WorldWideScience

Sample records for facilitating difficult dialogues

  1. Engaging Men in Difficult Dialogues about Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loschiavo, Chris; Miller, David S.; Davies, Jon

    2007-01-01

    Male privilege is one aspect of social inequality that underlies much of the oppression and violence that occurs on college campuses. Mad Skills, a program addressing power and privilege with college men, is described along with general recommendations about how to engage men in difficult dialogues. The PIE Model is used to describe defensive…

  2. Developing Difficult Dialogues: An Evaluation of Classroom Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placier, Peggy; Kroner, Crystal; Burgoyne, Suzanne; Worthington, Roger

    2012-01-01

    The University of Missouri (MU) participated in the Ford Foundation's Difficult Dialogues Initiative (DDI) supporting faculty development projects at over 40 institutions of higher education from 2006-2010. This paper reports findings from an evaluation conducted with instructors who not only engaged in faculty development workshops but also…

  3. Queer(y)ing Religion and Spirituality: Reflections from Difficult Dialogues Exploring Religion, Spirituality, and Homosexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    LePeau, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a student affairs practitioner's experience with co-instructing a course entitled, "Queer(y)ing Religion and Spirituality". The ways practitioners can facilitate difficult dialogues with students about the intersection of spirituality and GLBT issues are explored.

  4. Difficult Dialogues, Privilege and Social Justice: Uses of the Privileged Identity Exploration (PIE) Model in Student Affairs Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Sherry K.

    2007-01-01

    This article will introduce the Privileged Identity Exploration (PIE) Model. This model identifies eight (8) defense modes associated with behaviors individuals display when engaged in difficult dialogues about social justice issues. Implications for the model and ways it can be used to assist facilitators as they engage participants in…

  5. Process Memos: Facilitating Dialogues about Writing between Students and Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Heather Macpherson; Cherry, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    We have created a new teaching tool--process memos--to improve student writing. Process memos are guided reflections submitted with scaffolded assignments that facilitate a written dialogue between students and instructors about the process of writing. Within these memos, students critically assess available teaching tools, discuss their writing…

  6. Cultural hegemony? Educators’ perspectives on facilitating cross-cultural dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Zareen; Verstegen, Daniëlle; Vyas, Rashmi; Hamed, Omayma; Dornan, Tim; Morahan, Page

    2016-01-01

    Background We live in an age when education is being internationalized. This can confront students with ‘cultural hegemony’ that can result from the unequal distribution of power and privilege in global society. The name that is given to awareness of social inequality is ‘critical consciousness’. Cross-cultural dialogue provides an opportunity for learners to develop critical consciousness to counter cultural hegemony. The purpose of this research was to understand how learners engage with cross-cultural dialogue, so we can help them do so more effectively in the future. Method The setting for this research was an online discussion in an international health professions educator fellowship program. We introduced scenarios with cultural references to study the reaction of participants to cultural conversation cues. We used an inductive thematic analysis to explore power and hegemony issues. Results Participants reflected that personally they were more likely to take part in cross-cultural discussions if they recognized the context discussed or had prior exposure to educational settings with cultural diversity. They identified barriers as lack of skills in facilitating cross-cultural discussions and fear of offending others. They suggested deliberately introducing cultural issues throughout the curriculum. Conclusion Our results indicate that developing critical consciousness and cross-cultural competency will require instructional design to identify longitudinal opportunities to bring up cross-cultural issues, and training facilitators to foster cross-cultural discussions by asking clarifying questions and navigating crucial/sensitive conversations. PMID:27890048

  7. Cultural hegemony? Educators’ perspectives on facilitating cross-cultural dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zareen Zaidi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: We live in an age when education is being internationalized. This can confront students with ‘cultural hegemony’ that can result from the unequal distribution of power and privilege in global society. The name that is given to awareness of social inequality is ‘critical consciousness’. Cross-cultural dialogue provides an opportunity for learners to develop critical consciousness to counter cultural hegemony. The purpose of this research was to understand how learners engage with cross-cultural dialogue, so we can help them do so more effectively in the future. Method: The setting for this research was an online discussion in an international health professions educator fellowship program. We introduced scenarios with cultural references to study the reaction of participants to cultural conversation cues. We used an inductive thematic analysis to explore power and hegemony issues. Results: Participants reflected that personally they were more likely to take part in cross-cultural discussions if they recognized the context discussed or had prior exposure to educational settings with cultural diversity. They identified barriers as lack of skills in facilitating cross-cultural discussions and fear of offending others. They suggested deliberately introducing cultural issues throughout the curriculum. Conclusion: Our results indicate that developing critical consciousness and cross-cultural competency will require instructional design to identify longitudinal opportunities to bring up cross-cultural issues, and training facilitators to foster cross-cultural discussions by asking clarifying questions and navigating crucial/sensitive conversations.

  8. A lottery incentive system to facilitate dialogue and social support for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A lottery incentive system to facilitate dialogue and social support for workplace ... the LIS created excitement in the companies and renewed employees' personal ... social group pressure to seek HCT as a collective in anticipation of a reward.

  9. Facilitating Endotracheal Intubation in Difficult Cases Using an External Magnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Seyedhejazi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Difficult airway is conventionally defined as a medical scenario in which a trained examiner faces difficulty in either facemask ventilation or tracheal intubation (1. Unlike difficult intubation, the incidence of difficult mask ventilation in adults is considerable (2, 3. Anesthesiologists and those who practice intubation should be familiar with the management of airway and be able to recognize and identify potentially difficult airways including congenital craniofacial deformities with micrognathia (e.g. Pier Robin, Treacher Collins, Goldenhar's, and Crouzon's syndromes and metabolic diseases causing the deposition of accumulated by-products (e.g., Hurler's, Morquio's, and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndromes. Cormack and Lehane grades 3 and 4 at laryngoscopy are an indication for advanced techniques for intubation. Laryngeal mask airway (LMA and fiberscope with a directable tip are useful and important modalities in handling difficult airway and intubation (5. Even normal pediatric airway could become critical due to the anatomical and physiological differences between pediatric and adult airway; this particularly becomes a concern in infants, i.e. children younger than one year old. This hazard is augmented in the presence of congenital or acquired difficulties affecting airway. Consequently, proper preoperative assessment is considered as the cornerstone of pediatric difficult airway management. Every anesthetic plan should be tailored according to patients considering the scenario and also the expertise of the practitioner. Opting for spontaneous respiration maintenance and intervening in a step-wise manner are strongly suggested (6. Multiple airway devices have been and are developed that all of which can be placed under direct vision or blindly; most of these devices consistently both provide and maintain safe oxygenation and ventilation. Furthermore, a wide range of ancillary devices have also been introduced to be of assistance in the

  10. Dialogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde Nielsen, Espen

    2015-01-01

    need to engage with both the physical and the social dimension. In fact, the two can hardly be separated: the city and its inhabitants can be considered one organism, constantly shaping each other in a continuous dialogue. The inhabitants are co-authors of space. Hence, the definition of architecture...... or drawing table. Here artistic and critical spatial practices can lend themselves to engage directly with the physical reality, beyond reductive representations. At times, we need to invent techniques to by-pass the usual hierarchies and frameworks of perception in order to see what is ‘worn half......-invisible by use’ and draw out their inherent latent qualities or potentials, thus making way for spatial invention. These could take many forms: from intelligent aggregates and installations to performance and creative writing, but should all possess a situated agency and site-specific effect. By deploying...

  11. Examining the effects of structured dialogue grounded in socioculturalism as a tool to facilitate professional development in secondary science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Antoinette S.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of professional development characterized by teacher facilitated learning activities as a way to improve teaching practices and learning outcomes. In this study, teachers were provided opportunities to facilitate their own learning by investigating ways to consistently foster the desired learning outcomes for urban students over the course of three semesters. During the first semester, teachers focused on improving test scores and student motivation. By the third semester, teachers opted to extend time for students to complete assignments, and focused on sharing strategies that worked for students. Second, students of teachers who participated in the study group format using the structured dialogue approach demonstrated dramatic gains on the standardized content assessment in chemistry and integrated coordinated science (ICS) over three years. In chemistry, the percent of students scoring at far below basic decreased by 24%, and the percentage of students who scored basic increased 21%. In ICS, the percentage of students that scored far below basic decreased by 14% and the percent of students who scored basic increased 14%. The research findings suggest that using structured dialogue to facilitate teacher discourse in a way that is conducive to establishing positive discourse about student learning and rigorous pedagogy are key factors in improving teachers' ability to foster high academic outcomes from urban students.

  12. Dialogue Systems and Dialogue Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    in the following use cases: • Control: disability support, personal assistance • Education : tutorial and training • Medical: patient monitoring...considered as a means for furthering development of DST Group’s Consensus project by providing an engaging spoken interface to high -level...dialogue flow, error handling, and other high -level functions to facilitate these core capabilities. Dialogue state A single snapshot or slice of

  13. A Study of How Classroom Dialogue Facilitates the Development of Geometric Spatial Concepts Related to Understanding the Cause of Moon Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Sonya Ellouise; Wilhelm, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Research indicates that student understanding is either confirmed or reformed when given opportunities to share what they know. This study was conducted to answer the research question: Will classroom dialogue facilitate students' understanding of lunar concepts related to geometric spatial visualisation? Ninety-two middle school students engaged…

  14. Creating Dialogue by Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passila, Anne; Oikarinen, Tuija; Kallio, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to develop practice and theory from Augusto Boal's dialogue technique (Image Theatre) for organisational use. The paper aims to examine how the members in an organisation create dialogue together by using a dramaturgical storytelling framework where the dialogue emerges from storytelling facilitated by…

  15. Creating Dialogue by Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passila, Anne; Oikarinen, Tuija; Kallio, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to develop practice and theory from Augusto Boal's dialogue technique (Image Theatre) for organisational use. The paper aims to examine how the members in an organisation create dialogue together by using a dramaturgical storytelling framework where the dialogue emerges from storytelling facilitated by…

  16. A Dialogue with Carl Rogers: Cross-Cultural Challenges of Facilitating Person-Centered Groups in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain-Hill, Alicia; Rogers, Carl R.

    1988-01-01

    Presents brainstorming dialogue with Carl Rogers which was held in January of 1987, shortly before Rogers's death. Explores basic challenges involved in a large-scale, cross-cultural application of person-centered group work in South Africa. (Author)

  17. Facilitating Reflexivity in Preservice Science Teacher Education Using Video Analysis and Cogenerative Dialogue in Field-Based Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siry, Christina; Martin, Sonya N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to preservice science teacher education coupling video analysis with dialogue as tools for fostering teachers' ability to notice and reflexively interpret events captured during teaching practicum with the intent of transforming classroom practice. In this approach, video becomes a tool with which teachers…

  18. Considering students’ epistemic beliefs to facilitate their argumentative discourse and attitudinal change with a digital dialogue game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noroozi, Omid

    2016-01-01

    This study explores whether and how higher education students with various epistemic beliefs engage in argumentative discourse and shift their attitude within a digital dialogue game. Students were assigned to groups of four or five and asked to argue and explore various perspectives of four cont

  19. Facilitating Reflexivity in Preservice Science Teacher Education Using Video Analysis and Cogenerative Dialogue in Field-Based Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siry, Christina; Martin, Sonya N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to preservice science teacher education coupling video analysis with dialogue as tools for fostering teachers' ability to notice and reflexively interpret events captured during teaching practicum with the intent of transforming classroom practice. In this approach, video becomes a tool with which teachers connect…

  20. Apples and Pears: Engaging Social Work Students in Social Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyneke, Roelof P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how an adventure-based activity could help facilitate dialogue and enable a safe process where students could engage in a difficult topic such as diversity without feeling threatened. Method: A qualitative study was used in which 89 social work students who took part in diversity training gave permission that their…

  1. Apples and Pears: Engaging Social Work Students in Social Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyneke, Roelof P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how an adventure-based activity could help facilitate dialogue and enable a safe process where students could engage in a difficult topic such as diversity without feeling threatened. Method: A qualitative study was used in which 89 social work students who took part in diversity training gave permission that their…

  2. Think before You Teach: Preparing for Dialogues about Racial Realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaye, Stephen John

    2012-01-01

    Race is a difficult topic to discuss openly within college and university settings. Postsecondary educators who wish to facilitate dialogues about race and racism among students must take necessary steps to prepare for these discussions. Using data from a qualitative case study, this article discusses the strategies that educators employed to…

  3. The use of balloon atrial septostomy to facilitate difficult transseptal access in patients undergoing catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadeh, Andrew A; Cannom, David S; Macrum, Bruce L; Ho, Ivan C

    2011-07-01

    With the increasing number of patients undergoing repeat catheter ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation, it is not uncommon to encounter a fibrotic interatrial septum that resists the conventional manual advancement of the transseptal sheath. Forceful advancement of the transseptal apparatus can reduce fine control and potentially lead to a higher rate of perforation. We report a case where adjunctive balloon atrial septostomy was used to facilitate transseptal access in a patient with fibrotic interatrial septum. Using a small-caliber angioplasty balloon and under direct fluoroscopic and transesophageal echocardiogram visualization, balloon septostomy was performed with hand inflation until a "waist" was seen. This technique provides a safe way to control the size of the transseptal access created, and allows the passage of a relatively soft-tipped transseptal sheath across a resistive septum. To our knowledge this is the first published use of balloon atrial septostomy during transseptal puncture for left atrium access in a catheter ablation procedure. Balloon atrial septostomy should be considered as an alternative technique for safe transseptal cannulation in select patients in the electrophysiology laboratory or other interventional procedures requiring left atrial access or delivery of large-caliber catheters or sheaths. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Using a Dialogue System Based on Dialogue Maps for Computer Assisted Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Kwon; Kwon, Oh-Woog; Kim, Young-Kil; Lee, Yunkeun

    2016-01-01

    In order to use dialogue systems for computer assisted second-language learning systems, one of the difficult issues in such systems is how to construct large-scale dialogue knowledge that matches the dialogue modelling of a dialogue system. This paper describes how we have accomplished the short-term construction of large-scale and…

  5. Dialogue / End of dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Mads

    2009-01-01

    Afhandlingen fremsætter en analyse af udsigelse i ny europæisk dramatik fra perioden 1995 til 2006 med særligt fokus på værker af Martin Crimp, Sarah Kane og Roland Schimmelpfennig. ”Dialogue / End of dialogue” er sondringer i tre dramatiske forfatterskaber, der udtrykker dramatikkens aktuelle...... og genreteoretisk perspektiv. Under den spørgende titel, ”Dialogue / End of dialogue”, går afhandlingen i kritisk dialog med en udbredt idé om, at vi aktuelt har bevæget os hinsides det dramatiske paradigme, og bidrager dermed til at tegne et mere nuanceret billede af den nye europæiske dramatik....

  6. The use of dialogue tools to promote dialogue-based and person-centred patient education for people with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    K. Jensen, Natasja; Pals, Regitze A. S.; Willaing, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To explore educator experiences of implementing dialogue tools in practice to engender participatory patient education. Methods: Data were collected through qualitative interviews with 31 educators and 20 ethnographic observations of group-based education sessions at eight education...... to support educators in facilitating participatory patient education. Results: Consistent with the intended purpose of the dialogue tools, educators reported that the dialogue tools helped engender participatory education in the form of reflection and dialogue among participants regarding living...... with diabetes. However, educators also reported instances of discrepancies between the tools’ intended purpose and their actual use because some participants found it difficult to relate to the tools. Discussion: The application of dialogue tools to engender participatory patient education is highly dependent...

  7. Inspiring Dialogue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An exclusive interview with Yang Rui, the renowned English-language host of the show Dialogue, on CCTV-9 By LIU PING On the 10-year anniver sary of the international channel CCTV-9 ’ s famous talk show Dialogue ,

  8. How Is Global Dialogue Possible?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Intercultural dialogue is often invoked in vague reference to a method that can build cross-cultural understanding and facilitate global policy-making. The 25 chapters of this book--written by leading specialists in the respective areas--clarify the theoretical foundations of intercultural dialogue...

  9. Novel use of an exchange catheter to facilitate intubation with an Aintree catheter in a tall patient with a predicted difficult airway: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruenbaum Shaun E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The Aintree intubating catheter (Cook® Medical Inc., Bloomington, IN, USA has been shown to successfully facilitate difficult intubations when other methods have failed. The Aintree intubating catheter (Cook® Medical Inc., Bloomington, IN, USA has a fixed length of 56 cm, and it has been suggested in the literature that it may be too short for safe use in patients who are tall. Case presentation We present the case of a 32-year-old, 180 cm tall Caucasian woman with a predicted difficult airway who presented to our facility for an emergency cesarean section. After several failed intubation attempts via direct laryngoscopy, an airway was established with a laryngeal mask airway. After delivery of a healthy baby, our patient's condition necessitated tracheal intubation. A fiber-optic bronchoscope loaded with an Aintree intubating catheter (Cook® Medical Inc., Bloomington, IN, USA was passed through the laryngeal mask airway into the trachea until just above the carina, but was too short to safely allow for the passage of an endotracheal tube. Conclusions We present a novel technique in which the Aintree intubating catheter (Cook® Medical Inc., Bloomington, IN, USA was replaced with a longer (100 cm exchange catheter, over which an endotracheal tube was passed successfully into the trachea.

  10. Staging and Performing Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knox, Jeanette Bresson Ladegaard

    2015-01-01

    in facilitating Socratic dialogue. It also allows me to bring forth the particular dramatic circumstances of the participants and the communal effort of each individual player in the ensemble. The micro cosmos of SDG incarnates the living, moving world that theater represents. It connects the drama...... as a paradigmatic case to illustrate my theater metaphor....

  11. Libraries serving dialogue

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Odile

    2014-01-01

    This book based on experiences of libraries serving interreligious dialogue, presents themes like library tools serving dialogue between cultures, collections dialoguing, children and young adults dialoguing beyond borders, story telling as dialog, librarians serving interreligious dialogue.

  12. Factors that facilitate or make difficult the problembased learning in small groups, as seen by students at the Faculty of Medicine, University of La Frontera, Temuco, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarro-Hernández, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to explore factors that facilitate or make difficult the tutorial process in problem-based learning (PBL in small groups, at the Faculty of Medicine, University of La Frontera. Research was done under the qualitative paradigm through a case study. The sample consisted of 15 key informant students of the last two curricular levels. Information was collected through six interviews and a focus group. Triangulation was conducted by researcher, expert judgment and verification with study participants. We identified 574 meaning units, out of which 542 were grouped in 22 categories, among them: Tutorial group development, Tutor as an expert in methodology, Group management, Personal characteristics of the student, and Student responsibility. Four macro-categories emerged, namely: Competences of the tutor, Human relationships and learning environment, Characteristics and participation of the students and Organizational aspects. Students considered that the characteristics of the tutor and his/her experience and responsibility are relevant in the tutorial process. They also emphasized on collaborative work, interpersonal relationships, learning environment, and the administrative aspects that may influence the development of PBL.

  13. Difficult Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Uslu

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Difficult asthma is a distinct entity of asthma, comprising approximately %5 of asthmatic patients. There is no agreed definition of difficult asthma. It will include asthma uncontrolled by new standard therapy, steroid dependent, steroid resistant and severe asthma. In this study difficult asthma; clinical features, risk factors, pathophysiology and novel therapies are summarized by literatures.

  14. Difficult asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Uslu; Tülay Özdemir

    1989-01-01

    Difficult asthma is a distinct entity of asthma, comprising approximately %5 of asthmatic patients. There is no agreed definition of difficult asthma. It will include asthma uncontrolled by new standard therapy, steroid dependent, steroid resistant and severe asthma. In this study difficult asthma; clinical features, risk factors, pathophysiology and novel therapies are summarized by literatures.

  15. Dialogue Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Departing from Anthony Giddens´s theory of structuration and the concept double hermeneutics and Jürgen Habermas´s Theory of Communicative Actions the article specifies theories and methods af dialogue as method in the humanities and social sciences. The article concludes by pointing at dialogues...... as a new theoretical, methodological and empirical research concept i an society where the traditional planning instruments have failed....

  16. The use of a policy dialogue to facilitate evidence-informed policy development for improved access to care: the case of the Winnipeg Central Intake Service (WCIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damani, Zaheed; MacKean, Gail; Bohm, Eric; DeMone, Brie; Wright, Brock; Noseworthy, Tom; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna; Marshall, Deborah A

    2016-10-18

    Policy dialogues are critical for developing responsive, effective, sustainable, evidence-informed policy. Our multidisciplinary team, including researchers, physicians and senior decision-makers, comprehensively evaluated The Winnipeg Central Intake Service, a single-entry model in Winnipeg, Manitoba, to improve patient access to hip/knee replacement surgery. We used the evaluation findings to develop five evidence-informed policy directions to help improve access to scheduled clinical services across Manitoba. Using guiding principles of public participation processes, we hosted a policy roundtable meeting to engage stakeholders and use their input to refine the policy directions. Here, we report on the use and input of a policy roundtable meeting and its role in contributing to the development of evidence-informed policy. Our evidence-informed policy directions focused on formal measurement/monitoring of quality, central intake as a preferred model for service delivery, provincial scope, transparent processes/performance indicators, and patient choice of provider. We held a policy roundtable meeting and used outcomes of facilitated discussions to refine these directions. Individuals from our team and six stakeholder groups across Manitoba participated (n = 44), including patients, family physicians, orthopaedic surgeons, surgical office assistants, Winnipeg Central Intake team, and administrators/managers. We developed evaluation forms to assess the meeting process, and collected decision-maker partners' perspectives on the value of the policy roundtable meeting and use of policy directions to improve access to scheduled clinical services after the meeting, and again 15 months later. We analyzed roundtable and evaluation data using thematic analysis to identify key themes. Four key findings emerged. First, participants supported all policy directions, with revisions and key implementation considerations identified. Second, participants felt the policy roundtable

  17. Contentious Conversations: Using Mediation Techniques in Difficult Clinical Ethics Consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiester, Autumn

    2015-01-01

    Mediators utilize a wide range of skills in the process of facilitating dialogue and resolving conflicts. Among the most useful techniques for clinical ethics consultants (CECs)-and surely the least discussed-are those employed in acrimonious, hostile conversations between stakeholders. In the context of clinical ethics disputes or other bedside conflicts, good mediation skills can reverse the negative interactions that have prevented the creation of workable treatment plans or ethical consensus. This essay lays out the central framework mediators use in distinguishing positions from interests and describes a set of strategies for managing contentious ethics consultations or working with "difficult" patients, families, or patient-careprovider interactions.

  18. Disastrous Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Just, Sine Nørholm; Berg, Kristine Marie

    2016-01-01

    In 2010 the Danish artist Søren Thilo Funder was in Cairo to produce the art film Disastrous Dialogue. As Funder set to work he had a foreboding about how politically charged the piece might be. When he cut the film, however, events had exceeded his most fateful premonitions, reshaping the interp...... through the lens of the concept of plasticity. This leads us to propose a plastic understanding of agency as both formed by and formative of meaningful relationships—and able to creatively destruct and, thereby, transform configurations of meaning....... the interpretative context completely. The changes in Egyptian society, thus, altered the possible meaning–agency relations of the finished work. Through a close reading and a conceptually guided criticism of the text–context relationships of Disastrous Dialogue we explore interrelations of meaning and agency...

  19. Dialogues on air pollution: an Asian example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, C.; Stalpers, S.I.P.

    2013-01-01

    The efficient reduction of transboundary air pollution requires dialogue on emission reduction at an international level. A model is under construction to facilitate such dialogues for Asia. This is the Regional Air pollution Information System (RAINS-Asia), developed at the International Institute

  20. Dialogue Education in the Post-Secondary Classroom: Reflecting on Dialogue Processes from Two Higher Education Settings in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnlaugson, Olen; Moore, Janet

    2009-01-01

    In this article, educators Olen Gunnlaugson and Janet Moore reflect on their experiences developing and facilitating two dialogue-based courses. They proceed with a brief overview of dialogue education and how they are situating their approaches to dialogue within the field of higher education and in terms of transformative learning. Each then…

  1. miRNA engineering of CHO cells facilitates production of difficult-to-express proteins and increases success in cell line development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Simon; Marquart, Kim F; Pieper, Lisa A; Fieder, Juergen; Gamer, Martin; Gorr, Ingo; Schulz, Patrick; Bradl, Harald

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, coherent with growing biologics portfolios also the number of complex and thus difficult-to-express (DTE) therapeutic proteins has increased considerably. DTE proteins challenge bioprocess development and can include various therapeutic protein formats such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), multi-specific affinity scaffolds (e.g., bispecific antibodies), cytokines, or fusion proteins. Hence, the availability of robust and versatile Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) host cell factories is fundamental for high-yielding bioprocesses. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as potent cell engineering tools to improve process performance of CHO manufacturing cell lines. However, there has not been any report demonstrating the impact of beneficial miRNAs on industrial cell line development (CLD) yet. To address this question, we established novel CHO host cells constitutively expressing a pro-productive miRNA: miR-557. Novel host cells were tested in two independent CLD campaigns using two different mAb candidates including a normal as well as a DTE antibody. Presence of miR-557 significantly enhanced each process step during CLD in a product independent manner. Stable expression of miR-557 increased the probability to identify high-producing cell clones. Furthermore, production cell lines derived from miR-557 expressing host cells exhibited significantly increased final product yields in fed-batch cultivation processes without compromising product quality. Strikingly, cells co-expressing miR-557 and a DTE antibody achieved a twofold increase in product titer compared to clones co-expressing a negative control miRNA. Thus, host cell engineering using miRNAs represents a promising tool to overcome limitations in industrial CLD especially with regard to DTE proteins. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1495-1510. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Dialogue and Team Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Game, Ann; Metcalfe, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Although dialogue is a common word in educational theory, its full significance is diluted if it is seen as a matter of exchange or negotiation of prior intellectual positions. In fact, the "dia"- of dialogue indicates "through": dialogue moves through participants and they through it. Dialogue allows participants to have thoughts they could not…

  3. Midwifery and dialogue in organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Marianne; Block Poulsen, Jørgen

    the process. That goes for the understanding of dialogue as sharing, daring and caring; for dialogic competencies as, e.g., confirmation and meta-communication; and for generatively facilitated conversations as midwifery. The methodology is accordingly characterized as emergent, mutual involvement. The book...... is a dialogue between theory and praxis, too. It integrates research, action, and training as well as theories of interpersonal and organizational communication, Roger's humanistic psychology, Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics, and Buber's philosophy of dialogue. The empirical material consists...... of approximately 50 colleague supervision or midwifery conversations and group-feedback sessions; and of 24 staff appraisal interviews or development conversations, which we followed on a monitor in an adjoining room. After each of these conversations, a feedback session was held. In the book you will find...

  4. Building dialogue on complex conservation issues in a conference setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Jenny; Sparrow, Andrew; Wass, Rob; Moller, Henrik

    2014-10-01

    Dialogue about complex science and society issues is important for contemporary conservation agendas. Conferences provide an appropriate space for such dialogue, but despite its recognized worth, best practices for facilitating active dialogue are still being explored. Face-to-face (FTF) and computer-mediated communication (CMC) are two approaches to facilitating dialogue that have different strengths. We assessed the use of these approaches to create dialogue on cultural perspectives of conservation and biodiversity at a national ecology conference. In particular, we aimed to evaluate their potential to enhance dialogue through their integrated application. We used an interactive blog to generate CMC on participant-sourced issues and to prime subsequent discussion in an FTF conference workshop. The quantity and quality of both CMC and FTF discussion indicated that both approaches were effective in building dialogue. Prior to the conference the blog averaged 126 views per day, and 44 different authors contributed a total of 127 comments. Twenty-five participants subsequently participated in active FTF discussion during a 3-h workshop. Postconference surveys confirmed that CMC had developed participants' thinking and deepened FTF dialogue; 88% indicated specifically that CMC helped facilitate the FTF discussion. A further 83% of respondents concluded that preliminary blog discussion would be useful for facilitating dialogue at future conferences. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  5. Rapid Dialogue Prototyping Methodology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui Huu Trung, B.H.T.; Sojka, P.; Rajman, M.; Kopecek, I.; Melichar, M.; Pala, K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is about the automated production of dialogue models. The goal is to propose and validate a methodology that allows the production of finalized dialogue models (i.e. dialogue models specific for given applications) in a few hours. The solution we propose for such a methodology, called the

  6. Abortion-Related Services: Value Clarification through "Difficult Dialogues" Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpeli, Moliehi Rosemary; Botma, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Midwives play a pivotal role in women's health in the face of increased deaths related to backyard abortions. Since the commencement in South Africa of the Name of the Act No. 92 of 1996 that allows abortion services, there has been a moral divide among healthcare workers in South Africa. This article reflects the opinions of preregistration…

  7. Abortion-Related Services: Value Clarification through "Difficult Dialogues" Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpeli, Moliehi Rosemary; Botma, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Midwives play a pivotal role in women's health in the face of increased deaths related to backyard abortions. Since the commencement in South Africa of the Name of the Act No. 92 of 1996 that allows abortion services, there has been a moral divide among healthcare workers in South Africa. This article reflects the opinions of preregistration…

  8. Probabilistic authenticated quantum dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Luo, Yi-Ping

    2015-12-01

    This work proposes a probabilistic authenticated quantum dialogue (PAQD) based on Bell states with the following notable features. (1) In our proposed scheme, the dialogue is encoded in a probabilistic way, i.e., the same messages can be encoded into different quantum states, whereas in the state-of-the-art authenticated quantum dialogue (AQD), the dialogue is encoded in a deterministic way; (2) the pre-shared secret key between two communicants can be reused without any security loophole; (3) each dialogue in the proposed PAQD can be exchanged within only one-step quantum communication and one-step classical communication. However, in the state-of-the-art AQD protocols, both communicants have to run a QKD protocol for each dialogue and each dialogue requires multiple quantum as well as classical communicational steps; (4) nevertheless, the proposed scheme can resist the man-in-the-middle attack, the modification attack, and even other well-known attacks.

  9. The High Stakes of Artificial Dialogue in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Talking about important events, experiences, and ideas is a crucial societal concern for many reasons. In the field of teacher education, dialogue may be even more difficult because it is sometimes seen as being both essential and troubling. Dialogue is complicated because some people are fearful of open inquiry; others are inclined to rant; and…

  10. Esperanza y Poder: Democratic Dialogue and Authentic Parent Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This study explored ways to increase authentic participation of Mexican American parents in the education of their children. It focused on direct dialogue between Spanish-speaking parents and English-speaking school personnel and how dialogue facilitated group development. The design of the study included phenomenological inquiry and action…

  11. Dialogue as interpersonal synergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Raczaszek-Leonardi, Joanna; Tylén, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    dialogue based on the notion of interpersonal synergy. Crucial to this synergetic model is the emphasis on dialogue as an emergent, self-organizing, interpersonal system capable of functional coordination. A consequence of this model is that linguistic processes cannot be reduced to the workings...... of individual cognitive systems but must be approached also at the interpersonal level. From such a perspective follows a number of new predictions: beyond simple synchrony, dialogue affords complementary dynamics, constrained by contextual sensitivity and functional specificity. We substantiate our arguments...... by reference to recent empirical studies supporting the idea of dialogue as interpersonal synergy....

  12. Models of Persuasion Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakken, Henry

    This chapter1 reviews formal dialogue systems for persuasion. In persuasion dialogues two or more participants try to resolve a conflict of opinion, each trying to persuade the other participants to adopt their point of view. Dialogue systems for persuasion regulate how such dialogues can be conducted and what their outcome is. Good dialogue systems ensure that conflicts of view can be resolved in a fair and effective way [6]. The term ‘persuasion dialogue’ was coined by Walton [13] as part of his influential classification of dialogues into six types according to their goal. While persuasion aims to resolve a difference of opinion, negotiation tries to resolve a conflict of interest by reaching a deal, information seeking aims at transferring information, deliberationdeliberation wants to reach a decision on a course of action, inquiry is aimed at “growth of knowledge and agreement” and quarrel is the verbal substitute of a fight. This classification leaves room for shifts of dialogues of one type to another. In particular, other types of dialogues can shift to persuasion when a conflict of opinion arises. For example, in information-seeking a conflict of opinion could arise on the credibility of a source of information, in deliberation the participants may disagree about likely effects of plans or actions and in negotiation they may disagree about the reasons why a proposal is in one’s interest.

  13. Education as Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazepides, Tasos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that genuine dialogue is a refined human achievement and probably the most valid criterion on the basis of which we can evaluate educational or social policy and practice. The paper explores the prerequisites of dialogue in the language games, the common certainties, the rules of logic and the variety of common…

  14. Spoken Dialogue Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jokinen, Kristiina

    2009-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in the development of dialogue systems that support robust and efficient human-machine interaction using spoken language. Spoken dialogue technology allows various interactive applications to be built and used for practical purposes, and research focuses on issues that aim to increase the system's communicative competence by including aspects of error correction, cooperation, multimodality, and adaptation in context. This book gives a comprehensive view of state-of-the-art techniques that are used to build spoken dialogue systems. It provides

  15. A Welcome Dialogue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A dialogue mechanism has emerged in recent years from the annual G-8 summit that groups some of the world's most highly developed countries-Britain, Canada, France, Germany. Italy, Japan, Russia and the United States.

  16. Conflict Management: Difficult Conversations with Difficult People

    OpenAIRE

    Overton, Amy R.; Lowry, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Conflict occurs frequently in any workplace; health care is not an exception. The negative consequences include dysfunctional team work, decreased patient satisfaction, and increased employee turnover. Research demonstrates that training in conflict resolution skills can result in improved teamwork, productivity, and patient and employee satisfaction. Strategies to address a disruptive physician, a particularly difficult conflict situation in healthcare, are addressed.

  17. Conflict management: difficult conversations with difficult people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Amy R; Lowry, Ann C

    2013-12-01

    Conflict occurs frequently in any workplace; health care is not an exception. The negative consequences include dysfunctional team work, decreased patient satisfaction, and increased employee turnover. Research demonstrates that training in conflict resolution skills can result in improved teamwork, productivity, and patient and employee satisfaction. Strategies to address a disruptive physician, a particularly difficult conflict situation in healthcare, are addressed.

  18. Active Center of Islamic Dialogue Civilizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Moghimi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious that an essay have introduced about Dialogue Civilizations, at first must be start with a definition about it. Obviously, this simple definition is almost difficult. Defining of Dialogue Civilizations is complex and difficult as far as it need to a vast range of definitions. In this essay will argue that how ever definition of Dialogue Civilization is different, can only seek as specific of intemporall and special situations that are in real-life. As well as this essay emphasize to practice of environmental (realm in Islamic countries. The philosophy of this essay is that, what is the share of Islamic environments with regard to looking at Civilizations special phenomena. The first attitude is that Islamic civilization includes different spaces around the globe. The second attitude is that Islamic Civilization includes developing of other Civilizations realm. The third is that in the realm of Islamic Civilization live different human life and this is an important starting point for Cultural Dialogue in the Islamic countries together. The fourth is that, there are expanding (space, population, political systems, organs and economic is different, that we will describe them in this essay.

  19. Dialogue in fiction Dialogue in fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rosa Caldas-Coulthard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Characters and narrators, in fictional narrative discourse, exchange speech. Their interaction however is pseudo (see Sinclair, 1981, since it is not interactive in the real sense but imagined by an author, and it only happens intra-textually (the conversation only exists on a page of a book. Composed dialogue therefore, has features that distinguish it from real talk, although authors base their representation of speech on a model of what they think conversationalists do. Characters and narrators, in fictional narrative discourse, exchange speech. Their interaction however is pseudo (see Sinclair, 1981, since it is not interactive in the real sense but imagined by an author, and it only happens intra-textually (the conversation only exists on a page of a book. Composed dialogue therefore, has features that distinguish it from real talk, although authors base their representation of speech on a model of what they think conversationalists do.

  20. Analyser le style du dialogue. Quelques remarques sur le dialogue au XIXe siècle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naïm Jérémy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cet article dresse un état des lieux de l'analyse du dialogue de roman depuis trente ans. Il fait remarquer les difficultés rencontrées par les linguistes à dégager une spécificité du dialogue, empruntant là, et sans le dire, les outils de la narratologie, ici, mais avec précaution, ceux de l'analyse conversationnelle ou des discours rapportés. L'évolution des études sur le dialogue montre tout de même une attention grandissante pour son intégration dans la narration et l'interrogation renouvelée de sa référence extra-textuelle. L'auteur s'est donc proposé de prendre cinq extraits de dialogue du XIXe siècle et de les comparer, à partir de ces deux seuls critères. Il fait remarquer qu'au début du siècle, le dialogue est conçu comme un bloc de texte, autonome, isolé de la masse narrative. Les liens entre la rhétorique et le dialogue contribuent à renforcer cet isolement, en faisant du dialogue un morceau d'éloquence. Le réalisme s'attaque à cette représentation, en accentuant les liens du dialogue et de la narration et en proposant des dialogues qui ne se contentent pas de référer à des réalités verbales. Le naturalisme, à la fin du siècle, a complètement défait l'isolement du dialogue en l'amalgamant avec la narration. Les résultats historiques de cette étude sont à approfondir. Mais elle montre, sur plan théorique, la possibilité de s'affranchir des difficiles questions d'énonciation quand on aborde le dialogue de roman.

  1. "Chalepa Ta Kala," "Fine Things Are Difficult": Socrates' Insights into the Psychology of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Avi I.

    2010-01-01

    The proverb "chalepa ta kala" ("fine things are difficult") is invoked in three dialogues in the Platonic corpus: "Hippias Major," "Cratylus" and "Republic." In this paper, I argue that the context in which the proverb arises reveals Socrates' considerable pedagogical dexterity as he uses the proverb to rebuke his interlocutor in one dialogue but…

  2. 77 FR 66180 - Notice of Vacancies on the U.S. Section of the U.S.-Iraq Business Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-02

    ... Dialogue (Business Dialogue or Dialogue) as a bilateral forum to facilitate private sector business growth... areas: --Factors that affect the growth of private sector business in Iraq, including disincentives to... regulations, to promote private sector business growth in Iraq; --Promotion of business opportunities in...

  3. 78 FR 72640 - Notice of Vacancies on the U.S. Section of the U.S.-Iraq Business Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... Dialogue (Business Dialogue or Dialogue) as a bilateral forum to facilitate private sector business growth..., amending, enforcing, or repealing laws and regulations, to promote private sector business growth in Iraq... International Trade Administration Notice of Vacancies on the U.S. Section of the U.S.-Iraq Business...

