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  1. Mechanism of Error-Free DNA Replication Past Lucidin-Derived DNA Damage by Human DNA Polymerase κ.

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    Yockey, Oliver P; Jha, Vikash; Ghodke, Pratibha P; Xu, Tianzuo; Xu, Wenyan; Ling, Hong; Pradeepkumar, P I; Zhao, Linlin

    2017-11-20

    DNA damage impinges on genetic information flow and has significant implications in human disease and aging. Lucidin-3-O-primeveroside (LuP) is an anthraquinone derivative present in madder root, which has been used as a coloring agent and food additive. LuP can be metabolically converted to genotoxic compound lucidin, which subsequently forms lucidin-specific N 2 -2'-deoxyguanosine (N 2 -dG) and N 6 -2'-deoxyadenosine (N 6 -dA) DNA adducts. Lucidin is mutagenic and carcinogenic in rodents but has low carcinogenic risks in humans. To understand the molecular mechanism of low carcinogenicity of lucidin in humans, we performed DNA replication assays using site-specifically modified oligodeoxynucleotides containing a structural analogue (LdG) of lucidin-N 2 -dG DNA adduct and determined the crystal structures of DNA polymerase (pol) κ in complex with LdG-bearing DNA and an incoming nucleotide. We examined four human pols (pol η, pol ι, pol κ, and Rev1) in their efficiency and accuracy during DNA replication with LdG; these pols are key players in translesion DNA synthesis. Our results demonstrate that pol κ efficiently and accurately replicates past the LdG adduct, whereas DNA replication by pol η, pol ι is compromised to different extents. Rev1 retains its ability to incorporate dCTP opposite the lesion albeit with decreased efficiency. Two ternary crystal structures of pol κ illustrate that the LdG adduct is accommodated by pol κ at the enzyme active site during insertion and postlesion-extension steps. The unique open active site of pol κ allows the adducted DNA to adopt a standard B-form for accurate DNA replication. Collectively, these biochemical and structural data provide mechanistic insights into the low carcinogenic risk of lucidin in humans.

  2. Translesion Synthesis of the N(2)-2'-Deoxyguanosine Adduct of the Dietary Mutagen IQ in Human Cells: Error-Free Replication by DNA Polymerase κ and Mutagenic Bypass by DNA Polymerases η, ζ, and Rev1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Arindam; Millsap, Amy D; DeLeon, Arnie; Rizzo, Carmelo J; Basu, Ashis K

    2016-09-19

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) of the N(2)-2'-deoxyguanosine (dG-N(2)-IQ) adduct of the carcinogen 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) was investigated in human embryonic kidney 293T cells by replicating plasmid constructs in which the adduct was individually placed at each guanine (G1, G2, or G3) of the NarI sequence (5'-CG1G2CG3CC-3'). TLS efficiency was 38%, 29%, and 25% for the dG-N(2)-IQ located at G1, G2, and G3, respectively, which suggests that dG-N(2)-IQ is bypassed more efficiently by one or more DNA polymerases at G1 than at either G2 or G3. TLS efficiency was decreased 8-35% in cells with knockdown of pol η, pol κ, pol ι, pol ζ, or Rev1. Up to 75% reduction in TLS occurred when pol η, pol ζ, and Rev1 were simultaneously knocked down, suggesting that these three polymerases play important roles in dG-N(2)-IQ bypass. Mutation frequencies (MFs) of dG-N(2)-IQ at G1, G2, and G3 were 23%, 17%, and 11%, respectively, exhibiting a completely reverse trend of the previously reported MF of the C8-dG adduct of IQ (dG-C8-IQ), which is most mutagenic at G3 ( ( 2015 ) Nucleic Acids Res. 43 , 8340 - 8351 ). The major type of mutation induced by dG-N(2)-IQ was targeted G → T, as was reported for dG-C8-IQ. In each site, knockdown of pol κ resulted in an increase in MF, whereas MF was reduced when pol η, pol ι, pol ζ, or Rev1 was knocked down. The reduction in MF was most pronounced when pol η, pol ζ, and Rev1 were simultaneously knocked down and especially when the adduct was located at G3, where MF was reduced by 90%. We conclude that pol κ predominantly performs error-free TLS of the dG-N(2)-IQ adduct, whereas pols η, pol ζ, and Rev1 cooperatively carry out the error-prone TLS. However, in vitro experiments using yeast pol ζ and κ showed that the former was inefficient in full-length primer extension on dG-N(2)-IQ templates, whereas the latter was efficient in both error-free and error-prone extensions. We believe that the observed differences

  3. Translesion Synthesis of the N2-2′-Deoxyguanosine Adduct of the Dietary Mutagen IQ in Human Cells: Error-Free Replication by DNA Polymerase κ and Mutagenic Bypass by DNA Polymerases η, ζ, and Rev1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Translesion synthesis (TLS) of the N2-2′-deoxyguanosine (dG-N2-IQ) adduct of the carcinogen 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) was investigated in human embryonic kidney 293T cells by replicating plasmid constructs in which the adduct was individually placed at each guanine (G1, G2, or G3) of the NarI sequence (5′-CG1G2CG3CC-3′). TLS efficiency was 38%, 29%, and 25% for the dG-N2-IQ located at G1, G2, and G3, respectively, which suggests that dG-N2-IQ is bypassed more efficiently by one or more DNA polymerases at G1 than at either G2 or G3. TLS efficiency was decreased 8–35% in cells with knockdown of pol η, pol κ, pol ι, pol ζ, or Rev1. Up to 75% reduction in TLS occurred when pol η, pol ζ, and Rev1 were simultaneously knocked down, suggesting that these three polymerases play important roles in dG-N2-IQ bypass. Mutation frequencies (MFs) of dG-N2-IQ at G1, G2, and G3 were 23%, 17%, and 11%, respectively, exhibiting a completely reverse trend of the previously reported MF of the C8-dG adduct of IQ (dG-C8-IQ), which is most mutagenic at G3 ((2015) Nucleic Acids Res.43, 8340−835126220181). The major type of mutation induced by dG-N2-IQ was targeted G → T, as was reported for dG-C8-IQ. In each site, knockdown of pol κ resulted in an increase in MF, whereas MF was reduced when pol η, pol ι, pol ζ, or Rev1 was knocked down. The reduction in MF was most pronounced when pol η, pol ζ, and Rev1 were simultaneously knocked down and especially when the adduct was located at G3, where MF was reduced by 90%. We conclude that pol κ predominantly performs error-free TLS of the dG-N2-IQ adduct, whereas pols η, pol ζ, and Rev1 cooperatively carry out the error-prone TLS. However, in vitro experiments using yeast pol ζ and κ showed that the former was inefficient in full-length primer extension on dG-N2-IQ templates, whereas the latter was efficient in both error-free and error-prone extensions. We believe that the observed differences between

  4. Autophagy Facilitates Salmonella Replication in HeLa Cells

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    Yu, Hong B.; Croxen, Matthew A.; Marchiando, Amanda M.; Ferreira, Rosana B. R.; Cadwell, Ken; Foster, Leonard J.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a process whereby a double-membrane structure (autophagosome) engulfs unnecessary cytosolic proteins, organelles, and invading pathogens and delivers them to the lysosome for degradation. We examined the fate of cytosolic Salmonella targeted by autophagy and found that autophagy-targeted Salmonella present in the cytosol of HeLa cells correlates with intracellular bacterial replication. Real-time analyses revealed that a subset of cytosolic Salmonella extensively associates with autophagy components p62 and/or LC3 and replicates quickly, whereas intravacuolar Salmonella shows no or very limited association with p62 or LC3 and replicates much more slowly. Replication of cytosolic Salmonella in HeLa cells is significantly decreased when autophagy components are depleted. Eventually, hyperreplication of cytosolic Salmonella potentiates cell detachment, facilitating the dissemination of Salmonella to neighboring cells. We propose that Salmonella benefits from autophagy for its cytosolic replication in HeLa cells. PMID:24618251

  5. CTCF driven TERRA transcription facilitates completion of telomere DNA replication.

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    Beishline, Kate; Vladimirova, Olga; Tutton, Stephen; Wang, Zhuo; Deng, Zhong; Lieberman, Paul M

    2017-12-13

    Telomere repeat DNA forms a nucleo-protein structure that can obstruct chromosomal DNA replication, especially under conditions of replication stress. Transcription of telomere repeats can initiate at subtelomeric CTCF-binding sites to generate telomere repeat-encoding RNA (TERRA), but the role of transcription, CTCF, and TERRA in telomere replication is not known. Here, we have used CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing to mutate CTCF-binding sites at the putative start site of TERRA transcripts for a class of subtelomeres. Under replication stress, telomeres lacking CTCF-driven TERRA exhibit sister-telomere loss and upon entry into mitosis, exhibit the formation of ultra-fine anaphase bridges and micronuclei. Importantly, these phenotypes could be rescued by the forced transcription of TERRA independent of CTCF binding. Our findings indicate that subtelomeric CTCF facilitates telomeric DNA replication by promoting TERRA transcription. Our findings also demonstrate that CTCF-driven TERRA transcription acts in cis to facilitate telomere repeat replication and chromosome stability.

  6. HSV-1 Remodels Host Telomeres to Facilitate Viral Replication

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    Zhong Deng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres protect the ends of cellular chromosomes. We show here that infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 results in chromosomal structural aberrations at telomeres and the accumulation of telomere dysfunction-induced DNA damage foci (TIFs. At the molecular level, HSV-1 induces transcription of telomere repeat-containing RNA (TERRA, followed by the proteolytic degradation of the telomere protein TPP1 and loss of the telomere repeat DNA signal. The HSV-1-encoded E3 ubiquitin ligase ICP0 is required for TERRA transcription and facilitates TPP1 degradation. Small hairpin RNA (shRNA depletion of TPP1 increases viral replication, indicating that TPP1 inhibits viral replication. Viral replication protein ICP8 forms foci that coincide with telomeric proteins, and ICP8-null virus failed to degrade telomere DNA signal. These findings suggest that HSV-1 reorganizes telomeres to form ICP8-associated prereplication foci and to promote viral genomic replication.

  7. RAD52 Facilitates Mitotic DNA Synthesis Following Replication Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhowmick, Rahul; Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Hickson, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is necessary to counteract DNA replication stress. Common fragile site (CFS) loci are particularly sensitive to replication stress and undergo pathological rearrangements in tumors. At these loci, replication stress frequently activates DNA repair synthesis in mitosis...... replication stress at CFS loci during S-phase. In contrast, MiDAS is RAD52 dependent, and RAD52 is required for the timely recruitment of MUS81 and POLD3 to CFSs in early mitosis. Our results provide further mechanistic insight into MiDAS and define a specific function for human RAD52. Furthermore, selective...

  8. Portable and Error-Free DNA-Based Data Storage.

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    Yazdi, S M Hossein Tabatabaei; Gabrys, Ryan; Milenkovic, Olgica

    2017-07-10

    DNA-based data storage is an emerging nonvolatile memory technology of potentially unprecedented density, durability, and replication efficiency. The basic system implementation steps include synthesizing DNA strings that contain user information and subsequently retrieving them via high-throughput sequencing technologies. Existing architectures enable reading and writing but do not offer random-access and error-free data recovery from low-cost, portable devices, which is crucial for making the storage technology competitive with classical recorders. Here we show for the first time that a portable, random-access platform may be implemented in practice using nanopore sequencers. The novelty of our approach is to design an integrated processing pipeline that encodes data to avoid costly synthesis and sequencing errors, enables random access through addressing, and leverages efficient portable sequencing via new iterative alignment and deletion error-correcting codes. Our work represents the only known random access DNA-based data storage system that uses error-prone nanopore sequencers, while still producing error-free readouts with the highest reported information rate/density. As such, it represents a crucial step towards practical employment of DNA molecules as storage media.

  9. SMC1-mediated intra-S-phase arrest facilitates bocavirus DNA replication.

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    Luo, Yong; Deng, Xuefeng; Cheng, Fang; Li, Yi; Qiu, Jianming

    2013-04-01

    Activation of a host DNA damage response (DDR) is essential for DNA replication of minute virus of canines (MVC), a member of the genus Bocavirus of the Parvoviridae family; however, the mechanism by which DDR contributes to viral DNA replication is unknown. In the current study, we demonstrate that MVC infection triggers the intra-S-phase arrest to slow down host cellular DNA replication and to recruit cellular DNA replication factors for viral DNA replication. The intra-S-phase arrest is regulated by ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated kinase) signaling in a p53-independent manner. Moreover, we demonstrate that SMC1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes 1) is the key regulator of the intra-S-phase arrest induced during infection. Either knockdown of SMC1 or complementation with a dominant negative SMC1 mutant blocks both the intra-S-phase arrest and viral DNA replication. Finally, we show that the intra-S-phase arrest induced during MVC infection was caused neither by damaged host cellular DNA nor by viral proteins but by replicating viral genomes physically associated with the DNA damage sensor, the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex. In conclusion, the feedback loop between MVC DNA replication and the intra-S-phase arrest is mediated by ATM-SMC1 signaling and plays a critical role in MVC DNA replication. Thus, our findings unravel the mechanism underlying DDR signaling-facilitated MVC DNA replication and demonstrate a novel strategy of DNA virus-host interaction.

  10. Early growth response-1 facilitates enterovirus 71 replication by direct binding to the viral genome RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu; Cheng, Xin; Yang, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Rong; Wang, Peili; Han, Yang; Luo, Zhen; Cao, Yanhua; Zhu, Chengliang; Xiong, Ying; Liu, Yingle; Wu, Kailang; Wu, Jianguo

    2015-05-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections can cause hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), meningoencephalitis, neonatal sepsis, and even fatal encephalitis in children. Unfortunately, there is currently no effective treatment for EV71 infection due to the lack of understanding of viral replication and infection; and viral infections have emerged as an imperative global hazard. Thus, it is extremely important to understand the mechanism of EV71 replication in order to prevent and control the diseases associated with EV71 infections. Early growth response-1 (EGR1) is a multifunctional transcription factor that regulates diverse biological functions, including inflammation, apoptosis, differentiation, tumorigenesis, and even viral infection. Here, we provide new insight into the role of EV71 infection in regulating EGR1 production; and reveal a novel mechanism by which EGR1 facilitates EV71 replication. We demonstrate that EV71 activates EGR1 expression during infection by stimulating the protein kinase A/protein kinase Cɛ/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt (PKA/PKCɛ/PI3K/Akt) cascade. We further reveal that EV71-activated EGR1, in turn, regulates the internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) of EV71 to enhance viral replication. In addition, EGR1 facilitates EV71 replication by binding directly to stem-loops I and IV of EV71 5'-untranslated region (5'UTR) with its first two zinc fingers. Moreover, EGR1 protein co-localizes with EV71 RNA in the cytoplasm of infected cells to facilitate viral replication. Our results reveal an important new role of EGR1 in viral infection, provide new insight into the novel mechanism underlying the regulation of EV71 replication, and suggest a potential application of EGR1 in the control of EV71 infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Suppression of Rac1 Signaling by Influenza A Virus NS1 Facilitates Viral Replication

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    Jiang, Wei; Sheng, Chunjie; Gu, Xiuling; Liu, Dong; Yao, Chen; Gao, Shijuan; Chen, Shuai; Huang, Yinghui; Huang, Wenlin; Fang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major human pathogen with the potential to become pandemic. IAV contains only eight RNA segments; thus, the virus must fully exploit the host cellular machinery to facilitate its own replication. In an effort to comprehensively characterize the host machinery taken over by IAV in mammalian cells, we generated stable A549 cell lines with over-expression of the viral non-structural protein (NS1) to investigate the potential host factors that might be modulated by the NS1 protein. We found that the viral NS1 protein directly interacted with cellular Rac1 and facilitated viral replication. Further research revealed that NS1 down-regulated Rac1 activity via post-translational modifications. Therefore, our results demonstrated that IAV blocked Rac1-mediated host cell signal transduction through the NS1 protein to facilitate its own replication. Our findings provide a novel insight into the mechanism of IAV replication and indicate new avenues for the development of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27869202

  12. Failing the Future: Three Unsuccessful Attempts to Replicate Bem's ‘Retroactive Facilitation of Recall’ Effect

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    Ritchie, Stuart J.; Wiseman, Richard; French, Christopher C.

    2012-01-01

    Nine recently reported parapsychological experiments appear to support the existence of precognition. We describe three pre-registered independent attempts to exactly replicate one of these experiments, ‘retroactive facilitation of recall’, which examines whether performance on a memory test can be influenced by a post-test exercise. All three replication attempts failed to produce significant effects (combined n = 150; combined p = .83, one-tailed) and thus do not support the existence of psychic ability. PMID:22432019

  13. Set2 Methyltransferase Facilitates DNA Replication and Promotes Genotoxic Stress Responses through MBF-Dependent Transcription

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    Chen-Chun Pai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin modification through histone H3 lysine 36 methylation by the SETD2 tumor suppressor plays a key role in maintaining genome stability. Here, we describe a role for Set2-dependent H3K36 methylation in facilitating DNA replication and the transcriptional responses to both replication stress and DNA damage through promoting MluI cell-cycle box (MCB binding factor (MBF-complex-dependent transcription in fission yeast. Set2 loss leads to reduced MBF-dependent ribonucleotide reductase (RNR expression, reduced deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP synthesis, altered replication origin firing, and a checkpoint-dependent S-phase delay. Accordingly, prolonged S phase in the absence of Set2 is suppressed by increasing dNTP synthesis. Furthermore, H3K36 is di- and tri-methylated at these MBF gene promoters, and Set2 loss leads to reduced MBF binding and transcription in response to genotoxic stress. Together, these findings provide new insights into how H3K36 methylation facilitates DNA replication and promotes genotoxic stress responses in fission yeast.

  14. West Nile virus differentially modulates the unfolded protein response to facilitate replication and immune evasion.

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    Ambrose, Rebecca L; Mackenzie, Jason M

    2011-03-01

    For intracellular survival it is imperative that viruses have the capacity to manipulate various cellular responses, including metabolic and biosynthetic pathways. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is induced by various external and internal stimuli, including the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Our previous studies have indicated that the replication and assembly of the flavivirus West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV(KUN)) is intimately associated with the ER. Thus, we sought to determine whether the UPR was induced during WNV(KUN) infection. WNV(KUN) induces UPR signaling during replication, which is coordinated with peak replication. Interestingly, signaling is biased toward the ATF6/IRE-1 arm of the response, with high levels of Xbp-1 activation but negligible eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α phosphorylation and downstream transcription. We show that the PERK-mediated response may partially regulate replication, since external UPR stimulation had a limiting effect on early replication events and cells deficient for PERK demonstrated increased replication and virus release. Significantly, we show that the WNV(KUN) hydrophobic nonstructural proteins NS4A and NS4B are potent inducers of the UPR, which displayed a high correlation in inhibiting Jak-STAT signaling in response to alpha interferon (IFN-α). Sequential removal of the transmembrane domains of NS4A showed that reducing hydrophobicity decreased UPR signaling and restored IFN-α-mediated activation. Overall, these results suggest that WNV(KUN) can stimulate the UPR to facilitate replication and that the induction of a general ER stress response, regulated by hydrophobic WNV(KUN) proteins, can potentiate the inhibition of the antiviral signaling pathway.

  15. RAB1A promotes Vaccinia virus replication by facilitating the production of intracellular enveloped virions

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    Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Featherstone, Rebecca J.; Reynolds, Danielle K.; Brown, Helen K. [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland (United Kingdom); James, John; Prescott, Alan [Division of Cell Signalling and Immunology, College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Haga, Ismar R. [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland (United Kingdom); Beard, Philippa M., E-mail: pip.beard@roslin.ed.ac.uk [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus with a complex cytoplasmic replication cycle that exploits numerous cellular proteins. This work characterises the role of a proviral cellular protein, the small GTPase RAB1A, in VACV replication. Using siRNA, we identified RAB1A as required for the production of extracellular enveloped virions (EEVs), but not intracellular mature virions (IMVs). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy further refined the role of RAB1A as facilitating the wrapping of IMVs to become intracellular enveloped virions (IEVs). This is consistent with the known function of RAB1A in maintenance of ER to Golgi transport. VACV can therefore be added to the growing list of viruses which require RAB1A for optimal replication, highlighting this protein as a broadly proviral host factor. - Highlights: • Characterisation of the role of the small GTPase RAB1A in VACV replication. • RAB1A is not required for production of the primary virion form (IMV). • RAB1A is required for production of processed virion forms (IEVs, CEVs and EEVs). • Consistent with known role of RAB1A in ER to Golgi transport.

  16. Barriers and facilitators to replicating an evidence-based palliative care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E Maxwell; Jamison, Paula; Brumley, Richard; Enguídanos, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Recognition of the difficulties involved in replicating evidence- based interventions is well documented in the literature within the medical field. Promising research findings are often not translated into practice, and if they are, there is a significant time gap between study conclusion and practice adoption. The purpose of this article is to describe the barriers and facilitators encountered by two managed care organizations while replicating an evidence-based end of life in-home palliative care model. Using Diffusion of Innovation Theory as a theoretical framework, results from focus groups and interviews with the project's clinical, administrative and research teams are presented and recommendations made for improving translational efforts. The process of replicating the end of life in-home palliative care model clearly illustrated the key elements required for successfully diffusing innovation. These key elements include marketing and communication, leadership, organizational support and training and mentorship. This qualitative process study provides clear, real world perspectives of the myriad of challenges encountered in replicating an evidence-based project.

  17. Mcm10 deficiency causes defective-replisome-induced mutagenesis and a dependency on error-free postreplicative repair.

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    Becker, Jordan R; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Wang, Xiaohan; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Mcm10 is a multifunctional replication factor with reported roles in origin activation, polymerase loading, and replication fork progression. The literature supporting these variable roles is controversial, and it has been debated whether Mcm10 has an active role in elongation. Here, we provide evidence that the mcm10-1 allele confers alterations in DNA synthesis that lead to defective-replisome-induced mutagenesis (DRIM). Specifically, we observed that mcm10-1 cells exhibited elevated levels of PCNA ubiquitination and activation of the translesion polymerase, pol-ζ. Whereas translesion synthesis had no measurable impact on viability, mcm10-1 mutants also engaged in error-free postreplicative repair (PRR), and this pathway promoted survival at semi-permissive conditions. Replication gaps in mcm10-1 were likely caused by elongation defects, as dbf4-1 mutants, which are compromised for origin activation did not display any hallmarks of replication stress. Furthermore, we demonstrate that deficiencies in priming, induced by a pol1-1 mutation, also resulted in DRIM, but not in error-free PRR. Similar to mcm10-1 mutants, DRIM did not rescue the replication defect in pol1-1 cells. Thus, it appears that DRIM is not proficient to fill replication gaps in pol1-1 and mcm10-1 mutants. Moreover, the ability to correctly prime nascent DNA may be a crucial prerequisite to initiate error-free PRR.

  18. Phosphorylated STAT5 directly facilitates parvovirus B19 DNA replication in human erythroid progenitors through interaction with the MCM complex.

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    Ganaie, Safder S; Zou, Wei; Xu, Peng; Deng, Xuefeng; Kleiboeker, Steve; Qiu, Jianming

    2017-05-01

    Productive infection of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) exhibits high tropism for burst forming unit erythroid (BFU-E) and colony forming unit erythroid (CFU-E) progenitor cells in human bone marrow and fetal liver. This exclusive restriction of the virus replication to human erythroid progenitor cells is partly due to the intracellular factors that are essential for viral DNA replication, including erythropoietin signaling. Efficient B19V replication also requires hypoxic conditions, which upregulate the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) pathway, and phosphorylated STAT5 is essential for virus replication. In this study, our results revealed direct involvement of STAT5 in B19V DNA replication. Consensus STAT5-binding elements were identified adjacent to the NS1-binding element within the minimal origins of viral DNA replication in the B19V genome. Phosphorylated STAT5 specifically interacted with viral DNA replication origins both in vivo and in vitro, and was actively recruited within the viral DNA replication centers. Notably, STAT5 interacted with minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex, suggesting that STAT5 directly facilitates viral DNA replication by recruiting the helicase complex of the cellular DNA replication machinery to viral DNA replication centers. The FDA-approved drug pimozide dephosphorylates STAT5, and it inhibited B19V replication in ex vivo expanded human erythroid progenitors. Our results demonstrated that pimozide could be a promising antiviral drug for treatment of B19V-related diseases.

  19. Cellular Cholesterol Facilitates the Postentry Replication Cycle of Herpes Simplex Virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wudiri, George A; Nicola, Anthony V

    2017-07-15

    Cholesterol is an essential component of cell membranes and is required for herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) entry (1-3). Treatment of HSV-1-infected Vero cells with methyl beta-cyclodextrin from 2 to 9 h postentry reduced plaque numbers. Transport of incoming viral capsids to the nuclear periphery was unaffected by the cholesterol reduction, suggesting that cell cholesterol is important for the HSV-1 replicative cycle at a stage(s) beyond entry, after the arrival of capsids at the nucleus. The synthesis and release of infectious HSV-1 and cell-to-cell spread of infection were all impaired in cholesterol-reduced cells. Propagation of HSV-1 on DHCR24 -/- fibroblasts, which lack the desmosterol-to-cholesterol conversion enzyme, resulted in the generation of infectious extracellular virions (HSV des ) that lack cholesterol and likely contain desmosterol. The specific infectivities (PFU per viral genome) of HSV chol and HSV des were similar, suggesting cholesterol and desmosterol in the HSV envelope support similar levels of infectivity. However, infected DHCR24 -/- fibroblasts released ∼1 log less infectious HSV des and ∼1.5 log fewer particles than release of cholesterol-containing particles (HSV chol ) from parental fibroblasts, suggesting that the hydrocarbon tail of cholesterol facilitates viral synthesis. Together, the results suggest multiple roles for cholesterol in the HSV-1 replicative cycle. IMPORTANCE HSV-1 infections are associated with a wide range of clinical manifestations that are of public health importance. Cholesterol is a key player in the complex interaction between viral and cellular factors that allows HSV-1 to enter host cells and establish infection. Previous reports have demonstrated a role for cellular cholesterol in the entry of HSV-1 into target cells. Here, we employed both chemical treatment and cells that were genetically defined to synthesize only desmosterol to demonstrate that cholesterol is important at stages following the

  20. Human CST Facilitates Genome-wide RAD51 Recruitment to GC-Rich Repetitive Sequences in Response to Replication Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastain, Megan; Zhou, Qing; Shiva, Olga; Fadri-Moskwik, Maria; Whitmore, Leanne; Jia, Pingping; Dai, Xueyu; Huang, Chenhui; Ye, Ping; Chai, Weihang

    2016-08-02

    The telomeric CTC1/STN1/TEN1 (CST) complex has been implicated in promoting replication recovery under replication stress at genomic regions, yet its precise role is unclear. Here, we report that STN1 is enriched at GC-rich repetitive sequences genome-wide in response to hydroxyurea (HU)-induced replication stress. STN1 deficiency exacerbates the fragility of these sequences under replication stress, resulting in chromosome fragmentation. We find that upon fork stalling, CST proteins form distinct nuclear foci that colocalize with RAD51. Furthermore, replication stress induces physical association of CST with RAD51 in an ATR-dependent manner. Strikingly, CST deficiency diminishes HU-induced RAD51 foci formation and reduces RAD51 recruitment to telomeres and non-telomeric GC-rich fragile sequences. Collectively, our findings establish that CST promotes RAD51 recruitment to GC-rich repetitive sequences in response to replication stress to facilitate replication restart, thereby providing insights into the mechanism underlying genome stability maintenance. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mouse Norovirus infection promotes autophagy induction to facilitate replication but prevents final autophagosome maturation

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    O’Donnell, Tanya B. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010 (Australia); Hyde, Jennifer L. [School of Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Mintern, Justine D. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010 (Australia); Mackenzie, Jason M., E-mail: jason.mackenzie@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Autophagy is a cellular process used to eliminate intracellular pathogens. Many viruses however are able to manipulate this cellular process for their own advantage. Here we demonstrate that Mouse Norovirus (MNV) infection induces autophagy but does not appear to utilise the autophagosomal membrane for establishment and formation of the viral replication complex. We have observed that MNV infection results in lipidation and recruitment of LC3 to the autophagosome membrane but prevents subsequent fusion of the autophagosomes with lysosomes, as SQSTM1 (an autophagy receptor) accumulates and Lysosome-Associated Membrane Protein1 is sequestered to the MNV replication complex (RC) rather than to autophagosomes. We have additionally observed that chemical modulation of autophagy differentially affects MNV replication. From this study we can conclude that MNV infection induces autophagy, however suppresses the final maturation step of this response, indicating that autophagy induction contributes to MNV replication independently of RC biogenesis. - Highlights: • MNV induces autophagy in infected murine macrophages. • MNV does not utilise autophagosomal membranes for replication. • The MNV-induced autophagosomes do not fuse with lysosomes. • MNV sequesters SQSTM1 to prevent autophagy degradation and turnover. • Chemical modulation of autophagy enhances MNV replication.

  2. Building up and breaking down: mechanisms controlling recombination during replication.

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    Branzei, Dana; Szakal, Barnabas

    2017-08-01

    The complete and faithful duplication of the genome is an essential prerequisite for proliferating cells to maintain genome integrity. This objective is greatly challenged by DNA damage encountered during replication, which causes fork stalling and in certain cases, fork breakage. DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways mitigate the effects on fork stability induced by replication fork stalling by mediating damage-bypass and replication fork restart. These DDT mechanisms, largely relying on homologous recombination (HR) and specialized polymerases, can however contribute to genome rearrangements and mutagenesis. There is a profound connection between replication and recombination: recombination proteins protect replication forks from nuclease-mediated degradation of the nascent DNA strands and facilitate replication completion in cells challenged by DNA damage. Moreover, in case of fork collapse and formation of double strand breaks (DSBs), the recombination factors present or recruited to the fork facilitate HR-mediated DSB repair, which is primarily error-free. Disruption of HR is inexorably linked to genome instability, but the premature activation of HR during replication often leads to genome rearrangements. Faithful replication necessitates the downregulation of HR and disruption of active RAD51 filaments at replication forks, but upon persistent fork stalling, building up of HR is critical for the reorganization of the replication fork and for filling-in of the gaps associated with discontinuous replication induced by DNA lesions. Here we summarize and reflect on our understanding of the mechanisms that either suppress recombination or locally enhance it during replication, and the principles that underlie this regulation.

  3. The B. subtilis Accessory Helicase PcrA Facilitates DNA Replication through Transcription Units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher N Merrikh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria the concurrence of DNA replication and transcription leads to potentially deleterious encounters between the two machineries, which can occur in either the head-on (lagging strand genes or co-directional (leading strand genes orientations. These conflicts lead to replication fork stalling and can destabilize the genome. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells possess resolution factors that reduce the severity of these encounters. Though Escherichia coli accessory helicases have been implicated in the mitigation of head-on conflicts, direct evidence of these proteins mitigating co-directional conflicts is lacking. Furthermore, the endogenous chromosomal regions where these helicases act, and the mechanism of recruitment, have not been identified. We show that the essential Bacillus subtilis accessory helicase PcrA aids replication progression through protein coding genes of both head-on and co-directional orientations, as well as rRNA and tRNA genes. ChIP-Seq experiments show that co-directional conflicts at highly transcribed rRNA, tRNA, and head-on protein coding genes are major targets of PcrA activity on the chromosome. Partial depletion of PcrA renders cells extremely sensitive to head-on conflicts, linking the essential function of PcrA to conflict resolution. Furthermore, ablating PcrA's ATPase/helicase activity simultaneously increases its association with conflict regions, while incapacitating its ability to mitigate conflicts, and leads to cell death. In contrast, disruption of PcrA's C-terminal RNA polymerase interaction domain does not impact its ability to mitigate conflicts between replication and transcription, its association with conflict regions, or cell survival. Altogether, this work establishes PcrA as an essential factor involved in mitigating transcription-replication conflicts and identifies chromosomal regions where it routinely acts. As both conflicts and accessory helicases are found in all domains of life

  4. E1-mediated recruitment of a UAF1-USP deubiquitinase complex facilitates human papillomavirus DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoux, Michaël; Gagnon, David; Archambault, Jacques

    2014-08-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E1 helicase promotes viral DNA replication through its DNA unwinding activity and association with host factors. The E1 proteins from anogenital HPV types interact with the cellular WD repeat-containing factor UAF1 (formerly known as p80). Specific amino acid substitutions in E1 that impair this interaction inhibit maintenance of the viral episome in immortalized keratinocytes and reduce viral DNA replication by up to 70% in transient assays. In this study, we determined by affinity purification of UAF1 that it interacts with three deubiquitinating enzymes in C33A cervical carcinoma cells: USP1, a nuclear protein, and the two cytoplasmic enzymes USP12 and USP46. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that E1 assembles into a ternary complex with UAF1 and any one of these three USPs. Moreover, expression of E1 leads to a redistribution of USP12 and USP46 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies further revealed that E1 recruits these threes USPs to the viral origin in association with UAF1. The function of USP1, USP12, and USP46 in viral DNA replication was investigated by overproduction of catalytically inactive versions of these enzymes in transient assays. All three dominant negative USPs reduced HPV31 DNA replication by up to 60%, an effect that was specific, as it was not observed in assays performed with a truncated E1 lacking the UAF1-binding domain or with bovine papillomavirus 1 E1, which does not bind UAF1. These results highlight the importance of the USP1, USP12, and USP46 deubiquitinating enzymes in anogenital HPV DNA replication. Human papillomaviruses are small DNA tumor viruses that induce benign and malignant lesions of the skin and mucosa. HPV types that infect the anogenital tract are the etiological agents of cervical cancer, the majority of anal cancers, and a growing proportion of head-and-neck cancers. Replication of the HPV genome requires the viral protein E1, a DNA helicase

  5. PASHA: facilitating the replication and use of effective adolescent pregnancy and STI/HIV prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Josefina J; Lessard, Laura; Benner, Tabitha

    2007-03-01

    It is important that interventions that have been shown effective in changing risky behavior be disseminated, so that they can be replicated (implemented in a new site) and so that their effectiveness in a new setting can be investigated. This article provides an update on an innovative resource for promoting the replication of effective teen pregnancy and STI/HIV prevention programs. The resource is called the Program Archive on Sexuality, Health & Adolescence (PASHA). A Scientist Expert Panel rates candidate adolescent pregnancy and STI/HIV prevention programs based on the strength of the evidence of their effectiveness in changing risky sexual behavior among youth ages 10-19 (10-21 for STI/HIV prevention programs). Developers of selected programs are invited to make their program and evaluation materials publicly available through PASHA. PASHA publishes and disseminates replication kits for programs it successfully acquires. Fifty-six programs have been selected by PASHA's Scientist Expert Panel as "effective" in changing one or more risky behaviors associated with adolescent pregnancy or STI/HIV. Complete program and evaluation materials from 35 of these programs are now currently available through PASHA, five are pending, 12 are publicly available from other sources, and only four are not publicly available. PASHA programs are aimed at a diverse target population and cover diverse content on many abstinence and contraception/condom-related topics. Many pedagogical techniques are used to effect behavior change, noticeably role play and group discussion. PASHA illustrates well the productive research-to-practice feedback loop that is the backbone of "translation research." The resource can be used by adolescent pregnancy and STI/HIV prevention practitioners to put what works to work to continue the lowering of the nation's adolescent pregnancy and STI/HIV rates.

  6. Hepatitis B Virus Stimulated Fibronectin Facilitates Viral Maintenance and Replication through Two Distinct Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Ren

    Full Text Available Fibronectin (FN is a high molecular weight extracellular matrix protein that functions in cell adhesion, growth, migration, and embryonic development. However, little is known about the role of FN during viral infection. In the present study, we found significantly higher levels of FN in sera, and liver tissues from hepatitis B virus (HBV patients relative to healthy individuals. HBV expression enhanced FN mRNA and protein levels in the hepatic cell lines Huh7 and HepG2. HBV infection of susceptible HepG2-sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide cells also increased FN expression. We also found that transcriptional factor specificity protein 1 was involved in the induction of FN by HBV. Knockdown of FN expression significantly inhibited HBV DNA replication and protein synthesis through activating endogenous IFN-α production. In addition, FN interacted with the transforming growth factor β-activated protein kinase 1 (TAK1 and TAK1-binding protein complex and attenuated interferon signaling by inhibiting TAK1 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65 was found to be inhibited by FN. We also observed that FN promoted HBV enhancers to support HBV expression. These results suggest novel functions of endogenous FN involved in immune evasion and maintenance of HBV replication.

  7. Newcastle disease virus induces stable formation ofbona fidestress granules to facilitate viral replication through manipulating host protein translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yingjie; Dong, Luna; Yu, Shengqing; Wang, Xiaoxu; Zheng, Hang; Zhang, Pin; Meng, Chunchun; Zhan, Yuan; Tan, Lei; Song, Cuiping; Qiu, Xusheng; Wang, Guijun; Liao, Ying; Ding, Chan

    2017-04-01

    Mammalian cells respond to various environmental stressors to form stress granules (SGs) by arresting cytoplasmic mRNA, protein translation element, and RNA binding proteins. Virus-induced SGs function in different ways, depending on the species of virus; however, the mechanism of SG regulation of virus replication is not well understood. In this study, Newcastle disease virus (NDV) triggered stable formation of bona fide SGs on HeLa cells through activating the protein kinase R (PKR)/eIF2α pathway. NDV-induced SGs contained classic SG markers T-cell internal antigen (TIA)-1, Ras GTPase-activating protein-binding protein (G3BP)-1, eukaryotic initiation factors, and small ribosomal subunit, which could be disassembled in the presence of cycloheximide. Treatment with nocodazole, a microtubule disruption drug, led to the formation of relatively small and circular granules, indicating that NDV infection induces canonical SGs. Furthermore, the role of SGs on NDV replication was investigated by knockdown of TIA-1 and TIA-1-related (TIAR) protein, the 2 critical components involved in SG formation from the HeLa cells, followed by NDV infection. Results showed that depletion of TIA-1 or TIAR inhibited viral protein synthesis, reduced extracellular virus yields, but increased global protein translation. FISH revealed that NDV-induced SGs contained predominantly cellular mRNA rather than viral mRNA. Deletion of TIA-1 or TIAR reduced NP mRNA levels in polysomes. These results demonstrate that NDV triggers stable formation of bona fide SGs, which benefit viral protein translation and virus replication by arresting cellular mRNA.-Sun, Y., Dong, L., Yu, S., Wang, X., Zheng, H., Zhang, P., Meng, C., Zhan, Y., Tan, L., Song, C., Qiu, X., Wang, G., Liao, Y., Ding, C. Newcastle disease virus induces stable formation of bona fide stress granules to facilitate viral replication through manipulating host protein translation. © FASEB.

  8. Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) facilitates the replication of WSSV in Exopalaemon carinicauda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Li, Shihao; Liu, Guangxing; Li, Fuhua

    2017-06-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) is a vital enzyme in the glycolytic pathway, which can catalyze the interconversion of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). DHAP is involved in lipid metabolism and phospholipid synthesis. In order to know the role of TPI in WSSV infection to prawn, we cloned the full length cDNA of triosephosphate isomerase gene (EcTPI) from Exopalaemon carinicauda, and its function during WSSV infection was analyzed. EcTPI transcripts were widely distributed in all tissues, but showed relatively higher expression levels in the gill and epidermis. Its expression was apparently up-regulated after 24 h post WSSV injection (hpi), when the virus load began to rise. Furthermore, we detected the expressions of the key genes encoding the enzymes which catalyze the key steps in the glycolysis during WSSV infection. The data showed that genes encoding the enzymes which catalyzed upper steps of glycolysis to produce GAP, including hexokinase (HK), glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) and phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK-1), were significantly up-regulated at 24 and 27 hpi. Genes encoding the enzymes catalyzing down steps of glycolysis after GAP, including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), enolase (ENO) and pyruvate kinase (PK), were apparent down-regulated at 24 and 27 hpi. Meanwhile, the gene encoding the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) catalyzing DHAP to glycerol-3-phosphate (G-3-P) showed down-regulation at 12-27 hpi, while the gene encoding dihydroxyacetone-phosphate acyltransferase (DHAPAT) catalyzing DHAP to further synthesis of phospholipids showed up-regulation at 12-24 hpi. These data suggested that WSSV infection could change the glycolysis pathway to make them produce more phospholipids which could be very helpful for virus replication. In order to further confirm the above speculation, dsRNA interference (RNAi) approach was used to knock down EcTPI gene and analyze its effect on WSSV

  9. Enterovirus 71 virion-associated galectin-1 facilitates viral replication and stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Huan Lee

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection causes a myriad of diseases from mild hand-foot-and-mouth disease or herpangina to fatal brain stem encephalitis complicated with pulmonary edema. Several severe EV71 endemics have occurred in Asia-Pacific region, including Taiwan, and have become a serious threat to children's health. EV71 infection is initiated by the attachment of the virion to the target cell surface. Although this process relies primarily upon interaction between viruses and cell surface receptors, soluble factors may also influence the binding of EV71 to host cells. Galectin-1 has been reported to participate in several virus infections, but is not addressed in EV71. In this study, we found that the serum levels of galectin-1 in EV71-infected children were higher than those in non-infected people. In EV71 infected cells, galectin-1 was found to be associated with the EV71 VP1 and VP3 via carbohydrate residues and subsequently released and bound to another cell surface along with the virus. EV71 propagated from galectin-1 knockdown SK-N-SH cells exhibited lower infectivity in cultured cells and less pathogenicity in mice than the virus propagated from parental cells. In addition, this galectin-1-free EV71 virus was sensitive to high temperature and lost its viability after long-term storage, which could be restored following supplement of recombinant galectin-1. Taken together, our findings uncover a new role of galectin-1 in facilitating EV71 virus infection.

  10. Heroin use is associated with lower levels of restriction factors and type I interferon expression and facilitates HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia-Wu; Liu, Feng-Liang; Mu, Dan; Deng, De-Yao; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    Heroin use is associated with increased incidence of infectious diseases such as HIV-1 infection, as a result of immunosuppression to a certain extent. Host restriction factors are recently identified cellular proteins with potent antiviral activities. Whether heroin use impacts on the in vivo expression of restriction factors that result in facilitating HIV-1 replication is poorly understood. Here we recruited 432 intravenous drug users (IDUs) and 164 non-IDUs at high-risk behaviors. Based on serological tests, significantly higher prevalence of HIV-1 infection was observed among IDUs compared with non-IDUs. We included those IDUs and non-IDUs without HIV-1 infection, and found IDUs had significantly lower levels of TRIM5α, TRIM22, APOBEC3G, and IFN-α, -β expression than did non-IDUs. We also directly examined plasma viral load in HIV-1 mono-infected IDUs and non-IDUs and found HIV-1 mono-infected IDUs had significantly higher plasma viral load than did non-IDUs. Moreover, intrinsically positive correlation between type I interferon and TRIM5α or TRIM22 was observed, however, which was dysregulated following heroin use. Collectively, heroin use benefits HIV-1 replication that may be partly due to suppression of host restriction factors and type I interferon expression. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Avian metapneumovirus M2:2 protein inhibits replication in Vero cells: modification facilitates live vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clubbe, Jayne; Naylor, Clive J

    2011-11-28

    Throughout the world, avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) infection of subtype A is principally controlled by two live vaccines both derived from UK field strain #8544. Improvements of those vaccines by use of reverse genetics technology was found to be hampered by the inability of #8544 to replicate in the commonly exploited Vero cell based reverse genetics system. A systematic reverse genetics based genome modification of a DNA copy of #8544, employing sequence data from a Vero grown, #8544 derived, live vaccine; was used to determine mutations required to facilitate virus recovery and replication in Vero cells. This identified a single coding substitution in the M2:2 reading frame as responsible. Furthermore, ablation of M2:2 was found to elicit the same outcome. M2:2 sequence analysis of seven AMPVs found Vero cell adaption to be associated with non similar amino acid changes in M2:2. The study shows that M2:2 modification of field virus #8544 will enable research leading to improved vaccines. This may have more general application to other AMPV field strains. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stepwise translocation of Dpo4 polymerase during error-free bypass of an oxoG lesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Rechkoblit

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (oxoG, the predominant lesion formed following oxidative damage of DNA by reactive oxygen species, is processed differently by replicative and bypass polymerases. Our kinetic primer extension studies demonstrate that the bypass polymerase Dpo4 preferentially inserts C opposite oxoG, and also preferentially extends from the oxoG*C base pair, thus achieving error-free bypass of this lesion. We have determined the crystal structures of preinsertion binary, insertion ternary, and postinsertion binary complexes of oxoG-modified template-primer DNA and Dpo4. These structures provide insights into the translocation mechanics of the bypass polymerase during a complete cycle of nucleotide incorporation. Specifically, during noncovalent dCTP insertion opposite oxoG (or G, the little-finger domain-DNA phosphate contacts translocate by one nucleotide step, while the thumb domain-DNA phosphate contacts remain fixed. By contrast, during the nucleotidyl transfer reaction that covalently incorporates C opposite oxoG, the thumb-domain-phosphate contacts are translocated by one nucleotide step, while the little-finger contacts with phosphate groups remain fixed. These stepwise conformational transitions accompanying nucleoside triphosphate binding and covalent nucleobase incorporation during a full replication cycle of Dpo4-catalyzed bypass of the oxoG lesion are distinct from the translocation events in replicative polymerases.

