; Buntman, Fran L.; Alexander, Dameon V.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the use of problem-based learning (PBL) in the undergraduate sociology classroom. PBL shifts students from the role of passive listeners and learners to active knowledge builders and communicators through the use of concise and engaging social problem cases. PBL creates opportunities for building substantive area knowledge,…

  19. The Effects of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) on the Academic Achievement of Students Studying "Electrochemistry"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günter, Tugçe; Alpat, Sibel Kilinç

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of problem-based learning (PBL) on students' academic achievements in studying "Electrochemistry" within a course on Analytical Chemistry. The research was of a pretest-posttest control group quasi-experimental design and it was conducted with second year students in the Chemistry Teaching Program at…

  20. An Assessment of Resource Availability for Problem Based Learning in a Ghanaian University Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okyere, Gabriel Asare; Tawiah, Richard; Lamptey, Richard Bruce; Oduro, William; Thompson, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the differences pertaining to the resources presently accessible for problem-based learning (PBL) among six colleges of Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) in Ghana. Design/methodology/approach: Data for the study are the cross-sectional type drawn from 1,020 students. Poisson…

  1. Development of a Problem-Based Learning Matrix for Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipes, Shannon M.

    2017-01-01

    Few of the papers published in journals and conference proceedings on problem-based learning (PBL) are empirical studies, and most of these use self-report as the measure of PBL (Beddoes, Jesiek, & Borrego, 2010). The current study provides a theoretically derived matrix for coding and classifying PBL that was objectively applied to official…

  2. Application of Problem Based Learning ((PBL) in a Course on Financial Accounting Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaf, Nor Aziah Abdul; Ishak, Zuaini; Hussin, Wan Nordin Wan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to share experiences in teaching a Financial Accounting Principles course using a hybrid problem based learning (PBL) method. The three specific objectives of this paper are to document how the PBL project for this course was developed and managed in class, to compare the academic performance of PBL students with non-PBL…

  3. Gifted Middle School Students' Achievement and Perceptions of Science Classroom Quality during Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Anne K.; Galluzzo, Gary R.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of problem-based learning (PBL) on student achievement and students' perceptions of classroom quality. A group of students taught using PBL and a comparison group of students taught using traditional instruction were studied. A total of 457 students participated in the study. Pre- and…

  4. Problem-Based Learning in K-8 Mathematics and Science Education: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Joi; Lee, Mi Yeon; Rillero, Peter; Kinach, Barbara M.

    2017-01-01

    This systematic literature review was conducted to explore the effectiveness of problem-based and project-based learning (PBL) implemented with students in early elementary to grade 8 (ages 3-14) in mathematics and science classrooms. Nine studies met the following inclusion criteria: (a) focus on PBL, (b) experimental study, (c) kindergarten to…

  5. Peningkatan Academic Engagement Siswa melalui Penerapan Model Problem Based Learning di Madrasah Tsanawiyah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimul Muniroh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study was conducted to determine the improvement of students' academic engagement through the implementation of problem based-learning model in the madrasah. This study used single subject design with multiple baseline across subjects. The subjects served as intervention targets as well as the control participant. There are four students as participants. They were chosen based on both the result of subject identification through instruments of Academic Engagement Scale for Grade School Students (AES-GS and the result of observation to students with the lowest grades. The results of the graph analysis showed the decreased behavior in baseline phase but increased in the intervention phase. Key Words: academic engagement, problem based learning, Madrasah Tsanawiyah   Abstrak: Penelitian ini dilaksanakan untuk mengetahui peningkatan academic engagement siswa melalui penerapan model Problem Based Learning (PBL di madrasah. Penelitian ini menggunakan rancangan eksperimen subjek tunggal dengan desain multiple baseline across subject. Subjek penelitian yang diintervensi sekaligus sebagai control participant. Jumlah subjek penelitian sebanyak empat siswa. Subjek penelitian dipilih berdasarkan hasil identifikasi subjek melalui instrumen academic engagement scale for grade school students (AES-GS dengan perolehan hasil nilai paling rendah dan hasil observasi terhadap siswa yang menunjukkan nilai stabil rendah. Hasil analisis grafik pada kondisi baseline menunjukkan perilaku academic engagement stabil rendah, namun pada kondisi intervensi perilaku academic engagement meningkat.   Kata kunci: academic engagement,  problem based learning, Madrasah Tsanawiyah

  6. Problem-Based Learning in Social Work Education: Students' Experiences in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrad, Merete; Mølholt, Anne-Kirstine

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) constitutes a promising way of integrating academia and social work practice because PBL fosters engagement with real-life problems and enhances important skills needed in social work practice. However, little attention has been given to social work students' experiences of PBL. In this article we address this gap by…

  7. Geography Education Students' Experiences with a Problem-Based Learning Fieldwork Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raath, Schalk; Golightly, Aubrey

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on a problem-based learning (PBL) fieldwork activity carried out by geography education students on the Mooi River in the North West province of South Africa. The value of doing practical fieldwork using a PBL approach in the training of geography teachers was researched by means of an interpretative multimethods approach.…

  8. The Transfer of Problem-Based Learning Skills to Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Marie T.; Guerin, Suzanne; Barret, Terry

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present and discuss the reported impact of a fully problem-based learning (PBL) master's program on the way graduates worked with patients and colleagues in Ireland. These graduates had completed a sixteen-month fully PBL master's in sonography while concurrently working in clinical practice. Semi-structured…

  9. Bringing Lean Six Sigma to the Supply Chain Classroom: A Problem-Based Learning Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Keith E.; Hill, Craig; Miller, Antoinette R.

    2016-01-01

    The article describes a project that employs problem-based learning (PBL) to teach the Lean Six Sigma (LSS) methodology as part of an undergraduate or graduate business course. It is scalable to a variety of course delivery and schedule formats, and uses data sets that can create distinct problem-solving scenarios for up to 16 student teams. It…

  10. Using the 4MAT Framework to Design a Problem-Based Learning Biostatistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Amy S.

    2011-01-01

    The study presents and applies the 4MAT theoretical framework to educational planning to transform a biostatistics course into a problem-based learning experience. Using a four-question approach, described are specific activities/materials utilized at both the class and course levels. Two web-based instruments collected data regarding student…

  11. Student’s perspectives on Education for Sustainable Development in a problem based learning environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida; Holgaard, Jette Egelund

    2013-01-01

    to most engineering programmes, and scholars argue that a paradigm shift is needed to developing engineering education (EE) to embrace education for sustainable development (ESD). However, some of the more innovative pedagogies as for example problem based and project organised learning (PBL) already seem...

  12. Assessment of Problem-Based Learning in the Undergraduate Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiak, Christie P.

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate psychology majors (N = 51) at a mid-sized private university took a statistics examination on the first day of the research methods course, a course for which a grade of "C" or higher in statistics is a prerequisite. Students who had taken a problem-based learning (PBL) section of the statistics course (n = 15) were compared to those…

  13. A Cochlear Implant Signal Processing Lab: Exploration of a Problem-Based Learning Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, P. T.; McClellan, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an introductory signal processing laboratory and examines this laboratory exercise in the context of problem-based learning (PBL). Centered in a real-world application, a cochlear implant, the exercise challenged students to demonstrate a working software-based signal processor. Partnering in groups of two or three, second-year…

  14. Using Problem-Based Learning to Enhance Team and Player Development in Youth Soccer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubball, Harry; Robertson, Scott

    2004-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a coaching and teaching methodology that develops knowledge, abilities, and skills. It also encourages participation, collaborative investigation, and the resolution of authentic, "ill-structured" problems through the use of problem definition, teamwork, communication, data collection, decision-making,…

  15. Technological Support and Problem-Based Learning as a Means of Formation of Student's Creative Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakula, Sarma

    2011-01-01

    Problem-based learning and technology support for students in higher education investigates the new perspectives of education in connection with the change of life paradigm. The present research seeks to find out what study methods and technology support can be used for developing students' creative experience in the context of education for…

  16. Gifted Middle School Students' Achievement and Perceptions of Science Classroom Quality during Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Anne K.; Galluzzo, Gary R.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of problem-based learning (PBL) on student achievement and students' perceptions of classroom quality. A group of students taught using PBL and a comparison group of students taught using traditional instruction were studied. A total of 457 students participated in the study. Pre- and…

  17. A Scheme for Understanding Group Processes in Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammar Chiriac, Eva

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify, describe and interpret group processes occurring in tutorials in problem-based learning. Another aim was to investigate if a combination of Steiner's (Steiner, I. D. (1972). "Group process and productivity". New York: Academic Press.) theory of group work and Bion's (Bion, W. R. (1961). "Experiences in…

  18. A Case Study: Problem-Based Learning for Civil Engineering Students in Transportation Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes two case studies where problem-based learning (PBL) has been introduced to undergraduate civil engineering students in University College Dublin. PBL has recently been put in place in the penultimate and final year transport engineering classes in the civil engineering degree in University College Dublin. In this case study,…

  19. Introducing Problem-Based Learning to Undergraduate IT Service Management Course: Student Satisfaction and Work Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anicic, Katarina Pažur; Mekovec, Renata

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of problem-based learning (PBL) principles in an undergraduate IT service management course, followed by the results about student satisfaction and work performance. The results indicate the students' general satisfaction with the course implementation, as well as some challenges regarding the…

  20. Problem-Based Service Learning: The Evolution of a Team Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor-Greene, Patricia A.

    2002-01-01

    In this article, I describe the evolution of a problem-based service learning project in an undergraduate Abnormal Psychology course. Students worked in teams on a semester-long project to locate and evaluate information and treatment for specific psychiatric disorders. As part of the project, each team selected relevant bibliographic materials,…

  1. The Motivation of Problem-Based Teaching and Learning in Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingxue, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Problem-Based Learning (PBL) has been one of the popular pedagogical strategies these years. PBL is about students connecting disciplinary knowledge to real-world problems--the motivation to solve a problem. To recognize general elements and typological differences of language in translation is the motivation to solve real problems such as…

  2. Problem-Based Learning Used in the Context of Cardiac Rehabilitation: Different Scenes and Different Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmfors, Lisa; Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine; Kärner, Anita; Tingström, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Several studies show that how patients have difficulties in changing lifestyle even though such changes are essential because they are suffering from a life-threatening disease. Coronary artery disease (CAD) patients met 13 times during a year and used problem-based learning (PBL) to improve their empowerment and self-efficacy in making lifestyle…

  3. Online Problem-Based Learning in Postgraduate Medical Education--Content Analysis of Reflection Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Maria L.; Salmoni, Alan J.

    2008-01-01

    We developed the Med-e-Conference, an online tool to teach clinical skills to medical students, which integrated problem-based learning with collaborative group tasks. The final task asked students to consider what they had done (reflection). These comments were analysed using content analysis, and 10 themes were elicited. The number of agreements…

  4. Saving Face: Managing Rapport in a Problem-Based Learning Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Leslie; Harris, Ann; Burton, Rob

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the complex social aspects of communication required for students to participate effectively in Problem-Based Learning and explored how these dynamics are managed. The longitudinal study of a group of first-year undergraduates examined interactions using Rapport Management as a framework to analyse communication…

  5. Investigating Student Interactions within a Problem-Based Learning Environment in Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrera, Claudia P.; Lajoie, Susanne P.

    This aim of this study was to analyze the content of students' verbal interactions within a problem-based learning context in biology. This was achieved through the qualitative analysis of the verbal protocols of three groups of two clases of ninth-grade female students (average/high ability, high/high ability, and average/average ability). The…

  6. Case Study: Use of Problem-Based Learning to Develop Students' Technical and Professional Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, James N.; Mohammadi-Aragh, M. Jean

    2016-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a pedagogy that has attracted attention for many biomedical engineering curricula. The aim of the current study was to address the research question, "Does PBL enable students to develop desirable professional engineering skills?" The desirable skills identified were communication, teamwork, problem…

  7. Problem-Based Learning in Regional Anatomy Education at Peking University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Zhang, Weiguang; Qin, Lihua; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Shuyong; Gu, Jin; Zhou, Changman

    2010-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been introduced to medical schools around the world and has increasingly become a popular pedagogical technique in Asian countries since 1990. Gross anatomy is a fundamental basic science course in virtually all medical training programs, and the methods used to teach it are under frequent scrutiny and revision.…

  8. A Problem-Based Learning Approach to Teaching Introductory Soil Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Jose A.; Gorres, Josef H.

    2004-01-01

    At most land-grant universities in the USA, Introduction to Soil Science is traditionally taught using a combination of lecture and laboratory formats. To promote engagement, improve comprehension, and enhance retention of content by students, we developed a problem-based learning (PBL) introductory soil science course. Students work in groups to…

  9. A Tiny Adventure: The Introduction of Problem Based Learning in an Undergraduate Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dylan P.; Woodward, Jonathan R.; Symons, Sarah L.; Davies, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Year 1 of the chemistry degree at the University of Leicester has been significantly changed by the integration of a problem based learning (PBL) component into the introductory inorganic/physical chemistry module, "Chemical Principles". Small groups of 5-6 students were given a series of problems with real world scenarios and were then…

  10. The Effect of Problem-Based Learning in Nursing Education: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, In-Soo; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been identified as an approach that improves the training of nurses by teaching them how to apply theory to clinical practice and by developing their problem-solving skills, which could be used to overcome environmental constraints within clinical practice. A consensus is emerging that there is a need for…

  11. Promoting Problem-Based Learning in Retailing and Services Marketing Course Curricula with Reality Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Mark S.; Otalora, Mauricio Losada; Ramírez, Germán Contreras

    2015-01-01

    This research provides business educators who teach retailing and services courses with an innovative way to encourage students to engage in problem-based learning solving by incorporating reality television into their curricula. The authors explore the reality television genre from several theoretical perspectives to lend support to the…

  12. A Problem-Based Learning Project Focused on the Missouri Teacher Quality Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Joshua C.; Long, Jacob E.; Smith, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    This team project was a requirement for the Saint Louis University Executive Doctor of Education program. It was a problem-based learning project focused on the teacher quality standards adopted by the Missouri State Board of Education in June 2011. In the earliest stages prior to adoption of the standards, the researchers hired by the state…

  13. ADOPTING THE PROBLEM BASED LEARNING APPROACH IN A GIS PROJECT MANAGEMENT CLASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Problem Based Learning (PBL) is a process that emphasizes the need for developing problem solving skills through hands-on project formulation and management. A class adopting the PBL method provides students with an environment to acquire necessary knowledge to encounter, unders...