  4. What Makes Physics Difficult?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornek, Funda; Robinson, William R.; Haugan, Mark P.

    2008-01-01

    According to many students, introductory physics is difficult. We are investigating what students believe makes physics difficult and what can be done to overcome these difficulties. Our investigation includes an initial free-response survey given to approximately 1400 students in an introductory physics course and a second survey, which was given…

  5. Dialogues on modern physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sachs, Mendel

    1998-01-01

    In this book, important conceptual developments of the two major revolutions of modern physics - the quantum and relativity theories - are presented in a nonmathematical, dialectical form of dialogue. The implications of conflicting philosophical attitudes of these revolutions in physics and applications to topics such as cosmology/astrophysics and high energy physics are emphasized. It is argued that for any substantial progress in our understanding of 21st century physics, it will be necessary to resolve these 20th century conflicts. These richly rewarding dialogues provide a starting point

  6. The promise of dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Louise Jane

    It has become commonplace to employ dialogue-based approaches in producing and communicating knowledge in diverse fields. Here, “dialogue” has become a buzzword that promises democratic, participatory processes of mutual learning and knowledge co-production. But what does “dialogue” actually entail...... in the fields in which it is practised and how can we analyse those practices in ways that take account of their complexities? The Promise of Dialogue presents a novel theoretical framework for analysing the dialogic turn in the production and communication of knowledge that builds bridges across three research...

  7. Difficult Doctors, Difficult Patients: Building Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Patricia F; Wescom, Elise; Carlos, Ruth C

    2016-12-01

    Effective doctor-patient communication facilitates the therapeutic relationship, promotes patient physical and mental health, and improves physician satisfaction. Methods of teaching effective communication use a range of techniques, typically combining didactic instruction with simulated communication encounters and reflective discussion. Rarely are patients and physicians exposed to these instructions as colearners. The evidence for the utility of graphic stories, comics, and cartoons to improve patient comprehension and self-regulation is small but encouraging. The authors describe the use of graphic medicine as a teaching tool for engendering empathy from both the physician and the patient for the other during a shared clinical encounter. This use of educational comics in a colearning experience represents a new use of the medium as a teaching tool. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Dialogue on Dialogue on Dialogic Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Sullivan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available It appears that in September, 2011, Rome experienced much more than a dialogue on dialogic pedagogy but a gladiatorial clash of personalities and ideas. Heat, we are told, was generated (above, p.1 and in the dissipation of this heat on to the page, even the reader gets hot and flushed. We are told that arguments “fail” (above, p.16; that terms “are not clearly defined” (p.21, breakthroughs in classification (e.g. epistemological dialogical pedagogy are tackled and dragged down to personal eccentricities “his so-called epistemological dialogical pedagogy” (p.22, politeness tries to get a grip periodically, “I agree. But maybe I agree with Kiyo only to a point” but shouting (e.g. capital letters/underlining terms – e.g. “NOT the exclusive practice” (p.26 and assertions take over. Accusation fly - sometimes to the point of legal charges “I charge the Epistemological Pedagogical Dialogue II with...” (p.29.

  9. Formal systems for persuasion dialogue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakken, Henry

    This article reviews formal systems that regulate persuasion dialogues. In such dialogues two or more participants aim to resolve a difference of opinion, each trying to persuade the other participants to adopt their point of view. Systems for persuasion dialogue have found application in various

  10. Empowering Dialogues in Humanistic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloni, Nimrod

    2013-01-01

    In this article I propose a conception of empowering educational dialogue within the framework of humanistic education. It is based on the notions of Humanistic Education and Empowerment, and draws on a large and diverse repertoire of dialogues--from the classical Socratic, Confucian and Talmudic dialogues, to the modern ones associated with the…

  11. Dialogue in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Uyen Tran

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available What is the meaning of “dialogue” in education? Why is dialogue important in learning processes? Tran proposes a short review of the literature, starting with Vygotsky and ending with a new field of research in informal learning - conversations among the public visiting museums as a collaborative environment for learning.

  12. Capabilities for Intercultural Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    The capabilities approach offers a valuable analytical lens for exploring the challenge and complexity of intercultural dialogue in contemporary settings. The central tenets of the approach, developed by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum, involve a set of humanistic goals including the recognition that development is a process whereby people's…

  13. Ludics, dialogue and inferentialism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Lecomte

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we try to show that Ludics, a (pre-logical framework invented by J-Y. Girard, enables us to rethink some of the relationships between Philosophy, Semantics and Pragmatics. In particular, Ludics helps to shed light on the nature of dialogue and to articulate features of Brandom's inferentialism.

  14. Capabilities for Intercultural Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    The capabilities approach offers a valuable analytical lens for exploring the challenge and complexity of intercultural dialogue in contemporary settings. The central tenets of the approach, developed by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum, involve a set of humanistic goals including the recognition that development is a process whereby people's…

  15. Psychopathology in difficult asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.C.; van Son, M.J.M.; Keimpema, A.R.; van Ranst, D; Pommer, A; Meijer, J.W.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Within the asthma population, difficult asthma (DA) is a severe condition in which patients present with frequent exacerbations, hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The identification and treatment of psychopathology is included in the management of DA. Psychopathology is supposed

  16. WHAT MAKES CHEMISTRY DIFFICULT?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IICBA01

    regarded as a difficult subject for students by many researchers, teachers and science educators. [7-8] because ... Learning difficulties are important for both teaching and learning. Both ..... Concept –Cartoons as a strategy in teaching, learning.

  17. Psychopathology in difficult asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.C.; van Son, M.J.M.; Keimpema, A.R.; van Ranst, D; Pommer, A; Meijer, J.W.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Within the asthma population, difficult asthma (DA) is a severe condition in which patients present with frequent exacerbations, hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The identification and treatment of psychopathology is included in the management of DA. Psychopathology is supposed

  18. Intercultural Dialogue: Cultural Dialogues of Equals or Cultural Dialogues of Unequals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbino, John

    2011-01-01

    This article has two aims. The first aim of the article is to show some emerging problems and questions facing intercultural dialogue. This involves a critique of intercultural dialogue by situating it within emerging models of cultural change. The second aim of the article is to show alternative approaches to cultural dialogues. This involves the…

  19. The Intersection of Dialogue and Low Transactional Distance: Considerations for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    The theory of transactional distance has been subjected to a variety of empirical tests and philosophical critiques. Throughout this process, the variable of dialogue has attracted much attention. Although dialogue has proven difficult to measure and define, it is widely regarded as an ideal outcome of the teacher-learner transaction. Considered…

  20. Formatting Design Dialogues – Games and Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva; Messeter, Jörn; Binder, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    . Next we look more closely at what constitutes game and play, we discuss other authors’ use of games in collaborative settings and finally we examine the board game as a particularly interesting game format. In the second part of the article we present and discuss two board games: the User Game......This article discusses design games as a particular genre for formatting design dialogues. In the first part of the article we review the participatory design literature for game-oriented framings of co-design, and discuss why literal game formats are attractive for facilitating design dialogues...... and the Landscape Game. We show how these games respond to particular challenges, and how they have interesting characteristics in being both ‘as-if’ worlds to explore and shared representations of what the players accomplish. In the last section of the article we discuss how new games may be designed and played...

  1. Trinitarian paradigm for dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derdziuk Andrzej

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A dialogue as a social reality consists, first and foremost, in communication between those who realize that they are called to notice and to accept the other and to treat him or her with proper respect. Such a dialogue may be motivated either by the desire to share the good or by the willingness to avoid conflict. The aforementioned approaches are marked by distinctly different attitudes, which are not only rooted in two different methodologies and have two different aims, but they also encompass two diverse procedures. More importantly, engaging in dialogue may also be motivated by realizing one’s own mission in life, i.e. acting in harmony with the spiritual nature of the human being, who is a relational being. Upon realizing his or her likeness to the Triune God, i.e. the inseparable communion of the Divine Persons, a Christian discovers that the Holy Trinity constitutes the model and source for his or her own involvement in maintaining relationships with other people.

  2. Utilizing Statistical Dialogue Act Processing in Verbmobil

    CERN Document Server

    Reithinger, N; Reithinger, Norbert; Maier, Elisabeth

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we present a statistical approach for dialogue act processing in the dialogue component of the speech-to-speech translation system \\vm. Statistics in dialogue processing is used to predict follow-up dialogue acts. As an application example we show how it supports repair when unexpected dialogue states occur.

  3. Dialogue on Dialogic Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Matusov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In September 2011 in Rome at the International Society for Cultural and Activity Research conference, Eugene Matusov (USA, Kiyotaka Miyazaki (Japan, Jayne White (New Zealand, and Olga Dysthe (Norway organized a symposium on Dialogic Pedagogy. Formally during the symposium and informally after the symposium several heated discussions started among the participants about the nature of dialogic pedagogy. The uniting theme of these discussions was a strong commitment by all four participants to apply the dialogic framework developed by Soviet-Russian philosopher and literary theoretician Bakhtin to education. In this special issue, Eugene Matusov (USA and Kiyotaka Miyazaki (Japan have developed only three of the heated issues discussed at the symposium in a form of dialogic exchanges (dialogue-disagreements. We invited our Dialogic Pedagogy colleagues Jayne White (New Zealand and Olga Dysthe (Norway to write commentaries on the dialogues. Fortunately, Jayne White kindly accepted the request and wrote her commentary. Unfortunately, Olga Dysthe could not participate due to her prior commitments to other projects. We also invited Ana Marjanovic-Shane (USA, Beth Ferholt (USA, Rupert Wegerif (UK, and Paul Sullivan (UK to comment on Eugene-Kiyotaka dialogue-disagreement.                The first two heated issues were initiated by Eugene Matusov by providing a typology of different conceptual approaches to Dialogic Pedagogy that he had noticed in education. Specifically, the debate with Kiyotaka Miyazaki (and the other two participants was around three types of Dialogic Pedagogy defined by Eugene Matusov: instrumental, epistemological, and ontological types of Dialogic Pedagogy. Specifically, Eugene Matusov subscribes to ontological dialogic pedagogy arguing that dialogic pedagogy should be built around students’ important existing or emergent life interests, concerns, questions, and needs. He challenged both instrumental dialogic

  4. Discourse Obligations in Dialogue Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Traum, D R; Traum, David R.; Allen, James F.

    1994-01-01

    We show that in modeling social interaction, particularly dialogue, the attitude of obligation can be a useful adjunct to the popularly considered attitudes of belief, goal, and intention and their mutual and shared counterparts. In particular, we show how discourse obligations can be used to account in a natural manner for the connection between a question and its answer in dialogue and how obligations can be used along with other parts of the discourse context to extend the coverage of a dialogue system.

  5. Research on Spoken Dialogue Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aist, Gregory; Hieronymus, James; Dowding, John; Hockey, Beth Ann; Rayner, Manny; Chatzichrisafis, Nikos; Farrell, Kim; Renders, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    Research in the field of spoken dialogue systems has been performed with the goal of making such systems more robust and easier to use in demanding situations. The term "spoken dialogue systems" signifies unified software systems containing speech-recognition, speech-synthesis, dialogue management, and ancillary components that enable human users to communicate, using natural spoken language or nearly natural prescribed spoken language, with other software systems that provide information and/or services.

  6. Dialogue as base for learning professional practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Birgit Heimann

    2006-01-01

    and support during this transition are a major causes of anxiety. Morover, findings highlight the importance of clinicians and academic nurses working together to ensure that students are provided with the best possible opportunities for clinical learning. This paper discusses the dialogue as base......The ongoing debate and recent literature studies show that newly qualified nurses do not have the clinical experiences and qualifications required in nursing practice. Findings reveal that the transition from student nurse to staff nurse is a difficult time and that perceived lack of knowledge...

  7. Making marketing difficult

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Gitte

    2005-01-01

    embraced by the market-place, while maintaining the old scientific alienation from political life. The case is made that modern science was born ambiguous towards the market-place, and that such ambivalence - relating to different interpretations of the idea of knowledge as a common good - is still...... to be encountered among scientists. Drawing on series of interviews with scientists from bioscience and biotechnology it is argued that, on the one hand, scientists are into marketing and PR exercises; but, on the other hand, they also voice a demand that journalists should make such marketing difficult...

  8. A Difficult Diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primholdt, Nina; Primdahl, Jette; Hendricks, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    the onset of symptoms to diagnosis of 5.4 years. The analysis resulted in the following three themes: 'Daily living and psychological reactions', 'A difficult diagnosis' and 'Working life and identity'. CONCLUSIONS: It took a long time to make the correct diagnosis, and the period before diagnosis...... framework was grounded in critical psychology, and the analysis was based on Kvale and Brinkmann's meaning condensation. RESULTS: The five men interviewed were 21-37 years old. At the time of the interview, the participants had been diagnosed with AS for an average of 2.6 years, with an average time from...

  9. Making marketing difficult

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Gitte

    2005-01-01

    embraced by the market-place, while maintaining the old scientific alienation from political life. The case is made that modern science was born ambiguous towards the market-place, and that such ambivalence - relating to different interpretations of the idea of knowledge as a common good - is still...... to be encountered among scientists. Drawing on series of interviews with scientists from bioscience and biotechnology it is argued that, on the one hand, scientists are into marketing and PR exercises; but, on the other hand, they also voice a demand that journalists should make such marketing difficult...

  10. Dialogue as Data in Learning Analytics for Productive Educational Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Simon; Littleton, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a novel, conceptually driven stance on the state of the contemporary analytic challenges faced in the treatment of dialogue as a form of data across on- and offline sites of learning. In prior research, preliminary steps have been taken to detect occurrences of such dialogue using automated analysis techniques. Such advances…

  11. Quantum Dialogue Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAN Zhong-Xiao; ZHANG Zhan-Jun; LI Yong

    2005-01-01

    @@ An entanglement-based quantum dialogue protocol [Phys. Lett. A 328 (2004) 6] is proven to be insecure: that is, in the protocol an eavesdropper can steal the secret messages without being detected provided that he/she adopts the intercept-and-resend attack strategy. We modify the protocol, I.e. In the control mode, by introducing and randomly choosing two sets of measuring basis: the intercept-and-resend attack can be accordingly detected. Hence, within the present version two users can securely and simultaneously exchange their secret messages.

  12. Silent images in dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Isabel; Sandford-Richardson, Elizabeth; Richardson, Martin; Bernardo, Luis Miguel; Crespo, Helder

    2016-03-01

    In this series of digital art holograms and lenticulars, we used the HoloCam Portable Light System with the 35 mm cameras, Canon IS3 and the Canon 700D, to capture the image information, it was then edited on the computer using Motion 5 and Final Cut Pro X programs. We are presenting several actions in the digital holographic space. The figures are in dialogue within the holographic space and the viewer, in front of the holographic plate. In holography the time of the image is the time of the viewer present. And that particular feature is what distinguishes digital holography from other media.

  13. Assessing Knowledge in Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tackney, Charles T.; Strømgren, Ole; Sato, Toyoko

    2013-01-01

    The Synopsis–Based Oral Examination (S–BOE) is described as deployed in international management education programs in a Danish business school. It assesses students in light of specified learning objectives through time–constrained presentation and dialogue. The format is premised on prior...... submission of a synopsis, although the synopsis has no bearing on grade assessment. Practitioner experience and student feedback suggest that students experience this type of examination as an important learning experience, in itself, in addition to testing course–related knowledge. We reviewed the current...

  14. A Vision of Social Justice in Intergroup Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Jessica Belue; Quaye, Stephen John

    2016-01-01

    Intergroup dialogues (IGD)--face-to-face, structured interactions between people of different social identities--is one educational intervention used to foster engagement across differences and to promote social justice. Using an 18-month case study methodology, we examined the experiences of IGD students and facilitators at one campus to gain a…

  15. Group dialogue empowers Brazilian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiani, R; Becker, J

    1995-11-01

    In response to an alarming rise in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among Brazilian women during the early 1990s, the Sociedade Civil Bem-Estar Familiar no Brazil (BEMFAM) developed a project that integrates HIV prevention with clinical services, community-based prevention activities, and sexually transmitted disease diagnosis and treatment. Preliminary interviews with clinic clients revealed that women's fears they would be considered unfaithful were impeding their ability to suggest condom use to their sexual partners. Condom use within a relationship was considered appropriate only for pregnancy prevention. To facilitate dialogue about sexual health, BEMFAM developed a women's group intervention project. All women who attend a BEMFAM clinic are invited to participate in a one-hour group discussion before receiving medical services. Novela-style booklets with stories and characters women can relate to their own lives are used to stimulate discussion. Participants learn to use condoms correctly by putting them on a penis model and anticipate situations in which they would be able to negotiate condom use. The group setting enables women to gain confidence and practice assertiveness in a non-threatening, supportive environment. Their identification with other women's stories empowers women to take control of their health and sexual lives. Between October 1994 and July 1995, 3464 women participated in group discussions organized by BEMFAM and 40,688 condoms were distributed; 18% of these women returned to the clinic for additional condoms.

  16. Smart Dialogue for Smart Citizens: Assertive Approaches for Strategic Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidoro Fasolino

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It is very important to know how to communicate, but even more important is knowing how to listen. There is no dialogue without listening. Listening and speaking can generate a virtuous cycle that, enriching the field of information, allows the introduction of essential elements of innovation. It is relevant in this context the assertive ability of who manages and coordinates the decision-making processes. The potential of new approaches based on assertiveness are the new frontier of research discipline that is able to meet future challenges aiming to contribute to the construction of places and forms of living together in the growing interest of fairness and justice. Assertive facilitator knows how to guide difficult people and handle very hard situations without adopting manipulative behaviors. He is able to detect the potential conflict and to bring to light the reasons for disagreement , softening the tone and avoiding any possible uncontrolled escalation. He encourages debates and open discussions; he has to build links too, fueling reports profits, collaborating with others toward common goals; speaking and discussing in groups and among groups; seeking solutions in which, both parties, come out winning. So the view expressed is argument of discussion in the development of the tools of urban structure, with the aim of implementing a participatory methodology in the development of planning tools. We propose an application in the series of meetings of initial preparatory participation to the formation of a Preliminary Plan for a medium size town.

  17. Concepts of dialogue as counterterrorism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Ulrik Pram

    2012-01-01

    of information, partnerships and dialogue. This article analyses Danish counterterrorism policy narratives to identify the concepts of dialogue implied and the positions awarded to less-than-radical Muslim Others. This article finds that Muslims might – especially after the Danish Muhammad cartoon affair...

  18. Judicial Dialogue and Human Rights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, A.; Kjos, H.E.

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive analysis of the extent, method, purpose and effects of domestic and international courts' judicial dialogue on human rights. The analysis covers national courts' judicial dialogue from different regions of the world, including Eastern Europe, Latin America, Canada,

  19. John Dewey Lives: A Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, William C.; Schubert, William H.

    2012-01-01

    This dialogue is an edited version of a dialogue between William C. Ayers and William H. Schubert at the November 10-12, 2011, meeting of the Progressive Education Network hosted by the Francis W. Parker School in Chicago, Illinois. It was the opening keynote session on the evening of November 10. Ayers interviewed Schubert, who acted as John…

  20. Imre Lakatos's Use of Dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Judith Maxwell

    This paper uses a book, "Proofs and Refutations: The Logic of Mathematical Discovery," as an example of Lakatos's use of dialogue. The book was originally adapted from his dissertation and influenced by Polya and Popper. His discussion of the Euler conjecture is summarized. Three purposes for choosing the dialogue form for the book were…

  1. Dealing with difficult pasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAtackney, Laura

    2013-01-01

    with in the post-conflict context differs dramatically. Robben Island, in South Africa, closed in 1996 and was quickly transformed into a museum (1997) and then World Heritage site (1999), thus confirming its significance to both the national and international community as a symbolic cornerstone of the new...... ‘Rainbow’ nation. In comparison, the best known political prison in Northern Ireland – Long Kesh / Maze – closed in 2000 and despite three different proposals for its future ‘regeneration’ its remains are closed to the public whilst plans for a conflict transformation centre based at the site tentatively...... develop. I argue that such politically loaded manifestations of difficult pasts are highly significant during post-conflict renegotiations of society. They act as reminders of what happened, a commentary on how far society has – or has not moved on – and the potential for future relations and directions...

  2. Dialogue with computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippazzi, F.

    1991-03-01

    As to whether or not it would be possible to make a computer maintain dialogue with its operator and give plausible statements without actually 'understanding' what is being spoken about, the answer is, within certain limits, yes. An idea of this was given about 25 years ago with MIT's J. Weizenbaum's ELIZA program, named after G. B. Shaw's Pygmalion Cockney flower-seller who learned to talk like a duchess. The operating mechanism by which a computer would be able to do likewise must satisfy three prerequisites: the language must be natural; the speech coherent; and the answers should be consistent for any given question even when that question is asked in a slightly different form. To make this possible, the dialogue must take place within a limited context (in fact, the ELIZA experiment involved a simulated doctor/patient in-studio conversation). This article presents a portion of that conversation, in which the doctor, i.e., the computer, evasively answers his patient's questions without actually ever coming to grips with the issue, to illustrate how such a man-machine interface mechanism works.

  3. Theorizing plurivocal dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Ann

    2014-01-01

    and organizational discourse studies. These perspectives are elaborated on and implemented to frame, discuss and criticize the methodological basis of a case study which the author helped to initiate: a plurivocal, participatory research- based leadership forum involving professional leaders, researchers...... as the theoretical basis for the analysis. The article discusses how the Bakhtinian conception of dialogue offers a particular way of framing power, participation, meaning-making, knowledge pro- duction, and identity work in relation to the leadership forum and collab- orative research processes in general......- sider the messiness and tensions immanent in (organizational) interaction and the co-authoring of knowledge. This approach carries great potential for challenging crystallized knowledge forms and taken-for-granted ways of doing things (dispositifs and authoritative discourses)....

  4. Towards a wider dialogue

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    This week, I had the rewarding experience of taking part in a Wilton Park meeting examining three very different world-views: science, philosophy and theology. Wilton Park describes itself as a forum for analysing and advancing the agenda on global policy challenges, and over the years it has developed an enviable reputation for delivering authoritative reports drawn from bringing international experts together under the same roof for two days to discuss issues of topical relevance.   Participation is by invitation and there are no observers: everyone is there because they have something to bring to the discussion. Wilton Park reports always have their finger on the zeitgeist, appropriately, perhaps, for an institution born of Winston Churchill’s vision for reconciliation and dialogue in post-war Europe. When I learned that Wilton Park was running a series of meetings examining the role of religion in modern society, and that it was looking at the possibility of holding an event in...

  5. Dialogue, a critical space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Pura Moreno Moreno

    2016-05-01

    The dialectic method explores two approaches enriched thanks to  otherness, to what the other person says. The dialogue, without apparent end, represents a way of invitation to understanding where the movement of ideas along the time favors the appropriate open space to generate a  theory that relativizes the polyphonic speeches.The critique always arises  from a question in the search of the objective thing, and therefore besides being based on solid arguments, must be dialectic. Any trial, in this  framework of doubt, it is susceptible to conflicting interpretations; therefore the formulation of a question demanding -thesis - waiting for a reply -  antithesis - is an appropriate procedure able to test any kind of truth.

  6. Formatting Design Dialogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva; Binder, Thomas; Messeter, Jörn

    2008-01-01

    in collaborative settings and finally we examine the board game as a particularly interesting game format. In the second part of the article we present and discuss two board games: the User Game and the Landscape Game. We show how these games respond to particular challenges, and how they have interesting......This article discusses design games as a particular genre for formatting design dialogues. In the first part of the article we review the participatory design literature for game-oriented framings of co-design. We look at what constitutes game and play, we discuss other authors’ use of games...... characteristics in being both ‘as-if’ worlds to explore and shared representations of what the players accomplish. In the last section of the article we discuss how new games may be designed and played and what makes a good design game....

  7. Interfaith dialogue as moral encounter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galal, Lise Paulsen

    The concept of interfaith dialogue has been introduced and developed by scholars of different religions. The aim has been to find solutions from within religion to handle and optimise encounters with religious ‘Others’. Furthermore, interfaith dialogue has increasingly become a tool to solve...... problems of integration and geopolitical conflicts. Thus the focus has changed from religion as the solution to an ontologically given differentiation, to religion being the problem that must be transgressed in order to meet on equal terms. In this paper, I discuss the setup of interfaith dialogue meetings...

  8. Diálogos de aprendizagem com gestores da vigilância sanitária: percepções do facilitador / Learning dialogues with managers of health surveillance: perceptions of facilitator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Ferreira Menezes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Apresento uma apreciação crítica de ser facilitador ao formar especialistas em Gestão da Vigilância Sanitária, cujo desempenho exigiu habilidades inerentes à metodologia ativa em que o especializando é conduzido a refletir sobre suas práticas nas relações de trabalho. Enfatizo, acima de tudo, a sistematização de saberes e experiência ao desempenhar essa função, que teve por objetivo formar gestores atuantes no sistema. O curso proposto pela Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária foi formulado por expertises da área e coordenado pelo Instituto Sírio Libanês de Ensino e Pesquisa. Tal formulação calcou-se em perfil de competência baseado em três eixos — gestão do risco sanitário, do trabalho e da educação — que delimitam o escopo do trabalho e da atuação profissional. A abordagem construtivista adotada norteia a proposta pedagógica, aplicada com estratégias de aprendizagem baseada em problemas e da problematização, em que o professor assume o papel de facilitador. Ao final do processo analiso a positividade metodológica, visto que a abordagem construtivista permitiu edificar novos saberes que partem das experiências pessoais, tanto do facilitador quanto dos especializandos, além de valorizar criticamente as vivências do trabalho. Especialmente, foi possível observar o aprendizado compartilhado entre os indivíduos, a integração do grupo que possibilitou a (reconstrução de experiências no coletivo, aspectos esses que trazem raros significados para a qualificação dos gestores da vigilância sanitária. --------------------------------------------------------------- Present a critical assessment to be facilitator to train specialists in Management of Health Surveillance, whose performance demanded skills inherent in the active methodology that specializing is led to refl ect on their practices in labor relations. Emphasize, above all, the systematization of knowledge and experience to this

  9. Improving the Efficiency of Dialogue in Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Kristopher J.; Britt, M. Anne; Millis, Keith; Graesser, Arthur C.

    2012-01-01

    The current studies investigated the efficient use of dialogue in intelligent tutoring systems that use natural language interaction. Such dialogues can be relatively time-consuming. This work addresses the question of how much dialogue is needed to produce significant learning gains. In Experiment 1, a full dialogue condition and a read-only…

  10. A difficult beginning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneth Agampodi

    2013-10-01

    receives. But the manuscripts are submitted according to the quality of the journal (impact factor, indexation, circulation,. This is a vicious circle almost similar to what we and many others faced as start up researchers yesteryear. Without a grant, it is difficult to do research but to receive a grant you have to show research (publications. Journal impact factors should not be used to assess individual researcher’s contribution to science and for hiring, promotion, or funding decisions (2. Impact factors can be manipulated by journal editors and Thomson Scientific (the private company who creates impact factors is neither transparent about the process or have a clear policy (3.We are determined to elevate the quality of the journal. You will be the jury, but don’t be a silent assassin. Please let us know what you think at least by an E-mail. Otherwise, same fate that happened to our ancient kingdom of Rajarata will befall on the AMJ!

  11. LITERATURE REVIEW ON SOCIAL DIALOGUE IN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Otreba

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article depicts the most important aspects of social dialogue in Poland: definitions and dimensions of the term, basic research questions, dialogue partners and factors influencing the quality of social dialogue. The potential of subsequent research issues are advocated: institutionalized forms and bottom-up models of social dialogue, public policies aiming at enhancement of the analyzed process. Moreover, the social dialogue can be treated as a public policy itself.

  12. LITERATURE REVIEW ON SOCIAL DIALOGUE IN POLAND

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The article depicts the most important aspects of social dialogue in Poland: definitions and dimensions of the term, basic research questions, dialogue partners and factors influencing the quality of social dialogue. The potential of subsequent research issues are advocated: institutionalized forms and bottom-up models of social dialogue, public policies aiming at enhancement of the analyzed process. Moreover, the social dialogue can be treated as a public policy itself.

  13. Verbal redundancy aids memory for filmed entertainment dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkin, Michael P; Harris, Richard J; Miranda, Andrew T

    2014-01-01

    Three studies investigated the effects of presentation modality and redundancy of verbal content on recognition memory for entertainment film dialogue. U.S. participants watched two brief movie clips and afterward answered multiple-choice questions about information from the dialogue. Experiment 1 compared recognition memory for spoken dialogue in the native language (English) with subtitles in English, French, or no subtitles. Experiment 2 compared memory for material in English subtitles with spoken dialogue in English, French, or no sound. Experiment 3 examined three control conditions with no spoken or captioned material in the native language. All participants watched the same video clips and answered the same questions. Performance was consistently good whenever English dialogue appeared in either the subtitles or sound, and best of all when it appeared in both, supporting the facilitation of verbal redundancy. Performance was also better when English was only in the subtitles than when it was only spoken. Unexpectedly, sound or subtitles in an unfamiliar language (French) modestly improved performance, as long as there was also a familiar channel. Results extend multimedia research on verbal redundancy for expository material to verbal information in entertainment media.

  14. Parents Speak Out: A Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carolyn; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Three parents who met each other for the first time talk about their experiences with elementary school counselors. The dialogue emphasizes both the concerns and the positive impressions that parents have regarding the work of a counselor. (Author)

  15. Chatbot trained on movie dialogue

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A chatbot is a computer program that engages in written or spoken conversation with a human user. This project aims to investigate the possibility of training a chatbot in using movie dialogue in generating the response. Movie dialogue can be found in both movie scripts as well as subtitles, though using subtitles is much easier as they follow a special formatting. Using one subtitle as a response to each word found in the preceding subtitle, the implemented chatbot links together subtitles. ...

  16. Addressivity in cogenerative dialogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pei-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Ashraf Shady's paper provides a first-hand reflection on how a foreign teacher used cogens as culturally adaptive pedagogy to address cultural misalignments with students. In this paper, Shady drew on several cogen sessions to showcase his journey of using different forms of cogens with his students. To improve the quality of cogens, one strategy he used was to adjust the number of participants in cogens. As a result, some cogens worked and others did not. During the course of reading his paper, I was impressed by his creative and flexible use of cogens and at the same time was intrigued by the question of why some cogens work and not others. In searching for an answer, I found that Mikhail Bakhtin's dialogism, especially the concept of addressivity, provides a comprehensive framework to address this question. In this commentary, I reanalyze the cogen episodes described in Shady's paper in the light of dialogism. My analysis suggests that addressivity plays an important role in mediating the success of cogens. Cogens with high addressivity function as internally persuasive discourse that allows diverse consciousnesses to coexist and so likely affords productive dialogues. The implications of addressivity in teaching and learning are further discussed.

  17. A new dialogue

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    This is the first of a series of messages that I, or a member of my management team, will be writing for every printed issue of the Bulletin throughout my mandate. Over the coming months and years, I’m hoping to cover many subjects related to the life of CERN, from the science of the LHC to equal opportunities. However, if I’m to cover these things effectively and open up a dialogue with you, then efficient, open and direct communication with the broad CERN community is going to be essential. Therefore, I’ve chosen communication as my first topic. We need to develop the culture of communication at CERN. The Bulletin should be the place that you turn to for authoritative, timely and accurate information about the Organization. In addition, important news to be conveyed quickly should arrive in your e-mail box, on the CERN web pages, and be displayed on screens around the site. And if you have something to say, there should be a forum where your voice can be heard...

  18. Extracting Topic Words from the Web for Dialogue Sentence Generation

    OpenAIRE

    下川, 尚亮; Rafal, Rzepka; 荒木, 健治

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we extract topic words from Internet Relay Chat utterances. In such dialogues there are many more spoken language expressions than in blogs or usual Web pages and we presume that the always changing topic is difficult to determine only by nouns which are usually used for topic recognition. In this paper we propose a method for determining a conversation topic considering also association adjectives and verbs retrieved from the Web. Our first experiments show that extracting asso...

  19. Encountering Carl Rogers: His Views on Facilitating Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landreth, Garry L.

    1984-01-01

    Presents Carl Rogers' views on facilitating groups, as expressed in a telephone dialogue seminar with graduate students in counselor education at North Texas State University. Discusses extended group marathons, cocounseling, nonverbal group exercises and the future of group work. (JAC)

  20. Proactive spoken dialogue interaction in multi-party environments

    CERN Document Server

    Strauß, Petra-Maria

    2010-01-01

    This book describes spoken dialogue systems that act as independent dialogue partners in the conversation with and between users. It presents novel methods for dialogue history and dialogue management.

  1. Multi-stakeholder Virtual Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Niels; Mühlbacher, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces the special issue on multi-stakeholder virtual dialogue. Research as well as managerial practice in marketing has traditionally focused on single stakeholders and a one-way communication perspective. This special issue takes a novel approach by directing attention to the s......This article introduces the special issue on multi-stakeholder virtual dialogue. Research as well as managerial practice in marketing has traditionally focused on single stakeholders and a one-way communication perspective. This special issue takes a novel approach by directing attention...... success. While marketing literature increasingly recognizes that divers stakeholders have an impact on a company''s success, little is known about how virtual multi-stakeholder dialogue changes marketing research and management. This special issue provides insights on what roles stakeholders may play...... with what impact in virtual company-related interaction. The introductory article reviews seven articles and discusses their contributions to stakeholder marketing and virtual stakeholder interaction....

  2. Addressing diversity in schools through dialogue and compromise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tore Vincents

    2018-01-01

    This article evaluates a decentralized Danish model for dealing with cultural and religious diversity at individual schools. This evaluation is based upon normative theories of toleration, recognition and domination and examines whether the model implies compromise with the (liberal) educational...... values stipulated in the national legislation. The model, reconstructed from government publications, is based on reaching accommodation through dialogue between school staff and parents/students, with the pragmatic aim of facilitating the participation of students in everyday school activities...

  3. Handling emotions in human-computer dialogues

    CERN Document Server

    Pittermann, Johannes; Minker, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    This book presents novel methods to perform robust speech-based emotion recognition at low complexity. It describes a flexible dialogue model to conveniently integrate emotions and other dialogue-influencing parameters in human-computer interaction.

  4. Becoming a person of dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Stacy A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is imperative that Social Sciences examine in depth the underlying issues in human relations that have contributed to divisions among persons, within families, institutions, between nations and religions. If we accept that dialogue is the main currency of statecraft, diplomacy, negotiation, mediation and peacebuilding (Rieker and Turn 2015, then we need to ask ourselves, what are the characteristics of a person capable of engaging in dialogue? Are they characteristics that can be taught? Are they characteristics that make us human?

  5. Editorial. Dialogue, Communication and Collaboration: Aspects of Philosophy and Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovilė Barevičiūtė

    2016-03-01

    versus Antirealism in Science Education is a contribution by Seungbae Park, in which he attempts to define how the dialogue between teachers and students is possible, as he takes the position stating that the doctrine of scientific realism is much more effective than provided opportunities of scientific antirealism. And finally, Algis Mickūnas, in his article The Different Other and Dialogue, discusses the reasons why members of different communities find it difficult to establish dialogue-based relationships and why in some cases they remain imprisoned in the state of a monologue. This issue of the journal presents a truly wide field of investigations into opportunities and obstacles for communication, interaction and collaboration. It is pleasing to see that representatives of various humanities and social sciences joined the same dialogue. Looking forward to the productive insights in the future, the Editor would like to express her gratitude to the authors of this issue.

  6. Multimodal Dialogue Management - State of the art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui Huu Trung, B.H.T.

    This report is about the state of the art in dialogue management. We first introduce an overview of a multimodal dialogue system and its components. Second, four main approaches to dialogue management are described (finite-state and frame-based, information-state based and probabilistic, plan-based,

  7. History Museums and Social Cohesion: Building Identity, Bridging Communities, and Addressing Difficult Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Tracy Jean

    2011-01-01

    Museums have the capacity to enhance social cohesion, which is the product of a trusting, connected community. History museums and historic sites, in particular, can serve communities by stimulating dialogue on difficult issues, accurately representing all the people of a nation, and creating forums for discussion among groups with disparate…

  8. Dialogues in the COOL Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, S.I.P.; Kroeze, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Climate Options for the Long-term (COOL) Project is a participatory integrated assessment (PIA) comprising extensive dialogues at three levels: national, European and global. The objective of the COOL Project was to ‘develop strategic notions on how to achieve drastic reductions of greenhouse ga

  9. The Play of Socratic Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Proponents of philosophy for children generally see themselves as heirs to the "Socratic" tradition. They often claim too that children's aptitude for play leads them naturally to play with abstract, philosophical ideas. However in Plato's dialogues we find in the mouth of "Socrates" many warnings against philosophising with the young. Those…

  10. Dialogical Grammar: Varieties of Dialogue in Wittgenstein’s Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorit Lemberger

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The dialogical character of Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations has received scant attention in the literature, given the work’s status in his total oeuvre, and is dismissed as a marginal as compared to the other differences between the Tractatus and the Investigations. The main lines of interpretation that have been proposed see dialogue as a rhetorical technique intended to present erroneous positions and then refute them, as an exemplification of what can be expressed in language (McGinn 1997; Rhees 1998, or as a reflection of Wittgenstein’s informal teaching method (Malcolm 2001; Savickey et al. 1990. The present article adopts the perspective that Wittgenstein’s use of dialogue makes it possible to track the various modes of language-acts, consonant with his directions to examine the daily use of language (Wittgenstein 2009, §116 and esp. §132, “when language is, as it were, idling.” In his later inquiries, Wittgenstein frequently considers the nature of mental states, accompanied by an attempt to characterize the differences between them while at the same time dealing with the cases in which it is difficult to distinguish them. In this process he made a variety of uses of dialogue, each of which embodies a different aspect of language action.  Subsequently I will demonstrate that these different uses are not haphazard. A scrutiny of the nature of the dialogue can help us understand the nature of the activity carried out of the state of consciousness. Finally, I propose a distinction among three main types of dialogue: technical, conversational, and reflexive.