  13. Facilitering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    2012-01-01

    Facilitering (af latin facilis: gørbart, let at gøre) er den teknik at gøre det lettere for en forsamlet gruppe mennesker at udrette det, den ønsker. Facilitator er en slags mødeleder eller ordstyrer, der bistår gruppen ved at styre formen på deltagernes samtale og interaktion snarere end indholdet...

  14. Error-free 640 Gbit/s demultiplexing using a chalcogenide planar waveguide chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jing; Galili, Michael; Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate error free, low-penalty demultiplexing of a 640 Gbit/s OTDM signal to 10 Gbit/s using a 5cm long chalcogenide planar waveguide chip. Our approach exploits four-wave mixing by the instantaneous nonlinear response of chalcogenide.......We demonstrate error free, low-penalty demultiplexing of a 640 Gbit/s OTDM signal to 10 Gbit/s using a 5cm long chalcogenide planar waveguide chip. Our approach exploits four-wave mixing by the instantaneous nonlinear response of chalcogenide....

  15. Mechanism of error-free DNA synthesis across N1-methyl-deoxyadenosine by human DNA polymerase-ι

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Rinku; Choudhury, Jayati Roy; Buku, Angeliki; Johnson, Robert E.; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya; Aggarwal, Aneel K.

    2017-03-08

    N1-methyl-deoxyadenosine (1-MeA) is formed by methylation of deoxyadenosine at the N1 atom. 1-MeA presents a block to replicative DNA polymerases due to its inability to participate in Watson-Crick (W-C) base pairing. Here we determine how human DNA polymerase-ι (Polι) promotes error-free replication across 1-MeA. Steady state kinetic analyses indicate that Polι is ~100 fold more efficient in incorporating the correct nucleotide T versus the incorrect nucleotide C opposite 1-MeA. To understand the basis of this selectivity, we determined ternary structures of Polι bound to template 1-MeA and incoming dTTP or dCTP. In both structures, template 1-MeA rotates to the syn conformation but pairs differently with dTTP versus dCTP. Thus, whereas dTTP partakes in stable Hoogsteen base pairing with 1-MeA, dCTP fails to gain a “foothold” and is largely disordered. Together, our kinetic and structural studies show how Polι maintains discrimination between correct and incorrect incoming nucleotide opposite 1-MeA in preserving genome integrity.

  16. Post-licensing Specification of Eukaryotic Replication Origins by Facilitated Mcm2-7 Sliding along DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Julien; Kumar, Charanya; Lynch, Gerard; Yadav, Tejas; Whitehouse, Iestyn; Remus, Dirk

    2015-12-03

    Eukaryotic genomes are replicated from many origin sites that are licensed by the loading of the replicative DNA helicase, Mcm2-7. How eukaryotic origin positions are specified remains elusive. Here we show that, contrary to the bacterial paradigm, eukaryotic replication origins are not irrevocably defined by selection of the helicase loading site, but can shift in position after helicase loading. Using purified proteins we show that DNA translocases, including RNA polymerase, can push budding yeast Mcm2-7 double hexamers along DNA. Displaced Mcm2-7 double hexamers support DNA replication initiation distal to the loading site in vitro. Similarly, in yeast cells that are defective for transcription termination, collisions with RNA polymerase induce a redistribution of Mcm2-7 complexes along the chromosomes, resulting in a corresponding shift in DNA replication initiation sites. These results reveal a eukaryotic origin specification mechanism that departs from the classical replicon model, helping eukaryotic cells to negotiate transcription-replication conflict. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cellular Ubc2/Rad6 E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme facilitates tombusvirus replication in yeast and plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imura, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: imura@brs.nihon-u.ac.jp; Molho, Melissa; Chuang, Chingkai; Nagy, Peter D., E-mail: pdnagy2@uky.edu

    2015-10-15

    Mono- and multi-ubiquitination alters the functions and subcellular localization of many cellular and viral proteins. Viruses can co-opt or actively manipulate the ubiquitin network to support viral processes or suppress innate immunity. Using yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) model host, we show that the yeast Rad6p (radiation sensitive 6) E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and its plant ortholog, AtUbc2, interact with two tombusviral replication proteins and these E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes could be co-purified with the tombusvirus replicase. We demonstrate that TBSV RNA replication and the mono- and bi-ubiquitination level of p33 is decreased in rad6Δ yeast. However, plasmid-based expression of AtUbc2p could complement both defects in rad6Δ yeast. Knockdown of UBC2 expression in plants also decreases tombusvirus accumulation and reduces symptom severity, suggesting that Ubc2p is critical for virus replication in plants. We provide evidence that Rad6p is involved in promoting the subversion of Vps23p and Vps4p ESCRT proteins for viral replicase complex assembly. - Highlights: • Tombusvirus p33 replication protein interacts with cellular RAD6/Ubc2 E2 enzymes. • Deletion of RAD6 reduces tombusvirus replication in yeast. • Silencing of UBC2 in plants inhibits tombusvirus replication. • Mono- and bi-ubiquitination of p33 replication protein in yeast and in vitro. • Rad6p promotes the recruitment of cellular ESCRT proteins into the tombusvirus replicase.

  18. PolyC-binding protein 1 interacts with 5'-untranslated region of enterovirus 71 RNA in membrane-associated complex to facilitate viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Luo

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is one causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD, which may lead to severe neurological disorders and mortality in children. EV71 genome is a positive single-stranded RNA containing a single open reading frame (ORF flanked by 5'-untranslated region (5'UTR and 3'UTR. The 5'UTR is fundamentally important for virus replication by interacting with cellular proteins. Here, we revealed that poly(C-binding protein 1 (PCBP1 specifically binds to the 5'UTR of EV71. Detailed studies indicated that the RNA-binding K-homologous 1 (KH1 domain of PCBP1 is responsible for its binding to the stem-loop I and IV of EV71 5'UTR. Interestingly, we revealed that PCBP1 is distributed in the nucleus and cytoplasm of uninfected cells, but mainly localized in the cytoplasm of EV71-infected cells due to interaction and co-localization with the viral RNA. Furthermore, sub-cellular distribution analysis showed that PCBP1 is located in ER-derived membrane, in where virus replication occurred in the cytoplasm of EV71-infected cells, suggesting PCBP1 is recruited in a membrane-associated replication complex. In addition, we found that the binding of PCBP1 to 5'UTR resulted in enhancing EV71 viral protein expression and virus production so as to facilitate viral replication. Thus, we revealed a novel mechanism in which PCBP1 as a positive regulator involved in regulation of EV71 replication in the host specialized membrane-associated replication complex, which provides an insight into cellular factors involved in EV71 replication.

  19. Well begun is half done: Rubella virus perturbs autophagy signaling, thereby facilitating the construction of viral replication compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosz, László; Megyeri, Klára

    2016-04-01

    The rubella virus is the causative agent of postnatal German measles and the congenital rubella syndrome. The majority of the rubella virus replication complexes originate from the endomembrane system. The rubella virus perturbs the signaling pathways regulating the formation of autophagic membranes in the infected cells, including the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways. It is widely accepted that these pathways inhibit autophagy. In contrast, the class III PI3K enzymes are essential for autophagy initiation. By manipulating the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK, class I PI3K/Akt and class III PI3K axes of signal transduction, the rubella virus may differentially regulate the autophagic cascade, with consequent stimulation of the initiation and strong suppression of the later phases. Dysregulation of autophagy by this virus can have a significant impact on the construction of replication compartments by regulating membrane trafficking. We hypothesize that the rubella virus perturbs the autophagic process in order to prevent the degradation of the virus progeny, and to ensure its replication by hijacking omegasomes for the construction of the replication complexes. The virus is therefore able to utilize an antiviral mechanism to its own advantage. Therapeutic modalities targeting the autophagic process may help to ameliorate the serious consequences of the congenital rubella syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Separable and Error-Free Reversible Data Hiding in Encrypted Image with High Payload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxia Yin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a separable reversible data-hiding scheme in encrypted image which offers high payload and error-free data extraction. The cover image is partitioned into nonoverlapping blocks and multigranularity encryption is applied to obtain the encrypted image. The data hider preprocesses the encrypted image and randomly selects two basic pixels in each block to estimate the block smoothness and indicate peak points. Additional data are embedded into blocks in the sorted order of block smoothness by using local histogram shifting under the guidance of the peak points. At the receiver side, image decryption and data extraction are separable and can be free to choose. Compared to previous approaches, the proposed method is simpler in calculation while offering better performance: larger payload, better embedding quality, and error-free data extraction, as well as image recovery.

  1. The proteasomal Rpn11 metalloprotease suppresses tombusvirus RNA recombination and promotes viral replication via facilitating assembly of the viral replicase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Barajas, Daniel; Nagy, Peter D

    2015-03-01

    RNA viruses co-opt a large number of cellular proteins that affect virus replication and, in some cases, viral genetic recombination. RNA recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Tombusviruses and a yeast model host are used to identify cellular factors affecting RNA virus replication and RNA recombination. In this study, we have examined the role of the conserved Rpn11p metalloprotease subunit of the proteasome, which couples deubiquitination and degradation of proteasome substrates, in tombusvirus replication and recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and plants. Depletion or mutations of Rpn11p lead to the rapid formation of viral RNA recombinants in combination with reduced levels of viral RNA replication in yeast or in vitro based on cell extracts. Rpn11p interacts with the viral replication proteins and is recruited to the viral replicase complex (VRC). Analysis of the multifunctional Rpn11p has revealed that the primary role of Rpn11p is to act as a "matchmaker" that brings the viral p92(pol) replication protein and the DDX3-like Ded1p/RH20 DEAD box helicases into VRCs. Overexpression of Ded1p can complement the defect observed in rpn11 mutant yeast by reducing TBSV recombination. This suggests that Rpn11p can suppress tombusvirus recombination via facilitating the recruitment of the cellular Ded1p helicase, which is a strong suppressor of viral recombination, into VRCs. Overall, this work demonstrates that the co-opted Rpn11p, which is involved in the assembly of the functional proteasome, also functions in the proper assembly of the tombusvirus VRCs. RNA viruses evolve rapidly due to genetic changes based on mutations and RNA recombination. Viral genetic recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and facilitates adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Cellular factors affect viral RNA recombination, although the role

  2. Error Free Quantum Reading by Quasi Bell State of Entangled Coherent States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirota Osamu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nonclassical states of light field have been exploited to provide marvellous results in quantum information science. Usefulness of nonclassical states in quantum information science depends on whether a physical parameter as a signal is continuous or discrete. Here we present an investigation of the potential of quasi Bell states of entangled coherent states in quantum reading of the classical digital memory which was pioneered by Pirandola (Phys.Rev.Lett.,106,090504,2011. This is a typical example of discrimination for discrete quantum parameters. We show that the quasi Bell state gives the error free performance in the quantum reading that cannot be obtained by any classical state.

  3. Error Free Quantum Reading by Quasi Bell State of Entangled Coherent States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Osamu

    2017-12-01

    Nonclassical states of light field have been exploited to provide marvellous results in quantum information science. Usefulness of nonclassical states in quantum information science depends on whether a physical parameter as a signal is continuous or discrete. Here we present an investigation of the potential of quasi Bell states of entangled coherent states in quantum reading of the classical digital memory which was pioneered by Pirandola (Phys.Rev.Lett.,106,090504,2011). This is a typical example of discrimination for discrete quantum parameters. We show that the quasi Bell state gives the error free performance in the quantum reading that cannot be obtained by any classical state.

  4. Mechanism of Error-Free Bypass of the Environmental Carcinogen N-(2'-Deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-3-aminobenzanthrone Adduct by Human DNA Polymerase η.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Amritraj; Politica, Dustin A; Chatterjee, Arindom; Tokarsky, E John; Suo, Zucai; Basu, Ashis K; Stone, Michael P; Egli, Martin

    2016-11-03

    The environmental pollutant 3-nitrobenzanthrone produces bulky aminobenzanthrone (ABA) DNA adducts with both guanine and adenine nucleobases. A major product occurs at the C8 position of guanine (C8-dG-ABA). These adducts present a strong block to replicative polymerases but, remarkably, can be bypassed in a largely error-free manner by the human Y-family polymerase η (hPol η). Here, we report the crystal structure of a ternary Pol⋅DNA⋅dCTP complex between a C8-dG-ABA-containing template:primer duplex and hPol η. The complex was captured at the insertion stage and provides crucial insight into the mechanism of error-free bypass of this bulky lesion. Specifically, bypass involves accommodation of the ABA moiety inside a hydrophobic cleft to the side of the enzyme active site and formation of an intra-nucleotide hydrogen bond between the phosphate and ABA amino moiety, allowing the adducted guanine to form a standard Watson-Crick pair with the incoming dCTP. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. RNA Binding Protein RBM38 Regulates Expression of the 11-kDa Protein of Parvovirus B19 which Facilitates Viral DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganaie, Safder S; Chen, Aaron Yun; Huang, Chun; Xu, Peng; Kleiboeker, Steve; Du, Aifang; Qiu, Jianming

    2018-02-07

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) expresses a single precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), which undergoes alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation to generate 12 viral mRNA transcripts that encode two structural proteins (VP1 and VP2) and three nonstructural proteins (NS1, 7.5-kDa, and 11-kDa). Splicing at the second 5' donor site (D2) of the B19V pre-mRNA is essential for the expression of VP2 and 11-kDa. We have previously identified that a cis -acting intronic splicing enhancer 2 (ISE2) that lies immediately after the D2 site facilitates recognition of the D2 donor for its efficient splicing. In this study, we report that ISE2 is critical for expression of the 11-kDa viral non-structural protein. We found that ISE2 harbors a consensus RNA-binding motif protein 38 (RBM38) binding sequence-5' -UGUGUG-3'. RBM38 is expressed during the middle stage of erythropoiesis. We first confirmed that the RBM38 binds specifically with the ISE2 element in vitro. Knockdown of RBM38 significantly decreases the level of the spliced mRNA at D2 that encodes 11-kDa protein and, thereafter, expression of the 11-kDa protein, but not the D2-spliced mRNA that encodes VP2. Importantly, we found that the 11-kDa protein enhances viral DNA replication and virion release. Accordingly, knockdown of RBM38 decreases virus replication via downregulating 11-kDa expression. Taken together, these results suggest that the 11-kDa protein facilitates B19V DNA replication, and that RBM38 is an essential host factor for B19V pre-mRNA splicing and for the expression of the 11-kDa protein. IMPORTANCE B19V is a human pathogen that can cause fifth disease, arthropathy, anemia in immune compromised patients and sickle cell disease patients, myocarditis, and hydrops fetalis in pregnant women. Human erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) are most susceptible to B19V infection and fully support viral DNA replication. The exclusive tropism of B19V to erythroid lineage cells is not only dependent on the expression of viral

  6. A Salmonella small non-coding RNA facilitates bacterial invasion and intracellular replication by modulating the expression of virulence factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Gong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs that act as regulators of gene expression have been identified in all kingdoms of life, including microRNA (miRNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA in eukaryotic cells. Numerous sRNAs identified in Salmonella are encoded by genes located at Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs that are commonly found in pathogenic strains. Whether these sRNAs are important for Salmonella pathogenesis and virulence in animals has not been reported. In this study, we provide the first direct evidence that a pathogenicity island-encoded sRNA, IsrM, is important for Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells, intracellular replication inside macrophages, and virulence and colonization in mice. IsrM RNA is expressed in vitro under conditions resembling those during infection in the gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, IsrM is found to be differentially expressed in vivo, with higher expression in the ileum than in the spleen. IsrM targets the mRNAs coding for SopA, a SPI-1 effector, and HilE, a global regulator of the expression of SPI-1 proteins, which are major virulence factors essential for bacterial invasion. Mutations in IsrM result in disregulation of expression of HilE and SopA, as well as other SPI-1 genes whose expression is regulated by HilE. Salmonella with deletion of isrM is defective in bacteria invasion of epithelial cells and intracellular replication/survival in macrophages. Moreover, Salmonella with mutations in isrM is attenuated in killing animals and defective in growth in the ileum and spleen in mice. Our study has shown that IsrM sRNA functions as a pathogenicity island-encoded sRNA directly involved in Salmonella pathogenesis in animals. Our results also suggest that sRNAs may represent a distinct class of virulence factors that are important for bacterial infection in vivo.

  7. The Salmonella effectors SseF and SseG inhibit Rab1A-mediated autophagy to facilitate intracellular bacterial survival and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhao-Zhong; Jiang, An-Jie; Mao, An-Wen; Feng, Yuhan; Wang, Weinan; Li, Jingjing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xing, Ke; Peng, Xue

    2018-04-02

    In mammalian cells, autophagy plays crucial roles in restricting further spread of invading bacterial pathogens. Previous studies have established that the Salmonella virulence factors SseF and SseG are required for intracellular bacterial survival and replication. However, the underlying mechanism by which these two effectors facilitate bacterial infection remains elusive. Here, we report that SseF and SseG secreted by Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) inhibit autophagy in host cells and thereby establish a replicative niche for the bacteria in the cytosol. Mechanistically, SseF and SseG impaired autophagy initiation by directly interacting with the small GTPase Rab1A in the host cell. This interaction abolished Rab1A activation by disrupting the interaction with its guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), the TRAPPIII ( abbreviation for the transport protein particle III ) complex. This disruption of Rab1A signaling blocked the recruitment and activation of Unc51 like autophagy activating kinase 1 (ULK1) and decreased phosphatidylinositol 3 phosphate biogenesis, which ultimately impeded autophagosome formation. Furthermore, SseF or SseG deficient bacterial strains exhibited reduced survival and growth in both mammalian cell lines and mouse infection models, and Rab1A depletion could rescue these defects. These results reveal that virulence factor dependent inactivation of the small GTPase Rab1A represents a previously unrecognized strategy of S. Typhimurium to evade autophagy and the host defense system. Copyright © 2018, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. The glycoprotein and the matrix protein of rabies virus affect pathogenicity by regulating viral replication and facilitating cell-to-cell spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmanausahakul, Rojjanaporn; Li, Jianwei; Schnell, Matthias J; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    2008-03-01

    While the glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (RV) is known to play a predominant role in the pathogenesis of rabies, the function of the RV matrix protein (M) in RV pathogenicity is not completely clear. To further investigate the roles of these proteins in viral pathogenicity, we constructed chimeric recombinant viruses by exchanging the G and M genes of the attenuated SN strain with those of the highly pathogenic SB strain. Infection of mice with these chimeric viruses revealed a significant increase in the pathogenicity of the SN strain bearing the RV G from the pathogenic SB strain. Moreover, the pathogenicity was further increased when both G and M from SB were introduced into SN. Interestingly, the replacement of the G or M gene or both in SN by the corresponding genes of SB was associated with a significant decrease in the rate of viral replication and viral RNA synthesis. In addition, a chimeric SN virus bearing both the M and G genes from SB exhibited more efficient cell-to-cell spread than a chimeric SN virus in which only the G gene was replaced. Together, these data indicate that both G and M play an important role in RV pathogenesis by regulating virus replication and facilitating cell-to-cell spread.

  9. The Glycoprotein and the Matrix Protein of Rabies Virus Affect Pathogenicity by Regulating Viral Replication and Facilitating Cell-to-Cell Spread▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmanausahakul, Rojjanaporn; Li, Jianwei; Schnell, Matthias J.; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    While the glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (RV) is known to play a predominant role in the pathogenesis of rabies, the function of the RV matrix protein (M) in RV pathogenicity is not completely clear. To further investigate the roles of these proteins in viral pathogenicity, we constructed chimeric recombinant viruses by exchanging the G and M genes of the attenuated SN strain with those of the highly pathogenic SB strain. Infection of mice with these chimeric viruses revealed a significant increase in the pathogenicity of the SN strain bearing the RV G from the pathogenic SB strain. Moreover, the pathogenicity was further increased when both G and M from SB were introduced into SN. Interestingly, the replacement of the G or M gene or both in SN by the corresponding genes of SB was associated with a significant decrease in the rate of viral replication and viral RNA synthesis. In addition, a chimeric SN virus bearing both the M and G genes from SB exhibited more efficient cell-to-cell spread than a chimeric SN virus in which only the G gene was replaced. Together, these data indicate that both G and M play an important role in RV pathogenesis by regulating virus replication and facilitating cell-to-cell spread. PMID:18094173

  10. Cloning of replication-incompetent herpes simplex viruses as bacterial artificial chromosomes to facilitate development of vectors for gene delivery into differentiated neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeisser, Falko; Weir, Jerry P

    2006-01-01

    We have previously described the adaptation of a tetracycline-regulated system of gene expression for herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors and demonstrated that such a system was capable of inducible foreign gene expression in irreversibly differentiated neurons. These studies suggested that such gene delivery vectors would be especially useful for studying the neuron in vitro. Here, we describe the cloning of a replication-incompetent HSV vector as a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) to facilitate vector construction. Using prokaryotic genetic techniques for allele replacement, we demonstrate the ease of manipulation of the BAC-containing vector, including the construction of vector mutations for which there is no simple phenotypic selection. Such constructions include the insertion of a tetracycline-regulated gene cassette into the UL41 gene for regulated gene expression and the mutation of the UL48 gene to reduce vector toxicity. In addition, HSV vectors cloned as BACs can be sequentially modified to make multiple changes to the vector platform. Finally, using the BAC system, we constructed an HSV vector that expressed an inducible human superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) gene for delivery into differentiated human NT-neurons (cells of the human embryonal carcinoma cell line NT2, which differentiate irreversibly into postmitotic neuron-like cells after treatment with retinoic acid). The results indicated that there is appreciable expression of SOD1 from this HSV vector in the presence of doxycycline and that vector-expressed SOD1 interacts with endogenous SOD1. Thus, the BAC system provides a practicable platform for construction and manipulation of HSV vectors that are suitable for gene delivery into postmitotic neurons in vitro.

  11. Optical Waveform Sampling and Error-Free Demultiplexing of 1.28 Tb/s Serial Data in a Nanoengineered Silicon Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ji, Hua; Pu, Minhao; Hu, Hao

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental demonstrations of using a pure nanoengineered silicon waveguide for 1.28 Tb/s serial data optical waveform sampling and 1.28 Tb/s–10 Gb/s error free demultiplexing. The 330-fs pulses are resolved in each 780-fs time slot in waveform sampling. Error......-free operation is achieved in the 1.28 Tb/s–10 Gb/s demultiplexing....

  12. Error-free 5.1 Tbit/s data generation on a single-wavelength channel using a 1.28 Tbaud symbol rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen; Galili, Michael; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a record bit rate of 5.1 Tbit/s on a single wavelength using a 1.28 Tbaud OTDM symbol rate, DQPSK data-modulation, and polarisation-multiplexing. Error-free performance (BER......We demonstrate a record bit rate of 5.1 Tbit/s on a single wavelength using a 1.28 Tbaud OTDM symbol rate, DQPSK data-modulation, and polarisation-multiplexing. Error-free performance (BER...

  13. Replication Catastrophe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledo, Luis; Neelsen, Kai John; Lukas, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    Proliferating cells rely on the so-called DNA replication checkpoint to ensure orderly completion of genome duplication, and its malfunction may lead to catastrophic genome disruption, including unscheduled firing of replication origins, stalling and collapse of replication forks, massive DNA...... increased DNA replication stress....

  14. Suppression of the toll-like receptor 7-dependent type I interferon production pathway by autophagy resulting from enterovirus 71 and coxsackievirus A16 infections facilitates their replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie; Hu, Yajie; Li, Jiaqi; Zheng, Huiwen; Wang, Jingjing; Guo, Lei; Shi, Haijng; Liu, Longding

    2018-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) act as molecular sentinels, detecting invading viral pathogens and triggering host innate immune responses, including autophagy. However, many viruses have evolved a series of strategies to manipulate autophagy for their own benefit. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), as the primary agents causing hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), can induce autophagy leading to their replication. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate whether enhanced viral replication caused by autophagy in EV71 and CA16 infections was associated with a TLR-related signaling pathway. Our results demonstrate that complete autophagy and incomplete autophagy were observed in human bronchial epithelial (16HBE) cells infected with EV71 and CA16. Moreover, suppression of autophagy by the pharmacological modulator 3-MA significantly and clearly decreased the survival rates and viral replication of EV71 and CA16 in 16HBE cells. Inhibition of autophagy also enhanced the expression of molecules related to the TLR7-dependent type I interferon (IFN-I) production pathway, such as TLR7, MyD88, IRF7 and IFN-α/β. Finally, immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that TLR7 endosome marker M6PR levels were clearly reduced in EV71- and CA16-infected cells, while they were markedly elevated in infected cells treated with 3-MA. These findings suggest that increased EV71 and CA16 replication meditated by autophagy in 16HBE cells might promote degradation of the endosome, leading to suppression of the TLR7-mediated IFN-I signaling pathway.

  15. Fluorescent reporter signals, EGFP and DsRed, encoded in HIV-1 facilitate the detection of productively infected cells and cell-associated viral replication levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka eTerahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric analysis is a reliable and convenient method for investigating molecules at the single cell level. Previously, recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strains were constructed that express a fluorescent reporter, either enhanced green fluorescent protein or DsRed, which allow the monitoring of HIV-1-infected cells by flow cytometry. The present study further investigated the potential of these recombinant viruses in terms of whether the HIV-1 fluorescent reporters would be helpful in evaluating viral replication based on fluorescence intensity. When primary CD4+ T cells were infected with recombinant viruses, the fluorescent reporter intensity measured by flow cytometry was associated with the level of CD4 downmodulation and Gag p24 expression in infected cells. Interestingly, some HIV-1-infected cells, in which CD4 was only moderately downmodulated, were reporter-positive but Gag p24-negative. Furthermore, when the activation status of primary CD4+ T cells was modulated by T cell receptor-mediated stimulation, we confirmed the preferential viral production upon strong stimulation and showed that the intensity of the fluorescent reporter within a proportion of HIV-1-infected cells was correlated with the viral replication level. These findings indicate that a fluorescent reporter encoded within HIV-1 is useful for the sensitive detection of productively-infected cells at different stages of infection and for evaluating cell-associated viral replication at the single cell level.

  16. α-Synuclein Amyloids Hijack Prion Protein to Gain Cell Entry, Facilitate Cell-to-Cell Spreading and Block Prion Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulić, Suzana; Masperone, Lara; Narkiewicz, Joanna; Isopi, Elisa; Bistaffa, Edoardo; Ambrosetti, Elena; Pastore, Beatrice; De Cecco, Elena; Scaini, Denis; Zago, Paola; Moda, Fabio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Legname, Giuseppe

    2017-08-30

    The precise molecular mechanism of how misfolded α-synuclein (α-Syn) accumulates and spreads in synucleinopathies is still unknown. Here, we show the role of the cellular prion protein (PrP C ) in mediating the uptake and the spread of recombinant α-Syn amyloids. The in vitro data revealed that the presence of PrP C fosters the higher uptake of α-Syn amyloid fibrils, which was also confirmed in vivo in wild type (Prnp +/+ ) compared to PrP knock-out (Prnp -/- ) mice. Additionally, the presence of α-Syn amyloids blocked the replication of scrapie prions (PrP Sc ) in vitro and ex vivo, indicating a link between the two proteins. Indeed, whilst PrP C is mediating the internalization of α-Syn amyloids, PrP Sc is not able to replicate in their presence. This observation has pathological relevance, since several reported case studies show that the accumulation of α-Syn amyloid deposits in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients is accompanied by a longer disease course.

  17. Demonstration of error-free 25Gb/s duobinary transmission using a colourless reflective integrated modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Caroline P; Naughton, Alan; Ossieur, Peter; Antony, Cleitus; Smith, David W; Borghesani, Anna; Moodie, David G; Maxwell, Graeme; Healey, Peter; Poustie, Alistair; Townsend, Paul D

    2013-01-14

    To realise novel, low-cost, photonic technologies that can support 100Gb/s Ethernet in next-generation dense wavelength-division-multiplexed metro transport networks, we are developing arrayed photonic integrated circuits that leverage colourless reflective modulators. Here, we demonstrate a single-channel, hybrid reflective electroabsorption modulator-based device, showing error-free 25.3Gb/s duobinary transmission with bit-error rates less than 1 × 10(-12) over 35km of standard single-mode fibre. We further confirm the modulator's colourless operation over the ITU C-band, with a 1.2dB variation in required optical signal-to-noise ratio over this wavelength range.

  18. Forward error correction supported 150 Gbit/s error-free wavelength conversion based on cross phase modulation in silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Hao; Andersen, Jakob Dahl; Rasmussen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    We build a forward error correction (FEC) module and implement it in an optical signal processing experiment. The experiment consists of two cascaded nonlinear optical signal processes, 160 Gbit/s all optical wavelength conversion based on the cross phase modulation (XPM) in a silicon nanowire...... and subsequent 160 Gbit/s-to-10 Gbit/s demultiplexing in a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF). The XPM based all optical wavelength conversion in silicon is achieved by off-center filtering the red shifted sideband on the CW probe. We thoroughly demonstrate and verify that the FEC code operates correctly after...... the optical signal processing, yielding truly error-free 150 Gbit/s (excl. overhead) optically signal processed data after the two cascaded nonlinear processes. © 2013 Optical Society of America....

  19. DNA Virus Replication Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Melanie; Speiseder, Thomas; Dobner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Viruses employ a variety of strategies to usurp and control cellular activities through the orchestrated recruitment of macromolecules to specific cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Formation of such specialized virus-induced cellular microenvironments, which have been termed viroplasms, virus factories, or virus replication centers, complexes, or compartments, depends on molecular interactions between viral and cellular factors that participate in viral genome expression and replication and are in some cases associated with sites of virion assembly. These virus-induced compartments function not only to recruit and concentrate factors required for essential steps of the viral replication cycle but also to control the cellular mechanisms of antiviral defense. In this review, we summarize characteristic features of viral replication compartments from different virus families and discuss similarities in the viral and cellular activities that are associated with their assembly and the functions they facilitate for viral replication. PMID:24257611

  20. GAPDH--a recruits a plant virus movement protein to cortical virus replication complexes to facilitate viral cell-to-cell movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Kaido

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation of virus movement protein (MP-containing punctate structures on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum is required for efficient intercellular movement of Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV, a bipartite positive-strand RNA plant virus. We found that these cortical punctate structures constitute a viral replication complex (VRC in addition to the previously reported aggregate structures that formed adjacent to the nucleus. We identified host proteins that interacted with RCNMV MP in virus-infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using a tandem affinity purification method followed by mass spectrometry. One of these host proteins was glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-A (NbGAPDH-A, which is a component of the Calvin-Benson cycle in chloroplasts. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A reduced RCNMV multiplication in the inoculated leaves, but not in the single cells, thereby suggesting that GAPDH-A plays a positive role in cell-to-cell movement of RCNMV. The fusion protein of NbGAPDH-A and green fluorescent protein localized exclusively to the chloroplasts. In the presence of RCNMV RNA1, however, the protein localized to the cortical VRC as well as the chloroplasts. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay and GST pulldown assay confirmed in vivo and in vitro interactions, respectively, between the MP and NbGAPDH-A. Furthermore, gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A inhibited MP localization to the cortical VRC. We discuss the possible roles of NbGAPDH-A in the RCNMV movement process.

  1. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress.

  2. Error-free Dispersion-uncompensated Transmission at 20 Gb/s over SSMF using a Hybrid III-V/SOI DML with MRR Filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina; Kamchevska, Valerija; Ding, Yunhong

    2016-01-01

    Error-free 20-Gb/s directly-modulated transmission is achieved by enhancing the dispersion tolerance of a III-V/SOI DFB laser with a silicon micro-ring resonator. Low (∼0.4 dB) penalty compared to back-to-back without ring is demonstrated after 5-km SSMF....

  3. Database Replication

    CERN Document Server

    Kemme, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Database replication is widely used for fault-tolerance, scalability and performance. The failure of one database replica does not stop the system from working as available replicas can take over the tasks of the failed replica. Scalability can be achieved by distributing the load across all replicas, and adding new replicas should the load increase. Finally, database replication can provide fast local access, even if clients are geographically distributed clients, if data copies are located close to clients. Despite its advantages, replication is not a straightforward technique to apply, and

  4. Database Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Cristian MAZILU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available For someone who has worked in an environment in which the same database is used for data entry and reporting, or perhaps managed a single database server that was utilized by too many users, the advantages brought by data replication are clear. The main purpose of this paper is to emphasize those advantages as well as presenting the different types of Database Replication and the cases in which their use is recommended.

  5. A Novel Rrm3 Function in Restricting DNA Replication via an Orc5-Binding Domain Is Genetically Separable from Rrm3 Function as an ATPase/Helicase in Facilitating Fork Progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syed, Salahuddin; Madsen, Claus Desler; Rasmussen, Lene J.

    2016-01-01

    In response to replication stress cells activate the intra-S checkpoint, induce DNA repair pathways, increase nucleotide levels, and inhibit origin firing. Here, we report that Rrm3 associates with a subset of replication origins and controls DNA synthesis during replication stress. The N...... Rrm3 function are distinct. Although both lesion types activate the DNA-damage checkpoint, we find that the resultant increase in nucleotide levels is not sufficient for continued DNA synthesis under replication stress. Together, our findings suggest a role of Rrm3, via its Orc5-binding domain...

  6. Ultrafast all-optical switching and error-free 10 Gbit/s wavelength conversion in hybrid InP-silicon on insulator nanocavities using surface quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazin, Alexandre; Monnier, Paul; Beaudoin, Grégoire; Sagnes, Isabelle; Raj, Rama; Lenglé, Kevin; Gay, Mathilde; Bramerie, Laurent; Braive, Rémy; Raineri, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafast switching with low energies is demonstrated using InP photonic crystal nanocavities embedding InGaAs surface quantum wells heterogeneously integrated to a silicon on insulator waveguide circuitry. Thanks to the engineered enhancement of surface non radiative recombination of carriers, switching time is obtained to be as fast as 10 ps. These hybrid nanostructures are shown to be capable of achieving systems level performance by demonstrating error free wavelength conversion at 10 Gbit/s with 6 mW switching powers

  7. CENTRIOLE REPLICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Ikuko; Gall, Joseph

    1966-01-01

    Sperm formation was studied in the fern, Marsilea, and the cycad, Zamia, with particular emphasis on the centrioles. In Marsilea, the mature sperm possesses over 100 flagella, the basal bodies of which have the typical cylindrical structure of centrioles. Earlier observations by light microscopy suggested that these centrioles arise by fragmentation of a body known as the blepharoplast. In the youngest spermatids the blepharoplast is a hollow sphere approximately 0.8 µ in diameter. Its wall consists of closely packed immature centrioles, or procentrioles. The procentrioles are short cylinders which progressively lengthen during differentiation of the spermatid. At the same time they migrate to the surface of the cell, where each of them puts out a flagellum. A blepharoplast is found at each pole of the spindle during the last antheridial mitosis, and two blepharoplasts are found in the cytoplasm before this mitosis. Blepharoplasts are also found in the preceding cell generation, but their ultimate origin is obscure. Before the last mitosis the blepharoplasts are solid, consisting of a cluster of radially arranged tubules which bear some structural similarity to centrioles. In Zamia, similar stages are found during sperm formation, although here the number of flagella on each sperm is close to 20,000 and the blepharoplast measures about 10 µ in diameter. These observations are discussed in relation to theories of centriole replication. PMID:5950730

  8. Overcoming natural replication barriers: differential helicase requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ranjith P; Shah, Kartik A; Niu, Hengyao; Sung, Patrick; Mirkin, Sergei M; Freudenreich, Catherine H

    2012-02-01

    DNA sequences that form secondary structures or bind protein complexes are known barriers to replication and potential inducers of genome instability. In order to determine which helicases facilitate DNA replication across these barriers, we analyzed fork progression through them in wild-type and mutant yeast cells, using 2-dimensional gel-electrophoretic analysis of the replication intermediates. We show that the Srs2 protein facilitates replication of hairpin-forming CGG/CCG repeats and prevents chromosome fragility at the repeat, whereas it does not affect replication of G-quadruplex forming sequences or a protein-bound repeat. Srs2 helicase activity is required for hairpin unwinding and fork progression. Also, the PCNA binding domain of Srs2 is required for its in vivo role of replication through hairpins. In contrast, the absence of Sgs1 or Pif1 helicases did not inhibit replication through structural barriers, though Pif1 did facilitate replication of a telomeric protein barrier. Interestingly, replication through a protein barrier but not a DNA structure barrier was modulated by nucleotide pool levels, illuminating a different mechanism by which cells can regulate fork progression through protein-mediated stall sites. Our analyses reveal fundamental differences in the replication of DNA structural versus protein barriers, with Srs2 helicase activity exclusively required for fork progression through hairpin structures.

  9. Comparative Error-Free and Error-Prone Translesion Synthesis of N(2)-2'-Deoxyguanosine Adducts Formed by Mitomycin C and Its Metabolite, 2,7-Diaminomitosene, in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Arindam; Surugihalli, Chaitra; Pande, Paritosh; Champeil, Elise; Basu, Ashis K

    2016-05-16

    Mitomycin C (MC) is a cytotoxic and mutagenic antitumor agent that alkylates DNA upon reductive activation. 2,7-Diaminomitosene (2,7-DAM) is a major metabolite of MC in tumor cells, which also alkylates DNA. MC forms seven DNA adducts, including monoadducts and inter- and intrastrand cross-links, whereas 2,7-DAM forms two monoadducts. Herein, the biological effects of the dG-N(2) adducts formed by MC and 2,7-DAM have been compared by constructing single-stranded plasmids containing these adducts and replicating them in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Translesion synthesis (TLS) efficiencies of dG-N(2)-MC and dG-N(2)-2,7-DAM were 38 ± 3 and 27 ± 3%, respectively, compared to that of a control plasmid. This indicates that both adducts block DNA synthesis and that dG-N(2)-2,7-DAM is a stronger replication block than dG-N(2)-MC. TLS of each adducted construct was reduced upon siRNA knockdown of pol η, pol κ, or pol ζ. For both adducts, the most significant reduction occurred with knockdown of pol κ, which suggests that pol κ plays a major role in TLS of these dG-N(2) adducts. Analysis of the progeny showed that both adducts were mutagenic, and the mutation frequencies (MF) of dG-N(2)-MC and dG-N(2)-2,7-DAM were 18 ± 3 and 10 ± 1%, respectively. For both adducts, the major type of mutation was G → T transversions. Knockdown of pol η and pol ζ reduced the MF of dG-N(2)-MC and dG-N(2)-2,7-DAM, whereas knockdown of pol κ increased the MF of these adducts. This suggests that pol κ predominantly carries out error-free TLS, whereas pol η and pol ζ are involved in error-prone TLS. The largest reduction in MF by 78 and 80%, respectively, for dG-N(2)-MC and dG-N(2)-2,7-DAM constructs occurred when pol η, pol ζ, and Rev1 were simultaneously knocked down. This result strongly suggests that, unlike pol κ, these three TLS polymerases cooperatively perform the error-prone TLS of these adducts.

  10. PTEN Regulates DNA Replication Progression and Stalled Fork Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinxue; Kang, Xi; Yin, Yuxin; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Shen, Wen H.

    2015-01-01

    Faithful DNA replication is a cornerstone of genomic integrity. PTEN plays multiple roles in genome protection and tumor suppression. Here we report on the importance of PTEN in DNA replication. PTEN depletion leads to impairment of replication progression and stalled fork recovery, indicating an elevation of endogenous replication stress. Exogenous replication inhibition aggravates replication-originated DNA lesions without inducing S-phase arrest in cells lacking PTEN, representing replication stress tolerance. Our analysis reveals the physical association of PTEN with DNA replication forks and PTEN-dependent recruitment of Rad51. PTEN deletion results in Rad51 dissociation from replication forks. Stalled replication forks in Pten null cells can be reactivated by ectopic Rad51 or PTEN, the latter facilitating chromatin loading of Rad51. These data highlight the interplay of PTEN with Rad51 in promoting stalled fork restart. We propose that loss of PTEN may initiate a replication stress cascade that progressively deteriorates through the cell cycle. PMID:26158445

  11. Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction to detect epistasis for quantitative traits in the presence of error-free and noisy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahachie John, Jestinah M; Van Lishout, François; Van Steen, Kristel

    2011-06-01

    Detecting gene-gene interactions or epistasis in studies of human complex diseases is a big challenge in the area of epidemiology. To address this problem, several methods have been developed, mainly in the context of data dimensionality reduction. One of these methods, Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction, has so far mainly been applied to case-control studies. In this study, we evaluate the power of Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction for quantitative traits to detect gene-gene interactions (epistasis) in the presence of error-free and noisy data. Considered sources of error are genotyping errors, missing genotypes, phenotypic mixtures and genetic heterogeneity. Our simulation study encompasses a variety of settings with varying minor allele frequencies and genetic variance for different epistasis models. On each simulated data, we have performed Model-Based Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction in two ways: with and without adjustment for main effects of (known) functional SNPs. In line with binary trait counterparts, our simulations show that the power is lowest in the presence of phenotypic mixtures or genetic heterogeneity compared to scenarios with missing genotypes or genotyping errors. In addition, empirical power estimates reduce even further with main effects corrections, but at the same time, false-positive percentages are reduced as well. In conclusion, phenotypic mixtures and genetic heterogeneity remain challenging for epistasis detection, and careful thought must be given to the way important lower-order effects are accounted for in the analysis.

  12. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand Roesch

    Full Text Available HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  13. “Direct modulation of a hybrid III-V/Si DFB laser with MRR filtering for 22.5-Gb/s error-free dispersion-uncompensated transmission over 2.5-km SSMF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina; Da Ros, Francesco; Ding, Yunhong

    2016-01-01

    Error-free and penalty-free transmission over 2.5 km SSMF of a 22.5 Gb/s data signal from a directly modulated hybrid III-V/Si DFB laser is achieved by enhancing the dispersion tolerance using a silicon micro-ring resonator....

  14. Histone H2B mono-ubiquitylation maintains genomic integrity at stalled replication forks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, Matthew R.; Trujillo, Kelly M.

    2016-01-01

    Histone modifications play an important role in regulating access to DNA for transcription, DNA repair and DNA replication. A central player in these events is the mono-ubiquitylation of histone H2B (H2Bub1), which has been shown to regulate nucleosome dynamics. Previously, it was shown that H2Bub1 was important for nucleosome assembly onto nascent DNA at active replication forks. In the absence of H2Bub1, incomplete chromatin structures resulted in several replication defects. Here, we report new evidence, which shows that loss of H2Bub1 contributes to genomic instability in yeast. Specifically, we demonstrate that H2Bub1-deficient yeast accumulate mutations at a high frequency under conditions of replicative stress. This phenotype is due to an aberrant DNA Damage Tolerance (DDT) response upon fork stalling. We show that H2Bub1 normally functions to promote error-free translesion synthesis (TLS) mediated by DNA polymerase eta (Polη). Without H2Bub1, DNA polymerase zeta (Polζ) is responsible for a highly mutagenic alternative mechanism. While H2Bub1 does not appear to regulate other DDT pathways, error-free DDT mechanisms are employed by H2Bub1-deficient cells as another means for survival. However, in these instances, the anti-recombinase, Srs2, is essential to prevent the accumulation of toxic HR intermediates that arise in an unconstrained chromatin environment. PMID:27458205

  15. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... to promote genome integrity during DNA replication. This includes suppressing new replication origin firing, stabilization of replicating forks, and the safe restart of forks to prevent any loss of genetic information. Here, we describe mechanisms by which oncogenes can interfere with DNA replication thereby...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  16. Tunable error-free optical frequency conversion of a 4ps optical short pulse over 25 nm by four-wave mixing in a polarisation-maintaining optical fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, T.; Kawanishi, S.; Saruwatari, M.

    1994-05-01

    Error-free, tunable optical frequency conversion of a transform-limited 4.0 ps optical pulse signalis demonstrated at 6.3 Gbit/s using four-wave mixing in a polarization-maintaining optical fibre. The process generates 4.0-4.6 ps pulses over a 25nm range with time-bandwidth products of 0.31-0.43 and conversion power penalties of less than 1.5 dB.