  14. Cloud Study Investigators: Using NASA's CERES S'COOL in Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Susan; Popiolkowski, Gary

    2011-01-01

    1This article describes how, by incorporating NASA's Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL) project into a problem-based learning (PBL) activity, middle school students are engaged in authentic scientific research where they observe and record information about clouds and contribute ground truth data to NASA's Clouds and the Earth's…

  15. Summer Teacher Enhancement Institute for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Using the Problem-Based Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard H.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the Institute were: (a) increase participants' content knowledge about aeronautics, science, mathematics, and technology, (b) model and promote the use of scientific inquiry through problem-based learning, (c) investigate the use of instructional technologies and their applications to curricula, and (d) encourage the dissemination of TEI experiences to colleagues, students, and parents.

  16. Promoting Problem-Based Learning in Retailing and Services Marketing Course Curricula with Reality Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Mark S.; Otalora, Mauricio Losada; Ramírez, Germán Contreras

    2015-01-01

    This research provides business educators who teach retailing and services courses with an innovative way to encourage students to engage in problem-based learning solving by incorporating reality television into their curricula. The authors explore the reality television genre from several theoretical perspectives to lend support to the…

  17. Using Problem-Based Learning to Stimulate Entrepreneurial Awareness among Senior African Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Arthur James

    2014-01-01

    Literature states that entrepreneurial awareness is required in countries where entrepreneurship is neither publicized nor acclaimed, which is currently the situation in South Africa. Entrepreneurial skills include the ability to market one's product by means of a sales poster while problem-based learning is viewed as fundamental to…

  18. The Impact of Problem-Based Learning on Iranian EFL Learners’ Speaking Proficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loghman Ansarian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the effect of problem-based learning through cognition-based tasks on speaking proficiency of Iranian intermediate EFL learners in comparison to the effect of objective-based tasks. To this end, a true experimental research design was employed. Ninety five (N=95 language learners studying at a language institute in the city of Esfahan, Iran were given an IELTS listening and speaking test as the proficiency test and 75 learners were selected. In the next phase of the study, a second IELTS speaking test was administered as the homogeneity test and the pre-test to seventy five (N=75 learners chosen from the population and forty-eight (N=48 homogeneous intermediate learners were selected for the study (i.e., 24 learners in control group and 24 in experimental one. The results of an independent-sample t-test gained from the study proved that not only does implementation of problem-based learning through cognition-based tasks significantly increased intermediate participants’ speaking proficiency, but also it had more positive effect in comparison to objective-based tasks on participants’ speaking proficiency. Therefore, it is suggested that problem-based learning ought to be taken into account by educational scholars, those in charge of syllabus, material producers, language teachers and language learners. Keywords: Cognition-Based Tasks, Objective-Based Tasks, EFL Learners, Speaking Proficiency, Problem-Based Learning

  19. Using the 4MAT Framework to Design a Problem-Based Learning Biostatistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Amy S.

    2011-01-01

    The study presents and applies the 4MAT theoretical framework to educational planning to transform a biostatistics course into a problem-based learning experience. Using a four-question approach, described are specific activities/materials utilized at both the class and course levels. Two web-based instruments collected data regarding student…

  20. Problem-Based Learning in Social Work Education: Students' Experiences in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrad, Merete; Mølholt, Anne-Kirstine

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) constitutes a promising way of integrating academia and social work practice because PBL fosters engagement with real-life problems and enhances important skills needed in social work practice. However, little attention has been given to social work students' experiences of PBL. In this article we address this gap by…

  1. Play as mediator for knowledge-creation in Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsted, Ann Charlotte; Bing, Rie Grønbeck; Kristensen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article recounts a small group of students’ and their supervisor’s reflections on play utilized at their meetings and as part of a Problem Based Learning (PBL) process. The students’ experienced how a more untraditional professor-student relationship rose and transformed how they interacted ...

  2. The Impact of Problem-Based Learning on Iranian EFL Learners' Speaking Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansarian, Loghman; Adlipour, Ali Akbar; Saber, Mehrnoush Akhavan; Shafiei, Elmira

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the effect of problem-based learning through cognition-based tasks on speaking proficiency of Iranian intermediate EFL learners in comparison to the effect of objective-based tasks. To this end, a true experimental research design was employed. Ninety five (N = 95) language learners studying at a language institute in the…

  3. Problem-Based Learning in 9th Grade Chemistry Class: "Intermolecular Forces"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhan, Leman; Ayar-Kayali, Hulya; Urek, Raziye Ozturk; Acar, Burcin

    2008-01-01

    This research study aims to examine the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) on 9th grade students' understanding of intermolecular forces (dipole-dipole forces, London dispersion forces and hydrogen bonding). The student's alternate conceptions about intermolecular bonding and their beliefs about PBL were also measured. Seventy-eight…

  4. Problem-Based Learning in Secondary Education: Evaluation by an Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witte, Kristof; Rogge, Nicky

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of problem-based learning (PBL) in terms of increasing students' educational attainments has been extensively studied for higher education students and in nonexperimental settings. This paper tests the effectiveness of PBL as an alternative instruction method in secondary education. In a controlled experiment at the class level,…

  5. PENINGKATAN KUALITAS PEMBELAJARAN PPKN MELALUI PENERAPAN PROBLEM BASED LEARNING DI SMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yuniwati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk meningkatkan kualitas pembelajaran PPKn melalui penerapan model  Problem based learning di kelas VIII A semester 1 SMP Negeri 2 Manisrenggo Kabupaten Klaten tahun akademik 2014/2015. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian tindakan kelas (classroom action research dengan desain Kemmis & Taggart yang dilaksanakan dalam III siklus. Jenis tindakan yang dilaksanakan adalah penerapan model Problem based learning dalam pembelajaran PPKn.  Langkah-langkah pembelajaran meliputi mengidentifikasi masalah, menggali sumber informasi yang relevan, belajar secara mandiri, menyelidiki dan menginterpretasi data yang terkumpul, memilih beberapa alternatif solusi masalah, dengan mempertimbangkan pendapat atau informasi dari kolabolator. Pengumpulan data dilakukan melalui observasi, tes tertulis, wawancara, dan catatan lapangan. Analisis data dilakukan secara kualitatif dengan teknik yang dikembangkan Miles dan Huberman. Hasil penelitian menunjukan bahwa penerapan model Problem based learning dapat meningkatkan kualitas pembelajaran PPKn pada aspek proses pembelajaran dan hasil belajar yang komprehensif (kognitif, afektif, dan psikomotorik.   THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE CIVIV EDUCATION LEARNING QUALITY THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF THE PROBLEM BASED–LEARNING  AT SMP Abstract This study aimed to improve the Civic Education learning quality through the application of the problem- based learning model at Grade VIII A of SMP Negeri 2 Manisrenggo in semester 1 of the 2014/2015 academic year. This was a classroom action research (CAR study employing the design by Kemmis & MacTaggart, carried out in three cycles. The action implemented was the application of the problembased learning model in the Civic Education learning. The learning steps included identifying problems, looking for relevant information sources, learning autonomously, investigating and interpreting the collected data, and selecting several alternative problem solutions by taking

  6. Anatomy and physiology for nursing students: is problem-based learning effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayner, Lidia; Gillham, David; Sansoni, Julita

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether problem-based learning (PBL) was an effective strategy for nursing students learning anatomy and physiology. Anatomy and physiology are subject areas that have posed long standing difficulty for nursing students. Since anatomy and physiology underpin clinical decision making it is important that nursing students are able to understand and retain this knowledge and apply it to practice. Problem-based learning offers potential advantages for teaching anatomy and physiology as clinical cases can provide the impetus for student problem solving. This project trialled a simple PBL scenario and investigated students' response to the task of problem solving in a laboratory setting adapted to simulate a hospital ward. The study found students learn better, retain the knowledge and merge theory with simulated practice when a PBL teaching mode is used. While PBL was effective, blended, web based and hybrid PBL models warrant investigation.

  7. The influence of online problem-based learning on teachers' professional practice and identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Wheeler

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe the design of a managed learning environment called MTutor, which is used to teach an online Masters Module for teachers. In describing the design of MTutor pedagogic issues of problem-based learning, situated cognition and ill-structured problems are discussed. MTutor presents teachers with complex real-life teaching problems, which they are required to solve online through collaboration with other teachers. In order to explore the influence of this online learning experience on the identity and practice of teachers, we present the results from a small-scale study in which six students were interviewed about their online experiences. We conclude that, within the sample, students' engagement with online problem-based learning within their community of practice positively influenced their professional practice styles, but that there is little evidence to suggest that online identity influences real-life practice.

  8. Play as mediator for knowledge-creation in Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsted, Ann Charlotte; Bing, Rie Grønbeck; Kristensen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article recounts a small group of students’ and their supervisor’s reflections on play utilized at their meetings and as part of a Problem Based Learning (PBL) process. The students’ experienced how a more untraditional professor-student relationship rose and transformed how they interacted...... on respectively PBL as a problem-solving approach to learning and PpBL (Play and Problem Based Learning) where a more playful, experimenting and intuitive approach to PBL is utilized....... and related to each other to a more holistic, trustful, sensitive, open, creative and collaborative form, which gave rise to the following wondering: What is it a playful approach can bring into the learning-space, relationship and collaboration between students and their supervisor in a PBL process? Why did...

  9. Moodle supporting problem-based, project-organized learning at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian; Møller, Brian; Enevoldsen, Lars Peter;

    At Aalborg University all study programs are based on a unique pedagogical model of teaching and learning: the problem-based, project-organized model, also referred to as “PBL - The Aalborg model”. The PBL - Aalborg Model has become both nationally and internationally recognised as an advanced...... and efficient learning model and a trademark of Aalborg University. In 2008 some study programs started using Moodle as their learning platform. In 2011 it was decided that Moodle should be the official learning management system for Aalborg University on-campus. At the presentation we would like to share some...... of the challenges we have encountered when implementing Moodle at Aalborg University whilst keeping the problem-based, project-organized model as the pedagogical foundation....

  10. Supporting teachers integrating web 2.0 in a Problem Based Learning approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian

    2010-01-01

    Based on theoretical and methodological considerations within problem-based learning (PBL), web 2.0 technologies and learning designs, the article try to illustrate a design model for supporting teachers in their learning design trying to integrate web 2.0 technologies into their PBL approach...... that a transition from curriculum-based teaching to PBL entails a movement from a teacher-centered approach to a learner-centered approach [4],[5]. This move can in many ways be compared to the conceptual move from web 1.0 to web 2.0 that by some is seen as a transition from ‘users/learners as consumers’ towards...... at Aalborg University (AAU). Problem-Based Learning (PBL) has gained a lot of interest since it was launched in established educational settings over 30 years ago in the medical programmes at McMaster University, Canada. Essentially it is a leaning methods based on the principle of using problems...

  11. Problems in Problem-Based Learning - Experiences, Analysis and Lessons Learned on an Introductory Programming Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Päivi KINNUNEN

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available We have applied Problem-Based Learning (PBL on an introductory programming course for several years with positive results. In this paper we present the outcomes and discuss our experiences of applying a modified version of PBL such that needs less tutoring resources and could better be used in large-scale courses, too. PBL has many positive effects on studying: Students report that they liked the social aspect of studying in a group. Generally students appreciated the possibility to be active participants in a course. On the other hand, group dynamic difficulties, tolerance of uncertainty and demanding studying skills caused problems that were too hard to overcome to some students. In this paper we introduce different versions of PBL, discuss efficiently and inefficiently working PBL groups and present their characters. We also discuss the possible reasons for differently working groups. Finally, we give some suggestions for interventions that might help the PBL groups to work better.

  12. A descriptive study of medical educators' views of problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennick Reg

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a growing amount of literature on the benefits and drawbacks of Problem-Based Learning (PBL compared to conventional curricula. However, it seems that PBL research studies do not provide information rigorously and formally that can contribute to making evidence-based medical education decisions. The authors performed an investigation aimed at medical education scholars around the question, "What are the views of medical educators concerning the PBL approach?" Methods After framing the question, the method of data collection relied on asking medical educators to report their views on PBL. Two methods were used for collecting data: the questionnaire survey and an online discussion forum. Results The descriptive analysis of the study showed that many participants value the PBL approach in the practice and training of doctors. However, some participants hold contrasting views upon the importance of the PBL approach in basic medical education. For example, more than a third of participants (38.5% had a neutral stance on PBL as a student-oriented educational approach. The same proportion of participants also had a neutral view of the efficiency of traditional learning compared to a PBL tutorial. The open-ended question explored the importance of faculty development in PBL. A few participants had negative perceptions of the epistemological assumptions of PBL. Two themes emerged from the analysis of the forum repliers: the importance of the faculty role and self-managed education. Conclusion Whilst many participants valued the importance of the PBL approach in the practice and training of doctors and agreed with most of the conventional descriptions of PBL, some participants held contrasting views on the importance of the PBL approach in undergraduate medical education. However there was a strong view concerning the importance of facilitator training. More research is needed to understand the process of PBL better.