  11. Specialized Language Models using Dialogue Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Popovici, C; Popovici, Cosmin; Baggia, Paolo

    1996-01-01

    This paper analyses language modeling in spoken dialogue systems for accessing a database. The use of several language models obtained by exploiting dialogue predictions gives better results than the use of a single model for the whole dialogue interaction. For this reason several models have been created, each one for a specific system question, such as the request or the confirmation of a parameter. The use of dialogue-dependent language models increases the performance both at the recognition and at the understanding level, especially on answers to system requests. Moreover other methods to increase performance, like automatic clustering of vocabulary words or the use of better acoustic models during recognition, does not affect the improvements given by dialogue-dependent language models. The system used in our experiments is Dialogos, the Italian spoken dialogue system used for accessing railway timetable information over the telephone. The experiments were carried out on a large corpus of dialogues coll...

  12. Machine learning techniques in dialogue act recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Fišel

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This report addresses dialogue acts, their existing applications and techniques of automatically recognizing them, in Estonia as well as elsewhere. Three main applications are described: in dialogue systems to determine the intention of the speaker, in dialogue systems with machine translation to resolve ambiguities in the possible translation variants and in speech recognition to reduce word recognition error rate. Several recognition techniques are described on the surface level: how they work and how they are trained. A summary of the corresponding representation methods is provided for each technique. The paper also includes examples of applying the techniques to dialogue act recognition.The author comes to the conclusion that using the current evaluation metric it is impossible to compare dialogue act recognition techniques when these are applied to different dialogue act tag sets. Dialogue acts remain an open research area, with space and need for developing new recognition techniques and methods of evaluation.

  13. Effective communication during difficult conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, Jacquelyn M

    2013-06-01

    A strong interest and need exist in the workplace today to master the skills of conducting difficult conversations. Theories and strategies abound, yet none seem to have found the magic formula with universal appeal and success. If it is such an uncomfortable skill to master is it better to avoid or initiate such conversations with employees? Best practices and evidence-based management guide us to the decision that quality improvement dictates effective communication, even when difficult. This brief paper will offer some suggestions for strategies to manage difficult conversations with employees. Mastering the skills of conducting difficult conversations is clearly important to keeping lines of communication open and productive. Successful communication skills may actually help to avert confrontation through employee engagement, commitment and appropriate corresponding behavior

  14. Psychopathology in difficult asthma : Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.C.J.; van Son, M.A.C.; van Keimpema, A.R.J.; van Ranst, D.; Antonissen-Pommer, A.M.; Meijer, J.W.G.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Within the asthma population, difficult asthma (DA) is a severe condition in which patients present with frequent exacerbations, hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The identification and treatment of psychopathology is included in the management of DA. Psychopathology is supposed

  15. The personal created through dialogue: enhancing possibilities through the use of new media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue Clegg

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the relationships between a number of different developments in higher education pedagogy, which are subsumed under the broad heading of progress files. The overall concern of the paper is to explore the ways in which personal reflection and learning is enhanced through dialogue. The paper explores the ways learners engage in dialogue in two environments that use different aspects of digital technologies to support the development of portfolios. The findings from the case studies point to the ways in which different technologies facilitated personal reflection mediated through sharing and dialogue. We develop the idea of affordances as a relationship whereby the learner is involved in a purposeful engagement with the possibilities created by their environment. The affordance of digitised technologies in supporting dialogue is, therefore, conceptualised in relation to the characteristics of the learner, not as a simple technology relation.

  16. From Difficult Dialogues to Critical Conversations: Intersectionality in Our Teaching and Professional Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejano-Steele, AnnJanette; Hamington, Maurice; MacDonald, Lunden; Potter, Mark; Schafer, Shaun; Sgoutas, Arlene; Tull, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Effective diversity education requires that the instructor be knowledgeable and comfortable with the theories and issues of identity. Given the persistence of curricular ethnocentrism and the highly charged nature of contemporary identity narratives, the preparation of faculty to teach diversity effectively across academic disciplines is no small…

  17. The Possibilities for Reconciliation through Difficult Dialogues: Treaty Education as Peacebuilding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupper, Jennifer Anne

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the ongoing effects of colonialism on Aboriginal peoples in Canada and how these might be revealed and disrupted through particular curricular initiatives, informed by understandings of critical peacebuilding education. One such initiative, treaty education, has the potential to disturb dominant national narratives in…

  18. From Dialogue to Action: The Impact of Cross-Race Intergroup Dialogue on the Development of White College Students as Racial Allies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimo, Craig John

    2012-01-01

    Institutions of postsecondary education are poised to leverage the presence of racial diversity to educate for social change. The purpose of this study was to examine how a race/ethnicity intergroup dialogue facilitates the development of confidence and frequency of white college students' engagement in actions that are congruent with the…

  19. Figure analysis: An implementation dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Amy M

    2016-07-01

    Figure analysis is a novel active learning teaching technique that reinforces visual literacy. Small groups of students discuss diagrams in class in order to learn content. The instructor then gives a brief introduction and later summarizes the content of the figure. This teaching technique can be used in place of lecture as a mechanism to deliver information to students. Here, a "how to" guide is presented in the form of an in-class dialogue, displaying the difficulties in visual interpretation that some students may experience while figure analysis is being implemented in an upper-level, cell biology course. Additionally, the dialogue serves as a guide for instructors who may implement the active learning technique as they consider how to respond to students' concerns in class. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):345-348, 2016.

  20. Workplace aggression: beginning a dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLemore, Monica R

    2006-08-01

    The June 2005 Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing editorial titled "Communication: Whose Problem Is It?" (Griffin-Sobel, 2005) was written to begin a dialogue about a phenomenon frequently experienced yet rarely discussed: workplace aggression, also known as disruptive behavior. Prompted by a groundbreaking study published in the American Journal of Nursing by Rosenstein and O'Daniel (2005), the editorial challenged oncology nurses to begin to fix problems of communication. After reflecting on both of the articles and considering my own experience as a nurse manager, clinician, and scholar, I decided to explore the topic as it relates to nurse-to-nurse workplace aggression. The following is a summary of interviews with nurse managers, nurse practitioners, and nurse scientists about root causes and effective strategies to manage these sometimes complicated situations. This article is meant to continue the dialogue about the very sensitive issue. Confidentiality has been maintained, and I welcome your comments.

  1. Concepts of dialogue as counterterrorism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Ulrik Pram

    2012-01-01

    of information, partnerships and dialogue. This article analyses Danish counterterrorism policy narratives to identify the concepts of dialogue implied and the positions awarded to less-than-radical Muslim Others. This article finds that Muslims might – especially after the Danish Muhammad cartoon affair......Since 9/11, the terrorist is often awarded the position of the radical Other: the personified existential threat to the West. The counterterrorism strategy presented by the Danish government describes itself as covering a ‘broad spectrum’ of efforts. It includes an ‘active foreign policy......’ in relation to the Muslim world and an ‘active integration policy’ in relation to Muslim migrants. Both inside and outside the nation-state, efforts range from ‘hard power’ security strategies of elimination and control involving military, police and intelligence operations, to ‘soft power’ strategies...

  2. Inter-Religious Dialogue Models in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Sabri Wan Yusof

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, many organizations have involved in the implementation of inter-religious dialogue in Malaysia. However, there are stillthose who doubt the role and purpose of interreligious dialogue. This might be due to lack of information and understanding regardingthe methodology of dialogue and also about different types that it may take. The present study is aimed at exploring a few models ofinter-religious dialogue that have been practised by some organizations that actively involved in dialogue. The study focuses on a review of selected organizational or institutional dialoguemodels such as Center for Civilizational Dialogue (CCD, Students Representative Council of Malaysia Science University (HealthCampus and Inter-faith Spiritual Fellowship (INSaF. This study provides information concerning the various designs of inter-religiousdialogue model in Malaysia and proposes that different designs of inter-religious dialogue rely on its different types and goals. It is found that, the commonly practiced type of dialogue in Malaysia is educational type which focuses on exploring inter-religious commonalities as well as differences which consequently willincrease understanding and foster meaningful engagement between people of different ethnic and religious background in Malaysia. Thistype of dialogue is distinguished from conflict resolution types of dialogue which aims at identifying issues and generating action plansto conflicts or disputes.

  3. Navigating between Dialogue and Confrontation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    Interviews with political or organizational elites often constitute a valuable source of knowledge about organizational culture, values, and strategies. However, such interviews often confront the researcher with either reluctant or control-seeking respondents, especially for sensitive issues...... phronesis, Aristotle’s concept of practical rationality. A phronetic approach, involving reflections on the link between reason and emotions, is well suited for handling both dialogue and confrontation in the interview process. Empirically, the paper draws on interviews with representatives of trade unions...

  4. Stakeholder dialogue for sustainable service

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Human behavior threatens to ruin irrevocably our long-term existence; the downhill slide is steep and seemingly soon will be incurable. Shifting from unsustainable development would require substantial and far-reaching changes in lifestyles and living standards. As stakeholders (customers, consumers, shareholders, suppliers, distributors, employees, and local communities), through different kinds of dialogue we can influence organizations’ performance by applying pressure on them to change un...

  5. Spoken Dialogue Interfaces: Integrating Usability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliotopoulos, Dimitris; Stavropoulou, Pepi; Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    Usability is a fundamental requirement for natural language interfaces. Usability evaluation reflects the impact of the interface and the acceptance from the users. This work examines the potential of usability evaluation in terms of issues and methodologies for spoken dialogue interfaces along with the appropriate designer-needs analysis. It unfolds the perspective to the usability integration in the spoken language interface design lifecycle and provides a framework description for creating and testing usable content and applications for conversational interfaces. Main concerns include the problem identification of design issues for usability design and evaluation, the use of customer experience for the design of voice interfaces and dialogue, and the problems that arise from real-life deployment. Moreover it presents a real-life paradigm of a hands-on approach for applying usability methodologies in a spoken dialogue application environment to compare against a DTMF approach. Finally, the scope and interpretation of results from both the designer and the user standpoint of usability evaluation are discussed.

  6. Drastic Measures for Difficult Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galuszka, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses how colleges and universities are taking drastic measure for difficult times. Hit hard by the global financial crisis, colleges are cutting their budgets in ways that prompt fears about access and retention for minority students. Schools are considering layoffs, unpaid furloughs for faculty and staff, hiring freezes and…

  7. Introducing Spoken Dialogue Systems into Intelligent Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Heinroth, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Introducing Spoken Dialogue Systems into Intelligent Environments outlines the formalisms of a novel knowledge-driven framework for spoken dialogue management and presents the implementation of a model-based Adaptive Spoken Dialogue Manager(ASDM) called OwlSpeak. The authors have identified three stakeholders that potentially influence the behavior of the ASDM: the user, the SDS, and a complex Intelligent Environment (IE) consisting of various devices, services, and task descriptions. The theoretical foundation of a working ontology-based spoken dialogue description framework, the prototype implementation of the ASDM, and the evaluation activities that are presented as part of this book contribute to the ongoing spoken dialogue research by establishing the fertile ground of model-based adaptive spoken dialogue management. This monograph is ideal for advanced undergraduate students, PhD students, and postdocs as well as academic and industrial researchers and developers in speech and multimodal interactive ...

  8. A novel rescue technique for difficult intubation and difficult ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zestos, Maria M; Daaboul, Dima; Ahmed, Zulfiqar; Durgham, Nasser; Kaddoum, Roland

    2011-01-17

    We describe a novel non surgical technique to maintain oxygenation and ventilation in a case of difficult intubation and difficult ventilation, which works especially well with poor mask fit. Can not intubate, can not ventilate" (CICV) is a potentially life threatening situation. In this video we present a simulation of the technique we used in a case of CICV where oxygenation and ventilation were maintained by inserting an endotracheal tube (ETT) nasally down to the level of the naso-pharynx while sealing the mouth and nares for successful positive pressure ventilation. A 13 year old patient was taken to the operating room for incision and drainage of a neck abscess and direct laryngobronchoscopy. After preoxygenation, anesthesia was induced intravenously. Mask ventilation was found to be extremely difficult because of the swelling of the soft tissue. The face mask could not fit properly on the face due to significant facial swelling as well. A direct laryngoscopy was attempted with no visualization of the larynx. Oxygen saturation was difficult to maintain, with saturations falling to 80%. In order to oxygenate and ventilate the patient, an endotracheal tube was then inserted nasally after nasal spray with nasal decongestant and lubricant. The tube was pushed gently and blindly into the hypopharynx. The mouth and nose of the patient were sealed by hand and positive pressure ventilation was possible with 100% O2 with good oxygen saturation during that period of time. Once the patient was stable and well sedated, a rigid bronchoscope was introduced by the otolaryngologist showing extensive subglottic and epiglottic edema, and a mass effect from the abscess, contributing to the airway compromise. The airway was secured with an ETT tube by the otolaryngologist.This video will show a simulation of the technique on a patient undergoing general anesthesia for dental restorations.

  9. Building dialogue POMDPs from expert dialogues an end-to-end approach

    CERN Document Server

    Chinaei, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the Partially Observable Markov Decision Process (POMDP) framework applied in dialogue systems. It presents POMDP as a formal framework to represent uncertainty explicitly while supporting automated policy solving. The authors propose and implement an end-to-end learning approach for dialogue POMDP model components. Starting from scratch, they present the state, the transition model, the observation model and then finally the reward model from unannotated and noisy dialogues. These altogether form a significant set of contributions that can potentially inspire substantial further work. This concise manuscript is written in a simple language, full of illustrative examples, figures, and tables. Provides insights on building dialogue systems to be applied in real domain Illustrates learning dialogue POMDP model components from unannotated dialogues in a concise format Introduces an end-to-end approach that makes use of unannotated and noisy dialogue for learning each component of dialogue POM...

  10. Insights into the Dialogue Processing of VERBMOBIL

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandersson, J; Maier, E; Alexandersson, Jan; Reithinger, Norbert; Maier, Elisabeth

    1997-01-01

    We present the dialogue module of the speech-to-speech translation system VERBMOBIL. We follow the approach that the solution to dialogue processing in a mediating scenario can not depend on a single constrained processing tool, but on a combination of several simple, efficient, and robust components. We show how our solution to dialogue processing works when applied to real data, and give some examples where our module contributes to the correct translation from German to English.

  11. The Dialogic Turn: Dialogue or Violence?

    OpenAIRE

    Lidia Puigvert

    2012-01-01

    Individuals and social groups are increasingly using dialogue to take decisions, perform actions and solve conflicts in diverse social relationships, from international policies or globalization processes to personal friendships, labor relations or the intimacy of bedroom. When they do not use dialogue, they use violence or imposition: there are only two ways to proceed. The increase of dialogue does not imply that there is no violence in human and social relationships, obviously there is; bu...

  12. Please do not disturb - maintaining and shielding of attentive dialogues in kinderkartens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højholt, Marie

    2015-01-01

    This article seeks to investigate how and why the attentive dialogues between children and pedagogues are often interrupted, and can be difficult to establish and protect. Through field observations, it becomes clear that even dedicated and professional pedagogues are affected both by interpersonal...

  13. Talking back in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict: Rational dialogue or emotional shouting match?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Friedman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Internet has facilitated a broad global conversation among citizens, enabling cross-cultural dialogue on a range of issues, in particular through Web 2.0 tools. This study analyzes the nature of the talkback discourse on news web sites within the framework of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. The study's findings demonstrated that several talkback writers engage in rational-critical discussion of issues essential to the conflict, although they often use rational arguments to de-legitimize conflicting opinions. Talkback dialogue is characterized by engaged discussion, though the majority of respondents engage in dialogue with the article, rather than with other talkback writers. The findings showed that talkback discourse enables a lively, eclectic, and inclusive version of a public sphere, which facilitates the exchange of heterogeneous opinions, though favoring exhibitionism over engagement.

  14. 77 FR 64990 - Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee; Request for Nominations to the Pesticide Program Dialogue...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee; Request for Nominations to the Pesticide Program Dialogue... Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC). EPA values and welcomes diversity. In an effort to obtain... American food supply, the education and protection from unreasonable risk of those who apply or are...

  15. 75 FR 13284 - Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee; Request for Nominations to the Pesticide Program Dialogue...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee; Request for Nominations to the Pesticide Program Dialogue... to be considered for appointment to the Pesticide Program Dialogue Committee (PPDC). EPA values and... American food supply, the education and protection from unreasonable risk of those who apply or are...

  16. Aspectos que facilitan o dificultan la formación del enfermero en atención primaria de salud Aspectos que facilitam ou dificultam a formação de enfermeiro em atendimento primário à saúde Aspects that facilitate or difficult nurse’s training in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Cozer Montenegro

    2011-07-01

    estratégia de ensino através do internado rural e a participação de professores experientes em Saúde Pública. Conclusão. As deficiências na formação dos enfermeiros graduados para trabalhar em APS podem corrigir-se com a aplicação de estratégias de ensino teórico-prática nas universidades.Objective. To describe the aspects that facilitate or difficult nurse’s training in primary health care (PHC. Methodology. Qualitative case study carried out in 2009. 15 nurses, who worked in the Family Healthcare Teams of the Basic Health Units of Belo Horizonte, under an agreement with the Nursing school of the Federal University of Minas Gerais through the Reorientation Program of Healthcare Professional’s Training, participated in the study. Subjects were interviewed and data underwent content analysis. Results. The greatest difficulty is continuing PHC training after graduation. The main facilitating aspects were: Studying in a public university, more experienced professional’s escort, a rural internship, and the participation of teachers specialized in public health. Conclusion. Training deficiencies from graduated nurses to work in PHC can be corrected through the application of theory and practice teaching strategies at the universities.

  17. Socratic dialogue as a teaching and research method for co-creativity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Stenning

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We sketch a theory of creativity which centres on the framing of activity by repetitive thinking and action, and sees creativity as divergences from these routines which is thereby framed against them. Without a repetitive frame creativity is impossible. Mere repetition is not creative, even if new. Creativity disrupts a frame, purposefully. Socratic Dialogue is an ancient technique of engaging a student in a dialogue by asking non-leading questions, aimed at revealing to the student how much knowledge he or she already has on some topic: Socrates’ demonstration to the slave-boy (and the audience that the boy already knows geometry (without any schooling is the founding example. We aim to illustrate that internalising the Socratic kind of reflective self-questioning and co-questioning is intimately related to the view of creativity as the reframing of routine. Therefore, we have qualitatively analysed primary and secondary school pilots in Greece, Austria and the United Kingdom. The illustrations of facilitated Socratic Dialogues with children and young people have been derived from the analysis of 14 Socratic Dialogues involving a total number of 97 students. This paper outlines the Socratic Dialogue as a method of both researching and teaching creative thinking, and it reveals that the Socratic method dovetails with this conception of co-creativity. As a research method, Socratic Dialogue aims to elicit information concerning reasoning processes and shared experiences. As a teaching method, Socratic Dialogue aims to get students to internalise the public methodology of Socratic Dialogue, and to adopt it across the range of domains they meet. The students’ use of the internalised method towards enabling creative thinking is illustrated by the experiences of the teaching intervention teams in the C2Learn project, using games to provide occasions for co-creativity.

  18. Responding to Boy Readers: A Closer Look at the Role of the Teacher in Dialogue Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werderich, Donna E.

    2010-01-01

    In this qualitative study, the author examined the ways middle school literacy teachers responded to their boys' dialogue journals. The participants were 3 middle school literacy teachers and 19 middle school boys. The findings of this study indicated that the teachers took 4 roles (teacher as reader, teacher as responder, teacher as facilitator,…

  19. Hybrid Courses and Online Policy Dialogues: A Transborder Distance Learning Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Katina E.; Winton, Sue M.

    2011-01-01

    This essay describes a blended (hybrid) course collaboration used to facilitate policy dialogues between graduate students at two institutions (one in Canada and the other in the US) as a way to teach about policy. The course content and design is informed by three trends in research and practice: increased policy borrowing across boundaries and…

  20. Ethics and immunization policy: promoting dialogue to sustain consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudtner, C; Marcuse, E K

    2001-05-01

    The societal consensus that has supported the United States' universal childhood immunization programs for the past 50 years shows signs of eroding. This article proposes a systematic approach to evaluate immunization policy options. Through a unifying framework that combines epidemiologic, economic, and ethical concerns, this approach promotes a clearer understanding of underlying issues and inherent tradeoffs between alternative policies. Such a systematic examination of policy options could facilitate the public dialogue necessary to continually recreate a broad consensus on immunization practices and enable us to choose policies most in accord with our fundamental values.

  1. Automated spoken dialogue system for hypertensive patient home management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgino, Toni; Azzini, Ivano; Rognoni, Carla; Quaglini, Silvana; Stefanelli, Mario; Gretter, Roberto; Falavigna, Daniele

    2005-03-01

    Recent advances in automatic speech recognition and related technologies allow computers to carry on conversations by telephone. We developed an intelligent dialogue system that interacts with hypertensive patients to collect data about their health status. Patients thus avoid the inconvenience of traveling for frequent face to face visits to monitor the clinical variables they can easily measure at home; the physician is facilitated in acquiring patient information and cardiovascular risk, which is evaluated from the data according to noted guidelines. Controlled trials to assess the clinical efficacy are under way.

  2. Several difficult problems in lubrication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Whether in industry or in our human life, we will encounter many lubrication problems. A goodlubricant not only should have good performance, but also should meet the needs of the specific condi-tions. Here we give some examples about the difficult problems in lubrication and their solutions. Theseexamples are: (i) hydrolysis and emulsion of ZDTP; (ii) corrosion of chlorowax; (iii) coexistence of greencompressor oil and cryogen (R-134A); (iv) lubrication of cystoscope and catheter. On the same time,some achievements in lubrication field provided by Lubrication Chemistry Laboratory of Shanghai Uni-versity will be introduced in this paper.

  3. Disability rights in dialogue with clinical genetics conference, May 31 to June 2, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The issue of prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion has been hotly debated in the medical, genetic counselling, feminist, parents, disability rights and bio-ethics literature, each of the various positions critiquing each other. People from the disability rights community in particular have began to articulate a critical view of the practice of widespread prenatal diagnosis with intent to abort because the pregnancy might result in a child with a disability. Unfortunately, people from the various disciplines and perspectives, such as bioethics, disability rights, feminism and so forth, by and large, have tended only to write for themselves and their colleagues. Few people have crossed disciplines to try to talk to people with other views. The rapid advances of genome research have continued to produce new prenatal tests, raising many complex ethical questions regarding the applications of prenatal testing. But the widely disparate positions of the various factions has made it difficult to move toward formulation of public policy change necessary to encompass these new genetic technologies. Genetic counselling is in the front lines of the controversial social and ethical issues arising from prenatal diagnosis, in its interface between medical science and the consumer of services. The primary intent of the conference was to invite and facilitate productive dialogue between individuals and groups of people who have traditionally not interacted as a result of their disparate views on these issues and to learn from this process, emphasizing the involvement of people with disabilities and people who work in clinical genetics.

  4. Metaphors of Literacy: Dialogues in Inclusive Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causarano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of metaphors in education and in inclusive settings in particular. Metaphors are seen as the fabric of collaboration through dialogue across the curriculum. The article analyzes the dialogues among the Language Arts, Social Studies, and inclusion teacher in a large middle school in the Southwest of the United…

  5. A POMDP approach to Affective Dialogue Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui Huu Trung, B.H.T.; Poel, Mannes; Nijholt, Antinus; Zwiers, Jakob; Keller, E.; Marinaro, M.; Bratanic, M.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to developing a dialogue model that is able to take into account some aspects of the user's affective state and to act appropriately. Our dialogue model uses a Partially Observable Markov Decision Process approach with observations composed of the observed user's

  6. Dialogues and the problems of knowing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Kristian; Jacobsen, Peter Holm; Jensen, Daniel Toft

    2011-01-01

    We describe and analyze the introduction of legitimate dialogues in architectural competitions. What happens to the competition when the contestants are allowed to interact with each other and with the competition jury? We consider dialogues to be a supplementary social technology that is becomin...

  7. Burden of proof in legal dialogue games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenes, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    In recent years dialectics have received considerable attention in the field of Artificial Intelligence and law. A sub-branch of this field concentrates on the development of dialogue games. Many of these legal dialogue systems are fairly simple. As a consequence they are not very realistic as

  8. Human Rights: Dialogue and International Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王水霞; 孟保林

    2007-01-01

    @@ Dialogue is a major form of international cooperation on human rights issues. It is also instrumental in settling human rights disputes between nations. In this age of globalization, extensive global dialogues on human rights serve to deepen mutual understanding between nations, speed up the formation of international norms governing human rights, and hasten the advent of a harmonious world.

  9. Dialogue as a Site of Transformative Possibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shilpi

    2010-01-01

    This article examines how affect allows us to view the relational form of dialogue, as built upon the work of Derrida and Levinas, to be a site of transformative possibility for students as they encounter and address issues of social justice and difference in the classroom. The understanding of affect that attends this form of dialogue demands…

  10. The Double Role of a Dialogue Interpreter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadensjo, Cecilia

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on the Swedish system of "dialogue interpreting," where the interpreter acts as a cultural mediator. Discusses the strategies the interpreter uses that fulfill the functions of listening and talking in a social context, and also evaluating whatever is said to monitor and contribute to the intercultural dialogue. (NKA)

  11. The Practice of Dialogue in Critical Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Jodi Jan

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines dialogue in the higher education classroom. Instigated by my teaching experiences and the paucity of empirical studies examining dialogue in the higher education classroom, I present a re-examination of data I collected in 1996 for an ethnographic study focusing on the experiences of the participants in an ethnic literature…

  12. The Socratic Dialogue and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezic, Dubravka; Wubbels, Theo; Elbers, Ed; Hajer, Maaike

    2010-01-01

    This article argues that the Socratic Dialogue in the Nelson and Heckmann tradition will prove a considerable contribution in training teachers. A review of the literature and empirical research supports the claim that the Socratic Dialogue promotes student teachers' interpersonal sensitivity while stimulating conceptual understanding. The article…

  13. Interfaith Dialogue at Peace Museums in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachanga, Timothy; Mutisya, Munuve

    2015-01-01

    This paper makes a case for further studies on the contribution of peace museums to interfaith dialogue debate. Based on our experiences as museum curators, teachers and peace researchers and a review of published materials, we argue that there is a lacuna in the study on the contribution of peace museums to the interfaith dialogue debate. The…

  14. On the Usability of Spoken Dialogue Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Bo

    banking spoken dialogue system. It comprises more than 700 transcribed dialogues by 310 users. A number of objective (performance) measures are derived from the corpus. The system’s learnability is analysed through the turn-taking strategies and it is shown that users are capable of taking the initiative...

  15. An Application of Reinforcement Learning to Dialogue Strategy Selection in a Spoken Dialogue System for Email

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, M A

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method by which a spoken dialogue system can learn to choose an optimal dialogue strategy from its experience interacting with human users. The method is based on a combination of reinforcement learning and performance modeling of spoken dialogue systems. The reinforcement learning component applies Q-learning (Watkins, 1989), while the performance modeling component applies the PARADISE evaluation framework (Walker et al., 1997) to learn the performance function (reward) used in reinforcement learning. We illustrate the method with a spoken dialogue system named ELVIS (EmaiL Voice Interactive System), that supports access to email over the phone. We conduct a set of experiments for training an optimal dialogue strategy on a corpus of 219 dialogues in which human users interact with ELVIS over the phone. We then test that strategy on a corpus of 18 dialogues. We show that ELVIS can learn to optimize its strategy selection for agent initiative, for reading messages, and for summari...

  16. BAKHTIN: THE DANGERS OF DIALOGUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Khorev

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the relation to the Other - the underlying aspect of dialogism - in the works of Mikhail Bakhtin. His approach to heterology (science or knowledge of the Other is fundamental to analysis of such themes of his oeuvre as carnival (laughter, history, and economy of human existence. On a certain stage it appears, that two configurations may be distinguished in Bakhtin's conception of the Other. First, the Other dominated and apprropriated by the subject, or Author, or Self in the dialogic relation – it is only a provisional Other. The second is the irreducible Other, outside the possibility of adequate knowledge and thus potentially excluded from dialogue. Thus, the end of dialogue, the silence remains as a dark shadow on the horizon of the meaningful discursive logic. Moreover, the concepts of meaning and truth itself seem to be jeopardized here, since «answers to questions is what I call 'meanings'» (Bakhtin. Nevertheless, Bakhtin never openly questions the fundamental values of knowledge and final truth; his position may be summed up thus: «The truth is out there. Only it is probably not cognizable to an individual. Or may be not to anybody».

  17. Three dialogues concerning robots in elder care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Theodore A; Barnes, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    The three dialogues in this contribution concern 21st century application of life-like robots in the care of older adults. They depict conversations set in the near future, involving a philosopher (Dr Phonius) and a nurse (Dr Myloss) who manages care at a large facility for assisted living. In their first dialogue, the speakers discover that their quite different attitudes towards human-robot interaction parallel fundamental differences separating their respective concepts of consciousness. The second dialogue similarly uncovers deeply contrasting notions of personhood that appear to be associated with respective communities of nursing and robotics. The additional key awareness that arises in their final dialogue links applications of life-like robots in the care of older adults with potential transformations in our understandings of ourselves - indeed, in our understandings of the nature of our own humanity. This series of dialogues, therefore, appears to address a topic in nursing philosophy that merits our careful attention.

  18. [Difficult to control severe asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnan, Antoine; Pipet, Anaïs

    2011-03-01

    Difficult to control severe asthma is characterized by the persistence of inacceptable symptoms of asthma despite a continuous treatment with at least high doses of inhaled steroids and long acting bronchodilators. The diagnosis is done after a period of observation and some investigations that will allow confirm the diagnosis of asthma, eliminate alternative diagnosis and etiological forms that would be difficult to treat intrinsically (allergic broncho-pulmonary aspergillosis, Churg and Strauss disease, chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, occupational asthma). At the end of this period devoted to diagnosis a systematic approach is set up to take care of these patients. Therapeutic education includes action plans and measures for triggering factors avoidance in order to prevent exacerbations. Comorbidities such as rhinitis, nasal polyposis, gastro-oesophageal reflux and obesity are taken into account. Lastly, the treatment must be adapted according to the patient's preferences and aims, and to the asthma severity. Ultimately in steroid-dependent asthma, the lowest efficient dose is tracked continuously. For these patients, new molecules are needed.

  19. Intramuscular triamcinolone for difficult asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panickar, Jayachandran R; Kenia, Priti; Silverman, Michael; Grigg, Jonathan

    2005-05-01

    We treated a selected group of children attending a difficult asthma clinic with intramuscular triamcinolone acetonide. This study retrospectively reviews markers of asthma severity in those who received one or more monthly doses for three periods: 1) 3 months preceding the first injection (pretreatment), 2) from the first injection to 1 month after the last injection (treatment period), and 3) 3 months after the treatment period (follow-up period). Severity markers during the treatment and follow-up periods were compared with the pretreatment period by paired t-test. Five children (5-13 years old) received a single dose, and 8 children (12-15 years old) received multiple doses. Multiple doses of triamcinolone (n = 3-5) were associated with a fall in the number of asthma exacerbations (P < 0.01) and hospital admissions (P < 0.01) in both the treatment and follow-up periods. A single dose reduced exacerbations (P < 0.05, treatment vs. pretreatment) but not hospital admissions. We conclude that intramuscular triamcinolone is a useful short-term therapy in difficult asthma. Whether its efficacy is due to improved compliance, or an improved anti-inflammatory profile compared with oral steroids, remains unclear. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  20. Shaping the Public Dialogue on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, W.; Anderson, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    engaging in conversations with visitors based on audience research, role playing, and reflective feedback on their practice. From our NSF Phase I CCEP project, we have learned that in-depth training can help interpreters increase their confidence, self-efficacy, and a sense of hope in their ability to effectively communicate about climate change. This sense of hope and optimism has a powerful "ripple effect" on colleagues at their own institution, as well as others in their social and professional networks. In the next phase of our work, we hope to expand our reach to provide professional development for interpretive staff from additional institutions, in collaboration with climate scientists and cognitive/social scientists. Regional leaders will participate in recruiting and in planning and leading additional workshops. For youth interpreters, we plan to develop and implement special training methods. For scientists, we will offer workshops on strategic framing and communication. We will conduct and incorporate new social science research into a widely disseminated e-Workshop. For the growing network of participants, we will facilitate ongoing dialogue and an online community. Ultimately, we envision informal science interpreters as "vectors" for effective science communication, ocean and climate scientists with enhanced communication skills, and increased public demand for explanation and dialogue about global issues.

  1. Diabetic nephropathy: a national dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breyer, Matthew D; Coffman, Thomas M; Flessner, Michael F; Fried, Linda F; Harris, Raymond C; Ketchum, Christian J; Kretzler, Matthias; Nelson, Robert G; Sedor, John R; Susztak, Katalin

    2013-09-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases-supported Kidney Research National Dialogue (KRND) asked the scientific community to formulate and prioritize research objectives that would improve our understanding of kidney function and disease. Several high-priority objectives for diabetic nephropathy were identified in data and sample collection, hypothesis generation, hypothesis testing, and translation promotion. The lack of readily available human samples linked to comprehensive phenotypic, clinical, and demographic data remains a significant obstacle. With data and biological samples in place, several possibilities exist for using new technologies to develop hypotheses. Testing novel disease mechanisms with state-of-the-art tools should continue to be the foundation of the investigative community. Research must be translated to improve diagnosis and treatment of people. The objectives identified by the KRND provide the research community with future opportunities for improving the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

  2. Dialogue posthume avec Alfred Gell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Heinich

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Presented as an imaginary dialogue with the author of Art and Agency, this paper displays a number of methodological shared positions: the contextualist nature of his epistemology, his focus on relations rather than on objects, his sense of pragmatism, his proximity with the notion of “person-objects” such as developed by the author of the present paper, his attention to the meso-social level and, eventually, his neutral standing in front of research objects. In spite of a few disagreements, all these properties bring to light a convergence between Gell’s anthropological approach and the kind of sociological methodology presently practiced in certain trends of French sociology.

  3. Facilitation as a teaching strategy : experiences of facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Lekalakala-Mokgele

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in nursing education involve the move from traditional teaching approaches that are teacher-centred to facilitation, a student centred approach. The studentcentred approach is based on a philosophy of teaching and learning that puts the learner on centre-stage. The aim of this study was to identify the challenges of facilitators of learning using facilitation as a teaching method and recommend strategies for their (facilitators development and support. A qualitative, explorative and contextual design was used. Four (4 universities in South Africa which utilize facilitation as a teaching/ learning process were identified and the facilitators were selected to be the sample of the study. The main question posed during in-depth group interviews was: How do you experience facilitation as a teaching/learning method?. Facilitators indicated different experiences and emotions when they first had to facilitate learning. All of them indicated that it was difficult to facilitate at the beginning as they were trained to lecture and that no format for facilitation was available. They experienced frustrations and anxieties as a result. The lack of knowledge of facilitation instilled fear in them. However they indicated that facilitation had many benefits for them and for the students. Amongst the ones mentioned were personal and professional growth. Challenges mentioned were the fear that they waste time and that they do not cover the content. It is therefore important that facilitation be included in the training of nurse educators.

  4. Participation and dialogue in strategic manufacturing development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Jens Ove; Dukovska-Popovska, Iskra; Johansen, John

    2006-01-01

    Increased competition and the dynamics of technological and market developments have made operations in industrial enterprises very complex, with many stakeholders in and around the enterprise. At the same time, it has become important to address strategic issues of manufacturing. To plan...... dialogues during a workshop, part of which is a dialogue-monitoring instrument. Empirical studies will draw out process elements of participation and dialogue and demonstrate the applicability of the model. Finally, implications are spelled out for planning and managing workshops in different phases...

  5. Midwifery and dialogue in organizations. Emergent, mutual involvement in action research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Marianne; Bloch-Poulsen, Jørgen

    the process. That goes for the understanding of dialogue as sharing, daring and caring; for dialogic competencies as, e.g., confirmation and meta-communication; and for generatively facilitated conversations as midwifery. The methodology is accordingly characterized as emergent, mutual involvement. The book...... is a dialogue between theory and praxis, too. It integrates research, action, and training as well as theories of interpersonal and organizational communication, Roger's humanistic psychology, Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics, and Buber's philosophy of dialogue. The empirical material consists...... of approximately 50 colleague supervision or midwifery conversations and group-feedback sessions; and of 24 staff appraisal interviews or development conversations, which we followed on a monitor in an adjoining room. After each of these conversations, a feedback session was held. In the book you will find...

  6. What do mentors find difficult?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Laurence G; Davies, Moira

    2008-06-01

    (i) To assess whether mentors had a positive or negative attitude towards their role; and (ii) to discover what aspects of the role they found easy or difficult. The fact that mentorship is an important element in nurse training was recognized by Sir Leonard Peach, the United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting and the Nursing and Midwifery Council which has recently published new standards to support learning and assessment in practice, which include standards for the preparation of Mentors, to be implemented by September 2007. There are many anecdotal reports of the problems which face mentors, but little firm evidence. This paper reports a study of those problems. It used a Thurstone scale to assess role satisfaction among mentors (n = 86, response rate 89%) and two Likert scales to assess where problems, if any, lay. Unlike anecdotal reports, the Thurstone scale found that, overall, mentors regarded the role positively. In addition, a principal components analysis of responses to the Likert scales showed that there were two clearly delineated factors. The first (interpersonal/organisational factors) had been widely discussed in the literature. The second (cognitive/intellectual factors) has been rarely discussed and could with profit be more strongly stressed in mentor training. (i) Mentors had a positive attitude towards their role and enjoyed it. (ii) When looking at what caused mentors difficulty, in addition to the commonly discussed dimensions of organisational constraints (workload, skill mix) and interpersonal factors, there was clearly an additional cognitive one. Knowledge, not just personality, mattered. Mentors and those who train them could with profit pay more attention to cognitive components of the role, even if that meant laying a lesser stress on the interpersonal ones.

  7. Clostridium difficile phages: still difficult?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Hargreaves

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phages that infect Clostridium difficile were first isolated for typing purposes in the 1980s, but their use was short lived. However, the rise of C. difficile epidemics over the last decade has triggered a resurgence of interest in using phages to combat this pathogen. Phage therapy is an attractive treatment option for C. difficile infection, however developing suitable phages is challenging. In this review we summarise the difficulties faced by researchers in this field, and we discuss the solutions and strategies used for the development of C. difficile phages for use as novel therapeutics.Epidemiological data has highlighted the diversity and distribution of C. difficile, and shown that novel strains continue to emerge in clinical settings. In parallel with epidemiological studies, advances in molecular biology have bolstered our understanding of C. difficile biology, and our knowledge of phage-host interactions in other bacterial species. These three fields of biology have therefore paved the way for future work on C. difficile phages to progress and develop. Benefits of using C. difficile phages as therapeutic agents include the fact that they have highly specific interactions with their bacterial hosts. Studies also show that they can reduce bacterial numbers in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Genetic analysis has revealed the genomic diversity among these phages and provided an insight into their taxonomy and evolution.No strictly virulent C. difficile phages have been reported and this contributes to the difficulties with their therapeutic exploitation. Although treatment approaches using the phage-encoded endolysin protein have been explored, the benefits of using whole-phages are such that they remain a major research focus. Whilst we don’t envisage working with C. difficile phages will be problem free, sufficient study should inform future strategies to facilitate their development to combat this problematic pathogen.