  17. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  18. Chromatin Controls DNA Replication Origin Selection, Lagging-Strand Synthesis, and Replication Fork Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurat, Christoph F; Yeeles, Joseph T P; Patel, Harshil; Early, Anne; Diffley, John F X

    2017-01-05

    The integrity of eukaryotic genomes requires rapid and regulated chromatin replication. How this is accomplished is still poorly understood. Using purified yeast replication proteins and fully chromatinized templates, we have reconstituted this process in vitro. We show that chromatin enforces DNA replication origin specificity by preventing non-specific MCM helicase loading. Helicase activation occurs efficiently in the context of chromatin, but subsequent replisome progression requires the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription). The FACT-associated Nhp6 protein, the nucleosome remodelers INO80 or ISW1A, and the lysine acetyltransferases Gcn5 and Esa1 each contribute separately to maximum DNA synthesis rates. Chromatin promotes the regular priming of lagging-strand DNA synthesis by facilitating DNA polymerase α function at replication forks. Finally, nucleosomes disrupted during replication are efficiently re-assembled into regular arrays on nascent DNA. Our work defines the minimum requirements for chromatin replication in vitro and shows how multiple chromatin factors might modulate replication fork rates in vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human Parvovirus B19 Utilizes Cellular DNA Replication Machinery for Viral DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Wang, Zekun; Xiong, Min; Chen, Aaron Yun; Xu, Peng; Ganaie, Safder S; Badawi, Yomna; Kleiboeker, Steve; Nishimune, Hiroshi; Ye, Shui Qing; Qiu, Jianming

    2018-03-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection of human erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) induces a DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest at late S phase, which facilitates viral DNA replication. However, it is not clear exactly which cellular factors are employed by this single-stranded DNA virus. Here, we used microarrays to systematically analyze the dynamic transcriptome of EPCs infected with B19V. We found that DNA metabolism, DNA replication, DNA repair, DNA damage response, cell cycle, and cell cycle arrest pathways were significantly regulated after B19V infection. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that most cellular DNA replication proteins were recruited to the centers of viral DNA replication, but not the DNA repair DNA polymerases. Our results suggest that DNA replication polymerase δ and polymerase α are responsible for B19V DNA replication by knocking down its expression in EPCs. We further showed that although RPA32 is essential for B19V DNA replication and the phosphorylated forms of RPA32 colocalized with the replicating viral genomes, RPA32 phosphorylation was not necessary for B19V DNA replication. Thus, this report provides evidence that B19V uses the cellular DNA replication machinery for viral DNA replication. IMPORTANCE Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection can cause transient aplastic crisis, persistent viremia, and pure red cell aplasia. In fetuses, B19V infection can result in nonimmune hydrops fetalis and fetal death. These clinical manifestations of B19V infection are a direct outcome of the death of human erythroid progenitors that host B19V replication. B19V infection induces a DNA damage response that is important for cell cycle arrest at late S phase. Here, we analyzed dynamic changes in cellular gene expression and found that DNA metabolic processes are tightly regulated during B19V infection. Although genes involved in cellular DNA replication were downregulated overall, the cellular DNA replication machinery was tightly

  20. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new developments since 2006. In addition, we will cover the development of antivirals that interfere with human adenovirus (HAdV) replication and the impact of HAdV on human disease. PMID:23388625

  1. Facilitating innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, J.S.; Visser, A.J.; Migchels, G.

    2011-01-01

    Many innovations involve changes which transcend the individual business or are only achievable when various businesses and/or interested parties take up the challenge together. In System Innovation Programmes, the necessary innovations are facilitated by means of workshops related to specific areas

  2. Playing facilitator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houmøller, Ellen; Marchetti, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    workshops based on two classic role-play games: The Silent Game (Brandt, 2006) and The Six Thinking Hats (de Bono, 1985). These games were created to support students in learning design thinking in groups and are assigned positive values in literature, hence we expected a smooth process. However, our......t: This paper presents reflections on the role of teachers as facilitators, in a context of role-play targeting learning of design thinking skills. Our study was conducted according to the method of visual ethnography. We acted as facilitators for 50 students through the yearly six-day competitive...... event called InnoEvent, addressed to students in the fields of multimedia and healthcare. Being interested in studying games and role-play as tools to support independent learning in the field of design thinking and team-building, following Dewey’s (1938) theory of learning experience, we ran two...

  3. Animal Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Grzegorz L.; Oliveira, Marcos T.; Kaguni, Laurie S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication highlight the diversity of both the mechanisms utilized and the structural and functional organization of the proteins at mtDNA replication fork, despite the simplicity of the animal mtDNA genome. DNA polymerase γ, mtDNA helicase and mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein- the key replisome proteins, have evolved distinct structural features and biochemical properties. These appear to be correlated with mtDNA genomic features in different metazoan taxa and with their modes of DNA replication, although a substantial integrative research is warranted to establish firmly these links. To date, several modes of mtDNA replication have been described for animals: rolling circle, theta, strand-displacement, and RITOLS/bootlace. Resolution of a continuing controversy relevant to mtDNA replication in mammals/vertebrates will have a direct impact on the mechanistic interpretation of mtDNA-related human diseases. Here we review these subjects, integrating earlier and recent data to provide a perspective on the major challenges for future research. PMID:27241933

  4. The architecture and function of the chromatin replication machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas Cr; Costa, Alessandro

    2017-12-01

    Genomic DNA in eukaryotic cells is packaged into nucleosome arrays. During replication, nucleosomes need to be dismantled ahead of the advancing replication fork and reassembled on duplicated DNA. The architecture and function of the core replisome machinery is now beginning to be elucidated, with recent insights shaping our view on DNA replication processes. Simultaneously, breakthroughs in our mechanistic understanding of epigenetic inheritance allow us to build new models of how histone chaperones integrate with the replisome to reshuffle nucleosomes. The emerging picture indicates that the core eukaryotic DNA replication machinery has evolved elements that handle nucleosomes to facilitate chromatin duplication. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Psychology, replication & beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Keith R

    2016-06-01

    Modern psychology is apparently in crisis and the prevailing view is that this partly reflects an inability to replicate past findings. If a crisis does exists, then it is some kind of 'chronic' crisis, as psychologists have been censuring themselves over replicability for decades. While the debate in psychology is not new, the lack of progress across the decades is disappointing. Recently though, we have seen a veritable surfeit of debate alongside multiple orchestrated and well-publicised replication initiatives. The spotlight is being shone on certain areas and although not everyone agrees on how we should interpret the outcomes, the debate is happening and impassioned. The issue of reproducibility occupies a central place in our whig history of psychology.

  6. Registered Replication Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouwmeester, S.; Verkoeijen, P. P.J.L.; Aczel, B.

    2017-01-01

    In an anonymous 4-person economic game, participants contributed more money to a common project (i.e., cooperated) when required to decide quickly than when forced to delay their decision (Rand, Greene & Nowak, 2012), a pattern consistent with the social heuristics hypothesis proposed by Rand...... and colleagues. The results of studies using time pressure have been mixed, with some replication attempts observing similar patterns (e.g., Rand et al., 2014) and others observing null effects (e.g., Tinghög et al., 2013; Verkoeijen & Bouwmeester, 2014). This Registered Replication Report (RRR) assessed...... the size and variability of the effect of time pressure on cooperative decisions by combining 21 separate, preregistered replications of the critical conditions from Study 7 of the original article (Rand et al., 2012). The primary planned analysis used data from all participants who were randomly assigned...

  7. Towards scalable Byzantine fault-tolerant replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbierski, Maciej

    2017-08-01

    Byzantine fault-tolerant (BFT) replication is a powerful technique, enabling distributed systems to remain available and correct even in the presence of arbitrary faults. Unfortunately, existing BFT replication protocols are mostly load-unscalable, i.e. they fail to respond with adequate performance increase whenever new computational resources are introduced into the system. This article proposes a universal architecture facilitating the creation of load-scalable distributed services based on BFT replication. The suggested approach exploits parallel request processing to fully utilize the available resources, and uses a load balancer module to dynamically adapt to the properties of the observed client workload. The article additionally provides a discussion on selected deployment scenarios, and explains how the proposed architecture could be used to increase the dependability of contemporary large-scale distributed systems.

  8. Replication, refinement & reachability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debois, Søren; Hildebrandt, Thomas T.; Slaats, Tijs

    2018-01-01

    We explore the complexity of reachability and run-time refinement under safety and liveness constraints in event-based process models. Our study is framed in the DCR? process language, which supports modular specification through a compositional operational semantics. DCR? encompasses the “Dynamic...... Condition Response (DCR) graphs” declarative process model for analysis, execution and safe run-time refinement of process-aware information systems; including replication of sub-processes. We prove that event-reachability and refinement are np-hard for DCR? processes without replication...

  9. Genome Replication in Thermococcus kodakarensis Independent of Cdc6 and an Origin of Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Gehring

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The initiation of DNA replication is typically tightly regulated by proteins that form initiation complexes at specific sequences known as replication origins. In Archaea and Eukaryotes, Cdc6, a near-universally conserved protein binds and facilitates the origin-dependent assembly of the replicative apparatus. TK1901 encodes Cdc6 in Thermococcus kodakarensis but, as we report here, TK1901 and the presumed origin of replication can be deleted from the genome of this hyperthermophilic Archaeon without any detectable effects on growth, genetic competence or the ability to support autonomous plasmid replication. All regions of the genome were equally represented in the sequences generated by whole genome sequencing of DNA isolated from T. kodakarensis strains with or without TK1901, inconsistent with DNA initiation occurring at one or few origins, and instead suggestive of replication initiating at many sites distributed throughout the genome. We were unable to generate strains lacking the recombination factors, RadA or RadB, consistent with T. kodakarensis cells, that are oligoploid (7–19 genomes per cell, employing a recombination-based mechanism of DNA replication. Deletion of the previously presumed origin region reduced the long-term viability of cultures supporting the possibility that retaining an origin-based mechanism of DNA initiation provides a survival mechanism for stationary phase cells with only one genome.

  10. Evolution of Replication Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Nina Y.; O'Donnell, Mike E.

    2016-01-01

    The machines that decode and regulate genetic information require the translation, transcription and replication pathways essential to all living cells. Thus, it might be expected that all cells share the same basic machinery for these pathways that were inherited from the primordial ancestor cell from which they evolved. A clear example of this is found in the translation machinery that converts RNA sequence to protein. The translation process requires numerous structural and catalytic RNAs and proteins, the central factors of which are homologous in all three domains of life, bacteria, archaea and eukarya. Likewise, the central actor in transcription, RNA polymerase, shows homology among the catalytic subunits in bacteria, archaea and eukarya. In contrast, while some “gears” of the genome replication machinery are homologous in all domains of life, most components of the replication machine appear to be unrelated between bacteria and those of archaea and eukarya. This review will compare and contrast the central proteins of the “replisome” machines that duplicate DNA in bacteria, archaea and eukarya, with an eye to understanding the issues surrounding the evolution of the DNA replication apparatus. PMID:27160337

  11. Human Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Ian J.; Reyes, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of DNA replication in mitochondria is in its infancy. For many years, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome was regarded as greatly simplified compared to the nucleus. Mammalian mitochondria were reported to lack all DNA repair systems, to eschew DNA recombination, and to possess but a single DNA polymerase, polymerase γ. Polγ was said to replicate mitochondrial DNA exclusively via one mechanism, involving only two priming events and a handful of proteins. In this “strand-displacement model,” leading strand DNA synthesis begins at a specific site and advances approximately two-thirds of the way around the molecule before DNA synthesis is initiated on the “lagging” strand. Although the displaced strand was long-held to be coated with protein, RNA has more recently been proposed in its place. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA molecules with all the features of products of conventional bidirectional replication have been documented, suggesting that the process and regulation of replication in mitochondria is complex, as befits a genome that is a core factor in human health and longevity. PMID:23143808

  12. Replication studies in longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varcasia, O; Garasto, S; Rizza, T

    2001-01-01

    In Danes we replicated the 3'APOB-VNTR gene/longevity association study previously carried out in Italians, by which the Small alleles (less than 35 repeats) had been identified as frailty alleles for longevity. In Danes, neither genotype nor allele frequencies differed between centenarians and 20...

  13. Replication slippage of the thermophilic DNA polymerases B and D from the Euryarchaeota Pyrococcus abyssi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa G. eCastillo-Lizardo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Replication slippage or slipped-strand mispairing involves the misalignment of DNA strands during the replication of repeated DNA sequences, and can lead to genetic rearrangements such as microsatellite instability. Here, we show that PolB and PolD replicative DNA polymerases from the archaeal model Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab slip in vitro during replication of a single-stranded DNA template carrying a hairpin structure and short direct repeats. We find that this occurs in both their wild-type (exo+ and exonuclease deficient (exo- forms. The slippage behavior of PabPolB and PabPolD, probably due to limited strand displacement activity, resembles that observed for the high fidelity Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu DNA polymerase. The presence of PabPCNA inhibited PabPolB and PabPolD slippage. We propose a model whereby PabPCNA stimulates strand displacement activity and polymerase progression through the hairpin, thus permitting the error-free replication of repetitive sequences.

  14. Replication slippage of the thermophilic DNA polymerases B and D from the Euryarchaeota Pyrococcus abyssi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Lizardo, Melissa; Henneke, Ghislaine; Viguera, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Replication slippage or slipped-strand mispairing involves the misalignment of DNA strands during the replication of repeated DNA sequences, and can lead to genetic rearrangements such as microsatellite instability. Here, we show that PolB and PolD replicative DNA polymerases from the archaeal model Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab) slip in vitro during replication of a single-stranded DNA template carrying a hairpin structure and short direct repeats. We find that this occurs in both their wild-type (exo+) and exonuclease deficient (exo-) forms. The slippage behavior of PabPolB and PabPolD, probably due to limited strand displacement activity, resembles that observed for the high fidelity P. furiosus (Pfu) DNA polymerase. The presence of PabPCNA inhibited PabPolB and PabPolD slippage. We propose a model whereby PabPCNA stimulates strand displacement activity and polymerase progression through the hairpin, thus permitting the error-free replication of repetitive sequences.

  15. Methadone enhances human influenza A virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Wu, Kuang-Lun; Tsai, Ming-Ta; Chien, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Mao-Liang; Wang, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence has indicated that opioids enhance replication of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus in target cells. However, it is unknown whether opioids can enhance replication of other clinically important viral pathogens. In this study, the interaction of opioid agonists and human influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus was examined in human lung epithelial A549 cells. Cells were exposed to morphine, methadone or buprenorphine followed by human H1N1 viral infection. Exposure to methadone differentially enhanced viral propagation, consistent with an increase in virus adsorption, susceptibility to virus infection and viral protein synthesis. In contrast, morphine or buprenorphine did not alter H1N1 replication. Because A549 cells do not express opioid receptors, methadone-enhanced H1N1 replication in human lung cells may not be mediated through these receptors. The interaction of methadone and H1N1 virus was also examined in adult mice. Treatment with methadone significantly increased H1N1 viral replication in lungs. Our data suggest that use of methadone facilitates influenza A viral infection in lungs and might raise concerns regarding the possible consequence of an increased risk of serious influenza A virus infection in people who receive treatment in methadone maintenance programs. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  16. Energetic funnel facilitates facilitated diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencini, Massimo; Pigolotti, Simone

    2018-01-25

    Transcription factors (TFs) are able to associate to their binding sites on DNA faster than the physical limit posed by diffusion. Such high association rates can be achieved by alternating between three-dimensional diffusion and one-dimensional sliding along the DNA chain, a mechanism-dubbed facilitated diffusion. By studying a collection of TF binding sites of Escherichia coli from the RegulonDB database and of Bacillus subtilis from DBTBS, we reveal a funnel in the binding energy landscape around the target sequences. We show that such a funnel is linked to the presence of gradients of AT in the base composition of the DNA region around the binding sites. An extensive computational study of the stochastic sliding process along the energetic landscapes obtained from the database shows that the funnel can significantly enhance the probability of TFs to find their target sequences when sliding in their proximity. We demonstrate that this enhancement leads to a speed-up of the association process. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Replication Research and Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jason C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Replicating previously reported empirical research is a necessary aspect of an evidence-based field of special education, but little formal investigation into the prevalence of replication research in the special education research literature has been conducted. Various factors may explain the lack of attention to replication of special education…

  18. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  19. A Systematic Approach to Error Free Telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-28

    interference problem created by utilizing two antennas to transmit the same telemetry signal [8]. This has also been referred to as the “two antenna...selection, commonly called Best Source Selection (BSS). Up until recently there was not a robust method to assess link quality, time- align each source...and then choose the best source on a bit-by-bit basis. The key here is not the time alignment or the bit-by-bit selection, but the accurate

  20. DNA replication origins in archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenfang eWu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication initiation, which starts at specific chromosomal site (known as replication origins, is the key regulatory stage of chromosome replication. Archaea, the third domain of life, use a single or multiple origin(s to initiate replication of their circular chromosomes. The basic structure of replication origins is conserved among archaea, typically including an AT-rich unwinding region flanked by several conserved repeats (origin recognition box, ORB that are located adjacent to a replication initiator gene. Both the ORB sequence and the adjacent initiator gene are considerably diverse among different replication origins, while in silico and genetic analyses have indicated the specificity between the initiator genes and their cognate origins. These replicator-initiator pairings are reminiscent of the oriC-dnaA system in bacteria, and a model for the negative regulation of origin activity by a downstream cluster of ORB elements has been recently proposed in haloarchaea. Moreover, comparative genomic analyses have revealed that the mosaics of replicator-initiator pairings in archaeal chromosomes originated from the integration of extrachromosomal elements. This review summarizes the research progress in understanding of archaeal replication origins with particular focus on the utilization, control and evolution of multiple replication origins in haloarchaea.

  1. Modeling inhomogeneous DNA replication kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel G Gauthier

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at a series of chromosomal locations called origins, where replication forks are assembled proceeding bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins, in conjunction with the velocity at which forks progress, dictate the program of the replication process. Previous attempts at modeling DNA replication in eukaryotes have focused on cases where the firing rate and the velocity of replication forks are homogeneous, or uniform, across the genome. However, it is now known that there are large variations in origin activity along the genome and variations in fork velocities can also take place. Here, we generalize previous approaches to modeling replication, to allow for arbitrary spatial variation of initiation rates and fork velocities. We derive rate equations for left- and right-moving forks and for replication probability over time that can be solved numerically to obtain the mean-field replication program. This method accurately reproduces the results of DNA replication simulation. We also successfully adapted our approach to the inverse problem of fitting measurements of DNA replication performed on single DNA molecules. Since such measurements are performed on specified portion of the genome, the examined DNA molecules may be replicated by forks that originate either within the studied molecule or outside of it. This problem was solved by using an effective flux of incoming replication forks at the model boundaries to represent the origin activity outside the studied region. Using this approach, we show that reliable inferences can be made about the replication of specific portions of the genome even if the amount of data that can be obtained from single-molecule experiments is generally limited.

  2. SUMO and KSHV Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Pei-Ching [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Kung, Hsing-Jien, E-mail: hkung@nhri.org.tw [Institute for Translational Medicine, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); UC Davis Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Division of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 35 Keyan Road, Zhunan, Miaoli County 35053, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-29

    Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifier (SUMO) modification was initially identified as a reversible post-translational modification that affects the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein trafficking, chromosome segregation, and DNA repair. Increasing evidence suggests that the SUMO system also plays an important role in regulating chromatin organization and transcription. It is thus not surprising that double-stranded DNA viruses, such as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have exploited SUMO modification as a means of modulating viral chromatin remodeling during the latent-lytic switch. In addition, SUMO regulation allows the disassembly and assembly of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), an intrinsic antiviral host defense, during the viral replication cycle. Overcoming PML-NB-mediated cellular intrinsic immunity is essential to allow the initial transcription and replication of the herpesvirus genome after de novo infection. As a consequence, KSHV has evolved a way as to produce multiple SUMO regulatory viral proteins to modulate the cellular SUMO environment in a dynamic way during its life cycle. Remarkably, KSHV encodes one gene product (K-bZIP) with SUMO-ligase activities and one gene product (K-Rta) that exhibits SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) activity. In addition, at least two viral products are sumoylated that have functional importance. Furthermore, sumoylation can be modulated by other viral gene products, such as the viral protein kinase Orf36. Interference with the sumoylation of specific viral targets represents a potential therapeutic strategy when treating KSHV, as well as other oncogenic herpesviruses. Here, we summarize the different ways KSHV exploits and manipulates the cellular SUMO system and explore the multi-faceted functions of SUMO during KSHV’s life cycle and pathogenesis.

  3. Distraction As A Source Of Drive In Social Facilitation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Robert Steven; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Demonstrates that in a replication of a well known social facilitation study, subjects show indications across several measures of being more distracted in audience conditions than when they are alone. Subjects were 55 college students. (MP)

  4. Unveiling the mystery of mitochondrial DNA replication in yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin Jie; Clark-Walker, George Desmond

    2018-01-01

    Conventional DNA replication is initiated from specific origins and requires the synthesis of RNA primers for both the leading and lagging strands. In contrast, the replication of yeast mitochondrial DNA is origin-independent. The replication of the leading strand is likely primed by recombinational structures and proceeded by a rolling circle mechanism. The coexistent linear and circular DNA conformers facilitate the recombination-based initiation. The replication of the lagging strand is poorly understood. Re-evaluation of published data suggests that the rolling circle may also provide structures for the synthesis of the lagging-strand by mechanisms such as template switching. Thus, the coupling of recombination with rolling circle replication and possibly, template switching, may have been selected as an economic replication mode to accommodate the reductive evolution of mitochondria. Such a replication mode spares the need for conventional replicative components, including those required for origin recognition/remodelling, RNA primer synthesis and lagging-strand processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  5. DATABASE REPLICATION IN HETEROGENOUS PLATFORM

    OpenAIRE

    Hendro Nindito; Evaristus Didik Madyatmadja; Albert Verasius Dian Sano

    2014-01-01

    The application of diverse database technologies in enterprises today is increasingly a common practice. To provide high availability and survavibality of real-time information, a database replication technology that has capability to replicate databases under heterogenous platforms is required. The purpose of this research is to find the technology with such capability. In this research, the data source is stored in MSSQL database server running on Windows. The data will be replicated to MyS...

  6. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Stability and function of eukaryotic genomes are closely linked to chromatin structure and organization. During cell division the entire genome must be accurately replicated and the chromatin landscape reproduced on new DNA. Chromatin and nuclear structure influence where and when DNA replication...... initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...... synthesis is perturbed, cells can suffer loss of both genome and epigenome integrity with severe consequences for the organism....

  7. Replication of bacteriophage lambda DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurimoto, T.; Matsubara, K.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper results of studies on the mechanism of bacteriophage lambda replication using molecular biological and biochemical approaches are reported. The purification of the initiator proteins, O and P, and the role of the O and P proteins in the initiation of lambda DNA replication through interactions with specific DNA sequences are described. 47 references, 15 figures

  8. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifazi, F; Perez, E D; D'Apice, A; dell'Agnello, L; Düllmann, D; Girone, M; Re, G L; Martelli, B; Peco, G; Ricci, P P; Sapunenko, V; Vagnoni, V; Vitlacil, D

    2008-01-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. a database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informatics (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements.

  9. Template role of double-stranded RNA in tombusvirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, Nikolay; Pogany, Judit; Nagy, Peter D

    2014-05-01

    Replication of plus-strand RNA [(+)RNA] viruses of plants is a relatively simple process that involves complementary minus-strand RNA [(-)RNA] synthesis and subsequent (+)RNA synthesis. However, the actual replicative form of the (-)RNA template in the case of plant (+)RNA viruses is not yet established unambiguously. In this paper, using a cell-free replication assay supporting a full cycle of viral replication, we show that replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) leads to the formation of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Using RNase digestion, DNAzyme, and RNA mobility shift assays, we demonstrate the absence of naked (-)RNA templates during replication. Time course experiments showed the rapid appearance of dsRNA earlier than the bulk production of new (+)RNAs, suggesting an active role for dsRNA in replication. Radioactive nucleotide chase experiments showed that the mechanism of TBSV replication involves the use of dsRNA templates in strand displacement reactions, where the newly synthesized plus strand replaces the original (+)RNA in the dsRNA. We propose that the use of dsRNA as a template for (+)RNA synthesis by the viral replicase is facilitated by recruited host DEAD box helicases and the viral p33 RNA chaperone protein. Altogether, this replication strategy allows TBSV to separate minus- and plus-strand syntheses in time and regulate asymmetrical RNA replication that leads to abundant (+)RNA progeny. Positive-stranded RNA viruses of plants use their RNAs as the templates for replication. First, the minus strand is synthesized by the viral replicase complex (VRC), which then serves as a template for new plus-strand synthesis. To characterize the nature of the (-)RNA in the membrane-bound viral replicase, we performed complete RNA replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in yeast cell-free extracts and in plant extracts. The experiments demonstrated that the TBSV (-)RNA is present as a double-stranded RNA that serves as the template for TBSV

  10. Replication-uncoupled histone deposition during adenovirus DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Tetsuro; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2012-06-01

    In infected cells, the chromatin structure of the adenovirus genome DNA plays critical roles in its genome functions. Previously, we reported that in early phases of infection, incoming viral DNA is associated with both viral core protein VII and cellular histones. Here we show that in late phases of infection, newly synthesized viral DNA is also associated with histones. We also found that the knockdown of CAF-1, a histone chaperone that functions in the replication-coupled deposition of histones, does not affect the level of histone H3 bound on viral chromatin, although CAF-1 is accumulated at viral DNA replication foci together with PCNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using epitope-tagged histone H3 demonstrated that histone variant H3.3, which is deposited onto the cellular genome in a replication-independent manner, is selectively associated with both incoming and newly synthesized viral DNAs. Microscopic analyses indicated that histones but not USF1, a transcription factor that regulates viral late gene expression, are excluded from viral DNA replication foci and that this is achieved by the oligomerization of the DNA binding protein (DBP). Taken together, these results suggest that histone deposition onto newly synthesized viral DNA is most likely uncoupled with viral DNA replication, and a possible role of DBP oligomerization in this replication-uncoupled histone deposition is discussed.

  11. Replication of a Continuing Education Workshop in the Evidence-Based Practice Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromoske, Andrea N.; Berger, Lisa K.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To replicate the results of Parrish and Rubin's continuing education workshop in the evidence-based practice (EBP) process utilizing different workshop facilitators with participants in a different geographic location. Methods: We used a replicated, one-group pretest-posttest design with 3-month follow-up to evaluate the effectiveness…

  12. Broken silence restored-remodeling primes for deacetylation at replication forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasencakova, Zuzana; Groth, Anja

    2011-01-01

    Faithful propagation of chromatin structures requires assimilation of new histones to the modification profile of individual loci. In this issue of Molecular Cell, Rowbotham and colleagues identify a remodeler, SMARCAD1, acting at replication sites to facilitate histone deacetylation and restorat......Faithful propagation of chromatin structures requires assimilation of new histones to the modification profile of individual loci. In this issue of Molecular Cell, Rowbotham and colleagues identify a remodeler, SMARCAD1, acting at replication sites to facilitate histone deacetylation...

  13. Chromatin replication and histone dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Jasencakova, Zuzana; Groth, Anja

    2017-01-01

    organization into chromatin. We reveal how specialized replication-coupled mechanisms rapidly assemble newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes, while the complete restoration of chromatin organization including histone marks is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. Because failure...

  14. Synchronous replication of remote storage

    OpenAIRE

    Mirzoev, Dr. Timur

    2014-01-01

    Storage replication is one of the essential requirements for network environments. While many forms of Network Attached Storage (NAS), Storage Area Networks (SAN) and other forms of network storage exist, there is a need for a reliable synchronous storage replication technique between distant sites (less than 1 mile). Such technology allows setting new standards for network failover and failback systems for virtual servers; specifically, addressing the growing need for effective disaster reco...

  15. Functional analysis of replication determinantsin classical swine fever virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadsbjerg, Johanne

    and animal pathogens should facilitate finding new approaches for efficient disease control. The principal aim of this thesis is to characterise determinants involved in the replication of classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Classical swine fever is a highly contagious virus disease of domestic pigs and wild...... in cell culture. Knowledge of these sequence variations and putative long-range interactions will provide valuable insights into mechanisms underlying virustranslation and replication. In manuscript 3, a selection marker has been inserted into a CSFV-based replicon making it suitable for screening...

  16. The INO80 remodeller in transcription, replication and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Jérôme; Gasser, Susan M; Papamichos-Chronakis, Manolis

    2017-10-05

    The accessibility of eukaryotic genomes to the action of enzymes involved in transcription, replication and repair is maintained despite the organization of DNA into nucleosomes. This access is often regulated by the action of ATP-dependent nucleosome remodellers. The INO80 class of nucleosome remodellers has unique structural features and it is implicated in a diverse array of functions, including transcriptional regulation, DNA replication and DNA repair. Underlying these diverse functions is the catalytic activity of the main ATPase subunit, which in the context of a multisubunit complex can shift nucleosomes and carry out histone dimer exchange. In vitro studies showed that INO80 promotes replication fork progression on a chromatin template, while in vivo it was shown to facilitate replication fork restart after stalling and to help evict RNA polymerase II at transcribed genes following the collision of a replication fork with transcription. More recent work in yeast implicates INO80 in the general eviction and degradation of nucleosomes following high doses of oxidative DNA damage. Beyond these replication and repair functions, INO80 was shown to repress inappropriate transcription at promoters in the opposite direction to the coding sequence. Here we discuss the ways in which INO80's diverse functions help maintain genome integrity.This article is part of the themed issue 'Chromatin modifiers and remodellers in DNA repair and signalling'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. ATR-p53 restricts homologous recombination in response to replicative stress but does not limit DNA interstrand crosslink repair in lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca M Sirbu

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is required for the restart of collapsed DNA replication forks and error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB. However, unscheduled or hyperactive HR may lead to genomic instability and promote cancer development. The cellular factors that restrict HR processes in mammalian cells are only beginning to be elucidated. The tumor suppressor p53 has been implicated in the suppression of HR though it has remained unclear why p53, as the guardian of the genome, would impair an error-free repair process. Here, we show for the first time that p53 downregulates foci formation of the RAD51 recombinase in response to replicative stress in H1299 lung cancer cells in a manner that is independent of its role as a transcription factor. We find that this downregulation of HR is not only completely dependent on the binding site of p53 with replication protein A but also the ATR/ATM serine 15 phosphorylation site. Genetic analysis suggests that ATR but not ATM kinase modulates p53's function in HR. The suppression of HR by p53 can be bypassed under experimental conditions that cause DSB either directly or indirectly, in line with p53's role as a guardian of the genome. As a result, transactivation-inactive p53 does not compromise the resistance of H1299 cells to the interstrand crosslinking agent mitomycin C. Altogether, our data support a model in which p53 plays an anti-recombinogenic role in the ATR-dependent mammalian replication checkpoint but does not impair a cell's ability to use HR for the removal of DSB induced by cytotoxic agents.

  18. Tombusviruses upregulate phospholipid biosynthesis via interaction between p33 replication protein and yeast lipid sensor proteins during virus replication in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barajas, Daniel; Xu, Kai; Sharma, Monika; Wu, Cheng-Yu; Nagy, Peter D., E-mail: pdnagy2@uky.edu

    2014-12-15

    Positive-stranded RNA viruses induce new membranous structures and promote membrane proliferation in infected cells to facilitate viral replication. In this paper, the authors show that a plant-infecting tombusvirus upregulates transcription of phospholipid biosynthesis genes, such as INO1, OPI3 and CHO1, and increases phospholipid levels in yeast model host. This is accomplished by the viral p33 replication protein, which interacts with Opi1p FFAT domain protein and Scs2p VAP protein. Opi1p and Scs2p are phospholipid sensor proteins and they repress the expression of phospholipid genes. Accordingly, deletion of OPI1 transcription repressor in yeast has a stimulatory effect on TBSV RNA accumulation and enhanced tombusvirus replicase activity in an in vitro assay. Altogether, the presented data convincingly demonstrate that de novo lipid biosynthesis is required for optimal TBSV replication. Overall, this work reveals that a (+)RNA virus reprograms the phospholipid biosynthesis pathway in a unique way to facilitate its replication in yeast cells. - Highlights: • Tombusvirus p33 replication protein interacts with FFAT-domain host protein. • Tombusvirus replication leads to upregulation of phospholipids. • Tombusvirus replication depends on de novo lipid synthesis. • Deletion of FFAT-domain host protein enhances TBSV replication. • TBSV rewires host phospholipid synthesis.

  19. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  20. Defects of mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William C

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is replicated by DNA polymerase γ in concert with accessory proteins such as the mitochondrial DNA helicase, single-stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mitochondrial DNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion, which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mitochondrial DNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy. This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mitochondrial DNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2, and MGME1) that cause instability of mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial disease. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Biomarkers of replicative senescence revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers of replicative senescence can be defined as those ultrastructural and physiological variations as well as molecules whose changes in expression, activity or function correlate with aging, as a result of the gradual exhaustion of replicative potential and a state of permanent cell cycle...... arrest. The biomarkers that characterize the path to an irreversible state of cell cycle arrest due to proliferative exhaustion may also be shared by other forms of senescence-inducing mechanisms. Validation of senescence markers is crucial in circumstances where quiescence or temporary growth arrest may...... be triggered or is thought to be induced. Pre-senescence biomarkers are also important to consider as their presence indicate that induction of aging processes is taking place. The bona fide pathway leading to replicative senescence that has been extensively characterized is a consequence of gradual reduction...

  2. Personality and Academic Motivation: Replication, Extension, and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Martin H.; McMichael, Stephanie N.

    2015-01-01

    Previous work examines the relationships between personality traits and intrinsic/extrinsic motivation. We replicate and extend previous work to examine how personality may relate to achievement goals, efficacious beliefs, and mindset about intelligence. Approximately 200 undergraduates responded to the survey with a 150 participants replicating…

  3. International Expansion through Flexible Replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Anna; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2011-01-01

    to local environments and under the impact of new learning. To illuminate these issues, we draw on a longitudinal in-depth study of Swedish home furnishing giant IKEA, involving more than 70 interviews. We find that IKEA has developed organizational mechanisms that support an ongoing learning process aimed...... at frequent modification of the format for replication. Another finding is that IKEA treats replication as hierarchical: lower-level features (marketing efforts, pricing, etc.) are allowed to vary across IKEA stores in response to market-based learning, while higher-level features (fundamental values, vision...

  4. Chameleon Chasing II: A Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsom, Doug A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Replicates a 1972 survey of students, educators, and Public Relations Society of America members regarding who the public relations counselor really serves. Finds that, in 1992, most respondents thought primary responsibility was to the client, then to the client's relevant publics, then to self, then to society, and finally to media. Compares…

  5. Manual of Cupule Replication Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giriraj Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the world, iconic rock art is preceded by non-iconic rock art. Cupules (manmade, roughly semi-hemispherical depressions on rocks form the major bulk of the early non-iconic rock art globally. The antiquity of cupules extends back to the Lower Paleolithic in Asia and Africa, hundreds of thousand years ago. When one observes these cupules, the inquisitive mind poses so many questions with regard to understanding their technology, reasons for selecting the site, which rocks were used to make the hammer stones used, the skill and cognitive abilities employed to create the different types of cupules, the objective of their creation, their age, and so on. Replication of the cupules can provide satisfactory answers to some of these questions. Comparison of the hammer stones and cupules produced by the replication process with those obtained from excavation can provide support to observations. This paper presents a manual of cupule replication technology based on our experience of cupule replication on hard quartzite rock near Daraki-Chattan in the Chambal Basin, India.

  6. Visual explorer facilitator's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Palus, Charles J

    2010-01-01

    Grounded in research and practice, the Visual Explorer™ Facilitator's Guide provides a method for supporting collaborative, creative conversations about complex issues through the power of images. The guide is available as a component in the Visual Explorer Facilitator's Letter-sized Set, Visual Explorer Facilitator's Post card-sized Set, Visual Explorer Playing Card-sized Set, and is also available as a stand-alone title for purchase to assist multiple tool users in an organization.

  7. Uracil DNA glycosylase BKRF3 contributes to Epstein-Barr virus DNA replication through physical interactions with proteins in viral DNA replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Mei-Tzu; Liu, I-Hua; Wu, Chia-Wei; Chang, Shu-Ming; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Yang, Pei-Wen; Chuang, Yu-Chia; Lee, Chung-Pei; Chen, Mei-Ru

    2014-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BKRF3 shares sequence homology with members of the uracil-N-glycosylase (UNG) protein family and has DNA glycosylase activity. Here, we explored how BKRF3 participates in the DNA replication complex and contributes to viral DNA replication. Exogenously expressed Flag-BKRF3 was distributed mostly in the cytoplasm, whereas BKRF3 was translocated into the nucleus and colocalized with the EBV DNA polymerase BALF5 in the replication compartment during EBV lytic replication. The expression level of BKRF3 increased gradually during viral replication, coupled with a decrease of cellular UNG2, suggesting BKRF3 enzyme activity compensates for UNG2 and ensures the fidelity of viral DNA replication. In immunoprecipitation-Western blotting, BKRF3 was coimmuno-precipitated with BALF5, the polymerase processivity factor BMRF1, and the immediate-early transactivator Rta. Coexpression of BMRF1 appeared to facilitate the nuclear targeting of BKRF3 in immunofluorescence staining. Residues 164 to 255 of BKRF3 were required for interaction with Rta and BALF5, whereas residues 81 to 166 of BKRF3 were critical for BMRF1 interaction in glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown experiments. Viral DNA replication was defective in cells harboring BKRF3 knockout EBV bacmids. In complementation assays, the catalytic mutant BKRF3(Q90L,D91N) restored viral DNA replication, whereas the leucine loop mutant BKRF3(H213L) only partially rescued viral DNA replication, coupled with a reduced ability to interact with the viral DNA polymerase and Rta. Our data suggest that BKRF3 plays a critical role in viral DNA synthesis predominantly through its interactions with viral proteins in the DNA replication compartment, while its enzymatic activity may be supplementary for uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) function during virus replication. Catalytic activities of both cellular UDG UNG2 and viral UDGs contribute to herpesviral DNA replication. To ensure that the enzyme activity executes at

  8. Replicator dynamics in value chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantner, Uwe; Savin, Ivan; Vannuccini, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The pure model of replicator dynamics though providing important insights in the evolution of markets has not found much of empirical support. This paper extends the model to the case of firms vertically integrated in value chains. We show that i) by taking value chains into account, the replicator...... dynamics may revert its effect. In these regressive developments of market selection, firms with low fitness expand because of being integrated with highly fit partners, and the other way around; ii) allowing partner's switching within a value chain illustrates that periods of instability in the early...... stage of industry life-cycle may be the result of an 'optimization' of partners within a value chain providing a novel and simple explanation to the evidence discussed by Mazzucato (1998); iii) there are distinct differences in the contribution to market selection between the layers of a value chain...

  9. Replication Clamps and Clamp Loaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedglin, Mark; Kumar, Ravindra; Benkovic, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    To achieve the high degree of processivity required for DNA replication, DNA polymerases associate with ring-shaped sliding clamps that encircle the template DNA and slide freely along it. The closed circular structure of sliding clamps necessitates an enzyme-catalyzed mechanism, which not only opens them for assembly and closes them around DNA, but specifically targets them to sites where DNA synthesis is initiated and orients them correctly for replication. Such a feat is performed by multisubunit complexes known as clamp loaders, which use ATP to open sliding clamp rings and place them around the 3′ end of primer–template (PT) junctions. Here we discuss the structure and composition of sliding clamps and clamp loaders from the three domains of life as well as T4 bacteriophage, and provide our current understanding of the clamp-loading process. PMID:23545418

  10. Replication of Muscle Cell Using Bioimprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsuri, Fahmi; Mitchell, John S.; Alkaisi, Maan M.; Evans, John J.

    2009-07-01

    In our earlier study a heat-curable PDMS or a UV curable elastomer, was used as the replicating material to introduce Bioimprint methodology to facilitate cell imaging [1-2] But, replicating conditions for thermal polymerization is known to cause cell dehydration during curing. In this study, a new type of polymer was developed for use in living cell replica formation, and it was tested on human muscle cells. The cells were incubated and cultured according to standard biological culturing procedures, and they were grown for about 10 days. The replicas were then separated from the muscle cells and taken for analysis under an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The new polymer was designed to be biocompatible with higher resolution and fast curing process compared to other types of silicon-based organic polymers such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Muscle cell imprints were achieved and higher resolution images were able to show the micro structures of the muscle cells, including the cellular fibers and cell membranes. The AFM is able to image features at nanoscale resolution. This capacity enables a number of characteristics of biological cells to be visualized in a unique manner. Polymer and muscle cells preparations were developed at Hamilton, in collaboration between Plant and Food Research and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Canterbury. Tapping mode was used for the AFM image analysis as it has low tip-sample forces and non-destructive imaging capability. We will be presenting the bioimprinting processes of muscle cells, their AFM imaging and characterization of the newly developed polymer.

  11. Exploiting replicative stress to treat cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobbelstein, Matthias; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication in cancer cells is accompanied by stalling and collapse of the replication fork and signalling in response to DNA damage and/or premature mitosis; these processes are collectively known as 'replicative stress'. Progress is being made to increase our understanding of the mechanisms...... that govern replicative stress, thus providing ample opportunities to enhance replicative stress for therapeutic purposes. Rather than trying to halt cell cycle progression, cancer therapeutics could aim to increase replicative stress by further loosening the checkpoints that remain available to cancer cells...

  12. Training facilitators and supervisors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Louise Binow; O Connor, Maja; Krogh, Kristian

    At the Master’s program in Medicine at Aarhus University, Denmark, we have developed a faculty development program for facilitators and supervisors in 4 progressing student modules in communication, cooperation, and leadership. 1) A course for module 1 and 3 facilitators inspired by the apprentic...

  13. Trade Facilitation in Ethiopia:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tilahun_EK

    (UNCTAD), “Trade and transport facilitation … addresses a wide agenda in economic development and trade that may include improving transport infrastructure and services, reducing customs tariffs, and removing non-tariff trade barriers including administrative and regulatory barriers.”24. The definition of trade facilitation ...

  14. Learning facilitating leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Hansen, Mette Sanne

    2016-01-01

    deployed for this paper is empirical and conceptual. A specific facilitation project carried out by six international engineering students is presented. The importance of combining cognitive, emotional and synergistic skills is highlighted on the basis of this example, the authors’ extensive experience......This paper explains how engineering students at a Danish university acquired the necessary skills to become emergent facilitators of organisational development. The implications of this approach are discussed and related to relevant viewpoints and findings in the literature. The methodology...... in teaching facilitation and the literature. These types of skills are most effectively acquired by combining conceptual lectures, classroom exercises and the facilitation of groups in a real-life context. The paper also reflects certain ‘shadow sides’ related to facilitation observed by the students...

  15. Recombination-dependent concatemeric viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Piano, Ambra; Martínez-Jiménez, María I; Zecchi, Lisa; Ayora, Silvia

    2011-09-01

    The initiation of viral double stranded (ds) DNA replication involves proteins that recruit and load the replisome at the replication origin (ori). Any block in replication fork progression or a programmed barrier may act as a factor for ori-independent remodelling and assembly of a new replisome at the stalled fork. Then replication initiation becomes dependent on recombination proteins, a process called recombination-dependent replication (RDR). RDR, which is recognized as being important for replication restart and stability in all living organisms, plays an essential role in the replication cycle of many dsDNA viruses. The SPP1 virus, which infects Bacillus subtilis cells, serves as a paradigm to understand the links between replication and recombination in circular dsDNA viruses. SPP1-encoded initiator and replisome assembly proteins control the onset of viral replication and direct the recruitment of host-encoded replisomal components at viral oriL. SPP1 uses replication fork reactivation to switch from ori-dependent θ-type (circle-to-circle) replication to σ-type RDR. Replication fork arrest leads to a double strand break that is processed by viral-encoded factors to generate a D-loop into which a new replisome is assembled, leading to σ-type viral replication. SPP1 RDR proteins are compared with similar proteins encoded by other viruses and their possible in vivo roles are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. BPIFB6 Regulates Secretory Pathway Trafficking and Enterovirus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morosky, Stefanie; Lennemann, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) fold-containing family B, member 3 (BPIFB3) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized host factor that negatively regulates coxsackievirus B (CVB) replication through its control of the autophagic pathway. Here, we show that another member of the BPIFB family, BPIFB6, functions as a positive regulator of CVB, and other enterovirus, replication by controlling secretory pathway trafficking and Golgi complex morphology. We show that similar to BPIFB3, BPIFB6 localizes exclusively to the ER, where it associates with other members of the BPIFB family. However, in contrast to our findings that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of BPIFB3 greatly enhances CVB replication, we show that silencing of BPIFB6 expression dramatically suppresses enterovirus replication in a pan-viral manner. Mechanistically, we show that loss of BPIFB6 expression induces pronounced alterations in retrograde and anterograde trafficking, which correlate with dramatic fragmentation of the Golgi complex. Taken together, these data implicate BPIFB6 as a key regulator of secretory pathway trafficking and viral replication and suggest that members of the BPIFB family participate in diverse host cell functions to regulate virus infections. IMPORTANCE Enterovirus infections are associated with a number of severe pathologies, such as aseptic meningitis, dilated cardiomyopathy, type I diabetes, paralysis, and even death. These viruses, which include coxsackievirus B (CVB), poliovirus (PV), and enterovirus 71 (EV71), co-opt the host cell secretory pathway, which controls the transport of proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex, to facilitate their replication. Here we report on the identification of a novel regulator of the secretory pathway, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) fold-containing family B, member 6 (BPIFB6), whose expression is required for enterovirus replication. We show that loss of

  17. Replication of micro and nano surface geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Hocken, R.J.; Tosello, Guido

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the state-of-the-art in replication of surface texture and topography at micro and nano scale. The description includes replication of surfaces in polymers, metals and glass. Three different main technological areas enabled by surface replication processes are presented......: manufacture of net-shape micro/nano surfaces, tooling (i.e. master making), and surface quality control (metrology, inspection). Replication processes and methods as well as the metrology of surfaces to determine the degree of replication are presented and classified. Examples from various application areas...... are given including replication for surface texture measurements, surface roughness standards, manufacture of micro and nano structured functional surfaces, replicated surfaces for optical applications (e.g. optical gratings), and process chains based on combinations of repeated surface replication steps....