  13. Self-directed learning readiness of Asian students: students perspective on a hybrid problem based learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatemia, Lukas D; Susilo, Astrid P; van Berkel, Henk

    2016-12-03

    To identify the student's readiness to perform self-directed learning and the underlying factors influencing it on the hybrid problem based learning curriculum. A combination of quantitative and qualitative studies was conducted in five medical schools in Indonesia. In the quantitative study, the Self Directed Learning Readiness Scale was distributed to all students in all batches, who had experience with the hybrid problem based curriculum. They were categorized into low- and high -level based on the score of the questionnaire. Three focus group discussions (low-, high-, and mixed level) were conducted in the qualitative study with six to twelve students chosen randomly from each group to find the factors influencing their self-directed learning readiness. Two researchers analysed the qualitative data as a measure of triangulation. The quantitative study showed only half of the students had a high-level of self-directed learning readiness, and a similar trend also occurred in each batch. The proportion of students with a high level of self-directed learning readiness was lower in the senior students compared to more junior students. The qualitative study showed that problem based learning processes, assessments, learning environment, students' life styles, students' perceptions of the topics, and mood, were factors influencing their self-directed learning. A hybrid problem based curriculum may not fully affect the students' self-directed learning. The curriculum system, teacher's experiences, student's background and cultural factors might contribute to the difficulties for the student's in conducting self-directed learning.

  14. Introduction of problem-based learning in undergraduate dentistry program in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Rimal, Jyotsna; Paudel, Bishnu Hari; Shrestha, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Context: Problem-based learning (PBL) is a methodology widely used in medical education and is growing in dental education. Initiation of new ideas and teaching methods requires a change in perception from faculty and institute management. Student-centered education is a need of the day and PBL provides the best outlet to it. Aim: To introduce PBL, assess feasibility and challenges in undergraduate dentistry program and evaluate the impact on their learning. Settings and Design: PBL was used ...

  15. Reflecting on the Essence of our Problem-Based Learning Discussions: The Importance of Faculty Development and our Continuous Quest for Applications of Problem-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engle Angela Chan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available While problem-based learning (PBL is a teaching strategy to promote critical thinking, creativity and self-directedness in learning is very important. It is the meaning of the learning, with a contextual understanding, that marks the significance of this approach in our healthcare education. At the 2008 Kaohsiung Medical University International Conference and Workshop on PBL, the scholarly discourse on sharing empirical findings and practical experience with various aspects of PBL brought forth the importance of the teachers' continued learning about the meaning, the dynamics of the process, and the pragmatic details of PBL. This quest for a continuous learning and understanding about PBL parallels our search to extend the classroom PBL into students' clinical experience. The development of clinical teachers in the understanding of PBL was explored as part of their experiential learning in clinical teaching after their PBL workshops. While the clinical teachers who participated in the project appreciated the merits of clinical PBL, the complex balance between patient service and student teaching—in an unpredictable clinical setting—has led to the use of a simulated clinical environment with simulated patients. We also piloted PBL for interprofessional education of undergraduate students of nursing and social work. The ways we can adopt PBL in various settings with different intents will help prepare our healthcare graduates in meeting the challenges of our ever more complex healthcare systems, and the demands of holistic patient care.

  16. Reflecting on the essence of our problem-based learning discussions: the importance of faculty development and our continuous quest for applications of problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Engle Angela

    2009-05-01

    While problem-based learning (PBL) is a teaching strategy to promote critical thinking, creativity and self-directedness in learning is very important. It is the meaning of the learning, with a contextual understanding, that marks the significance of this approach in our healthcare education. At the 2008 Kaohsiung Medical University International Conference and Workshop on PBL, the scholarly discourse on sharing empirical findings and practical experience with various aspects of PBL brought forth the importance of the teachers' continued learning about the meaning, the dynamics of the process, and the pragmatic details of PBL. This quest for a continuous learning and understanding about PBL parallels our search to extend the classroom PBL into students' clinical experience. The development of clinical teachers in the understanding of PBL was explored as part of their experiential learning in clinical teaching after their PBL workshops. While the clinical teachers who participated in the project appreciated the merits of clinical PBL, the complex balance between patient service and student teaching--in an unpredictable clinical setting--has led to the use of a simulated clinical environment with simulated patients. We also piloted PBL for interprofessional education of undergraduate students of nursing and social work. The ways we can adopt PBL in various settings with different intents will help prepare our healthcare graduates in meeting the challenges of our ever more complex healthcare systems, and the demands of holistic patient care.

  17. Longterm effects of problem-based learning: A comparison of competencies acquired by graduates of a problem-based and a conventional medical school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. Schmidt (Henk); L. Vermeulen (Lyanda); H.T. van der Molen (Henk)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Problem-based learning (PBL) as an approach to the instruction of medical students has attracted much attention in recent years. However, its effect on the performance of its graduates is the subject of considerable debate. This article presents data from a large-scale study

  18. Traditional learning and problem-based learning: self-perception of preparedness for internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, Laís Pereira Bueno; Semer, Beatriz; Rodrigues, José Mauro da Silva; Gianini, Reinaldo José

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate Pontificia Universidade Católica de São Paulo (PUC-SP) medical students' perception of their preparedness to attend the internship course by comparing students who entered the internship in 2009, who were taught according to the traditional learning method, and those who entered the internship in 2010, who were taught according to the new method, i.e. problem-based learning (PBL). 50 traditional learning method students answered a standard Lickert scale questionnaire upon entering internship in 2009. In 2010, the process was repeated with PBL students. The questionnaire was based upon the Preparation for Hospital Practice Questionnaire. This questionnaire was evaluated by professors from three medical schools in Brazil regarding its applicability. The original questions were classified according to the importance these professors attributed to them, and less important questions were removed. Scores obtained from the Student's t-test were considered significant with p internship activities than PBL students, according to the following three comparative means: by analyzing the answers to each question, by grouping these answers into dimensions, and by calculating the means of answers to the whole questionnaire.

  19. Problem-Based Learning for Didactic Presentation to Baccalaureate Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenery, Susan

    2017-05-01

    Nursing judgment is an essential component in the delivery of safe, quality patient care. Nurses must have the knowledge and skills to question authority, make judgments, substantiate evidence, and advocate for the patient. Traditional pedagogy in content-laden courses remains primarily lecture based. Incorporating active strategies to strengthen professional practice is essential. A pilot study assessed senior baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of problem-based learning (PBL) and their readiness for self-directed learning. In addition, the authors analyzed the relationship between readiness for self-directed learning and course content mastery using PBL. Students completed the Self-directed Learning Readiness Scale, the Problem-Based Learning Environment Inventory, and course content mastery exams. Students reported positive experiences with PBL and readiness for self-directed learning. Readiness for self-directed learning and 2 of 5 exam scores were inversely, significantly related. Students' perceptions of their readiness for self-directed learning did not always correspond with course content mastery. Specifically, some students who perceived themselves as ready for self-directed learning did not perform well on course content exams. This inverse relationship has not been reported by other researchers and brings an interesting perspective to student perceptions and actual performance. Four themes emerged from students' narrative responses: Prepared Me for Real Life Professional Situations, Stimulated My Critical Thinking, Promoted Independent Problem Solving, and Supported Learning Retention. PBL as a pedagogical approach provides opportunities for nursing students to explore their professional independence while attempting to master content.

  20. Appreciation of learning environment and development of higher-order learning skills in a problem-based learning medical curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mala-Maung; Abdullah, Azman; Abas, Zoraini W

    2011-12-01

    This cross-sectional study determined the appreciation of the learning environment and development of higher-order learning skills among students attending the Medical Curriculum at the International Medical University, Malaysia which provides traditional and e-learning resources with an emphasis on problem based learning (PBL) and self-directed learning. Of the 708 participants, the majority preferred traditional to e-resources. Students who highly appreciated PBL demonstrated a higher appreciation of e-resources. Appreciation of PBL is positively and significantly correlated with higher-order learning skills, reflecting the inculcation of self-directed learning traits. Implementers must be sensitive to the progress of learners adapting to the higher education environment and innovations, and to address limitations as relevant.

  1. Interprofessional problem-based learning project outcomes between prelicensure baccalaureate of science in nursing and doctor of pharmacy programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Helen F; Massey, Ann T

    2015-04-01

    Persistently high medical error rates, caregiver dissatisfaction, and compromised patient safety often result from poorly coordinated, increasingly complex health care. Barriers to interprofessional health professions education persist despite the urgent calls for improved quality and safety. Investigators explored the effects of a problem-based learning (PBL) strategy between prelicensure doctorate of pharmacy (PharmD) and baccalaureate nursing (BSN) students. A descriptive design was used to compare the learning gains and satisfaction with a PBL hybrid approach for BSN and PharmD prelicensure student groups over three academic terms. Consistent with earlier works, content-based learning gains and student satisfaction were not significantly different between groups. Narrative data provide insight into perceived benefits, barriers, and perspectives of participating students and facilitators. Attributes of this pedagogical approach provide opportunity for prelicensure students to explore professional interdependence while adequately mastering fact-based content. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Pengembangan perangkat pembelajaran matematika SMP kelas VIII semester genap dengan model problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Trisna Sero Wondo

    2017-06-01

    Abstract This study aimed to produce mathematics learning kits using the problem based learning model oriented to the learning achievement, problem solving skill, and self-confidence for Grade VIII students of the junior high school (JHS in the even semester. This study was and development study used the development model by Plomp (preliminary study, development, evaluation. The research subjects were teachers and students of Grade VIII of Swasta Katolik Maria Goretti Ende. The analysis of the data was done by converting the quantitative data in the form scores as the results of the evaluation into qualitative data in the form of five-scale standard scores. This study produce mathematics learning kits in the form of lesson plans and student worksheets for Grade VIII students of the junior high school in the even semester. Of the results of expert validation, a teacher evaluation scores, a students evaluation scores, an observation for the implementation of learning activities, a learning achievement test, a problem solving skil test, and a self-confidence questionnaire show that lesson plans (RPP  and student worksheets (LKS is valid, practical, and effective. Keywords: learning kits, problem-based learning, learning achievement, problem solving, self-confidence

  3. IMPLEMENTASI MODEL PROBLEM BASED LEARNING UNTUK MENINGKATKAN PEMAHAMAN KONSEP DAN AKTIVITAS SISWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudzrika Fariana

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this research is to improve mathematics learning quality and students’ activity. this action research were carried out 33 students of grade 8th. Data collection method used in this research are two cycle of test, observation and documentation, the data was analyzed by descriptive precentage. The result shows that the percetage of concept understanding is represented by students’ achievement. Students which have passed the KKM is 72,73% in 1st cycle, and 87,88%in 2nd cycle. Students which active during mathematic lesson is 59,09% in 1st cycle and 68,94% in 2nd cycle.Thus, students’ activity and understanding conceptcan be improved by implementing problem based learning. Keywords: concept understanding, students’ activity, problem based learning.

  4. Strengths and weaknesses of Problem Based Learning from the professional perspective of registered nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cónsul-Giribet

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to identify competency strengths and weaknesses as perceived by nursing professionals who graduated with a integrated curriculum and competency-based through Problem Based Learning in small groups.METHOD: an intrinsic case study method was used, which analyzes this innovation through former students (from the first class with three years of professional experience. The data were collected through a questionnaire and discussion groups.RESULTS: the results show that their competency level is valued in a very satisfactory manner. This level paradoxically contrasts with the lack of theoretical knowledge they perceived at the end of their education, when they started working in clinical practice.CONCLUSIONS: the teaching strategy was key to motivate an in-depth study and arouse the desire to know. In addition, Problem Based Learning favors and reinforces the decision to learn, which is that necessary in the course of professional life.

  5. [Problem-based learning, a comparison in the acquisition of transversal competencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Pascual, Juan Luis; López Martin, Inmaculada; Toledo Gómez, David

    2009-01-01

    In the European Higher Education Area (EEES in Spanish reference), a change in the pedagogical model has occurred: from teaching centered on the figure of the professor to learning centered on students, from an integral perspective. This learning must bring together the full set of competencies included in the program requirements necessary to obtain a degree. The specific competencies characterize a profession and distinguish one from others. The transversal competencies surpass the limits of one particular discipline to be potentially developed in all; these are subdivided in three types: instrumental, interpersonal and systemic. The authors describe and compare the acquisition of transversal competencies connected to students' portfolios and Problem-based Learning as pedagogical methods from the perspective of second year nursing students at the European University in Madrid during the 2007-8 academic year To do so, the authors carried out a transversal descriptive study; data was collected by a purpose-made questionnaire the authors developed which they based on the transversal competencies of the Tuning Nursing Project. Variables included age, sex, pedagogical method, perception on acquisition of those 24 competencies by means of a Likert Scale. U de Mann-Whitney descriptive and analytical statistics. The authors conclude that the portfolio and Problem-based Learning are useful pedagogical methods for acquiring transversal competencies; these results coincide with those of other studies. Comparing both methods, the authors share the opinion that the Problem-based Learning method could stimulate the search for information better than the portfolio method.