  8. Analysis and Lessons Learned from an Online, Consultative Dialogue between Community Leaders and Climate Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylak-Glassman, E.; Clavin, C.

    2016-12-01

    Common approaches to climate resilience planning in the United States rely upon participatory planning approaches and dialogues between decision-makers, science translators, and subject matter experts. In an effort to explore alternative approaches support community climate resilience planning, a pilot of a public-private collaboration called the Resilience Dialogues was held in February and March of 2016. The Resilience Dialogues pilot was an online, asynchronous conversation between community leaders and climate experts, designed to help communities begin the process of climate resilience planning. In order to identify lessons learned from the pilot, we analyzed the discourse of the facilitated dialogues, administered surveys and conducted interviews with participants. Our analysis of the pilot suggests that participating community leaders found value in the consultative dialogue with climate experts, despite limited community-originated requests for climate information. Community leaders most often asked for advice regarding adaptation planning, including specific engineering guidance and advice on how to engage community members around the topic of resilience. Community leaders that had access to downscaled climate data asked experts about how to incorporate the data into their existing planning processes. The guidance sought by community leaders during the pilot shows a large range of hurdles that communities face in using climate information to inform their decision-making processes. Having a forum that connects community leaders with relevant experts and other community leaders who have familiarity with both climate impacts and municipal planning processes would likely help communities accelerate their resilience efforts.

  9. High-Level Dialogue on International Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UNHCR

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available UNHCR wishes to bring the following observations andrecommendations to the attention of the High-LevelDialogue (HLD on International Migration and Development,to be held in New York, 14-15 September 2006:

  10. On confessional dialogue and collective subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Ulf; Petersson, Kenneth; Krejsler, John B.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of dialogue as an ideal for face-to face relationships in education has a long history in Western societies. Dialogue, however, does not only opeate in face-to-face relationships but also between collective subjects such as national states. The focus of this chapter is to discuss...... the operation of dialogue as a governmental practice in the construction of the contemporary European Higher Educational Area (EHEA) as a transnational political space. In this context the Bologna Process, as an expression of the rationalities of Open Method of Coordination, operates as a goal directed...... machinery or, as we prefer to call it, as a dialogic dispositive for the governmentalisation of Europe as a transnational political space. Dialogue operates as a means to reaching a form of unity in diversity considered inevitable if the hope for a future Europe with smart, sustainable and inclusive growth...

  11. CONSIDERATIONS ON THE EUROPEAN SOCIAL DIALOGUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai, OPRESCU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available At the moment, worldwide, social dialogue is considered to be a very useful tool in solving serious social problems caused by globalization or as a consequence of the way the costs and benefits of the economic changes are distributed. Promoting social dialogue at European level remains a strategic objective of the European Union, which must be sustained by all appropriate means, and in the same time it should be used as an instrument for Stability and Development. Improving the convergence of the social partners' actions from the Member States with the social partners' actions from the Community level is required for the effectiveness of European social dialogue. Social dialogue will be applied, in the next period, into the trans-national system, at regional and inter-regional levels, given the trends of decentralization, integration and globalization that affect all communities.

  12. New techniques and devices for difficult airway management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirgoska, Biljana; Netkovski, Jane

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to compare old conventional techniques and devices for difficult airway management and new sophisticated techniques and devices. Recent techniques and devices are defined as the American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) practice guidelines for the management of difficult airway, published in 1992, reviewed in 1993 and updated in 2003. According to ASA, the techniques for difficult airway management are divided into techniques for difficult intubation and techniques for difficult ventilation. Awake fiberoptic intubation is the technique of choice for difficult airway management prescribed by the World Health Organization document for patient safety in the operating theater. Conventional techniques for intubation used direct visualization. The new generation of devices does not require direct visualization of the vocal cords for endotracheal tube placement. They allow better glottis view and successful endotracheal placement of the tube with indirect laryngoscopy. New intubation devices such as video laryngoscopes facilitate endotracheal intubation by indirect visualization of glottis structures without aligning the oral, pharyngeal and laryngeal axes in patients with cervical spine abnormality. Video laryngoscopes such as V-Mac and C-Mac, Glide scope, McGrath, Airway Scope, Airtraq, Bonfils and Bullard laryngoscope are widely available at the market. Airway gadgets are lighted stylets and endotracheal tube guides. The principal conclusion of this review is that utilization of these devices can be easily learned. The technique of indirect laryngoscopy is currently used for managing difficult airway in the operating room as well as for securing the airway in daily anesthesia routine.

  13. Social Software for Reflective Dialogue: Questions about Reflection and Dialogue in Student Teachers' Blogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, Carina

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a study of 57 Swedish pre-school student teachers' experiences and achievements in using blogs for reflective dialogue over the course of 2007-2008. In order to examine the extent to which students engaged in reflective dialogue, text analyses of their blogs were carried out. Furthermore, 13 narrative interviews were…

  14. Discussing dialogue: perspectives on the value of science dialogue events that do not inform policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael; McCallie, Ellen; Simonsson, Elin

    2009-01-01

    While theoretical work and empirical research have examined science policy-informing "dialogue events," dialogue events that do not seek to inform public policy are under-theorized and under-researched, even though they are common and growing in popularity in the UK. We describe how, from...

  15. Monologue à plusiers voix : Montaigne et le dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftgaard, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Noting that both the earliest readers of Montaigne's Essais and their modern counterparts have likened them to a dialogue with a friend, this article seeks to explore the work's dialogic characteristics. The humanist dialogue is an obvious precursor to the Essais, and even though Montaigne voiced...... dissatisfaction with Plato's dialogues, he aspired to match Plato's style, not least in achieving a conversational tone. Three different elements of dialogue are analysed : the “Dialogue of One“ between the different parts of Montaigne's mind, the dialogue between the author and the writers quoted and paraphrased......, and the use of direct address to the reader to invite or provoke the reader to enter into dialogue with the author. This essay is concerned to show how Montaigne uses the dialogue to create an entirely new genre, poised between monologue and dialogue...

  16. Lessons learnt from the Climate Dialogue initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crok, Marcel; Strengers, Bart; Vasileiadou, Eleftheria

    2015-04-01

    The weblog Climate Dialogue (climatedialogue.org) has been an experimental climate change communication project. It was the result of a motion in the Dutch parliament, which asked the Dutch government "to also involve climate sceptics in future studies on climate change". Climate Dialogue was set up by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL), and Dutch science journalist Marcel Crok. It operated for slightly more than two years (From November 2012 till December 2014). Around 20 climate scientists from all over the world, many of them leading in their respective fields, participated in six dialogues. Climate Dialogue was a moderated blog on controversial climate science topics introducing a combination of several novel elements: a) bringing together scientists with widely separated viewpoints b) strict moderation of the discussion and c) compilation of executive and extended summaries of the discussions that were approved by the invited scientists. In our talk, we will discuss the operation and results of the Climate Dialogue project, focusing more explicitly on the lessons learnt with respect to online climate change communication addressing the question: "To what extent can online climate change communication bring together climate scientists with widely separated viewpoints, and what would be the advantage of such communication practice?" We identify how Climate Dialogue was received and perceived by the participating scientists, but also by different scientific and online communities. Finally, we present our ideas on how Climate Dialogue could evolve in a novel way of contributing to (climate) science and what steps would be necessary and/or beneficial for such a platform to survive and succeed.

  17. A PERSPECTIVE OF INTERCULTURAL DIALOGUE IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Christina SUCIU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses briefly some modern visions of the topic of intercultural dialogue within the context of a multicultural education environment and pluralistic society. The main reason for choosing this topic is directly related to the globalization process that marks our existence today. Globalization might provide opportunities for education and for businesses. But it also addresses serious challenges as well. We believe that by supporting intercultural sensitivity and intercultural dialogue within the education system in the spirit of multicultural societies will generate mostly on the long-run benefits for both individuals and organizations. The paper provides mostly a theoretical perspective of intercultural dialogue that is complemented by some guidelines for an effective intercultural education with a focus on how and what kind of education should contribute to better prepare people to live in multicultural societies.

  18. The Human Communication Research Centre dialogue database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A H; Garrod, S C; Clark, A; Boyle, E; Mullin, J

    1992-10-01

    The HCRC dialogue database consists of over 700 transcribed and coded dialogues from pairs of speakers aged from seven to fourteen. The speakers are recorded while tackling co-operative problem-solving tasks and the same pairs of speakers are recorded over two years tackling 10 different versions of our two tasks. In addition there are over 200 dialogues recorded between pairs of undergraduate speakers engaged on versions of the same tasks. Access to the database, and to its accompanying custom-built search software, is available electronically over the JANET system by contacting liz@psy.glasgow.ac.uk, from whom further information about the database and a user's guide to the database can be obtained.

  19. Quantum Secure Dialogue with Quantum Encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tian-Yu

    2014-09-01

    How to solve the information leakage problem has become the research focus of quantum dialogue. In this paper, in order to overcome the information leakage problem in quantum dialogue, a novel approach for sharing the initial quantum state privately between communicators, i.e., quantum encryption sharing, is proposed by utilizing the idea of quantum encryption. The proposed protocol uses EPR pairs as the private quantum key to encrypt and decrypt the traveling photons, which can be repeatedly used after rotation. Due to quantum encryption sharing, the public announcement on the state of the initial quantum state is omitted, thus the information leakage problem is overcome. The information-theoretical efficiency of the proposed protocol is nearly 100%, much higher than previous information leakage resistant quantum dialogue protocols. Moreover, the proposed protocol only needs single-photon measurements and nearly uses single photons as quantum resource so that it is convenient to implement in practice.

  20. Dialogue and Connectivism: A New Approach to Understanding and Promoting Dialogue-Rich Networked Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Ravenscroft

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Connectivism offers a theory of learning for the digital age that is usually understood as contrasting with traditional behaviourist, cognitivist, and constructivist approaches. This article will provide an original and significant development of this theory through arguing and demonstrating how it can benefit from social constructivist perspectives and a focus on dialogue. Similarly, I argue that we need to ask whether networked social media is, essentially, a new landscape for dialogue and therefore should be conceived and investigated based on this premise, through considering dialogue as the primary means to develop and exploit connections for learning. A key lever in this argument is the increasingly important requirement for greater criticality on the Internet in relation to our assessment and development of connections with people and resources. The open, participative, and social Web actually requires a greater emphasis on higher order cognitive and social competencies that are realised predominantly through dialogue and discourse. Or, as Siemens (2005 implies in his call to rethink the fundamental precepts of learning, we need to shift our focus to promoting core evaluative skills for flexible learning that will, for example, allow us to actuate the knowledge we need at the point that we need it. A corollary of this is the need to reorient educational experiences to ensure that we develop in our learners the ability “to think, reason, and analyse.” In considering how we can achieve these aims this article will review the principles of connectivism from a dialogue perspective; propose some social constructivist approaches based on dialectic and dialogic dimensions of dialogue, which can act as levers in realising connectivist learning dialogue; demonstrate how dialogue games can link the discussed theories to the design and performance of networked dialogue processes; and consider the broader implications of this work for designing

  1. Fundamentalism and postmodernism: two threats to interreligious dialogue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorthuis, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Due to anti-institutional bias and a tendency to individualism, interreligious dialogue seems to decline in Western Europe. Two seemingly contradictory currents, fundamentalism and postmodernism constoitute in reality similar threats to interreligious dialogue

  2. A Robust System for Natural Spoken Dialogue

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, J F; Ringger, E K; Sikorski, T; Allen, James F.; Miller, Bradford W.; Ringger, Eric K.; Sikorski, Teresa

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a system that leads us to believe in the feasibility of constructing natural spoken dialogue systems in task-oriented domains. It specifically addresses the issue of robust interpretation of speech in the presence of recognition errors. Robustness is achieved by a combination of statistical error post-correction, syntactically- and semantically-driven robust parsing, and extensive use of the dialogue context. We present an evaluation of the system using time-to-completion and the quality of the final solution that suggests that most native speakers of English can use the system successfully with virtually no training.

  3. Reinforcement learning for adaptive dialogue systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rieser, Verena

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has seen a revolution in the field of spoken dialogue systems. As in other areas of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence, data-driven methods are now being used to drive new methodologies for system development and evaluation. This book is a unique contribution to that ongoing change. A new methodology for developing spoken dialogue systems is described in detail. The journey starts and ends with human behaviour in interaction, and explores methods for learning from the data, for building simulation environments for training and testing systems, and for evaluating the r

  4. Avoiding Dialogues of Non-discovery through Promoting Dialogues of Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall Richards

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available International students and direct entrants—those entering a higher year of a degree—often come from socio-economic or cultural backgrounds different from traditional students, and have different educational backgrounds. It is assumed such students need help with unfamiliar assessment tasks such as essays, reports, and so on, and many sources aim to help with these elements. Further assumptions are that dialogue helps, and that the words used in such dialogue will be understood similarly. Yet, if the assumed meanings of the words actually differ, then such dialogue is based on a false assumption; rather than genuine dialogue, what actually occurs is an exchange of monologic utterances. This article is a structured narrative of our ongoing research into how key assessment task words such as ‘discuss,’ ‘analyse,’ and ‘critically evaluate’ are understood differently in higher education. We describe how such differences are perpetuated through Martin Buber’s (1947 ideas of monologic utterances, and what we call ‘dialogues of non-discovery’. Here we detail a research-based approach to promote genuine and technical dialogue: what we call ‘dialogues of discovery.’ We first introduce a dialogue that led to the genesis of the study and theoretical context of our dialogues with the literature. We then detail our methods of data collection in a section of ‘dialogues of exploration’. We present our findings in the form of categorizations of the different elements underpinning people’s understandings of ‘the word.’ Our own categorizations of these elements encourage dialogue around the elements of language, culture, stakeholder, subject, weight, and development over time. This is an approach we term an ‘anti-glossary approach’ in that it is opposite to, and against, ‘fixing’ or ‘ossifying’ the language in a glossary. In the Bakhtinian tradition of ‘incompletedness,’ we conclude by encouraging readers to take

  5. Discussing dialogue: perspectives on the value of science dialogue events that do not inform policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael; McCallie, Ellen; Simonsson, Elin;

    2009-01-01

    While theoretical work and empirical research have examined science policy-informing "dialogue events," dialogue events that do not seek to inform public policy are under-theorized and under-researched, even though they are common and growing in popularity in the UK. We describe how, from...... deliberately draw on different literatures and seek to make use of practitioner expertise within our discussion, in order to display several perspectives on the value of non-policy dialogue on science as sites of symmetrical individual or small-scale learning --rather than institutional learning...

  6. Facilitation skills for nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Cilliers

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Using the pcrson-centered approach, facilitation in this study was conceptualised as providing opportunities for personal growth in the patient, and operationalised in a skills workshop for 40 nurses from different hospitals in Gauteng. The first objective was to evaluate the workshop and the second to ascertain its effect on the participant’s experienced performance. A combined quantitative and qualitative research design was used. The quantitative measurement (Personal Orientation Inventory, Carkhuff scales indicated that the workshop stimulated self-actualisation in terms of intrapersonal awareness, and the interpersonal skills of respect, realness, concreteness, empathy, as well as in terms of attending and responding behaviour. The qualitative measurement (a semi-structured interview indicated that the participants were able to empower patients to find their own answers to difficult personal questions. The alternative hypothesis was accepted, namely that this workshop in facilitations skills significantly enhanced the intra- and interpersonal characteristics associated with self-actualisation and the facilitation of growth in patients. The findings highlighted the difference between the two roles of instructor and facilitator, and recommendations to this effect were formulated.

  7. Study of Approaches to Danish-Arab Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pace, Michelle; Haugbølle, Rikke Hostrup; Skrubbeltrang, Jørgen

    This study responds to previous critique of the ‘dialogue objective’ of the Danish Arab Partnership Programme (DAPP). The ‘dialogue objective’ specifically refers to the second objective of the DAPP which is ‘to improve dialogue, understanding and cooperation between Denmark and the MENA region (...

  8. Dialogue-Based CALL: An Overview of Existing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibauw, Serge; François, Thomas; Desmet, Piet

    2015-01-01

    Dialogue-based Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) covers applications and systems allowing a learner to practice the target language in a meaning-focused conversational activity with an automated agent. We first present a common definition for dialogue-based CALL, based on three features: dialogue as the activity unit, computer as the…

  9. Burden of proof in dialogue games and Dutch civil procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenes, R.E.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years dialectics has become popular in Artificial Intelligence and law. A sub-branch of this field concentrates on the development of dialogue games. Many of these legal dialogue systems are fairly simple, in some respects even too simple. Among the topics dialogue games can improve on, is

  10. Sino-America Dialogue Brings Long-term Cooperation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Dialogue between China and U.S.is various in channels,among which Sino-U.S.Strategic Economic Dialogue paves way for a smoothly-going and long-term cooperation in bilateral relations.The dialogue focuses on bilateal and global strategic economic issues of common interests and concerns.

  11. Language Facilities for Programming User-Computer Dialogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, J. M.; Gries, D.

    1978-01-01

    Proposes extensions to PASCAL that provide for programing man-computer dialogues. An interactive dialogue application program is viewed as a sequence of frames and separate computational steps. PASCAL extensions allow the description of the items of information in each frame and the inclusion of behavior rules specifying the interactive dialogue.…

  12. A Dialogue Game Protocol for Agent Purchase Negotiations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McBurney, P.; Eijk, R.M. van; Parsons, S.; Amgoud, L.

    2003-01-01

    We propose a dialogue game protocol for purchase negotiation dialogues which identifies appropriate speech acts, defines constraints on their utterances, and specifies the different sub-tasks agents need to perform in order to engage in dialogues according to this protocol. Our formalism combines a

  13. Reasoning under uncertainty in natural language dialogue using Bayesian networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, Simon

    2003-01-01

    In which uncertainty in natural language dialogue is introduced as the central problem in the research described in this thesis. The idea of using of Bayesian networks is hypothesised as a possible solution to this problem. Dialogue acts are presented as the central notion in our approach to dialogu

  14. Three Modes of Dialogue about Works of Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubard, Olga M.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades, art teachers and museum educators have increasingly embraced group dialogue to help students make meaning from works of art. To an outside observer, most dialogues about art could appear to be the same. Nevertheless, careful analysis reveals that the spirit and dynamics can differ greatly from one dialogue to the next.…

  15. Automatic Dialogue Scoring for a Second Language Learning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin-Xia; Lee, Kyung-Soon; Kwon, Oh-Woog; Kim, Young-Kil

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic dialogue scoring approach for a Dialogue-Based Computer-Assisted Language Learning (DB-CALL) system, which helps users learn language via interactive conversations. The system produces overall feedback according to dialogue scoring to help the learner know which parts should be more focused on. The scoring measures…

  16. Dialogue and Its Conditions: The Construction of European Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    The Council of Europe's "White Paper on Intercultural Dialogue" provides an example of the way in which dialogue has become part of the current mode of governance in Europe. Throughout current policy, the terms "dialogue" and "voice" inform the introduction of practices and tools that constitute the citizen, or active learning citizen. Notions of…

  17. Interreligious Dialogue in Schools: Beyond Asymmetry and Categorisation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riitaoja, Anna-Leena; Dervin, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Interreligious dialogue is a central objective in European and UNESCO policy and research documents, in which educational institutions are seen as central places for dialogue. In this article, we discuss this type of dialogue under the conditions of asymmetry and categorisation in two Finnish schools. Finnish education has often been lauded for…

  18. A Dialogue Game Protocol for Agent Purchase Negotiations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McBurney, P.; Eijk, R.M. van; Parsons, S.; Amgoud, L.

    2003-01-01

    We propose a dialogue game protocol for purchase negotiation dialogues which identifies appropriate speech acts, defines constraints on their utterances, and specifies the different sub-tasks agents need to perform in order to engage in dialogues according to this protocol. Our formalism combines

  19. Peacebuilding Dialogue Pedagogies in Canadian Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickmore, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Constructively critical and inclusive dialogue about conflictual issues is one necessary ingredient of both democratic citizenship and peacebuilding learning. However, in North American classrooms populated by heterogeneous and non-affluent students, pedagogies involving discussion of conflicts are rarely fully implemented, sustained, or inclusive…

  20. Dialogue and Communication between School and Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, Jerold P.

    This paper discusses school-home dialogue: its benefits; its theoretical underpinnings (Plato, Dewey, Hegel); perspectives on parent involvement, including societal changes that seem to produce barriers to communication between homes and schools (changes in family structure and role, time/schedule problems, distance, and educational bureaucracy);…

  1. CONFLICT RESOLUTION THROUGH DIALOGUE IN THE NIGER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imitch

    lingering crises and the importance of dialogue at resolving the conflict permanently. .... The cause and effect in the play as in Nigeria's real ... up of doing simple duties for their husbands and children as befits ... youths, by the time the women embarked on the self exile, panic grips the men as now with the armed youths of.

  2. Research-Policy Dialogues in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak Jørgensen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    given to evidence-based policymaking in the country. Subsequently, disenchantment about research-policy dialogues has occurred. While the use of external research arguably has been limited, there has, in contrast, been a proliferation of in-house research institutions within the political system itself...

  3. Utilising digital technology for dialogue and evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates how digital technology can enhance evaluation and eflection through dialogue in a theory lesson in the context of university college teaching. The pedagogical designs in the article vary from synchronous classroom evaluation on smartphones, to online discussion fora...

  4. Utilising digital technology for dialogue and evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates how digital technology can enhance evaluation and reflection through dialogue in a theory lesson in the context of university college teaching. The pedagogical designs in the article vary from synchronous classroom evaluation on smartphones, to online discussion fora...

  5. Socratic dialogue and teacher-pupil interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knezic, D.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this quasi experimental research involving an experimental and a control group was to answer the question whether a course in the Socratic Dialogue in Nelson-Heckmann tradition would have any effects on content area student teachers’ beliefs and interactional behaviour with second languag

  6. First Footing Inter-Faith Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luby, Antony

    2014-01-01

    This article examines an action research project on inter-faith dialogue within the sensitive context of Catholic pupils being taught Catholic religious education in state-funded secondary schools. Twenty pupils in S3 and S4 (Year 10 and Year 11) participated in a series of three paired conversations that focused primarily on science and religion,…

  7. Supporting Critical Dialogue across Educational Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laman, Tasha Tropp; Jewett, Pamela; Jennings, Louise B.; Wilson, Jennifer L.; Souto-Manning, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    This article draws upon five different empirical studies to examine how critical dialogue can be fostered across educational settings and with diverse populations: middle-school students discussing immigration picture books, a teacher study group exploring texts on homelessness, a teacher education class studying critical literacy, working class…

  8. Leadership for Social Justice: A Transnational Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Jill

    2009-01-01

    This article is framed in two ways. First, by an editorial concern regarding the Americentricity of a special issue for the "Journal of Research on Educational Leadership" on leadership preparation. And second, Jean-Marie, Normore, and Brooks' (2009) desire for a "new social order" for a "multinational dialogue" as…

  9. Religious Dialogue, World Peace and Social Harmony

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE XIAOWEN

    2007-01-01

    @@ Ⅰ. The World Peace Requires Religious Dialogues Peace, development and cooperation are the mainstay of the times in the present world, but there are unseen tricky and atrocious flows. The increasing opposition and conflicts are raging between different countries, nations and religions, which are challenging the wisdom and civilization of mankind.

  10. Professional Academic Development through Professional Journal Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Damian; Naidoo, Kogi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the cooperative analysis by a lecturer and an academic development practitioner of a reflective journal dialogue over the 12 weeks of teaching a postgraduate course. Through a retrospective analysis of the journal the present paper explores the following issues: the framing of an inquiry; the personal-professional nexus; and…

  11. Spoken dialogue understanding and local context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeman, Peter A.

    1994-07-01

    Spoken dialogue poses many new problems to researchers in the field of computational linguistics. In particular, conversants must detect and correct speech repairs, segment a turn into individual utterances, and identify discourse markers. These problems are interrelated. For instance, there are some lexical items whose role in an utterance can be ambiguous: they can act as discourse markers, signal as speech repair, or even be part of the content of an utterance unit. So, these issues must be addressed together. The resolution of these problems will allow a basic understanding of how a speaker's turn can be broken down into individual contributions to the dialogue. We propose that this resolution must be and can be done using local context. They do not require a full understanding of the dialogue so far, nor, in most cases, a deep understanding of the current turn. Resolving these issues locally also means they can be resolved for the most part before later processing, and so will make a natural language understanding system more robust and able to deal with the unconstrained nature of spoken dialogue.

  12. The Dialogic Turn: Dialogue or Violence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Puigvert

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Individuals and social groups are increasingly using dialogue to take decisions, perform actions and solve conflicts in diverse social relationships, from international policies or globalization processes to personal friendships, labor relations or the intimacy of bedroom. When they do not use dialogue, they use violence or imposition: there are only two ways to proceed. The increase of dialogue does not imply that there is no violence in human and social relationships, obviously there is; but this phenomenon confirms that there exist many dialogic interactions and procedures in society which shed light to the process of radicalization of democracy, and thus need to be further analyzed from the social sciences. This article does so; it discusses the “dialogic turn” in the social sciences and illustrates it with the case of feminist theory and practice. Whereas in the past feminism had been a movement for few academic women often speaking for “others”, current dialogic feminism brings into egalitarian dialogue the voices of very diverse women who reach agreements regarding vision and action.

  13. First China-Canada Cultural Dialogue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>An official visit to China in December 2009 by Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper and the holding of the First China-Canada Cultural Dialogue in Beijing a month earlier gave the two countries unique opportunities to further promote friendly cooperation. The two sides agreed to make concerted efforts to safeguard and consolidate the non-governmental basis

  14. Contracting dynamics in the competitive dialogue procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoezen, M.E.L.; Voordijk, J.T.; Dewulf, G.P.M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The competitive dialogue (CD) aims to align complex demands of principals with possible solutions that contractors have to offer. It is, however, unclear how formal and informal structures and processes in the CD are interrelated. The purpose of this paper is to provide insights in to the

  15. Dialogue Needs a Point and Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Viviane M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the writings of Burbules and Young, two major educational theorists committed to promoting and understanding the practice of dialogue in educational contexts, focusing on Jurgen Habermas's theory of communicative action. Their works have shown the necessity for researchers to move across disciplinary boundaries and developing theories of…

  16. Utilising digital technology for dialogue and evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates how digital technology can enhance evaluation and reflection through dialogue in a theory lesson in the context of university college teaching. The pedagogical designs in the article vary from synchronous classroom evaluation on smartphones, to online discussion fora as ...

  17. Dialogue on Separation: Clinicians as Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Pauline Grossenbacher; Whitaker, Carl

    1979-01-01

    This dialogue on separation by three clinicians took place in a family relations class at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It emphasizes the point that psychological separation, more than physical separation, is the essence of individuation, and that for students to understand the concept of individuation they must experience as well as study…

  18. Challenging Political Spectacle through Grassroots Policy Dialogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, Sue; Evans, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Can simply talking about policy strengthen democracy? Drawing on data collected for case studies of one Canadian and two U.S. grassroots organizations, we demonstrate that taking part in policy dialogues hosted by grassroots organizations enables participants to gain greater clarity regarding policy issues, policy processes, and citizens'…

  19. Indian Delegation Visits Cultura Dialogue%Indian Delegation Visits Cultura Dialogue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    At the invitation of Zhejiang People's Association for Friendship with Foreign Countries, a friendship delegation from Indian Association for Global Cooperation and Cultural Relations visited Cultural Dialogue on October 18, 2011 during their stay in Hangzhou. The two sides engaged in a friendly and amiable dialogue and exchanged views on cooperation, information sharing, and friendship promotion. The meeting of the two sides enhanced mutual understanding and friendship between Chinese and Indian peoples.

  20. US-Japan energy policy dialogue. [Final] report, June 1991--December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-16

    The Atlantic Council has cooperated in an ongoing dialogue on energy policy issues with key Japanese organizations for the past twelve years. These Japanese organizations are the Committee for Energy Policy Promotion (CEPP) and the Institute of Energy Economics (IEE). The members of CEPP are major energy supplier and user companies. The IEE conducts sophisticated research and prepares policy papers on a range of international and Japanese energy issues. This energy dialogue is the only long-term US-Japan dialogue which engages CEPP/IEE members. Over the past twelve years the US-Japan energy dialogue has met seventeen times, with alternating meetings held in Tokyo, Hawaii, and Washington, DC. While the dialogue is a private sector activity, US and Japanese government officials are kept informed on the program and are invited to participate in the meetings in Washington and Tokyo. Major benefits of this activity have included: Establishment of close working relationships among Japanese and US private sector energy institutions and experts; exchange of papers on energy issues among participants and on a selected basis to others in the private and governmental sectors; facilitation of separate US-Japanese work on policy issues - for example a joint US-Japan cooperative policy paper on global climate change published in 1991, some government representatives participated in a May 1991 meeting on this subject. Encouragement of Japanese participation in separate Atlantic Council programs on US energy policy imperatives (1990); technology cooperation with developing countries in the field of energy supply and use for sustainable development (1992); creation of a World Energy Efficiency Association (1993); and a US-Japan-Newly Independent States project on NIS energy policy (1992--1994).

  1. Difficult asthma: assessment and management, Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Aidan A; Fanta, Christopher H

    2012-01-01

    A minority of asthma patients have disease that proves difficult to control with usual medications and experience ongoing symptoms, poor quality of life, and limitations in activity and/or frequent asthma exacerbations. This group of patients accounts for much of the expense associated with asthma care and is the focus of national and international collaborative study groups. Distinguishing between "difficult-to-manage asthma" and truly "therapy-resistant asthma" is helpful and promotes a systematic consideration of contributory factors. Critical evaluation of factors contributing to difficult-to-manage asthma including adverse environment, comorbidities, nonadherence, and incorrect diagnosis is recommended in a systematic fashion in Part 1 of this contribution.

  2. Overcoming difficult conversations in clinical supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams B

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Brett Williams,1 Christine King,1 Tanya Edlington,21Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, Monash University, Franskton, VIC, 2The Conversation Clinic Pty Ltd, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Background: Clinical supervisors are responsible for managing many facets of clinical learning and face a range of challenges when the need for "difficult" conversations arises, including the need to manage conflict and relationships. Methods: Spotlight on Conversations Workshop was developed to improve the capacity of clinical supervisors to engage in difficult conversations. They were designed to challenge the mindset of clinical supervisors about difficult conversations with students, the consequences of avoiding difficult conversations, and to offer activities for practicing difficult conversations. Preworkshop, postworkshop, and 4-month follow-up evaluations assessed improvements in knowledge, intent to improve, and confidence along with workshop satisfaction. Results: Nine workshops were delivered in a range of locations across Victoria, Australia, involving a total of 117 clinical supervisors. Preworkshop evaluations illustrated that more than half of the participants had avoided up to two difficult conversations in the last month in their workplace. Postworkshop evaluation at 4 months showed very high levels of satisfaction with the workshop's relevancy, content, and training, as well as participants' intention to apply knowledge and skills. Also shown were significant changes in participants' confidence to have difficult conversations not only with students but also with other peers and colleagues. In follow-up in-depth interviews with 20 of the 117 participants, 75% said they had made definite changes in their practice because of what they learned in the workshop and another 10% said they would make changes to their practice, but had not had the opportunity yet to do so. Conclusion: We conclude that the Spotlight on

  3. Students want feedback and educators need dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Rask, Morten

    2015-01-01

    We discuss what we call “the interaction paradox” in Danish management education. On the one hand, the fact that students want more feedback and educators want to foster dialogue with their students should bode well for interaction in educational settings. On the other hand, both groups are left...... wanting: a survey found that only a third of students at Business and Social Science (BSS), Aarhus University (AU), think they get sufficient feedback on their work , while educators bemoan the impossibility of activating and engaging students in the substantive, theoretical and methodological discussions...... in class-room settings that are considered central for effective learning. In other words, we have a situation where students want to talk to their teachers and teachers also want to engage in dialogue, but they seem to get nowhere. Based on qualitative and quantitative data from both students...

  4. The palaeontological exhibition: a venue for dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murriello, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dialogue between museums and their visitors enables museums to subsist, undergo transformations and become consolidated as socially valued cultural venues. The Museo de La Plata (Argentina) was created in the late nineteenth century as a natural history museum, and this study shows that currently the museum is valued socially as a venue for family leisure and education, at which people make sense to the objects exhibited through characteristics conferred upon them by both the institution and the visitor. Nevertheless, such dialogue is somehow affected by the museographic proposal and the public interpretation of the institutional narrative, which could be analysed within the frame of contextual learning. As a consequence, the evolutionary idea that the museum aims to communicate is distorted by the public. This article highlights the importance of considering the visitors' interpretations when planning museum exhibitions, a perspective that has been rather absent in the Argentinian museums.

  5. Exploring difference as a dynamic of dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Louise Jane

    particular forms of knowledge and subjectivities, dominate and others are marginalised? The paper examines these questions through empirical analysis of the collaborative practices of an interdisciplinary social and health care team in Australia which offers advice to residential care home workers on “person......In dialogue-based communication, communication is configured as dialogue in which multiple social actors co-produce knowledge collaboratively across multiple knowledge forms and knowledge interests. According to dialogic ideals, expert knowledge is democratized as multiple ways of knowing....../knowledge. The theoretical framework is applied in empirical analysis of how knowledge is co-produced collaboratively across difference in social interaction in six team case meetings. Methods of data production are video and audio recording and participant observation. The focus of the analysis is on the relational...

  6. Students want feedback and educators need dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Rask, Morten

    2015-01-01

    in class-room settings that are considered central for effective learning. In other words, we have a situation where students want to talk to their teachers and teachers also want to engage in dialogue, but they seem to get nowhere. Based on qualitative and quantitative data from both students...... and performance levels for both students and educators, and also be used as a medium to provide suggestions for improving learning. The conceptual model can be used to solve the interaction paradox. It has implications for both individual educators and on an institutional level for creating the conditions......We discuss what we call “the interaction paradox” in Danish management education. On the one hand, the fact that students want more feedback and educators want to foster dialogue with their students should bode well for interaction in educational settings. On the other hand, both groups are left...

  7. Dialogue is bliss (Italian original version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Sturloni

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The practice of dialogue does not erase the conflicts that can be found upon solid diverging interests. But conflicts are not forcedly a trauma. More then an impossible abolition of diversity, it is important to promote a practice that helps everybody to express their own point of view looking for socially sustainable solution between the parts. But according to Sturloni, «Even in that case: not a dialogue meant to achieve a utopian unitary view able to level all divergences, but to allow the expression of different perspectives and of legitimate interests. The final aim should be to make a choice shared as much as possible within the legal system of a democratic country».

  8. Asymmetric quantum dialogue in noisy environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Anindita; Shukla, Chitra; Thapliyal, Kishore; Pathak, Anirban; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2017-02-01

    A notion of asymmetric quantum dialogue (AQD) is introduced. Conventional protocols of quantum dialogue are essentially symmetric as the users (Alice and Bob) can encode the same amount of classical information. In contrast, the proposed scheme for AQD provides different amount of communication powers to Alice and Bob. The proposed scheme offers an architecture, where the entangled state to be used and the encoding scheme to be shared between Alice and Bob depend on the amount of classical information they want to exchange with each other. The general structure for the AQD scheme has been obtained using a group theoretic structure of the operators introduced in Shukla et al. (Phys Lett A 377:518, 2013). The effect of different types of noises (e.g., amplitude damping and phase damping noise) on the proposed scheme is investigated, and it is shown that the proposed scheme for AQD is robust and it uses an optimized amount of quantum resources.

  9. Empowering dialogues--the patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveiten, Sidsel; Knutsen, Ingrid Ruud

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to highlight the patients' experiences and perspectives of the dialogue with the health professionals at a pain clinic. This knowledge can develop and give nuanced understanding of patient empowerment and sense of control. Qualitative content analysis was used to reveal the meaning of the patients' experiences and perspectives during focus group interviews. The findings and interpretations revealed the main theme; preconditions and opportunities for participation. The main theme was represented by four subthemes; means for common understanding, basis for collaboration, acknowledgement and legitimacy. The findings and interpretations are discussed in the light of an evolving theory on women's sense of control while experiencing chronic pain and empowerment. The dialogue is very important related to aspects of control, remoralization and demoralization and is affected by external structural factors. This underlines the importance of further research focusing on empowerment and power. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2010 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  10. Manufacturing Vision Development – Process and Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dukovska-Popovska, Iskra

    This Ph.D. project has been conducted in the context of PRODUCTION+5 methodology for devel¬oping manufacturing visions for companies, and related to Experimental Laboratory for Production. Both have been established in the Center for Industrial Production. The empirical parts of the research...... involve case studies of three companies that are part of the MCD-process. The cases primarily are focusing on the process and the dialogue dur¬ing the manufacturing vision development....

  11. Controlled quantum dialogue robust against conspiring users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Shih-Hung; Hwang, Tzonelih

    2016-10-01

    This paper explores a new security problem in controlled quantum dialogue (CQD) protocols, where the communicants may try to conspire to communicate without the controller's permission. According to our survey, all the previous CQD protocols suffer from this attack. In order to resolve this problem, we also present an improvement protocol. The security analyses show that the improved scheme is secure under this and other well-known attacks.

  12. New challenges for public services social dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Nana Wesley; Mailand, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    This is the national report on Denmark to the country comparative project New Challenges for Public Services: Integrating Service User and Workforce In-volvement to Support Responsive Public Services in Tough Times. The project examines service user involvement and how it is related to tradi......-tional forms of social dialogue in five European countries. Furthermore, the project examines how employers and trade unions are responding to recent de-velopments in the countries....