  18. Evaluating replicability of laboratory experiments in economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerer, Colin F; Dreber, Anna; Forsell, Eskil; Ho, Teck-Hua; Huber, Jürgen; Johannesson, Magnus; Kirchler, Michael; Almenberg, Johan; Altmejd, Adam; Chan, Taizan; Heikensten, Emma; Holzmeister, Felix; Imai, Taisuke; Isaksson, Siri; Nave, Gideon; Pfeiffer, Thomas; Razen, Michael; Wu, Hang

    2016-03-25

    The replicability of some scientific findings has recently been called into question. To contribute data about replicability in economics, we replicated 18 studies published in the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics between 2011 and 2014. All of these replications followed predefined analysis plans that were made publicly available beforehand, and they all have a statistical power of at least 90% to detect the original effect size at the 5% significance level. We found a significant effect in the same direction as in the original study for 11 replications (61%); on average, the replicated effect size is 66% of the original. The replicability rate varies between 67% and 78% for four additional replicability indicators, including a prediction market measure of peer beliefs. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Top2 and Sgs1-Top3 Act Redundantly to Ensure rDNA Replication Termination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamilla Mundbjerg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Faithful DNA replication with correct termination is essential for genome stability and transmission of genetic information. Here we have investigated the potential roles of Topoisomerase II (Top2 and the RecQ helicase Sgs1 during late stages of replication. We find that cells lacking Top2 and Sgs1 (or Top3 display two different characteristics during late S/G2 phase, checkpoint activation and accumulation of asymmetric X-structures, which are both independent of homologous recombination. Our data demonstrate that checkpoint activation is caused by a DNA structure formed at the strongest rDNA replication fork barrier (RFB during replication termination, and consistently, checkpoint activation is dependent on the RFB binding protein, Fob1. In contrast, asymmetric X-structures are formed independent of Fob1 at less strong rDNA replication fork barriers. However, both checkpoint activation and formation of asymmetric X-structures are sensitive to conditions, which facilitate fork merging and progression of replication forks through replication fork barriers. Our data are consistent with a redundant role of Top2 and Sgs1 together with Top3 (Sgs1-Top3 in replication fork merging at rDNA barriers. At RFB either Top2 or Sgs1-Top3 is essential to prevent formation of a checkpoint activating DNA structure during termination, but at less strong rDNA barriers absence of the enzymes merely delays replication fork merging, causing an accumulation of asymmetric termination structures, which are solved over time.

  20. Variance Swap Replication: Discrete or Continuous?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Le Floc’h

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The popular replication formula to price variance swaps assumes continuity of traded option strikes. In practice, however, there is only a discrete set of option strikes traded on the market. We present here different discrete replication strategies and explain why the continuous replication price is more relevant.

  1. Reporting to Improve Reproducibility and Facilitate Validity Assessment for Healthcare Database Studies V1.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Shirley V.; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Berger, Marc L.; Brown, Jeffrey; de Vries, Frank; Douglas, Ian; Gagne, Joshua J.; Gini, Rosa; Klungel, Olaf; Mullins, C. Daniel; Nguyen, Michael D.; Rassen, Jeremy A.; Smeeth, Liam; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Defining a study population and creating an analytic dataset from longitudinal healthcare databases involves many decisions. Our objective was to catalogue scientific decisions underpinning study execution that should be reported to facilitate replication and enable assessment of validity

  2. Reporting to Improve Reproducibility and Facilitate Validity Assessment for Healthcare Database Studies V1.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Shirley V.; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Berger, Marc L.; Brown, Jeffrey; de Vries, Frank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/303546670; Douglas, Ian; Gagne, Joshua J.; Gini, Rosa; Klungel, Olaf|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/181447649; Mullins, C. Daniel; Nguyen, Michael D.; Rassen, Jeremy A.; Smeeth, Liam; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Defining a study population and creating an analytic dataset from longitudinal healthcare databases involves many decisions. Our objective was to catalogue scientific decisions underpinning study execution that should be reported to facilitate replication and enable assessment of validity of

  3. DBR1 siRNA inhibition of HIV-1 replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naidu Yathi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 and all retroviruses are related to retroelements of simpler organisms such as the yeast Ty elements. Recent work has suggested that the yeast retroelement Ty1 replicates via an unexpected RNA lariat intermediate in cDNA synthesis. The putative genomic RNA lariat intermediate is formed by a 2'-5' phosphodiester bond, like that found in pre-mRNA intron lariats and it facilitates the minus-strand template switch during cDNA synthesis. We hypothesized that HIV-1 might also form a genomic RNA lariat and therefore that siRNA-mediated inhibition of expression of the human RNA lariat de-branching enzyme (DBR1 expression would specifically inhibit HIV-1 replication. Results We designed three short interfering RNA (siRNA molecules targeting DBR1, which were capable of reducing DBR1 mRNA expression by 80% and did not significantly affect cell viability. We assessed HIV-1 replication in the presence of DBR1 siRNA and found that DBR1 knockdown led to decreases in viral cDNA and protein production. These effects could be reversed by cotransfection of a DBR1 cDNA indicating that the inhibition of HIV-1 replication was a specific effect of DBR1 underexpression. Conclusion These data suggest that DBR1 function may be needed to debranch a putative HIV-1 genomic RNA lariat prior to completion of reverse transcription.

  4. Modelling the Replication Management in Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezar TOADER

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the modern economy, the benefits of Web services are significant because they facilitates the activities automation in the framework of Internet distributed businesses as well as the cooperation between organizations through interconnection process running in the computer systems. This paper presents the development stages of a model for a reliable information system. This paper describes the communication between the processes within the distributed system, based on the message exchange, and also presents the problem of distributed agreement among processes. A list of objectives for the fault-tolerant systems is defined and a framework model for distributed systems is proposed. This framework makes distinction between management operations and execution operations. The proposed model promotes the use of a central process especially designed for the coordination and control of other application processes. The execution phases and the protocols for the management and the execution components are presented. This model of a reliable system could be a foundation for an entire class of distributed systems models based on the management of replication process.

  5. Facilitating Knowledge Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    Abstract This paper argues that knowledge sharing can be conceptualized as different situations of exchange in which individuals relate to each other in different ways, involving different rules, norms and traditions of reciprocity regulating the exchange. The main challenge for facilitating...... and the intermediaries regulating the exchange, and facilitating knowledge sharing should therefore be viewed as a continuum of practices under the influence of opportunistic behaviour, obedience or organizational citizenship behaviour. Keywords: Knowledge sharing, motivation, organizational settings, situations...

  6. A quantitative and high-throughput assay of human papillomavirus DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, David; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Replication of the human papillomavirus (HPV) double-stranded DNA genome is accomplished by the two viral proteins E1 and E2 in concert with host DNA replication factors. HPV DNA replication is an established model of eukaryotic DNA replication and a potential target for antiviral therapy. Assays to measure the transient replication of HPV DNA in transfected cells have been developed, which rely on a plasmid carrying the viral origin of DNA replication (ori) together with expression vectors for E1 and E2. Replication of the ori-plasmid is typically measured by Southern blotting or PCR analysis of newly replicated DNA (i.e., DpnI digested DNA) several days post-transfection. Although extremely valuable, these assays have been difficult to perform in a high-throughput and quantitative manner. Here, we describe a modified version of the transient DNA replication assay that circumvents these limitations by incorporating a firefly luciferase expression cassette in cis of the ori. Replication of this ori-plasmid by E1 and E2 results in increased levels of firefly luciferase activity that can be accurately quantified and normalized to those of Renilla luciferase expressed from a control plasmid, thus obviating the need for DNA extraction, digestion, and analysis. We provide a detailed protocol for performing the HPV type 31 DNA replication assay in a 96-well plate format suitable for small-molecule screening and EC50 determinations. The quantitative and high-throughput nature of the assay should greatly facilitate the study of HPV DNA replication and the identification of inhibitors thereof.

  7. Viral and Cellular Determinants of Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication in Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Volker; Hoffmann, Sandra; Herian, Ulrike; Penin, Francois; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    Studies on the replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been facilitated by the development of selectable subgenomic replicons replicating in the human hepatoma cell line Huh-7 at a surprisingly high level. Analysis of the replicon population in selected cells revealed the occurrence of cell culture-adaptive mutations that enhance RNA replication substantially. To gain a better understanding of HCV cell culture adaptation, we characterized conserved mutations identified by sequence analysis of 26 independent replicon cell clones for their effect on RNA replication. Mutations enhancing replication were found in nearly every nonstructural (NS) protein, and they could be subdivided into at least two groups by their effect on replication efficiency and cooperativity: (i) mutations in NS3 with a low impact on replication but that enhanced replication cooperatively when combined with highly adaptive mutations and (ii) mutations in NS4B, -5A, and -5B, causing a strong increase in replication but being incompatible with each other. In addition to adaptive mutations, we found that the host cell plays an equally important role for efficient RNA replication. We tested several passages of the same Huh-7 cell line and found up to 100-fold differences in their ability to support replicon amplification. These differences were not due to variations in internal ribosome entry site-dependent translation or RNA degradation. In a search for cellular factor(s) that might be responsible for the different levels of permissiveness of Huh-7 cells, we found that replication efficiency decreased with increasing amounts of transfected replicon RNA, indicating that viral RNA or proteins are cytopathic or that host cell factors in Huh-7 cells limit RNA amplification. In summary, these data show that the efficiency of HCV replication in cell culture is determined both by adaptation of the viral sequence and by the host cell itself. PMID:12584326

  8. Rif1 regulates initiation timing of late replication origins throughout the S. cerevisiae genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared M Peace

    Full Text Available Chromosomal DNA replication involves the coordinated activity of hundreds to thousands of replication origins. Individual replication origins are subject to epigenetic regulation of their activity during S-phase, resulting in differential efficiencies and timings of replication initiation during S-phase. This regulation is thought to involve chromatin structure and organization into timing domains with differential ability to recruit limiting replication factors. Rif1 has recently been identified as a genome-wide regulator of replication timing in fission yeast and in mammalian cells. However, previous studies in budding yeast have suggested that Rif1's role in controlling replication timing may be limited to subtelomeric domains and derives from its established role in telomere length regulation. We have analyzed replication timing by analyzing BrdU incorporation genome-wide, and report that Rif1 regulates the timing of late/dormant replication origins throughout the S. cerevisiae genome. Analysis of pfa4Δ cells, which are defective in palmitoylation and membrane association of Rif1, suggests that replication timing regulation by Rif1 is independent of its role in localizing telomeres to the nuclear periphery. Intra-S checkpoint signaling is intact in rif1Δ cells, and checkpoint-defective mec1Δ cells do not comparably deregulate replication timing, together indicating that Rif1 regulates replication timing through a mechanism independent of this checkpoint. Our results indicate that the Rif1 mechanism regulates origin timing irrespective of proximity to a chromosome end, and suggest instead that telomere sequences merely provide abundant binding sites for proteins that recruit Rif1. Still, the abundance of Rif1 binding in telomeric domains may facilitate Rif1-mediated repression of non-telomeric origins that are more distal from centromeres.

  9. Repair replication in replicating and nonreplicating DNA after irradiation with uv light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slor, H.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1978-06-01

    Ultraviolet light induces more pyrimidine dimers and more repair replication in DNA that replicates within 2 to 3 h of irradiation than in DNA that does not replicate during this period. This difference may be due to special conformational changes in DNA and chromatin that might be associated with semiconservative DNA replication.

  10. Adressing Replication and Model Uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersberger, Bernd; Galia, Fabrice; Laursen, Keld

    innovation survey data for France, Germany and the UK, we conduct a ‘large-scale’ replication using the Bayesian averaging approach of classical estimators. Our method tests a wide range of determinants of innovation suggested in the prior literature, and establishes a robust set of findings on the variables...... which shape the introduction of new to the firm and new to the world innovations. We provide some implications for innovation research, and explore the potential application of our approach to other domains of research in strategic management.......Many fields of strategic management are subject to an important degree of model uncertainty. This is because the true model, and therefore the selection of appropriate explanatory variables, is essentially unknown. Drawing on the literature on the determinants of innovation, and by analyzing...

  11. Chromosome length influences replication-induced topological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Andreas; Betts-Lindroos, Hanna; Kanno, Takaharu; Jeppsson, Kristian; Ström, Lena; Katou, Yuki; Itoh, Takehiko; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Sjögren, Camilla

    2011-03-17

    During chromosome duplication the parental DNA molecule becomes overwound, or positively supercoiled, in the region ahead of the advancing replication fork. To allow fork progression, this superhelical tension has to be removed by topoisomerases, which operate by introducing transient DNA breaks. Positive supercoiling can also be diminished if the advancing fork rotates along the DNA helix, but then sister chromatid intertwinings form in its wake. Despite these insights it remains largely unknown how replication-induced superhelical stress is dealt with on linear, eukaryotic chromosomes. Here we show that this stress increases with the length of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes. This highlights the possibility that superhelical tension is handled on a chromosome scale and not only within topologically closed chromosomal domains as the current view predicts. We found that inhibition of type I topoisomerases leads to a late replication delay of longer, but not shorter, chromosomes. This phenotype is also displayed by cells expressing mutated versions of the cohesin- and condensin-related Smc5/6 complex. The frequency of chromosomal association sites of the Smc5/6 complex increases in response to chromosome lengthening, chromosome circularization, or inactivation of topoisomerase 2, all having the potential to increase the number of sister chromatid intertwinings. Furthermore, non-functional Smc6 reduces the accumulation of intertwined sister plasmids after one round of replication in the absence of topoisomerase 2 function. Our results demonstrate that the length of a chromosome influences the need of superhelical tension release in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and allow us to propose a model where the Smc5/6 complex facilitates fork rotation by sequestering nascent chromatid intertwinings that form behind the replication machinery.

  12. From Teaching to Facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Graaff, Erik

    2013-01-01

    A shift from teaching to learning is characteristic of the introduction of Problem Based Learning (PBL) in an existing school. As a consequence the teaching staff has to be trained in skills like facilitating group work and writing cases. Most importantly a change in thinking about teaching...... and learning will have to be realized. In the implementation of PBL it makes a difference how the core features of the problem and the role of the facilitator have been defined. This paper will present components of a PBL faculty-development training programme and discuss the relevance with respect...

  13. Coal export facilitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eeles, L.

    1998-01-01

    There is a wide range of trade barriers, particularly tariffs, in current and potential coal market. Commonwealth departments in Australia play a crucial role in supporting government industry policies. This article summarises some of more recent activities of the Department of Primary Industries and Energy (DPIE) in facilitating the export of Australian Coals. Coal export facilitation activities are designed to assist the Australian coal industry by directing Commonwealth Government resources towards issues which would be inappropriate or difficult for the industry to address itself

  14. DNA intercalator stimulates influenza transcription and virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poon Leo LM

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Influenza A virus uses its host transcription machinery to facilitate viral RNA synthesis, an event that is associated with cellular RNA polymerase II (RNAPII. In this study, various RNAPII transcription inhibitors were used to investigate the effect of RNAPII phosphorylation status on viral RNA transcription. A low concentration of DNA intercalators, such as actinomycin D (ActD, was found to stimulate viral polymerase activity and virus replication. This effect was not observed in cells treated with RNAPII kinase inhibitors. In addition, the loss of RNAPIIa in infected cells was due to the shift of nonphosphorylated RNAPII (RNAPIIa to hyperphosphorylated RNAPII (RNAPIIo.

  15. The challenges of facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika

    The aim of the paper is to investigate the role of the facilitators in the enactment of the principles of deliberative democracy and how they are carried out in practice. More specifically, the focus is on how the facilitators‟ balances between the intention of opening up for a plurality of voice...

  16. Facilitating leadership team communication

    OpenAIRE

    Hedman, Eerika

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand and describe how to facilitate competent communication in leadership teamwork. Grounded in the premises of social constructionism and informed by such theoretical frameworks as coordinated management of meaning theory (CMM), dialogic organization development (OD), systemic-constructionist leadership, communication competence, and reflexivity, this study seeks to produce further insights into understanding leadership team communicati...

  17. Replicating chromatin: a tale of histones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja

    2009-01-01

    framework of chromatin and carry information to specify higher-order organization and gene expression. When replication forks traverse the chromosomes, nucleosomes are transiently disrupted, allowing the replication machinery to gain access to DNA. Histone recycling, together with new deposition, ensures...... reassembly on nascent DNA strands. The aim of this review is to discuss how histones - new and old - are handled at the replication fork, highlighting new mechanistic insights and revisiting old paradigms....

  18. Enzymatic recognition of DNA replication origins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stayton, M.M.; Bertsch, L.; Biswas, S.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the process of recognition of the complementary-strand origin with emphasis on RNA polymerase action in priming M13 DNA replication, the role of primase in G4 DNA replication, and the function of protein n, a priming protein, during primosome assembly. These phage systems do not require several of the bacterial DNA replication enzymes, particularly those involved in the regulation of chromosome copy number of the initiatiion of replication of duplex DNA. 51 references, 13 figures, 1 table

  19. Facilitating Learning at Conferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib; Elsborg, Steen

    2011-01-01

    The typical conference consists of a series of PowerPoint presentations that tend to render participants passive. Students of learning have long abandoned the transfer model that underlies such one-way communication. We propose an al-ternative theory of conferences that sees them as a forum...... for learning, mutual inspiration and human flourishing. We offer five design principles that specify how conferences may engage participants more and hence increase their learning. In the research-and-development effort reported here, our team collaborated with conference organizers in Denmark to introduce...... and facilitate a variety of simple learning techniques at thirty one- and two-day conferences of up to 300 participants each. We present ten of these techniques and data evaluating them. We conclude that if conference organizers allocate a fraction of the total conference time to facilitated processes...

  20. Essence: Facilitating Software Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Ivan

    2008-01-01

      This paper suggests ways to facilitate creativity and innovation in software development. The paper applies four perspectives – Product, Project, Process, and People –to identify an outlook for software innovation. The paper then describes a new facility–Software Innovation Research Lab (SIRL) ......) – and a new method concept for software innovation – Essence – based on views, modes, and team roles. Finally, the paper reports from an early experiment using SIRL and Essence and identifies further research.......  This paper suggests ways to facilitate creativity and innovation in software development. The paper applies four perspectives – Product, Project, Process, and People –to identify an outlook for software innovation. The paper then describes a new facility–Software Innovation Research Lab (SIRL...

  1. Mindfulness for group facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Krohn, Simon

    2014-01-01

    thinking and ‘Eastern’ mindfulness which refers to an open, accepting state of mind, as intended with Buddhist-inspired techniques such as meditation. In this paper, we are interested in the latter type of mindfulness and demonstrate how Eastern mindfulness techniques can be used as a tool for facilitation......In this paper, we argue that mindfulness techniques can be used for enhancing the outcome of group performance. The word mindfulness has different connotations in the academic literature. Broadly speaking there is ‘mindfulness without meditation’ or ‘Western’ mindfulness which involves active....... A brief introduction to the physiology and philosophy of Eastern mindfulness constitutes the basis for the arguments of the effect of mindfulness techniques. The use of mindfulness techniques for group facilitation is novel as it changes the focus from individuals’ mindfulness practice...

  2. Laser facilitates vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of novel vaccine deliveries and vaccine adjuvants is of great importance to address the dilemma that the vaccine field faces: to improve vaccine efficacy without compromising safety. Harnessing the specific effects of laser on biological systems, a number of novel concepts have been proposed and proved in recent years to facilitate vaccination in a safer and more efficient way. The key advantage of using laser technology in vaccine delivery and adjuvantation is that all processes are initiated by physical effects with no foreign chemicals administered into the body. Here, we review the recent advances in using laser technology to facilitate vaccine delivery and augment vaccine efficacy as well as the underlying mechanisms.

  3. Containers, facilitators, innovators?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makkonen, Teemu; Merisalo, Maria; Inkinen, Tommi

    2018-01-01

    : are they containers, facilitators or innovators? This is investigated here through empirical material derived from 27 interviews with top departmental management in three Finnish cities (Helsinki, Espoo and Vantaa). The results show that local city governments (LCGs) consider cities as facilitators of innovation...... without the active role of LCGs as innovators. City employees are innovative – the seeming lack of public sector innovation is actually a result of measurement issues that favour (patentable) technological innovations rather than those more common to LCGs, meaning service and organisational types....... Therefore, LCGs can be seen as highly innovative organisations. There are, however, barriers to innovation in the public sector, such as the cost of innovation activity, the lack of incentives for it, and working culture that does not support it. Lastly, the results show that LCGs have not really fully...

  4. Facilitating Knowledge Sharing

    OpenAIRE

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Abstract This paper argues that knowledge sharing can be conceptualized as different situations of exchange in which individuals relate to each other in different ways, involving different rules, norms and traditions of reciprocity regulating the exchange. The main challenge for facilitating knowledge sharing is to ensure that the exchange is seen as equitable for the parties involved, and by viewing the problems of knowledge sharing as motivational problems situated in different organization...

  5. TRAIP is a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase that protects genome stability after replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Saskia; Smedegaard, Stine; Nakamura, Kyosuke

    2016-01-01

    ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling in human cells by facilitating the generation of RPA-bound single-stranded DNA regions upon replication stress in a manner that critically requires its E3 ligase activity and is potentiated by the PIP box. Consequently, loss of TRAIP function leads to enhanced...

  6. ATM and ATR Activities Maintain Replication Fork Integrity during SV40 Chromatin Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowd, Gregory A.; Li, Nancy Yan; Fanning, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Mutation of DNA damage checkpoint signaling kinases ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) or ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) results in genomic instability disorders. However, it is not well understood how the instability observed in these syndromes relates to DNA replication/repair defects and failed checkpoint control of cell cycling. As a simple model to address this question, we have studied SV40 chromatin replication in infected cells in the presence of inhibitors of ATM and ATR activities. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and southern blotting of SV40 chromatin replication products reveal that ATM activity prevents accumulation of unidirectional replication products, implying that ATM promotes repair of replication-associated double strand breaks. ATR activity alleviates breakage of a functional fork as it converges with a stalled fork. The results suggest that during SV40 chromatin replication, endogenous replication stress activates ATM and ATR signaling, orchestrating the assembly of genome maintenance machinery on viral replication intermediates. PMID:23592994

  7. Host factors involved in chikungunya virus replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholte, Florine Elisabeth Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis the interplay of CHIKV with cellular (host) factors involved in its replication is addressed. An in-depth understanding of the interactions between the viral proteins and those of their host is required for the elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying viral replication. A

  8. Using Replication Projects in Teaching Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standing, Lionel G.; Grenier, Manuel; Lane, Erica A.; Roberts, Meigan S.; Sykes, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that replication projects may be valuable in teaching research methods, and also address the current need in psychology for more independent verification of published studies. Their use in an undergraduate methods course is described, involving student teams who performed direct replications of four well-known experiments, yielding…

  9. Replication and Robustness in Developmental Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Greg J.; Engel, Mimi; Claessens, Amy; Dowsett, Chantelle J.

    2014-01-01

    Replications and robustness checks are key elements of the scientific method and a staple in many disciplines. However, leading journals in developmental psychology rarely include explicit replications of prior research conducted by different investigators, and few require authors to establish in their articles or online appendices that their key…

  10. Data from Investigating Variation in Replicability: A “Many Labs” Replication Project

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Richard A.; Ratliff, Kate A; Vianello, Michelangelo; Adams Jr., Reginald B; Bahník, Stĕpán; Bernstein, Michael J; Bocian, Konrad; Brandt, Mark J; Brooks, Beach; Brumbaugh, Claudia Chloe; Cemalcilar, Zeynep; Chandler, Jesse; Cheong, Winnee; Davis, William E; Devos, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    This dataset is from the Many Labs Replication Project in which 13 effects were replicated across 36 samples and over 6,000 participants. Data from the replications are included, along with demographic variables about the participants and contextual information about the environment in which the replication was conducted. Data were collected in-lab and online through a standardized procedure administered via an online link. The dataset is stored on the Open Science Framework website. These da...

  11. Truncation of a P1 leader proteinase facilitates potyvirus replication in a non-permissive host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Hongying; Pasin, Fabio; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E; Simón-Mateo, Carmen; García, Juan Antonio; Rodamilans, Bernardo

    2017-11-08

    The Potyviridae family is a major group of plant viruses that includes c. 200 species, most of which have narrow host ranges. The potyvirid P1 leader proteinase self-cleaves from the remainder of the viral polyprotein and shows large sequence variability linked to host adaptation. P1 proteins can be classified as Type A or Type B on the basis, amongst other things, of their dependence or not on a host factor to develop their protease activity. In this work, we studied Type A proteases from the Potyviridae family, characterizing their host factor requirements. Our in vitro cleavage analyses of potyvirid P1 proteases showed that the N-terminal domain is relevant for host factor interaction and suggested that the C-terminal domain is also involved. In the absence of plant factors, the N-terminal end of Plum pox virus P1 antagonizes protease self-processing. We performed extended deletion mutagenesis analysis to define the N-terminal antagonistic domain of P1. In viral infections, removal of the P1 protease antagonistic domain led to a gain-of-function phenotype, strongly increasing local infection in a non-permissive host. Altogether, our results shed new insights into the adaptation and evolution of potyvirids. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  12. A DEAD box protein facilitates HIV-1 replication as a cellular co-factor of Rev

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV-1 Rev escorts unspliced viral mRNAs out of the nucleus of infected cells, which allows formation of infectious HIV-1 virions. We have identified a putative DEAD box (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) RNA helicase, DDX1, as a cellular co-factor of Rev, through yeast and mammalian two-hybrid systems using the N-terminal motif of Rev as 'bait'. DDX1 is not a functional homolog of HIV-1 Rev, but down-regulation of DDX1 resulted in an alternative splicing pattern of Rev-responsive element (RRE)-containing mRNA, and attenuation of Gag p24 antigen production from HLfb rev(-) cells rescued by exogenous Rev. Co-transfection of a DDX1 expression vector with HIV-1 significantly increased viral production. DDX1 binding to Rev, as well as to the RRE, strongly suggest that DDX1 affects Rev function through the Rev-RRE axis. Moreover, down-regulation of DDX1 altered the steady state subcellular distribution of Rev, from nuclear/nucleolar to cytoplasmic dominance. These findings indicate that DDX1 is a critical cellular co-factor for Rev function, which maintains the proper subcellular distribution of this lentiviral regulatory protein. Therefore, alterations in DDX1-Rev interactions could induce HIV-1 persistence and targeting DDX1 may lead to rationally designed and novel anti-HIV-1 strategies and therapeutics

  13. CRISPR-Cas9 Can Inhibit HIV-1 Replication but NHEJ Repair Facilitates Virus Escape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Gang; Zhao, Na; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T.

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies demonstrated that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease Cas9 can be used for guide RNA (gRNA)-directed, sequence-specific cleavage of HIV proviral DNA in infected cells. We here demonstrate profound inhibition of HIV-1

  14. Suppression of Poxvirus Replication by Resveratrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Cao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Poxviruses continue to cause serious diseases even after eradication of the historically deadly infectious human disease, smallpox. Poxviruses are currently being developed as vaccine vectors and cancer therapeutic agents. Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol stilbenoid found in plants that has been shown to inhibit or enhance replication of a number of viruses, but the effect of resveratrol on poxvirus replication is unknown. In the present study, we found that resveratrol dramatically suppressed the replication of vaccinia virus (VACV, the prototypic member of poxviruses, in various cell types. Resveratrol also significantly reduced the replication of monkeypox virus, a zoonotic virus that is endemic in Western and Central Africa and causes human mortality. The inhibitory effect of resveratrol on poxviruses is independent of VACV N1 protein, a potential resveratrol binding target. Further experiments demonstrated that resveratrol had little effect on VACV early gene expression, while it suppressed VACV DNA synthesis, and subsequently post-replicative gene expression.

  15. Rescue from replication stress during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkos, Michalis; Naim, Valeria

    2017-04-03

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer and a common feature of human disorders, characterized by growth defects, neurodegeneration, cancer predisposition, and aging. Recent evidence has shown that DNA replication stress is a major driver of genomic instability and tumorigenesis. Cells can undergo mitosis with under-replicated DNA or unresolved DNA structures, and specific pathways are dedicated to resolving these structures during mitosis, suggesting that mitotic rescue from replication stress (MRRS) is a key process influencing genome stability and cellular homeostasis. Deregulation of MRRS following oncogene activation or loss-of-function of caretaker genes may be the cause of chromosomal aberrations that promote cancer initiation and progression. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of replication stress, focusing on its persistence in mitosis as well as the mechanisms and factors involved in its resolution, and the potential impact of incomplete replication or aberrant MRRS on tumorigenesis, aging and disease.

  16. Characteristics of the poliovirus replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienz, K; Egger, D; Pfister, T

    1994-01-01

    In the infected cell, the poliovirus replication complex (RC) is found in the center of a rosette formed by many virus-induced vesicles. The RC is attached to the vesicular membranes and contains a compact central part which encloses the replication forks of the replicative intermediate and all proteins necessary for strand elongation. The growing plus strands of the replicative intermediate protrude from the central part of the RC, but are still enclosed by membraneous structures of the rosette. After completion, progeny 36S RNA is set free at the surface of the rosette. In an in vitro transcription system, isolated replication complex-containing rosettes are active in initiation, elongation and maturation (release) of plus strand progeny RNA. Full functionality of the RC depends on an intact structural framework of all membraneous components of the rosette.

  17. Recommendations for Replication Research in Special Education: A Framework of Systematic, Conceptual Replications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Michael D.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Special education researchers conduct studies that can be considered replications. However, they do not often refer to them as replication studies. The purpose of this article is to consider the potential benefits of conceptualizing special education intervention research within a framework of systematic, conceptual replication. Specifically, we…

  18. Expert and novice facilitated modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavella, Elena; Papadopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    the behaviour of one expert and two novice facilitators during a Viable System Model workshop. The findings suggest common facilitation patterns in the behaviour of experts and novices. This contrasts literature claiming that experts and novices behave and use their available knowledge differently......This paper provides an empirical study based on action research in which expert and novice facilitators in facilitated modelling workshops are compared. There is limited empirical research analysing the differences between expert and novice facilitators. Aiming to address this gap we study...... and facilitation strategies in contexts in which external, expert facilitation is not always possible are also discussed, and limitations of this study are provided....

  19. Essence: Facilitating Software Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Ivan

    2008-01-01

      This paper suggests ways to facilitate creativity and innovation in software development. The paper applies four perspectives – Product, Project, Process, and People –to identify an outlook for software innovation. The paper then describes a new facility–Software Innovation Research Lab (SIRL......) – and a new method concept for software innovation – Essence – based on views, modes, and team roles. Finally, the paper reports from an early experiment using SIRL and Essence and identifies further research....

  20. Factors influencing microinjection molding replication quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Julie; Brulez, Anne-Catherine; Contraires, Elise; Larochette, Mathieu; Trannoy-Orban, Nathalie; Pignon, Maxime; Mauclair, Cyril; Valette, Stéphane; Benayoun, Stéphane

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increased interest in producing and providing high-precision plastic parts that can be manufactured by microinjection molding: gears, pumps, optical grating elements, and so on. For all of these applications, the replication quality is essential. This study has two goals: (1) fabrication of high-precision parts using the conventional injection molding machine; (2) identification of robust parameters that ensure production quality. Thus, different technological solutions have been used: cavity vacuuming and the use of a mold coated with DLC or CrN deposits. AFM and SEM analyses were carried out to characterize the replication profile. The replication quality was studied in terms of the process parameters, coated and uncoated molds and crystallinity of the polymer. Specific studies were processed to quantify the replicability of injection molded parts (ABS, PC and PP). Analysis of the Taguchi experimental designs permits prioritization of the impact of each parameter on the replication quality. A discussion taking into account these new parameters and the thermal and spreading properties on the coatings is proposed. It appeared that, in general, increasing the mold temperature improves the molten polymer fill in submicron features except for the steel insert (for which the presence of a vacuum is the most important factor). Moreover, the DLC coating was the best coating to increase the quality of the replication. This result could be explained by the lower thermal diffusivity of this coating. We noted that the viscosity of the polymers is not a primordial factor of the replication quality.

  1. Ultrastructural Characterization of Zika Virus Replication Factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Cortese

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: A global concern has emerged with the pandemic spread of Zika virus (ZIKV infections that can cause severe neurological symptoms in adults and newborns. ZIKV is a positive-strand RNA virus replicating in virus-induced membranous replication factories (RFs. Here we used various imaging techniques to investigate the ultrastructural details of ZIKV RFs and their relationship with host cell organelles. Analyses of human hepatic cells and neural progenitor cells infected with ZIKV revealed endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane invaginations containing pore-like openings toward the cytosol, reminiscent to RFs in Dengue virus-infected cells. Both the MR766 African strain and the H/PF/2013 Asian strain, the latter linked to neurological diseases, induce RFs of similar architecture. Importantly, ZIKV infection causes a drastic reorganization of microtubules and intermediate filaments forming cage-like structures surrounding the viral RF. Consistently, ZIKV replication is suppressed by cytoskeleton-targeting drugs. Thus, ZIKV RFs are tightly linked to rearrangements of the host cell cytoskeleton. : Cortese et al. show that ZIKV infection in both human hepatoma and neuronal progenitor cells induces drastic structural modification of the cellular architecture. Microtubules and intermediate filaments surround the viral replication factory composed of vesicles corresponding to ER membrane invagination toward the ER lumen. Importantly, alteration of microtubule flexibility impairs ZIKV replication. Keywords: Zika virus, flavivirus, human neural progenitor cells, replication factories, replication organelles, microtubules, intermediate filaments, electron microscopy, electron tomography, live-cell imaging

  2. Replicated Data Management for Mobile Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Douglas, Terry

    2008-01-01

    Managing data in a mobile computing environment invariably involves caching or replication. In many cases, a mobile device has access only to data that is stored locally, and much of that data arrives via replication from other devices, PCs, and services. Given portable devices with limited resources, weak or intermittent connectivity, and security vulnerabilities, data replication serves to increase availability, reduce communication costs, foster sharing, and enhance survivability of critical information. Mobile systems have employed a variety of distributed architectures from client-server

  3. Replication and Analysis of Ebbinghaus' Forgetting Curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murre, Jaap M J; Dros, Joeri

    2015-01-01

    We present a successful replication of Ebbinghaus' classic forgetting curve from 1880 based on the method of savings. One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days. The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data. We analyze the effects of serial position on forgetting and investigate what mathematical equations present a good fit to the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve and its replications. We conclude that the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve has indeed been replicated and that it is not completely smooth but most probably shows a jump upwards starting at the 24 hour data point.

  4. Replication and Analysis of Ebbinghaus’ Forgetting Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murre, Jaap M. J.; Dros, Joeri

    2015-01-01

    We present a successful replication of Ebbinghaus’ classic forgetting curve from 1880 based on the method of savings. One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days. The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data. We analyze the effects of serial position on forgetting and investigate what mathematical equations present a good fit to the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve and its replications. We conclude that the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve has indeed been replicated and that it is not completely smooth but most probably shows a jump upwards starting at the 24 hour data point. PMID:26148023

  5. Replication and Analysis of Ebbinghaus' Forgetting Curve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaap M J Murre

    Full Text Available We present a successful replication of Ebbinghaus' classic forgetting curve from 1880 based on the method of savings. One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days. The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data. We analyze the effects of serial position on forgetting and investigate what mathematical equations present a good fit to the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve and its replications. We conclude that the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve has indeed been replicated and that it is not completely smooth but most probably shows a jump upwards starting at the 24 hour data point.

  6. Replication-Competent Controlled Herpes Simplex Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, David C; Feller, Joyce; McAnany, Peterjon; Vilaboa, Nuria; Voellmy, Richard

    2015-10-01

    We present the development and characterization of a replication-competent controlled herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Replication-essential ICP4 and ICP8 genes of HSV-1 wild-type strain 17syn+ were brought under the control of a dually responsive gene switch. The gene switch comprises (i) a transactivator that is activated by a narrow class of antiprogestins, including mifepristone and ulipristal, and whose expression is mediated by a promoter cassette that comprises an HSP70B promoter and a transactivator-responsive promoter and (ii) transactivator-responsive promoters that drive the ICP4 and ICP8 genes. Single-step growth experiments in different cell lines demonstrated that replication of the recombinant virus, HSV-GS3, is strictly dependent on an activating treatment consisting of administration of a supraphysiological heat dose in the presence of an antiprogestin. The replication-competent controlled virus replicates with an efficiency approaching that of the wild-type virus from which it was derived. Essentially no replication occurs in the absence of activating treatment or if HSV-GS3-infected cells are exposed only to heat or antiprogestin. These findings were corroborated by measurements of amounts of viral DNA and transcripts of the regulated ICP4 gene and the glycoprotein C (gC) late gene, which was not regulated. Similar findings were made in experiments with a mouse footpad infection model. The alphaherpesviruses have long been considered vectors for recombinant vaccines and oncolytic therapies. The traditional approach uses vector backbones containing attenuating mutations that restrict replication to ensure safety. The shortcoming of this approach is that the attenuating mutations tend to limit both the immune presentation and oncolytic properties of these vectors. HSV-GS3 represents a novel type of vector that, when activated, replicates with the efficiency of a nonattenuated virus and whose safety is derived from deliberate, stringent regulation of

  7. LHCb Data Replication During SC3

    CERN Multimedia

    Smith, A

    2006-01-01

    LHCb's participation in LCG's Service Challenge 3 involves testing the bulk data transfer infrastructure developed to allow high bandwidth distribution of data across the grid in accordance with the computing model. To enable reliable bulk replication of data, LHCb's DIRAC system has been integrated with gLite's File Transfer Service middleware component to make use of dedicated network links between LHCb computing centres. DIRAC's Data Management tools previously allowed the replication, registration and deletion of files on the grid. For SC3 supplementary functionality has been added to allow bulk replication of data (using FTS) and efficient mass registration to the LFC replica catalog.Provisional performance results have shown that the system developed can meet the expected data replication rate required by the computing model in 2007. This paper details the experience and results of integration and utilisation of DIRAC with the SC3 transfer machinery.

  8. Surface Microstructure Replication in Injection Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Arlø, Uffe Rolf

    2005-01-01

    topography is transcribed onto the plastic part through complex mechanisms. This replication however, is not perfect, and the replication quality depends on the plastic material properties, the topography itself, and the process conditions. This paper describes and discusses an investigation of injection......In recent years polymer components with surface microstructures have been in rising demand for applications such as lab-on-a-chip and optical components. Injection moulding has proven to be a feasible and efficient way to manufacture such components. In injection moulding the mould surface...... moulding of surface microstructures. Emphasis is put on the ability to replicate surface microstructures under normal injection moulding conditions, notably with low cost materials at low mould temperatures. The replication of surface microstructures in injection moulding has been explored...

  9. Lipid Tales of Viral Replication and Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan-Bonnet, Nihal

    2017-03-01

    Positive-strand RNA viruses are the largest group of RNA viruses on Earth and cellular membranes are critical for all aspects of their life cycle, from entry and replication to exit. In particular, membranes serve as platforms for replication and as carriers to transmit these viruses to other cells, the latter either as an envelope surrounding a single virus or as the vesicle containing a population of viruses. Notably, many animal and human viruses appear to induce and exploit phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate/cholesterol-enriched membranes for replication, whereas many plant and insect-vectored animal viruses utilize phosphatidylethanolamine/cholesterol-enriched membranes for the same purpose; and phosphatidylserine-enriched membrane carriers are widely used by both single and populations of viruses for transmission. Here I discuss the implications for viral pathogenesis and therapeutic development of this remarkable convergence on specific membrane lipid blueprints for replication and transmission. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Surface Micro Topography Replication in Injection Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlø, Uffe Rolf; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Kjær, Erik Michael

    2005-01-01

    carried out with rough EDM (electrical discharge machining) mould surfaces, a PS grade, and by applying established three-dimensional topography parameters. Significant quantitative relationships between process parameters and topography parameters were established. It further appeared that replication...

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Replication Checkpoint Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénédicte Recolin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The major challenge of the cell cycle is to deliver an intact, and fully duplicated, genetic material to the daughter cells. To this end, progression of DNA synthesis is monitored by a feedback mechanism known as replication checkpoint that is untimely linked to DNA replication. This signaling pathway ensures coordination of DNA synthesis with cell cycle progression. Failure to activate this checkpoint in response to perturbation of DNA synthesis (replication stress results in forced cell division leading to chromosome fragmentation, aneuploidy, and genomic instability. In this review, we will describe current knowledge of the molecular determinants of the DNA replication checkpoint in eukaryotic cells and discuss a model of activation of this signaling pathway crucial for maintenance of genomic stability.

  12. Is psychology suffering from a replication crisis? What does "failure to replicate" really mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Scott E; Lau, Michael Y; Howard, George S

    2015-09-01

    Psychology has recently been viewed as facing a replication crisis because efforts to replicate past study findings frequently do not show the same result. Often, the first study showed a statistically significant result but the replication does not. Questions then arise about whether the first study results were false positives, and whether the replication study correctly indicates that there is truly no effect after all. This article suggests these so-called failures to replicate may not be failures at all, but rather are the result of low statistical power in single replication studies, and the result of failure to appreciate the need for multiple replications in order to have enough power to identify true effects. We provide examples of these power problems and suggest some solutions using Bayesian statistics and meta-analysis. Although the need for multiple replication studies may frustrate those who would prefer quick answers to psychology's alleged crisis, the large sample sizes typically needed to provide firm evidence will almost always require concerted efforts from multiple investigators. As a result, it remains to be seen how many of the recently claimed failures to replicate will be supported or instead may turn out to be artifacts of inadequate sample sizes and single study replications. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Replication and Analysis of Ebbinghaus? Forgetting Curve

    OpenAIRE

    Murre, Jaap M. J.; Dros, Joeri

    2015-01-01

    We present a successful replication of Ebbinghaus’ classic forgetting curve from 1880 based on the method of savings. One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days. The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data. We analyze the effects of serial position on forgetting and investigate what mathematical equations present a good fit to the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve and its replications. We conclude that the Ebbingha...

  14. Evolution of Database Replication Technologies for WLCG

    OpenAIRE

    Baranowski, Zbigniew; Pardavila, Lorena Lobato; Blaszczyk, Marcin; Dimitrov, Gancho; Canali, Luca

    2015-01-01

    In this article we summarize several years of experience on database replication technologies used at WLCG and we provide a short review of the available Oracle technologies and their key characteristics. One of the notable changes and improvement in this area in recent past has been the introduction of Oracle GoldenGate as a replacement of Oracle Streams. We report in this article on the preparation and later upgrades for remote replication done in collaboration with ATLAS and Tier 1 databas...

  15. The Legal Road To Replicating Silicon Valley

    OpenAIRE

    John Armour; Douglas Cumming

    2004-01-01

    Must policymakers seeking to replicate the success of Silicon Valley’s venture capital market first replicate other US institutions, such as deep and liquid stock markets? Or can legal reforms alone make a significant difference? In this paper, we compare the economic and legal determinants of venture capital investment, fundraising and exits. We introduce a cross-sectional and time series empirical analysis across 15 countries and 13 years of data spanning an entire business cycle. We show t...

  16. Commercial Building Partnerships Replication and Diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Dillon, Heather E.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2013-09-16

    This study presents findings from survey and interview data investigating replication efforts of Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) partners that worked directly with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL partnered directly with 12 organizations on new and retrofit construction projects, which represented approximately 28 percent of the entire U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CBP program. Through a feedback survey mechanism, along with personal interviews, PNNL gathered quantitative and qualitative data relating to replication efforts by each organization. These data were analyzed to provide insight into two primary research areas: 1) CBP partners’ replication efforts of technologies and approaches used in the CBP project to the rest of the organization’s building portfolio (including replication verification), and, 2) the market potential for technology diffusion into the total U.S. commercial building stock, as a direct result of the CBP program. The first area of this research focused specifically on replication efforts underway or planned by each CBP program participant. Factors that impact replication include motivation, organizational structure and objectives firms have for implementation of energy efficient technologies. Comparing these factors between different CBP partners revealed patterns in motivation for constructing energy efficient buildings, along with better insight into market trends for green building practices. The second area of this research develops a diffusion of innovations model to analyze potential broad market impacts of the CBP program on the commercial building industry in the United States.

  17. Facilitative root interactions in intercrops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, H.; Jensen, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    Facilitation takes place when plants ameliorate the environment of their neighbours, and increase their growth and survival. Facilitation occurs in natural ecosystems as well as in agroecosystems. We discuss examples of facilitative root interactions in intercropped agroecosystems; including...... of root architecture, exudation of growth stimulating substances, and biofumigation. Facilitative root interactions are most likely to be of importance in nutrient poor soils and in low-input agroecosystems due to critical interspecific competition for plant growth factors. However, studies from more...

  18. Development of an Abbe Error Free Micro Coordinate Measuring Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiangxian Huang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A micro Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM with the measurement volume of 50 mm × 50 mm × 50 mm and measuring accuracy of about 100 nm (2σ has been developed. In this new micro CMM, an XYZ stage, which is driven by three piezo-motors in X, Y and Z directions, can achieve the drive resolution of about 1 nm and the stroke of more than 50 mm. In order to reduce the crosstalk among X-, Y- and Z-stages, a special mechanical structure, which is called co-planar stage, is introduced. The movement of the stage in each direction is detected by a laser interferometer. A contact type of probe is adopted for measurement. The center of the probe ball coincides with the intersection point of the measuring axes of the three laser interferometers. Therefore, the metrological system of the CMM obeys the Abbe principle in three directions and is free from Abbe error. The CMM is placed in an anti-vibration and thermostatic chamber for avoiding the influence of vibration and temperature fluctuation. A series of experimental results show that the measurement uncertainty within 40 mm among X, Y and Z directions is about 100 nm (2σ. The flatness of measuring face of the gauge block is also measured and verified the performance of the developed micro CMM.