  6. Problem-based learning using patient-simulated videos showing daily life for a comprehensive clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Akiko; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Uehara, Takanori; Noda, Kazutaka; Suzuki, Shingo; Shikino, Kiyoshi; Kajiwara, Hideki; Kondo, Takeshi; Hirota, Yusuke; Ikusaka, Masatomi

    2017-02-27

    We examined whether problem-based learning tutorials using patient-simulated videos showing daily life are more practical for clinical learning, compared with traditional paper-based problem-based learning, for the consideration rate of psychosocial issues and the recall rate for experienced learning. Twenty-two groups with 120 fifth-year students were each assigned paper-based problem-based learning and video-based problem-based learning using patient-simulated videos. We compared target achievement rates in questionnaires using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and discussion contents diversity using the Mann-Whitney U test. A follow-up survey used a chi-square test to measure students' recall of cases in three categories: video, paper, and non-experienced. Video-based problem-based learning displayed significantly higher achievement rates for imagining authentic patients (p=0.001), incorporating a comprehensive approach including psychosocial aspects (pmaterials.

  7. Constructive and problem-based learning using blended learning anchored instruction approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, M.

    2012-04-01

    Based on an anchored instruction approach, an enriched blended learning lecture course ("Introduction into GNSS positioning") was established in order to enable constructive and problem-based learning. The lecture course "Introduction into GNSS positioning" is a compulsory part of the Bachelor study course "Geodesy and Geoinformatics" and also a supplementary module of the Bachelor study course "Geophysics". Within the lecture course, basic knowledge and basic principles of Global Navigation Satellite Systems, like GPS, are imparted. The presented higher education technique "anchored instruction" uses a real and up-to-date and therefore authentic scientific paper dealing with a recent large-scale geodetic project (Fehmarn Belt Fixed Link) in order to introduce the topic of GNSS-based positioning to the students. In the beginning of the semester, the students have to read the paper individually and carefully. This enables them to realize a lot of not-known GNSS-related facts. Therefore, questions can be formulated focusing on new, unclear or not-understood aspects of the paper. The lecture course deals with these questions, in order to answer them throughout the semester. During the lecture course this paper is referred, e.g., in the middle of the semester, the paper has to be read again in order to check which questions have been answered; in addition, new question arise. At the end of the lecture course, the author of the scientific paper gave a concluding lecture. The framing anchor technique enables the students to anchor their GNSS knowledge. The presented case study uses a teaching resp. learning setting consisting of classroom lectures (given by teachers and learners), practical trainings (e.g., field exercises, students select topics individually), and online lectures (learning management system ILIAS is used as data, result, and asynchronous communication platform). The implementation and the elements of the anchoring technique, which enables student

  8. Decision PBL: A 4-year retrospective case study of the use of virtual patients in problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Poulton, Terry; Jivram, Trupti

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, St George's University of London (SGUL) replaced their paper-based problem-based learning (PBL) cases with virtual patients for intermediate-level undergraduate students. This involved the development of Decision-Problem-Based Learning (D-PBL), a variation on progressive-release PBL that uses virtual patients instead of paper cases, and focuses on patient management decisions and their consequences. Using a case study method, this paper describes four years of developing and running D-PBL at SGUL from individual activities up to the ways in which D-PBL functioned as an educational system. A number of broad issues were identified: the importance of debates and decision-making in making D-PBL activities engaging and rewarding; the complexities of managing small group dynamics; the time taken to complete D-PBL activities; the changing role of the facilitator; and the erosion of the D-PBL process over time. A key point in understanding this work is the construction and execution of the D-PBL activity, as much of the value of this approach arises from the actions and interactions of students, their facilitators and the virtual patients rather than from the design of the virtual patients alone. At a systems level D-PBL needs to be periodically refreshed to retain its effectiveness.

  9. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CASE BASED DISCUSSION AS A VALID PROBLEM BASED LEARNING METHOD IN ANAESTHESIA POSTGRADUATE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melveetil S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available : CONTEXT: Anaesthesia is a branch of medicine which allows only a very narrow margin of error. Anaesthesia post-graduate (PG teaching with problem-based learning (PBL enhances the critical thinking and problem-solving skills among the students .Among the different problem based learning methods case based discussions (CBD are most widely practiced out of all in anaesthesia PG teaching. METHODS AND MATERIAL: An anonymous questionnaire based, crosssectional survey among 37 anaesthesia residents from two medical institutions in North Kerala, India was conducted. The present survey was designed to assess the effectiveness of case based discussions in anaesthesia PG teaching by assessing the student’s satisfaction with CBD and the suggested modifications if any to improve the current status of teaching. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The CBD as a part of PBL in anesthesia PG teaching in our set up lacks many important aspects of PBL such as formulation of objectives, facilitation skills, communication on direction of PBL and supplementation of inadequacies. A broader, strict and organized implementation of PBL incorporating the key elements of PBL needs emphasis in PG teaching curriculum. Facilitation skill development programs needs motivation and encouragement from the perspective of the academic administrators.

  10. Future Workshop as a Pedagogical Framework for Doing Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnerup, Ulla; Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    2016-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) as guiding learning principles in higher education is challenged in different ways. The defies are linked to the big uptake of students and the big number of students in a year-group, but more seriously, also linked to a ritualization of PBL and a relapse to a lecture...... based dissemination strategy. This paper is going to address how to design for PBL, so the practice doesn’t ritualize and so the students and professors become participants in a shared learning process even when scaling up the number of students. The research takes point of departure in a single case...

  11. Using Problem Based Learning and Game Design to motivate Non-technical Students to engage in Technical Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reng, Lars; Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide a growing number of educational institutions are trying to meet the demands for a more humanistic focused computer scientist to solve problems related to the human factors of computing and the growing experience economy. By introducing multidisciplinary studies in the field of media...... of Medialogy, we employ problem based learning and game design to engage these students in learning the technical elements. This paper will describe our approach and exemplify the method by introducing various examples of student projects, where the interest in game design combined with problem based learning...

  12. Impacts of the Problem-Based Learning Pedagogy on English Learners' Reading Comprehension, Strategy Use, and Active Learning Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lu-Fang

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether an English reading course integrated with the problem-based learning approach could foster foreign language learners' reading comprehension ability, strategy use, and their active learning attitudes. The pedagogy was featured with the small group scaffolding. Two intact English classes in a Taiwanese university were…

  13. Introducing Problem-Based Learning (PBL) into a Foundation Programme to Develop Self-Directed Learning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malan, Sharon B.; Ndlovu, Mdutshekelwa; Engelbrecht, Petra

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the qualitative aspects of a study that examined whether introducing a "Problem-based Learning" ("PBL") approach in a one-year foundation programme can create conditions for learners to develop and sustain self-directed learning skills. This interpretive constructivist case study was located in…

  14. Should we choose between problem-based learning and team-based learning? No, combine the best of both worlds!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolmans, D.; Michaelsen, L.; Merrienboer, J. van; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: To meet changes in society and health care, medical curricula require continuous improvement. A relatively new development in medical education is team-based learning (TBL). In the previous century, problem-based learning (PBL) emerged as an exciting new method. AIMS: What are t

  15. Research and Teaching: Assessing the Effect of Problem-Based Learning on Undergraduate Student Learning in Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandeville, David; Stoner, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of using the problem-based learning (PBL) teaching strategy on student academic achievement and secondary learning outcomes when compared with the traditional lecture (TL) for an undergraduate Biomechanics course. Successive undergraduate Biomechanics courses--a TL cohort and a PBL cohort--were…

  16. Exploring the pros and cons of mechanistic case diagrams for problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjeong Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Mechanistic case diagram (MCD was recommended for increasing the depth of understanding of disease, but with few articles on its specific methods. We address the experience of making MCD in the fullest depth to identify the pros and cons of using MCDs in such ways. Methods During problem-based learning, we gave guidelines of MCD for its mechanistic exploration from subcellular processes to clinical features, being laid out in as much detail as possible. To understand the students’ attitudes and depth of study using MCDs, we analyzed the results of a questionnaire in an open format about experiencing MCDs and examined the resulting products. Results Through the responses to questionnaire, we found several favorable outcomes, major of which was deeper insight and comprehensive understanding of disease facilitated by the process of making well-organized diagram. The main disadvantages of these guidelines were the feeling of too much workload and difficulty of finding mechanisms. Students gave suggestions to overcome these problems: cautious reading of comprehensive texts, additional guidance from staff about depth and focus of mechanisms, and cooperative group work. From the analysis of maps, we recognized there should be allowance of diversities in the appearance of maps and many hypothetical connections, which could be related to an insufficient understanding of mechanisms in nature. Conclusion The more detailed an MCD task is, the better students can become acquainted with deep knowledges. However, this advantage should be balanced by the results that there are many ensuing difficulties for the work and deliberate help plans should be prepared.

  17. Rethinking the globalisation of problem-based learning: how culture challenges self-directed learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; Chan, Li-Chong; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2012-08-01

    Medical schools worldwide are increasingly switching to student-centred methods such as problem-based learning (PBL) to foster lifelong self-directed learning (SDL). The cross-cultural applicability of these methods has been questioned because of their Western origins and because education contexts and learning approaches differ across cultures. This study evaluated PBL's cross-cultural applicability by investigating how it is applied in three medical schools in regions with different cultures in, respectively, East Asia, the Middle East and Western Europe. Specifically, it investigated how students' cultural backgrounds impact on SDL in PBL and how this impact affects students. A qualitative, cross-cultural, comparative case study was conducted in three medical schools. Data were collected through 88 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with Year 1 and 3 students, tutors and key persons involved in PBL, 32 observations of Year 1 and 3 PBL tutorials, document analysis, and contextual information. The data were thematically analysed using the template analysis method. Comparisons were made among the three medical schools and between Year 1 and 3 students across and within the schools. The cultural factors of uncertainty and tradition posed a challenge to Middle Eastern students' SDL. Hierarchy posed a challenge to Asian students and achievement impacted on both sets of non-Western students. These factors were less applicable to European students, although the latter did experience some challenges. Several contextual factors inhibited or enhanced SDL across the cases. As students grew used to PBL, SDL skills increased across the cases, albeit to different degrees. Although cultural factors can pose a challenge to the application of PBL in non-Western settings, it appears that PBL can be applied in different cultural contexts. However, its globalisation does not postulate uniform processes and outcomes, and culturally sensitive alternatives might be developed.

  18. Educational Technologies in Problem-Based Learning in Health Sciences Education: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background As a modern pedagogical philosophy, problem-based learning (PBL) is increasingly being recognized as a major research area in student learning and pedagogical innovation in health sciences education. A new area of research interest has been the role of emerging educational technologies in PBL. Although this field is growing, no systematic reviews of studies of the usage and effects of educational technologies in PBL in health sciences education have been conducted to date. Objective The aim of this paper is to review new and emerging educational technologies in problem-based curricula, with a specific focus on 3 cognate clinical disciplines: medicine, dentistry, and speech and hearing sciences. Analysis of the studies reviewed focused on the effects of educational technologies in PBL contexts while addressing the particular issue of scaffolding of student learning. Methods A comprehensive computerized database search of full-text articles published in English from 1996 to 2014 was carried out using 3 databases: ProQuest, Scopus, and EBSCOhost. Eligibility criteria for selection of studies for review were also determined in light of the population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) guidelines. The population was limited to postsecondary education, specifically in dentistry, medicine, and speech and hearing sciences, in which PBL was the key educational pedagogy and curriculum design. Three types of educational technologies were identified as interventions used to support student inquiry: learning software and digital learning objects; interactive whiteboards (IWBs) and plasma screens; and learning management systems (LMSs). Results Of 470 studies, 28 were selected for analysis. Most studies examined the effects of learning software and digital learning objects (n=20) with integration of IWB (n=5) and LMS (n=3) for PBL receiving relatively less attention. The educational technologies examined in these studies were seen as potentially fit for

  19. Thinking in Possibilities: Unleashing Cognitive Creativity Through Assessment in a Problem-Based Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie F.C. Servant

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the way in which students’ cognitive creativity and the construction of meaning could be fostered by means of assessment in a Problem-based learning programme. We propose that a dual assessment structure within such a programme through examinations and coursework assignments could ensure the acquisition of a foundational knowledge base while allowing the development of the cognitive creative process. Using a Dutch University as a case study, including its assessment philosophy and practice, we describe and tentatively support by means of some preliminary results how assessment can foster construction of meaning. The paper closes on suggestions for practice in fostering cognitive creativity through assessment in Problem-based learning programmes.

  20. Developing the Qualifications of the ICT Workforce through problem-based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coto, Mayela; Mora, Sonia; Lykke, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    , and foreign languages. In computer engineering, teaching has traditionally been deductive, with lecturers presenting theories and general principles, illustrative examples, practical work, and at the course end tests of students’ ability to do the same kind of reasoning through exams. This approach is very...... common in Costa Rican universities. However, many studies show that problem-based, inductive teaching that present students to real-life questions and realistic case studies is a preferable alternative. Problem-based teaching prepares better the students to complex, real-life problems and work. When...... students analyze the data and try to solve the problems, they create and see a need to know the principles, facts, rules and procedures. This need has a strong impact on motivation for learning, because students can understand the purpose of what they are learning. This chapter presents findings from...