  13. Rational Dialogue between Kosovo and Serbia - Way Toward Reconciliation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Sc. Samet Dalipi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Within a decade, Kosovo has compromised twice: accepting the process of decentralization in order to achieve independence and international recognition, through the President Martti Ahtisaari’s Comprehensive Proposal for the Kosovo Status Settlement (2 February 2007, and finally, by approving to offer autonomy for Kosovo Serbs for the sovereignty, but still within the limits of the Ahtisaari Plan. Coincidentally, the same Serbian political parties which had fought three wars, resulting in dissolution of the state (Former Yugoslavia at that time (the Socialist Party and the Serbian Radical Party, now are in power in the Republic of Serbia, and have the possibility to finally solve the Kosovo case, and to open the perspective for this part, Europe’s black hole, to be engaged in global integration. Statements by senior Serbian politicians are positively shifting, compared to the radicalization of the relations between Albanians and Serbs three decades ago and it is believed that the developments will evolve towards rational choice and acceptance by the parties. Being under pressure by difficult socio-economic situation and need for integration processes, both sides undertake risky and unpopular steps by signing unclear political and verbal agreements on normalization of relations, which may produce difficult solving externalities in the future. The risk lies in the possibility of further damaging the Kosovo’s “piece of the cake”, after every refusal step by the Serbian side, which will damage the interest of Kosovo side according to the “zero sum” game. Analyses of the dialogue process between Kosovo and Serbia reflect the mixed benefits to the parties, resulting in not very soon European integration, and with hope on difficult but necessary reconciliation between Albanians and Serbs in the region. The broken, after the war established, status quo is better than entering into a protracted conflict in the middle of Europe.

  14. The Use of a Virtual Online Debating Platform to Facilitate Student Discussion of Potentially Polarising Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, Paul D; Tzioumis, Vicky; Degeling, Chris; Johnson, Jane; Brown, Robert; Sands, Mike; Starling, Melissa J; Phillips, Clive J C

    2017-09-02

    The merits of students exchanging views through the so-called human continuum exercise (HCE) are well established. The current article describes the creation of the virtual human continuum (VHC), an online platform that facilitates the same teaching exercise. It also reports feedback on the VHC from veterinary science students (n = 38). First-year Doctor of Veterinary Medicine students at the University of Sydney, Australia, trialed the platform and provided feedback. Most students agreed or strongly agreed that the VHC offered: a non-threatening environment for discussing emotive and challenging issues; and an opportunity to see how other people form ideas. It also made them think about how to express their ideas and make arguments; and left them feeling more comfortable about expressing their views using it than they would discussing ideas face-to-face (98%, 84%, 79% and 76%, respectively). All respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the VHC encouraged them to consider other opinions. These data suggest that the transition of the HCE to an online platform facilitates dialogue on difficult ethical issues in a supportive environment.

  15. Dialogue on dialogues Multi-voiced dialogues (dialogism) as means for the co-production of knowledge in and on leadership communicative practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The article elaborates on a theoretical understanding of dialogue as a means for the co-production of knowledge in and on leadership communicative practices through ongoing research collaboration that involves leaders, researchers and master students at Aalborg University. Dialogue is viewed from...... a dissensus perspective, which draws on Bakhtin’s dynamic thoughts on the heteroglossic nature of interaction and on multi-voiced dialogues as battles between centrifugal and centripetal forces. The concept multi-voiced dialogues is posited as a means for opening up dialogical moments of change in order...... to cultivate the creative and transformational powers of dialogues in which new meanings, voices and forms of knowledge emerge. I discuss how this way of framing the dialogical co-production of knowledge challenges the mainstream understanding of dialogical practices by embracing relational, conflictual...

  16. Metrics for Evaluating Dialogue Strategies in a Spoken Language System

    CERN Document Server

    Danieli, M; Danieli, Morena; Gerbino, Elisabetta

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a set of metrics for the evaluation of different dialogue management strategies in an implemented real-time spoken language system. The set of metrics we propose offers useful insights in evaluating how particular choices in the dialogue management can affect the overall quality of the man-machine dialogue. The evaluation makes use of established metrics: the transaction success, the contextual appropriateness of system answers, the calculation of normal and correction turns in a dialogue. We also define a new metric, the implicit recovery, which allows to measure the ability of a dialogue manager to deal with errors by different levels of analysis. We report evaluation data from several experiments, and we compare two different approaches to dialogue repair strategies using the set of metrics we argue for.

  17. The Strategic Dialogue and Sino-U. S. Relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Mengzi; Yuan Peng; Niu Xinchun; Da Wei; Wang Wenfeng; Guo Yongjun

    2005-01-01

    @@ On August 1-2, China and the United States held a strategic dialogue. This is in fact the first mechanized strategic dialogue between China and America. Both sides decided to hold such a dialogue alternatively in each other's capital twice a year.The significance of the first comprehensive and mechanized senior dialogue between the two sides to discuss strategic issues of common interest cannot be underestimated. Therefore, it was an event that attracted worldwide attention. Apart from paying attention tothe dialogue itself, the media hope to fully understand the cause of the dialogue, the result of the first strategic talk, the influence of the talk on bilateral relations. The Editorial Department of Contemporary International Relations invited scholars from the Institute of American studies of China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations to hold a discussion to provide our readers some food for thought over relevant issues.

  18. Dialogue Genre Texts in Ancient Greek Prose: Linguostylistic Aspect

    OpenAIRE

    Gita Bērziņa

    2011-01-01

    Dialogue Genre Texts in Ancient Greek Prose: Linguostylistic Aspect Doctoral thesis deals with the study of essential linguistic features of the Ancient Greek dialogue as an important ancient prose genre. The goal of the thesis is to disclose the specific linguistic characteristics of the genre of Ancient Greek dialogue on the basis of comparative analysis of the linguistic structure (on all levels as well as in style) of the texts of three most prominent authors (Plato, Xenoph...

  19. Difficult childhood asthma: management and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillie-Leblond, Isabelle; Deschildre, Antoine; Gosset, Philippe; de Blic, Jacques

    2012-09-01

    Diagnosis and management of severe asthma implies the definition of different entities, that is, difficult asthma and refractory severe asthma, but also the different phenotypes included in the term refractory severe asthma. A complete evaluation by a physician expert in asthma is necessary, adapted for each child. Identification of mechanisms involved in different phenotypes in refractory severe asthma may improve the therapeutic approach. The quality of care and monitoring of children with severe asthma is as important as the prescription drug, and is also crucial for differentiating between severe asthma and difficult asthma, whereby expertise is required.

  20. Reflective scientific sense-making dialogue in two languages: The science in the dialogue and the dialogue in the science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Doris

    2004-11-01

    In this paper I focus on the transition from everyday to scientific ways of reasoning, and on the intertwined roles of meaning-making dialogue and science content as they contribute to scientific literacy. I refer to views of science, and how scientific understanding is advanced dialogically, by Hurd (Science Education, 1998, 82, 402-416), Brown (The Journal of Learning Sciences, 1992, 2(2), 141-178), Bruner (Acts of Meaning, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1990), Roth (In J. Brophy (Ed.), Social Constructivist Teaching: Affordances and Constraints (Advances in Research on Teaching Series, Vol. 9), New York: Elsevier/JAI, 2003), and Wells (Dialogic Inquiry: Towards a Sociocultural Practice and Theory of Education, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1999). I argue that family collaborative dialogues in nonschool settings can be the foundations for scientific ways of thinking. I focus on the particular reflective family dialogues at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, when family members remembered and synthesized essential biological themes, centering on adaptation, from one visit to the next, in both Spanish and English. My approach is informed by sociocultural theory, with emphasis on the negotiations of meaning in the zone of proximal development (Vygotsky, 1978), as learners engage in joint productive activity (Tharp & Gallimore, Rousing Minds to Life: Teaching, Learning and Schooling in Social Context, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1988). Over the past decades, researchers have discovered that observing social activity, conversation, and meaning-making in informal settings (Crowley & Callanan, 1997; Guberman, 2002; Rogoff, 2001; Vasquez, Pease-Alvarez, & Shannon, Pushing Boundaries: Language and Culture in a Mexicano Community, New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994) has much to teach us regarding learning in general. To date there has been little research with Spanish-speaking families in informal learning settings and virtually none that

  1. Dialogue Analysis and Its Application in English Language Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李婧雅

    2014-01-01

    Dialogue is frequently employed as role-play in the classroom activities. Students are encouraged to practice speaking skill in the context of a certain conversation. Conversation tasks in listening exercises also attract various interests in English les-sons. This essay aims to analyze the functions of dialogues, followed with the discussion on how to apply the proper dialogues in-to English classroom, and ending up with the suggestions of some possible activities adopted in English language class. A dialogue cited from Dellar and Walkley (2003, p. 125) is used as a sample to interpret in detail.

  2. Collective Referential Intentionality in the Semantics of Dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquette Dale

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a dialogue is considered in general terms from the standpoint of its referential presuppositions. The semantics of dialogue implies that dialogue participants must generally have a collective intentionality of agreed-upon references that is minimally sufficient for them to be able to disagree about other things, and ideally for outstanding disagreements to become clearer at successive stages of the dialogue. These points are detailed and illustrated in a fictional dialogue, in which precisely these kinds of referential confusions impede progress in shared understanding. It is only through a continuous exchange of question and answer in this dialogue case study that the meanings of key terms and anaphorical references are disambiguated, and a relevantly complete collective intentionality of shared meaning between dialogue participants is achieved. The importance of a minimally shared referential semantics for the terms entering into reasoning and argument in dialogue contexts broadly construed cannot be over-estimated. Where to draw the line between referential agreement and disagreement within any chosen dialogue, as participants work toward better mutual understanding in clearing up referential incongruities, is sometimes among the dialogue’s main points of dispute.

  3. Adapting and Implementing Open Dialogue in the Scandinavian Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Bikic, Aida; Jacobsen, Elise Kragh

    2017-01-01

    in Finland, and 2) summarises this literature. We included 33 publications. Most studies in this scoping review were published as "grey" literature and most grappled with how to implement Open Dialogue faithfully. In the Scandinavian research context, Open Dialogue was mainly described as a promising......Open Dialogue is a resource-oriented mental health approach, which mobilises a crisis-struck person's psychosocial network resources. This scoping review 1) identifies the range and nature of literature on the adoption of Open Dialogue in Scandinavia in places other than the original sites...

  4. Labor Relations and Social Dialogue: Measurement and Diagnosis Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel Lefter

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Social dialogue and tripartism play an important role in promoting and strengthening fundamental principles and rights at work, promoting job creation and expanding social protection. In the context of the severe challenges of globalization, a growing number of developing countries are recognizing the need to faster dialogue, partnership and participatory approaches to decision-making. Thus, social dialogue becomes a prerequisite for efficient corporate governance and means to attain national economic and social objectives and to contribute to poverty reduction policies. We shall propose a diagnosis and analysis system in order to measure and monitor the evolution of the industrial relations and social dialogue.

  5. Some contemporary aspects of Hindu-Christian dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru-Corneliu Arion

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with an important aspect of today’s interreligious dialogue, that between Christianity and the second largest religion of Asia, namely Hinduism. The concern is centering around not the ancient or traditional links between these two expressions of the Sacred, but rather of the contemporary ones. But that requires certain knowledge of what has already happened. The dialogue comes from the heart of the people, and is situated in the middle of life. Unfortunately, many present-day dialogues set the stage according to the terms of one of the parties alone. But in spite of misunderstandings and difficulties of the Hindu-Christian dialogue, it has an unavoidable effect: it changes our vision and interpretation of our own religion. The main tenets would be: the future of Hindu-Christian dialogue will largely depend on future mutual interest; Hindu-Christian dialogue may be linked to the future development of Hinduism and Christianity; the future of Hindu-Christian dialogue may be endangered by an institutional misunderstanding of its nature; Hindu-Christian dialogue may have to be placed into a larger “secular” context; Hindu-Christian dialogue is inevitable. It is an imperative and it must exhibit more continuity.

  6. Flexible, Robust and Dynamic Dialogue Modeling with a Speech Dialogue Interface for Controlling a Hi-Fi Audio System.

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Martínez, Fernando; Ferreiros López, Javier; Lucas Cuesta, Juan Manuel; Echeverry Correa, Julian David; San Segundo Hernández, Rubén; Córdoba Herralde, Ricardo de

    2010-01-01

    This work is focused on the context of speech interfaces for controlling household electronic devices. In particular, we present an example of a spoken dialogue system for controlling a Hi-Fi audio system. This system demonstrates that a more natural, flexible and robust dialogue is possible. That is due to both the Bayesian Networks based solution that we propose for dialogue modeling, and also to carefully designed contextual information handling strategies.

  7. Polishing Difficult-To-Reach Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinzak, R. Michael; Booth, Gary N.

    1990-01-01

    Springy abrasive tool used to finish surfaces of narrow cavities made by electrical-discharge machining. Robot arm moves vibrator around perimeters of cavities, polishing walls of cavities as it does so. Tool needed because such cavities inaccessible or at least difficult to reach with most surface-finishing tools.

  8. Qualitative analysis of unanticipated difficult airway management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, C; Hansen, E G; Kristensen, M S

    2006-01-01

    Unanticipated difficult airway management (DAM) is a major challenge for the anaesthesiologist and is associated with a risk of severe patient damage. We analysed 24 cases of unanticipated DAM for actual case management and anaesthesiologists knowledge, technical and non-technical skills...

  9. The difficult encounter between inspector and farmer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anneberg, Inger; Sørensen, Jan Tind; Vaarst, Mette

    2012-01-01

    When the inspector drives into the farmyard and asks to see the animal barns to inspect the welfare of the animals, a tense situation may arise because inspections transcend limits and are complex and difficult for many farmers to relate to. A new research project is examining the interaction...... between authorities and farmers....

  10. Panel Conditioning in Difficult Attitudinal Questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binswanger, J.; Schunk, D.; Toepoel, V.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate whether survey answers of trained respondents differ systematically from answers of novice respondents. Focusing on difficult attitudinal or preference questions, we find that novice respondents answer “don’t know” significantly more often. Importantly, however, there is no systematic

  11. Questions That Science Teachers Find Difficult (II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Presents some questions that science teachers find difficult. Focuses on three further questions relating to "simple" everyday situations that are normally explained in terms of the kinetic theory of matter. Identifies looking at the difference between chemical and physical changes as the most problematic question. (Author/YDS)

  12. Teaching Difficult Topics with Primary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Lee Ann

    2011-01-01

    "Difficult" or "challenging" topics to teach include racism, violence, genocide, bullying, gangs, abuse (physical, emotional, and substance), slavery, suffering, hatred, terrorism, war, disease, loss, addiction, and more. But by confronting them with students, in the safety of a classroom through thoughtfully constructed lessons (ones that take…

  13. Qualitative analysis of unanticipated difficult airway management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstock, C; Hansen, E G; Kristensen, M S;

    2006-01-01

    Unanticipated difficult airway management (DAM) is a major challenge for the anaesthesiologist and is associated with a risk of severe patient damage. We analysed 24 cases of unanticipated DAM for actual case management and anaesthesiologists knowledge, technical and non-technical skills. Anaesth...

  14. [Partnership around difficult teenagers in Brest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-André, Stéphane; Botbol, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The issues surrounding difficult teenagers results in professionals formalising a partnership. Certain areas of focus are identified such as getting to know each other better in order to understand each other better, working in a "common language", understanding professional identities, or embracing long term partnership. Pressure to assess and rationalise spending, as well as political challenges, must be taken into consideration.

  15. Questions That Science Teachers Find Difficult (II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Presents some questions that science teachers find difficult. Focuses on three further questions relating to "simple" everyday situations that are normally explained in terms of the kinetic theory of matter. Identifies looking at the difference between chemical and physical changes as the most problematic question. (Author/YDS)

  16. What healthcare teams find ethically difficult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoal, Dara; Kihlgren, Annica; James, Inger; Svantesson, Mia

    2016-12-01

    Ethically difficult situations are frequently encountered by healthcare professionals. Moral case deliberation is one form of clinical ethics support, which has the goal to support staff to manage ethical difficulties. However, little is known which difficult situations healthcare teams need to discuss. To explore which kinds of ethically difficult situations interprofessional healthcare teams raise during moral case deliberation. A series of 70 moral case deliberation sessions were audio-recorded in 10 Swedish workplaces. A descriptive, qualitative approach was applied, using thematic content analysis. Ethical considerations: An advisory statement specifying no objections to the study was provided from an Ethical Review Board, and consent to be recorded was assumed by virtue of participation in the moral case deliberation. Three themes emerged: powerlessness over managing difficult interactions with patients and next-of-kin, unease over unsafe and unequal care, and uncertainty over who should have power over care decisions. The powerlessness comprised feelings of insufficiency, difficulties to respond or manage patient's/next-of-kin's emotional needs or emotional outbursts and discouragement over motivating patients not taking responsibility for themselves. They could be uncertain over the patient's autonomy, who should have power over life and death, disclosing the truth or how much power next-of-kin should have. The findings suggest that the nature of the ethically difficult situations brought to moral case deliberations contained more relational-oriented ethics than principle-based ethics, were permeated by emotions and the uncertainties were pervaded by power aspects between stakeholders. MCD can be useful in understanding the connection between ethical issues and emotions from a team perspective.

  17. Rimac: A Natural-Language Dialogue System that Engages Students in Deep Reasoning Dialogues about Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Sandra; Jordan, Pamela; Litman, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The natural-language tutorial dialogue system that the authors are developing will allow them to focus on the nature of interactivity during tutoring as a malleable factor. Specifically, it will serve as a research platform for studies that manipulate the frequency and types of verbal alignment processes that take place during tutoring, such as…

  18. Leadership and Civil Civic Dialogue across "Enemy" Lines: Promoting the Will for Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Geraldine

    2012-01-01

    Leaders often display the all-too-human characteristic of talking only or mostly to people with whom they agree. Yet, to be effective as a leader in many circumstances requires reaching out and engaging in dialogue with those who one may fundamentally disagree and may even view as an enemy. To do so requires a particular conception of leadership,…

  19. Metalogue: A Multiperspective Multimodal Dialogue System with Metacognitive Abilities for Highly Adaptive and Flexible Dialogue Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexandersson, Jan; Aretoulaki, Maria; Campbell, Nick; Gardner, Michael; Girenko, Andrey; Klakow, Dietrich; Koryzis, Dimitris; Petukhova, Volha; Specht, Marcus; Spiliotopoulos, Dimitris; Stricker, Alexander; Taatgen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    This poster paper presents a high-level description of the Metalogue project that is developing a multi-modal dialogue system that is able to implement interactive behaviors that seem natural to users and is flexible enough to exploit the full potential of multimodal interaction. We provide an outli

  20. Modelling multi-issue bargaining dialogues : Data collection, annotation design and corpus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petukhova, Volha; Stevens, Christopher; de Weerd, Hermanes; Taatgen, Niels; Cnossen, Fokeltje; Malchanau, Andrei; Calzolari, Nicoletta; Choukri, Khalid; Declerck, Thierry; Goggi, Sara; Grobelnik, Marko; Maegaard, Bente; Mariani, Joseph; Mazo, Hélène; Moreno, Asunción; Odijk, Jan; Piperidis, Stelios

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes experimental dialogue data collection activities, as well semantically annotated corpus creation undertaken within EU-funded METALOGUE project. The project aims to develop a dialogue system with flexible dialogue management to enable systems adaptive, reactive, interactive and

  1. A moonshine dialogue in mathematical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Planat, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Phys and Math are two colleagues at the University of Sa\\c{c}enbon (Crefan Kingdom), dialoguing about the remarkable efficiency of mathematics for physics. They talk about the notches on the Ishango bone, the various uses of psi in maths and physics, they arrive at dessins d'enfants, moonshine concepts, Rademacher sums and their significance in the quantum world. You should not miss their eccentric proposal of relating Bell's theorem to the Baby Monster group. Their hyperbolic polygons show a considerable singularity/cusp structure that our modern age of computers is able to capture. Henri Poincar\\'e would have been happy to see it.

  2. Discourse Processing of Dialogues with Multiple Threads

    CERN Document Server

    Rose', C P; Levin, L S; Van Ess-Dykema, C; Rose', Carolyn Penstein; Eugenio, Barbara Di; Levin, Lori S.; Ess-Dykema, Carol Van

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we will present our ongoing work on a plan-based discourse processor developed in the context of the Enthusiast Spanish to English translation system as part of the JANUS multi-lingual speech-to-speech translation system. We will demonstrate that theories of discourse which postulate a strict tree structure of discourse on either the intentional or attentional level are not totally adequate for handling spontaneous dialogues. We will present our extension to this approach along with its implementation in our plan-based discourse processor. We will demonstrate that the implementation of our approach outperforms an implementation based on the strict tree structure approach.

  3. Man-machine dialogue design and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Landragin, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    This book summarizes the main problems posed by the design of a man-machine dialogue system and offers ideas on how to continue along the path towards efficient, realistic and fluid communication between humans and machines. A culmination of ten years of research, it is based on the author's development, investigation and experimentation covering a multitude of fields, including artificial intelligence, automated language processing, man-machine interfaces and notably multimodal or multimedia interfaces. Contents Part 1. Historical and Methodological Landmarks 1. An Assessment of the Evolution

  4. Value representations: a value based dialogue tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegaard

    2011-01-01

    Stereotypic presumptions about gender affect the design process, both in relation to how users are understood and how products are designed. As a way to decrease the influence of stereotypic presumptions in design process, we propose not to disregard the aspect of gender in the design process......, as the perspective brings valuable insights on different approaches to technology, but instead to view gender through a value lens. Contributing to this perspective, we have developed Value Representations as a design-oriented instrument for staging a reflective dialogue with users. Value Representations...

  5. Is Science Nearing Its Limits ? Summarizing Dialogue

    CERN Document Server

    Luminet, J -P

    2008-01-01

    In 2007 an international conference engaged a reflection on the present conditions for sciences and scientific practice, to initiate a dialogue between science, philosophy, epistemology and sociology. Starting from many examples taken from the history of sciences and the present status of astrophysics, cosmology and fundamental physics, I analyze various issues such as the possible limits of theoretical and technological advances, the paradox of non-verifiability in string theory, incompleteness, the role of imagination in scientific research along with educational aspects, the epistemological value of the Ockham's razor principle for constraining theories, and our undersanding of man's place in Creation.

  6. Problems and prospects of EU — Russia dialogue on visa-free travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voinikov Vadim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the issues pertinent to the EU — Russia visa dialogue — one of the major areas of cooperation between the two partners. The article aims to identify the main problems of this dialogue, as well as prospects for the introduction of a visa-free regime between the EU and Russia. The authors provide a historical overview of cooperation in this area and consider problems and prospects of visa liberalization from the economic, legal, and political perspectives. The analysis draws on primary sources such as the EU and Russia’s legislation, EU — Russia agreements on visa facilitation and readmission, visa statistics, expert interviews, as well as analytical reports and research works on the topic. Particular attention is paid to the “Common steps towards visa-free short-term travel of the citizens of the EU and Russia”, which is currently the main document in the visa dialogue. Having assessed the implementation of the provisions contained in the four blocks of the “Common Steps”, the authors draw conclusions about the political nature of major obstacles to a visa-free regime. This article is based on the proceedings of the “Russia and European Union: the dynamics of interrelations” international conference organized by the EU center of the I. Kant Baltic Federal University (the EU4U project.

  7. Egalitarian dialogue and instrumental dimension. Two principles of dialogic learning in the classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Racionero Plaza

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Dialogic conceptualizations of learning have rapidly arisen inthe last two decades. Building upon Vygotsky’s socio-cultural psychology, these theories emphasize that people make meaning in interaction with others, where language is the main mediational tool. One of those accounts is the theory of “dialogic learning” (Flecha, 2000. This article explores two of the principles ofdialogic learning: egalitarian dialogue and instrumental dimension, through the meanings that a group of elementary school children gave to learning in interactive groups, a practice of dialogic learning in the classroom. The data revealed the meanings that students gave to those two principles of dialogic learning and how each of those principles gets manifested in interactive groups. Regarding egalitarian dialogue, children perceived that participants in interactive groups hold validity claims, engage in communicative action, and care about the effects and context of the interactions. As for the principle of instrumental dimension, the students pointed out multiple ways in which dialogue act as a tool to learn more, for example, facilitating the identification of gaps and errors in one’s reasoning and fostering the development of communicative abilities.

  8. Promoting pollution prevention through community-industry dialogues: the good neighbor model in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Barbara Scott; Sexton, Ken

    2002-05-15

    This article examines five attempts by communities to promote pollution prevention through direct negotiations with local manufacturing plants. These projects were Good Neighbor Dialogues spearheaded by Citizens for a Better Environment-Minnesota, an environmental advocacy organization. Three community-company partnerships (a container plant, a foundry, and a cabinet manufacturer) were successful and two (a munitions plant and a petroleum refinery) were not. Successful dialogues all shared certain characteristics: the company was open to negotiating with the community; there was an effective "champion" within the company; a skilled, independent facilitator served as moderator; community participants received independent technical assistance; and both the company and community understood the value of cooperative environmental decision making. Results suggest that Good Neighbor Dialogues can, under the right settings and circumstances, be an effective mechanism for building social capital by fostering greater understanding and trust between companies and communities. They offer the prospect of community-company partnerships that promote pollution prevention and other environmental improvements, while at the same time reinforcing and amplifying traditional pollution control strategies.

  9. The Dialogue Between Medical Doctors and Bioethicists: Rethinking Experience to Improve Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, Luca; Russo, María Teresa; Curcio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    More and more seems to be necessary to find new ways of communication between medical doctors and bioethicists in order to build a shared vocabulary and to prevent conflicts: many bioethical problems seem to be caused by the lack of dialogue between them, which both seem to speak two different languages. Improving this dialogue means searching new languages and innovative forms of communication: the narration could be a really effective tool to enhance the physicians' and bioethicist's moral conscience, since it facilitates reasoning on someone's particular experience, and, ultimately, on our experience. Starting from the results of a questionnaire administered to a group of students of the Faculty of Medicine and Surgery of the University Campus Bio-Medico we present a theoretical discussion about the need for more dialogue and for a shared vocabulary in medical experiences. In this regard, we suggest as a possible solution to the conflicts among medical doctors and bioethicists, an educational strategy, i.e., humanities courses for medical students, which may help them to deeply describe their practical present (and future) experience.

  10. SUPPORT Tools for evidence-informed health Policymaking (STP) 14: Organising and using policy dialogues to support evidence-informed policymaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavis, John N; Boyko, Jennifer A; Oxman, Andrew D; Lewin, Simon; Fretheim, Atle

    2009-12-16

    This article is part of a series written for people responsible for making decisions about health policies and programmes and for those who support these decision makers. Policy dialogues allow research evidence to be considered together with the views, experiences and tacit knowledge of those who will be involved in, or affected by, future decisions about a high-priority issue. Increasing interest in the use of policy dialogues has been fuelled by a number of factors: 1. The recognition of the need for locally contextualised 'decision support' for policymakers and other stakeholders 2. The recognition that research evidence is only one input into the decision-making processes of policymakers and other stakeholders 3. The recognition that many stakeholders can add significant value to these processes, and 4. The recognition that many stakeholders can take action to address high-priority issues, and not just policymakers. In this article, we suggest questions to guide those organising and using policy dialogues to support evidence-informed policymaking. These are: 1. Does the dialogue address a high-priority issue? 2. Does the dialogue provide opportunities to discuss the problem, options to address the problem, and key implementation considerations? 3. Is the dialogue informed by a pre-circulated policy brief and by a discussion about the full range of factors that can influence the policymaking process? 4. Does the dialogue ensure fair representation among those who will be involved in, or affected by, future decisions related to the issue? 5. Does the dialogue engage a facilitator, follow a rule about not attributing comments to individuals, and not aim for consensus? 6. Are outputs produced and follow-up activities undertaken to support action?

  11. Drama Wor(l)ds: Explorations of Latina/o Realistic Fiction: Drama Encourages Critical Dialogue through Exploration of Multiple Voices and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Carmen L.

    2004-01-01

    The fifth graders interpretations of one piece of Latino/a realistic fictions in a mid-western school, specifically around the theme of Mexican Americans living on the U.S/Mexico border is looked at. A demonstration is given on how drama-in-education strategies serve as a powerful set of tools to facilitate complex dialogues and interpretation of…

  12. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Using Peer-Dialogue Assessment (PDA) for Improving Pre-Service Teachers' Perceived Confidence and Competence to Teach Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eather, Narelle; Riley, Nick; Miller, Drew; Jones, Bradley

    2017-01-01

    Developing effective methods for improving student learning in higher education is a priority. Recent findings have shown that feedback on student work can effectively facilitate learning if students are engaged as active participants in the feedback cycle; where they seek, generate and use feedback in the form of dialogue. This novel study…

  13. Drama Wor(l)ds: Explorations of Latina/o Realistic Fiction: Drama Encourages Critical Dialogue through Exploration of Multiple Voices and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Carmen L.

    2004-01-01

    The fifth graders interpretations of one piece of Latino/a realistic fictions in a mid-western school, specifically around the theme of Mexican Americans living on the U.S/Mexico border is looked at. A demonstration is given on how drama-in-education strategies serve as a powerful set of tools to facilitate complex dialogues and interpretation of…

  14. Dialogue on dialogues Multi-voiced dialogues (dialogism) as means for the co-production of knowledge in and on leadership communicative practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The article elaborates on a theoretical understanding of dialogue as a means for the co-production of knowledge in and on leadership communicative practices through ongoing research collaboration that involves leaders, researchers and master students at Aalborg University. Dialogue is viewed from...... to cultivate the creative and transformational powers of dialogues in which new meanings, voices and forms of knowledge emerge. I discuss how this way of framing the dialogical co-production of knowledge challenges the mainstream understanding of dialogical practices by embracing relational, conflictual...

  15. Facilitering som styringsredskab

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, Karen Overgaard

    2006-01-01

    #This thesis surveys facilitation as a new tool of steering within the public sector in Denmark. It is explored how facilitation is articulated and practiced among facilitators from the public, private and voluntary sector. Furthermore, the facilitator’s challenges by using facilitation are examined. The thesis is based on the presumption that facilitation is articulated by rationalities, which influence how facilitation is practiced and performed. Also, a facilitator is seen as a performer a...

  16. Space Situational Awareness: Difficult, Expensive and Necessary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Senior Leader Perspective November–December 2014 Air & Space Power Journal | 6 Space Situational Awareness Difficult, Expensive—and Necessary Dr...authors thank Gen William Shelton for his thoughtful and insightful comments. Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed or implied in the Journal ...permission. If it is reproduced, the Air and Space Power Journal requests a courtesy line. Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188

  17. Difficult treatment decisions in autoimmune hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Albert; J; Czaja

    2010-01-01

    Treatment decisions in autoimmune hepatitis are complicated by the diversity of its clinical presentations,uncertainties about its natural history,evolving opinions regarding treatment end points,varied nature of refractory disease,and plethora of alternative immu-nosuppressive agents. The goals of this article are to review the difficult treatment decisions and to provide the bases for making sound therapeutic judgments. The English literature on the treatment problems in au-toimmune hepatitis were identif...

  18. Difficult ("heartsink" patients and clinical communication difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino R Pérez-López

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Faustino R Pérez-LópezDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital Clínico de Zaragoza, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, SpainAbstract: Managing the difficult patient requires a set of skills or strategies oriented at improving the physician–patient relationship and avoiding conflictive situations. There are different types of difficult patients who should be precisely identified for their management. These patients seek appropriate medical care which is not always provided. However, some may have unrecognized pathological illnesses, especially personality or psychiatry disorders. Clinical communications may be altered by professional and situational factors. In some circumstances, clinical symptoms are medically unexplainable or poorly defined as part of a disease or syndrome. Organic disease should be ruled out before patients are classified as having a somatoform disorder. Diagnosis may be delayed when symptoms are not properly evaluated therefore causing serious health consequences. Clinical competence, empathy, and high quality communication is required to succeed in difficult clinical encounters.Keywords: physician–patient communication, barriers to communication, expert patient

  19. Production of Demonstratives in Dutch, English and Portuguese dialogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, Ielka; Luz, S.

    2011-01-01

    A data elicitation study on the type of demonstratives and determiners selected to denote objects in English, Dutch and Portuguese dialogues is presented. Participants were given a scenario and a scripted dialogue in which a furniture seller identifies target objects to a buyer. They were then asked

  20. Dialogue Theory as a Tool for Understanding Interactive Learning Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysthe, Olga

    1999-01-01

    Explicates aspects of dialogue theory that may enhance understanding of educational processes in general and interactive learning processes in particular. Bakhtin's extended theory of dialogue, the concept of multivoicedness and Lotman's dual functions of texts are explained and used to analyze a Web-mediated discussion among university students.…

  1. Capturing Mentor Teachers' Reflective Moments during Mentoring Dialogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crasborn, Frank; Hennissen, Paul; Brouwer, Niels; Korthagen, Fred; Bergen, Theo

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of the current study is to capture differential frequencies of mentor teachers' reflective moments, as indicators of different levels of consciousness in mentor teachers' use and acquisition of supervisory skills during mentoring dialogues. For each of the 30 participants, two mentoring dialogues were analyzed: one before and one…

  2. Using dialogues with customers as sources of knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, M.

    2004-01-01

    Every day organizations have numerous dialogues with (potential) customers. The representatives of the organization see themselves presented with the daunting task of how to identify and use the most relevant information that the customer communicated. Equally vexing for these dialogue participants

  3. Furthering the Goal of Cross-Disciplinary Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Pamela A.; Pullin, Diana; Gee, James Paul; Haertel, Edward H.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a rejoinder on the commentaries of the authors' article titled, "The Idea of Testing: Psychometric and Sociocultural Perspectives." In different ways, each commentary has made a productive contribution to a multidisciplinary dialogue about educational assessment. The authors acknowledge that dialogue across disciplinary…

  4. Exploring Creative Thinking in Graphically Mediated Synchronous Dialogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegerif, Rupert; McLaren, Bruce M.; Chamrada, Marian; Scheuer, Oliver; Mansour, Nasser; Miksatko, Jan; Williams, Mriga

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on an aspect of the EC funded Argunaut project which researched and developed awareness tools for moderators of online dialogues. In this study we report on an investigation into the nature of creative thinking in online dialogues and whether or not this creative thinking can be coded for and recognized automatically such that…

  5. Including Psychology in Inclusive Pedagogy: Enriching the Dialogue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershner, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive education is a complex field of study and practice that requires good communication and dialogue between all involved. Psychology has to some extent been marginalised in these educational dialogues. This is, in part, due to psychology's perceived heritage in the standardised testing that has been used to support the educational…

  6. Using Intergroup Dialogue to Promote Social Justice and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessel, Adrienne; Rogge, Mary E.; Garlington, Sarah B.

    2006-01-01

    Intergroup dialogue is a public process designed to involve individuals and groups in an exploration of societal issues such as politics, racism, religion, and culture that are often flashpoints for polarization and social conflict. This article examines intergroup dialogue as a bridging mechanism through which social workers in clinical, other…

  7. Dialogue on Modernity and Modern Education in Dispute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael; Peters, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    This is a dialogue or conversation between Michael Baker (MB) and Michael A. Peters (MP) on the concept of modernity and its significance for educational theory. The dialogue took place originally as a conversation about a symposium on modernity held at the American Educational Studies Association meeting 2010. It was later developed for…

  8. Using dialogues with customers as sources of knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, M.

    2004-01-01

    Every day organizations have numerous dialogues with (potential) customers. The representatives of the organization see themselves presented with the daunting task of how to identify and use the most relevant information that the customer communicated. Equally vexing for these dialogue participants

  9. Dialogue as a Means of Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine how dialogue is involved in learning and teaching in the classroom. Dialogue is present in many forms as it is used in group interactions, used with technology and how pre-service teachers communicate with their school supervisors during their training. Research was conducted through Educational Resources…

  10. DISCUSS: Toward a Domain Independent Representation of Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lee

    2012-01-01

    While many studies have demonstrated that conversational tutoring systems have a positive effect on learning, the amount of manual effort required to author, design, and tune dialogue behaviors remains a major barrier to widespread deployment and adoption of these systems. Such dialogue systems must not only understand student speech, but must…

  11. Teaching Literature as Dialogue: Coming to Terms with Terry Eagleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Thomas R.

    The literary theorist Terry Eagleton believes that literary study is the study of human discourse. To build on his idea for use in the classroom, it must first be assumed that literature constitutes a dialogue between the work (and its author) and the reader. The dialogue process can be introduced in a 2- to 4-week unit through a cluster of…

  12. Promoting Children's Healthy Social-Emotional Growth: Dialogue Journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Chiaki; Park, Sol

    2017-01-01

    Dialogue journals are a form of writing in which a student and a teacher carry on a conversation over time. This paper addresses the benefits of using dialogue journals for promoting a positive social-emotional learning (SEL) environment for children in school settings. Educators and researchers have increasingly acknowledged the importance of SEL…

  13. Toward affective dialogue management using partially observable Markov decision processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui, Trung Huu

    2008-01-01

    Designing and developing affective dialogue systems have recently received much interest from the dialogue research community. A distinctive feature of these systems is affect modeling. Previous work was mainly focused on showing system's emotions to the user in order to achieve the designer's goal

  14. A Dialogue Game Approach to Multi-Agent System Programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebbink, Henk-Jan; Witteman, Cilia; Meyer, John-Jules Ch.

    2005-01-01

    This paper approaches multi-agent system programming with dialogue games allowing the semantics of communicative acts to be a component in multi-agent architectures. We present a dialogue game for enquiry enabling agents to answer questions in a distributed fashion. In addition, we propose a reasoni

  15. An Evaluation of "Dialogue Completion" in English Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵阳

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the validity of "dialogue completion" item in the language testing,this article explores three contradictions by analyzing aspects of its characters,content,validity and reliability.The finding is that "dialogue completion" patten has unpredicted answer and should be avoided in the testing as much as possible.