  19. Legionella pneumophila-Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles Promote Bacterial Replication in Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lena Jung

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs is a phenomenon of Gram-negative bacteria. This includes Legionella pneumophila (L. pneumophila, a causative agent of severe pneumonia. Upon its transmission into the lung, L. pneumophila primarily infects and replicates within macrophages. Here, we analyzed the influence of L. pneumophila OMVs on macrophages. To this end, differentiated THP-1 cells were incubated with increasing doses of Legionella OMVs, leading to a TLR2-dependent classical activation of macrophages with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling reduced the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, treatment of THP-1 cells with OMVs prior to infection reduced replication of L. pneumophila in THP-1 cells. Blocking of TLR2 activation or heat denaturation of OMVs restored bacterial replication in the first 24 h of infection. With prolonged infection-time, OMV pre-treated macrophages became more permissive for bacterial replication than untreated cells and showed increased numbers of Legionella-containing vacuoles and reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Additionally, miRNA-146a was found to be transcriptionally induced by OMVs and to facilitate bacterial replication. Accordingly, IRAK-1, one of miRNA-146a's targets, showed prolonged activation-dependent degradation, which rendered THP-1 cells more permissive for Legionella replication. In conclusion, L. pneumophila OMVs are initially potent pro-inflammatory stimulators of macrophages, acting via TLR2, IRAK-1, and NF-κB, while at later time points, OMVs facilitate L. pneumophila replication by miR-146a-dependent IRAK-1 suppression. OMVs might thereby promote spreading of L. pneumophila in the host.

  20. Efficient replication of genotype 3a and 4a hepatitis C virus replicons in human hepatoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Mohsan; Scheel, Troels K H; Gottwein, Judith M

    2012-01-01

    culture adaptive mutations originally reported for genotype 1b replicons. RNA replication was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and detection of viral protein. Sequencing of multiple independent replicon clones revealed the presence of additional nonsynonymous mutations. Interestingly......Despite recent advances in the treatment of hepatitis C, the quest for pan-genotype, effective, and well-tolerated inhibitors continues. To facilitate these efforts, it is desirable to have in vitro replication systems for all major HCV genotypes. However, cell culture replication systems exist...

  1. The structure and function of replication protein A in DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Aishwarya; Borgstahl, Gloria E O

    2012-01-01

    In all organisms from bacteria and archaea to eukarya, single-stranded DNA binding proteins play an essential role in most, if not all, nuclear metabolism involving single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic ssDNA binding protein, has two important roles in DNA metabolism: (1) in binding ssDNA to protect it and to keep it unfolded, and (2) in coordinating the assembly and disassembly of numerous proteins and protein complexes during processes such as DNA replication. Since its discovery as a vital player in the process of replication, RPAs roles in recombination and DNA repair quickly became evident. This chapter summarizes the current understanding of RPA's roles in replication by reviewing the available structural data, DNA-binding properties, interactions with various replication proteins, and interactions with DNA repair proteins when DNA replication is stalled.

  2. The Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) HBx Protein Activates AKT To Simultaneously Regulate HBV Replication and Hepatocyte Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Siddhartha

    2014-01-01

    essential role of HBx during HBV replication, HBx activation of AKT inhibits hepatocyte apoptosis, and this may facilitate persistent, noncytopathic HBV replication. AKT regulates HBV replication by reducing the activity of the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). HBx activation of AKT may contribute to the development of liver cancer by facilitating persistent HBV replication, augmenting the dedifferentiation of hepatocytes by inhibiting HNF4α functions, and activating AKT-regulated oncogenic pathways. AKT-regulated factors may provide therapeutic targets for inhibiting HBV replication and the development of HBV-associated liver cancer. PMID:25355887

  3. UGGT1 enhances enterovirus 71 pathogenicity by promoting viral RNA synthesis and viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Nien Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA virus infections can induce the stress-related unfolded protein response (UPR in host cells. This study found that enterovirus A71 (EVA71 utilizes host UDP-glucose glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGGT1, a key endoplasmic reticulum protein (ER involved in UPR, to enhance viral replication and virulence. EVA71 forms replication complexes (RCs on cellular membranes that contain a mix of host and viral proteins to facilitate viral replication, but the components and processes involved in the assembly and function of RCs are not fully understood. Using EVA71 as a model, this study found that host UGGT1 and viral 3D polymerase co-precipitate along with other factors on membranous replication complexes to enhance viral replication. Increased UGGT1 levels elevated viral growth rates, while viral pathogenicity was observed to be lower in heterozygous knockout mice (Uggt1 +/- mice. These findings provide important insight on the role of UPR and host UGGT1 in regulating RNA virus replication and pathogenicity.

  4. SSRI Facilitated Crack Dancing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Doobay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Choreoathetoid movement secondary to cocaine use is a well-documented phenomenon better known as “crack dancing.” It consists of uncontrolled writhing movements secondary to excess dopamine from cocaine use. We present a 32-year-old male who had been using cocaine for many years and was recently started on paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI for worsening depression four weeks before presentation. He had been doing cocaine every 2 weeks for the last three years and had never “crack danced” before this episode. The authors have conducted a thorough literature review and cited studies that suggest “crack dancing” is associated with excess dopamine. There has never been a documented case report of an SSRI being linked with “crack dancing.” The authors propose that the excess dopaminergic effect of the SSRI lowered the dopamine threshold for “crack dancing.” There is a communication with the Raphe Nucleus and the Substantia Nigra, which explains how the SSRI increases dopamine levels. This is the first documented case of an SSRI facilitating the “crack dance.”

  5. Facilitating post traumatic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Helen

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst negative responses to traumatic injury have been well documented in the literature, there is a small but growing body of work that identifies posttraumatic growth as a salient feature of this experience. We contribute to this discourse by reporting on the experiences of 13 individuals who were traumatically injured, had undergone extensive rehabilitation and were discharged from formal care. All participants were injured through involvement in a motor vehicle accident, with the exception of one, who was injured through falling off the roof of a house. Methods In this qualitative study, we used an audio-taped in-depth interview with each participant as the means of data collection. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically to determine the participants' unique perspectives on the experience of recovery from traumatic injury. In reporting the findings, all participants' were given a pseudonym to assure their anonymity. Results Most participants indicated that their involvement in a traumatic occurrence was a springboard for growth that enabled them to develop new perspectives on life and living. Conclusion There are a number of contributions that health providers may make to the recovery of individuals who have been traumatically injured to assist them to develop new views of vulnerability and strength, make changes in relationships, and facilitate philosophical, physical and spiritual growth.

  6. Dynamics of Escherichia coli Chromosome Segregation during Multifork Replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2007-01-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division...

  7. Replication ofVibrio choleraeclassical CTX phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jin; Yu, Hyun Jin; Lee, Je Hee; Kim, Jae-Ouk; Han, Seung Hyun; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Chun, Jongsik; Nair, G Balakrish; Kim, Dong Wook

    2017-02-28

    The toxigenic classical and El Tor biotype Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 strains are generated by lysogenization of host-type-specific cholera toxin phages (CTX phages). Experimental evidence of the replication and transmission of an El Tor biotype-specific CTX phage, CTX-1, has explained the evolution of V. cholerae El Tor biotype strains. The generation of classical biotype strains has not been demonstrated in the laboratory, and the classical biotype-specific CTX phage, CTX-cla, is considered to be defective with regard to replication. However, the identification of atypical El Tor strains that contain CTX-cla-like phage, CTX-2, indicates that CTX-cla and CTX-2 replicate and can be transmitted to V. cholerae strains. The replication of CTX-cla and CTX-2 phages and the transduction of El Tor biotype strains by various CTX phages under laboratory conditions are demonstrated in this report. We have established a plasmid-based CTX phage replication system that supports the replication of CTX-1, CTX-cla, CTX-2, and CTX-O139. The replication of CTX-2 from the tandem repeat of lysogenic CTX-2 in Wave 2 El Tor strains is also presented. El Tor biotype strains can be transduced by CTX phages in vitro by introducing a point mutation in toxT , the transcriptional activator of the tcp (toxin coregulated pilus) gene cluster and the cholera toxin gene. This mutation also increases the expression of cholera toxin in El Tor strains in a sample single-phase culture. Our results thus constitute experimental evidence of the genetic mechanism of the evolution of V. cholerae .

  8. Mechanisms Governing DDK Regulation of the Initiation of DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larasati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK complex—comprised of cell division cycle (Cdc7 kinase and its regulatory subunit dumbbell former 4 (Dbf4—is required to trigger the initiation of DNA replication through the phosphorylation of multiple minichromosome maintenance complex subunits 2-7 (Mcm2-7. DDK is also a target of the radiation sensitive 53 (Rad53 checkpoint kinase in response to replication stress. Numerous investigations have determined mechanistic details, including the regions of Mcm2, Mcm4, and Mcm6 phosphorylated by DDK, and a number of DDK docking sites. Similarly, the way in which the Rad53 forkhead-associated 1 (FHA1 domain binds to DDK—involving both canonical and non-canonical interactions—has been elucidated. Recent work has revealed mutual promotion of DDK and synthetic lethal with dpb11-1 3 (Sld3 roles. While DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2-7 subunits facilitates their interaction with Sld3 at origins, Sld3 in turn stimulates DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2. Details of a mutually antagonistic relationship between DDK and Rap1-interacting factor 1 (Rif1 have also recently come to light. While Rif1 is able to reverse DDK-mediated Mcm2-7 complex phosphorylation by targeting the protein phosphatase glycogen 7 (Glc7 to origins, there is evidence to suggest that DDK can counteract this activity by binding to and phosphorylating Rif1.

  9. Initiation of Replication in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob

    plasmid results in a lower origin concentration and asynchronous initiation. The optimal DARS1 and DARS2 location was investigated using a novel transposon mediated approach. Here we find that the optimal DARS2 position is in fact the wild-type position. The same is not true for DARS1. We also show......The circular chromosome of Escherichia coli is replicated by two replisomes assembled at the unique origin and moving in the opposite direction until they meet in the less well defined terminus. The key protein in initiation of replication, DnaA, facilitates the unwinding of double-stranded DNA...... of regulation of initiation in E. coli. Indeed, we show that the chromosomal position of regions influence the regulation of initiation. Relocation of DARS1 to oriC or datA to terC results in an increased origin concentration compared to the wild-type. DARS2 located in the terminus or on a low-copy number...

  10. Autophagy Negatively Regulates Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Longjun; Yu, Haidong; Gu, Weihong; Luo, Xiaolei; Li, Ren; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Yunfei; Yang, Lijun; Shen, Nan; Feng, Li; Wang, Yue

    2016-03-31

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient pathway that has been shown to be important in the innate immune defense against several viruses. However, little is known about the regulatory role of autophagy in transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) replication. In this study, we found that TGEV infection increased the number of autophagosome-like double- and single-membrane vesicles in the cytoplasm of host cells, a phenomenon that is known to be related to autophagy. In addition, virus replication was required for the increased amount of the autophagosome marker protein LC3-II. Autophagic flux occurred in TGEV-infected cells, suggesting that TGEV infection triggered a complete autophagic response. When autophagy was pharmacologically inhibited by wortmannin or LY294002, TGEV replication increased. The increase in virus yield via autophagy inhibition was further confirmed by the use of siRNA duplexes, through which three proteins required for autophagy were depleted. Furthermore, TGEV replication was inhibited when autophagy was activated by rapamycin. The antiviral response of autophagy was confirmed by using siRNA to reduce the expression of gene p300, which otherwise inhibits autophagy. Together, the results indicate that TGEV infection activates autophagy and that autophagy then inhibits further TGEV replication.

  11. Extremal dynamics in random replicator ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kärenlampi, Petri P., E-mail: petri.karenlampi@uef.fi

    2015-10-02

    The seminal numerical experiment by Bak and Sneppen (BS) is repeated, along with computations with replicator models, including a greater amount of features. Both types of models do self-organize, and do obey power-law scaling for the size distribution of activity cycles. However species extinction within the replicator models interferes with the BS self-organized critical (SOC) activity. Speciation–extinction dynamics ruins any stationary state which might contain a steady size distribution of activity cycles. The BS-type activity appears as a dissimilar phenomenon in comparison to speciation–extinction dynamics in the replicator system. No criticality is found from the speciation–extinction dynamics. Neither are speciations and extinctions in real biological macroevolution known to contain any diverging distributions, or self-organization towards any critical state. Consequently, biological macroevolution probably is not a self-organized critical phenomenon. - Highlights: • Extremal Dynamics organizes random replicator ecosystems to two phases in fitness space. • Replicator systems show power-law scaling of activity. • Species extinction interferes with Bak–Sneppen type mutation activity. • Speciation–extinction dynamics does not show any critical phase transition. • Biological macroevolution probably is not a self-organized critical phenomenon.

  12. Replicating viruses for gynecologic cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J W; Kim, M

    2016-01-01

    Despite advanced therapeutic treatments, gynecologic malignancies such as cervical and ovarian cancers are still the top ten leading cause of cancer death among women in South Korea. Thus a novel and innovative approach is urgently needed. Naturally occurring viruses are live, replication-proficient viruses that specifically infect human cancer cells while sparing normal cell counterparts. Since the serendipitous discovery of the naturally oncotropic virus targeting gynecologic cancer in 1920s, various replicating viruses have shown various degrees of safety and efficacy in preclinical or clinical applications for gynecologic cancer therapy. Cellular oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, which are frequently dysregulated in gynecologic malignancies, play an important role in determining viral oncotropism. Published articles describing replicating, oncolytic viruses for gynecologic cancers are thoroughly reviewed. This review outlines the discovery of replication-proficient virus strains for targeting gynecologic malignancies, recent progresses elucidating molecular connections between oncogene/tumor suppressor gene abnormalities and viral oncotropism, and the associated preclinical/clinical implications. The authors would also like to propose future directions in the utility of the replicating viruses for gynecologic cancer therapy.

  13. COPI is required for enterovirus 71 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Wang

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71, a member of the Picornaviridae family, is found in Asian countries where it causes a wide range of human diseases. No effective therapy is available for the treatment of these infections. Picornaviruses undergo RNA replication in association with membranes of infected cells. COPI and COPII have been shown to be involved in the formation of picornavirus-induced vesicles. Replication of several picornaviruses, including poliovirus and Echovirus 11 (EV11, is dependent on COPI or COPII. Here, we report that COPI, but not COPII, is required for EV71 replication. Replication of EV71 was inhibited by brefeldin A and golgicide A, inhibitors of COPI activity. Furthermore, we found EV71 2C protein interacted with COPI subunits by co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assay, indicating that COPI coatomer might be directed to the viral replication complex through viral 2C protein. Additionally, because the pathway is conserved among different species of enteroviruses, it may represent a novel target for antiviral therapies.

  14. DNA replication stress and cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitao, Hiroyuki; Iimori, Makoto; Kataoka, Yuki; Wakasa, Takeshi; Tokunaga, Eriko; Saeki, Hiroshi; Oki, Eiji; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2018-02-01

    DNA replication is one of the fundamental biological processes in which dysregulation can cause genome instability. This instability is one of the hallmarks of cancer and confers genetic diversity during tumorigenesis. Numerous experimental and clinical studies have indicated that most tumors have experienced and overcome the stresses caused by the perturbation of DNA replication, which is also referred to as DNA replication stress (DRS). When we consider therapeutic approaches for tumors, it is important to exploit the differences in DRS between tumor and normal cells. In this review, we introduce the current understanding of DRS in tumors and discuss the underlying mechanism of cancer therapy from the aspect of DRS. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. The replication of expansive production knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum; Yang, Cheng; Madsen, Erik Skov

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – With the aim to support offshore production line replication, this paper specifically aims to explore the use of templates and principles to transfer expansive productive knowledge embedded in a production line and understand the contingencies that influence the mix of these approaches...... exploration, the small sample size is an obvious limitation for generalisation. Practical implications – A roadmap for knowledge transfer within the replication of a production line is suggested, which, together with four managerial suggestions, provides strong support and clear directions to managers....... Originality/value – Research in replication to date has mostly focused on templates and has mainly taken an organizational perspective. This paper shows its potential contribution on bridging the relevant theoretical gaps by (1) addressing the effects of principles; and (2) exploring how to use templates...

  16. The replication of expansive production knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum; Yang, Cheng; Madsen, Erik Skov

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – With the aim to support offshore production line replication, this paper specifically aims to explore the use of templates and principles to transfer expansive productive knowledge embedded in a production line and understand the contingencies that influence the mix of these approaches....... Design/methodology/approach – Two case studies are introduced. Empirical data were collected over a period of two years based on interviews and participating observations. Findings – The findings show that (1) knowledge transfer within the replication of a production line is a stepwise expansive process......; and (2) rather than being viewed as alternative approaches, templates and principles should be seen as complementary once the transfer motive moves beyond pure replication. Research limitations – The concepts introduced in this paper were derived from two Danish cases. While acceptable for theory...

  17. Evolution of Database Replication Technologies for WLCG

    CERN Document Server

    Baranowski, Zbigniew; Blaszczyk, Marcin; Dimitrov, Gancho; Canali, Luca

    2015-01-01

    In this article we summarize several years of experience on database replication technologies used at WLCG and we provide a short review of the available Oracle technologies and their key characteristics. One of the notable changes and improvement in this area in recent past has been the introduction of Oracle GoldenGate as a replacement of Oracle Streams. We report in this article on the preparation and later upgrades for remote replication done in collaboration with ATLAS and Tier 1 database administrators, including the experience from running Oracle GoldenGate in production. Moreover, we report on another key technology in this area: Oracle Active Data Guard which has been adopted in several of the mission critical use cases for database replication between online and offline databases for the LHC experiments.

  18. Sulfolobus Replication Factor C stimulates the activity of DNA Polymerase B1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Xuanxuan; Zhang, Likui; Guo, Li

    2014-01-01

    Replication factor C (RFC) is known to function in loading proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) onto primed DNA, allowing PCNA to tether DNA polymerase for highly processive DNA synthesis in eukaryotic and archaeal replication. In this report, we show that an RFC complex from...... the hyperthermophilic archaea of the genus Sulfolobus physically interacts with DNA polymerase B1 (PolB1) and enhances both the polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease activities of PolB1 in an ATP-independent manner. Stimulation of the PolB1 activity by RFC is independent of the ability of RFC to bind DNA but is consistent...... with the ability of RFC to facilitate DNA binding by PolB1 through protein-protein interaction. These results suggest that Sulfolobus RFC may play a role in recruiting DNA polymerase for efficient primer extension, in addition to clamp loading, during DNA replication....

  19. Chromatin structure and replication origins: determinants of chromosome replication and nuclear organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Owen K; Aladjem, Mirit I

    2014-10-09

    The DNA replication program is, in part, determined by the epigenetic landscape that governs local chromosome architecture and directs chromosome duplication. Replication must coordinate with other biochemical processes occurring concomitantly on chromatin, such as transcription and remodeling, to insure accurate duplication of both genetic and epigenetic features and to preserve genomic stability. The importance of genome architecture and chromatin looping in coordinating cellular processes on chromatin is illustrated by two recent sets of discoveries. First, chromatin-associated proteins that are not part of the core replication machinery were shown to affect the timing of DNA replication. These chromatin-associated proteins could be working in concert, or perhaps in competition, with the transcriptional machinery and with chromatin modifiers to determine the spatial and temporal organization of replication initiation events. Second, epigenetic interactions are mediated by DNA sequences that determine chromosomal replication. In this review, we summarize recent findings and current models linking spatial and temporal regulation of the replication program with epigenetic signaling. We discuss these issues in the context of the genome's three-dimensional structure with an emphasis on events occurring during the initiation of DNA replication. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. The progression of replication forks at natural replication barriers in live bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moolman, M.C.; Tiruvadi Krishnan, S; Kerssemakers, J.W.J.; de Leeuw, R.; Lorent, V.J.F.; Sherratt, David J.; Dekker, N.H.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-DNA complexes are one of the principal barriers the replisome encounters during replication. One such barrier is the Tus-ter complex, which is a direction dependent barrier for replication fork progression. The details concerning the dynamics of the replisome when encountering these

  1. Signal replication in a DNA nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Oscar; Houmadi, Said; Aimé, Jean-Pierre; Elezgaray, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Logic circuits based on DNA strand displacement reaction are the basic building blocks of future nanorobotic systems. The circuits tethered to DNA origami platforms present several advantages over solution-phase versions where couplings are always diffusion-limited. Here we consider a possible implementation of one of the basic operations needed in the design of these circuits, namely, signal replication. We show that with an appropriate preparation of the initial state, signal replication performs in a reproducible way. We also show the existence of side effects concomitant to the high effective concentrations in tethered circuits, such as slow leaky reactions and cross-activation.

  2. Chromatin challenges during DNA replication and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Rocha, Walter; Verreault, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Inheritance and maintenance of the DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin are central for eukaryotic life. To orchestrate DNA-replication and -repair processes in the context of chromatin is a challenge, both in terms of accessibility and maintenance of chromatin organization. To meet...... the challenge of maintenance, cells have evolved efficient nucleosome-assembly pathways and chromatin-maturation mechanisms that reproduce chromatin organization in the wake of DNA replication and repair. The aim of this Review is to describe how these pathways operate and to highlight how the epigenetic...... landscape may be stably maintained even in the face of dramatic changes in chromatin structure....

  3. Temporal organization of cellular self-replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Victor; Pugatch, Rami

    Recent experiments demonstrate that single cells grow exponentially in time. A coarse grained model of cellular self-replication is presented based on a novel concept - the cell is viewed as a self-replicating queue. This allows to have a more fundamental look into various temporal organizations and, importantly, the inherent non-Markovianity of noise distributions. As an example, the distribution of doubling times can be inferred and compared to single cell experiments in bacteria. We observe data collapse upon scaling by the average doubling time for different environments and present an inherent task allocation trade-off. Support from the Simons Center for Systems Biology, IAS, Princeon.

  4. Involvement of Autophagy in Coronavirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Britton

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses are single stranded, positive sense RNA viruses, which induce the rearrangement of cellular membranes upon infection of a host cell. This provides the virus with a platform for the assembly of viral replication complexes, improving efficiency of RNA synthesis. The membranes observed in coronavirus infected cells include double membrane vesicles. By nature of their double membrane, these vesicles resemble cellular autophagosomes, generated during the cellular autophagy pathway. In addition, coronavirus infection has been demonstrated to induce autophagy. Here we review current knowledge of coronavirus induced membrane rearrangements and the involvement of autophagy or autophagy protein microtubule associated protein 1B light chain 3 (LC3 in coronavirus replication.

  5. SV40 utilizes ATM kinase activity to prevent non-homologous end joining of broken viral DNA replication products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowd, Gregory A; Mody, Dviti; Eggold, Joshua; Cortez, David; Friedman, Katherine L; Fanning, Ellen

    2014-12-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) and cellular DNA replication rely on host ATM and ATR DNA damage signaling kinases to facilitate DNA repair and elicit cell cycle arrest following DNA damage. During SV40 DNA replication, ATM kinase activity prevents concatemerization of the viral genome whereas ATR activity prevents accumulation of aberrant genomes resulting from breakage of a moving replication fork as it converges with a stalled fork. However, the repair pathways that ATM and ATR orchestrate to prevent these aberrant SV40 DNA replication products are unclear. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting, we show that ATR kinase activity, but not DNA-PK(cs) kinase activity, facilitates some aspects of double strand break (DSB) repair when ATM is inhibited during SV40 infection. To clarify which repair factors associate with viral DNA replication centers, we examined the localization of DSB repair proteins in response to SV40 infection. Under normal conditions, viral replication centers exclusively associate with homology-directed repair (HDR) and do not colocalize with non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) factors. Following ATM inhibition, but not ATR inhibition, activated DNA-PK(cs) and KU70/80 accumulate at the viral replication centers while CtIP and BLM, proteins that initiate 5' to 3' end resection during HDR, become undetectable. Similar to what has been observed during cellular DSB repair in S phase, these data suggest that ATM kinase influences DSB repair pathway choice by preventing the recruitment of NHEJ factors to replicating viral DNA. These data may explain how ATM prevents concatemerization of the viral genome and promotes viral propagation. We suggest that inhibitors of DNA damage signaling and DNA repair could be used during infection to disrupt productive viral DNA replication.

  6. Origins of DNA Replication and Amplification in the Breast Cancer Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    somatic mutations or other genomic changes. We wish to ask if a genomic change (genetic or epigenetic) might produce novel binding site(s) for the...bacteriophages, animal viruses , and unicellular eukaryotes studied thus far have high AT content, presumably to facilitate unwinding of the DNA. Task (3...have the GC skew, which is more consistent with the base composition of replication origins from bacteria, viruses and yeast.  Performed

  7. Deep Temporal-Recurrent-Replicated-Softmax for Topical Trends over Time

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Pankaj; Rajaram, Subburam; Schütze, Hinrich; Andrassy, Bernt

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic topic modeling facilitates the identification of topical trends over time in temporal collections of unstructured documents. We introduce a novel unsupervised neural dynamic topic model known as Recurrent Neural Network-Replicated Softmax Model (RNNRSM), where the discovered topics at each time influence the topic discovery in the subsequent time steps. We account for the temporal ordering of documents by explicitly modeling a joint distribution of latent topical dependencies over tim...

  8. Suppression of Coronavirus Replication by Cyclophilin Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Sasaki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses infect a variety of mammalian and avian species and cause serious diseases in humans, cats, mice, and birds in the form of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP, mouse hepatitis, and avian infectious bronchitis, respectively. No effective vaccine or treatment has been developed for SARS-coronavirus or FIP virus, both of which cause lethal diseases. It has been reported that a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, could inhibit the replication of coronaviruses. CsA is a well-known immunosuppressive drug that binds to cellular cyclophilins to inhibit calcineurin, a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific phosphatase. The inhibition of calcineurin blocks the translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells from the cytosol into the nucleus, thus preventing the transcription of genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin-2. Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases with physiological functions that have been described for many years to include chaperone and foldase activities. Also, many viruses require cyclophilins for replication; these include human immunodeficiency virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and hepatitis C virus. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the suppression of viral replication differ for different viruses. This review describes the suppressive effects of CsA on coronavirus replication.

  9. Replication and analysis of Ebbinghaus' forgetting curve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murre, J.M.J.; Dros, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a successful replication of Ebbinghaus’ classic forgetting curve from 1880 based on the method of savings. One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days. The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data. We

  10. Optical replication techniques for image slicers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmoll, J.; Robertson, D.J.; Dubbeldam, C.M.; Bortoletto, F.; Pína, L.; Hudec, René; Prieto, E.; Norrie, C.; Ramsay- Howat, S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 50, 4-5 (2006), s. 263-266 ISSN 1387-6473 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : smart focal planes * image slicers * replication Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.914, year: 2006

  11. Surface microstructure replication in injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Uffe Arlø; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2006-01-01

    molding of surface microstructures. The fundamental problem of surface microstructure replication has been studied. The research is based on specific microstructures as found in lab-on-a-chip products and on rough surfaces generated from EDM (electro discharge machining) mold cavities. Emphasis is put...

  12. Conditionally replicating HIV and SIV variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Atze T.; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Conditionally replicating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) variants that can be switched on and off at will are attractive tools for HIV and SIV research. We constructed HIV and SIV variants in which the natural transcription control mechanism was replaced

  13. Inhibition of DNA replication by ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edenberg, H.J.

    1976-08-01

    DNA replication in ultraviolet-irradiated HeLa cells was studied by two different techniques: measurements of the kinetics of semiconservative DNA synthesis, and DNA fiber autoradiography. In examining the kinetics of semiconservative DNA synthesis, density label was used to avoid measuring the incorporation due to repair replication. The extent of inhibition varied with time. After doses of less than 10 J/m/sup 2/ the rate was initially depressed but later showed some recovery. After higher doses, a constant, low rate of synthesis was seen for at least the initial 6 h. An analysis of these data indicated that the inhibition of DNA synthesis could be explained by replication forks halting at pyrimidine dimers. DNA fiber autoradiography was used to further characterize replication after ultraviolet irradiation. The average length of labeled segments in irradiated cells increased in the time immediately after irradiation, and then leveled off. This is the predicted pattern if DNA synthesis in each replicon continued at its previous rate until a lesion is reached, and then halted. The frequency of lesions that block synthesis is approximately the same as the frequency of pyrimidine dimers.

  14. Den gode facilitator af refleksionsarbejde

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Pia

    2009-01-01

    præsenteres i det følgende afsnit, og forfatteren argumenterer for begrebet facilitator af refleksionsarbejde. Herefter udfoldes rollen som facilitator ifølge Ghay og Lillyman. De har fokus på positive praksisoplevelser og tillidsfulde relationer. Gillie Boltons teoretiske og praktiske referenceramme...

  15. Facilitating Dialogues about Racial Realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaye, Stephen John

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Facilitating dialogues about racial issues in higher education classroom settings continues to be a vexing problem facing postsecondary educators. In order for students to discuss race with their peers, they need skilled facilitators who are knowledgeable about racial issues and able to support students in these difficult…

  16. Bacteriophage SPP1 DNA replication strategies promote viral and disable host replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seco, Elena M; Zinder, John C; Manhart, Carol M; Lo Piano, Ambra; McHenry, Charles S; Ayora, Silvia

    2013-02-01

    Complex viruses that encode their own initiation proteins and subvert the host's elongation apparatus have provided valuable insights into DNA replication. Using purified bacteriophage SPP1 and Bacillus subtilis proteins, we have reconstituted a rolling circle replication system that recapitulates genetically defined protein requirements. Eleven proteins are required: phage-encoded helicase (G40P), helicase loader (G39P), origin binding protein (G38P) and G36P single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB); and host-encoded PolC and DnaE polymerases, processivity factor (β(2)), clamp loader (τ-δ-δ') and primase (DnaG). This study revealed a new role for the SPP1 origin binding protein. In the presence of SSB, it is required for initiation on replication forks that lack origin sequences, mimicking the activity of the PriA replication restart protein in bacteria. The SPP1 replisome is supported by both host and viral SSBs, but phage SSB is unable to support B. subtilis replication, likely owing to its inability to stimulate the PolC holoenzyme in the B. subtilis context. Moreover, phage SSB inhibits host replication, defining a new mechanism by which bacterial replication could be regulated by a viral factor.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic characterization of the origin-binding domain of the bacteriophage λ O replication initiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struble, E. B.; Gittis, A. G.; Bianchet, M. A.; McMacken, R.

    2007-01-01

    Crystallization and preliminary diffraction data of the N-terminal 19–139 fragment of the origin-binding domain of bacteriophage λ O replication initiator are reported. The bacteriophage λ O protein binds to the λ replication origin (oriλ) and serves as the primary replication initiator for the viral genome. The binding energy derived from the binding of O to oriλ is thought to help drive DNA opening to facilitate initiation of DNA replication. Detailed understanding of this process is severely limited by the lack of high-resolution structures of O protein or of any lambdoid phage-encoded paralogs either with or without DNA. The production of crystals of the origin-binding domain of λ O that diffract to 2.5 Å is reported. Anomalous dispersion methods will be used to solve this structure

  18. High-Resolution Replication Profiles Define the Stochastic Nature of Genome Replication Initiation and Termination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Hawkins

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genome replication is stochastic, and each cell uses a different cohort of replication origins. We demonstrate that interpreting high-resolution Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome replication data with a mathematical model allows quantification of the stochastic nature of genome replication, including the efficiency of each origin and the distribution of termination events. Single-cell measurements support the inferred values for stochastic origin activation time. A strain, in which three origins were inactivated, confirmed that the distribution of termination events is primarily dictated by the stochastic activation time of origins. Cell-to-cell variability in origin activity ensures that termination events are widely distributed across virtually the whole genome. We propose that the heterogeneity in origin usage contributes to genome stability by limiting potentially deleterious events from accumulating at particular loci.

  19. DNA Replication in Engineered Escherichia coli Genomes with Extra Replication Origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbredt, Sarah; Farmani, Neda; Sobetzko, Patrick; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2016-10-21

    The standard outline of bacterial genomes is a single circular chromosome with a single replication origin. From the bioengineering perspective, it appears attractive to extend this basic setup. Bacteria with split chromosomes or multiple replication origins have been successfully constructed in the last few years. The characteristics of these engineered strains will largely depend on the respective DNA replication patterns. However, the DNA replication has not been investigated systematically in engineered bacteria with multiple origins or split replicons. Here we fill this gap by studying a set of strains consisting of (i) E. coli strains with an extra copy of the native replication origin (oriC), (ii) E. coli strains with an extra copy of the replication origin from the secondary chromosome of Vibrio cholerae (oriII), and (iii) a strain in which the E. coli chromosome is split into two linear replicons. A combination of flow cytometry, microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and modeling revealed silencing of extra oriC copies and differential timing of ectopic oriII copies compared to the native oriC. The results were used to derive construction rules for future multiorigin and multireplicon projects.

  20. DNA replication and repair in Tilapia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yew, F.H.; Chang, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of ultraviolet radiation on a cell line established from the warm water fish Tilapia has been assessed by measuring the rate of DNA synthesis, excision repair, post-replication repair and cell survival. The cells tolerate ultraviolet radiation better than mammalian cells with respect to DNA synthesis, post-replication repair and cell survival. They are also efficient in excision repair, which in other fish cell lines has been found to be at a low level or absent. Their response to the inhibitors hydroxyurea and 1-β-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine is less sensitive than that of other cell lines, yet the cells seem to have very small pools of DNA precursor. (author)

  1. Learning to Facilitate (Online) Meetings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Peter; Bull, Susan; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    We describe an approach to teaching collaboration skills directly by building on competences for meeting facilitation. (Online) meetings provide a rich arena to practice collaboration since they can serve multiple purposes: learning, problem solving, decision making, idea generation and advancement...

  2. Individual but not fragile: individual differences in task control predict Stroop facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanthroff, E; Henik, A

    2013-06-01

    The Stroop effect is composed of interference and facilitation effects. The facilitation is less stable and thus many times is referred to as a "fragile effect". Here we suggest the facilitation effect is highly vulnerable to individual differences in control over the task conflict (between relevant color naming and irrelevant word reading in the Stroop task). We replicated previous findings of a significant correlation between stop-signal reaction time (SSRT) and Stroop interference, and also found a significant correlation between SSRT and the Stroop facilitation effect-participants with low inhibitory control (i.e., long SSRT) had no facilitation effect or even a reversed one. These results shed new light on the "fragile" facilitation effect and highlight the necessity of awareness of task conflict, especially in the Stroop task. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Replication of SNP associations with keratoconus in a Czech cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskova, Petra; Dudakova, Lubica; Krepelova, Anna; Klema, Jiri; Hysi, Pirro G

    2017-01-01

    Keratoconus is a relatively frequent disease leading to severe visual impairment. Existing therapies are imperfect and clinical management may benefit from improved understanding of mechanisms leading to this disease. We aim to investigate the replication of 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with keratoconus. SNPs from loci previously found in association with keratoconus were genotyped in 165 keratoconus cases of Caucasian Czech origin (108 males and 57 females) and 193 population and gender-matched controls. They included rs1536482 (COL5A1), rs4839200 (KCND3), rs757219 and rs214884 (IMMP2L), rs1328083 and rs1328089 (DAOA), rs2721051 (FOXO1), rs4894535 (FNDC3B), rs4954218 (MAP3K19, RAB3GAP1), rs9938149 (ZNF469) and rs1324183 (MPDZ). A case-control association analysis was assessed using Fisher's exact tests. The strongest association was found for rs1324183 (allelic test OR = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.10-2.24, p = 0.01). Statistically significant values were also obtained for rs2721051 (allelic test OR = 1.72; 95% CI, 1.07-2.77, p = 0.025) and rs4954218 (allelic test OR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.01-2.34; p = 0.047) which showed an opposite effect direction compared to previously reported one. Independent replication of association between two SNPs and keratoconus supports the association of these loci with the risks for the disease development, while the effect of rs4954218 warrants further investigation. Understanding the role of the genetic factors involved in keratoconus etiopathogenesis may facilitate development of novel therapies and an early detection.

  4. Replication of SNP associations with keratoconus in a Czech cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Liskova

    Full Text Available Keratoconus is a relatively frequent disease leading to severe visual impairment. Existing therapies are imperfect and clinical management may benefit from improved understanding of mechanisms leading to this disease. We aim to investigate the replication of 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with keratoconus.SNPs from loci previously found in association with keratoconus were genotyped in 165 keratoconus cases of Caucasian Czech origin (108 males and 57 females and 193 population and gender-matched controls. They included rs1536482 (COL5A1, rs4839200 (KCND3, rs757219 and rs214884 (IMMP2L, rs1328083 and rs1328089 (DAOA, rs2721051 (FOXO1, rs4894535 (FNDC3B, rs4954218 (MAP3K19, RAB3GAP1, rs9938149 (ZNF469 and rs1324183 (MPDZ. A case-control association analysis was assessed using Fisher's exact tests.The strongest association was found for rs1324183 (allelic test OR = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.10-2.24, p = 0.01. Statistically significant values were also obtained for rs2721051 (allelic test OR = 1.72; 95% CI, 1.07-2.77, p = 0.025 and rs4954218 (allelic test OR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.01-2.34; p = 0.047 which showed an opposite effect direction compared to previously reported one.Independent replication of association between two SNPs and keratoconus supports the association of these loci with the risks for the disease development, while the effect of rs4954218 warrants further investigation. Understanding the role of the genetic factors involved in keratoconus etiopathogenesis may facilitate development of novel therapies and an early detection.

  5. Replicable effects of primes on human behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, B Keith; Brown-Iannuzzi, Jazmin L; Loersch, Chris

    2016-10-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported online in Journal of Experimental Psychology: General on Oct 31 2016 (see record 2016-52334-001). ] The effect of primes (i.e., incidental cues) on human behavior has become controversial. Early studies reported counterintuitive findings, suggesting that primes can shape a wide range of human behaviors. Recently, several studies failed to replicate some earlier priming results, raising doubts about the reliability of those effects. We present a within-subjects procedure for priming behavior, in which participants decide whether to bet or pass on each trial of a gambling game. We report 6 replications (N = 988) showing that primes consistently affected gambling decisions when the decision was uncertain. Decisions were influenced by primes presented visibly, with a warning to ignore the primes (Experiments 1 through 3) and with subliminally presented masked primes (Experiment 4). Using a process dissociation procedure, we found evidence that primes influenced responses through both automatic and controlled processes (Experiments 5 and 6). Results provide evidence that primes can reliably affect behavior, under at least some conditions, without intention. The findings suggest that the psychological question of whether behavior priming effects are real should be separated from methodological issues affecting how easily particular experimental designs will replicate. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved

  6. Ultrastructural Characterization of Zika Virus Replication Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Mirko; Goellner, Sarah; Acosta, Eliana Gisela; Neufeldt, Christopher John; Oleksiuk, Olga; Lampe, Marko; Haselmann, Uta; Funaya, Charlotta; Schieber, Nicole; Ronchi, Paolo; Schorb, Martin; Pruunsild, Priit; Schwab, Yannick; Chatel-Chaix, Laurent; Ruggieri, Alessia; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2017-02-28

    A global concern has emerged with the pandemic spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) infections that can cause severe neurological symptoms in adults and newborns. ZIKV is a positive-strand RNA virus replicating in virus-induced membranous replication factories (RFs). Here we used various imaging techniques to investigate the ultrastructural details of ZIKV RFs and their relationship with host cell organelles. Analyses of human hepatic cells and neural progenitor cells infected with ZIKV revealed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane invaginations containing pore-like openings toward the cytosol, reminiscent to RFs in Dengue virus-infected cells. Both the MR766 African strain and the H/PF/2013 Asian strain, the latter linked to neurological diseases, induce RFs of similar architecture. Importantly, ZIKV infection causes a drastic reorganization of microtubules and intermediate filaments forming cage-like structures surrounding the viral RF. Consistently, ZIKV replication is suppressed by cytoskeleton-targeting drugs. Thus, ZIKV RFs are tightly linked to rearrangements of the host cell cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular Biology of Rotavirus Entry and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Marie Christine; Leon, Theresa; Diaz, Yuleima; Michelangeli, Fabian

    2009-01-01

    Rotavirus is a nonenveloped, double-stranded, RNA virus belonging to the Reoviridae family and is the major etiological agent of viral gastroenteritis in young children and young animals. Remarkable progress in the understanding of the rotavirus cycle has been made in the last 10 years. The knowledge of viral replication thus far acquired is based on structural studies, the expression and coexpression of individual viral proteins, silencing of individual genes by siRNAs, and the effects that these manipulations have on the physiology of the infected cell. The functions of the individual rotavirus proteins have been largely dissected; however, the interactions between them and with cell proteins, and the molecular mechanisms of virus replication, are just beginning to be understood. These advancements represent the basis for the development of effective vaccination and rational therapeutic strategies to combat rotavirus infection and diarrhea syndromes. In this paper, we review and try to integrate the new knowledge about rotavirus entry, replication, and assembly, and pose some of the questions that remain to be solved. PMID:20024520

  8. The molecular biology of Bluetongue virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Avnish; Roy, Polly

    2014-03-01

    The members of Orbivirus genus within the Reoviridae family are arthropod-borne viruses which are responsible for high morbidity and mortality in ruminants. Bluetongue virus (BTV) which causes disease in livestock (sheep, goat, cattle) has been in the forefront of molecular studies for the last three decades and now represents the best understood orbivirus at a molecular and structural level. The complex nature of the virion structure has been well characterised at high resolution along with the definition of the virus encoded enzymes required for RNA replication; the ordered assembly of the capsid shell as well as the protein and genome sequestration required for it; and the role of host proteins in virus entry and virus release. More recent developments of Reverse Genetics and Cell-Free Assembly systems have allowed integration of the accumulated structural and molecular knowledge to be tested at meticulous level, yielding higher insight into basic molecular virology, from which the rational design of safe efficacious vaccines has been possible. This article is centred on the molecular dissection of BTV with a view to understanding the role of each protein in the virus replication cycle. These areas are important in themselves for BTV replication but they also indicate the pathways that related viruses, which includes viruses that are pathogenic to man and animals, might also use providing an informed starting point for intervention or prevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Patient advocacy: barriers and facilitators

    OpenAIRE

    Nikravesh Mansoure; Ahmadi Fazlollah; Oskouie Fatemeh; Negarandeh Reza; Hallberg Ingalill

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background During the two recent decades, advocacy has been a topic of much debate in the nursing profession. Although advocacy has embraced a crucial role for nurses, its extent is often limited in practice. While a variety of studies have been generated all over the world, barriers and facilitators in the patient advocacy have not been completely identified. This article presents the findings of a study exploring the barriers and facilitators influencing the role of advocacy among ...

  10. On novice facilitators doing research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavella, Elena

    2018-01-01

    Opportunities for novices to facilitate Problem Structuring Methods (PSMs) workshops are limited, especially because of a lack of access to real-world interventions and confidence in their capabilities. Novices are usually young academics building their careers through publishing. Publishing...... is challenging if facilitation and opportunities for data collection are limited. To address this challenge, this paper suggests autoethnography as a framework for addressing difficulties that novices face in conducting research and publishing on PSMs. This suggestion grows out of a literature study...