  1. Problem-based learning for technical students on the base TRIZ (theory of inventive problem solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babenko Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The basis of modern educational technology in teaching is problem-based learning through the use of educational technologies Powerful Thinking - Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ, including a systematic approach to the complex organization of independent work of search and research character. Developed by systemic administration of the physical features workshops on the basis TRIZ in the cycle of the natural sciences with the implementation of all aspects of the educational activities - substantive, procedural and motivational. A new model of the physical design of the workshop and its form of organization, which is based on problem-based learning with the use of TRIZ Interactive form of organization of the workshop allows you to get high-quality substantive and personality of the students who have a significant role in the formation of professional competencies and affect the quality of produce practice-oriented specialists.

  2. College Students' Perceptions of Learning and Knowledge Transfer in Problem-Based Video Instruction: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Jun

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate college students' perceptions of learning and knowledge transfer in problem-based video instruction. To achieve this purpose, this study compared students' interview data of learning and knowledge transfer in problem-based video instruction (PBVI) that was produced for an undergraduate course of the…

  3. The Implementation and Evaluation of a Project-Oriented Problem-Based Learning Module in a First Year Engineering Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoone, Seamus C.; Lawlor, Bob J.; Meehan, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes how a circuits-based project-oriented problem-based learning educational model was integrated into the first year of a Bachelor of Engineering in Electronic Engineering programme at Maynooth University, Ireland. While many variations of problem based learning exist, the presented model is closely aligned with the model used in…

  4. Challenges and benefits for teachers in online Problem-Based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Nortvig, Anne-Mette

    2017-01-01

    Research topic/aim Original problem based and project organized learning (PBL) was developed for collaboration between physically present students, but political decisions at many universities also require that collaboration, dialogues and other PBL activities take place online. We are interested...... University, and we are interested in categorising strategies that support teaching and supervision activities in online PBL settings. Our research question is: What challenges and benefits do teachers face when PBL is to take place online?...

  5. Using problem-based learning to teach health policy at the DNP level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, Arlene N; Schlosser, Sharron P

    2014-01-01

    Nursing education recognizes the importance of graduate nurses understanding their roles as advocates, developers, implementers, and evaluators of health policies to impact the delivery of safe, patient-centered care. This article describes the use of problem-based learning as one approach to DNP health policy education. Students select a health problem and an associated health policy and use evidence-based practice, scholarly writing, and health services research to analyze the policy for efficiency, effectiveness, and equity.

  6. Support of a Problem-Based Learning Curriculum by Basic Science Faculty

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, William L.; Glew, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    Although published reports describe benefits to students of learning in a problem-based, student-centered environment, questions have persisted about the excessive faculty time commitments associated with the implementation of PBL pedagogy. The argument has been put forward that the excessive faculty costs of such a curriculum cannot be justified based upon the potential benefits to students. However, the magnitude of the faculty time commitment to a PBL curriculum to support the aforemention...

  7. [Problem-based teaching and learning. An opportunity for medical psychology, psychosomatic medicine and psychotherapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhle, K; Obliers, R; Koerfer, A; Antepohl, W; Thomas, W

    1999-05-01

    All proposals for a reform of the study of medicine recommend problem-based teaching and learning methods. The rapid increase in the number of medical faculties abroad offering experimental courses along these lines is an indicator of their usefulness. The results of empirical research also suggest that departments of medical psychology, psychosomatic medicine and psychotherapy should participate more closely in the introduction and exploration of the advantages of this didactic approach.

  8. Problem-based learning: Dental student's perception of their education environments at Qassim University

    OpenAIRE

    Alkhuwaiter, Shahad S.; Aljuailan, Roqayah I.; Banabilh, Saeed M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The objectives of this study were to assess perceptions of the Saudi dental students of the problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum and to compare their perceptions among different sex and academic years. Subjects and Methods: Data was collected through a questionnaire-based survey at Qassim College of dentistry. The questionnaire consisted of 19 questions regarding the perception of PBL curriculum and was distributed to 240 students. The chi-square test was used for statistical analysi...

  9. Active teaching-learning methodologies: medical students' views of problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Bittencourt Costa

    Full Text Available The prevailing undergraduate medical training process still favors disconnection and professional distancing from social needs. The Brazilian Ministries of Education and Health, through the National Curriculum Guidelines, the Incentives Program for Changes in the Medical Curriculum (PROMED, and the National Program for Reorientation of Professional Training in Health (PRO-SAÚDE, promoted the stimulus for an effective connection between medical institutions and the Unified National Health System (SUS. In accordance to the new paradigm for medical training, the Centro Universitário Serra dos Órgãos (UNIFESO established a teaching plan in 2005 using active methodologies, specifically problem-based learning (PBL. Research was conducted through semi-structured interviews with third-year undergraduate students at the UNIFESO Medical School. The results were categorized as proposed by Bardin's thematic analysis, with the purpose of verifying the students' impressions of the new curriculum. Active methodologies proved to be well-accepted by students, who defined them as exciting and inclusive of theory and practice in medical education.

  10. Towards High-Quality Reflective Learning amongst Law Undergraduate Students: Analysing Students' Reflective Journals during a Problem-Based Learning Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rué, Joan; Font, Antoni; Cebrián, Gisela

    2013-01-01

    There is wide agreement that problem-based learning is a key strategy to promote individual abilities for "learning how to learn". This paper presents the main contributions that reflective journals and the problem-based learning approach can make to foster professional knowledge and quality learning in higher education. Thirty-six…

  11. Theoretical assumptions of Maffesoli's sensitivity and Problem-Based Learning in Nursing Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Aurora Rodríguez-Borrego

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: understand the everyday and the imaginary of Nursing students in their knowledge socialization process through the Problem-Based Learning (PBL strategy.METHOD: Action Research, involving 86 students from the second year of an undergraduate Nursing program in Spain. A Critical Incident Questionnaire and Group interview were used. Thematic/categorical analysis, triangulation of researchers, subjects and techniques.RESULTS: the students signal the need to have a view from within, reinforcing the criticism against the schematic dualism; PBL allows one to learn how to be with the other, with his mechanical and organic solidarity; the feeling together, with its emphasis on learning to work in group and wanting to be close to the person taking care.CONCLUSIONS: The great contradictions the protagonists of the process, that is, the students experience seem to express that group learning is not a form of gaining knowledge, as it makes them lose time to study. The daily, the execution time and the imaginary of how learning should be do not seem to have an intersection point in the use of Problem-Based Learning. The importance of focusing on the daily and the imaginary should be reinforced when we consider nursing education.

  12. Theoretical assumptions of Maffesoli's sensitivity and Problem-Based Learning in Nursing Education1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Borrego, María-Aurora; Nitschke, Rosane Gonçalves; do Prado, Marta Lenise; Martini, Jussara Gue; Guerra-Martín, María-Dolores; González-Galán, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Objective understand the everyday and the imaginary of Nursing students in their knowledge socialization process through the Problem-Based Learning (PBL) strategy. Method Action Research, involving 86 students from the second year of an undergraduate Nursing program in Spain. A Critical Incident Questionnaire and Group interview were used. Thematic/categorical analysis, triangulation of researchers, subjects and techniques. Results the students signal the need to have a view from within, reinforcing the criticism against the schematic dualism; PBL allows one to learn how to be with the other, with his mechanical and organic solidarity; the feeling together, with its emphasis on learning to work in group and wanting to be close to the person taking care. Conclusions The great contradictions the protagonists of the process, that is, the students experience seem to express that group learning is not a form of gaining knowledge, as it makes them lose time to study. The daily, the execution time and the imaginary of how learning should be do not seem to have an intersection point in the use of Problem-Based Learning. The importance of focusing on the daily and the imaginary should be reinforced when we consider nursing education. PMID:25029064

  13. A problem-based e-Learning prototype system for clinical medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Fong-Ming; Liang, Ya-Fen; Hsu, Wei-Ting Agnes; Luh, Jer-Junn; Chen, Heng-Shuen

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this system is to establish virtual medical school (VMS) as the platform of e-learning center, which integrates collaborative and self-directed learning environment by virtual group, classroom and library, and automatically converts valuable clinical case from Hospital Information System (HIS) database into virtual patient by online authoring tools for problem-based e-learning. In this system, the VMS provides a problem-based e-learning environment, and utilizes HIS to capture and store valuable clinical cases. All medical students and residents now have the opportunity to learn from these typical cases online. The VMS at National Taiwan University has the potential to develop into a national medical education network for the meditation and provision of comprehensive medical resources. The system will use the international standard SCORM 1.2 to develop teaching material and assist with the HL7 v2.4, CDA v1.0 standards to connect Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems in the hospital. It can provide resources sharing among medical centers by using high transportation ability of Grid Computing integrated with the broadband video platform, Access Grid, and personal multiple point videoconference platform, Multi-video, to popularize the application of e-learning in clinical medical education.

  14. Changing the Curriculum to Problem-Based and Project-Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Problem based and project based learning (PBL) models are implemented all over the world in various versions at curriculum or course level. Due to this development, the conceptual understanding of PBL has become more diverse and sometimes confusing. This chapter summarizes the conceptual work done...... by the UNESCO Chair in PBL in engineering education in order to define PBL as a set of core learning principles that can be applied in practice. The PBL learning principles are formulated within three aspects: learning, social, and content of study. Furthermore, the chapter contains a PBL curriculum model......, which can be used for analysis and development of the curriculum or single courses. Seven elements are identified as important for the planning and implementation of PBL learning principles, and for each of the elements there are several choices to be made. Finally, the chapter presents concrete advice...

  15. Changing the Curriculum to Problem-Based and Project-Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Problem based and project based learning (PBL) models are implemented all over the world in various versions at curriculum or course level. Due to this development, the conceptual understanding of PBL has become more diverse and sometimes confusing. This chapter summarizes the conceptual work done...... by the UNESCO Chair in PBL in engineering education in order to define PBL as a set of core learning principles that can be applied in practice. The PBL learning principles are formulated within three aspects: learning, social, and content of study. Furthermore, the chapter contains a PBL curriculum model......, which can be used for analysis and development of the curriculum or single courses. Seven elements are identified as important for the planning and implementation of PBL learning principles, and for each of the elements there are several choices to be made. Finally, the chapter presents concrete advice...

  16. Developing an integrated framework of problem-based learning and coaching psychology for medical education: a participatory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Li, Huiping; Pang, Weiguo; Liang, Shuo; Su, Yiliang

    2016-01-05

    Medical schools have been making efforts to develop their own problem-based learning (PBL) approaches based on their educational conditions, human resources and existing curriculum structures. This study aimed to explore a new framework by integrating the essential features of PBL and coaching psychology applicable to the undergraduate medical education context. A participatory research design was employed. Four educational psychology researchers, eight undergraduate medical school students and two accredited PBL tutors participated in a four-month research programme. Data were collected through participatory observation, focus groups, semi-structured interviews, workshop documents and feedback surveys and then subjected to thematic content analysis. The triangulation of sources and member checking were used to ensure the credibility and trustworthiness of the research process. Five themes emerged from the analysis: current experience of PBL curriculum; the roles of and relationships between tutors and students; student group dynamics; development of self-directed learning; and coaching in PBL facilitation. On the basis of this empirical data, a systematic model of PBL and coaching psychology was developed. The findings highlighted that coaching psychology could be incorporated into the facilitation system in PBL. The integrated framework of PBL and coaching psychology in undergraduate medical education has the potential to promote the development of the learning goals of cultivating clinical reasoning ability, lifelong learning capacities and medical humanity. Challenges, benefits and future directions for implementing the framework are discussed in this paper.