  16. Bakhtin and Freire: Dialogue, Dialectic and Boundary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Dialogue is a seminal concept within the work of the Brazilian adult education theorist, Paulo Freire, and the Russian literary critic and philosopher, Mikhail Bakhtin. While there are commonalities in their understanding of dialogue, they differ in their treatment of dialectic. This paper addresses commonalities and dissonances within a…

  17. Monologue to Dialogue: Education in the 21st Century

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, Frans

    2013-01-01

    This paper argues that there is a need for a dialogical learning space because soft skills are becoming increasingly important in an ever more unstable labour market. Where once a monological form of education worked to prepare youth for the future, now a dialogue is required. This dialogue, by defi

  18. Socrates Lives: Dialogue as a Means of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Eric M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to argue for the ongoing use of dialogue as a modern pedagogical and andragogical method. The author reviewed 18 scholarly sources from three education databases in this literature review. The use of dialogue as mode of instruction dates from the Socratic Method of 399 B.C.E. to present uses. The literature reveals…

  19. Analyzing Empirical Notions of Suffering: Advancing Youth Dialogue and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baring, Rito V.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the possibilities of advancing youth dialogue and education among the Filipino youth using empirical notions of students on suffering. Examining empirical data, this analysis exposes uncharted notions of suffering and shows relevant meanings that underscore the plausible trappings of youth dialogue and its benefits on…

  20. A Response to Jane Sahi's "Dialogue as Education: Martin Buber"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniwal, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    This article is inspired by Jane Sahi's commentary, "Dialogue as Education: Martin Buber," published under the feature "Classics with Commentary" in the Monsoon 2005 issue of "Contemporary Education Dialogue." I seek to further the discussion of the contributions of Martin Buber to the discourse of education through…

  1. Intergroup Dialogue: Education for a Broad Conception of Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurin, Patricia; Nagda, Biren A.; Sorensen, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Intergroup dialogue provides what students need in order to relate and collaborate across differences, something they have to do in community projects that usually involve interactions across racial, social class, religious, and geographical divides. In this article, the authors demonstrate the efficacy of intergroup dialogue, drawing from a…

  2. Democracy in Education through Community-Based Policy Dialogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, Sue

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, People for Education, an Ontario-based parent-led organization, hosted eight policy dialogues with citizens about possibilities for the province's public schools. Policy dialogues are conversations about policy issues, ideas, processes, and outcomes where participants share their knowledge, perspectives, and experiences. In small groups…

  3. The Dialogue Journal: A Tool for Building Better Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denne-Bolton, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Using dialogue journals gives English language learners valuable writing practice. This article explores topics such as audience, fluency, teacher-student relationships, empowerment, and making the connection to academic writing. And the author gives practical advice on how teachers can institute dialogue journals in their classrooms and how best…

  4. Speaking across Difference in Community Dialogues on Affirmative Action Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Kristen L.; Moses, Michele S.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relevance of participants' social group differences with regard to the processes and outcomes of community dialogues on affirmative action. We found that participants' professional status was most salient to both the quantity of participants' contributions as well as their persuasiveness within the dialogues, with…

  5. Dialogue on Modernity and Modern Education in Dispute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael; Peters, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    This is a dialogue or conversation between Michael Baker (MB) and Michael A. Peters (MP) on the concept of modernity and its significance for educational theory. The dialogue took place originally as a conversation about a symposium on modernity held at the American Educational Studies Association meeting 2010. It was later developed for…

  6. SCIENCE- RELIGION DIALOGUE. THE CASE OF ECONOMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANDA DRAGOŞ CONSTANTIN

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of the present day scientists think that religion can never come to terms with science. In sharp contrast with this widespread opinion, this paper argues that, historically, scientific reasoning and religious belief joined hands in their effort to investigate and understand reality. In fact, the present-day divorce between science and religion is nothing else than the final outcome of a gradual, long-term, and deliberately assumed process of science secularization. However, especially during the latest two decades, we are all the same confronted with the advance of a new concern that some of the nowadays scientists have, the one of reviewing the sphere of problems specific to the domains of investigation they are involved in, with the face to the themes that are usually addressed by the theological thought. The paper describes this recent development as being captured by an emerging new field of investigation within the modern scientific epistemology: the dialogue between Science and Religion. It is also shown that the dialogue follows two divergent directions of analysis, namely the scholastic approach and the personalist one, respectively.

  7. THE ARCTIC: A DIALOGUE FOR DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury Mazurov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In September 2010, Moscow hosted the International Arctic Forum “The Arctic—Territory of Dialogue.” The Arctic Forum focused its attention on elements of sustainable development in the Arctic region, i.e., ecology, economics, infrastructure, social services, security, and geopolitics. Many Russian experts and many well-known politicians and experts from leading research centers of the Arctic countries (Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and USA, as well as by participants from France, Germany, Netherlands, and other countries attended the forum. Scholars and public figures from the European countries, representatives of the NATO, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe and other institutions were also present at the conference. In his key-note speech the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Russian Geographical Society (RGS, Prime Minister of the Russian Federation, Vladimir V. Putin formulated the principles of Russian national policy in the Arctic. Russian and foreign participants supported the idea of continuing dialogue on the Arctic under the RGS’s aegis and the transformation of the Arctic Forum into a permanent platform for discussions on the most urgent issues of the region.

  8. A dialogue between archive, knowledge and technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Machado dos Santos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Perform a brief reflection on knowledge management in archives, emphasizing the connections necessary for a dialogue between archive, knowledge and technology. Method. It consists in review of material previously published in the areas of Management Science, Archival Science and Information Science. The sources consulted consist of books, theses, texts on websites and scientific journal articles indexed in Google Scholar. Thus, the collected data is analyzed qualitatively. Results. There is a close relationship between the archive, knowledge and technology. In this sense, the document has the role of interlocutor in this dialogue. The interdisciplinary scenario envisioned, enhance existing rapprochement between the archival practices and knowledge management, in order to make possible a feedback cycle that will support the practices related to the management, either, of knowledge, of information or of documents. Conclusions. There is need for further studies to address the potential of the archives in order to fill possible gaps theory thus reach multiple looks more points interdisciplinary convergence. Finally, there is the informational potential of archives, then mediated by technology information, can enrich the knowledge management practices, and for this it is essential to strengthen the interdisciplinary relationships between Management Science, Archival Science and Information Science.

  9. An investigation into participation in classroom dialogue in mainland China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Song

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Classroom dialogue is commonly used in teaching and learning, and viewed as in terms of helping students to think critically and understand knowledge better. Thus, educators and scholars call on active participation in classroom dialogue. However, students in mainland China are traditionally viewed as less talkative in class. In this study, I aimed to investigate how Chinese students in secondary school normally participate in classroom dialogue. I designed an instrument for measuring students’ participation, and my research yielded initial evidence for its reliability and validity. The findings indicated that most students generally talked less and the teachers took the lead in initiating dialogue. Accuracy was used as the main criterion for evaluating whether students made a good contribution in class. A positive change was that students developed their reasoning through participating in dialogue.

  10. Dialogues with social robots enablements, analyses, and evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcock, Graham

    2017-01-01

    This book explores novel aspects of social robotics, spoken dialogue systems, human-robot interaction, spoken language understanding, multimodal communication, and system evaluation. It offers a variety of perspectives on and solutions to the most important questions about advanced techniques for social robots and chat systems. Chapters by leading researchers address key research and development topics in the field of spoken dialogue systems, focusing in particular on three special themes: dialogue state tracking, evaluation of human-robot dialogue in social robotics, and socio-cognitive language processing. The book offers a valuable resource for researchers and practitioners in both academia and industry whose work involves advanced interaction technology and who are seeking an up-to-date overview of the key topics. It also provides supplementary educational material for courses on state-of-the-art dialogue system technologies, social robotics, and related research fields.

  11. Gallstone ileus: a difficult emergency diagnosis!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, B; Sharma, H; Anwar, M A; Memon, M A

    2010-03-01

    Gallstone ileus (GSI) is a rare cause of mechanical small bowel obstruction. It occurs when a fistula between the gallbladder and the small bowel facilitates the migration of gallstone(s) into the small bowel. The commonest site of impaction is in the terminal ileum. We report the case of a 71-year-old female presenting with GSI diagnosed on CT scan. She was surgically explored and gallstones extracted by a simple enterotomy leading to full recovery of the patient.

  12. The Use of the Dialogue Concepts from the Arsenal of the Norwegian Dialogue Pedagogy in the Time of Postmodernism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradovski, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by the views by the American educationalist Henry Giroux on the role teachers and educationalists should be playing in the time of postmodernism and by Abraham Maslow's concept of biological idiosyncrasy, the author discusses how the concepts of the dialogues created by the representatives of Norwegian Dialogue Pedagogy, Hans Skjervheim,…

  13. Teacher-Student Dialogue: Transforming Teacher Interpersonal Behaviour and Pedagogical Praxis through Co-Teaching and Co-Generative Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmawati, Yuli; Koul, Rekha; Fisher, Darrell

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports a study of the effectiveness of co-teaching and co-generative dialogue in science learning and teaching in lower secondary science classes. The idea of co-teaching and co-generative dialogue--first proposed by two leading educationists, Roth and Tobin, in early 2000--made an international impact in educational research. In the…

  14. The Use of the Dialogue Concepts from the Arsenal of the Norwegian Dialogue Pedagogy in the Time of Postmodernism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradovski, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by the views by the American educationalist Henry Giroux on the role teachers and educationalists should be playing in the time of postmodernism and by Abraham Maslow's concept of biological idiosyncrasy, the author discusses how the concepts of the dialogues created by the representatives of Norwegian Dialogue Pedagogy, Hans Skjervheim,…

  15. The long shadows of the difficult past?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolnik, Kevin; Busse, Britta; Tholen, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the question of how young people today evaluate the Second World War today and how this ‘difficult past’ determines their political attitudes. Furthermore, the channels through which the current young generation in Europe is informed about the events dating back to the first...... World War. The evidence highlights the different perceptions of history among youth and points to the absence of a common European understanding of what happened between 1939 and 1945. The empirical evidence comes from a research project (2011–2015) funded by the European Commission and covering 14...

  16. [Difficult teenagers: the challenges of interdisciplinarity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Andrté, Stéphane; Botbola, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The adolescents in great distress, because of ruptures in the course of their lives and of their chaotic family environment, need educational and social actions. The consensual point of view is that responding to the needs of the so called "difficult adolescents" implies the involvement of educational, therapeutic and judicial services. Nevertheless, the usual tendency to categorize the users with the idea it will permit to guide them to the appropriate skill field and the transgressive characteristic of these adolescents' behaviours lead all these services to reject them and send them to the two other services.

  17. [Prisoners in units for difficult patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Brulin-Solignac, Diane; Lodetti, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Prisoners, on remand or convicted, can be placed for a variable amount of time in a unit for difficult patients if their pathological mental state so requires. For the most part, their therapeutic care does not depend on their status as prisoner. The treatments provided are those indicated for their psychological pathologies and their potential or known dangerousness. However, some administrative measures make a distinction between their treatment and that of non-prisoner patients placed in these secure psychiatric units. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Unexpected difficult intubation due to subglottic ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkadir Atım

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Airway damages encountered during endotracheal intubationor tracheostomy may cause some complicationssuch as severe dyspnea. Upper airway diagnostic endoscopywas planned to find the etiology of effort dyspnea ina 5 years old girl who had endotracheal intubation beenperformed during newborn period. Her ASA score was 1,and Mallampati score for preoperative airway evaluationwas 1. Physical examination revealed neither dyspneanor stridor while the patient was not exerting effort. Herchest radiograms were normal. She had no history of previoussurgical or anesthetical intervention. In this reportwe presented a difficult intubation during the endoscopicexamination of upper airway in a patient who had dyspneawhile exerting effort.

  19. Biomarkers in the Management of Difficult Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleich, Florence; Demarche, Sophie; Louis, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Difficult asthma is a heterogeneous disease of the airways including various types of bronchial inflammation and various degrees of airway remodeling. Therapeutic response of severe asthmatics can be predicted by the use of biomarkers of Type2-high or Type2-low inflammation. Based on sputum cell analysis, four inflammatory phenotypes have been described. As induced sputum is timeconsuming and expensive technique, surrogate biomarkers are useful in clinical practice. Eosinophilic phenotype is likely to reflect ongoing adaptive immunity in response to allergen. Several biomarkers of eosinophilic asthma are easily available in clinical practice (blood eosinophils, serum IgE, exhaled nitric oxyde, serum periostin). Neutrophilic asthma is thought to reflect innate immune system activation in response to pollutants or infectious agents while paucigranulocytic asthma is thought to be not inflammatory and characterized by smooth muscle dysfunction. We currently lack of user-friendly biomarkers of neutrophilic asthma and airway remodeling. In this review, we summarize the biomarkers available for the management of difficult asthma.

  20. Honey bees selectively avoid difficult choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Clint J; Barron, Andrew B

    2013-11-19

    Human decision-making strategies are strongly influenced by an awareness of certainty or uncertainty (a form of metacognition) to increase the chances of making a right choice. Humans seek more information and defer choosing when they realize they have insufficient information to make an accurate decision, but whether animals are aware of uncertainty is currently highly contentious. To explore this issue, we examined how honey bees (Apis mellifera) responded to a visual discrimination task that varied in difficulty between trials. Free-flying bees were rewarded for a correct choice, punished for an incorrect choice, or could avoid choosing by exiting the trial (opting out). Bees opted out more often on difficult trials, and opting out improved their proportion of successful trials. Bees could also transfer the concept of opting out to a novel task. Our data show that bees selectively avoid difficult tasks they lack the information to solve. This finding has been considered as evidence that nonhuman animals can assess the certainty of a predicted outcome, and bees' performance was comparable to that of primates in a similar paradigm. We discuss whether these behavioral results prove bees react to uncertainty or whether associative mechanisms can explain such findings. To better frame metacognition as an issue for neurobiological investigation, we propose a neurobiological hypothesis of uncertainty monitoring based on the known circuitry of the honey bee brain.

  1. Assessment of difficult airway predictors for predicting difficult laryngoscopy and intubation

    OpenAIRE

    S, Srinivasa; Oza, Vrinda; Kumar, Vasantha; Parmar, Vandana; Chhaya, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    Title: Assessment of difficult airway predictors for predicting difficult laryngoscopy and intubationObjectives: The aims and objectives of this study was to study and compare the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, odds ratio, relative risk, likelihood ratio and accuracy of the following parameters, modified Mallampati grading, interincisor gap, thyromental distance (TMD), ratio of height to thyromental distance (RHTMD), sternomental distance, neck...

  2. Social network science: pedagogy, dialogue, deliberation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Watermeyer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The online world constitutes an ever-expanding store and incubator for scientific information. It is also a social space where forms of creative interaction engender new ways of approaching science. Critically, the web is not only a repository of knowledge but a means with which to experience, interact and even supplement this bank. Social Network Sites are a key feature of such activity. This paper explores the potential for Social Network Sites (SNS as an innovative pedagogical tool that precipitate the ‘incidental learner’. I suggest that these online spaces, characterised by informality, open-access, user input and widespread popularity, offer a potentially indispensable means of furthering the public understanding of science; and significantly one that is rooted in dialogue.

  3. [Literature, history and pharmacy: a possible dialogue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Irene Nogueira de

    2015-01-01

    In the Memory Center of the Pharmacy School of UFMG there are documents relating to the passage of Carlos Drummond de Andrade through the institution, a fact that has led to reflection on the presence of the pharmacy and the pharmaceutical expert in literature. By means of interdisciplinary dialogue and research into elements that prove this presence, active participation and presence in the literature, an attempt was made to historicize these ties, not only of the poet from Itabira, but other men of letters, be they pharmaceutical professionals or people inspired by them. The objective was also to highlight some evidence that supports and demonstrates the importance of this professional in Brazilian society of the late-nineteenth century and early-twentieth century.

  4. [Knowledge production: a dialogue among different knowledge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Schlindwein, Betina Hömer; de Sousa, Francisca Georgina Macedo

    2006-01-01

    This text approaches the necessary dialogue among different knowledge and considers the advances within Nursing in the search for consistence and clarity within the Nursing discipline. Towards this end, the text is based upon transdisciplinarity, intersectorality, complexity, and the interaction of different pairs in health and other areas, as well as the sustainance of scientific and technological space within Nursing. It argues perspectives that open possibilities for scientific and technological knowledge construction within a more responsible and mutual social commitment. The purpose of the paperis to amplify the aptitude for contextualization and globalize different knowledge, as well as transcend differences and peculiarities within the perspective of more qualitative policies which may overcome disciplinary barriers.

  5. Mysticism and mental health: A critical dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Drazenovich

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary research suggests that a path is now open for critical dialogue between mysticism and mental health. Data are accumulating regarding the frequency with which mystical experience occurs in the general population. Social science researchers are undertaking studies to determine whether people can knowledgably differentiate between the presence of a mystical experience and other types of experience that occur in their lives. Psychologists are developing clinical criteria by which the mystical and psychotic experience can be differentiated. Neuropsychiatric researchers are exploring the effect of the mystical experience by way of enhanced brain imagery. Theologians are opening up the received wisdom of the mystical tradition and applying it to the present historical context. This paper drew these diverse disciplines together to demonstrate an emerging consensus with respect to the efficacy of mysticism in the field of mental health.

  6. History as Dialogue: On Online Narrativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiel van den Akker

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital history covers a wide variety of information technology driven initiatives about the past. Many reflections on digital history either consider the auxiliary sciences of history or public history, whilst they tend to disregard historical understanding as it is traditionally achieved in the academic historical narrative. The problem is that the historical monograph no longer seems an appropriate model for historical understanding in a digital environment. How then, are we to conceptualise online historical understanding? Information technology, we are told, is participatory, interactive, dynamic, and collaborative, enabling direct communication. It can therefore be argued that the dialogue is the underlying concept of information technology. We may push this concept even further, at the risk of being misunderstood, and present it as an online alternative for academic history writing. The function of such an exercise is to underline and provoke a much needed reflection on historical understanding in the digital age.

  7. Interpretive research methodology: broadening the dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenberg, J S

    1993-12-01

    This article expands the dialogue on interpretive research methodology, locating this set of approaches within a broad historical and interdisciplinary context. Several of the most commonly held misconceptions in nursing, particularly those related to the meanings and derivations ascribed to "grounded theory," "symbolic interactionism," and "ethnography," are examined. The interpretive research approaches not only have gained broader acceptance across disciplines, but also have shifted in more radical and often less structured directions during the past decade. Several pivotal areas of these ongoing shifts are analyzed for their relevance to nursing research: the influence of critical and feminist theory and postmodernism, the ambiguity inherent in both every-day life and the research enterprise, the importance of locating the researcher, power and status inequities, the problematic aspects of language, meaning, and representation, and the emphasis on reflexivity and context as constitutive of meaning.

  8. Referential Opacity and Hermeneutics in Plato’s Dialogue Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard McDonough

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper argues that Plato’s dialogue form creates a Quinean “opaque context” that segregates the assertions by Plato’s characters in the dialogues from both Plato and the real world with the result that the dialogues require a hermeneutical interpretation. Sec. I argues that since the assertions in the dialogues are located inside an opaque context, the forms of life of the characters in the dialogues acquires primary philosophical importance for Plato. The second section argues that the thesis of Sec. I coheres with the claim in Plato’s Seventh Letter that since philosophical truth is incommunicable by means of language it is of primary importance for philosophers to develop proper “schemes of living” (forms of life. Sec. III argues since the forms of life of the characters portrayed in the dialogues is of primary philosophical importance for Plato, and since hermeneutical methods are required to interpret emerging forms of life, Plato’s dialogues are positively crafted to be read hermeneutically. Sec IV argues that Heidegger, who is famous for seeing Plato’s views as antithetical to his own hermeneutical approach, is mistaken, and that Plato’s real views are, in principle, more akin to Heidegger’s views than he thinks.

  9. Application of Kinesio Taping method for newborn swallowing difficultly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Lin; Wu, Wei-Ting; Chang, Ke-Vin; Lin, Hong-Yi; Chou, Li-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Preterm infants are at an increased risk of sucking problems, swallowing difficulty, and poor nourishment. During the neonatal period, the neurobehavioral organization of a preterm baby is poor compared with that of appropriate gestational age infants. Kinesio Taping has been widely used for edema control, joint protection, and proprioception training. With the help of augmentation of the sensory input for muscle facilitation and inhibition through tapping, the coordination of the target muscle groups can be improved. Until now, no research is available on the use of Kinesio Taping for the swallowing difficulty of infant. Methods: We reported a preterm infant suffering from brain edema at birth and swallowing difficultly until 40 weeks. The swallowing reflex was delayed. Moreover, lip closure and rooting reflex combined with the dysfunction grade of jaw movement were poor. We performed KT methods on the baby under the theory of the direction of the tape for facilitate or inhibit the muscle. Result: After the Kinesio Taping treatment, the sucking function was improved with good lip closure.One week later, the baby was discharged without the use of an oral gastric tube. Conclusion: Kinesio Taping contributed significantly to the improvement of impaired sucking and swallowing and could be implemented as a regular rehabilitative approach for infants suffering from these difficulties. PMID:27495080

  10. Difficult weaning in delayed onset diaphragmatic hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Syed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Diaphragmatic injuries are relatively rare and result from either blunt or penetrating trauma. Regardless of the mechanism, diagnosis is often missed and high index of suspicion is vital. The clinical signs associated with a diaphragmatic hernia can range from no outward signs to immediately life-threatening respiratory compromise. Establishing the clinical diagnosis of diaphragmatic injuries (DI can be challenging as it is often clinically occult. Accurate diagnosis is critical since missed DI may result in grave sequelae due to herniation and strangulation of displaced intra-abdominal organs. We present a case of polytrauma with rib fracture and delayed appearance of diaphragmatic hernia manifesting as difficult weaning from ventilatory support.

  11. Effective Climate Communication with Difficult Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, S.

    2015-12-01

    Climate communication is often fraught with ideological baggage ("noise") that makes it very difficult to connect to audiences. In these cases, it is helpful to use "best practices" known from other fields of communication. Engaging audiences with authenticity, using plain language, respecting cultural and political differences, and a sprinkling of humor can go a long way toward establishing a connection. It's important to avoid common but polarizing tropes from popular media, and often quite helpful to frame climate issues in novel or unexpected ways that cut across entrenched political discourse. Emerging social science research Beyond ideology, climate change is Simple, Serious, and Solvable. Effective communication of these three key ideas can succeed when the science argument is carefully framed to avoid attack of the audience's ethical identity. Simple arguments from common sense and everyday experience are more successful than data. Serious consequences to values that resonate with the audience can be avoided by solutions that don't threaten those values.

  12. Foreign body aspiration masquerading as difficult asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rai S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to assess patients of difficult/therapy resistant asthma carefully in order to identify whether there are any correctable factors that may contribute to their poor control. It is critical to make a diagnosis of asthma and to exclude other airway diseases. A 65-years-old lady presented with repeated acute episodes of dyspnoea and wheezing. She was on regular medication for bronchial asthma for 18 years. There was no history of foreign body aspiration or loss of consciousness. Her chest radiograph was normal. She showed poor response to corticosteroids and bronchodilators. Fibreoptic bronchoscopy (FOB showed intracordal cyst of the left vocal cord and 1cm size irregular piece of betel nut in right main bronchus, which was removed endoscopically with the help of dormia basket, following which her condition improved and asthma was controlled on inhaled bronchodilators.

  13. Crowd sourcing difficult problems in protein science().

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Nathan S; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2017-08-01

    Dedicated computing resources are expensive to develop, maintain, and administrate. Frequently, research groups require bursts of computing power, during which progress is still limited by available computing resources. One way to alleviate this bottleneck would be to use additional computing resources. Today, many computing devices remain idle most of the time. Passive volunteer computing exploits this unemployed reserve of computing power by allowing device-owners to donate computing time on their own devices. Another complementary way to alleviate bottlenecks in computing resources is to use more efficient algorithms. Engaging volunteer computing employs human intuition to help solve challenging problems for which efficient algorithms are difficult to develop or unavailable. Designing engaging volunteer computing projects is challenging but can result in high-quality solutions. Here, we highlight four examples. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  14. Cuffed oropharyngeal airway for difficult airway management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaishi, Kazumi; Kawahito, Shinji; Tomioka, Shigemasa; Eguchi, Satoru; Kitahata, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Difficulties with airway management are often caused by anatomic abnormalities due to previous oral surgery. We performed general anesthesia for a patient who had undergone several operations such as hemisection of the mandible and reconstructive surgery with a deltopectoralis flap, resulting in severe maxillofacial deformation. This made it impossible to ventilate with a face mask and to intubate in the normal way. An attempt at oral awake intubation using fiberoptic bronchoscopy was unsuccessful because of severe anatomical abnormality of the neck. We therefore decided to perform retrograde intubation and selected the cuffed oropharyngeal airway (COPA) for airway management. We inserted the COPA, not through the patient's mouth but through the abnormal oropharyngeal space. Retrograde nasal intubation was accomplished with controlled ventilation through the COPA, which proved to be very useful for this difficult airway management during tracheal intubation even though the method was unusual.

  15. Ontologies and adaptivity in dialogue for question answering

    CERN Document Server

    Sonntag, D

    2010-01-01

    Question answering (QA) has become one of the fastest growing topics in computational linguistics and information access. To advance research in the area of dialogue-based question answering, we propose a combination of methods from different scientific fields (i.e., Information Retrieval, Dialogue Systems, Semantic Web, and Machine Learning). This book sheds light on adaptable dialogue-based question answering. We demonstrate the technical and computational feasibility of the proposed ideas, the introspective methods in particular, by beginning with an extensive introduction to the dialogical

  16. Learning to Generate Dialogue: Theory, Practice, and Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCallie, Ellen; Simonsson, Elin; Gammon, Ben

    2007-01-01

    -commonly called dialogue events-that bring scientific and technical experts, social scientists, and policymakers into discussion with members of the public about contemporary science-based issues. This article clarifies the difference between non-policy-informing dialogue events and other interactions in museums......Over the past decade in the UK, communities of scientists, governmental bodies, and informal learning organizations have increasingly promoted public engagement with science. One of the most visible features of these efforts within museums is the staging of adult-focused, face-to-face forums...... of engagement through dialogue related to science and society...

  17. Never So Important——First Sino-US Strategic and Economic Dialogue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Xiu

    2009-01-01

    @@ The first Sino-US Strategic and Economic Dialogue was held on July 27 and 28,2009 in Washington.Either before or during the dialogue,PRC and USA attached great importance to it.The former Strategic Dialogue and the biannual Strategic Economic Dialogue were initiated by the two heads of state in 2005 and 2006 respectively.

  18. Interface for Barge-in Free Spoken Dialogue System Based on Sound Field Reproduction and Microphone Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinamoto Yoichi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A barge-in free spoken dialogue interface using sound field control and microphone array is proposed. In the conventional spoken dialogue system using an acoustic echo canceller, it is indispensable to estimate a room transfer function, especially when the transfer function is changed by various interferences. However, the estimation is difficult when the user and the system speak simultaneously. To resolve the problem, we propose a sound field control technique to prevent the response sound from being observed. Combined with a microphone array, the proposed method can achieve high elimination performance with no adaptive process. The efficacy of the proposed interface is ascertained in the experiments on the basis of sound elimination and speech recognition.

  19. Interprofessional Dialogues within a Senior Mentoring Program: Incorporating Gerontology Students as Facilitation Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropf, Nancy P.; Idler, Ellen; Flacker, Jonathan; Clevenger, Carolyn; Rothschild, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Effective health care with older adults requires that clinicians and practitioners are knowledgeable about aging issues and have the skills to work within an interdisciplinary team context. This article describes a Senior Mentoring Program that paired clinical students in medicine, nursing, and a physician assistant program with community-dwelling…

  20. Interprofessional Dialogues within a Senior Mentoring Program: Incorporating Gerontology Students as Facilitation Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropf, Nancy P.; Idler, Ellen; Flacker, Jonathan; Clevenger, Carolyn; Rothschild, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Effective health care with older adults requires that clinicians and practitioners are knowledgeable about aging issues and have the skills to work within an interdisciplinary team context. This article describes a Senior Mentoring Program that paired clinical students in medicine, nursing, and a physician assistant program with community-dwelling…

  1. A lottery incentive system to facilitate dialogue and social support for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Martin Weihs

    2014-07-15

    Jul 15, 2014 ... To cite this article: Martin Weihs & Anna Meyer-Weitz (2014) A lottery .... including HCT, and care (Bhagwanjee, Petersen, Akintola & George. 2008 ...... Lee, R., Cui, R. R., Muessig, K. E., Thirumurthy, H. & Tucker, J. D. (2013).

  2. Identifying key areas for active interprofessional learning partnerships: A facilitated dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Kathryn; Angus, Allyson; Breckenridge, Jenna; Davey, Peter; Tully, Vicki; Muir, Fiona

    2016-11-01

    Student and service user involvement is recognised as an important factor in creating interprofessional education (IPE) opportunities. We used a team-based learning approach to bring together undergraduate health professional students, early career professionals (ECPs), public partners, volunteers, and carers to explore learning partnerships. Influenced by evaluative inquiry, this qualitative study used a free text response to allow participants to give their own opinion. A total of 153 participants (50 public partners and 103 students and professionals representing 11 healthcare professions) took part. Participants were divided into mixed groups of six (n = 25) and asked to identify areas where students, professionals, and public could work together to improve health professional education. Each group documented their discussions by summarising agreed areas and next steps. Responses were collected and transcribed for inductive content analysis. Seven key themes (areas for joint working) were identified: communication, public as partners, standards of conduct, IPE, quality improvement, education, and learning environments. The team-based learning format enabled undergraduate and postgraduate health professionals to achieve consensus with public partners on areas for IPE and collaboration. Some of our results may be context-specific but the approach is generalisable to other areas.

  3. US-Japan energy policy dialogue. [Contains a list of attendees, agenda, report summaries, and a financial report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guertin, Donald L.; Davis, W. Kenneth; Ikuta, Toyoaki

    1993-03-16

    The Atlantic Council has cooperated in an ongoing dialogue on energy policy issues with key Japanese organizations for the past twelve years. These Japanese organizations are the Committee for Energy Policy Promotion (CEPP) and the Institute of Energy Economics (IEE). The members of CEPP are major energy supplier and user companies. The IEE conducts sophisticated research and prepares policy papers on a range of international and Japanese energy issues. This energy dialogue is the only long-term US-Japan dialogue which engages CEPP/IEE members. Over the past twelve years the US-Japan energy dialogue has met seventeen times, with alternating meetings held in Tokyo, Hawaii, and Washington, DC. While the dialogue is a private sector activity, US and Japanese government officials are kept informed on the program and are invited to participate in the meetings in Washington and Tokyo. Major benefits of this activity have included: Establishment of close working relationships among Japanese and US private sector energy institutions and experts; exchange of papers on energy issues among participants and on a selected basis to others in the private and governmental sectors; facilitation of separate US-Japanese work on policy issues - for example a joint US-Japan cooperative policy paper on global climate change published in 1991, some government representatives participated in a May 1991 meeting on this subject. Encouragement of Japanese participation in separate Atlantic Council programs on US energy policy imperatives (1990); technology cooperation with developing countries in the field of energy supply and use for sustainable development (1992); creation of a World Energy Efficiency Association (1993); and a US-Japan-Newly Independent States project on NIS energy policy (1992--1994).

  4. Difficult airway and difficult intubation in postintubation tracheal stenosis: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarogoulidis P

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Paul Zarogoulidis,1 Theodoros Kontakiotis,1 Kosmas Tsakiridis,2 Michael Karanikas,3 Christos Simoglou,4 Konstantinos Porpodis,1 Alexandros Mitrakas,3 Agisilaos Esebidis, 3 Maria Konoglou,5 Nikolaos Katsikogiannis,6 Vasilis Zervas,1 Christina Aggelopoulou,7 Dimitrios Mikroulis,4 Konstantinos Zarogoulidis11Pulmonary Department, "G Papanikolaou" General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 2Cardiothoracic Department, Saint Luke Private Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece; 31st University Surgery Department, 4Cardiothoracic Department, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece; 51st Pulmonary Department, "G Papanikolaou" General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 6Surgery Department (NHS, 7Neurology Department (NHS, University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, GreeceAbstract: Management of a "difficult airway" remains one of the most relevant and challenging tasks for anesthesiologists and pulmonary physicians. Several conditions, such as inflammation, trauma, tumor, and immunologic and metabolic diseases, are considered responsible for the difficult intubation of a critically ill patient. In this case report we present the case of a 46-year-old male with postintubation tracheal stenosis. We will focus on the method of intubation used, since the patient had a "difficult airway" and had to be intubated immediately because he was in a life-threatening situation. Although technology is of utter importance, clinical examination and history-taking remain invaluable for the appropriate evaluation of the critically ill patient in everyday medical life. Every physician who will be required to perform intubation has to be familiar with the evaluation of the difficult airway and, in the event of the unanticipated difficult airway, to be able to use a wide variety of tools and

  5. Islam and the future of tolerance: A dialogue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohd Ashraf Malik

    2016-01-01

      The book takes the form of a dialogue between the famous atheist, Sam Harris, and an ex-member of Hizb-ut-Tahrir and the cofounder of Quilliam, a counter-extremism organisation in London, Maajid...

  6. Development of critically reflective dialogues in communities of health professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de Esther; Endedijk, Maaike D.; Jaarsma, Debbie; Beukelen, van Peter; Simons, Robert-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Critically reflective dialogues (CRD) are important for knowledge sharing and creating meaning in communities. CRD includes different aspects: being open about mistakes, critical opinion sharing, asking for and giving feedback, experimentation, challenging groupthink and research utilisation. In thi

  7. Individual and Domain Adaptation in Sentence Planning for Dialogue

    CERN Document Server

    Mairesse, F; Stent, A; Walker, M A; 10.1613/jair.2329

    2011-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the development and deployment of spoken dialogue systems is the design of the spoken language generation module. This challenge arises from the need for the generator to adapt to many features of the dialogue domain, user population, and dialogue context. A promising approach is trainable generation, which uses general-purpose linguistic knowledge that is automatically adapted to the features of interest, such as the application domain, individual user, or user group. In this paper we present and evaluate a trainable sentence planner for providing restaurant information in the MATCH dialogue system. We show that trainable sentence planning can produce complex information presentations whose quality is comparable to the output of a template-based generator tuned to this domain. We also show that our method easily supports adapting the sentence planner to individuals, and that the individualized sentence planners generally perform better than models trained and tested on a popu...

  8. Dialogue in Music Therapy - Its Role and Forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Dialogue is a fundamental human way of acquiring knowledge. Psychological descriptions of dialogue range from pre-natal ones to adult turn-taking. Scales have been devised to rate its well-functioning, and conversational analysis has been introduced to illuminate the interactive aspect within music....... The latter had the purpose of providing a relatively safe situation where initiative had to be shown. Asymmetric dialogue deals with the challenge presented by clients with contact disabilities. Ideas are stated on how to cope with scarcity of response. A hierarchical model of time-levels is presented...... in which levels are related to activities of the session, aiming at providing sustained structure as well as flexibility ccording to situations arising. The conclusion compares forms of dialogue described in the vignettes: "regular turn-taking", "communication at a "split-second level"" and "asymmetric...

  9. Marital Dialogue – Between Conflict, Agreement and Relationship Breakdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornaszewska-Polak Monika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Marital dialogue plays an essential role in shaping the relationship between spouses and supports experiencing personal I in the context of the community – We. In these couples, where dialogue is going well, it fulfils the function of a secure base forming a community based on the foundation of unity. However, contemporary culture denies an interpersonal dialogue the authenticity and engagement, emphasizing individualistic attitudes, preoccupation with oneself, leading to relationship and community disintegration and breakdown. This paper is to present the authors twenty year research into bonds, communication styles, marital conflicts and ways of coping with them. The research shows various issues related to developing the interpersonal dialogue and thus creating bonds and unity in the marriage and family. At first, the research devoted to the transmission of generation patterns in the family is presented and it is followed by presentation of selected psychological factors influencing marriage quality and marital satisfaction.

  10. The Buber-Rogers Dialogue: Theory Confirmed in Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckinger, Donald S.

    1976-01-01

    Considers a dialogue between Carl Rogers and Martin Buber and its use both in distinguishing the concept teaching from the concept therapy as a general case and specifically in differentiating existential psychotherapy from Buber's theory of instruction. (Author/RK)

  11. Science and religion in dialogue over the global commons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edenhofer, Ottmar; Flachsland, Christian; Knopf, Brigitte

    2015-10-01

    The Pope's encyclical makes unprecedented progress in developing scientific dialogue with religion by drawing on research, and encouraging further discussion about the ethical challenge of governing the global commons.

  12. Dialogue-Writing in the Teaching of Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymon, Theresa Drew

    1979-01-01

    Argues for the use of dialogue writing as an aid in the teaching of composition. Notes among its advantages its potential for addressing a number of specific writing problems rarely eliminated by drill work or class lectures. (FL)

  13. Difficult-to-treat asthma in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Alexandra; Saglani, Sejal

    2013-06-01

    Asthma continues to be one of the greatest burdens to healthcare resources throughout the developed world. In most cases, good symptom control can be achieved with low-dose inhaled corticosteroids, and can be cared for in the primary and secondary healthcare systems. However, there is a group in whom control is not achieved despite high-dose inhaled corticosteroids and maximal add-on therapies; these are children with problematic severe asthma that should be referred to a specialist team for further investigation and management. In this review we aimed to provide an evidence-based guide for pediatricians providing care for children with asthma in secondary healthcare settings. The review focuses on a proposed investigation and management strategy for children aged between 6 and 16 years with problematic severe asthma, and is supported as far as possible by evidence from the literature. We first address recent advances in nomenclature and then discuss our proposed course of investigation and management of these children. Distinction of children with true, severe, therapy-resistant asthma from those with asthma that is difficult to treat because of unaddressed underlying modifiable factors is critical and is discussed in detail.

  14. Control of roofs difficult to break down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukashov, V.G.; Suslyakov, V.P.; Korobov, A.N.