  11. Loss of Caenorhabditis elegans BRCA1 Promotes Genome Stability During Replication in smc-5 Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Stefanie; Ermolaeva, Maria A.; Bickel, Jeremy S.; Fingerhut, Jaclyn M.; Khanikar, Jayshree; Chan, Raymond C.; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage by ultraviolet (UV) light poses a risk for mutagenesis and a potential hindrance for cell cycle progression. Cells cope with UV-induced DNA damage through two general strategies to repair the damaged nucleotides and to promote cell cycle progression in the presence of UV-damaged DNA. Defining the genetic pathways and understanding how they function together to enable effective tolerance to UV remains an important area of research. The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) proteins form distinct complexes that maintain genome stability during chromosome segregation, homologous recombination, and DNA replication. Using a forward genetic screen, we identified two alleles of smc-5 that exacerbate UV sensitivity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Germ cells of smc-5-defective animals show reduced proliferation, sensitivity to perturbed replication, chromatin bridge formation, and accumulation of RAD-51 foci that indicate the activation of homologous recombination at DNA double-strand breaks. Mutations in the translesion synthesis polymerase polh-1 act synergistically with smc-5 mutations in provoking genome instability after UV-induced DNA damage. In contrast, the DNA damage accumulation and sensitivity of smc-5 mutant strains to replication impediments are suppressed by mutations in the C. elegans BRCA1/BARD1 homologs, brc-1 and brd-1. We propose that SMC-5/6 promotes replication fork stability and facilitates recombination-dependent repair when the BRC-1/BRD-1 complex initiates homologous recombination at stalled replication forks. Our data suggest that BRC-1/BRD-1 can both promote and antagonize genome stability depending on whether homologous recombination is initiated during DNA double-strand break repair or during replication stalling. PMID:24424777

  12. Systematic determination of replication activity type highlights interconnections between replication, chromatin structure and nuclear localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkash-Amar, Shlomit; David, Yaara; Polten, Andreas; Hezroni, Hadas; Eldar, Yonina C; Meshorer, Eran; Yakhini, Zohar; Simon, Itamar

    2012-01-01

    DNA replication is a highly regulated process, with each genomic locus replicating at a distinct time of replication (ToR). Advances in ToR measurement technology enabled several genome-wide profiling studies that revealed tight associations between ToR and general genomic features and a remarkable ToR conservation in mammals. Genome wide studies further showed that at the hundreds kb-to-megabase scale the genome can be divided into constant ToR regions (CTRs) in which the replication process propagates at a faster pace due to the activation of multiple origins and temporal transition regions (TTRs) in which the replication process propagates at a slower pace. We developed a computational tool that assigns a ToR to every measured locus and determines its replication activity type (CTR versus TTR). Our algorithm, ARTO (Analysis of Replication Timing and Organization), uses signal processing methods to fit a constant piece-wise linear curve to the measured raw data. We tested our algorithm and provide performance and usability results. A Matlab implementation of ARTO is available at http://bioinfo.cs.technion.ac.il/people/zohar/ARTO/. Applying our algorithm to ToR data measured in multiple mouse and human samples allowed precise genome-wide ToR determination and replication activity type characterization. Analysis of the results highlighted the plasticity of the replication program. For example, we observed significant ToR differences in 10-25% of the genome when comparing different tissue types. Our analyses also provide evidence for activity type differences in up to 30% of the probes. Integration of the ToR data with multiple aspects of chromosome organization characteristics suggests that ToR plays a role in shaping the regional chromatin structure. Namely, repressive chromatin marks, are associated with late ToR both in TTRs and CTRs. Finally, characterization of the differences between TTRs and CTRs, with matching ToR, revealed that TTRs are associated with

  13. Systematic determination of replication activity type highlights interconnections between replication, chromatin structure and nuclear localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlomit Farkash-Amar

    Full Text Available DNA replication is a highly regulated process, with each genomic locus replicating at a distinct time of replication (ToR. Advances in ToR measurement technology enabled several genome-wide profiling studies that revealed tight associations between ToR and general genomic features and a remarkable ToR conservation in mammals. Genome wide studies further showed that at the hundreds kb-to-megabase scale the genome can be divided into constant ToR regions (CTRs in which the replication process propagates at a faster pace due to the activation of multiple origins and temporal transition regions (TTRs in which the replication process propagates at a slower pace. We developed a computational tool that assigns a ToR to every measured locus and determines its replication activity type (CTR versus TTR. Our algorithm, ARTO (Analysis of Replication Timing and Organization, uses signal processing methods to fit a constant piece-wise linear curve to the measured raw data. We tested our algorithm and provide performance and usability results. A Matlab implementation of ARTO is available at http://bioinfo.cs.technion.ac.il/people/zohar/ARTO/. Applying our algorithm to ToR data measured in multiple mouse and human samples allowed precise genome-wide ToR determination and replication activity type characterization. Analysis of the results highlighted the plasticity of the replication program. For example, we observed significant ToR differences in 10-25% of the genome when comparing different tissue types. Our analyses also provide evidence for activity type differences in up to 30% of the probes. Integration of the ToR data with multiple aspects of chromosome organization characteristics suggests that ToR plays a role in shaping the regional chromatin structure. Namely, repressive chromatin marks, are associated with late ToR both in TTRs and CTRs. Finally, characterization of the differences between TTRs and CTRs, with matching ToR, revealed that TTRs are

  14. Replication stress, a source of epigenetic aberrations in cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasencakova, Zusana; Groth, Anja

    2010-01-01

    . Chromatin organization is transiently disrupted during DNA replication and maintenance of epigenetic information thus relies on faithful restoration of chromatin on the new daughter strands. Acute replication stress challenges proper chromatin restoration by deregulating histone H3 lysine 9 mono...

  15. The progression of replication forks at natural replication barriers in live bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolman, M Charl; Tiruvadi Krishnan, Sriram; Kerssemakers, Jacob W J; de Leeuw, Roy; Lorent, Vincent; Sherratt, David J; Dekker, Nynke H

    2016-07-27

    Protein-DNA complexes are one of the principal barriers the replisome encounters during replication. One such barrier is the Tus-ter complex, which is a direction dependent barrier for replication fork progression. The details concerning the dynamics of the replisome when encountering these Tus-ter barriers in the cell are poorly understood. By performing quantitative fluorescence microscopy with microfuidics, we investigate the effect on the replisome when encountering these barriers in live Escherichia coli cells. We make use of an E. coli variant that includes only an ectopic origin of replication that is positioned such that one of the two replisomes encounters a Tus-ter barrier before the other replisome. This enables us to single out the effect of encountering a Tus-ter roadblock on an individual replisome. We demonstrate that the replisome remains stably bound after encountering a Tus-ter complex from the non-permissive direction. Furthermore, the replisome is only transiently blocked, and continues replication beyond the barrier. Additionally, we demonstrate that these barriers affect sister chromosome segregation by visualizing specific chromosomal loci in the presence and absence of the Tus protein. These observations demonstrate the resilience of the replication fork to natural barriers and the sensitivity of chromosome alignment to fork progression. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Addressing the "Replication Crisis": Using Original Studies to Design Replication Studies with Appropriate Statistical Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Samantha F; Maxwell, Scott E

    2017-01-01

    Psychology is undergoing a replication crisis. The discussion surrounding this crisis has centered on mistrust of previous findings. Researchers planning replication studies often use the original study sample effect size as the basis for sample size planning. However, this strategy ignores uncertainty and publication bias in estimated effect sizes, resulting in overly optimistic calculations. A psychologist who intends to obtain power of .80 in the replication study, and performs calculations accordingly, may have an actual power lower than .80. We performed simulations to reveal the magnitude of the difference between actual and intended power based on common sample size planning strategies and assessed the performance of methods that aim to correct for effect size uncertainty and/or bias. Our results imply that even if original studies reflect actual phenomena and were conducted in the absence of questionable research practices, popular approaches to designing replication studies may result in a low success rate, especially if the original study is underpowered. Methods correcting for bias and/or uncertainty generally had higher actual power, but were not a panacea for an underpowered original study. Thus, it becomes imperative that 1) original studies are adequately powered and 2) replication studies are designed with methods that are more likely to yield the intended level of power.

  17. The DNA damage response pathway contributes to the stability of chromosome III derivatives lacking efficient replicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F Theis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic chromosomes, DNA replication initiates at multiple origins. Large inter-origin gaps arise when several adjacent origins fail to fire. Little is known about how cells cope with this situation. We created a derivative of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome III lacking all efficient origins, the 5ORIΔ-ΔR fragment, as a model for chromosomes with large inter-origin gaps. We used this construct in a modified synthetic genetic array screen to identify genes whose products facilitate replication of long inter-origin gaps. Genes identified are enriched in components of the DNA damage and replication stress signaling pathways. Mrc1p is activated by replication stress and mediates transduction of the replication stress signal to downstream proteins; however, the response-defective mrc1(AQ allele did not affect 5ORIΔ-ΔR fragment maintenance, indicating that this pathway does not contribute to its stability. Deletions of genes encoding the DNA-damage-specific mediator, Rad9p, and several components shared between the two signaling pathways preferentially destabilized the 5ORIΔ-ΔR fragment, implicating the DNA damage response pathway in its maintenance. We found unexpected differences between contributions of components of the DNA damage response pathway to maintenance of ORIΔ chromosome derivatives and their contributions to DNA repair. Of the effector kinases encoded by RAD53 and CHK1, Chk1p appears to be more important in wild-type cells for reducing chromosomal instability caused by origin depletion, while Rad53p becomes important in the absence of Chk1p. In contrast, RAD53 plays a more important role than CHK1 in cell survival and replication fork stability following treatment with DNA damaging agents and hydroxyurea. Maintenance of ORIΔ chromosomes does not depend on homologous recombination. These observations suggest that a DNA-damage-independent mechanism enhances ORIΔ chromosome stability. Thus, components of the DNA damage

  18. Effects of Student-Facilitated Learning on Instructional Facilitators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Sarah M.; Somers, Jennifer A.; Rivera, Gwendelyn J.; Keiler, Leslie S.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated perceptions about learning strategy use and instructional roles among a sample of high needs adolescents (n = 230) who acted as near-peer instructional facilitators. The sample was drawn from science and mathematics classes in nonselective public secondary schools in New York City. Students participated in an inschool intervention…

  19. Replication Fidelity Assessment in Nano Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaon, Matteo; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tosello, Guido

    2015-01-01

    to remove technology barrier between lab-scale proof-of-principle and high-volume low-cost production of nanotechnology-based products. In the current study research work has been devoted to develop methods and approaches to process chain characterization for final polymer micro and nano structures......Innovations in nanotechnology propose applications integrating micro and nanometer structures fabricated as master geometries for final replication on polymer substrates. The possibility for polymer materials of being processed with technologies enabling large volume production introduces solutions...

  20. Exception Handling in a Replicated Agent Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Azmeh, Zeina; Dony, Christophe; Tibermacine, Chouki; Urtado, Christelle; Vauttier, Sylvain

    2008-01-01

    This document is the semestrial report of the Lirmm partner for the Facoma project. It concludes semester 2 - out of 6 - for the project. During this semester, partners from Lirmm and Lgi2p have worked on: i) defining an exception handling system for agents. This work is based on previous work that has been done by these partners on the Sage exception handling system that was adapted to the context of the Facoma pro ject; ii) refining their knowledge and understanding of the Dimax replicated ...

  1. Implementing e-Transactions with Asynchronous Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Frolund, Svend; Guerraoui, Rachid

    2000-01-01

    An e-Transaction is one that executes exactly-once despite failures. This paper describes a distributed protocol that implements the abstraction of e-Transactionsin three-tier architectures. Three-tier architectures are typically Internet-oriented architectures, where the end-user interacts with front-end clients (e.g., browsers) that invoke middle-tier application servers (e.g., web servers) to access back-end databases. We implement the e-Transaction abstraction using an asynchronous replic...

  2. Replication of DNA during barley endosperm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, H.

    1992-01-01

    The incorporation of [6-H-3]-thymidine into DNA of developing barley end sperm was examined by autoradiography of cross sections of seeds and DNA analysis. The majority of nuclear divisions took place in the very young endosperm, but as late as 25 days after anthesis there was evidence for DNA...... replication. The DNA content of the endosperm increases during development and in response to nitrogen application in parallel to the storage protein synthesis profile. The hordein genes were hypersensitive to DNase I treatment throughout development....

  3. Accounting for PDMS shrinkage when replicating structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Morten Hannibal; Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Hansen, Poul-Erik

    2014-01-01

    are seldom applied to counteract the shrinkage of PDMS. Also, to perform metrological measurements using replica techniques one has to take the shrinkage into account. Thus we report a study of the shrinkage of PDMS with several different mixing ratios and curing temperatures. The shrinkage factor, with its...... associated uncertainty, for PDMS in the range 40 to 120 °C is provided. By applying this correction factor, it is possible to replicate structures with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.2% in lateral dimensions using typical curing temperatures and PDMS mixing ratios in the range 1:6 to 1:20 (agent:base)....

  4. Lattice gas simulations of replicating domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, S.P.; Hasslacher, B.; Pearson, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    We use the lattice gas cellular automation (LGCA) developed to simulate a process of pattern-formation recently observed in reaction-diffusion systems. We study the reaction mechanism, which is an extension of the Selkov model for glycolytic oscillations. We are able to reproduce the self-replicating domains observed in this work. We use the LGCA simulation to estimate the smallest length-scale on which this process can occur under conditions encountered in the cell. These estimates are similar to those obtained for Turing patterns in the same setting

  5. The Nature of Stability in Replicating Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addy Pross

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We review the concept of dynamic kinetic stability, a type of stability associated specifically with replicating entities, and show how it differs from the well-known and established (static kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities associated with regular chemical systems. In the process we demonstrate how the concept can help bridge the conceptual chasm that continues to separate the physical and biological sciences by relating the nature of stability in the animate and inanimate worlds, and by providing additional insights into the physicochemical nature of abiogenesis.

  6. Lattice gas simulations of replicating domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, S.P.; Hasslacher, B.; Pearson, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    We use the lattice gas cellular automation (LGCA) developed to simulate a process of pattern-formation recently observed in reaction-diffusion systems. We study the reaction mechanism, which is an extension of the Selkov model for glycolytic oscillations. We are able to reproduce the self-replicating domains observed in this work. We use the LGCA simulation to estimate the smallest length-scale on which this process can occur under conditions encountered in the cell. These estimates are similar to those obtained for Turing patterns in the same setting.

  7. Geminin: a major DNA replication safeguard in higher eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melixetian, Marina; Helin, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved multiple mechanisms to restrict DNA replication to once per cell cycle. These mechanisms prevent relicensing of origins of replication after initiation of DNA replication in S phase until the end of mitosis. Most of our knowledge of mechanisms controlling prereplication...

  8. Anaphase onset before complete DNA replication with intact checkpoint responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres-Rosell, Jordi; De Piccoli, Giacomo; Cordon-Preciado, Violeta

    2007-01-01

    Cellular checkpoints prevent mitosis in the presence of stalled replication forks. Whether checkpoints also ensure the completion of DNA replication before mitosis is unknown. Here, we show that in yeast smc5-smc6 mutants, which are related to cohesin and condensin, replication is delayed, most...

  9. Mapping autonomously replicating sequence elements in a 73-kb ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) elements are the genetic determinants of replication origin function in yeasts. They can be easily identified as the plasmids containing them transform yeast cells at a high frequency. As the first step towards identifying all potential replication origins in a 73-kb region of the long arm ...

  10. DNA replication in pathogens: Unique properties and possible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    asd

    Eukaryotic DNA Replication Initiation and Elongation. 1. 2. 3 5. 4. 6. ARS. Origin Recognition. Complex (ORC). MCM2-7. CDC6. 1. 2. 3 5. 4. ARS. Replication Initiation. ATP Hydrolysis? Yeast. 6. 2. 2. Replication Elongation. Is ORC function and cell cycle regulation is conserved in. Plasmodium falciparum?

  11. Uncoupling of Sister Replisomes during Eukaryotic DNA Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yardimci, Hasan; Loveland, Anna B.; Habuchi, Satoshi; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, Johannes C.

    2010-01-01

    The duplication of eukaryotic genomes involves the replication of DNA from multiple origins of replication. In S phase, two sister replisomes assemble at each active origin, and they replicate DNA in opposite directions. Little is known about the functional relationship between sister replisomes.

  12. Facilitation of learning: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Tyler; Trish, Houghton; Barry, Debbie

    2016-04-06

    This article, the fourth in a series of 11, discusses the context for the facilitation of learning. It outlines the main principles and theories for understanding the process of learning, including examples which link these concepts to practice. The practical aspects of using these theories in a practice setting will be discussed in the fifth article of this series. Together, these two articles will provide mentors and practice teachers with knowledge of the learning process, which will enable them to meet the second domain of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice on facilitation of learning.

  13. Efficient Hybrid Detection of Node Replication Attacks in Mobile Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The node replication attack is one of the notorious attacks that can be easily launched by adversaries in wireless sensor networks. A lot of literatures have studied mitigating the node replication attack in static wireless sensor networks. However, it is more difficult to detect the replicas in mobile sensor networks because of their node mobility. Considering the limitations of centralized detection schemes for static wireless sensor networks, a few distributed solutions have been recently proposed. Some existing schemes identified replicated attacks by sensing mobile nodes with identical ID but different locations. To facilitate the discovery of contradictory conflicts, we propose a hybrid local and global detection method. The local detection is performed in a local area smaller than the whole deployed area to improve the meeting probability of contradictory nodes, while the distant replicated nodes in larger area can also be efficiently detected by the global detection. The complementary two levels of detection achieve quick discovery by searching of the replicas with reasonable overhead.

  14. NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of the replication initiator protein DnaA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemmer, David E.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Rosalind; Yokota, Hisao; Wemmer, David E.

    2007-08-07

    DnaA is an essential component in the initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication. DnaA binds to a series of 9 base pair repeats leading to oligomerization, recruitment of the DnaBC helicase, and the assembly of the replication fork machinery. The structure of the N-terminal domain (residues 1-100) of DnaA from Mycoplasma genitalium was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The backbone r.m.s.d. for the first 86 residues was 0.6 +/- 0.2 Angstrom based on 742 NOE, 50 hydrogen bond, 46 backbone angle, and 88 residual dipolar coupling restraints. Ultracentrifugation studies revealed that the domain is monomeric in solution. Features on the protein surface include a hydrophobic cleft flanked by several negative residues on one side, and positive residues on the other. A negatively charged ridge is present on the opposite face of the protein. These surfaces may be important sites of interaction with other proteins involved in the replication process. Together, the structure and NMR assignments should facilitate the design of new experiments to probe the protein-protein interactions essential for the initiation of DNA replication.

  15. RepExplore: addressing technical replicate variance in proteomics and metabolomics data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaab, Enrico; Schneider, Reinhard

    2015-07-01

    High-throughput omics datasets often contain technical replicates included to account for technical sources of noise in the measurement process. Although summarizing these replicate measurements by using robust averages may help to reduce the influence of noise on downstream data analysis, the information on the variance across the replicate measurements is lost in the averaging process and therefore typically disregarded in subsequent statistical analyses.We introduce RepExplore, a web-service dedicated to exploit the information captured in the technical replicate variance to provide more reliable and informative differential expression and abundance statistics for omics datasets. The software builds on previously published statistical methods, which have been applied successfully to biomedical omics data but are difficult to use without prior experience in programming or scripting. RepExplore facilitates the analysis by providing a fully automated data processing and interactive ranking tables, whisker plot, heat map and principal component analysis visualizations to interpret omics data and derived statistics. Freely available at http://www.repexplore.tk enrico.glaab@uni.lu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Replication, gene expression and particle production by a consensus Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Neumann

    Full Text Available Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV genomes are clonally integrated in tumor tissues of approximately 85% of all Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC cases, a highly aggressive tumor of the skin which predominantly afflicts elderly and immunosuppressed patients. All integrated viral genomes recovered from MCC tissue or MCC cell lines harbor signature mutations in the early gene transcript encoding for the large T-Antigen (LT-Ag. These mutations selectively abrogate the ability of LT-Ag to support viral replication while still maintaining its Rb-binding activity, suggesting a continuous requirement for LT-Ag mediated cell cycle deregulation during MCC pathogenesis. To gain a better understanding of MCPyV biology, in vitro MCPyV replication systems are required. We have generated a synthetic MCPyV genomic clone (MCVSyn based on the consensus sequence of MCC-derived sequences deposited in the NCBI database. Here, we demonstrate that transfection of recircularized MCVSyn DNA into some human cell lines recapitulates efficient replication of the viral genome, early and late gene expression together with virus particle formation. However, serial transmission of infectious virus was not observed. This in vitro culturing system allows the study of viral replication and will facilitate the molecular dissection of important aspects of the MCPyV lifecycle.

  17. COPI activity coupled with fatty acid biosynthesis is required for viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Cherry

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available During infection by diverse viral families, RNA replication occurs on the surface of virally induced cytoplasmic membranes of cellular origin. How this process is regulated, and which cellular factors are required, has been unclear. Moreover, the host-pathogen interactions that facilitate the formation of this new compartment might represent critical determinants of viral pathogenesis, and their elucidation may lead to novel insights into the coordination of vesicular trafficking events during infection. Here we show that in Drosophila cells, Drosophila C virus remodels the Golgi apparatus and forms a novel vesicular compartment, on the surface of which viral RNA replication takes place. Using genome-wide RNA interference screening, we found that this step in the viral lifecycle requires at least two host encoded pathways: the coat protein complex I (COPI coatamer and fatty acid biosynthesis. Our results integrate, clarify, and extend numerous observations concerning the cell biology of viral replication, allowing us to conclude that the coupling of new cellular membrane formation with the budding of these vesicles from the Golgi apparatus allows for the regulated generation of this new virogenic organelle, which is essential for viral replication. Additionally, because these pathways are also limiting in flies and in human cells infected with the related RNA virus poliovirus, they may represent novel targets for antiviral therapies.

  18. The influence of partner-specific memory associations on picture naming: a failure to replicate Horton (2007).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Schmidt, Sarah; Horton, William S

    2014-01-01

    The results of two experiments by Horton (2007) show that speakers name a pictured object faster when in the presence of another person with whom the speaker has previously associated that object name. The first of those two experiments (Horton, 2007, Experiment 1) is the focus of the present research. This paper presents the results of three experiments designed to replicate and extend Horton's (2007) Experiment 1. The original findings were not replicated. These findings do not support the hypothesis that partner-specific memory associations facilitate object naming.

  19. Efficient replication and expression of murine leukemia virus with major deletions in the enhancer region of U3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, K.; Lovmand, S.; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    1992-01-01

    of the viral RNA. Genetic tagging of the retrovirus with lacO facilitated the analysis. Among the individual mutated LTRs an over 100-fold difference in a transient expression assay was previously detected. This difference was not revealed in studies of viral replication in cell culture, where the expression......The effect of deletions within the enhancer region in the U3 part of the LTR derived from the murine retrovirus Akv was studied. The deletions were stably transmitted through normal virus replication as shown by sequence analysis of cloned polymerase chain reaction product of the cDNA copy...

  20. Le Chatelier's principle in replicator dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E; Galstyan, Aram

    2011-10-01

    The Le Chatelier principle states that physical equilibria are not only stable, but they also resist external perturbations via short-time negative-feedback mechanisms: a perturbation induces processes tending to diminish its results. The principle has deep roots, e.g., in thermodynamics it is closely related to the second law and the positivity of the entropy production. Here we study the applicability of the Le Chatelier principle to evolutionary game theory, i.e., to perturbations of a Nash equilibrium within the replicator dynamics. We show that the principle can be reformulated as a majorization relation. This defines a stability notion that generalizes the concept of evolutionary stability. We determine criteria for a Nash equilibrium to satisfy the Le Chatelier principle and relate them to mutualistic interactions (game-theoretical anticoordination) showing in which sense mutualistic replicators can be more stable than (say) competing ones. There are globally stable Nash equilibria, where the Le Chatelier principle is violated even locally: in contrast to the thermodynamic equilibrium a Nash equilibrium can amplify small perturbations, though both types of equilibria satisfy the detailed balance condition.

  1. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Three DNA polymerases — Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ — are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson–Crick base pairing and 3′exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to ‘polymerase proofreading associated polyposis’ (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an ‘ultramutator’ phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. PMID:24583393

  2. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Three DNA polymerases - Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ - are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson-Crick base pairing and 3'exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to 'polymerase proofreading associated polyposis' (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an 'ultramutator' phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Le Chatelier's principle in replicator dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Galstyan, Aram

    2011-10-01

    The Le Chatelier principle states that physical equilibria are not only stable, but they also resist external perturbations via short-time negative-feedback mechanisms: a perturbation induces processes tending to diminish its results. The principle has deep roots, e.g., in thermodynamics it is closely related to the second law and the positivity of the entropy production. Here we study the applicability of the Le Chatelier principle to evolutionary game theory, i.e., to perturbations of a Nash equilibrium within the replicator dynamics. We show that the principle can be reformulated as a majorization relation. This defines a stability notion that generalizes the concept of evolutionary stability. We determine criteria for a Nash equilibrium to satisfy the Le Chatelier principle and relate them to mutualistic interactions (game-theoretical anticoordination) showing in which sense mutualistic replicators can be more stable than (say) competing ones. There are globally stable Nash equilibria, where the Le Chatelier principle is violated even locally: in contrast to the thermodynamic equilibrium a Nash equilibrium can amplify small perturbations, though both types of equilibria satisfy the detailed balance condition.

  4. The role of dimerization in prion replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompa, Peter; Tusnády, Gábor E; Friedrich, Peter; Simon, István

    2002-04-01

    The central theme in prion diseases is the conformational transition of a cellular protein from a physiologic to a pathologic (so-called scrapie) state. Currently, two alternative models exist for the mechanism of this autocatalytic process; in the template assistance model the prion is assumed to be a monomer of the scrapie conformer, whereas in the nucleated polymerization model it is thought to be an amyloid rod. A recent variation on the latter assumes disulfide reshuffling as the mechanism of polymerization. The existence of stable dimers, let alone their mechanistic role, is not taken into account in either of these models. In this paper we review evidence supporting that the dimerization of either the normal or the scrapie state, or both, has a decisive role in prion replication. The contribution of redox changes, i.e., the temporary opening and possible rearrangement of the intramolecular disulfide bridge is also considered. We present a model including these features largely ignored so far and show that it adheres satisfactorily to the observed phenomenology of prion replication.

  5. Multiaxial yield behaviour of Al replicated foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combaz, E.; Bacciarini, C.; Charvet, R.; Dufour, W.; Mortensen, A.

    2011-09-01

    Multiaxial experiments are performed on replicated aluminium foam using a custom-built apparatus. The foam structure is isotropic, and features open monomodal pores 75 μm in average diameter. Plane stress ( σ1, σ2, σ3=0) and axisymmetric ( σ1, σ2=σ3) yield envelopes are measured using cubical specimens, supplemented by tests on hollow cylindrical and uniaxial samples. In addition to the three stress components at 0.2% offset strain, the computer-controlled testing apparatus also measures the three instantaneous displacement vectors. Results show that the shape of the yield surface is independent of the relative density of the foam in the explored range (13-28%). Strain increment vectors lie, within error, roughly normal to the line traced through data points in stress space. Replicated foams feature asymmetric yield behaviour between tension and compression. The data additionally show an influence on the yield surface of the third stress tensor invariant (i.e., of the Lode angle). Simple general expressions for the yield surface are fitted to the data, leading to conclude that their behaviour is slightly better captured by parabolic rather than elliptic expressions dependent on all three stress invariants.

  6. Field replication of classwide peer tutoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, C R; Dinwiddie, G; Bailey, V; Carta, J J; Dorsey, D; Kohler, F W; Nelson, C; Rotholz, D; Schulte, D

    1987-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale field replication study of classwide peer tutoring applied to spelling instruction (Greenwood, Delquadri, & Hall, 1984). Two hundred and eleven inner-city students in four schools participated during their first- and second-grade school years. The effects of classwide peer tutoring were compared to teacher instructional procedures and pretest probes using a group replication design (Barlow, Hayes, & Nelson, 1984). Analysis of group and individual results indicated that (a) both teacher instructional procedures and classwide peer tutoring were effective in increasing spelling performance above pretest levels, (b) peer tutoring produced statistically greater gains relative to the teachers' procedures for both low and high student groups formed on pretest levels, (c) these outcomes were representative of groups, classes, individuals, and years during the project, and (d) participant satisfaction with the program was generally high. A separate analysis of the social importance of treatment outcome revealed differential findings for low and high groups related to pretest levels. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  7. Field replication of classwide peer tutoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, C R; Dinwiddie, G; Bailey, V; Carta, J J; Dorsey, D; Kohler, F W; Nelson, C; Rotholz, D; Schulte, D

    1987-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale field replication study of classwide peer tutoring applied to spelling instruction (Greenwood, Delquadri, & Hall, 1984). Two hundred and eleven inner-city students in four schools participated during their first- and second-grade school years. The effects of classwide peer tutoring were compared to teacher instructional procedures and pretest probes using a group replication design (Barlow, Hayes, & Nelson, 1984). Analysis of group and individual results indicated that (a) both teacher instructional procedures and classwide peer tutoring were effective in increasing spelling performance above pretest levels, (b) peer tutoring produced statistically greater gains relative to the teachers' procedures for both low and high student groups formed on pretest levels, (c) these outcomes were representative of groups, classes, individuals, and years during the project, and (d) participant satisfaction with the program was generally high. A separate analysis of the social importance of treatment outcome revealed differential findings for low and high groups related to pretest levels. Implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:3610894

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress causes EBV lytic replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Gwen Marie; Raghuwanshi, Sandeep K; Rowe, David T; Wadowsky, Robert M; Rosendorff, Adam

    2011-11-17

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress triggers a homeostatic cellular response in mammalian cells to ensure efficient folding, sorting, and processing of client proteins. In lytic-permissive lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), pulse exposure to the chemical ER-stress inducer thapsigargin (TG) followed by recovery resulted in the activation of the EBV immediate-early (BRLF1, BZLF1), early (BMRF1), and late (gp350) genes, gp350 surface expression, and virus release. The protein phosphatase 1 a (PP1a)-specific phosphatase inhibitor Salubrinal (SAL) synergized with TG to induce EBV lytic genes; however, TG treatment alone was sufficient to activate EBV lytic replication. SAL showed ER-stress-dependent and -independent antiviral effects, preventing virus release in human LCLs and abrogating gp350 expression in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-treated B95-8 cells. TG resulted in sustained BCL6 but not BLIMP1 or CD138 expression, which is consistent with maintenance of a germinal center B-cell, rather than plasma-cell, phenotype. Microarray analysis identified candidate genes governing lytic replication in LCLs undergoing ER stress.

  9. Replication strategy of human hepatitis B virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Will, H.; Reiser, W.; Weimer, T.; Pfaff, E.; Buescher, M.; Sprengel, R.; Cattaneo, R.; Schaller, H.

    1987-01-01

    To study the replication strategy of the human hepatitis B virus, the 5' end of the RNA pregenome and the initiation sites of DNA plus and minus strands have been mapped. The RNA pregenome was found to be terminally redundant by 120 nucleotides; it is initiated within the pre-C region and may also function as mRNA for synthesis of the major core protein and the hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase. The hepatitis B virus DNA minus strand is initiated within the direct repeat sequence DR1, it contains a terminal redundancy of up to eight nucleotides, and its synthesis does not require any template switch. The DNA plus strand is primed by a short oligoribonucleotide probably derived from the 5' end of the RNA pregenome, and its synthesis is initiated close to the direct repeat sequence DR2. For its elongation to pass the discontinuity in the DNA minus strand an intramolecular template switch occurs using the terminal redundancy of this template. Thus, the route of reverse transcription and DNA replication of hepatitis B viruses is fundamentally different from that of retroviruses

  10. How to securely replicate services (preliminary version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Michael; Birman, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A method is presented for constructing replicated services that retain their availability and integrity despite several servers and clients being corrupted by an intruder, in addition to others failing benignly. More precisely, a service is replicated by 'n' servers in such a way that a correct client will accept a correct server's response if, for some prespecified parameter, k, at least k servers are correct and fewer than k servers are correct. The issue of maintaining causality among client requests is also addressed. A security breach resulting from an intruder's ability to effect a violation of causality in the sequence of requests processed by the service is illustrated. An approach to counter this problem is proposed that requires that fewer than k servers are corrupt and, to ensure liveness, that k is less than or = n - 2t, where t is the assumed maximum total number of both corruptions and benign failures suffered by servers in any system run. An important and novel feature of these schemes is that the client need not be able to identify or authenticate even a single server. Instead, the client is required only to possess at most two public keys for the service.

  11. Social Facilitation of Aiding Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartell, Patricia; And Others

    Research on individual's response to emergency situations in the presence of others has produced conflicting results. The bystander effect is the label applied to inaction or the unlikelihood of assistance with others present. The social facilitation effect occurs when the presence of others energizes response; strong habit responses are…

  12. Brug af mindfulness til facilitering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine; Krohn, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Gennem de senere år er mindfulness gået fra udelukkende at være en eksistentiel praksis til også at være en behandlingsform og senest til også at blive brugt som et praktisk redskab i erhvervslivet. Denne artikel viser, at mindfulness også kan anvendes i forbindelse med facilitering. Facilitering...... er et værktøj, som bruges i arbejdslivet fx til møder og konferencer, hvor en gruppe mennesker er samlet for at lære eller udrette noget sammen. Det nye ved at kombinere mindfulness med facilitering er, at fokus hermed ændres fra individet, som er centrum for den eksistentielle fordybelse eller det...... terapeutiske forløb, til gruppen, som er udgangspunktet i facilitering. Artiklen viser, hvordan mindfulness konkret kan bruges på gruppeniveau og diskuterer samtidig hvilke problemer, der kan være forbundet hermed. Baseret på vores egne erfaringer, diskuterer vi, hvordan mindfulness kan påvirke en gruppes...

  13. Facilitation of Mourning During Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliman, Gilbert; And Others

    This paper discusses case studies of children psychologically disturbed by the death of parents or siblings. Illustrations of mourning facilitation were mainly gathered from 16 orphaned children, ages 3-14. Some techniques used in helping children mourn include: discussing physical details of the illness, discussing previous deaths of animals and…

  14. Binding Affinities among DNA Helicase-Primase, DNA Polymerase, and Replication Intermediates in the Replisome of Bacteriophage T7*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huidong; Tang, Yong; Lee, Seung-Joo; Wei, Zeliang; Cao, Jia; Richardson, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a replication loop on the lagging strand facilitates coordinated synthesis of the leading- and lagging-DNA strands and provides a mechanism for recycling of the lagging-strand DNA polymerase. As an Okazaki fragment is completed, the loop is released, and a new loop is formed as the synthesis of a new Okazaki fragment is initiated. Loop release requires the dissociation of the complex formed by the interactions among helicase, DNA polymerase, and DNA. The completion of the Okazaki fragment may result in either a nick or a single-stranded DNA region. In the replication system of bacteriophage T7, the dissociation of the polymerase from either DNA region is faster than that observed for the dissociation of the helicase from DNA polymerase, implying that the replication loop is released more likely through the dissociation of the lagging-strand DNA from polymerase, retaining the polymerase at replication fork. Both dissociation of DNA polymerase from DNA and that of helicase from a DNA polymerase·DNA complex are much faster at a nick DNA region than the release from a ssDNA region. These results suggest that the replication loop is released as a result of the nick formed when the lagging-strand DNA polymerase encounters the previously synthesized Okazaki fragment, releasing lagging-strand DNA and retaining DNA polymerase at the replication fork for the synthesis of next Okazaki fragment. PMID:26620561

  15. Regulation of replication fork progression through histone supply and demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Corpet, Armelle; Cook, Adam J L

    2007-01-01

    DNA replication in eukaryotes requires nucleosome disruption ahead of the replication fork and reassembly behind. An unresolved issue concerns how histone dynamics are coordinated with fork progression to maintain chromosomal stability. Here, we characterize a complex in which the human histone c...... progression and histone supply and demand.......1 chaperone function, histone supply, and replicative unwinding of DNA in chromatin. We propose that Asf1, as a histone acceptor and donor, handles parental and new histones at the replication fork via an Asf1-(H3-H4)-MCM2-7 intermediate and thus provides a means to fine-tune replication fork...

  16. Materials Chemistry and Performance of Silicone-Based Replicating Compounds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumbach, Michael T.; Mirabal, Alex James; Kalan, Michael; Trujillo, Ana B; Hale, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    Replicating compounds are used to cast reproductions of surface features on a variety of materials. Replicas allow for quantitative measurements and recordkeeping on parts that may otherwise be difficult to measure or maintain. In this study, the chemistry and replicating capability of several replicating compounds was investigated. Additionally, the residue remaining on material surfaces upon removal of replicas was quantified. Cleaning practices were tested for several different replicating compounds. For all replicating compounds investigated, a thin silicone residue was left by the replica. For some compounds, additional inorganic species could be identified in the residue. Simple solvent cleaning could remove some residue.

  17. Blood meal acquisition enhances arbovirus replication in mosquitoes through activation of the GABAergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yibin; Zhang, Rudian; Zhang, Bei; Zhao, Tongyan; Wang, Penghua; Liang, Guodong; Cheng, Gong

    2017-11-02

    Mosquitoes are hematophagous insects that carry-on and transmit many human viruses. However, little information is available regarding the common mechanisms underlying the infection of mosquitoes by these viruses. In this study, we reveal that the hematophagous nature of mosquitoes contributes to arboviral infection after a blood meal, which suppresses antiviral innate immunity by activating the GABAergic pathway. dsRNA-mediated interruption of the GABA signaling and blockage of the GABA A receptor by the specific inhibitors both significantly impaired arbovirus replication. Consistently, inoculation of GABA enhanced arboviral infection, indicating that GABA signaling facilitates the arboviral infection of mosquitoes. The ingestion of blood by mosquitoes resulted in robust GABA production from glutamic acid derived from blood protein digestion. The oral introduction of glutamic acid increased virus acquisition by mosquitoes via activation of the GABAergic system. Our study reveals that blood meals enhance arbovirus replication in mosquitoes through activation of the GABAergic system.

  18. Nanopatterning planar and non-planar mold surfaces for a polymer replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cech, Jiri; Pranov, Henrik; Kofod, Guggi

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel process to create nanopatterns on planar and non-planar polymer replication tools, such as metallic molds for an injection molding. Such tools with nanopatterned cavities then allow affordable mass production of nanopatterned polymer parts with inherent advanced functionalities...... energy and sticktion and to facilitate de-molding of plastic parts.1 This allows forming of affordable plastic parts with advanced functionality.......We present a novel process to create nanopatterns on planar and non-planar polymer replication tools, such as metallic molds for an injection molding. Such tools with nanopatterned cavities then allow affordable mass production of nanopatterned polymer parts with inherent advanced functionalities...... such as low reflectivity or color effects, self cleaning, superhydrofobicity, antifouling, etc, all created in a single injection molding cycle. Presented process is based on the classic cleanroom microfabrication of micro/nano patterns, nickel electroplating and template removal to form a flexible...

  19. Amplification of Chirality through Self-Replication of Micellar Aggregates in Water

    KAUST Repository

    Bukhriakov, Konstantin

    2015-03-17

    We describe a system in which the self-replication of micellar aggregates results in a spontaneous amplification of chirality in the reaction products. In this system, amphiphiles are synthesized from two "clickable" fragments: a water-soluble "head" and a hydrophobic "tail". Under biphasic conditions, the reaction is autocatalytic, as aggregates facilitate the transfer of hydrophobic molecules to the aqueous phase. When chiral, partially enantioenriched surfactant heads are used, a strong nonlinear induction of chirality in the reaction products is observed. Preseeding the reaction mixture with an amphiphile of one chirality results in the amplification of this product and therefore information transfer between generations of self-replicating aggregates. Because our amphiphiles are capable of catalysis, information transfer, and self-assembly into bounded structures, they present a plausible model for prenucleic acid "lipid world" entities. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  20. Late-replicating CNVs as a source of new genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Juan

    2013-11-01

    Asynchronous replication of the genome has been associated with different rates of point mutation and copy number variation (CNV in human populations. Here, our aim was to investigate whether the bias in the generation of CNV that is associated with DNA replication timing might have conditioned the birth of new protein-coding genes during evolution. We show that genes that were duplicated during primate evolution are more commonly found among the human genes located in late-replicating CNV regions. We traced the relationship between replication timing and the evolutionary age of duplicated genes. Strikingly, we found that there is a significant enrichment of evolutionary younger duplicates in late-replicating regions of the human and mouse genome. Indeed, the presence of duplicates in late-replicating regions gradually decreases as the evolutionary time since duplication extends. Our results suggest that the accumulation of recent duplications in late-replicating CNV regions is an active process influencing genome evolution.

  1. Eukaryotic Mismatch Repair in Relation to DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erie, Dorothy A.

    2017-01-01

    Three processes act in series to accurately replicate the eukaryotic nuclear genome. The major replicative DNA polymerases strongly prevent mismatch formation, occasional mismatches that do form are proofread during replication, and rare mismatches that escape proofreading are corrected by mismatch repair (MMR). This review focuses on MMR in light of increasing knowledge about nuclear DNA replication enzymology and the rate and specificity with which mismatches are generated during leading- and lagging-strand replication. We consider differences in MMR efficiency in relation to mismatch recognition, signaling to direct MMR to the nascent strand, mismatch removal, and the timing of MMR. These studies are refining our understanding of relationships between generating and repairing replication errors to achieve accurate replication of both DNA strands of the nuclear genome. PMID:26436461

  2. Replication, falsification, and the crisis of confidence in social psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Brian D.; Trafimow, David

    2015-01-01

    The (latest) crisis in confidence in social psychology has generated much heated discussion about the importance of replication, including how it should be carried out as well as interpreted by scholars in the field. For example, what does it mean if a replication attempt “fails”—does it mean that the original results, or the theory that predicted them, have been falsified? And how should “failed” replications affect our belief in the validity of the original research? In this paper, we consider the replication debate from a historical and philosophical perspective, and provide a conceptual analysis of both replication and falsification as they pertain to this important discussion. Along the way, we highlight the importance of auxiliary assumptions (for both testing theories and attempting replications), and introduce a Bayesian framework for assessing “failed” replications in terms of how they should affect our confidence in original findings. PMID:26042061

  3. Recruitment of Brd4 to the human papillomavirus type 16 DNA replication complex is essential for replication of viral DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Helfer, Christine M; Pancholi, Neha; Bradner, James E; You, Jianxin

    2013-04-01

    Replication of the human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA genome relies on viral factors E1 and E2 and the cellular replication machinery. Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (Brd4) interacts with viral E2 protein to mediate papillomavirus (PV) genome maintenance and viral transcription. However, the functional role of Brd4 in the HPV life cycle remains to be clearly defined. In this study, we provide the first look into the E2-Brd4 interaction in the presence of other important viral factors, such as the HPV16 E1 protein and the viral genome. We show that Brd4 is recruited to actively replicating HPV16 origin foci together with HPV16 E1, E2, and a number of the cellular replication factors: replication protein A70 (RPA70), replication factor C1 (RFC1), and DNA polymerase δ. Mutagenesis disrupting the E2-Brd4 interaction abolishes the formation of the HPV16 replication complex and impairs HPV16 DNA replication in cells. Brd4 was further demonstrated to be necessary for HPV16 viral DNA replication using a cell-free replication system in which depletion of Brd4 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing leads to impaired HPV16 viral DNA replication and recombinant Brd4 protein is able to rescue viral DNA replication. In addition, releasing endogenous Brd4 from cellular chromatin by using the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1(+) enhances HPV16 DNA replication, demonstrating that the role of Brd4 in HPV DNA replication could be uncoupled from its function in chromatin-associated transcriptional regulation and cell cycle control. Our study reveals a new role for Brd4 in HPV genome replication, providing novel insights into understanding the life cycle of this oncogenic DNA virus.

  4. Do Neuroscience Journals Accept Replications? A Survey of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy W. K. Yeung

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent reports in neuroscience, especially those concerning brain-injury and neuroimaging, have revealed low reproducibility of results within the field and urged for more replication studies. However, it is unclear if the neuroscience journals welcome or discourage the submission of reports on replication studies. Therefore, the current study assessed the explicit position of neuroscience journals on replications.Methods: A list of active neuroscience journals publishing in English was compiled from Scopus database. These journal websites were accessed to read their aims and scope and instructions to authors, and to assess if they: (1 explicitly stated that they accept replications; (2 did not state their position on replications; (3 implicitly discouraged replications by emphasizing on the novelty of the manuscripts; or (4 explicitly stated that they reject replications. For journals that explicitly stated they accept or reject replications, their subcategory within neuroscience and their 5-year impact factor were recorded. The distribution of neuroscience replication studies published was also recorded by searching and extracting data from Scopus.Results: Of the 465 journals reviewed, 28 (6.0% explicitly stated that they accept replications, 394 (84.7% did not state their position on replications, 40 (8.6% implicitly discouraged replications by emphasizing on the novelty of the manuscripts, and 3 (0.6% explicitly stated that they reject replications. For the 28 journals that explicitly welcomed replications, three (10.7% stated their position in the aims and scope, whereas 25 (89.3% stated in within the detailed instructions to authors. The five-year impact factor (2015 of these journals ranged from 1.655 to 10.799, and nine of them (32.1% did not receive a 5-year or annual impact factor in 2015. There was no significant difference in the proportions of journals explicitly welcomed replications (journals with vs. without impact

  5. Do Neuroscience Journals Accept Replications? A Survey of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Andy W. K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Recent reports in neuroscience, especially those concerning brain-injury and neuroimaging, have revealed low reproducibility of results within the field and urged for more replication studies. However, it is unclear if the neuroscience journals welcome or discourage the submission of reports on replication studies. Therefore, the current study assessed the explicit position of neuroscience journals on replications. Methods: A list of active neuroscience journals publishing in English was compiled from Scopus database. These journal websites were accessed to read their aims and scope and instructions to authors, and to assess if they: (1) explicitly stated that they accept replications; (2) did not state their position on replications; (3) implicitly discouraged replications by emphasizing on the novelty of the manuscripts; or (4) explicitly stated that they reject replications. For journals that explicitly stated they accept or reject replications, their subcategory within neuroscience and their 5-year impact factor were recorded. The distribution of neuroscience replication studies published was also recorded by searching and extracting data from Scopus. Results: Of the 465 journals reviewed, 28 (6.0%) explicitly stated that they accept replications, 394 (84.7%) did not state their position on replications, 40 (8.6%) implicitly discouraged replications by emphasizing on the novelty of the manuscripts, and 3 (0.6%) explicitly stated that they reject replications. For the 28 journals that explicitly welcomed replications, three (10.7%) stated their position in the aims and scope, whereas 25 (89.3%) stated in within the detailed instructions to authors. The five-year impact factor (2015) of these journals ranged from 1.655 to 10.799, and nine of them (32.1%) did not receive a 5-year or annual impact factor in 2015. There was no significant difference in the proportions of journals explicitly welcomed replications (journals with vs. without impact factors

  6. Facilitating Facilitators to Facilitate, in Problem or Enquiry Based Learning Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) has been used in dental education over the past 20 years and uses a patient case scenario to stimulate learning in a small group setting, where a trained facilitator does not teach but guides the group to bring about deep contextualized learning, to be empathetic to each other and to encourage fair and equitable…

  7. Replicability and generalizability of PTSD networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiko I., Fried; Eidhof, Marloes B.; Palic, Sabina

    2018-01-01

    The growing literature conceptualizing mental disorders like Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) as networks of interacting symptoms faces three key challenges. Prior studies predominantly used (a) small samples with low power for precise estimation, (b) non-clinical samples, and (c) single...... samples. This renders network structures in clinical data, and the extent to which networks replicate across datasets, unknown. To overcome these limitations, the present cross-cultural multisite study estimated regularized partial correlation networks of 16 PTSD symptoms across four datasets...... of traumatized patients receiving treatment for PTSD (total N=2,782). Despite differences in culture, trauma-type and severity of the samples, considerable similarities emerged, with moderate to high correlations between symptom profiles (0.43-0.82), network structures (0.62-0.74), and centrality estimates (0...