  17. PENGEMBANGAN PERANGKAT PEMBELAJARAN BERBASIS PROBLEM BASED LEARNING UNTUK MENINGKATKAN KINERJA DALAM MENYUSUN LAPORAN SISWA SMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Ningsih

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze the validity, practicality and effectifity of the development of  learning tools through the test of control class, test of treatment class  and the effectivity test in order to produce biology learning tools based PBL (problem based learning that valid, practical and effective to improve performance in prepared a report to 11th grade of high school students. The development of the learning tools refers to a Borg and Gall development model. Data was collected using observation sheets, validation sheet, questionnaire, and test. Methods of data analysis done by quantitative descriptive analysis of the needs analysis, the validity and practicality of the learning tools. The effectifity of the learning is done by pretest posttest. Effectifity of learning tools analyzed by paired t-test. Results showed that the learning tools otherwise (1 very valid with a percentage of 98.91%, (2 practical with a percentage of 84,68%, and (3 effective with Tvalue amounting to 3,51 (Tvalue> Ttable at significance level of 5%. Based on the results of this study concluded that the PBL Based Learning has met the criteria perfectly valid, prractical, and effective way to improve performance in preparing the reports of students through learning biology in high school, so it can be used in a broader scope. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis kebutuhan guru, kelayakan, kepraktisan dan keefektifan dalam pengembangan perangkat pembelajaran berbasis Problem Based Learning untuk meningkatkan kinerja dalam menyusun laporan siswa SMA kelas XI Tahun Pembelajaran 2016/2017. Pengembangan perangkat pembelajaran mengacu pada model pengembangan Borg and Gall. Data dikumpulkan dengan menggunakan lembar observasi, lembar validasi, angket, dan tes. Metode analisis data dilakukan dengan analisis deskriptif kuantitatif terhadap analisis kebutuhan, validitas dan kelayakan perangkat pembelajaran. Efektivitas perangkat pembelajaran dilakukan dengan pretest

  18. Courses for tutors in problem-based learning. Current challenges at four Swedish universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Susan Setterud

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The key role of the tutor in problem-based learning (PBL is to help students become selfregulated learners. Tutors need training to acquire the necessary facilitating skills for this task. The aim of this article is to describe and discuss how PBL tutor training is currently arranged at four universities in Sweden: Linköping University, Lund Medical Faculty, Uppsala Medical School and Örebro School of Medicine. Moreover, we seek to analyse how the content and format of the tutor training courses correspond to the desired skills and competencies for PBL tutors described in the literature. We draw especially on work coming out of three pioneering universities for PBL: McMaster University, Canada; Maastricht University, The Netherlands; and Linköping University, Sweden. One aim has been to construct a framework for analysis that uses categories specifying the knowledge base, capabilities and skills to support students’ learning processes which characterise the full-fledged PBL tutor. For this framework, we have used the following categories: Knowledge of PBL and pedagogical theories, Personal traits, Student-centeredness, Ability to handle group processes, and Subject knowledge. We collected descriptions of the course design and content from the four universities, and assessed to what extent these categories were represented within the courses. Our results show that all categories inform the course content at all four universities, though the design varies between courses. In summary, we show that the four PBL tutor training courses are all designed to enable participants to experience PBL first-hand both as members of a tutorial group and as tutors. They all also include a theoretical base and offer opportunities for discussion and reflection with peers; however, there are some differences in design between the courses. According to participants, all four courses provide good preparation for the tutor role. Yet, we see a need for the

  19. Nora’s Medulla: A Problem-Based Learning Case for Neuroscience Fundamentals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Leah A.; Frenzel, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    Students work through this Problem-Based Learning Case in order to discover how Nora ended up blue lipped and non-responsive. By exploring fundamental mechanisms of neuronal communication, students examine facts, research concepts, and propose hypotheses about how Nora’s physiology was disrupted to cause her respiratory distress. The dramatic context supports student learning at many levels – from systems neurophysiology to synaptic pharmacology. The case as written is used in an undergraduate course for non-science majors, but because the case focuses on basic fundamental neuroscience concepts, the case could be easily used in high school or other undergraduate courses that cover basic neuroscience. PMID:27385927

  20. Using Problem-based learning (PBL) in teaching law to social work students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Trine

    legal problems in small groups and the group-work is complemented by a web-based learning space, where the students have the opportunity to ask questions to the teacher. In this paper the motivation, challenges and experiences of introducing a new teaching strategy and pedagogical approach is presented.......In Aalborg, the law teachers have chosen to supply traditional lectures with case-based instruction focused on problem-based learning. The inspiration comes from the "seven jump step" of the Maastricht model, but it has been modified for the purpose of teaching law. The students work with specific...

  1. Implementation of Problem Based Learning (PBL) - in a Malaysian Teacher Education Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borhan, Mohamad Termizi Bin; Yassin, Sopia Md

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes an employment of a Problem Based Learning (PBL) approach in a Malaysian graduate teacher education course. The discussions focus on how PBL was introduced, the PBL tasks and explore issues and benefits perceived by students. Data were obtained from journal reflections......, interviews and field note of observations. All types of data were analyze using inductive analytical approach. The result indicated that students were struggling at the preliminary phase of PBL, require more time in PBL learning process and link the acquisition of skills and group working process as benefits...

  2. Fourth Issue of the Journal of Problem Based Learning in Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob; Ryberg, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We are pleased to introduce the fourth issue of the Journal of Problem Based Learning in Higher Education. Current issue is composed of five research papers and two PBL cases. These address different aspects of PBL in higher education as and represent an international experiences and knowledge...... reports on students‟ attitudes towards different types of exams (e.g. individual exams and group exams) in two engineering programs at Aalborg University. The fifth paper compares three different learning designs in an introductory computer science course on programming. The current issue explores...

  3. How effective the problem-based learning (PBL) in dental education. A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrahlah, Ali

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this critical review is to explore the research supporting the effectiveness of problem-based learning (PBL) as a teaching method in dental education. PBL was developed more than 40 years ago in reaction to the problems and limitations of traditional teaching approaches. Here, aspects of the PBL teaching approach are reviewed, and the reasons for the substantial effect of this approach on dental education are discussed. Evidence shows that students in PBL-based courses exhibit superior professional skills and effective learning compared with those instructed using traditional approaches.

  4. Analysis of factors affecting satisfaction level on problem based learning approach using structural equation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Nur Farahin Mee; Zahid, Zalina

    2014-12-01

    Nowadays, in the job market demand, graduates are expected not only to have higher performance in academic but they must also be excellent in soft skill. Problem-Based Learning (PBL) has a number of distinct advantages as a learning method as it can deliver graduates that will be highly prized by industry. This study attempts to determine the satisfaction level of engineering students on the PBL Approach and to evaluate their determinant factors. The Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to investigate how the factors of Good Teaching Scale, Clear Goals, Student Assessment and Levels of Workload affected the student satisfaction towards PBL approach.

  5. Problem-based learning in pharmacology:a survey of department heads in Taiwan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-tung LAU

    2004-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) requires active student participation and the use of clinical cases as a trigger to learn within a given area. It has gained much attention as a pedagogic alternative in the course of reform in medica education due to information overload. From discipline-based consideration, it is interesting to understand the views of department heads of pharmacology about implementing PBL for their medical students. According to a general survey from the heads of the department of pharmacology across medical schools in Taiwan, we found that although serious reservation about the approach remains, many departments indeed look forward to including PBL component in their pharmacology curriculum.

  6. Applying the problem-based learning approach in teaching digital integrated circuit design

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, CU

    2010-01-01

    The problem-based learning (PBL) method has been applied to curriculum development in some areas of electrical engineering. The overall result has been a positive learning experience for students. However, PBL has not, as yet, been used in the area of digital integrated circuit (IC) design. IC design is in a revolutionary phase at present. It could even be said that IC design is at the beginning of a new epoch. Design is moving toward nano-size. Thus, design techniques are advancing so rap...

  7. Problem-Based Learning in Biomechanics: Advantages, Challenges, and Implementation Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clyne, Alisa Morss; Billiar, Kristen L

    2016-07-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been shown to be effective in biomedical engineering education, particularly in motivating student learning, increasing knowledge retention, and developing problem solving, communication, and teamwork skills. However, PBL adoption remains limited by real challenges in effective implementation. In this paper, we review the literature on advantages and challenges of PBL and present our own experiences. We also provide practical guidelines for implementing PBL, including two examples of PBL modules from biomechanics courses at two different institutions. Overall, we conclude that the benefits for both professors and students support the use of PBL in biomedical engineering education.

  8. Supporting teachers integrating web 2.0 in a Problem Based Learning approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian

    2010-01-01

    Based on theoretical and methodological considerations within problem-based learning (PBL), web 2.0 technologies and learning designs, the article try to illustrate a design model for supporting teachers in their learning design trying to integrate web 2.0 technologies into their PBL approach...... that a transition from curriculum-based teaching to PBL entails a movement from a teacher-centered approach to a learner-centered approach [4],[5]. This move can in many ways be compared to the conceptual move from web 1.0 to web 2.0 that by some is seen as a transition from ‘users/learners as consumers’ towards...... ‘users/learners as producers’ [6]. Consequently, it makes good sense to connect Web 2.0 with a problem-based approach to learning. Therefore it’s interesting to look upon a learning design model supporting teachers at AAU in their pedagogical design combining these two. The Collaborative E...

  9. Problem-based learning and larger student groups: mutually exclusive or compatible concepts – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lymn Joanne S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Problem-based learning is recognised as promoting integration of knowledge and fostering a deeper approach to life-long learning, but is associated with significant resource implications. In order to encourage second year undergraduate medical students to integrate their pharmacological knowledge in a professionally relevant clinical context, with limited staff resources, we developed a novel clustered PBL approach. This paper utilises preliminary data from both the facilitator and student viewpoint to determine whether the use of this novel methodology is feasible with large groups of students. Methods Students were divided into 16 groups (20–21 students/group and were allocated a PBL facilitator. Each group was then divided into seven subgroups, or clusters, of 2 or 3 students wh each cluster being allocated a specific case. Each cluster was then provided with more detailed clinical information and studied an individual and distinct case-study. An electronic questionnaire was used to evaluate both student and facilitator perception of this clustered PBL format, with each being asked to rate the content, structure, facilitator effectiveness, and their personal view of the wider learning experience. Results Despite initial misgivings, facilitators managed this more complex clustered PBL methodology effectively within the time restraints and reported that they enjoyed the process. They felt that the cases effectively illustrated medical concepts and fitted and reinforced the students' pharmacological knowledge, but were less convinced that the scenario motivated students to use additional resources or stimulated their interest in pharmacology. Student feedback was broadly similar to that of the facilitators; although they were more positive about the scenario stimulating the use of additional resources and an interest in pharmacology. Conclusion This clustered PBL methodology can be successfully used with larger groups of

  10. The Implementation and Evaluation of a Project-Oriented Problem-Based Learning Module in a First Year Engineering Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seamus McLoone

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes how a circuits-based project-oriented problem-based learning educational model was integrated into the first year of a Bachelor of Engineering in Electronic Engineering programme at Maynooth University, Ireland. While many variations of problem based learning exist, the presented model is closely aligned with the model used in Aalborg University, Denmark. Key learning outcomes, implementation features and an evaluation of the integrated project-oriented problem-based learning module over a two year period are all presented within.

  11. Case study: use of problem-based learning to develop students' technical and professional skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, James N.; Mohammadi-Aragh, M. Jean

    2016-03-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a pedagogy that has attracted attention for many biomedical engineering curricula. The aim of the current study was to address the research question, 'Does PBL enable students to develop desirable professional engineering skills?' The desirable skills identified were communication, teamwork, problem solving and self-directed learning. Forty-seven students enrolled in a biomedical materials course participated in the case study. Students worked in teams to complete a series of problems throughout the semester. The results showed that students made significant improvements in their problem-solving skills, written communication and self-directed learning. Students also demonstrated an ability to work in teams and communicate orally. In conclusion, this case study provides empirical evidence of the efficacy of PBL on student learning. We discuss findings from our study and provide observations of student performance and perceptions that could be useful for faculty and researchers interested in PBL for biomedical engineering education.

  12. Development of professional practice through problem-based learning in human nutrition and Dietetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-López Ma Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although competency-based education is well established in health care education, research shows that the competencies do not always match the reality of clinical workplaces, especially in nutrition area. Student of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, have reported shortcomings in their general competencies, such as organizational skills, teamwork, knowledge to develop proposals for intervention. Were given to students a problem-based learning (PBL activity with collaborative learning competence for to investigate their evolutions in collaborative learning and the knowledge in nutrition education. The results suggest that the PBL provided better preparation with respect to several of the competencies. The effect of PBL for the experienced students' collaborative learning and education nutrition competencies is especially promising in the professional development of future nutritionists.

  13. An overview of case-based and problem-based learning methodologies for dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadershahi, Nader A; Bender, Daniel J; Beck, Lynn; Lyon, Cindy; Blaseio, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Dental education has undergone significant curriculum reform in response to the 1995 Institute of Medicine report Dental Education at the Crossroads and the series of white papers from the American Dental Education Association Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education (ADEA CCI) first published in the Journal of Dental Education and subsequently collected in a volume titled Beyond the Crossroads: Change and Innovation in Dental Education. An important element of this reform has been the introduction into academic dentistry of active learning strategies such as problem-based and case-based learning. As an aide to broadening understanding of these approaches in order to support their expansion in dental education, this article reviews the major characteristics of each approach, situates each in adult learning theory, and discusses the advantages of case-based learning in the development of a multidisciplinary, integrated predoctoral dental curriculum.

  14. EFFECTS OF EXAMPLE-PROBLEM BASED LEARNING ON TRANSFER PERFORMANCE IN CIRCUIT THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Hisham Jalani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the study was to test a hypothesis that Example-Problem-Based Learning (EPBL would lead to better transfer performance compared Traditional Learning (TL approach.  The participants were vocational diploma-level students and the learning domain was Circuit Theory. As a means of data collection, 10-items open-ended test (five items each for assessing near-transfer and far-transfer was administered as a pre-test and post-test. A sufficient reliability estimate was obtained, a= 0.74, based on the Cronbach Alpha method. A statistically significant difference on the post test score was observed between the EPBL and the TL group where the EPBL group scored higher than the TL group on both near and far-transfer.  In conclusion, EPBL approaches produces greater learning compared to TL approach, for both near and distant-transfer.