    1981-03-01

    This paper describes a method of advanced torpedoing a roof difficult to break down at the Polysaevskaya coal mine. It consists in placing explosive charges in the roof ahead of the coal face. Three schemes were tested: boreholes were drilled parallel to the face, perpendicular or inclined at an angle to the face. Boreholes were 112 mm in diameter and their length ranged from 30 to 100 m, distance between the boreholes amounted to 20 m. 6ZhV ammonite explosive, 90 mm in diameter and 500 mm long, were used. Torpedos were 2 m long, and separated by 3 to 4 m long air pockets. When a roof characterized by a high compressive strength coefficient (about 10 on the Protod'yakonov scale) was torpedoed, 250 kg of ammonite were used for a borehole 80 m long, and 160 kg for a borehole 50 m long. When borehole length was reduced to 40 m explosive consumption decreased to 117 kg. In the case of rocks with compressive strength coefficient of 6, explosive amount was two times lower. In a coal mine in which an OKP-70 face system was used applying advanced torpedoing increased labor productivity of the face by 30% and reduced cost of mining by 42%. Number of work accidents was reduced 13 times. (In Russian)

  15. Why behavior change is difficult to sustain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouton, Mark E

    2014-11-01

    Unhealthy behavior is responsible for much human disease, and a common goal of contemporary preventive medicine is therefore to encourage behavior change. However, while behavior change often seems easy in the short run, it can be difficult to sustain. This article provides a selective review of research from the basic learning and behavior laboratory that provides some insight into why. The research suggests that methods used to create behavior change (including extinction, counterconditioning, punishment, reinforcement of alternative behavior, and abstinence reinforcement) tend to inhibit, rather than erase, the original behavior. Importantly, the inhibition, and thus behavior change more generally, is often specific to the "context" in which it is learned. In support of this view, the article discusses a number of lapse and relapse phenomena that occur after behavior has been changed (renewal, spontaneous recovery, reinstatement, rapid reacquisition, and resurgence). The findings suggest that changing a behavior can be an inherently unstable and unsteady process; frequent lapses should be expected. In the long run, behavior-change therapies might benefit from paying attention to the context in which behavior change occurs.

  16. Navigating language barriers under difficult circumstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, Yael; Lo, Bernard; Ettinger, Katharine M; Fernandez, Alicia

    2008-08-19

    The proportion of the U.S. population with limited English proficiency is growing. Physicians often find themselves caring for patients with limited English proficiency in settings with limited language services. There has been little exploration of the decisions physicians face when providing care across language barriers. The authors offer a conceptual framework to aid physicians in thinking through difficult choices about language services and provide responses to common questions encountered in the care of patients with limited English proficiency. Specifically, they describe 4 factors that should inform the decision to call an interpreter (the clinical situation, degree of language gap, available resources, and patient preference), discuss who may be an appropriate interpreter, and offer strategies for when a professional interpreter is not available. The authors use a hypothetical case to illustrate how decisions about language services may evolve over the course of an interaction. This conceptual and practical approach can help clinicians to improve the quality of care provided to patients with limited English proficiency.

  17. Definitions of Complexity are Notoriously Difficult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Peter

    Definitions of complexity are notoriously difficult if not impossible at all. A good working hypothesis might be: Everything is complex that is not simple. This is precisely the way in which we define nonlinear behavior. Things appear complex for different reasons: i) Complexity may result from lack of insight, ii) complexity may result from lack of methods, and (iii) complexity may be inherent to the system. The best known example for i) is celestial mechanics: The highly complex Pythagorean epicycles become obsolete by the introduction of Newton's law of universal gravitation. To give an example for ii), pattern formation and deterministic chaos became not really understandable before extensive computer simulations became possible. Cellular metabolism may serve as an example for iii) and is caused by the enormous complexity of biochemical reaction networks with up to one hundred individual reaction fluxes. Nevertheless, only few fluxes are dominant in the sense that using Pareto optimal values for them provides near optimal values for all the others...

  18. Learning is in the facilitation: faculty perspectives with facilitated teaching and learning-recommendations from informal discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Prospero, Lisa; Bhimji-Hewitt, Sheena

    2011-01-01

    Small group learning is an interactive activity that requires a skilled teacher with the ability to facilitate and debrief. Approximately 250 students from seven health professions were enrolled in a first year interprofessional education course that focused on the importance of communication and collaboration. Weekly faculty debrief sessions were conducted and were utilized to share the teachers perspectives with facilitative teaching as well as for feedback and improvement strategies. Recommendations included linking the learning within the small group sessions back to clinical and professional practice in order to validate the course content and thereby increase student engagement; creation of facilitator guides with specific debrief instructions for the given objectives in order to encourage effective learning dialogue among all participants; and providing faculty with formalized facilitator training as well as debrief strategies in order to attain the skills to better guide student learning.

  19. A dialogue game approach to multi-agent system programming

    OpenAIRE

    Lebbink, Henk-Jan; Witteman, Cilia; Meyer, John-Jules Ch.

    2004-01-01

    This paper approaches multi-agent system programming with dialogue games allowing the semantics of communicative acts to be a component in multi-agent architectures. We present a dialogue game for enquiry enabling agents to answer questions in a distributed fashion. In addition, we propose a reasoning game that defines when agents are allowed to make decisions, in the current case, decisions to accept to believe propositions. These games are brought together in a deliberation cycle and are im...

  20. Rationality and Motivation: Moral Psychology in Plato's Socratic Dialogues

    OpenAIRE

    Ivars Neiders

    2011-01-01

    "Rationality and Motivation: Moral Psychology in Plato's Socratic Dialogues" Annotation The dissertation "Rationality and Motivation: Moral Psychology in Plato's Socratic Dialogues" is a philosophical study of Socratic views in moral psychology. Particular attention is paid to what the author calls (1) Doxastic competence and (2) Orectic competence. It is argued that according to Socrates these two different epistemic relations are important aspects of our self-understanding. The doxast...

  1. Evaluating deliberative dialogues focussed on healthy public policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavis, John N; Boyko, Jennifer A; Gauvin, Francois-Pierre

    2014-12-17

    Deliberative dialogues have recently captured attention in the public health policy arena because they have the potential to address several key factors that influence the use of research evidence in policymaking. We conducted an evaluation of three deliberative dialogues convened in Canada by the National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy in order to learn more about deliberative dialogues focussed on healthy public policy. The evaluation included a formative assessment of participants' views about and experiences with ten key design features of the dialogues, and a summative assessment of participants' intention to use research evidence of the type that was discussed at the dialogue. We surveyed participants immediately after each dialogue was completed and again six months later. We analyzed the ratings using descriptive statistics and the written comments by conducting a thematic analysis. A total of 31 individuals participated in the three deliberative dialogues that we evaluated. The response rate was 94% (N = 29; policymakers (n = 9), stakeholders (n = 18), researchers (n = 2)) for the initial survey and 56% (n = 14) for the follow-up. All 10 of the design features that we examined as part of the formative evaluation were rated favourably by all participant groups. The findings of the summative evaluation demonstrated a mean behavioural intention score of 5.8 on a scale from 1 (strongly disagree) to 7 (strongly agree). Our findings reinforce the promise of deliberative dialogues as a strategy for supporting evidence-informed public health policies. Additional work is needed to understand more about which design elements work in which situations and for different issues, and whether intention to use research evidence is a suitable substitute for measuring actual behaviour change.

  2. Exploratory Perspectives for an AQAL Model of Generative Dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olen Gunnlaugson

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Otto Scharmer’s generative dialogue model of the four fields of conversation has been largely applied in organizational settings with the intent of fostering conditions for groups to learn to think together, generate new knowledge and solve the deeper problems that pervade organizational culture. This article introduces elements of Wilber’s Integral or AQAL paradigm as an interpretive framework for advancing key distinctions within Scharmer’s account of generative dialogue.

  3. Fostering Writing and Critical Thinking through Dialogue Journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Bhushan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Much like the regular physical exercise, having a regular writing workout is necessary for learners of English language. Dialogue journals provide the perfect means for this. Dialogue journal in an English classroom is an informal written conversation between the students and the teacher; in fact it can motivate a learner to write more in English. The language in a dialogue journal is closer to speech than to academic writing, so it promotes authentic, informal and lively conversation between the writers. As our learners need frequent opportunities to practice speaking English freely without fear of being corrected, in order to achieve oral fluency; similarly they need the chance to write freely without inhibition to promote fluency in writing. Often it is in the act of writing a response that actual learning takes place and this is how critical thinking develops. In fact, dialogue journal is the place where students explore their thinking before classroom discussion. It enables speaking and writing, referencing each other. The main objective of using dialogue journals in the English language classroom is to give students more time and opportunities for writing so that they can experience the pleasure of communication through the written word and at the same time become better writers and thinkers in English. With this background, the aim of this paper is to discuss the role of dialogue journals in developing the skills of writing and critical thinking of English language learners.

  4. Health care managers learning by listening to subordinates' dialogue training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, C; Ahlborg, G; Wikström, E

    2014-01-01

    Middle managers in health care today are expected to continuously and efficiently decide and act in administration, finance, care quality, and work environment, and strategic communication has become paramount. Since dialogical communication is considered to promote a healthy work environment, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the ways in which health care managers experienced observing subordinates' dialogue training. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and documents from eight middle managers in a dialogue programme intervention conducted by dialogue trainers. Focus was on fostering and assisting workplace dialogue. Conventional qualitative content analysis was used. Managers' experiences were both enriching and demanding, and consisted of becoming aware of communication, meaning perceiving interaction between subordinates as well as own silent interaction with subordinates and trainer; Discovering communicative actions for leadership, by gaining self-knowledge and recognizing relational leadership models from trainers--such as acting democratically and pedagogically--and converting theory into practice, signifying practising dialogue-promoting conversation behaviour with subordinates, peers, and superiors. Only eight managers participated in the intervention, but data afforded a basis for further research. Findings stressed the importance of listening, and of support from superiors, for well-functioning leadership communication at work. Studies focusing on health care managers' communication and dialogue are few. This study contributes to knowledge about these activities in managerial leadership.

  5. THE PRACTICES AND APPROACHES OF INTERFAITH DIALOGUE AT LEICESTER, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Faizuddin Ramli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of human is one of the God's. With the diversity, people from different religions, ethnics, and cultures can live together and sharing the good values. However, it can only be achieved with dialogue which is perceived as the best mechanism to build mutual understanding and respect with each other. In the context of Leicester, which located in the East Midlands of England, the practices of interfaith dialogue are implemented successfully till today. There are a lot of organizations and people who are involved and organizing interfaith dialogue activities with different approaches. This article will discuss about the practices and approaches of interfaith dialogue in Leicester. The method used in this research was qualitative, which included literature review, observation and participation, and particularly interviews with fifteen people who represented interfaith organization and religious community in Leicester. The findings show the practices of interfaith dialogue have been organized with different types of approaches. In addition, it can be deliberated as a good model of interfaith dialogue particularly for those who want to involve in these activities.

  6. Combined precut in difficult biliary cannulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Espinel-Díez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: precut sphincterotomy refers to a variety of endoscopic techniques that are used in order to access the bile duct when conventional methods of cannulation have failed. There are not significant data (such as efficacy, safety about the use of different techniques of precutting at the same session. We have described our experience with combined precut sphincterotomy (CPS and we have compared our results to the use of an isolated precut. Patients and methods: we have performed 247 precuts of a total of 2.390 ERCPs. Patients were distributed according to the type of precut practiced: Needle-knife, transpancreatic and combined precut sphincterotomies. "Combined precut" consisted in performing first a transpancreatic sphincterotomy and, if the access was not achieved, then performing a needle-knife sphincterotomy in the same session. The data about safety and efficacy were prospectively collected. The complications were defined according to the consensus criteria. Results: we performed precutting techniques in 247 patients. Needle-knife, transpancreatic, and combined precuts were performed in 125 (6.9%, 74 (4.1% and 48 (2.6% patients, respectively. Bile duct cannulation was successful in 48 patients (100% in the group of combined precut, 121 patients (96.8% in the transpancreatic group, and 67 patients (90.5% in the needle-knife group (p = 0.03. There were not differences in complications rates between the three groups. There was no pancreatitis in the combined precut group. The complications were successfully managed with conservative treatment. Conclusions: combined precut sphincterotomy seems to be a safe and successful technique in those cases of difficult bile duct cannulation.

  7. Pen Torch Transillumination: Difficult Venepuncture Made Easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Elijah Zhengyang; Sankaran, Kalarani; Tan, Monica; Chan, Yiong Huak; Lim, Thiam Chye

    2017-09-01

    Our novel technique of pen torch transillumination (PTI) uses a cheap and easily available instrument (Penlite-LP212(®), Energizer(®), Missouri, USA) to visualize superficial veins invisible to the naked eye. We evaluate the efficacy of PTI in improving venepuncture success rate (SR) for patients with poor venous access. This prospective randomized controlled trial looked at adult patients (n = 69) aged 21-90 with difficult venous access (history of ≥3 consecutive attempts required for successful cannulation during the current admission) requiring non-emergent venepuncture. Patients underwent venepuncture over the upper-limb using one of the following: conventional venepuncture (control); Veinlite(®) EMS (TransLite(®), Texas, USA), a commercial transillumination device; PTI. Outcome measures were: successful cannulation within 2 attempts and total duration of venepuncture. Fisher's exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests were performed. A significantly larger number of patients had successful venepuncture within 2 attempts using PTI (22/23, 95.7%) and Veinlite (23/23, 100%), compared to the controls (7/23, 30.4%) (p < 0.05). The total duration required for successful venepuncture was significantly shorter for Veinlite (mean 3.7 min, 1.0-5.3 min) and PTI (mean 8.5 min, range 1.08-27 min) compared to the controls (mean 23.2 min, range 1.88-46.5 min) (p < 0.05). PTI allows users to visualize veins invisible to the naked eye. Thrombosed/tortuous veins, branch points and valves, are easily identified and avoided. It has comparable efficacy to Veinlite(®) and is cheaper (Veinlite(®)-USD 227 vs. Penlite-LP212(®)-USD 7.00) and more easily available. PTI improves patient care, especially in developing regions where costs are a concern.

  8. Kidney research national dialogue overview and commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys-Sikora, Krystyna E; Ketchum, Christian J; Star, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) asked the scientific community to formulate and prioritize research objectives to improve understanding of kidney function and disease. The Kidney Research National Dialogue welcomed all interested parties to submit, discuss, and prioritize ideas via an interactive website. More than 1600 participants posted approximately 300 ideas and assigned them to 12 topic areas (AKI, CKD, diabetic nephropathy, National Kidney Disease Education Program/translation, ESRD/dialysis, GN/inflammation, hypertension, normal biology/development/physiology, polycystic kidney disease, training, transplantation, other). This commentary provides an overview of the NIDDK's first experience with web-based strategic planning and addresses the broader issues of open access and cloud-sourcing technologies to capture input from a large, heterogeneous group of contributors. Discussions and findings for each topic will be published as separate, forthcoming commentaries. A final commentary will present cross-cutting themes and concluding remarks. The hope is that this series of commentaries constitutes a cohesive, integrated vision of future research opportunities to be pursued by the kidney research community and supported by the NIDDK.

  9. Conscientization, Dialogue and Collaborative Problem Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conscientization, Dialogue and Collaborative Problem Based Learning

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that Paulo Freire’s concept of conscientization, where critical awareness and engagement are central to a problem-posing pedagogy, provides the philosophical principles to underpin Problem Based Learning (PBL. By using dialogue groups and a combination of learning strategies to discover the nature of a problem, understand its constraints, options, and multi-voiced perspectives, students can negotiate the sociological nature of its resolution and how competing perspectives may inform decision-making. This paper will first present the background of PBL, before it introduces and argues for reflective and reflexive learning environments founded within dialogical practices. It then provides tales from the field that illustrate how conscientization is enacted in the classroom, before considering implications and the Ten Principles of Critical Learning’ for reflective and reflexive practice. It concludes by arguing that conscientization and the dialogical process are central to PBL in order to engage the individual voice, foster democratic practices, and for the creation of shared meanings and understandings.

  10. Exhibition: Dialogue between Science and religion

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Can the theory of the Big Bang reached by physicists and the concept of creation beloved of religion ever be reconciled? The two approaches have at least one point in common: they do not provide a final answer to the mysteries of the birth of the Universe. And this means that dialogue is alays possible between the two. It is to show the potential of such an exchange that Geneva's Société Evangélique organization is opening an exhibition under the title 'Big Bang and Creation', at the Planète Charmilles shopping centre, to run from 19 to 30 March. View of the 'Big Bang and Creation' exhibition. The exhibition is divided into three sections, showing the views of the scientist and those of the believer without setting them up in opposition to one another. In the first section, under a representation of the vault of heaven, the visitor will discover the different ideas explaining the birth of the Universe: Genesis and the Big Bang, and the different dominant theories ...

  11. DEVELOPING AN INTERCULTURAL VALUE-BASED DIALOGUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziano Telleschi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peaceful co-existence and inclusion do not depend solely on the availability of goods and welfare systems, but primarily on shared cultural values. In order to build shared values, we propose a new concept, the worthy, as the pull-factor of the value. A value-based dialogue begins from making each ones’ worthies ‘speak to each other’ so each actor can enter into Alter’s point of view to gain, afterward, a sharing of values. Beginning from the worthy, we outline the path of an innovative integrative model: safeguard some features of the ‘diversity’ (multiculturalism and to build some ‘resemblances’ (interculturality. By this resemblances/differences trade-off both migrants, ethnic groups and autochthonous absorb something of Alter’s believes and values, and at the same time gain awareness about complementarity and interdependency with Alter, the core of an otherness mind and the requirement to manage conflicts. By this way, each actor embraces a wider and wider network of Alter (linking bonds without losing his own identity and belonging. Finally, this paper suggests operative ways involving, as game-changers of a ‘feasible’ society, school and social services from one side, and local, political entities and the civil society, from the other side (deliberative democracy.

  12. Learning facilitating leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Hansen, Mette Sanne

    2016-01-01

    in teaching facilitation and the literature. These types of skills are most effectively acquired by combining conceptual lectures, classroom exercises and the facilitation of groups in a real-life context. The paper also reflects certain ‘shadow sides’ related to facilitation observed by the students...

  13. Difficult Airway Management in Field Conditions: Somalia Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Ahmet Selim; Nasır, Serdar Nazif

    2015-10-01

    Difficult airway is defined as having the patient's mask ventilation or difficult tracheal intubation of an experienced anaesthesiologist. A number of reasons, such as congenital or acquired anatomical anomalies, can cause difficult intubation and difficult ventilation. Keeping all equipment ready for airway management of patients will reduce mortality and complications. In this case, it is intended that the submission of difficult airway management who encountered in mandibular reconstruction for mandible bone defect repairing with reconstruction plates before at the field conditions in Somalia.

  14. Ragnar Rommetveit's Approach to Everyday Spoken Dialogue from Within.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, Sabine; O'Connell, Daniel C

    2016-04-01

    The following article presents basic concepts and methods of Ragnar Rommetveit's (born 1924) hermeneutic-dialogical approach to everyday spoken dialogue with a focus on both shared consciousness and linguistically mediated meaning. He developed this approach originally in his engagement of mainstream linguistic and psycholinguistic research of the 1960s and 1970s. He criticized this research tradition for its individualistic orientation and its adherence to experimental methodology which did not allow the engagement of interactively established meaning and understanding in everyday spoken dialogue. As a social psychologist influenced by phenomenological philosophy, Rommetveit opted for an alternative conceptualization of such dialogue as a contextualized, partially private world, temporarily co-established by interlocutors on the basis of shared consciousness. He argued that everyday spoken dialogue should be investigated from within, i.e., from the perspectives of the interlocutors and from a psychology of the second person. Hence, he developed his approach with an emphasis on intersubjectivity, perspectivity and perspectival relativity, meaning potential of utterances, and epistemic responsibility of interlocutors. In his methods, he limited himself for the most part to casuistic analyses, i.e., logical analyses of fictitious examples to argue for the plausibility of his approach. After many years of experimental research on language, he pursued his phenomenologically oriented research on dialogue in English-language publications from the late 1980s up to 2003. During that period, he engaged psycholinguistic research on spoken dialogue carried out by Anglo-American colleagues only occasionally. Although his work remained unfinished and open to development, it provides both a challenging alternative and supplement to current Anglo-American research on spoken dialogue and some overlap therewith.

  15. The clinical practice with difficult patients in the collective imaginary of psychology students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Aguetoni Cambuí

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The conducts that occur in the context of intersubjectivity are arranged from unconscious psychological fields which influence individual and collective practices. Therefore, it becomes important to consider the collective imagination of psychology students as this may interfere about the exercise of their clinical practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the collective imaginary of psychology students about the clinical practice with patients considered difficult in the analytic setting. Based on the psychoanalytic method, this research utilized the Procedure of Drawings-Stories with Theme in group interview, for the purpose of discuss on the vicissitudes of contemporary clinical work with these patients. In the present study, participated eight undergraduates of the eighth semester of a psychology course.The resulting material of the interview constituted by drawings-stories and the narrative was psychoanalytically analyzed, in the light of the Multiple Fields Theory proposed by Herrmann and in dialogue with the winnicottian thought, allowing to apprehend the follows fields of affective-emotional meaning: “Insecurity”, “Perfect Therapist”, “Mutuality”, “Experience”, “Negation of Madness” and “Madness as tal”. In general the imaginary manifestations of psychology students constitute the analytic relationship with the difficult patients by mobilizing feelings of insecurity, distress, anxiety, incapacity and helplessness.

  16. When dialogue fails. Music therapy with elderly with neurological degenerative diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2004-01-01

    they can happen, the music therapist must build up a structure for the therapy that compensates for missing cognitive abilities of the client. This is illustrated by the following steps that integrate neuropsychological and psychodynamic theories: 1. Focus attention 2. Regulate arousal level 3. Dialogue 4...... day conversation is building on abilities to remember facts or episodes, to sustain attention, to listen, and to time a response. Without these fundamental cognitive abilities it is difficult to communicate with others – unless the communication is adjusted to the person. Clients with a neurological...... and the ability to understand ‘what is going on’. “You need to have just the right level of activation to perform optimally” (LeDoux 1998, p. 289). Stimulating and sedating effects of music or songs are obtained by musical parameters, such as tempo, rhythm, timbre, volume, pitch, phrasing, dynamic, and timing...

  17. Asymmetrical peer interaction and formal operational development: Dialogue dimensions analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepanović-Ilić Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the study is to define dialogue dimensions in order to describe the interaction within peer dyads and potentially connect them with formal operations development in the less competent participants. Its significance is related to rare investigations of this subject in the context of formal operations development and to practical implications regarding peer involvement in education process. The sample included 316 students aged 12 and 14. The research had an experimental design: pre-test, intervention and post-test. In the pre-test and the post-test phases students solved the formal operations test BLOT. According to the pre-test results, 47 dyads were formed where less and more competent students jointly solved tasks from BLOT. Their dialogues were coded by 14 dimensions operationalized for this purpose. Correlations between the dialogue dimensions indicate clearly distinguished positive and negative interaction patterns. There are no connections between dialogue dimensions and progress of less competent adolescents on BLOT in the entire sample, but several are found in the subsamples. Arguments exchange seems to be the most encouraging dialogue feature regarding formal operations development, particularly in older students. This confirms relevant research data and the expectations about peers’ constructive role in fostering cognitive development. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179018: Identification, measurement and development of cognitive and emotional competences important for a society oriented towards European integrations

  18. Love, responsibility, otherness: Finnish church leaders and interreligious dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Illman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author will focus on the subject matter addressed in this appeal, i.e. peace and dialogue. The aim is to analyse how these Christian leaders view the role of religions, and especially interreligious dialogue, in creating and promoting peace. The author will begin by presenting the Peace Appeal and the interviews which form the empirical material upon which the research is based. The author will then concentrate on five issues which emerge from the analysis of this material as being especially important: the question of peace, love and reconciliation in a religious perspective; the question of otherness in interfaith dialogue; the relationship between dialogue and mission; the question of God’s presence in other religions; and personal responsibility and action. Emphasis is placed on presenting and analysing the empirical material, but the topics are also tied to a theoretical framework based on current thoughts within moral philosophy and the dialogue philosophy of Martin Buber. The discussion is, in conclusion, summarised with the help of the three notions which form the topic of this article: love, responsibility and otherness.

  19. ‘YOUTH AMPLIFIED’: USING CRITICAL PEDAGOGY TO STIMULATE LEARNING THROUGH DIALOGUE AT A YOUTH RADIO SHOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Cooper

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I describe and analyse how critical pedagogy, an approach to teaching and learning that encourages students to reflect on their socio-political contexts, may stimulate critical consciousness and dialogue at a youth radio show. The participants, who attended four diverse Cape Town high schools and predominantly lived in poor townships, named the show Youth Amplified. Youth Amplified dialogues were catalysed by a range of materials, including documentary films, newspapers and academic articles, which participants engaged with prior to the show. Participants then generated questions, which contributed to the dialogues that took place live on air. Two central themes emerged from the radio shows. First, the values and discourses of elite schools were transported to Youth Amplified and presented as incontestable truths that often denigrated marginalised learners. Second, participants used ‘race’ as a marker of social difference to make sense of peers and South African society. I argue that critical pedagogy interventions also need to work with educators to reflect on inequalities and socio-political contexts, if such interventions are to be successful. The show illuminated that young South Africans want to speak about racialised and class-based forms of historical oppression, but that these kinds of discussions require skilled facilitation.

  20. Creating dialogue: a workshop on "Uncertainty in Decision Making in a Changing Climate"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Tracy; Addor, Nans; Johnson, Leigh; Coltekin, Arzu; Derungs, Curdin; Muccione, Veruska

    2014-05-01

    Uncertainty is present in all fields of climate research, spanning from projections of future climate change, to assessing regional impacts and vulnerabilities, to adaptation policy and decision-making. In addition to uncertainties, managers and planners in many sectors are often confronted with large amounts of information from climate change research whose complex and interdisciplinary nature make it challenging to incorporate into the decision-making process. An overarching issue in tackling this problem is the lack of institutionalized dialogue between climate researchers, decision-makers and user groups. Forums that facilitate such dialogue would allow climate researchers to actively engage with end-users and researchers in different disciplines to better characterize uncertainties and ultimately understand which ones are critically considered and incorporated into decisions made. We propose that the introduction of students to these challenges at an early stage of their education and career is a first step towards improving future dialogue between climate researchers, decision-makers and user groups. To this end, we organized a workshop at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, entitled "Uncertainty in Decision Making in a Changing Climate". It brought together 50 participants, including Bachelor, Master and PhD students and academic staff, and nine selected speakers from academia, industry, government, and philanthropy. Speakers introduced participants to topics ranging from uncertainties in climate model scenarios to managing uncertainties in development and aid agencies. The workshop consisted of experts' presentations, a panel discussion and student group work on case studies. Pedagogical goals included i) providing participants with an overview of the current research on uncertainty and on how uncertainty is dealt with by decision-makers, ii) fostering exchange between practitioners, students, and scientists from different backgrounds, iii) exposing

  1. Learning facilitating leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Hansen, Mette Sanne

    2016-01-01

    This paper explains how engineering students at a Danish university acquired the necessary skills to become emergent facilitators of organisational development. The implications of this approach are discussed and related to relevant viewpoints and findings in the literature. The methodology deplo....... By connecting the literature, the authors’ and engineering students’ reflections on facilitator skills, this paper adds value to existing academic and practical discussions on learning facilitating leadership....

  2. Visual explorer facilitator's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Palus, Charles J

    2010-01-01

    Grounded in research and practice, the Visual Explorer™ Facilitator's Guide provides a method for supporting collaborative, creative conversations about complex issues through the power of images. The guide is available as a component in the Visual Explorer Facilitator's Letter-sized Set, Visual Explorer Facilitator's Post card-sized Set, Visual Explorer Playing Card-sized Set, and is also available as a stand-alone title for purchase to assist multiple tool users in an organization.

  3. Speech Dialogue with Facial Displays Multimodal Human-Computer Conversation

    CERN Document Server

    Nagao, K; Nagao, Katashi; Takeuchi, Akikazu

    1994-01-01

    Human face-to-face conversation is an ideal model for human-computer dialogue. One of the major features of face-to-face communication is its multiplicity of communication channels that act on multiple modalities. To realize a natural multimodal dialogue, it is necessary to study how humans perceive information and determine the information to which humans are sensitive. A face is an independent communication channel that conveys emotional and conversational signals, encoded as facial expressions. We have developed an experimental system that integrates speech dialogue and facial animation, to investigate the effect of introducing communicative facial expressions as a new modality in human-computer conversation. Our experiments have shown that facial expressions are helpful, especially upon first contact with the system. We have also discovered that featuring facial expressions at an early stage improves subsequent interaction.

  4. A case study of epistemic order in mathematics classroom dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Ruthven

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We define epistemic order as the way in which the exchange and development of knowledge takes place in the classroom, breaking this down into a system of three components: epistemic initiative relating to who sets the agenda in classroom dialogue, and how; epistemic appraisal relating to who judges contributions to classroom dialogue, and how; and epistemic framing relating to the terms in which development and exchange of knowledge are represented, particularly in reflexive talk. These components are operationalised in terms of various types of structural and semantic analysis of dialogue. It is shown that a lesson segment displays a multi-layered epistemic order differing from that of conventional classroom recitation.

  5. Persuasive Dialogue Based on a Narrative Theory: An ECA Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazza, Marc; Smith, Cameron; Charlton, Daniel; Crook, Nigel; Boye, Johan; Pulman, Stephen; Moilanen, Karo; Pizzi, David; de La Camara, Raul Santos; Turunen, Markku

    Embodied Conversational Agents (ECA) are poised to constitute a specific category within persuasive systems, in particular through their ability to support affective dialogue. One possible approach consists in using ECA as virtual coaches or personal assistants and to make persuasion part of a dialogue game implementing specific argumentation or negotiation features. In this paper, we explore an alternative framework, which emerges from the long-term development of ECA as "Companions" supporting free conversation with the user, rather than task-oriented dialogue. Our system aims at influencing user attitudes as part of free conversation, albeit on a limited set of topics. We describe the implementation of a Companion ECA to which the user reports on his working day, and which can assess the user's emotional attitude towards daily events in the office, trying to influence such attitude using affective strategies derived from a narrative model. This discussion is illustrated through examples from a first fully-implemented prototype.

  6. Possible future climates. The IPCC-scenarios simulated by dialogue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekstra, J. [KEMA-KES, Arnheim (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    Global warming is an environmental problem that increasingly attracts the attention of governments, (inter)national organizations and the general public. Policymakers that want to attack this problem need to understand the causes and effects of all related aspects. For this reason integrated assessment tools are developed that allow policymakers to analyze and evaluate climate change scenarios. Dialogue is such an integrated assessment tool. This article presents the results of Dialogue when the socio-economic parameters of the six well-known IPCC-scenarios, IS92a-f (IPCC 1992) are taken as a point of departure. Using as input, variables as population growth and the energy intensity of an economy, Dialogue goes through a chain of processes and finally determines climatic changes in temperature and precipitation

  7. Learning Content Selection Rules for Generating Object Descriptions in Dialogue

    CERN Document Server

    Jordan, P W; 10.1613/jair.1591

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental requirement of any task-oriented dialogue system is the ability to generate object descriptions that refer to objects in the task domain. The subproblem of content selection for object descriptions in task-oriented dialogue has been the focus of much previous work and a large number of models have been proposed. In this paper, we use the annotated COCONUT corpus of task-oriented design dialogues to develop feature sets based on Dale and Reiters (1995) incremental model, Brennan and Clarks (1996) conceptual pact model, and Jordans (2000b) intentional influences model, and use these feature sets in a machine learning experiment to automatically learn a model of content selection for object descriptions. Since Dale and Reiters model requires a representation of discourse structure, the corpus annotations are used to derive a representation based on Grosz and Sidners (1986) theory of the intentional structure of discourse, as well as two very simple representations of discourse structure based purel...

  8. Computing Dialogue Acts from Features with Transformation-Based Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Samuel, K B; Vijay-Shanker, K; Samuel, Ken; Carberry, Sandra

    1998-01-01

    To interpret natural language at the discourse level, it is very useful to accurately recognize dialogue acts, such as SUGGEST, in identifying speaker intentions. Our research explores the utility of a machine learning method called Transformation-Based Learning (TBL) in computing dialogue acts, because TBL has a number of advantages over alternative approaches for this application. We have identified some extensions to TBL that are necessary in order to address the limitations of the original algorithm and the particular demands of discourse processing. We use a Monte Carlo strategy to increase the applicability of the TBL method, and we select features of utterances that can be used as input to improve the performance of TBL. Our system is currently being tested on the VerbMobil corpora of spoken dialogues, producing promising preliminary results.

  9. Mixed Initiative in Dialogue An Investigation into Discourse Segmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, M; Walker, Marilyn; Whittaker, Steve

    1995-01-01

    Conversation between two people is usually of mixed-initiative, with control over the conversation being transferred from one person to another. We apply a set of rules for the transfer of control to 4 sets of dialogues consisting of a total of 1862 turns. The application of the control rules lets us derive domain-independent discourse structures. The derived structures indicate that initiative plays a role in the structuring of discourse. In order to explore the relationship of control and initiative to discourse processes like centering, we analyze the distribution of four different classes of anaphora for two data sets. This distribution indicates that some control segments are hierarchically related to others. The analysis suggests that discourse participants often mutually agree to a change of topic. We also compared initiative in Task Oriented and Advice Giving dialogues and found that both allocation of control and the manner in which control is transferred is radically different for the two dialogue t...

  10. From monologue to dialogue: a transition in psychoanalytic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Theodore

    2002-01-01

    During the latter part of the twentieth century, psychoanalysts of various stripes espoused the move from free association and neutrality to various forms of intersubjectivity and dialogue. This shift is studied from the vantage point of conversational rules in terms of the shift from monologue to dialogue, using the concepts of semantics, syntax, and pragmatics. Viewing the data of analysis in this manner offers a means of evaluating the contributions of both monologue and dialogue to our understanding of the conduct of an analysis and the kind of information that can be expected to emerge. Exclusive devotion to either stance, it is argued, renders less understanding than would emerge from a balanced use of both.

  11. Language use in imagined dialogue and narrative disclosures of trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Philip A; Bradley, Rebekah G

    2006-02-01

    Support exists in many populations for the use of written disclosure to express thoughts and emotions about a traumatic experience. The present study examined language use in a variation of the writing task modified to include an imagined dialogue with another person. We hypothesized that this method would increase cognitive, affective, and present-tense word use, all of which are linked with beneficial outcomes from writing. We randomly assigned 169 college students to write in one of three conditions: trauma narrative, trauma dialogue, or control writing. Results suggested that writing about traumatic experiences in the form of a dialogue promotes greater present-oriented, affective experiencing and cognitive processing than does writing in the form of a narrative.

  12. A Multi-Party Imaginary Dialogue about Power and Cybernetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Guddemi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is written as a multi-sided dialogue intended to present a number of ideas about power. Some of these ideas are my own, expressed in a kind of evolutionary idiom of adaptation though they were partly developed in reaction to Foucault (and are far more indebted to Foucault and cybernetics than to contemporary evolutionist thinking. There is a deep irony in that my way of thinking is primarily rooted in the cybernetic anthropology of Gregory Bateson; however, he was deeply skeptical of the concept of power. My personification of him in this dialogue, as “Bateson,” demonstrates this skepticism and brings into the discussion other relevant ideas of his. The third participant in the dialogue, Mary Midgley, is included because her consideration of Hobbes’ ideas leads us to consider yet another, probabilistic, way of thinking about power.

  13. A Multi-Party Imaginary Dialogue about Power and Cybernetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Guddemi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is written as a multi-sided dialogue intended to present a number of ideas about power. Some of these ideas are my own, expressed in a kind of evolutionary idiom of adaptation though they were partly developed in reaction to Foucault (and are far more indebted to Foucault and cybernetics than to contemporary evolutionist thinking. There is a deep irony in that my way of thinking is primarily rooted in the cybernetic anthropology of Gregory Bateson; however, he was deeply skeptical of the concept of power. My personification of him in this dialogue, as “Bateson,” demonstrates this skepticism and brings into the discussion other relevant ideas of his. The third participant in the dialogue, Mary Midgley, is included because her consideration of Hobbes’ ideas leads us to consider yet another, probabilistic, way of thinking about power.

  14. CONTACTS AND INTERCULTURAL DIALOGUE AS INTEGRATED SOCIAL VALUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minevere Morina Rashiti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents not only a linked segment but as well explores cultural level contacts as a generation of establishing linkages and intercultural dialogue among people, countries, ethnicities, groups and individuals. The topic treats culture as a phenomenon, cultural ties and conflicts dominating human cultural integration, not only in the Balkans and Europe, but even in wider area. This is because of the fact that Balkans integration is presented as premium of European universal. Through this paper we elaborate significance of culture, intercultural communication, conflict resolution, cultural dialogue, cultural conversation and types of conflicts and relation of culture all along with conflict management. Conflicts, confrontation of civilizations; the ideology of confrontation and processes of war in terms of welfare and peace culture, human values will be processed. Furthermore, we examine the functioning of the culture of dialogue, cultural organization, finding problems all along with mediation, restoration of the practical dimension of multiculturalism.

  15. Nursing leadership and health policy: a dialogue with nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Pamela N; Swider, Susan; Bigley, Mary Beth

    2013-04-01

    National public health policy influencing the entire population is particularly exciting when nurses serve as key players informing the process. The leaders in this dialogue participated in the process by sharing their disciplinary knowledge and experience. They were selected to work with bureaucrats to design healthcare for the future. This dialogue among two nurse leaders demonstrates a path to top leadership in the United States. Swider and Bigley here share their stories of how they moved beyond clinical practice to involvement in their communities and the nation. Through public health and policy initiatives, both nurse leaders have helped shape healthcare to provide better patient-centered care at all levels. This dialogue not only shares their successes, but also sets the stage for others in nursing to use policy to transform healthcare for the future.

  16. Dialogue with Citizens - the Missing Link in Delivering e-Government?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Olphert

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Many governments and political bodies across the globe are exploring the potential benefits of ICT as a means of improving communication with citizens and stimulating participation and engagement in political and civic processes. This paper reviews progress to date in the UK towards delivering e-government at the local level, and concludes that that there is evidence of a lack of 'pull-through' of the ministerial concepts and vision in the current delivery of e-government. In order to achieve the important e-government goals of increasing citizen participation and improved speed and efficiency of the underlying processes, the authors argue that a participative approach to the design and delivery of e-government is required. A co-creation approach to design is proposed. This will enable a dialogue between the citizen and the local authority, and which will embody and support democratic processes which will facilitate the genuine co-creation of decisions.