  8. Security in a Replicated Metadata Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Koblitz, B

    2007-01-01

    The gLite-AMGA metadata has been developed by NA4 to provide simple relational metadata access for the EGEE user community. As advanced features, which will be the focus of this presentation, AMGA provides very fine-grained security also in connection with the built-in support for replication and federation of metadata. AMGA is extensively used by the biomedical community to store medical images metadata, digital libraries, in HEP for logging and bookkeeping data and in the climate community. The biomedical community intends to deploy a distributed metadata system for medical images consisting of various sites, which range from hospitals to computing centres. Only safe sharing of the highly sensitive metadata as provided in AMGA makes such a scenario possible. Other scenarios are digital libraries, which federate copyright protected (meta-) data into a common catalogue. The biomedical and digital libraries have been deployed using a centralized structure already for some time. They now intend to decentralize ...

  9. Parametrised Constants and Replication for Spatial Mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüttel, Hans; Haagensen, Bjørn

    2009-01-01

    and the calculus of mobile ambients. Here, processes are located at sites and can migrate between them. In this paper we say that an encoding is local if it does not introduce extra migration. We first study this property for the distributed π-calculus where locations can be dynamically created. If the set...... of reachable sites is static an encoding exists, but we also show that parametrised constants can not be encoded in the full calculus. The locality requirement supplements widely accepted encoding criteria. It appears to be a natural property in spatial calculi where links and locations can fail. The versions...... of the distributed π-calculus with parametrised constants and replication are incomparable. On the other hand, we shall see that there exists a simple encoding of recursion in mobile ambients....

  10. Replicator dynamics for optional public good games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauert, C.; De Monte, Silvia; Hofbauer, J.

    2002-01-01

    The public goods game represents a straightforward generalization of the prisoner's dilemma to an arbitrary number of players. Since the dominant strategy is to defect, both classical and evolutionary game theory predict the asocial outcome that no player contributes to the public goods....... In contrast to the compulsory public goods game, optional participation provides a natural way to avoid deadlocks in the state of mutual defection. The three resulting strategies-collaboration or defection in the public goods game, as well as not joining at all-are studied by means of a replicator dynamics...... participation makes cooperation feasible. But for each strategy, the average payoff value remains equal to the earnings of those not participating in the public goods game....

  11. Physically Embedded Minimal Self-Replicating Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellermann, Harold

    Self-replication is a fundamental property of all living organisms, yet has only been accomplished to limited extend in manmade systems. This thesis is part of the ongoing research endeavor to bridge the two sides of this gap. In particular, we present simulation results of a minimal life...... for any model above the atomistic scale. This is achieved by deriving an alternative scaling procedure for interaction parameters in the model. We perform system-level simulations of the design which attempt to account for theoretical, and experimental knowledge, as well as results from other...... other life-like features can be achieved in systems of formerly unanticipated simplicity – if these systems exploit physicochemical principles that are immanent to their physical scale....

  12. Data Service: Distributed Data Capture and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, P. B.; Pietrowicz, S. R.

    2007-10-01

    Data Service is a critical component of the NOAO Data Management and Science Support (DMaSS) Solutions Platform, which is based on a service-oriented architecture, and is to replace the current NOAO Data Transport System. Its responsibilities include capturing data from NOAO and partner telescopes and instruments and replicating the data across multiple (currently six) storage sites. Java 5 was chosen as the implementation language, and Java EE as the underlying enterprise framework. Application metadata persistence is performed using EJB and Hibernate on the JBoss Application Server, with PostgreSQL as the persistence back-end. Although potentially any underlying mass storage system may be used as the Data Service file persistence technology, DTS deployments and Data Service test deployments currently use the Storage Resource Broker from SDSC. This paper presents an overview and high-level design of the Data Service, including aspects of deployment, e.g., for the LSST Data Challenge at the NCSA computing facilities.

  13. Origin-independent plasmid replication occurs in vaccinia virus cytoplasmic factories and requires all five known poxvirus replication factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moss Bernard

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Replication of the vaccinia virus genome occurs in cytoplasmic factory areas and is dependent on the virus-encoded DNA polymerase and at least four additional viral proteins. DNA synthesis appears to start near the ends of the genome, but specific origin sequences have not been defined. Surprisingly, transfected circular DNA lacking specific viral sequences is also replicated in poxvirus-infected cells. Origin-independent plasmid replication depends on the viral DNA polymerase, but neither the number of additional viral proteins nor the site of replication has been determined. Results Using a novel real-time polymerase chain reaction assay, we detected a >400-fold increase in newly replicated plasmid in cells infected with vaccinia virus. Studies with conditional lethal mutants of vaccinia virus indicated that each of the five proteins known to be required for viral genome replication was also required for plasmid replication. The intracellular site of replication was determined using a plasmid containing 256 repeats of the Escherichia coli lac operator and staining with an E. coli lac repressor-maltose binding fusion protein followed by an antibody to the maltose binding protein. The lac operator plasmid was localized in cytoplasmic viral factories delineated by DNA staining and binding of antibody to the viral uracil DNA glycosylase, an essential replication protein. In addition, replication of the lac operator plasmid was visualized continuously in living cells infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses the lac repressor fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein. Discrete cytoplasmic fluorescence was detected in cytoplasmic juxtanuclear sites at 6 h after infection and the area and intensity of fluorescence increased over the next several hours. Conclusion Replication of a circular plasmid lacking specific poxvirus DNA sequences mimics viral genome replication by occurring in cytoplasmic viral factories

  14. In vivo facilitated diffusion model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Bauer

    Full Text Available Under dilute in vitro conditions transcription factors rapidly locate their target sequence on DNA by using the facilitated diffusion mechanism. However, whether this strategy of alternating between three-dimensional bulk diffusion and one-dimensional sliding along the DNA contour is still beneficial in the crowded interior of cells is highly disputed. Here we use a simple model for the bacterial genome inside the cell and present a semi-analytical model for the in vivo target search of transcription factors within the facilitated diffusion framework. Without having to resort to extensive simulations we determine the mean search time of a lac repressor in a living E. coli cell by including parameters deduced from experimental measurements. The results agree very well with experimental findings, and thus the facilitated diffusion picture emerges as a quantitative approach to gene regulation in living bacteria cells. Furthermore we see that the search time is not very sensitive to the parameters characterizing the DNA configuration and that the cell seems to operate very close to optimal conditions for target localization. Local searches as implied by the colocalization mechanism are only found to mildly accelerate the mean search time within our model.

  15. Software for Replicating Data Between X.500 and LDAP Directories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    X500/LDAP Directory Replication Utility is a computer program for replicating information between X.500 and LDAP directories. [X.500 is an international standard for on-line directory services. LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is a simple directory access protocol.] The utility can be used to replicate an object of any type from X.500 to LDAP or from LDAP to X.500. The program uses the LDAP version 2 protocol, which is capable of working with both X.500 and LDAP directories. The program can provide any or all of the following services: (1) replicate only modified objects; (2) force replication of all objects; (3) replicate individual objects, one level of objects, or a subtree of objects; (4) filter sets of objects to select ones to be replicated; (5) remove and/or modify object classes from objects that are replicated; and (6) select and/or limit attributes that are replicated. The program includes a separate program that is used to remove objects that are no longer required to be replicated.

  16. Capitalizing on disaster: Establishing chromatin specificity behind the replication fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Ahmad, Kami; Henikoff, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packaged into nucleosomal chromatin, and genomic activity requires the precise localization of transcription factors, histone modifications and nucleosomes. Classic work described the progressive reassembly and maturation of bulk chromatin behind replication forks. More recent proteomics has detailed the molecular machines that accompany the replicative polymerase to promote rapid histone deposition onto the newly replicated DNA. However, localized chromatin features are transiently obliterated by DNA replication every S phase of the cell cycle. Genomic strategies now observe the rebuilding of locus-specific chromatin features, and reveal surprising delays in transcription factor binding behind replication forks. This implies that transient chromatin disorganization during replication is a central juncture for targeted transcription factor binding within genomes. We propose that transient occlusion of regulatory elements by disorganized nucleosomes during chromatin maturation enforces specificity of factor binding. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Evidence for sequential and increasing activation of replication origins along replication timing gradients in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Guilbaud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide replication timing studies have suggested that mammalian chromosomes consist of megabase-scale domains of coordinated origin firing separated by large originless transition regions. Here, we report a quantitative genome-wide analysis of DNA replication kinetics in several human cell types that contradicts this view. DNA combing in HeLa cells sorted into four temporal compartments of S phase shows that replication origins are spaced at 40 kb intervals and fire as small clusters whose synchrony increases during S phase and that replication fork velocity (mean 0.7 kb/min, maximum 2.0 kb/min remains constant and narrowly distributed through S phase. However, multi-scale analysis of a genome-wide replication timing profile shows a broad distribution of replication timing gradients with practically no regions larger than 100 kb replicating at less than 2 kb/min. Therefore, HeLa cells lack large regions of unidirectional fork progression. Temporal transition regions are replicated by sequential activation of origins at a rate that increases during S phase and replication timing gradients are set by the delay and the spacing between successive origin firings rather than by the velocity of single forks. Activation of internal origins in a specific temporal transition region is directly demonstrated by DNA combing of the IGH locus in HeLa cells. Analysis of published origin maps in HeLa cells and published replication timing and DNA combing data in several other cell types corroborate these findings, with the interesting exception of embryonic stem cells where regions of unidirectional fork progression seem more abundant. These results can be explained if origins fire independently of each other but under the control of long-range chromatin structure, or if replication forks progressing from early origins stimulate initiation in nearby unreplicated DNA. These findings shed a new light on the replication timing program of mammalian genomes and

  18. Non-determinism in Byzantine Fault-Tolerant Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Cachin, Christian; Vukolic, Marko; Schubert, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Service replication distributes an application over many processes for tolerating faults, attacks, and misbehavior among a subset of the processes. With the recent interest in blockchain technologies, distributed execution of one logical application has become a prominent topic. The established state-machine replication paradigm inherently requires the application to be deterministic. This paper distinguishes three models for dealing with non-determinism in replicated services, where some pro...

  19. Intracellular Detection of Viral Transcription and Replication Using RNA FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    Chapter 14. Intracellular detection of viral transcription and replication using RNA FISH i. Summary/Abstract Many hemorrhagic fever viruses...resolution. However, viral RNA tends to cluster in specific subcellular sites (e.g. viral replication factories). Thus while true single-molecule...assays [4]. Detection of viral RNA allows for in depth interrogation of the subcellular sites of viral replication and such experiments will help further

  20. PTEN regulates RPA1 and protects DNA replication forks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangxi; Li, Yang; Wang, Pan; Liang, Hui; Cui, Ming; Zhu, Minglu; Guo, Limei; Su, Qian; Sun, Yujie; McNutt, Michael A; Yin, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor PTEN regulates cellular activities and controls genome stability through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we report that PTEN is necessary for the protection of DNA replication forks against replication stress. We show that deletion of PTEN leads to replication fork collapse and chromosomal instability upon fork stalling following nucleotide depletion induced by hydroxyurea. PTEN is physically associated with replication protein A 1 (RPA1) via the RPA1 C-terminal domain. STORM and iPOND reveal that PTEN is localized at replication sites and promotes RPA1 accumulation on replication forks. PTEN recruits the deubiquitinase OTUB1 to mediate RPA1 deubiquitination. RPA1 deletion confers a phenotype like that observed in PTEN knockout cells with stalling of replication forks. Expression of PTEN and RPA1 shows strong correlation in colorectal cancer. Heterozygous disruption of RPA1 promotes tumorigenesis in mice. These results demonstrate that PTEN is essential for DNA replication fork protection. We propose that RPA1 is a target of PTEN function in fork protection and that PTEN maintains genome stability through regulation of DNA replication. PMID:26403191

  1. ATR Prohibits Replication Catastrophe by Preventing Global Exhaustion of RPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledo Lazaro, Luis Ignacio; Altmeyer, Matthias; Rask, Maj-Britt

    2013-01-01

    ATR, activated by replication stress, protects replication forks locally and suppresses origin firing globally. Here, we show that these functions of ATR are mechanistically coupled. Although initially stable, stalled forks in ATR-deficient cells undergo nucleus-wide breakage after unscheduled...... origin firing generates an excess of single-stranded DNA that exhausts the nuclear pool of RPA. Partial reduction of RPA accelerated fork breakage, and forced elevation of RPA was sufficient to delay such "replication catastrophe" even in the absence of ATR activity. Conversely, unscheduled origin firing...... commonly feature intrinsically high replication stress, this study also provides a molecular rationale for their hypersensitivity to ATR inhibitors....

  2. Electrochemically replicated smooth aluminum foils for anodic alumina nanochannel arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biring, Sajal; Tsai, K-T; Sur, Ujjal Kumar; Wang, Y-L

    2008-01-01

    A fast electrochemical replication technique has been developed to fabricate large-scale ultra-smooth aluminum foils by exploiting readily available large-scale smooth silicon wafers as the masters. Since the adhesion of aluminum on silicon depends on the time of surface pretreatment in water, it is possible to either detach the replicated aluminum from the silicon master without damaging the replicated aluminum and master or integrate the aluminum film to the silicon substrate. Replicated ultra-smooth aluminum foils are used for the growth of both self-organized and lithographically guided long-range ordered arrays of anodic alumina nanochannels without any polishing pretreatment

  3. USP7 is a SUMO deubiquitinase essential for DNA replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecona, Emilio; Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara; Specks, Julia

    2016-01-01

    to the accumulation of Ub on SUMOylated proteins, which are displaced away from replisomes. Our findings provide a model explaining the differential accumulation of SUMO and Ub at replication forks and identify an essential role of USP7 in DNA replication that should be considered in the development of USP7...... is maintained at sites of DNA replication in mammalian cells remains unexplored. Here we identify USP7 as a replisome-enriched SUMO deubiquitinase that is essential for DNA replication. By acting on SUMO and SUMOylated proteins, USP7 counteracts their ubiquitination. Inhibition or genetic deletion of USP7 leads...

  4. Human Cytomegalovirus Induces JC Virus DNA Replication in Human Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbronn, Regine; Albrecht, Ingrid; Stephan, Sonja; Burkle, Alexander; Zur Hausen, Harald

    1993-12-01

    JC virus, a human papovavirus, is the causative agent of the demyelinating brain disease progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML). PML is a rare but fatal disease which develops as a complication of severe immunosuppression. Latent JC virus is harbored by many asymptomatic carriers and is transiently reactivated from the latent state upon immunosuppression. JC virus has a very restricted host range, with human glial cells being the only tissue in which it can replicate at reasonable efficiency. Evidence that latent human cytomegalovirus is harbored in the kidney similar to latent JC virus led to the speculation that during episodes of impaired immunocompetence, cytomegalovirus might serve as helper virus for JC virus replication in otherwise nonpermissive cells. We show here that cytomegalovirus infection indeed leads to considerable JC virus DNA replication in cultured human fibroblasts that are nonpermissive for the replication of JC virus alone. Cytomegalovirus-mediated JC virus replication is dependent on the JC virus origin of replication and T antigen. Ganciclovir-induced inhibition of cytomegalovirus replication is associated with a concomitant inhibition of JC virus replication. These results suggest that reactivation of cytomegalovirus during episodes of immunosuppression might lead to activation of latent JC virus, which would enhance the probability of subsequent PML development. Ganciclovir-induced repression of both cytomegalovirus and JC virus replication may form the rational basis for the development of an approach toward treatment or prevention of PML.

  5. Energy Proportionality for Disk Storage Using Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinoh; Rotem, Doron

    2010-09-09

    Energy saving has become a crucial concern in datacenters as several reports predict that the anticipated energy costs over a three year period will exceed hardware acquisition. In particular, saving energy for storage is of major importance as storage devices (and cooling them off) may contribute over 25 percent of the total energy consumed in a datacenter. Recent work introduced the concept of energy proportionality and argued that it is a more relevant metric than just energy saving as it takes into account the tradeoff between energy consumption and performance. In this paper, we present a novel approach, called FREP (Fractional Replication for Energy Proportionality), for energy management in large datacenters. FREP includes areplication strategy and basic functions to enable flexible energy management. Specifically, our method provides performance guarantees by adaptively controlling the power states of a group of disks based on observed and predicted workloads. Our experiments, using a set of real and synthetic traces, show that FREP dramatically reduces energy requirements with a minimal response time penalty.

  6. Synaptic theory of Replicator-like melioration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Loewenstein

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the theory of Melioration, organisms in repeated choice settings shift their choice preference in favor of the alternative that provides the highest return. The goal of this paper is to explain how this learning behavior can emerge from microscopic changes in the efficacies of synapses, in the context of two-alternative repeated-choice experiment. I consider a large family of synaptic plasticity rules in which changes in synaptic efficacies are driven by the covariance between reward and neural activity. I construct a general framework that predicts the learning dynamics of any decision-making neural network that implements this synaptic plasticity rule and show that melioration naturally emerges in such networks. Moreover, the resultant learning dynamics follows the Replicator equation which is commonly used to phenomenologically describe changes in behavior in operant conditioning experiments. Several examples demonstrate how the learning rate of the network is affected by its properties and by the specifics of the plasticity rule. These results help bridge the gap between cellular physiology and learning behavior.

  7. Factor Copula Models for Replicated Spatial Data

    KAUST Repository

    Krupskii, Pavel

    2016-12-19

    We propose a new copula model that can be used with replicated spatial data. Unlike the multivariate normal copula, the proposed copula is based on the assumption that a common factor exists and affects the joint dependence of all measurements of the process. Moreover, the proposed copula can model tail dependence and tail asymmetry. The model is parameterized in terms of a covariance function that may be chosen from the many models proposed in the literature, such as the Matérn model. For some choice of common factors, the joint copula density is given in closed form and therefore likelihood estimation is very fast. In the general case, one-dimensional numerical integration is needed to calculate the likelihood, but estimation is still reasonably fast even with large data sets. We use simulation studies to show the wide range of dependence structures that can be generated by the proposed model with different choices of common factors. We apply the proposed model to spatial temperature data and compare its performance with some popular geostatistics models.

  8. Minority games, evolving capitals and replicator dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galla, Tobias; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2009-11-01

    We discuss a simple version of the minority game (MG) in which agents hold only one strategy each, but in which their capitals evolve dynamically according to their success and in which the total trading volume varies in time accordingly. This feature is known to be crucial for MGs to reproduce stylized facts of real market data. The stationary states and phase diagram of the model can be computed, and we show that the ergodicity breaking phase transition common for MGs, and marked by a divergence of the integrated response, is present also in this simplified model. An analogous majority game turns out to be relatively void of interesting features, and the total capital is found to diverge in time. Introducing a restraining force leads to a model akin to the replicator dynamics of evolutionary game theory, and we demonstrate that here a different type of phase transition is observed. Finally we briefly discuss the relation of this model with one strategy per player to more sophisticated minority games with dynamical capitals and several trading strategies per agent.

  9. Inference by replication in densely connected systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neirotti, Juan P; Saad, David

    2007-10-01

    An efficient Bayesian inference method for problems that can be mapped onto dense graphs is presented. The approach is based on message passing where messages are averaged over a large number of replicated variable systems exposed to the same evidential nodes. An assumption about the symmetry of the solutions is required for carrying out the averages; here we extend the previous derivation based on a replica-symmetric- (RS)-like structure to include a more complex one-step replica-symmetry-breaking-like (1RSB-like) ansatz. To demonstrate the potential of the approach it is employed for studying critical properties of the Ising linear perceptron and for multiuser detection in code division multiple access (CDMA) under different noise models. Results obtained under the RS assumption in the noncritical regime give rise to a highly efficient signal detection algorithm in the context of CDMA; while in the critical regime one observes a first-order transition line that ends in a continuous phase transition point. Finite size effects are also observed. While the 1RSB ansatz is not required for the original problems, it was applied to the CDMA signal detection problem with a more complex noise model that exhibits RSB behavior, resulting in an improvement in performance.

  10. Voice congruency facilitates word recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeanu, Sandra; Craik, Fergus I M; Alain, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral studies of spoken word memory have shown that context congruency facilitates both word and source recognition, though the level at which context exerts its influence remains equivocal. We measured event-related potentials (ERPs) while participants performed both types of recognition task with words spoken in four voices. Two voice parameters (i.e., gender and accent) varied between speakers, with the possibility that none, one or two of these parameters was congruent between study and test. Results indicated that reinstating the study voice at test facilitated both word and source recognition, compared to similar or no context congruency at test. Behavioral effects were paralleled by two ERP modulations. First, in the word recognition test, the left parietal old/new effect showed a positive deflection reflective of context congruency between study and test words. Namely, the same speaker condition provided the most positive deflection of all correctly identified old words. In the source recognition test, a right frontal positivity was found for the same speaker condition compared to the different speaker conditions, regardless of response success. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the benefit of context congruency is reflected behaviorally and in ERP modulations traditionally associated with recognition memory.

  11. Voice congruency facilitates word recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Campeanu

    Full Text Available Behavioral studies of spoken word memory have shown that context congruency facilitates both word and source recognition, though the level at which context exerts its influence remains equivocal. We measured event-related potentials (ERPs while participants performed both types of recognition task with words spoken in four voices. Two voice parameters (i.e., gender and accent varied between speakers, with the possibility that none, one or two of these parameters was congruent between study and test. Results indicated that reinstating the study voice at test facilitated both word and source recognition, compared to similar or no context congruency at test. Behavioral effects were paralleled by two ERP modulations. First, in the word recognition test, the left parietal old/new effect showed a positive deflection reflective of context congruency between study and test words. Namely, the same speaker condition provided the most positive deflection of all correctly identified old words. In the source recognition test, a right frontal positivity was found for the same speaker condition compared to the different speaker conditions, regardless of response success. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that the benefit of context congruency is reflected behaviorally and in ERP modulations traditionally associated with recognition memory.

  12. NLRX1 Sequesters STING to Negatively Regulate the Interferon Response, Thereby Facilitating the Replication of HIV-1 and DNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Haitao; König, Renate; Deng, Meng; Riess, Maximilian; Mo, Jinyao; Zhang, Lu; Petrucelli, Alex; Yoh, Sunnie M; Barefoot, Brice; Samo, Melissa; Sempowski, Gregory D; Zhang, Aiping; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M; Feng, Hui; Lemon, Stanley M; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Yanping; Wen, Haitao; Zhang, Zhigang; Damania, Blossom; Tsao, Li-Chung; Wang, Qi; Su, Lishan; Duncan, Joseph A; Chanda, Sumit K; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2016-04-13

    Understanding the negative regulators of antiviral immune responses will be critical for advancing immune-modulated antiviral strategies. NLRX1, an NLR protein that negatively regulates innate immunity, was previously identified in an unbiased siRNA screen as required for HIV infection. We find that NLRX1 depletion results in impaired nuclear import of HIV-1 DNA in human monocytic cells. Additionally, NLRX1 was observed to reduce type-I interferon (IFN-I) and cytokines in response to HIV-1 reverse-transcribed DNA. NLRX1 sequesters the DNA-sensing adaptor STING from interaction with TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), which is a requisite for IFN-1 induction in response to DNA. NLRX1-deficient cells generate an amplified STING-dependent host response to cytosolic DNA, c-di-GMP, cGAMP, HIV-1, and DNA viruses. Accordingly, Nlrx1(-/-) mice infected with DNA viruses exhibit enhanced innate immunity and reduced viral load. Thus, NLRX1 is a negative regulator of the host innate immune response to HIV-1 and DNA viruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Up-regulation of hepatitis C virus replication by human T cell leukemia virus type I-encoded Tax protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yamada, Osamu; Kawagishi, Kenji; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Araki, Hiromasa; Yamaoka, Shoji; Hattori, Toshio; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2007-12-05

    Co-infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with other blood-borne pathogens such as human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV) is common in highly endemic areas. Clinical evidence showing a correlation between HTLV-I co-infection and rapid progression of HCV-associated liver disease promoted us to investigate the effect of HTLV-I-encoded Tax protein on HCV replication. Reporter assay showed that HCV replicon-encoded luciferase expression was significantly augmented by co-transfection of the Tax-expressing plasmid. Further, HCV RNA replication in replicon cells was increased either by co-culture with cells stably expressing Tax protein (Huhtax) or by culture in the presence of Huhtax-conditioned medium, indicating that Tax could also modulate HCV replication of adjacent cells in a paracrine manner. Additionally, HCV replication in Huhtax exhibited a reduced responsiveness to interferon-alpha-induced antiviral activity. This study demonstrates the facilitation of HCV replication by Tax protein, which may partially account for severer clinical consequences of HCV-related disease in HCV/HTLV co-infected individuals.

  14. Functional connectivity in replicated urban landscapes in the land snail (Cornu aspersum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbi, Manon; Ernoult, Aude; Poli, Pedro; Madec, Luc; Guiller, Annie; Martin, Marie-Claire; Nabucet, Jean; Beaujouan, Véronique; Petit, Eric J

    2018-02-07

    Urban areas are highly fragmented and thereby exert strong constraints on individual dispersal. Despite this, some species manage to persist in urban areas, such as the garden snail, Cornu aspersum, which is common in cityscapes despite its low mobility. Using landscape genetic approaches, we combined study area replication and multiscale analysis to determine how landscape composition, configuration and connectivity influence snail dispersal across urban areas. At the overall landscape scale, areas with a high percentage of roads decreased genetic differentiation between populations. At the population scale, genetic differentiation was positively linked with building surface, the proportion of borders where wooded patches and roads appeared side by side and the proportion of borders combining wooded patches and other impervious areas. Analyses based on pairwise genetic distances validated the isolation-by-distance and isolation-by-resistance models for this land snail, with an equal fit to least-cost paths and circuit-theory-based models. Each of the 12 landscapes analysed separately yielded specific relations to environmental features, whereas analyses integrating all replicates highlighted general common effects. Our results suggest that urban transport infrastructures facilitate passive snail dispersal. At a local scale, corresponding to active dispersal, unfavourable habitats (wooded and impervious areas) isolate populations. This work upholds the use of replicated landscapes to increase the generalizability of landscape genetics results and shows how multiscale analyses provide insight into scale-dependent processes. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA repair and replication proteins revealed by targeted chemical probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisnovsky, Simon; Jean, Sae Rin; Kelley, Shana O

    2016-07-01

    Efficient and accurate replication and repair of mitochondrial DNA is essential for cellular viability, yet only a minimal complement of mitochondrial proteins with relevant activities have been identified. Here, we describe an approach to screen for new pathways involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) that leverages the activities of DNA-damaging probes exhibiting specific subcellular localization. By conducting a siRNA screen of known nuclear DNA maintenance factors, and monitoring synergistic effects of gene depletion on the activity of mitochondria-specific DNA-damaging agents, we identify a series of proteins not previously recognized to act within mitochondria. These include proteins that function in pathways of oxidative DNA damage repair and dsDNA break repair, along with a novel mitochondrial DNA polymerase, POLθ, that facilitates efficient DNA replication in an environment prone to oxidative stress. POLθ expression levels affect the mutational rate of mitochondrial DNA, but this protein also appears critical for efficient mtDNA replication.

  16. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research.

  17. The Relationship between Baseline Drinking Status, Peer Motivational Interviewing Microskills, and Drinking Outcomes in a Brief Alcohol Intervention for Matriculating College Students: A Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollison, Sean J.; Mastroleo, Nadine R.; Mallett, Kimberly A.; Witkiewitz, Katie; Lee, Christine M.; Ray, Anne E.; Larimer, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to replicate and extend previous findings (Tollison et al., 2008) on the association between peer facilitator adherence to motivational interviewing (MI) microskills and college student drinking behavior. This study used a larger sample size, multiple follow-up time-points, and latent variable analyses allowing for…

  18. Human Cytomegalovirus Can Procure Deoxyribonucleotides for Viral DNA Replication in the Absence of Retinoblastoma Protein Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuny, Chad V; Kalejta, Robert F

    2016-10-01

    Viral DNA replication requires deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTPs). These molecules, which are found at low levels in noncycling cells, are generated either by salvage pathways or through de novo synthesis. Nucleotide synthesis utilizes the activity of a series of nucleotide-biosynthetic enzymes (NBEs) whose expression is repressed in noncycling cells by complexes between the E2F transcription factors and the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor. Rb-E2F complexes are dissociated and NBE expression is activated during cell cycle transit by cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-mediated Rb phosphorylation. The DNA virus human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes a viral Cdk (v-Cdk) (the UL97 protein) that phosphorylates Rb, induces the expression of cellular NBEs, and is required for efficient viral DNA synthesis. A long-held hypothesis proposed that viral proteins with Rb-inactivating activities functionally similar to those of UL97 facilitated viral DNA replication in part by inducing the de novo production of dNTPs. However, we found that dNTPs were limiting even in cells infected with wild-type HCMV in which UL97 is expressed and Rb is phosphorylated. Furthermore, we revealed that both de novo and salvage pathway enzymes contribute to viral DNA replication during HCMV infection and that Rb phosphorylation by cellular Cdks does not correct the viral DNA replication defect observed in cells infected with a UL97-deficient virus. We conclude that HCMV can obtain dNTPs in the absence of Rb phosphorylation and that UL97 can contribute to the efficiency of DNA replication in an Rb phosphorylation-independent manner. Transforming viral oncoproteins, such as adenovirus E1A and papillomavirus E7, inactivate Rb. The standard hypothesis for how Rb inactivation facilitates infection with these viruses is that it is through an increase in the enzymes required for DNA synthesis, which include nucleotide-biosynthetic enzymes. However, HCMV UL97, which functionally mimics these viral

  19. Hypotension and Environmental Noise: A Replication Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Lercher

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Up to now, traffic noise effect studies focused on hypertension as health outcome. Hypotension has not been considered as a potential health outcome although in experiments some people also responded to noise with decreases of blood pressure. Currently, the characteristics of these persons are not known and whether this down regulation of blood pressure is an experimental artifact, selection, or can also be observed in population studies is unanswered. In a cross-sectional replication study, we randomly sampled participants (age 20–75, N = 807 from circular areas (radius = 500 m around 31 noise measurement sites from four noise exposure strata (35–44, 45–54, 55–64, >64 Leq, dBA. Repeated blood pressure measurements were available for a smaller sample (N = 570. Standardized information on socio-demographics, housing, life style and health was obtained by door to door visits including anthropometric measurements. Noise and air pollution exposure was assigned by GIS based on both calculation and measurements. Reported hypotension or hypotension medication past year was the main outcome studied. Exposure-effect relationships were modeled with multiple non-linear logistic regression techniques using separate noise estimations for total, highway and rail exposure. Reported hypotension was significantly associated with rail and total noise exposure and strongly modified by weather sensitivity. Reported hypotension medication showed associations of similar size with rail and total noise exposure without effect modification by weather sensitivity. The size of the associations in the smaller sample with BMI as additional covariate was similar. Other important cofactors (sex, age, BMI, health and moderators (weather sensitivity, adjacent main roads and associated annoyance need to be considered as indispensible part of the observed relationship. This study confirms a potential new noise effect pathway and discusses potential patho

  20. Facilitating Value Co-Creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veith, Anne; Assaf, Albert; Josiassen, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    ) introduced a new dominant logic in the marketing literature, the Service-Dominant Logic (S-D Logic), in which service, interactions, and enhanced experiences help create value, and this potential for value is what attracts consumers. Therefore organizations must be customer-centric in order to facilitate...... unique, positive experiences. As the name indicates, both organizations and consumers (should) obtain value when co-creating, which is why both parties are willing to increase their degree of involvement, e.g. spending more resources, sharing tacit knowledge, etc., because a high degree of involvement......). Therefore, for instance, being part of the process is a key incentive for consumers. Postmodern consumers' search for unique experiences calls for individualization, personalization, etc. Although Prahalad & Ramaswamy (2004), Karpen et al. (2008), and Karpen et al. (2011) have presented S-D Logic...

  1. Facilitating Collaboration through Design Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva; Messeter, Jørn

    2004-01-01

    in collaboration with industrial partners and potential users, and use of the games in three educational settings.The overall aim of the design games is to help facilitate a user-centered design process for cross-disciplinary design groups early in the design process. Framing collaborative design activities...... understanding of the development task. This paper presents a set of four design games, which offers solutions to the challenges mentioned. The design games have been developed in the Space Studio during several projects and years. Here experiences are discussed on the basis of two research projects carried out...... in a game format, arguably improves idea generation and communication between stakeholders. By shifting focus to the game, power relations and other factors that might hamper idea generation, are downplayed....

  2. Facilitating attachment after international adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Natalie L

    2009-01-01

    Americans have increasingly turned to international adoption (IA) as an alternative way to build a family. Unfortunately, IA families are often being developed under conditions of loss, and sometimes these families struggle to form healthy attachments to each other. Disordered attachment (the failure to form a reciprocal, loving bond between parent and child) can occur, and can have devastating consequences. In some instances, IA children have been relinquished into state foster care systems; other families simply struggle for years caring for a developmentally delayed child who appears to have no emotion for his/her adoptive family. Nurses are likely to have contact with IA families and can use their education about attachment and bonding to help facilitate attachment in these developing families. Swanson's caring theory provides a clinically useful guide to meet this need.

  3. Anterior ethmoid anatomy facilitates dacryocystorhinostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, W K; Moore, C A; Linberg, J V

    1990-12-01

    The ethmoid air cell labyrinth lies adjacent to the medial orbital wall, extending even beyond the sutures of the ethmoid bone. Its anatomic relationship to the lacrimal sac fossa is important in lacrimal surgery. We evaluated computed tomographic scans of 190 orbits with normal ethmoid anatomy to define the anatomic relationship of anterior ethmoid air cells to the lacrimal sac fossa. In 93% of the orbits, the cells extended anterior to the posterior lacrimal crest, with 40% entering the frontal process of the maxilla. This anatomic relationship may be used to facilitate the osteotomy during dacryocystorhinostomy. During a 10-year period (310 cases), one of us routinely entered the anterior ethmoid air cells to initiate the osteotomy during dacryocystorhinostomy. This technique has helped to avoid lacerations of the nasal mucosa.

  4. Bypass of a protein barrier by a replicative DNA helicase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yardimci, Hasan; Wang, Xindan; Loveland, Anna B.; Tappin, Inger; Rudner, David Z.; Hurwitz, Jerard; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, Johannes C.

    2012-01-01

    Replicative DNA helicases generally unwind DNA as a single hexamer that encircles and translocates along one strand of the duplex while excluding the complementary strand (known as steric exclusion). By contrast, large T antigen, the replicative DNA helicase of the simian virus 40 (SV40), is

  5. Stalled replication forks generate a distinct mutational signature in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B.; Liberti, Sascha E.; Vogel, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Proliferating cells acquire genome alterations during the act of DNA replication. This leads to mutation accumulation and somatic cell mosaicism in multicellular organisms, and is also implicated as an underlying cause of aging and tumorigenesis. The molecular mechanisms of DNA replication-associ...

  6. Trajectory of Externalizing Child Behaviors in a KEEP Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uretsky, Mathew C.; Lee, Bethany R.; Greeno, Elizabeth J.; Barth, Richard P.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to examine the correlates of child behavior change over time in a replication of the KEEP intervention. Method: The study sample was drawn from the treatment group of the Maryland replication of KEEP (n=65). Change over time was analyzed using multilevel linear mixed modeling. Results: Parents' use of…

  7. Parallelizing Federated SPARQL Queries in Presence of Replicated Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minier, Thomas; Montoya, Gabriela; Skaf-Molli, Hala

    2017-01-01

    Federated query engines have been enhanced to exploit new data localities created by replicated data, e.g., Fedra. However, existing replication aware federated query engines mainly focus on pruning sources during the source selection and query decomposition in order to reduce intermediate results...

  8. Reconsidering Replication: New Perspectives on Large-Scale School Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peurach, Donald J.; Glazer, Joshua L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to reconsider organizational replication as a strategy for large-scale school improvement: a strategy that features a "hub" organization collaborating with "outlet" schools to enact school-wide designs for improvement. To do so, we synthesize a leading line of research on commercial replication to construct a…

  9. The Causes and Consequences of Topological Stress during DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyi, Andrea; Minchell, Nicola E; Baxter, Jonathan

    2016-12-21

    The faithful replication of sister chromatids is essential for genomic integrity in every cell division. The replication machinery must overcome numerous difficulties in every round of replication, including DNA topological stress. Topological stress arises due to the double-stranded helical nature of DNA. When the strands are pulled apart for replication to occur, the intertwining of the double helix must also be resolved or topological stress will arise. This intrinsic problem is exacerbated by specific chromosomal contexts encountered during DNA replication. The convergence of two replicons during termination, the presence of stable protein-DNA complexes and active transcription can all lead to topological stresses being imposed upon DNA replication. Here we describe how replication forks respond to topological stress by replication fork rotation and fork reversal. We also discuss the genomic contexts where topological stress is likely to occur in eukaryotes, focusing on the contribution of transcription. Finally, we describe how topological stress, and the ways forks respond to it, may contribute to genomic instability in cells.

  10. Replication stress in Mammalian cells and its consequences for mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelot, Camille; Magdalou, Indiana; Lopez, Bernard S

    2015-05-22

    The faithful transmission of genetic information to daughter cells is central to maintaining genomic stability and relies on the accurate and complete duplication of genetic material during each cell cycle. However, the genome is routinely exposed to endogenous and exogenous stresses that can impede the progression of replication. Such replication stress can be an early cause of cancer or initiate senescence. Replication stress, which primarily occurs during S phase, results in consequences during mitosis, jeopardizing chromosome segregation and, in turn, genomic stability. The traces of replication stress can be detected in the daughter cells during G1 phase. Alterations in mitosis occur in two types: 1) local alterations that correspond to breaks, rearrangements, intertwined DNA molecules or non-separated sister chromatids that are confined to the region of the replication dysfunction; 2) genome-wide chromosome segregation resulting from centrosome amplification (although centrosomes do not contain DNA), which amplifies the local replication stress to the entire genome. Here, we discuss the endogenous causes of replication perturbations, the mechanisms of replication fork restart and the consequences for mitosis, chromosome segregation and genomic stability.

  11. Murine leukemia virus (MLV replication monitored with fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittner Alexandra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer gene therapy will benefit from vectors that are able to replicate in tumor tissue and cause a bystander effect. Replication-competent murine leukemia virus (MLV has been described to have potential as cancer therapeutics, however, MLV infection does not cause a cytopathic effect in the infected cell and viral replication can only be studied by immunostaining or measurement of reverse transcriptase activity. Results We inserted the coding sequences for green fluorescent protein (GFP into the proline-rich region (PRR of the ecotropic envelope protein (Env and were able to fluorescently label MLV. This allowed us to directly monitor viral replication and attachment to target cells by flow cytometry. We used this method to study viral replication of recombinant MLVs and split viral genomes, which were generated by replacement of the MLV env gene with the red fluorescent protein (RFP and separately cloning GFP-Env into a retroviral vector. Co-transfection of both plasmids into target cells resulted in the generation of semi-replicative vectors, and the two color labeling allowed to determine the distribution of the individual genomes in the target cells and was indicative for the occurrence of recombination events. Conclusions Fluorescently labeled MLVs are excellent tools for the study of factors that influence viral replication and can be used to optimize MLV-based replication-competent viruses or vectors for gene therapy.

  12. Chromosomal context and replication properties of ARS plasmids in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-28

    Nov 28, 2015 ... mously Replicating Sequence (ARS) elements (reviewed in Campbell and Newlon 1991) function as replication origins in plasmids as well as in chromosomes. ARS elements can be identified by cloning and transformation analysis (also called ARS assay) as plasmids bearing them transform yeast cells.

  13. The Genomic Replication of the Crenarchaeal Virus SIRV2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Alvarez, Laura

    Archaeal viruses have been found to be remarkably diverse in terms of their morphologies and genomes. But knowledge about their replication cycles and interactions with their hosts is still lacking. The aim of this work was to gain insight about the molecular mechanism of the genomic replication ...

  14. Fidelity of a human cell DNA replication complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.D.; Kunkel, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have measured the fidelity of bidirectional, semiconservative DNA synthesis by a human DNA replication complex in vitro. Replication was performed by extracts of HeLa cells in the presence of simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor antigen by using a double-stranded phage M13mp2 DNA template containing the SV40 origin of replication and either of two different target sequences for scoring mutations in the lacZα-complementation gene, which encodes the α region (specifying the amino-terminal portion) of β-galactosidase. Replicative synthesis was substantially more accurate than synthesis by the human DNA polymerase α-DNA primase complex purified from HeLa cell extracts by immunoaffinity chromatography, suggesting that additional factors or activities in the extract may increase fidelity during bidirectional replication. However, by using a sensitive opal codon reversion assay, single-base substitution errors were readily detected in the replication products at frequencies significantly higher than estimated spontaneous mutation rates in vivo. These data suggest that additional fidelity factors may be present during chromosomal replication in vivo and/or that the fidelity of replication alone does not account for the low spontaneous mutation rates in eukaryotes

  15. CRISPR-mediated control of the bacterial initiation of replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiktor, J.M.; Lesterlin, Christian; Sherratt, David J.; Dekker, C.

    2016-01-01

    Programmable control of the cell cycle has been shown to be a powerful tool in cell-biology studies. Here, we develop a novel system for controlling the bacterial cell cycle, based on binding of CRISPR/dCas9 to the origin-of-replication locus. Initiation of replication of bacterial chromosomes is

  16. Chromosomal context and replication properties of ARS plasmids in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-28

    Nov 28, 2015 ... ImageJ and Adobe Photoshop 7 soft-wares. 3. Results and discussion. To study the effect of the chromosomal context on replication origin activity and replication timing of ars2004 and ars727, our first goal was to make context specific clones containing the ura4 gene as a selectable marker. This was ...

  17. Three attempts to replicate the moral licensing effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanken, I.; van de Ven, N.; Zeelenberg, M.; Meijers, M.H.C.

    2014-01-01

    The present work includes three attempts to replicate the moral licensing effect by Sachdeva, Iliev, and Medin (2009). The original authors found that writing about positive traits led to lower donations to charity and decreased cooperative behavior. The first two replication attempts (student

  18. Nidovirus replication structures : hijacking membranes to support viral RNA synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoops, Kèvin

    2011-01-01

    Positive-stranded RNA viruses replicate in the cytoplasm of host cells and their replication complexes are associated with modified cell membranes. We investigated the structure of the nidovirus-induced membrane modifications and found that nidoviruses transform the endoplasmic reticulum into a

  19. Fidelity of a human cell DNA replication complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J.D.; Kunkel, T.A. (National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA))

    1988-10-01

    The authors have measured the fidelity of bidirectional, semiconservative DNA synthesis by a human DNA replication complex in vitro. Replication was performed by extracts of HeLa cells in the presence of simian virus 40 (SV40) large tumor antigen by using a double-stranded phage M13mp2 DNA template containing the SV40 origin of replication and either of two different target sequences for scoring mutations in the lacZ{alpha}-complementation gene, which encodes the {alpha} region (specifying the amino-terminal portion) of {beta}-galactosidase. Replicative synthesis was substantially more accurate than synthesis by the human DNA polymerase {alpha}-DNA primase complex purified from HeLa cell extracts by immunoaffinity chromatography, suggesting that additional factors or activities in the extract may increase fidelity during bidirectional replication. However, by using a sensitive opal codon reversion assay, single-base substitution errors were readily detected in the replication products at frequencies significantly higher than estimated spontaneous mutation rates in vivo. These data suggest that additional fidelity factors may be present during chromosomal replication in vivo and/or that the fidelity of replication alone does not account for the low spontaneous mutation rates in eukaryotes.

  20. Poverty and suicide among native Canadians: a replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, C

    1991-08-01

    In replication of USA research, poverty and suicide were shown to have strong positive correlations in an ecological study of males, aged 15 to 34 years, in 26 Native reservations in Alberta, Canada. The importance of cross-cultural research in replicating and refining psychological research is stressed.

  1. Replication of Psycholinguistic Experiments and the Resolution of Inconsistencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rákosi, Csilla

    2017-01-01

    Non-exact replications are regarded as effective tools of problem solving in psycholinguistic research because they lead to more plausible experimental results; however, they are also ineffective tools of problem solving because they trigger cumulative contradictions among different replications of an experiment. This paper intends to resolve this…

  2. Cell-Free and Cell-Based Approaches to Explore the Roles of Host Membranes and Lipids in the Formation of Viral Replication Compartment Induced by Tombusviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Peter D; Pogany, Judit; Xu, Kai

    2016-03-03

    Plant positive strand RNA viruses are intracellular infectious agents that take advantage of cellular lipids and membranes to support replication and protect viral RNA from degradation by host antiviral responses. In this review, we discuss how Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) co-opts lipid transfer proteins and modulates lipid metabolism and transport to facilitate the assembly of the membrane-bound viral replicase complexes within intricate replication compartments. Identification and characterization of the proviral roles of specific lipids and proteins involved in lipid metabolism based on results from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) model host and cell-free approaches are discussed. The review also highlights the advantage of using liposomes with chemically defined composition to identify specific lipids required for TBSV replication. Remarkably, all the known steps in TBSV replication are dependent on cellular lipids and co-opted membranes.