  15. Evaluation of ultrasound training in the problem based learning radiography curriculum at Makerere University, Uganda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsie, Kiguli-Malwadde [Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Radiology Department, Kampala (Uganda); Gonzaga, Mubuuke A., E-mail: gmubuuke@gmail.co [Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Radiology Department, Kampala (Uganda); Francis, Businge; Rebecca, Nakatudde; Stephen, Bule [Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Radiology Department, Kampala (Uganda)

    2010-11-15

    Introduction: The College of Health Sciences (CHS), Makerere University has been training health professionals since 1924. Six years ago, there was a curriculum change to Problem Based Learning/Community based Education and Service (PBL/COBES). A SPICES model (Student centered, problem based, integrated, community based, electives, systematic) was adopted and defined to suit the CHS environment. The radiography program is 3 years in length which involves Ultrasound as an important part of the training. It was a challenge to adopt the new PBL method of learning after having a lecture-based pedagogical method for over 80 years. Objective: To implement the training of ultrasound in the PBL radiography curriculum as well as evaluate the opinions of the staff and students about Ultrasound training in the new curriculum. Methodology: A participatory approach was used. Workshops were conducted and objectives for ultrasound courses refined. Scenarios were written for use in the PBL sessions. A retrospective review of student performance in the ultrasound courses was carried out. A cross-sectional survey involving teachers and current radiography students was also carried out to evaluate learning of ultrasound using the PBL approach. Results: Students have consistently excelled in ultrasound courses using the PBL approach of learning. Both teachers and students rated the teaching of ultrasound to radiography students as being highly important and supported the new approach to training. Conclusion: Ultrasound training using PBL has been successfully implemented. However, this is still an ongoing process and will require the total commitment of both students and teachers.

  16. Problem-based learning spanning real and virtual words: a case study in Second Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Good

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing use of immersive virtual environments for educational purposes. However, much of this activity is not yet documented in the public domain, or is descriptive rather than analytical. This paper presents a case study in which university students were tasked with building an interactive learning experience using Second Life as a platform. Both problem-based learning and constructionism acted as framing pedagogies for the task, with students working in teams to design and build a learning experience which could potentially meet the needs of a real client in innovative ways which might not be possible in real life. A process account of the experience is provided, which examines how the pedagogies and contexts (real and virtual influence and enhance each other. The use of a virtual environment, combined with problem-based learning and constructionism, subtly changed the nature of the instructor–student relationship, allowed students to explore ‘problematic problems' in a motivating and relevant manner, provided students with greater ownership over their work, and allowed problems to be set which were flexible, but at the same time allowed for ease of assessment.

  17. PENINGKATAN HASIL DAN AKTIVITAS BELAJAR IPS MODEL PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING BERBANTUAN MEDIA SMPN 2 KAWUNGANTEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suharto Suharto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk (1 meningkatkan hasil dan (2 Aktivitas belajar IPS siswa kelas VIII C SMP Negeri 2 Kawunganten Cilacap. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian tindakan kelas (PTK yang terdiri atas empat pertemuan dalam dua siklus, menggunakan desain Kemmis & Taggart. Subjek penelitian adalah 35 siswa kelas VIII C SMP Negeri 2 Kawunganten Cilacap. Teknik pengumpulan data yang digunakan adalah observasi, tes hasil belajar, angket, dokumentasi, dan catatan lapangan. Teknik analisis data menggunakan analisis deskriptif kuantitatif. Hasil penelitian adalah sebagai berikut: (1 Melalui model pembelajaran Problem-based learning berbantuan media dalam pembelajaran IPS dapat meningkatkan hasil belajar. (2 Ada peningkatan ketuntasan hasil belajar ranah kognitif. Pada siklus I ketuntasan belajar siswa 60,00%, dan siklus II menjadi 85,71%. (3 Ada peningkatan nilai sikap siswa (hasil belajar ranah afektif. Rata-rata nilai sikap siswa 62,20 pada siklus I menjadi 67,97 pada siklus II atau meningkat 5,77 poin. (4 Ada peningkatan aktivitas belajar siswa; siklus I rata-rata aktivitas belajar siswa 3,01 menjadi 3,37 pada siklus II, atau meningkat 0,36 poin.   IMPROVING LEARNING OUTCOME AND ACTIVITIES IN SOCIAL STUDIES OF THE MEDIA-AIDED PROBLEM- BASED LEARNING INSTRUCTIONAL MODEL SMPN 2 KAWUNGANTEN Abstract This study aims to: (1 improve the learning outcome and (2 activities of class VIII C, SMP Negeri 2 Kawunganten Cilacap. This study is classroom action research (CAR consisting of two cycles, each of which consisted of two meetings, using Kemmis & Taggart design. The subject is 35 students of class VIII C, SMP Negeri 2 Kawunganten Cilacap. The data collection techniques used were observation, achievement test, questionnaire, documentation, and field note. The  data analysis used the quantitative descriptive analysis. The results are as follows (1 The through of media-aided Problem-Based Learning instructional model in social studies teaching can

  18. Problem based learning - 'Bringing everything together' - A strategy for Graduate Nurse Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittrup, Ann-Charlotte; Davey, Anna

    2010-03-01

    This article discusses a case study that was initiated by a Graduate Nurse Coordinator of an acute care inpatient hospital in Australia. It outlines the conceptualisation and creative implementation of a structured group problem based learning activity which was a component of a Graduate Nurse Program. The learning activity was based on the beliefs that knowledge acquisition today is an active process and should focus on the learner developing strategies to obtain, review and manage information. The learning activity implemented in this case study was valuable as it recognised the benefits that can be gained for the Graduate Nurse by ensuring the context of their teaching and learning activities is grounded in practical experiences. The learning activity aimed to prepare Graduate Nurses to cope with the multiple challenges faced as they enter the nursing profession by enhancing their skills of inquiry, problem solving and reasoning. The evaluation of this case study found that the incorporation of structured group problem based learning did promote the achievement of these educational outcomes with Graduate Nurses displaying critical thinking, clinical judgment and knowledge acquisition skills. An unexpected benefit of this activity for Graduate Nurses was the enhancement of clinical practice behaviours, such as communication and interactive skills. This case study describes the positive outcomes not only for Graduates Nurses in the application of their learning but also the wider benefits which can be gained for the organisation, patient care standards and the health care team. It is anticipated that this article will be an inspiration to others who are interested in implementing innovative teaching strategies into Graduate Nurse Programs.

  19. A Cognitive Support System to Scaffold Students' Problem-Based Learning in a Web-Based Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xun; Planas, Lourdes G.; Er, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of question prompts and peer review on scaffolding students' problem-based learning in a web-based cognitive support system. Ninety-six pharmacy students were randomly assigned to a treatment or control condition. The students in both conditions were asked to generate solutions to a…

  20. The psychological basis of problem-based learning: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, G R; Schmidt, H G

    1992-09-01

    Several potential advantages for students' learning are claimed for problem-based learning (PBL). Students in PBL curricula may be more highly motivated; they may be better problem solvers and self-directed learners; they may be better able to learn and recall information; and they may be better able to integrate basic science knowledge into the solutions of clinical problems. Although some of these claims find theoretical support from the literature on the psychology of learning, to date there has been no review of the experimental evidence supporting the possible differences in students' learning that can be attributed to PBL. In this review article, the authors examine each claim critically in light of that evidence. They conclude that (1) there is no evidence that PBL curricula result in any improvement in general, content-free problem-solving skills; (2) learning in a PBL format may initially reduce levels of learning but may foster, over periods up to several years, increased retention of knowledge; (3) some preliminary evidence suggests that PBL curricula may enhance both transfer of concepts to new problems and integration of basic science concepts into clinical problems; (4) PBL enhances intrinsic interest in the subject matter; and (5) PBL appears to enhance self-directed learning skills, and this enhancement may be maintained.

  1. PBL 2.0: enhancing problem-based learning through increased student participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiznia, Daniel; Korom, Robert; Marzuk, Peter; Safdieh, Joseph; Grafstein, Bernice

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a new problem-based learning (PBL) method to see if it reinvigorated the learning experience. A new PBL format called PBL 2.0, which met for 90 min two times per week, was introduced in 2009 into an 11-week integrated neuroscience course. One hundred second-year medical students, divided into 10 groups of 10, who had completed their first year of medical school using a traditional PBL format, participated in PBL 2.0. Students were prohibited from using computers during the first session. Learning objectives were distributed at the end of the first day to the small groups, and students were assigned to pairs/trios responsible for leading an interactive discussion on specific learning objectives the following day. Student-led 'lectures' were prohibited. All students were responsible for learning all of the learning objectives so that they could participate in their discussions. One hundred and six students were surveyed and 98 submitted answers (92% response). The majority of groups adhered to the new PBL method. Students invested more time preparing the learning objectives. Students indicated that the level of interaction among students increased. The majority of students preferred the new PBL format. PBL 2.0 was effective in increasing student interaction and promoting increased learning.

  2. Interactive film scenes for tutor training in problem-based learning (PBL): dealing with difficult situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Hans M; Huwendiek, Soeren; Skelin, Silvia; Kirschfink, Michael; Nikendei, Christoph

    2010-07-06

    In problem-based learning (PBL), tutors play an essential role in facilitating and efficiently structuring tutorials to enable students to construct individual cognitive networks, and have a significant impact on students' performance in subsequent assessments. The necessity of elaborate training to fulfil this complex role is undeniable. In the plethora of data on PBL however, little attention has been paid to tutor training which promotes competence in the moderation of specific difficult situations commonly encountered in PBL tutorials. Major interactive obstacles arising in PBL tutorials were identified from prior publications. Potential solutions were defined by an expert group. Video clips were produced addressing the tutor's role and providing exemplary solutions. These clips were embedded in a PBL tutor-training course at our medical faculty combining PBL self-experience with a non-medical case. Trainees provided pre- and post-intervention self-efficacy ratings regarding their PBL-related knowledge, skills, and attitudes, as well as their acceptance and the feasibility of integrating the video clips into PBL tutor-training (all items: 100 = completely agree, 0 = don't agree at all). An interactive online tool for PBL tutor training was developed comprising 18 video clips highlighting difficult situations in PBL tutorials to encourage trainees to develop and formulate their own intervention strategies. In subsequent sequences, potential interventions are presented for the specific scenario, with a concluding discussion which addresses unresolved issues. The tool was well accepted and considered worth the time spent on it (81.62 +/- 16.91; 62.94 +/- 16.76). Tutors considered the videos to prepare them well to respond to specific challenges in future tutorials (75.98 +/- 19.46). The entire training, which comprised PBL self-experience and video clips as integral elements, improved tutor's self-efficacy with respect to dealing with problematic situations (pre

  3. Rethinking and Redesigning an Image Processing Course from a Problem-Based Learning Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reng, Lars; Triantafyllou, Evangelia; Triantafyllidis, George

    2015-01-01

    Our experience at the Media Technology department, Aalborg University Copenhangen has shown that learning core concepts and techniques in image processing is a challenge for undergraduate students. One possible cause for this is the gap between understanding the mathematical formalism...... of such concepts and being able to use them for solving real-world problems. The Problem-Based Learning (PBL) pedagogy is an approach, which favours learning by applying knowledge to solve such problems. However, formulating an appropriate project for image processing courses presents challenges on how...... to appropriately present relevant concepts and techniques to students. This article presents our redesign of an image processing course at the Media Technology department, which focused on relevant concept and technique presentation and design projects and employed a game engine (Unity) in order to present...

  4. "Sustainability On Earth" WebQuests: Do They Qualify as Problem-Based Learning Activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Laurinda; Dourado, Luís; Morgado, Sofia

    2015-02-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICT), namely the Internet, can play a valuable educational role in several school subjects, including science education. The same applies to problem-based learning (PBL), that is, a student-centered active learning methodology that can prepare students for lifelong learning. WebQuests (WQs) combine PBL and Internet use, and they can reduce the probability of having students surfing the Internet without any clear purpose. The objective of this paper is to investigate to what extent WQs available from Portuguese schools' and universities' websites, focusing on the "Sustainability on Earth" eighth-grade school science theme, are consistent with a PBL perspective. Results from content analysis of 92 WQs indicate that the WQs selected for this paper are rarely consistent with PBL requirements. Teachers should be both aware of this issue and ready to improve the WQs available before using them in their science classes so that greater educational advantage can be generated from this powerful tool.

  5. Preparing foundation-year students for medical studies in a problem-based learning environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Massoud, Walid; Al-Banna, Nadia Ali

    2016-01-01

    - and post-test was high (2.38). Paired t-tests showed significant improvements (po.001) for each of the 4 factors. The four factors together explained 60.7% percent of variance in the data. Discussion: Students reported large improvements among learning skills required in a problem-based medical curriculum....... Cronbach's alpha was used to test for internal consistency and reliability of the collected data and Principal Component Exploratory Factor Analysis was performed. Paired t-test was used to examine differences between pre- and post-analysis data. Results: The internal consistency of the questionnaire...... was sufficient. Factor analysis identified four factors: 1) Ability to search for, share, and present information, 2) Ability to develop learning tools and express opinions, 3) Ability to use diverse learning sources, and 4) Ability to participate in discussion and reflect. Overall improvement between pre...

  6. Designing and Facilitating Learning in a Cooperative Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Søren Bolvig; Rustrup, Louise Lønborg; Mortensen, Helle

    2010-01-01

    This paper unfolds how learning for design-engineer students can be established and facilitated in a dynamic research setting, between academics and industrial partners. It challenges years of experience from teaching traditional Problem Based Learning, and it requires new initiatives to ensure...... and affect the culture of innovation in the building sector. One of the research initiatives was originally probing hypothesizes through student projects, where the students not only play a practical and performing role, but also engage in a rather equal partnership with the academic. This was also the case...