  17. Framing the Dialogue: Strategies, Issues and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    development to accelerate technological innovation and for training of public works professionals, and "* A rational capital budgeting process at all levels of...towards the goal of facilitating the training , application, and continuing enhancement of the model to address evolving needs. Current members of the group...programs, such as high-speed rail or MAGLEV , "smart" highways, and other technological advances led by the private sector, such as in

  18. Patient advocacy: barriers and facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikravesh Mansoure

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the two recent decades, advocacy has been a topic of much debate in the nursing profession. Although advocacy has embraced a crucial role for nurses, its extent is often limited in practice. While a variety of studies have been generated all over the world, barriers and facilitators in the patient advocacy have not been completely identified. This article presents the findings of a study exploring the barriers and facilitators influencing the role of advocacy among Iranian nurses. Method This study was conducted by grounded theory method. Participants were 24 Iranian registered nurses working in a large university hospital in Tehran, Iran. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and simultaneously Constant comparative analysis was used according to the Strauss and Corbin method. Results Through data analysis, several main themes emerged to describe the factors that hindered or facilitated patient advocacy. Nurses in this study identified powerlessness, lack of support, law, code of ethics and motivation, limited communication, physicians leading, risk of advocacy, royalty to peers, and insufficient time to interact with patients and families as barriers to advocacy. As for factors that facilitated nurses to act as a patient advocate, it was found that the nature of nurse-patient relationship, recognizing patients' needs, nurses' responsibility, physician as a colleague, and nurses' knowledge and skills could be influential in adopting the advocacy role. Conclusion Participants believed that in this context taking an advocacy role is difficult for nurses due to the barriers mentioned. Therefore, they make decisions and act as a patient's advocate in any situation concerning patient needs and status of barriers and facilitators. In most cases, they can not act at an optimal level; instead they accept only what they can do, which we called 'limited advocacy' in

  19. Conversational interfaces for task-oriented spoken dialogues: design aspects influencing interaction quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niculescu, A.I.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the design and evaluation of speech-based conversational interfaces for task-oriented dialogues. Conversational interfaces are software programs enabling interaction with computer devices through natural language dialogue. Even though processing conversational speech is

  20. Doing Dialogue: Genre and Flexibility in Public Engagement with Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2009-01-01

    'Public engagement with science' is an increasingly important but contested practice. In this study of London's Dana Centre I look at dialogue events carried out there as a case study of public engagement, performing a detailed analysis in order to examine their nature and practice. The analysis...... traditional genres such as lectures. While it seems there is flexibility in the practice of these informal dialogue events, they are, however, not open to reinvention by all participants equally. The fluidity of practice observed may be due to the newness of these kinds of processes in most people...

  1. Guiding dialogue in the transformation of teacher-student relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, S; Baldwin, D

    1996-01-01

    The National League for Nursing at its 1989 biennial convention resolved that nursing curricula be revised to reflect enriched caring practices through egalitarian teacher-student and teacher-to-teacher relationships that reflect cooperation and a sense of community. The distribution of power relationships between student and teacher, teacher and teacher, and teacher and administrator must be reconceptualized and realized before any significant change in nursing education's curriculum can occur. Revising curricula to incorporate such a change in teacher-student relationships begins with dialogue with teachers that is authentic. Authentic dialogue will cause examination and reexamination of assumptions and ideologies about teacher-student relationships.

  2. Exploring the Roles in a Photo Elicitation Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleron, Benedicte Frederikke Rex; Pedersen, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    This paper begins to delineate the different roles in a participatory research setting with a focus of using photography as a medium for an elicitation dialogue. We investigate how others have used photography and we include our own experiences of using photography explaining how it established...... a communication bridge between participants and researchers. Based upon a concluded case, we illustrate how the photographs encourage and contribute to a lively dialogue among the participants. Furthermore, we describe our reflections and considerations of the roles of the photos, the participants...

  3. Entropy-growth-based model of emotionally charged online dialogues

    CERN Document Server

    Sienkiewicz, Julian; Paltoglou, Georgios; Holyst, Janusz A

    2012-01-01

    We analyze emotionally annotated massive data from IRC (Internet Relay Chat) and model the dialogues between its participants by assuming that the driving force for the discussion is the entropy growth of emotional probability distribution. This process is claimed to be correlated to the emergence of the power-law distribution of the discussion lengths observed in the dialogues. We perform numerical simulations based on the noticed phenomenon obtaining a good agreement with the real data. Finally, we propose a method to artificially prolong the duration of the discussion that relies on the entropy of emotional probability distribution.

  4. On the pitch of dialogue in Chinese Putonghua

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Maolin; LIN Maocan; LI Aijun

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve the naturalness of TTS speech so as to represent the cadence of natural speech, it is necessary to have a study on the pitch of spontaneous speech. Based on the 973 telephone corpus, the pitch ranges and pitch registers of 1084 intonation phrases are analyzed. It is found that intonation phrases can be classified according to their ranges and registers, and this is related to their positions in dialogue exchange. Compared with read speech, the pitch patterns in dialogue are more variable.

  5. Secure quantum dialogue based on single-photon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Xin; Zhang Shou

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a quantum dialogue scheme is proposed by using N batches of single photons. The same secret message is encoded on each batch of single photons by the sender with two different unitary operations, and then the N batches of single photons are sent to the receiver. After eavesdropping check, the message is encoded on the one remaining batch by the receiver. It is shown that the intercept-and-resend attack and coupling auxiliary modes attack can be resisted more efficiently, because the photons are sent only once in our quantum dialogue scheme.

  6. The challenges of facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika

    and at the same time make closures in order to secure progress in the process? The analysis draws upon theoretical perspectives on deliberative democracy and facilitation. Whereas, the scholarly literature on deliberative democracy is rich in describing potential outcomes and criteria for deliberative processes...... hours transcriptions of three table deliberations; questionnaires of 91 participants, 2 focus group interviews with participants and facilitators....

  7. Training facilitators and supervisors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Louise Binow; O Connor, Maja; Krogh, Kristian;

    At the Master’s program in Medicine at Aarhus University, Denmark, we have developed a faculty development program for facilitators and supervisors in 4 progressing student modules in communication, cooperation, and leadership. 1) A course for module 1 and 3 facilitators inspired by the apprentic...

  8. Learning by doing. Training health care professionals to become facilitator of moral case deliberation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, Margreet; Molewijk, Bert; Widdershoven, Guy

    2015-03-01

    Moral case deliberation (MCD) is a dialogue among health care professionals about moral issues in practice. A trained facilitator moderates the dialogue, using a conversation method. Often, the facilitator is an ethicist. However, because of the growing interest in MCD and the need to connect MCD to practice, healthcare professionals should also become facilitators themselves. In order to transfer the facilitating expertise to health care professionals, a training program has been developed. This program enables professionals in health care institutions to acquire expertise in dealing with moral questions independent of the expertise of an (external) ethicist. Over the past 10 years, we developed a training program with a specific mix of theory and practice, aiming to foster the right attitude, skills and knowledge of the trainee. The content and the didactics of the training developed in line with the philosophy of MCD: pragmatic hermeneutics, dialogical ethics and Socratic epistemology. Central principles are: 'learning by doing', 'reflection instead of ready made knowledge', and 'dialogue on dialogue'. This paper describes the theoretical background and the didactic content of the current training. Furthermore, we present didactic tools which we developed for stimulating active learning. We also go into lessons we learned in developing the training. Next, we provide some preliminary data from evaluation research of the training program by participants. The discussion highlights crucial aspects of educating professionals to become facilitators of MCD. The paper ends with concluding remarks and a plea for more evaluative evidence of the effectiveness and meaning of this training program for doing MCD in institutions.

  9. Speech by Mr. Zhou Tienong at The Opening Ceremony of the 2012 Understanding and Cooperation Dialogue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    正The 2012 Understanding and Cooperation Dialogue opens today. I'd like to extend heartfelt congratulations to the convening of the Dialogue, as well as my warm welcome to the political leaders and friends from different countries who have come to China for the Dialogue.

  10. Diversity and constructive conflict in stakeholder dialogue: considerations for design and methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuppen, E.H.W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Diversity is generally recognized as a key issue for learning in stakeholder dialogue on wicked sustainability issues. Yet the question on how design of stakeholder dialogue and supporting methods actually enhance learning in stakeholder dialogue deserves more attention. This paper presents construc

  11. Dialogue in Religious Education Lessons--Possibilities and Hindrances in the Estonian Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schihalejev, Olga

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the limitations and potentials for dialogue in religious education (RE) classes on the basis of observations of Estonian RE lessons. I investigated how the way of asking questions contributes to the dialogue in the classroom. Additionally I investigated how students' readiness to engage in dialogue is influenced by others'…

  12. Why Students Learn More From Dialogue-Than Monologue-Videos: Analyses of Peer Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Michelene T. H.; Kang, Seokmin; Yaghmourian, David L.

    2017-01-01

    In 2 separate studies, we found that college-age students learned more when they collaboratively watched tutorial dialogue-videos than lecture-style monologue-videos. In fact, they can learn as well as the tutees in the dialogue-videos. These results replicate similar findings in the literature showing the advantage of dialogue-videos even when…

  13. Daisaku Ikeda and Value-Creative Dialogue: A New Current in Interculturalism and Educational Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulah, Jason

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on Daisaku Ikeda's (1928- ) philosophy and practice of intercultural dialogue--what I call "value-creative dialogue"--as a new current in interculturalism and educational philosophy and theory. I use excerpts from Ikeda's writings to consider two aspects of his approach to dialogue. First, I locate his approach…

  14. Rhizosphere chemical dialogues: plant-microbe interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badri, D.V.; van der Lelie, D.; Weir, T. L.; Vivanco, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Every organism on earth relies on associations with its neighbors to sustain life. For example, plants form associations with neighboring plants, microflora, and microfauna, while humans maintain symbiotic associations with intestinal microbial flora, which is indispensable for nutrient assimilation and development of the innate immune system. Most of these associations are facilitated by chemical cues exchanged between the host and the symbionts. In the rhizosphere, which includes plant roots and the surrounding area of soil influenced by the roots, plants exude chemicals to effectively communicate with their neighboring soil organisms. Here we review the current literature pertaining to the chemical communication that exists between plants and microorganisms and the biological processes they sustain.

  15. Management of Patients with Predicted Difficult Airways in an Academic Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakles, John C; Douglas, Matthew J K; Hypes, Cameron D; Patanwala, Asad E; Mosier, Jarrod M

    2017-08-01

    Patients with difficult airways are sometimes encountered in the emergency department (ED), however, there is a little data available regarding their management. To determine the incidence, management, and outcomes of patients with predicted difficult airways in the ED. Over the 1-year period from July 1, 2015 to June 30, 2016, data were prospectively collected on all patients intubated in an academic ED. After each intubation, the operator completed an airway management data form. Operators performed a pre-intubation difficult airway assessment and classified patients into routine, challenging, or difficult airways. All non-arrest patients were included in the study. There were 456 patients that met inclusion criteria. Fifty (11%) had predicted difficult airways. In these 50 patients, neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) were used in 40 (80%), an awake intubation technique with light sedation was used in 7 (14%), and no medications were used in 3 (6%). In the 40 difficult airway patients who underwent NMBA facilitated intubation, a video laryngoscope (GlideScope 21, Verathon, Bothell, WA and C-MAC 19, Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany) was used in each of these, with a first-pass success of 90%. In the 7 patients who underwent awake intubation, a video laryngoscope was used in 5, and a flexible fiberoptic scope was used in 2. Ketamine was used in 6 of the awake intubations. None of these difficult airway patients required rescue with a surgical airway. Difficult airways were predicted in 11% of non-arrest patients requiring intubation in the ED, the majority of which were managed using an NMBA and a video laryngoscope with a high first-pass success. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nanotechnology and Public Interest Dialogue: Some International Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Diana M.; Hodge, Graeme A.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines nanotechnology within the context of the public interest. It notes that though nanotechnology research and development investment totalled US$9.6 billion in 2005, the public presently understands neither the implications nor how it might be best governed. The article maps a range of nanotechnology dialogue activities under…

  17. Social Class Dialogues and the Fostering of Class Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    How do critical pedagogies promote undergraduate students' awareness of social class, social class identity, and social class inequalities in education? How do undergraduate students experience class consciousness-raising in the intergroup dialogue classroom? This qualitative study explores undergraduate students' class consciousness-raising in an…

  18. Intangible Culture, Cooperation and Intercultural Dialogue among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Susana

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on intercultural competence and dialogue across cultural borders between university students from different Portuguese-speaking countries. Various principles and strategies for intercultural education are summarised, and the project "cultures@esec", based on such principles and strategies, is described. The project was…

  19. Queer Reparations: Dialogue and the Queer Past of Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This article reflects on historical homophobia within educational practice and administration as an effort to consider how we might promote dialogue around the queer past of schooling. Along the way, it provides some discussion of the significance of archival knowledge in helping us to develop an understanding of the past while also providing…

  20. "OK This Is Hard": Doing Emotions in Social Justice Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, Candace R.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I explore emotions in relation to social justice dialogue and share vignettes to illustrate how emotions are embodied, situated and fissured, drawing upon narrative, critical sociocultural and rhizomatic theories. Data comes from a practitioner inquiry while teaching 5- and 6-year-olds in a summer enrichment program in a…

  1. Proceedings from the Nordcode Seminar. Participation and Dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv Merete Nielsen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This issue of FORMakademisk is the result of a cooperative effort involving the Nordcode research network, the Department of Product Design at Akershus University College and the FORMakademisk. It builds on the Participation and Dialogue seminar, held in May 2010, which was supported by Nordforsk, The Norwegian Research Council and Kjeller Science Park.

  2. Human rights concepts in EU Human Rights Dialogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, A.S.H.; Sosa, Lorena; Majtényi, Balázs

    2016-01-01

    This report presents five case studies on EU Human Rights Dialogues (HRDs). The case studies concern the HRDs with the African Union, China, India, Morocco and Peru. Building on the findings of the previous reports in Work Package 3 of the FRAME project, the aim of this report is to explore how

  3. This Passionate Study: A Dialogue with Florence Nightingale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maindonald, John; Richardson, Alice M.

    2004-01-01

    On her death in 1910, Florence Nightingale left a vast collection of reports, letters, notes and other written material. There are numerous publications that make use of this material, often highlighting Florence's attitude to a particular issue. In this paper we gather a set of quotations and construct a dialogue with Florence Nightingale on the…

  4. Radical versus Social Constructivism: Dilemma, Dialogue, and Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belbase, Shashidhar

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss epistemological and philosophical foundation of meaningful learning and teaching mathematics and science from the perspective of radical and social constructivism. I have reflected on my experiences of radical and social constructivism through dilemma, dialogue, and defense of my personal epistemology of learning. I went…

  5. Psychological Type and Asynchronous Written Dialogue in Adult Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Cranton, Patricia; Bridglall, Beatrice

    2005-01-01

    This study explores how adults learn from asynchronous written dialogue through the lens of psychological type preferences. We asked participants to discover their dominant and auxiliary psychological preferences using the Personal Empowerment through Type inventory. Participants then completed an open-ended survey in which they described their…

  6. Automated dialogue generation for behavior intervention on mobile devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fitrianie, S.; Griffioen-Both, F.; Spruit, S.; Lancee, J.; Beun, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Communication in the form of dialogues between a virtual coach and a human patient (coachee) is one of the pillars in an intervention app for smartphones. The virtual coach is considered as a cooperative partner that supports the individual with various exercises for a behavior intervention therapy.

  7. Development of Critically Reflective Dialogues in Communities of Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Esther; Endedijk, Maaike; Jaarsma, Debbie; van Beukelen, Peter; Simons, Robert-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Critically reflective dialogues (CRD) are important for knowledge sharing and creating meaning in communities. CRD includes different aspects: being open about mistakes, critical opinion sharing, asking for and giving feedback, experimentation, challenging groupthink and research utilisation. In this article we explore whether CRD aspects change…

  8. The Information Literacy of Survey Mark Hunting: A Dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Galas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In Brief: This article makes connections between the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and the activity of survey mark hunting. After a brief review of the literature related to geographic information systems (GIS, information literacy, and gamification of learning, the authors enter into a dialogue in which they discover and describe the...

  9. Demonstration and Dialogue: Mediation in Swedish Nuclear Waste Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Mark, e-mail: mark.elam@sociology.gu.se; Lidberg, Maria; Soneryd, Linda; Sundqvist, Goeran

    2009-07-01

    This report analyses mediation and mediators in Swedish nuclear waste management. Mediation is about establishing agreement and building common knowledge. It is argued that demonstrations and dialogue are the two prominent approaches to mediation in Swedish nuclear waste management. Mediation through demonstration is about showing, displaying, and pointing out a path to safe disposal for inspection. It implies a strict division between demonstrator and audience. Mediation through dialogue on the other hand, is about collective acknowledgements of uncertainty and suspensions of judgement creating room for broader discussion. In Sweden, it is the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) that is tasked with finding a method and a site for the final disposal of the nation's nuclear waste. Two different legislative frameworks cover this process. In accordance with the Act on Nuclear Activities, SKB is required to demonstrate the safety of its planned nuclear waste management system to the government, while in respect of the Swedish Environmental Code, they are obliged to organize consultations with the public. How SKB combines these requirements is the main question under investigation in this report in relation to materials deriving from three empirical settings: 1) SKB's safety analyses, 2) SKB's public consultation activities and 3) the 'dialogue projects', initiated by other actors than SKB broadening the public arena for discussion. In conclusion, an attempt is made to characterise the long- term interplay of demonstration and dialogue in Swedish nuclear waste management

  10. Participatory and Dialogue Democracy in U.S. Mathematics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Shiuli

    2009-01-01

    Teaching math to reflect values of democracy has to begin with some consideration of how democracy is conceptualized. A review of various theories of democracy conducted by Hagen (1992) provides everyone with a good starting point as it identifies three primary forms of democracy: competitive, participatory, and dialogue. In this essay, the author…

  11. Interculturalism, Education and Dialogue. Global Studies in Education. Volume 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besley, Tina, Ed.; Peters, Michael A., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Intercultural dialogue is a concept and discourse that dates back to the 1980s. It is the major means for managing diversity and strengthening democracy within Europe and beyond. It has been adopted by the United Nations, UNESCO and the Council of Europe as the basis for interreligious and interfaith initiatives and has become increasingly…

  12. Empower the patients with a dialogue-based web application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnes, Charlotte D.; Cummings, Elizabeth; Nøhr, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Based on a clinical intervention study this paper adds to the significance of users involvement in design processes and substantiate the potential of online, flexible health informatics tools as useful components to accommodate organizational changes that short stay treatment demands. A dialogue...

  13. Claiming Our Own Space: Polyphony in Teacher-Student Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, David; Murakami, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we reappraise the model of Discourse Analysis developed by Sinclair and Coulthard (1975) to analyse classroom talk. We analyse an extract of teacher-student dialogue using this model, then re-analyse the same extract drawing on conventions and concepts developed within the framework of Conversation Analysis. We argue that this…

  14. Dialogical Rhetoric: An Application of Martin Buber's Philosophy of Dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czubaroff, Jeanine

    2000-01-01

    Postulates that the philosophy of dialogue developed by Martin Buber provides a coherent grounding for a dialogical/ontological rhetoric. Contrasts, respectively, instrumental and dialogical conceptions of the rhetorical situation and instrumental and dialogical characterizations of the rhetor, the rhetor's purposes and modes of influence.…

  15. Russian REDCo Findings in Support of Dialogue and Hermeneutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyrev, Fedor

    2011-01-01

    REDCo findings question the ideal of neutrality of the teacher on ethical, epistemological and didactical grounds showing in particular that the exposure of the teacher's personal commitments and beliefs stimulates students to participate in dialogue. The findings support hermeneutical approaches to the empirical studies in education showing that…

  16. The Dialogue of Disciplines: An Arts Approach to Shakespeare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashian, Kathleen Ryniker

    1996-01-01

    Describes using a "dialogue of disciplines", a teaching method which traces a particular theme across artistic disciplines, to present Shakespeare's play "Romeo and Juliet" in a comprehensive way. Suggests that exposing students to paintings, films, stage performances, and operas creates a multidimensional experience and encourages exploration of…

  17. Towards automatic addressee identification in multi-party dialogues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jovanovic, N.; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.

    2004-01-01

    The paper is about the issue of addressing in multi-party dialogues. Analysis of addressing behavior in face to face meetings results in the identification of several addressing mechanisms. From these we extract several utterance features and features of non-verbal communicative behavior of a

  18. Keeping Public Officials Accountable through Dialogue: Resolving the Accountability Paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nancy C.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses Harmon's Accountability Paradox in relation to the accountability of public officials. Promotes the use of dialogue because its advantage outweighs its cost as a mechanism of accountability when officials confront problems that defy definition and solution and when traditional solution methods have failed. (Contains 54 references.) (JOW)

  19. Refining the DCT: Comparing Open Questionnaires and Dialogue Completion Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardovi-Harlig, Kathleen; Hartford, Beverly S.

    A study compared the influence of two forms of discourse completion test (DCT) on the elicitation of rejection of advice. An open questionnaire providing scenarios alone was compared with a classic dialogue completion task in which a conversational turn is provided. The tasks were given to 32 graduate students, 19 native and 13 non-native…

  20. Professional Judgement in Ethical Decision-Making: Dialogue and Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Ron; Sumarah, John

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the role of professional judgement in the ethical decision-making process. Drawing on the personalist philosophy of John MacMurray, and the CCA Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice, the authors propose that a social constructivist approach involving dialogue and relationship complement the current internal psychologically…

  1. A Lightweight Story-Comprehension Approach to Game Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Robert P.; Cheong, Yun-Gyung; Nelson, Mark Jason

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe Answery, a rule-based system that allows authors to specify game characters' background stories in natural language. The system parses these background stories, applies transfor- mation rules to turn them into semantic content, and generates dialogue during gameplay...

  2. Designing for Dialogue and Digitality in Higher and Continuing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard; Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates and contrasts three scenarios of further education; presence lessons and two types of blended learning. It addresses the conceptual challenge of creating learning designs for online learning communities of practice (COPs) with a focus on 'collaborative digital dialogue...

  3. Exploring Features and Classifiers for Dialogue Act Segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    op den Akker, Harm; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Schulz, Christian; Popescu-Belis, Andrei; Stiefelhagen, Rainer

    2008-01-01

    This paper takes a classical machine learning approach to the task of Dialogue Act segmentation. A thorough empirical evaluation of features, both used in other studies as well as new ones, is performed. An explorative study to the effectiveness of different classification methods is done by looking

  4. Dialogue in Music Therapy - Its Role and Forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2015-01-01

    in which levels are related to activities of the session, aiming at providing sustained structure as well as flexibility ccording to situations arising. The conclusion compares forms of dialogue described in the vignettes: "regular turn-taking", "communication at a "split-second level"" and "asymmetric...

  5. Reciprocal Learning via Dialogue Interaction: Challenges and Prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Fernández; S. Larsson; R. Cooper; J. Ginzburg; D. Schlangen

    2011-01-01

    Humans learn to communicate with each other by engaging in language coordination during dialogue. In this position paper, we present the main ideas behind the challenge of language coordination in human-machine interaction. We review relevant empirical evidence and current approaches to learning con

  6. Distributed Pedagogical Leadership and Generative Dialogue in Educational Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jappinen, Aini-Kristiina; Sarja, Anneli

    2012-01-01

    The article presents practices of distributed pedagogical leadership and generative dialogue as a tool with which management and personnel can better operate in the increasingly turbulent world of education. Distributed pedagogical leadership includes common characteristics of a professional learning community when the educational actors…

  7. The Role of Meaningful Dialogue in Early Childhood Education Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakins, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Action research was used to study the effectiveness of Learning Organisation and Adaptive Enterprise theories for promoting organisation-wide learning and creating a more effective early childhood education organisation. This article describes the leadership steps taken to achieve shared vision via meaningful dialogue between board, management and…

  8. Third Dialogue Between Chinese and Spanish Mayors Held in Taiyuan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ni; Yuan

    2014-01-01

    <正>The Third Dialogue between Chinese and Spanish Mayors sponsored by the CPAFFC,the Federation of Spanish Municipalities and Provinces(Federacion Espanola de Municipios y Provincias-FEMP)and the Shanxi Provincial People’s Government and hosted by the Foreign and Overseas Chinese Affairs Office of the Shanxi Provincial Government was held in Taiyuan on September 16,2013.

  9. The reflective meta-dialogue in psycho-dynamic supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølund, Lone; Nielsen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this article is to describe and examine the influence of the reflective dialogue on the process of supervision with the aim of developing professional competence. Supervision will be described from a meta-perspective, which is based on the supervisee's narration about the ...

  10. Plato the Pederast: Rhetoric and Cultural Procreation in the Dialogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, Elizabeth

    1993-01-01

    Examines Plato's Dialogues by reading them through two cultural lenses: the role of eros in classical Greece and its analogous relationship to language and rhetoric; and the educational function of eros within the ancient institution of pederasty. Shows how the cultural values of ancient Greece manifested themselves in Plato's erotic educational…

  11. Managing Dialogue: How Information Availability Affects Collaborative Reference Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Dominique; Le Bigot, Ludovic

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments investigated how both shared and privileged knowledge affect reference production during dialogue. Dyads of participants jointly established routes for an imaginary person. Each participant was given a map featuring shared landmarks (i.e., they also appeared on the partner's map) and privileged landmarks (i.e., they did not appear…

  12. An Important Part of Me: A Dialogue about Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lico, Sofia; Luttrell, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    This article is an experiment in writing about and across differences; it seeks to open up dialogue between adults and young people in childhood and youth studies research. The coauthors, Sofia and Wendy, met through Wendy's longitudinal research project, which explores the roles that gender, race, and immigrant status play in how young people…

  13. Exploring the Roles in a Photo Elicitation Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleron, Benedicte Frederikke Rex; Pedersen, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    a communication bridge between participants and researchers. Based upon a concluded case, we illustrate how the photographs encourage and contribute to a lively dialogue among the participants. Furthermore, we describe our reflections and considerations of the roles of the photos, the participants...

  14. Claiming Our Own Space: Polyphony in Teacher-Student Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, David; Murakami, Kyoko

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we reappraise the model of Discourse Analysis developed by Sinclair and Coulthard (1975) to analyse classroom talk. We analyse an extract of teacher-student dialogue using this model, then re-analyse the same extract drawing on conventions and concepts developed within the framework of Conversation Analysis. We argue that this…

  15. From Freire to Religious Pluralism: Exploring Dialogue in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The educational work of Paolo Freire on dialogue took place in a specific context: poverty and oppression in Brazil and Latin America in the 1960s. Similarly, Buber and Levinas were engaged in, or reflected on, contemporary philosophical debates. During the last half century, the irruption of the "Third World" into geopolitics has been,…

  16. Bridges China Dialogue 2009 be Held in Geneva

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ The Bridges China Dialogue 2009,oriented with the theme of "China and Global Sustainable Recovery:Trade,Energy Conservation and Low Carbon Initiative",will be held during October 26-27,2009,at the World Meteorological Organization Conference Hall,in Geneva.

  17. From Design for Dominance to Design for Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitges, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing complexity of the network society is the result of a particular approach to design: that of mastery, control, ease of use and interconnectedness. The author analyzes this design approach for its negative and positive aspects, which he labels as "designing for dominance" and "designing for dialogue", respectively. Both of these…

  18. Distributed Pedagogical Leadership and Generative Dialogue in Educational Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jappinen, Aini-Kristiina; Sarja, Anneli

    2012-01-01

    The article presents practices of distributed pedagogical leadership and generative dialogue as a tool with which management and personnel can better operate in the increasingly turbulent world of education. Distributed pedagogical leadership includes common characteristics of a professional learning community when the educational actors…

  19. Doing Dialogue: Genre and Flexibility in Public Engagement with Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2009-01-01

    'Public engagement with science' is an increasingly important but contested practice. In this study of London's Dana Centre I look at dialogue events carried out there as a case study of public engagement, performing a detailed analysis in order to examine their nature and practice. The analysis...

  20. From Freire to Religious Pluralism: Exploring Dialogue in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The educational work of Paolo Freire on dialogue took place in a specific context: poverty and oppression in Brazil and Latin America in the 1960s. Similarly, Buber and Levinas were engaged in, or reflected on, contemporary philosophical debates. During the last half century, the irruption of the "Third World" into geopolitics has been,…

  1. Social Class Dialogues and the Fostering of Class Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    How do critical pedagogies promote undergraduate students' awareness of social class, social class identity, and social class inequalities in education? How do undergraduate students experience class consciousness-raising in the intergroup dialogue classroom? This qualitative study explores undergraduate students' class consciousness-raising in an…

  2. Flipper: An Information State Component for Spoken Dialogue Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maat, Mark; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Vilhjálmsson, Hannes; Kopp, Stefan; Marsella, Stacy; Thórisson, Kristinn

    This paper introduces Flipper, an specification language and interpreter for Information State Update rules that can be used for developing spoken dialogue systems and embodied conversational agents. The system uses XML-templates to modify the information state and to select behaviours to perform.

  3. a model for incremental grounding in spoken dialogue systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Thomas; Traum, David; DeVault, David; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in incremental language processing for dialogue systems promise to enable more natural conversation between humans and computers. By analyzing the user's utterance while it is still in progress, systems can provide more human-like overlapping and backchannel responses to convey their

  4. Bridges China Dialogue 2009 be Held in Geneva

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The Bridges China Dialogue 2009, oriented with the theme of "China and Global Sustainable Recovery: Trade, Energy Conservation and Low Car-bon Initiative", will be held during October 26–27, 2009, at the World Me-teorological Organization Conference Hall, in Geneva.

  5. Creation of the "Sphere of the Between" in Educational Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman-Daniely, Dvora

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the current perception of dialogical teaching models as a notion that is concerned primarily with the cognitive layers of the dialogue, and focuses on the cognitive functions of learning, information processing, interpretation and decision-making. This perception, according to different researchers, ignores the relational…

  6. The Quality of Student Dialogue in Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuitema, Jaap; van Boxtel, Carla; Veugelers, Wiel; ten Dam, Geert

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the quality of student dialogue and students' ability to justify their viewpoints on a moral issue. A curriculum unit for dialogic citizenship education was developed and implemented in the 8th grade of secondary education. In the final lesson, students discussed a moral issue and then wrote an…

  7. Interculturalism, Education and Dialogue. Global Studies in Education. Volume 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besley, Tina, Ed.; Peters, Michael A., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Intercultural dialogue is a concept and discourse that dates back to the 1980s. It is the major means for managing diversity and strengthening democracy within Europe and beyond. It has been adopted by the United Nations, UNESCO and the Council of Europe as the basis for interreligious and interfaith initiatives and has become increasingly…

  8. The interplay between dialogue, cognitive schemata and kinesthetic learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Johannsen, Bjørn Friis

    We ask how students use communicative signs (e.g., speech and gesture) to shape and develop cognitive schemata during a bodily exploration of force and motion in a physics teaching-learning activity. We refer to this interplay between dialogue, cognition, and bodily exploration as kinesthetic...

  9. Developments in Religious Studies: Towards a Dialogue with Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cush, Denise; Robinson, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The early days of non-confessional, multi-faith religious education in Britain benefitted from close collaboration between academics in universities, teacher educators and teachers. This article attempts to initiate a revival of such a dialogue, by summarizing some developments in religious studies at university level and suggesting possible…

  10. Collaborating in Dialogue for an Optimal Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werder, Carmen; Garcia, Joseph; Bush, Jamie; Dallstream, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Four different perspectives--from the director of a scholarship of teaching and learning dialogue forum, the director of a leadership institute, and two undergraduate students--join together to discuss a collaboration in optimizing leadership education at Western Washington University.

  11. Collaborating in Dialogue for an Optimal Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werder, Carmen; Garcia, Joseph; Bush, Jamie; Dallstream, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Four different perspectives--from the director of a scholarship of teaching and learning dialogue forum, the director of a leadership institute, and two undergraduate students--join together to discuss a collaboration in optimizing leadership education at Western Washington University.

  12. The Limits of Dialogue among Teachers from Different National Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jenna Min

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the author investigates the dynamics of dialogue among teachers in different national contexts based on their responses to different cultural practices. Employing Pierre Bourdieu's sociological theory of practice and his concept of habitus, the author shows that, as the teachers' responses are not entirely context-specific, they are…

  13. Creating Effective Dialogue Around Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehl, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Communicating climate change to people from diverse sectors of society has proven to be difficult in the United States. It is widely recognized that difficulties arise from a number of sources, including: basic science understanding, the psychologically affect laden content surrounding climate change, and the diversity of value systems that exist in our society. I explore ways of working with the affect that arises around climate change and describe specific methods to work with the resistance often encountered when communicating this important issue. The techniques I describe are rooted in psychology and group process and provide means for creating more effective narratives to break through the barriers to communicating climate change science. Examples are given from personal experiences in presenting climate change to diverse groups.

  14. Difficult Airway Society 2015 guidelines for management of unanticipated difficult intubation in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerk, C; Mitchell, V S; McNarry, A F; Mendonca, C; Bhagrath, R; Patel, A; O'Sullivan, E P; Woodall, N M; Ahmad, I

    2015-12-01

    These guidelines provide a strategy to manage unanticipated difficulty with tracheal intubation. They are founded on published evidence. Where evidence is lacking, they have been directed by feedback from members of the Difficult Airway Society and based on expert opinion. These guidelines have been informed by advances in the understanding of crisis management; they emphasize the recognition and declaration of difficulty during airway management. A simplified, single algorithm now covers unanticipated difficulties in both routine intubation and rapid sequence induction. Planning for failed intubation should form part of the pre-induction briefing, particularly for urgent surgery. Emphasis is placed on assessment, preparation, positioning, preoxygenation, maintenance of oxygenation, and minimizing trauma from airway interventions. It is recommended that the number of airway interventions are limited, and blind techniques using a bougie or through supraglottic airway devices have been superseded by video- or fibre-optically guided intubation. If tracheal intubation fails, supraglottic airway devices are recommended to provide a route for oxygenation while reviewing how to proceed. Second-generation devices have advantages and are recommended. When both tracheal intubation and supraglottic airway device insertion have failed, waking the patient is the default option. If at this stage, face-mask oxygenation is impossible in the presence of muscle relaxation, cricothyroidotomy should follow immediately. Scalpel cricothyroidotomy is recommended as the preferred rescue technique and should be practised by all anaesthetists. The plans outlined are designed to be simple and easy to follow. They should be regularly rehearsed and made familiar to the whole theatre team.

  15. The use of extemporizing in music therapy to facilitate communication in a person with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Gummesen, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    A person who has dementia may also have aphasia and severe communicative disabilities with the risk of leading to social isolation. This study explored the music therapeutic process with a person with dementia and aphasia in order to understand how music therapy may facilitate communication...... and dialogue. In an explorative hermeneutic case study, new understandings to the music therapy process were added and led to the identification of the improvisation method known as extemporizing described by Tony Wigram. In a subsequent literature review extemporization was explored and is suggested...... as a valuable method for providing a safe ground for the person with dementia and hereby facilitating engagement in communicative dialogues and in this way meeting psychosocial needs....

  16. Facilitating Understandings of Geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Christine C.; Bush, Sara

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates some learning encounters for facilitating first graders' understanding of geometry. Describes some of children's approaches using Cuisenaire rods and teacher's intervening. Presents six problems involving various combinations of Cuisenaire rods and cubes. (YP)

  17. Dialogue on the threshold and diatribe: construction mechanisms of the individual's self-consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Gedra Ruiz Alvarez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the dialogue on the threshold whose origins are in the Socratic dialogue and the diatribe (a dialogued internal gender, both understood as privileged mechanisms in the construction of the main character of Dostoevski´s novel Uma criatura dócil [The Meek One]. Its aim is to discuss the materiality of the text – mainly the dialogue on the threshold when the main character is in its existential crisis – and the mechanism of the diatribe which provokethe philosophical dialogue experience that the individual assumes while constituting his voice.

  18. Dialogue on ‘Dialogic Education’: Has Rupert gone over to ‘the Dark Side’?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Matusov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This email dialogue that we record and report here between Eugene Matusov and Rupert Wegerif, exemplifies Internet mediated dialogic education. When Eugene emailed Rupert with his initial (misunderstanding of Rupert's position about dialogic pedagogy Rupert felt really motivated to reply. Rupert was not simply motivated to refute Eugene and assert his correctness, although Rupert is sure such elements enter into every dialogue, but also to explore and to try to resolve the issues ignited by the talk in New Zealand. Through this extended dialogue Rupert's and Eugene's positions become more nuanced and focussed. Rupert brings out his concern with the long-term and collective nature of some dialogues claiming that the – "dialogue of humanity that education serves is bigger than the interests of particular students and particular teachers.…" – and so he argues that it is often reasonable to induct students into the dialogue so far so that they can participate fully. On the other hand, Eugene's view of dialogue seems more focussed on personal responsibility, particular individual desires, interests and positions, individual agency and answering the final ethical "damned questions" without an alibi-in-being.  Rupert claims that dialogic education is education FOR dialogue and Eugene claims that dialogic education is education AS dialogue. Both believe in education THROUGH dialogue but education through dialogue is not in itself dialogic education. For Rupert dialogic education can include ‘scaffolding’ for full participation in dialogue as long as dialogue is the aim. For Eugene dialogic education has to be a genuine dialogue and this means that a curriculum goal cannot be specified in advance because learning in a dialogue is always emergent and unpredictable. Our dialogue-disagreement is a relational and discursive experiment to develop a new genre of academic critical dialogue. The dialogue itself called to us and motivated us and flowed

  19. Optimizing Dialogue Management with Reinforcement Learning: Experiments with the NJFun System

    CERN Document Server

    Kearns, M; Singh, S; Walker, M; 10.1613/jair.859

    2011-01-01

    Designing the dialogue policy of a spoken dialogue system involves many nontrivial choices. This paper presents a reinforcement learning approach for automatically optimizing a dialogue policy, which addresses the technical challenges in applying reinforcement learning to a working dialogue system with human users. We report on the design, construction and empirical evaluation of NJFun, an experimental spoken dialogue system that provides users with access to information about fun things to do in New Jersey. Our results show that by optimizing its performance via reinforcement learning, NJFun measurably improves system performance.

  20. Facilitating Knowledge Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    Abstract This paper argues that knowledge sharing can be conceptualized as different situations of exchange in which individuals relate to each other in different ways, involving different rules, norms and traditions of reciprocity regulating the exchange. The main challenge for facilitating...... and the intermediaries regulating the exchange, and facilitating knowledge sharing should therefore be viewed as a continuum of practices under the influence of opportunistic behaviour, obedience or organizational citizenship behaviour. Keywords: Knowledge sharing, motivation, organizational settings, situations...