  7. Enhancing Higher Order Thinking Skills In A Marine Biology Class Through Problem-Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Magsino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to examine students' perspectives of their learning in marine biology in the collaborative group context of Problem-based Learning (PBL. Students’ higher order thinking skills (HOTS using PBL involves the development of their logical thinking and reasoning abilities which stimulates their curiosity and associative thinking. This study aimed to investigate how critical thinking skills, particularly analysis, synthesis and evaluation were enhanced in a marine biology class through PBL. Qualitative research approach was used to examine student responses in a questionnaire involving 10 open-ended questions that target students’ HOTS on a problem presented in a marine biology class for BS Biology students. Using axial coding as a qualitative data analysis technique by which grounded theory can be performed, the study was able to determine how students manifest their higher reasoning abilities when confronted with a marine biology situation. Results show student responses yielding affirmative remarks on the 10 questions intended to know their level of analysis (e.g., analyzing, classifying, inferring, discriminating and relating or connecting, synthesis (e.g., synthesizing and collaborating, and evaluation (e.g., comparing, criticizing, and convincing of information from the presented marine biology problem. Consequently, students were able to effectively design experiments to address the presented issue through problem-based learning. Results of the study show that PBL is an efficient instructional strategy embedded within a conventional curriculum used to develop or enhance critical thinking in marine biology.

  8. Influence of problem-based teaching and learning of grammar on pupils’ attainment in primary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocić Zorica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose of getting an insight into the effects of problem-based teaching and learning, an experiment was carried out by using the method of parallel groups on the sample of 204 pupils in the third and sixth grade of primary school. The results of final knowledge assessment showed that problem-based teaching and learning of grammar had positive influence on pupils' attainment comparing to the usual way of learning grammar. A significant improvement has been achieved in the field of reproductive and productive grammar knowledge on the whole sample of pupils as well as on the subsamples of pupils in the third and sixth grade. Because of the limited time left for this experimental programme, the reproductive knowledge of pupils was bigger than the productive knowledge. It has been noticed that regarding the successfulness of solving the grammatical problems, there was no difference between the pupils of younger and older primary school age, in the situation when these problems were decided on according to their age and intellectual abilities. All pupils had made an improvement, but they remained within the range of their marks in Serbian language. In addition to this, better progress was made by the pupils with better marks in Serbian language. Girls were more successful than boys, but the difference between boys and girls was smaller regarding the reproductive knowledge than the productive knowledge.

  9. Enhancing students' higher order thinking skills through computer-based scaffolding in problem-based learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Ju

    This multiple paper dissertation addressed several issues in Problem-based learning (PBL) through conceptual analysis, meta-analysis, and empirical research. PBL is characterized by ill-structured tasks, self-directed learning process, and a combination of individual and cooperative learning activities. Students who lack content knowledge and problem-solving skills may struggle to address associated tasks that are beyond their current ability levels in PBL. This dissertation addressed a) scaffolding characteristics (i.e., scaffolding types, delivery method, customization) and their effects on students' perception of optimal challenge in PBL, b) the possibility of virtual learning environments for PBL, and c) the importance of information literacy for successful PBL learning. Specifically, this dissertation demonstrated the effectiveness of scaffolding customization (i.e., fading, adding, and fading/adding) to enhance students' self-directed learning in PBL. Moreover, the effectiveness of scaffolding was greatest when scaffolding customization is self-selected than based on fixed-time interval and their performance. This suggests that it might be important for students to take responsibility for their learning in PBL and individualized and just-in-time scaffolding can be one of the solutions to address K-12 students' difficulties in improving problem-solving skills and adjusting to PBL.

  10. On Problem Based Learning and Application to Computer Games Design Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timcenko, Olga; Stojic, Radoslav

    2012-01-01

    is Medialogy education, which was established in 2002. This paper presents transfer of experiences from Medialogy education in Denmark to Game development education in Serbia - a new (2 years old) study line successfully developed in the country where game development companies hardly exist, but a need......Problem-based learning is a pedagogical approach which started in early 1970s. It is well developed and established until now. Aalborg University in Denmark is one of pioneering world universities in PBL and has accumulated a huge experience in PBL for many different study lines. One of them...

  11. Curriculum design for problem-based learning on a volunteer basis: a Yonsei approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun; Lee, Soo Kon; Lee, Moo Sang; Ahn, Duck Sun

    2002-04-01

    Innovative new medical programs such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) are being developed worldwide. An increasing number of medical schools are starting to introduce these programs into or even to replace the existing curriculum. At Yonsei University College of Medicine (YUCM), we developed our own PBL curriculum and evaluation method. In order to develop a program suitable for our school, we suggest that for trial purposes, a small number of student and teacher volunteers should be selected and that the tutors involved in the program be given adequate training.

  12. Synthesis of Complex Natural Products as a Vehicle for Student-Centered, Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Kevin J.; Krow, Grant R.

    1998-10-01

    Management strategies for upper-level undergraduate and graduate courses in organic synthesis at Temple University are described, and both student and faculty responsibilities are discussed. Using natural product synthesis as a vehicle, students choose a synthetic problem from the literature, identify the knowledge needed to solve the problem, explore resources for attaining that knowledge, identify the goals and criteria for a successful synthetic plan, and create and do assessments of their work. The method is an example of teacher-guided, student-directed, interdependent, small-group, problem-based learning.

  13. On Problem Based Learning and Application to Computer Games Design Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timcenko, Olga; Stojic, Radoslav

    2012-01-01

    is Medialogy education, which was established in 2002. This paper presents transfer of experiences from Medialogy education in Denmark to Game development education in Serbia - a new (2 years old) study line successfully developed in the country where game development companies hardly exist, but a need......Problem-based learning is a pedagogical approach which started in early 1970s. It is well developed and established until now. Aalborg University in Denmark is one of pioneering world universities in PBL and has accumulated a huge experience in PBL for many different study lines. One of them...

  14. Facility with the English language and problem-based learning group interaction: findings from an Arabic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpofu, D J; Lanphear, J; Stewart, T; Das, M; Ridding, P; Dunn, E

    1998-09-01

    The Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS), United Arab Emirates (UAE) University is in a unique position to explore issues related to English language proficiency and medical student performance. All students entering the FMHS have English as a second language. This study focused on the issues of students' proficiency in English as measured by the TOEFL test, student background factors and interaction in problem-based learning (PBL) groups. Using a modification of Bales Interaction Process Analysis, four problem-based learning groups were observed over four thematic units, to measure the degree of student interaction within PBL groups and to compare this to individual TOEFL scores and key background variables. The students' contributions correlated highly with TOEFL test results in the giving of information (range r = 0.67-0.74). The female students adhered to interacting in English during group sessions, whereas the male students were more likely to revert to using Arabic in elaborating unclear phenomena (p TOEFL scores for the male students, but not for female students. Multivariate analysis was undertaken to analyse the relative contribution of the TOEFL, parental education and years of studying in English. The best predictor of students' contributions in PBL groups was identified as TOEFL scores. The study demonstrates the importance of facilitating a locally acceptable level of English proficiency prior to admission to the FMHS. However, it also highlights the importance of not focusing only on English proficiency but paying attention to additional factors in facilitating medical students in maximizing benefits from interactions in PBL settings.

  15. A ROAD NOT TAKEN: A BREAKTHROUGH IN ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES VIA PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Anthony

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Problem-based learning (PBL is purported to empower learners by encouraging them to take a deep approach to learning and become more confident and self-directed in their learning. This paper explores lecturer and student experiences of a first year undergraduate English for Specific Purposes (ESP course that uses the PBL approach. The learning was grounded in genuine situations of practice in which high degree of team work and collaboration was eminent. In particular, this paper presents a PhD ethnographic case study that focuses on higher education student experiences of learning English in a PBL environment. A particular community was established in which lecturers and students interacted to negotiate and construct new understandings and develop life-long learning skills. Data on the lecturer and student experiences were gathered from classroom observations, a focus group, and student/lecturer interviews and access to student reflective journal entries. Students welcomed and valued the opportunity of the new found learning territory of taking more responsibility for their learning and the freedom of action and thought. During the course, participants achieved new insights into themselves as language learners despite finding it challenging, particularly in the initial phase when they were confronted with learning in a different mode. They became very involved in the course because they were genuinely enthused and interested in the learning process. This is seen as crucial and significant for developing the necessary competence in mastery of the English language in higher education. It is also useful in suggesting that PBL is viable as an (optional subsequent teaching strategy in the Malaysian or similar context.

  16. Community of learners: charting learning in first year graduate entry medical students during problem-based learning (PBL) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsmond, Paul; Zvauya, R

    2015-05-01

    This study considers social learning practices within and outside the overt curriculum. A thematic approach was used to analyse data from six focus group interviews with 11 graduate entry medical students from a UK university over a year of study. The results indicate that: (1) during their first year of study students form a community of learning practice, (2) this community of practice influences learning inside and outside the overt curriculum, (3) there is a changing community profile over the year of practice, (4) the students' engagement in problem-based learning (PBL) as part of their overt curriculum strongly influences the development of a community of practice and hence learning both inside and outside the overt curriculum. Findings are discussed in terms of Wenger's community of practice framework, the role of distributed cognition and social learning. It is concluded that PBL is an effective approach for academics to enrich students' social learning practices.

  17. Designing, implementing and evaluating an online problem-based learning (PBL) environment--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Manwa L; Bridges, Susan; Law, Sam Po; Whitehill, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been shown to be effective for promoting student competencies in self-directed and collaborative learning, critical thinking, self-reflection and tackling novel situations. However, the need for face-to-face interactions at the same place and time severely limits the potential of traditional PBL. The requirements of space and for meeting at a specific location at the same time create timetabling difficulties. Such limitations need to be tackled before all potentials of PBL learning can be realized. The present study aimed at designing and implementing an online PBL environment for undergraduate speech/language pathology students, and assessing the associated pedagogical effectiveness. A group of eight PBL students were randomly selected to participate in the study. They underwent 4 weeks of online PBL using Adobe Connect. Upon completion of the experiment, they were assessed via a self-reported questionnaire and quantitative comparison with traditional PBL students based on the same written assignment. The questionnaire revealed that all participating students enjoyed online PBL, without any perceived negative effects on learning. Online PBL unanimously saved the students travel time to and from school. Statistical analysis indicated no significant difference in assignment grades between the online and traditional PBL groups, indicating that online PBL learning appears to be similarly effective as traditional face-to-face PBL learning.

  18. Enhancing students' learning in problem based learning: validation of a self-assessment scale for active learning and critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoiriyah, Umatul; Roberts, Chris; Jorm, Christine; Van der Vleuten, C P M

    2015-08-26

    Problem based learning (PBL) is a powerful learning activity but fidelity to intended models may slip and student engagement wane, negatively impacting learning processes, and outcomes. One potential solution to solve this degradation is by encouraging self-assessment in the PBL tutorial. Self-assessment is a central component of the self-regulation of student learning behaviours. There are few measures to investigate self-assessment relevant to PBL processes. We developed a Self-assessment Scale on Active Learning and Critical Thinking (SSACT) to address this gap. We wished to demonstrated evidence of its validity in the context of PBL by exploring its internal structure. We used a mixed methods approach to scale development. We developed scale items from a qualitative investigation, literature review, and consideration of previous existing tools used for study of the PBL process. Expert review panels evaluated its content; a process of validation subsequently reduced the pool of items. We used structural equation modelling to undertake a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of the SSACT and coefficient alpha. The 14 item SSACT consisted of two domains "active learning" and "critical thinking." The factorial validity of SSACT was evidenced by all items loading significantly on their expected factors, a good model fit for the data, and good stability across two independent samples. Each subscale had good internal reliability (>0.8) and strongly correlated with each other. The SSACT has sufficient evidence of its validity to support its use in the PBL process to encourage students to self-assess. The implementation of the SSACT may assist students to improve the quality of their learning in achieving PBL goals such as critical thinking and self-directed learning.

  19. Problem-based learning for inter-professional education: evidence from an inter-professional PBL module on palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Nora; D'Eon, Marcel; Trinder, Krista

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this article was to analyze the theory and pedagogical basis of the use of problem-based learning (PBL) for inter-professional education (IPE) in undergraduate health science education and present evidence from a palliative care iPBL (inter-professional PBL) module that confirms the importance of the two methodologies being used together. More than 1000 student surveys collected over 4 years were analyzed for components of usefulness, enjoyment and facilitator effectiveness. A retrospective self-assessment of learning was used for both content knowledge of palliative care and knowledge of the other professions participating in the module. Statistically significant gains in knowledge were recorded in both areas assessed. Medical students reported lower gains in knowledge than those in other programs. On a scale of 0 to 6, mean scores were moderately high for usefulness (4.37) and facilitator effectiveness (5.19). Mean scores for enjoyment of the iPBL module were very high at 5.25. There is strong theoretical and empirical evidence that PBL is a useful method to deliver IPE for palliative care education. With the evidence presented from the palliative care iPBL it is our contention that PBL inter-professional cases should be utilized more often, incorporated into IPE programs generally, and researched more rigorously.

  20. The Model of Problem Based Learning in Practice: Evidence from Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    The aim of this paper is to share an experience from Aalborg University on the application of Problem Based Learning (PBL) model, with a specific example from a bachelor studies. PBL model has now been acknowledged worldwide as a powerful tool that allows students, faculty members and industry...... practitioners engage in multi-disciplinary, collaborative and geographically distributed activities. The key word in the model is ‘problem’ – a problem that is correctly formulated eventually affects the process of learning. It is also linked to the intended outcome of the PBL based teaching, whereby students...... solve real life problems of companies and organizations. As companies and organizations have various types of problems which might be attempted from different perspectives, it is pivotal that students have the opportunity to get equipped with a wide range of theoretical models and tools they can put...