  3. Facilitating submetering implementation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, M.A.

    1996-05-01

    Residential submetering is the measurement and billing of electric use in individual apartments in master-metered buildings. In master-metered building situations, residents do not bear electricity costs in proportion to consumption levels. As a result, studies have confirmed that residents in master-metered buildings tend to consume more electricity than residents with individual apartment metering, and have established electrical submetering as an effective energy conservation measure. The New York State Energy Research & Development Authority (NYSERDA) has commissioned a project called Facilitating Submetering Implementation to identify and analyze barriers to the implementation of residential electrical submetering in New York and to formulate recommendations that would facilitate the removal of these barriers, streamlining the process. Experienced professionals in the technical, legal, regulatory, analytical, financial, and other aspects of submetering were retained to interview key interested parties and conduct public forums. This and other data were then analyzed to ascertain the barriers to submetering and develop recommendations designed to reduce or eliminate these barriers. The key barriers to submetering implementation were found to be the Public Service Commission (PSC) requirement for a vote of a majority of shareholders (for coops and condos) and the high initial cost that cannot easily be recouped by owners of both rental and shareholder-owned buildings. The key recommendations are to repeal the voting requirement, maintain the utility incentives, adopt a uniform dispute resolution mechanism, and increase awareness through an Ad-hoc Submetering Committee and supporting educational materials. Other funding sources not fully available can also be made available with regulatory agency support.

  4. Hepatitis C Virus Replication Depends on Endosomal Cholesterol Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeck, Ina Karen; Lee, Ji-Young; Tabata, Keisuke; Romero-Brey, Inés; Paul, David; Schult, Philipp; Lohmann, Volker; Kaderali, Lars; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2018-01-01

    Similar to other positive-strand RNA viruses, hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes massive rearrangements of intracellular membranes, resulting in a membranous web (MW) composed of predominantly double-membrane vesicles (DMVs), the presumed sites of RNA replication. DMVs are enriched for cholesterol, but mechanistic details on the source and recruitment of cholesterol to the viral replication organelle are only partially known. Here we focused on selected lipid transfer proteins implicated in direct lipid transfer at various endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-membrane contact sites. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown identified several hitherto unknown HCV dependency factors, such as steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer domain protein 3 (STARD3), oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 1A and -B (OSBPL1A and -B), and Niemann-Pick-type C1 (NPC1), all residing at late endosome and lysosome membranes and required for efficient HCV RNA replication but not for replication of the closely related dengue virus. Focusing on NPC1, we found that knockdown or pharmacological inhibition caused cholesterol entrapment in lysosomal vesicles concomitant with decreased cholesterol abundance at sites containing the viral replicase factor NS5A. In untreated HCV-infected cells, unesterified cholesterol accumulated at the perinuclear region, partially colocalizing with NS5A at DMVs, arguing for NPC1-mediated endosomal cholesterol transport to the viral replication organelle. Consistent with cholesterol being an important structural component of DMVs, reducing NPC1-dependent endosomal cholesterol transport impaired MW integrity. This suggests that HCV usurps lipid transfer proteins, such as NPC1, at ER-late endosome/lysosome membrane contact sites to recruit cholesterol to the viral replication organelle, where it contributes to MW functionality. IMPORTANCE A key feature of the replication of positive-strand RNA viruses is the rearrangement of the host cell

  5. Diversity of the DNA Replication System in the Archaea Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Sarmiento

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise and timely duplication of the genome is essential for cellular life. It is achieved by DNA replication, a complex process that is conserved among the three domains of life. Even though the cellular structure of archaea closely resembles that of bacteria, the information processing machinery of archaea is evolutionarily more closely related to the eukaryotic system, especially for the proteins involved in the DNA replication process. While the general DNA replication mechanism is conserved among the different domains of life, modifications in functionality and in some of the specialized replication proteins are observed. Indeed, Archaea possess specific features unique to this domain. Moreover, even though the general pattern of the replicative system is the same in all archaea, a great deal of variation exists between specific groups.

  6. Cytoplasmic ATR Activation Promotes Vaccinia Virus Genome Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Postigo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to most DNA viruses, poxviruses replicate their genomes in the cytoplasm without host involvement. We find that vaccinia virus induces cytoplasmic activation of ATR early during infection, before genome uncoating, which is unexpected because ATR plays a fundamental nuclear role in maintaining host genome integrity. ATR, RPA, INTS7, and Chk1 are recruited to cytoplasmic DNA viral factories, suggesting canonical ATR pathway activation. Consistent with this, pharmacological and RNAi-mediated inhibition of canonical ATR signaling suppresses genome replication. RPA and the sliding clamp PCNA interact with the viral polymerase E9 and are required for DNA replication. Moreover, the ATR activator TOPBP1 promotes genome replication and associates with the viral replisome component H5. Our study suggests that, in contrast to long-held beliefs, vaccinia recruits conserved components of the eukaryote DNA replication and repair machinery to amplify its genome in the host cytoplasm.

  7. Viral trans-factor independent replication of human papillomavirus genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeletti Peter C

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papillomaviruses (PVs establish a persistent infection in the proliferating basal cells of the epithelium. The viral genome is replicated and maintained as a low-copy nuclear plasmid in basal keratinocytes. Bovine and human papillomaviruses (BPV and HPV are known to utilize two viral proteins; E1, a DNA helicase, and E2, a transcription factor, which have been considered essential for viral DNA replication. However, growing evidence suggests that E1 and E2 are not entirely essential for stable replication of HPV. Results Here we report that multiple HPV16 mutants, lacking either or both E1 and E2 open reading frame (ORFs and the long control region (LCR, still support extrachromosomal replication. Our data clearly indicate that HPV16 has a mode of replication, independent of viral trans-factors, E1 and E2, which is achieved by origin activity located outside of the LCR.

  8. Replication-Coupled Modulation of Early Replicating Chromatin Domains Detected by an Anti-Actin Antibody

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fidlerová, Helena; Mašata, Martin; Malínský, Jan; Fialová, Markéta; Cvačková, Zuzana; Loužecká, A.; Koberna, Karel; Berezney, R.; Raška, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 5 (2005), 899-916 ISSN 0730-2312 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/00/1622; GA ČR GA304/03/1121; GA ČR GA304/04/0692; GA ČR GA304/02/0342; GA AV ČR IAA5039103 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906; MSM111100003 Keywords : DNA replication * chromatin * cell cycle Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 3.591, year: 2005

  9. Phosphorylation of NS5A Serine-235 is essential to hepatitis C virus RNA replication and normal replication compartment formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyre, Nicholas S., E-mail: nicholas.eyre@adelaide.edu.au [School of Biological Sciences and Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide (Australia); Hampton-Smith, Rachel J.; Aloia, Amanda L. [School of Biological Sciences and Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide (Australia); Eddes, James S. [Adelaide Proteomics Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Simpson, Kaylene J. [Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Hoffmann, Peter [Adelaide Proteomics Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS), University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Beard, Michael R. [School of Biological Sciences and Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5A protein is essential for HCV RNA replication and virus assembly. Here we report the identification of NS5A phosphorylation sites Ser-222, Ser-235 and Thr-348 during an infectious HCV replication cycle and demonstrate that Ser-235 phosphorylation is essential for HCV RNA replication. Confocal microscopy revealed that both phosphoablatant (S235A) and phosphomimetic (S235D) mutants redistribute NS5A to large juxta-nuclear foci that display altered colocalization with known replication complex components. Using electron microscopy (EM) we found that S235D alters virus-induced membrane rearrangements while EM using ‘APEX2’-tagged viruses demonstrated S235D-mediated enrichment of NS5A in irregular membranous foci. Finally, using a customized siRNA screen of candidate NS5A kinases and subsequent analysis using a phospho-specific antibody, we show that phosphatidylinositol-4 kinase III alpha (PI4KIIIα) is important for Ser-235 phosphorylation. We conclude that Ser-235 phosphorylation of NS5A is essential for HCV RNA replication and normal replication complex formation and is regulated by PI4KIIIα. - Highlights: • NS5A residues Ser-222, Ser-235 and Thr-348 are phosphorylated during HCV infection. • Phosphorylation of Ser-235 is essential to HCV RNA replication. • Mutation of Ser-235 alters replication compartment localization and morphology. • Phosphatidylinositol-4 kinase III alpha is important for Ser-235 phosphorylation.

  10. The Escherichia coli Tus-Ter replication fork barrier causes site-specific DNA replication perturbation in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Sass, Ehud; Suski, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Replication fork (RF) pausing occurs at both 'programmed' sites and non-physiological barriers (for example, DNA adducts). Programmed RF pausing is required for site-specific DNA replication termination in Escherichia coli, and this process requires the binding of the polar terminator protein, Tu...

  11. Flock House virus subgenomic RNA3 is replicated and its replication correlates with transactivation of RNA2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerle, Lance D.; Albarino, Cesar G.; Ball, L. Andrew.

    2003-01-01

    The nodavirus Flock House virus has a bipartite genome composed of RNAs 1 and 2, which encode the catalytic component of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and the capsid protein precursor, respectively. In addition to catalyzing replication of the viral genome, the RdRp also transcribes from RNA1 a subgenomic RNA3, which is both required for and suppressed by RNA2 replication. Here, we show that in the absence of RNA1 replication, FHV RdRp replicated positive-sense RNA3 transcripts fully and copied negative-sense RNA3 transcripts into positive strands. The two nonstructural proteins encoded by RNA3 were dispensable for replication, but sequences in the 3'-terminal 58 nucleotides were required. RNA3 variants that failed to replicate also failed to transactivate RNA2. These results imply that RNA3 is naturally produced both by transcription from RNA1 and by subsequent RNA1-independent replication and that RNA3 replication may be necessary for transactivation of RNA2

  12. Online interprofessional education facilitation: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Sherryn Maree; Ward, Catherine; Reeves, Scott

    2018-04-22

    The use of online media to deliver interprofessional education (IPE) is becoming more prevalent across health professions education settings. Facilitation of IPE activities is known to be critical to the effective delivery of IPE, however, specifics about the nature of online IPE facilitation remains unclear. To explore the health professions education literature to understand the extent, range and nature of research on online IPE facilitation. Scoping review methodology was used to guide a search of four electronic databases for relevant papers. Of the 2095 abstracts initially identified, after screening of both abstracts and full-text papers, 10 studies were selected for inclusion in this review. Following abstraction of key information from each study, a thematic analysis was undertaken. Three key themes emerged to describe the nature of the IPE facilitation literature: (1) types of online IPE facilitation contributions, (2) the experience of online IPE facilitation and (3) personal outcomes of online IPE facilitation. These IPE facilitation themes were particularly focused on facilitation of interprofessional student teams on an asynchronous basis. While the included studies provide some insight into the nature of online IPE facilitation, future research is needed to better understand facilitator contributions, and the facilitation experience and associated outcomes, both relating to synchronous and asynchronous online environments.

  13. Facilitation of decommissioning light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.B. Jr.

    1979-12-01

    Information on design features, special equipment, and construction methods useful in the facilitation of decommissioning light water reactors is presented. A wide range of facilitation methods - from improved documentation to special decommissioning tools and techniques - is discussed. In addition, estimates of capital costs, cost savings, and radiation dose reduction associated with these facilitation methods are given

  14. The transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 interacts with replication protein A and maintains genome stability during replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausing, Emanuel; Mayer, Andreas; Chanarat, Sittinan

    2010-01-01

    Multiple DNA-associated processes such as DNA repair, replication, and recombination are crucial for the maintenance of genome integrity. Here, we show a novel interaction between the transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 and replication protein A (RPA), the eukaryotic single-stranded DNA......-binding protein with functions in DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Bur1 interacted via its C-terminal domain with RPA, and bur1-¿C mutants showed a deregulated DNA damage response accompanied by increased sensitivity to DNA damage and replication stress as well as increased levels of persisting Rad52...... foci. Interestingly, the DNA damage sensitivity of an rfa1 mutant was suppressed by bur1 mutation, further underscoring a functional link between these two protein complexes. The transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 interacts with RPA and maintains genome integrity during DNA replication stress....

  15. Facilitating Collaboration in Online Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geralyn E Stephens

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Demonstrating the ability to collaborate effectively is essential for students moving into 21st century workplaces. Employers are expecting new hires to already possess group-work skills and will seek evidence of their ability to cooperate, collaborate, and complete projects with colleagues, including remotely or at a distance. Instructional activities and assignments that provide students with a variety of ways to engage each other have a direct and immediate effect on their academic performance. This paper shares the Facilitating Collaboration in Online Groups (FCOG instructional planning strategy. The strategy is designed for faculty use and familiarizes students with the process and technology necessary to collaborate effectively in online classroom groups. The strategy utilizes proven teaching techniques to maximize student-student and student-content relationships. Each of the four (4 sequential phases in the FCOG instructional planning strategy are discussed: 1 Creating Groups, 2 Establishing Expectations, 3 Communication Tools, and 4 Assignments and Activities. The discussion also contains implementation suggestions as well as examples of instructional assignments and activities that provide students with a variety of ways to collaborate to reach the learning outcomes.

  16. GIS-facilitated spatial narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Lasse; Jeppesen, Henrik; Kofie, Richard Y.

    2008-01-01

    The paper examines the implementation and dissemination of spatial narratives within a geographical information system context with specific reference to portable GPS-enabled devices. The overall goal is to establish a framework for the creation of computer assisted 'guided tours' based on the th......The paper examines the implementation and dissemination of spatial narratives within a geographical information system context with specific reference to portable GPS-enabled devices. The overall goal is to establish a framework for the creation of computer assisted 'guided tours' based...... on the thematically and narrative linking of a set of locations within an area. A spatial narrative that describes the - largely unsuccessful - history of Danish plantations on the Gold Coast (1788-1850) is implemented through the Google Earth client. This client is seen both as a type of media in itself for ‘home......-based' exploration of sites related to the narrative and as a tool that facilitates the design of spatial narratives before implementation within portable GIS devices. The Google Earth-based visualization of the spatial narrative is created by a Python script that outputs a web-accessible KML format file. The KML...

  17. Non‐Canonical Replication Initiation: You’re Fired!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazilė Ravoitytė

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The division of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells produces two cells that inherit a perfect copy of the genetic material originally derived from the mother cell. The initiation of canonical DNA replication must be coordinated to the cell cycle to ensure the accuracy of genome duplication. Controlled replication initiation depends on a complex interplay of cis‐acting DNA sequences, the so‐called origins of replication (ori, with trans‐acting factors involved in the onset of DNA synthesis. The interplay of cis‐acting elements and trans‐acting factors ensures that cells initiate replication at sequence‐specific sites only once, and in a timely order, to avoid chromosomal endoreplication. However, chromosome breakage and excessive RNA:DNA hybrid formation can cause breakinduced (BIR or transcription‐initiated replication (TIR, respectively. These non‐canonical replication events are expected to affect eukaryotic genome function and maintenance, and could be important for genome evolution and disease development. In this review, we describe the difference between canonical and non‐canonical DNA replication, and focus on mechanistic differences and common features between BIR and TIR. Finally, we discuss open issues on the factors and molecular mechanisms involved in TIR.

  18. Inhibitors of Nucleotidyltransferase Superfamily Enzymes Suppress Herpes Simplex Virus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Tollefson, Ann E.; Ying, Baoling; Korom, Maria; Cheng, Xiaohong; Cao, Feng; Davis, Katie L.; Wold, William S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Herpesviruses are large double-stranded DNA viruses that cause serious human diseases. Herpesvirus DNA replication depends on multiple processes typically catalyzed by nucleotidyltransferase superfamily (NTS) enzymes. Therefore, we investigated whether inhibitors of NTS enzymes would suppress replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. Eight of 42 NTS inhibitors suppressed HSV-1 and/or HSV-2 replication by >10-fold at 5 μM, with suppression at 50 μM reaching ∼1 million-fold. Five compounds in two chemical families inhibited HSV replication in Vero and human foreskin fibroblast cells as well as the approved drug acyclovir did. The compounds had 50% effective concentration values as low as 0.22 μM with negligible cytotoxicity in the assays employed. The inhibitors suppressed accumulation of viral genomes and infectious particles and blocked events in the viral replication cycle before and during viral DNA replication. Acyclovir-resistant mutants of HSV-1 and HSV-2 remained highly sensitive to the NTS inhibitors. Five of six NTS inhibitors of the HSVs also blocked replication of another herpesvirus pathogen, human cytomegalovirus. Therefore, NTS enzyme inhibitors are promising candidates for new herpesvirus treatments that may have broad efficacy against members of the herpesvirus family. PMID:25267681

  19. CRISPR-mediated control of the bacterial initiation of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, Jakub; Lesterlin, Christian; Sherratt, David J; Dekker, Cees

    2016-05-05

    Programmable control of the cell cycle has been shown to be a powerful tool in cell-biology studies. Here, we develop a novel system for controlling the bacterial cell cycle, based on binding of CRISPR/dCas9 to the origin-of-replication locus. Initiation of replication of bacterial chromosomes is accurately regulated by the DnaA protein, which promotes the unwinding of DNA at oriC We demonstrate that the binding of CRISPR/dCas9 to any position within origin or replication blocks the initiation of replication. Serial-dilution plating, single-cell fluorescence microscopy, and flow-cytometry experiments show that ongoing rounds of chromosome replication are finished upon CRISPR/dCas9 binding, but no new rounds are initiated. Upon arrest, cells stay metabolically active and accumulate cell mass. We find that elevating the temperature from 37 to 42°C releases the CRISR/dCas9 replication inhibition, and we use this feature to recover cells from the arrest. Our simple and robust method of controlling the bacterial cell cycle is a useful asset for synthetic biology and DNA-replication studies in particular. The inactivation of CRISPR/dCas9 binding at elevated temperatures may furthermore be of wide interest for CRISPR/Cas9 applications in genomic engineering. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Specificity and function of Archaeal DNA replication initiator proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Rachel Y.; Xu, Yanqun; Gadelha, Catarina

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomes with multiple DNA replication origins are a hallmark of Eukaryotes and some Archaea. All eukaryal nuclear replication origins are defined by the origin recognition complex (ORC) that recruits the replicative helicase MCM(2-7) via Cdc6 and Cdt1. We find that the three origins in the si......Chromosomes with multiple DNA replication origins are a hallmark of Eukaryotes and some Archaea. All eukaryal nuclear replication origins are defined by the origin recognition complex (ORC) that recruits the replicative helicase MCM(2-7) via Cdc6 and Cdt1. We find that the three origins...... in the single chromosome of the archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus are specified by distinct initiation factors. While two origins are dependent on archaeal homologs of eukaryal Orc1 and Cdc6, the third origin is instead reliant on an archaeal Cdt1 homolog. We exploit the nonessential nature of the orc1-1 gene...... to investigate the role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in initiator function in vivo and in vitro. We find that the ATP-bound form of Orc1-1 is proficient for replication and implicates hydrolysis of ATP in downregulation of origin activity. Finally, we reveal that ATP and DNA binding by Orc1-1 remodels...

  1. On the Growth Rate of Non-Enzymatic Molecular Replicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Fellermann

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that non-enzymatic template directed molecular replicators X + nO -> 2X exhibit parabolic growth d[X]/dt -> k[X]1/2. Here, we analyze the dependence of the effective replication rate constant k on hybridization energies, temperature, strand length, and sequence composition. First we derive analytical criteria for the replication rate k based on simple thermodynamic arguments. Second we present a Brownian dynamics model for oligonucleotides that allows us to simulate their diffusion and hybridization behavior. The simulation is used to generate and analyze the effect of strand length, temperature, and to some extent sequence composition, on the hybridization rates and the resulting optimal overall rate constant k. Combining the two approaches allows us to semi-analytically depict a replication rate landscape for template directed replicators. The results indicate a clear replication advantage for longer strands at lower temperatures in the regime where the ligation rate is rate limiting. Further the results indicate the existence of an optimal replication rate at the boundary between the two regimes where the ligation rate and the dehybridization rates are rate limiting.

  2. Geminin: a major DNA replication safeguard in higher eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melixetian, Marina; Helin, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved multiple mechanisms to restrict DNA replication to once per cell cycle. These mechanisms prevent relicensing of origins of replication after initiation of DNA replication in S phase until the end of mitosis. Most of our knowledge of mechanisms controlling prereplication...... complex (preRC) formation are based on studies from yeast and Xenopus, while much less is known for mammalian cells. Here we discuss our recent data demonstrating that Geminin is required for preventing rereplication in human normal and cancer cells....

  3. The Bimodal Lifestyle of Intracellular Salmonella in Epithelial Cells: Replication in the Cytosol Obscures Defects in Vacuolar Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium invades and proliferates within epithelial cells. Intracellular bacteria replicate within a membrane bound vacuole known as the Salmonella containing vacuole. However, this bacterium can also replicate efficiently in the cytosol of epithelial cells and net intracellular growth is a product of both vacuolar and cytosolic replication. Here we have used semi-quantitative single-cell analyses to investigate the contribution of each of these replicative niches to intracellular proliferation in cultured epithelial cells. We show that cytosolic replication can account for the majority of net replication even though it occurs in less than 20% of infected cells. Consequently, assays for net growth in a population of infected cells, for example by recovery of colony forming units, are not good indicators of vacuolar proliferation. We also show that the Salmonella Type III Secretion System 2, which is required for SCV biogenesis, is not required for cytosolic replication. Altogether this study illustrates the value of single cell analyses when studying intracellular pathogens. PMID:22719929

  4. Replication assessment of surface texture at sub-micrometre scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quagliotti, Danilo; Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2017-01-01

    Precision molding and micro injection molding (μIM) have been the main replication technologies allowing for a rapid reduction of the dimensions of the products and, consequently, for the realization of new advanced micro and nano systems. Such miniaturization in the manufacture of polymer micro......, because of the replication nature of molding processes, the required specifications for the manufacture of micro molded components must be ensured by means of a metrological approach to surface replication and dimensional control of both master geometry and replicated substrate [3]-[4]. Therefore......, a detailed knowledge is necessary of not only absolute dimensions and geometrical quantities, but also of the measurement uncertainty, which is a decisive parameter to deal with the quality assurance of micro and nano manufactured components [5].In this context, the quality of the achieved surface texture...

  5. Advanced Optical Metrology for XRAY Replication Mandrels and Mirrors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced x-ray observatories such as IXO and GenX will require thousands of thin shell mirror segments produced by replication using convex mandrels. Quality and...

  6. Viral and Cellular Components of AAV2 Replication Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Rebecca; Seyffert, Michael; Pereira, Bruna de Andrade; Fraefel, Cornel

    2013-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is a helpervirus-dependent parvovirus with a bi-phasic life cycle comprising latency in absence and lytic replication in presence of a helpervirus, such as adenovirus (Ad) or herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Helpervirus-supported AAV2 replication takes place in replication compartments (RCs) in the cell nucleus where virus DNA replication and transcription occur. RCs consist of a defined set of helper virus-, AAV2-, and cellular proteins. Here we compare the profile of cellular proteins recruited into AAV2 RCs or identified in Rep78-associated complexes when either Ad or HSV-1 is the helpervirus, and we discuss the potential roles of some of these proteins in AAV2 and helpervirus infection. PMID:24222808

  7. Submicron Composite Mirror Replication (PDRT08-027), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR program will identify and address the primary technical issues that limit the current precision of replicated CFRP optics. These issues must be resolved to...

  8. RAD51 Interconnects Between DNA Replication DNA Repair and Immunity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — RAD51 a multifunctional protein plays a central role in DNA replication and homologous recombination repair and is known to be involved in cancer development. We...

  9. Function of BRCA1 at a DNA Replication Origin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lieberman, Paul

    2004-01-01

    ... and allow efficient repair of damaged DNA. In this proposal, we present preliminary data that BRCA1 functions in a DNA checkpoint response for the origin of Epstein-Barr Virus DNA replication (Ori P...

  10. Process chain validation in micro and nano replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaon, Matteo

    tranches a standard deviation of 4 % around the calculated average value was assessed. The work is concluded validating the deterministic test structures as a tool to predict, through relocation of measuring positions, replication quality of critical geometries of specific LoC devices. The study showed...... to the polymer flow) on the final quality of replicated sub-µm features. For cross test structure with target design height dimension of 62 nm and width of 500 nm, the largest depth deviation was measured. For an average measured polymer channel depth corresponding to 94 % replication of the corresponding nickel...... nm and process reproducibility within a range of ±8 nm. Therefore test structures provide a process calibration tool enabling definition of tolerance limits within micro and nano replication...

  11. EPA Lean Government Initiative: How to Replicate Lean Successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Lean Replication Primer describes how EPA Offices and Regions can identify and adapt successful practices from previous Lean projects to “replicate” their successes and generate further improvements.

  12. Mechanism of Archaeal MCM Helicase Recruitment to DNA Replication Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Rachel Y.; Abeyrathne, Priyanka D.; Bell, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cellular DNA replication origins direct the recruitment of replicative helicases via the action of initiator proteins belonging to the AAA+ superfamily of ATPases. Archaea have a simplified subset of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery proteins and possess initiators that appear ancestral to both eukaryotic Orc1 and Cdc6. We have reconstituted origin-dependent recruitment of the homohexameric archaeal MCM in vitro with purified recombinant proteins. Using this system, we reveal that archaeal Orc1-1 fulfills both Orc1 and Cdc6 functions by binding to a replication origin and directly recruiting MCM helicase. We identify the interaction interface between these proteins and reveal how ATP binding by Orc1-1 modulates recruitment of MCM. Additionally, we provide evidence that an open-ring form of the archaeal MCM homohexamer is loaded at origins. PMID:26725007

  13. Inhibition of cyclophilin A suppresses H2O2-enhanced replication of HCMV through the p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jun; Song, Xin; Deng, Jiang; Lv, Liping; Ma, Ping; Gao, Bo; Zhou, Xipeng; Zhang, Yanyu; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection can be accelerated by intracellular and extracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stimulation, mediated by the activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. However, it remains unknown whether host gene expression is involved in H2O2-upregulated HCMV replication. Here, we show that the expression of the host gene, cyclophilin A (CyPA), could be facilitated by treatment with H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. Experiments with CyPA-specific siRNA, or with cyclosporine A, an inhibitor of CyPA, confirmed that H2O2-mediated upregulation of HCMV replication is specifically mediated by upregulation of CyPA expression. Furthermore, depletion or inhibition of CyPA reduced H2O2-induced p38 activation, consistent with that of H2O2-upregulated HCMV lytic replication. These results show that H2O2 is capable of activating ROS-CyPA-p38 MAPK interactions to enhance HCMV replication.

  14. Enterovirus 71 induces autophagy by regulating has-miR-30a expression to promote viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuxuan; Xu, Wentao; Chen, Deyan; Feng, Chunhong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Xiaohui; Lv, Xiaowen; Zheng, Nan; Jin, Yu; Wu, Zhiwei

    2015-12-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), the etiological agent of hand-foot-and-mouth disease, has increasingly become a public health challenge around the world. Previous studies reported that EV71 infection can induce autophagic machinery to enhance viral replication in vitro and in vivo, but did not address the underlying mechanisms. Increasing evidence suggests that autophagy, in a virus-specific manner, may function to degrade viruses or facilitate viral replication. In this study, we reported that EV71 infection of human epidermoid carcinoma (Hep2) and African green monkey kidney cells (Vero) induced autophagy, which is beneficial for viral replication. Our investigation of the mechanisms revealed that EV71 infection resulted in the reduction of cellular miR-30a, which led to the inhibition of Beclin-1, a key autophagy-promoting gene that plays important roles at the early phase of autophagosome formation. We provided further evidence that by modulating cellular miR-30a level through either overexpression or inhibition, one can inhibit or promote EV71 replication, respectively, through regulating autophagic activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA replication, development and cancer: a homeotic connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falaschi, Arturo; Abdurashidova, Gulnara; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2010-02-01

    The homeotic proteins are transcription factors, highly conserved in metazoan organisms, exerting a pivotal role in development and differentiation. They individually display a loose specificity for the DNA sequence they can bind, but operate mainly in multi-molecular associations that assure their target and function specificity. Homeotic proteins are known to play a role in the positive or negative regulation of cell proliferation. Furthermore, many homeotic proteins are actually proto-oncogenes, since different translocations involving their genes cause tumors, particularly in the hematopoietic system. A one-hybrid screen to detect proteins with affinity for the lamin B2 replication origin identified three homeotic proteins, namely HoxA13, HoxC10 and HoxC13. Recent data demonstrate that the HoxC13 oncoprotein specifically associates with replication foci and binds in vitro and in vivo to several human DNA replication origins. Moreover, Hox proteins interact with geminin, a regulator of cell cycle progression, and control the interaction of this protein with the DNA replication licensing factor Ctd1. Thus, the homeotic proteins, by participating directly in the function of DNA replication origins, may provide a direct link between the accurate regulation of DNA replication required by the morphogenetic program and the deregulation of this process typical of cancer.

  16. Dynamics of picornavirus RNA replication within infected cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Normann, Preben

    2008-01-01

    Replication of many picornaviruses is inhibited by low concentrations of guanidine. Guanidine-resistant mutants are readily isolated and the mutations map to the coding region for the 2C protein. Using in vitro replication assays it has been determined previously that guanidine blocks the initiat...... replication. Thus, the guanidine-sensitive step in RNA synthesis is important throughout the virus life cycle in cells....... the initiation of negative-strand synthesis. We have now examined the dynamics of RNA replication, measured by quantitative RT-PCR, within cells infected with either swine vesicular disease virus (an enterovirus) or foot-and-mouth disease virus as regulated by the presence or absence of guanidine. Following...... the removal of guanidine from the infected cells, RNA replication occurs after a significant lag phase. This restoration of RNA synthesis requires de novo protein synthesis. Viral RNA can be maintained for at least 72 h within cells in the absence of apparent replication but guanidine-resistant virus can...

  17. Replication, Communication, and the Population Dynamics of Scientific Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElreath, Richard; Smaldino, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Many published research results are false (Ioannidis, 2005), and controversy continues over the roles of replication and publication policy in improving the reliability of research. Addressing these problems is frustrated by the lack of a formal framework that jointly represents hypothesis formation, replication, publication bias, and variation in research quality. We develop a mathematical model of scientific discovery that combines all of these elements. This model provides both a dynamic model of research as well as a formal framework for reasoning about the normative structure of science. We show that replication may serve as a ratchet that gradually separates true hypotheses from false, but the same factors that make initial findings unreliable also make replications unreliable. The most important factors in improving the reliability of research are the rate of false positives and the base rate of true hypotheses, and we offer suggestions for addressing each. Our results also bring clarity to verbal debates about the communication of research. Surprisingly, publication bias is not always an obstacle, but instead may have positive impacts-suppression of negative novel findings is often beneficial. We also find that communication of negative replications may aid true discovery even when attempts to replicate have diminished power. The model speaks constructively to ongoing debates about the design and conduct of science, focusing analysis and discussion on precise, internally consistent models, as well as highlighting the importance of population dynamics.

  18. ATM Couples Replication Stress and Metabolic Reprogramming during Cellular Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M. Aird

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Replication stress induced by nucleotide deficiency plays an important role in cancer initiation. Replication stress in primary cells typically activates the cellular senescence tumor-suppression mechanism. Senescence bypass correlates with development of cancer, a disease characterized by metabolic reprogramming. However, the role of metabolic reprogramming in the cellular response to replication stress has been little explored. Here, we report that ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM plays a central role in regulating the cellular response to replication stress by shifting cellular metabolism. ATM inactivation bypasses senescence induced by replication stress triggered by nucleotide deficiency. This was due to restoration of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate (dNTP levels through both upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway via increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD activity and enhanced glucose and glutamine consumption. These phenotypes were mediated by a coordinated suppression of p53 and upregulation of c-MYC downstream of ATM inactivation. Our data indicate that ATM status couples replication stress and metabolic reprogramming during senescence.

  19. SMARCAL1 Resolves Replication Stress at ALT Telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Kelli E; Maréchal, Alexandre; Flynn, Rachel Litman

    2016-02-09

    Cancer cells overcome replicative senescence by exploiting mechanisms of telomere elongation, a process often accomplished by reactivation of the enzyme telomerase. However, a subset of cancer cells lack telomerase activity and rely on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway, a recombination-based mechanism of telomere elongation. Although the mechanisms regulating ALT are not fully defined, chronic replication stress at telomeres might prime these fragile regions for recombination. Here, we demonstrate that the replication stress response protein SMARCAL1 is a critical regulator of ALT activity. SMARCAL1 associates with ALT telomeres to resolve replication stress and ensure telomere stability. In the absence of SMARCAL1, persistently stalled replication forks at ALT telomeres deteriorate into DNA double-strand breaks promoting the formation of chromosome fusions. Our studies not only define a role for SMARCAL1 in ALT telomere maintenance, but also demonstrate that resolution of replication stress is a crucial step in the ALT mechanism. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Replicative intermediates in UV-irradiated Simian virus 40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.M.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have used Simian virus 40 (SV40) as a probe to study the replication of UV-damaged DNA in mammalian cells. Viral DNA replication in infected monkey kidney cells was synchronized by incubating a mutant of SV40 (tsA58) temperature-sensitive for the initiation of DNA synthesis at the restrictive temperature and then adding aphidicolin to temporarily inhibit DNA synthesis at the permissive temperature while permitting pre-replicative events to occur. After removal of the drug, the infected cells were irradiated at 100 J/m 2 (254 nm) to produce 6-7 pyrimidine dimers per SV40 genome, and returned to the restrictive temperature to prevent reinitiation of replication from the SV40 origin. Replicative intermediates (RI) were labeled with [ 3 H]thymidine. The size distribution of daughter DNA strands in RI isolated shortly after irradiation was skewed towards lengths less than the interdimer spacing in parental DNA; this bias persisted for at least 1 h after irradiation, but disappeared within 3 h by which time the size of the newly-synthesized DNA exceeded the interdimer distance. Evidence was obtained for the generation at late times after irradiation, of Form I molecules in which the daughter DNA strand contain dimers. Thus DNA strand exchange as well as trans-dimer synthesis may be involved in the generation of supercoiled Form I DNA from 0V-damaged SV40 replicative intermediates. (Auth.)

  1. Late replication domains are evolutionary conserved in the Drosophila genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyenkova, Natalya G; Kolesnikova, Tatyana D; Makunin, Igor V; Pokholkova, Galina V; Boldyreva, Lidiya V; Zykova, Tatyana Yu; Zhimulev, Igor F; Belyaeva, Elena S

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila chromosomes are organized into distinct domains differing in their predominant chromatin composition, replication timing and evolutionary conservation. We show on a genome-wide level that genes whose order has remained unaltered across 9 Drosophila species display late replication timing and frequently map to the regions of repressive chromatin. This observation is consistent with the existence of extensive domains of repressive chromatin that replicate extremely late and have conserved gene order in the Drosophila genome. We suggest that such repressive chromatin domains correspond to a handful of regions that complete replication at the very end of S phase. We further demonstrate that the order of genes in these regions is rarely altered in evolution. Substantial proportion of such regions significantly coincide with large synteny blocks. This indicates that there are evolutionary mechanisms maintaining the integrity of these late-replicating chromatin domains. The synteny blocks corresponding to the extremely late-replicating regions in the D. melanogaster genome consistently display two-fold lower gene density across different Drosophila species.

  2. Break induced replication in eukaryotes: mechanisms, functions, and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Malkova, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Break-induced replication (BIR) is an important pathway specializing in repair of one-ended double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). This type of DSB break typically arises at collapsed replication forks or at eroded telomeres. BIR initiates by invasion of a broken DNA end into a homologous template followed by initiation of DNA synthesis that can proceed for hundreds of kilobases. This synthesis is drastically different from S-phase replication in that instead of a replication fork, BIR proceeds via a migrating bubble and is associated with conservative inheritance of newly synthesized DNA. This unusual mode of DNA replication is responsible for frequent genetic instabilities associated with BIR, including hyper-mutagenesis, which can lead to the formation of mutation clusters, extensive loss of heterozygosity, chromosomal translocations, copy-number variations and complex genomic rearrangements. In addition to budding yeast experimental systems that were initially employed to investigate eukaryotic BIR, recent studies in different organisms including humans, have provided multiple examples of BIR initiated within different cellular contexts, including collapsed replication fork and telomere maintenance in the absence of telomerase. In addition, significant progress has been made towards understanding microhomology-mediated BIR (MMBIR) that can promote complex chromosomal rearrangements, including those associated with cancer and those leading to a number of neurological disorders in humans.

  3. A dimeric Rep protein initiates replication of a linear archaeal virus genome: implications for the Rep mechanism and viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oke, Muse; Kerou, Melina; Liu, Huanting

    2011-01-01

    that a protein encoded in the 34-kbp genome of the rudivirus SIRV1 is a member of the replication initiator (Rep) superfamily of proteins, which initiate rolling-circle replication (RCR) of diverse viruses and plasmids. We show that SIRV Rep nicks the viral hairpin terminus, forming a covalent adduct between...... positioned active sites, each with a single tyrosine residue, work in tandem to catalyze DNA nicking and joining. We propose a novel mechanism for rudivirus DNA replication, incorporating the first known example of a Rep protein that is not linked to RCR. The implications for Rep protein function and viral......The Rudiviridae are a family of rod-shaped archaeal viruses with covalently closed, linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes. Their replication mechanisms remain obscure, although parallels have been drawn to the Poxviridae and other large cytoplasmic eukaryotic viruses. Here we report...

  4. Analysis of replication intermediates indicates that Drosophila melanogaster mitochondrial DNA replicates by a strand-coupled theta mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priit Jõers

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA synthesis is necessary for the normal function of the organelle and for the eukaryotic organism as a whole. Here we demonstrate, using two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis to analyse replication intermediates, that unidirectional, strand-coupled DNA synthesis is the prevalent mode of mtDNA replication in Drosophila melanogaster. Commencing within the single, extended non-coding region (NCR, replication proceeds around the circular genome, manifesting an irregular rate of elongation, and pausing frequently in specific regions. Evidence for a limited contribution of strand-asynchronous DNA synthesis was found in a subset of mtDNA molecules, but confined to the ribosomal RNA gene region, just downstream of the NCR. Our findings imply that strand-coupled replication is widespread amongst metazoans, and should inform future research on mtDNA metabolism in D. melanogaster.

  5. Ghana - Land Tenure Facilitation Impact Evaluation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The MCC-supported Land Title Facilitation Activity (LTF) in Ghana was designed to increase investment and productivity by strengthening property rights. In Ghana,...

  6. Rapid transient production in plants by replicating and non-replicating vectors yields high quality functional anti-HIV antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Sainsbury

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of plants and plant cells to produce large amounts of recombinant protein has been well established. Due to advantages in terms of speed and yield, attention has recently turned towards the use of transient expression systems, including viral vectors, to produce proteins of pharmaceutical interest in plants. However, the effects of such high level expression from viral vectors and concomitant effects on host cells may affect the quality of the recombinant product.To assess the quality of antibodies transiently expressed to high levels in plants, we have expressed and characterised the human anti-HIV monoclonal antibody, 2G12, using both replicating and non-replicating systems based on deleted versions of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV RNA-2. The highest yield (approximately 100 mg/kg wet weight leaf tissue of affinity purified 2G12 was obtained when the non-replicating CPMV-HT system was used and the antibody was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Glycan analysis by mass-spectrometry showed that the glycosylation pattern was determined exclusively by whether the antibody was retained in the ER and did not depend on whether a replicating or non-replicating system was used. Characterisation of the binding and neutralisation properties of all the purified 2G12 variants from plants showed that these were generally similar to those of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell-produced 2G12.Overall, the results demonstrate that replicating and non-replicating CPMV-based vectors are able to direct the production of a recombinant IgG similar in activity to the CHO-produced control. Thus, a complex recombinant protein was produced with no apparent effect on its biochemical properties using either high-level expression or viral replication. The speed with which a recombinant pharmaceutical with excellent biochemical characteristics can be produced transiently in plants makes CPMV-based expression vectors an attractive option for

  7. Replication-Coupled Dilution of H4K20me2 Guides 53BP1 to Pre-replicative Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Stefania; Michelena, Jone; Teloni, Federico; Imhof, Ralph; Altmeyer, Matthias

    2017-05-30

    The bivalent histone modification reader 53BP1 accumulates around DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), where it dictates repair pathway choice decisions by limiting DNA end resection. How this function is regulated locally and across the cell cycle to channel repair reactions toward non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) in G1 and promote homology-directed repair (HDR) in S/G2 is insufficiently understood. Here, we show that the ability of 53BP1 to accumulate around DSBs declines as cells progress through S phase and reveal that the inverse relationship between 53BP1 recruitment and replicated chromatin is linked to the replication-coupled dilution of 53BP1's target mark H4K20me2. Consistently, premature maturation of post-replicative chromatin restores H4K20me2 and rescues 53BP1 accumulation on replicated chromatin. The H4K20me2-mediated chromatin association of 53BP1 thus represents an inbuilt mechanism to distinguish DSBs in pre- versus post-replicative chromatin, allowing for localized repair pathway choice decisions based on the availability of replication-generated template strands for HDR. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dissection of the beta-globin replication-initiation region reveals specific requirements for replicator elements during gene amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Okada

    Full Text Available Gene amplification plays a pivotal role in malignant transformation of human cells. A plasmid with both a mammalian replication-initiation region (IR/origin/replicator and a nuclear matrix-attachment region (MAR is spontaneously amplified in transfected cells by a mechanism that involves amplification at the extrachromosomal site, followed by amplification at the chromosomal arm, ultimately generating a long homogeneously staining region (HSR. Several observations suggest that replication initiation from IR sequences might mediate amplification. To test this idea, we previously dissected c-myc and DHFR IRs to identify the minimum sequence required to support amplification. In this study, we applied an improved analysis that discriminates between two amplification steps to the ß-globin RepP IR, which contains separate elements already known to be essential for initiation on the chromosome arm. The IR sequence was required at least for the extrachromosomal amplification step. In addition to the vector-encoded MAR, amplification also required an AT-rich region and a MAR-like element, consistent with the results regarding replicator activity on the chromosome. However, amplification did not require the AG-rich tract necessary for replicator activity, but instead required a novel sequence containing another AG-rich tract. The differential sequence requirement might be a consequence of extrachromosomal replication.

  9. The eukaryotic elongation factor 1A is critical for genome replication of the paramyxovirus respiratory syncytial virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wei

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic translation factor eEF1A assists replication of many RNA viruses by various mechanisms. Here we show that down-regulation of eEF1A restricts the expression of viral genomic RNA and the release of infectious virus, demonstrating a biological requirement for eEF1A in the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV life cycle. The key proteins in the replicase/transcriptase complex of RSV; the nucleocapsid (N protein, phosphoprotein (P and matrix (M protein, all associate with eEF1A in RSV infected cells, although N is the strongest binding partner. Using individually expressed proteins, N, but not P or M bound to eEF1A. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between eEF1A and the RSV replication complex, through binding to N protein, to facilitate genomic RNA synthesis and virus production.

  10. The eukaryotic elongation factor 1A is critical for genome replication of the paramyxovirus respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ting; Li, Dongsheng; Marcial, Daneth; Khan, Moshin; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Snape, Natale; Ghildyal, Reena; Harrich, David; Spann, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation factor eEF1A assists replication of many RNA viruses by various mechanisms. Here we show that down-regulation of eEF1A restricts the expression of viral genomic RNA and the release of infectious virus, demonstrating a biological requirement for eEF1A in the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) life cycle. The key proteins in the replicase/transcriptase complex of RSV; the nucleocapsid (N) protein, phosphoprotein (P) and matrix (M) protein, all associate with eEF1A in RSV infected cells, although N is the strongest binding partner. Using individually expressed proteins, N, but not P or M bound to eEF1A. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between eEF1A and the RSV replication complex, through binding to N protein, to facilitate genomic RNA synthesis and virus production.

  11. Using learning theory, interprofessional facilitation competencies, and behavioral indicators to evaluate facilitator training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGros, Theresa A; Amerongen, Helen M; Cooley, Janet H; Schloss, Ernest P

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing need for faculty and preceptors skilled in interprofessional facilitation (IPF), the relative novelty of the field poses a challenge to the development and evaluation of IPF programs. We use learning theory and IPF competencies with associated behavioral indicators to develop and evaluate six key messages in IPF training and experience. Our mixed methods approach included two phases: quantitative data collection with embedded qualitative data, followed by qualitative data collection in explanatory sequential fashion. This enabled triangulated analyses of both data types and of facilitation behaviors from facilitator and student perspectives. Results indicate the competency-based training was effective. Facilitators felt comfortable performing behaviors associated with IPF competencies; student observations of those behaviors supported facilitator self-reported performance. Overall, students perceived more facilitation opportunities than facilitators. Findings corroborate the importance of recruiting seasoned facilitators and establishing IPF guidelines that acknowledge variable team dynamics and help facilitators recognize teachable moments.

  12. Cell Cycle-Dependent Expression of Adeno-Associated Virus 2 (AAV2) Rep in Coinfections with Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Gives Rise to a Mosaic of Cells Replicating either AAV2 or HSV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzoso, Francesca D; Seyffert, Michael; Vogel, Rebecca; Yakimovich, Artur; de Andrade Pereira, Bruna; Meier, Anita F; Sutter, Sereina O; Tobler, Kurt; Vogt, Bernd; Greber, Urs F; Büning, Hildegard; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel

    2017-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) depends on the simultaneous presence of a helper virus such as herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) for productive replication. At the same time, AAV2 efficiently blocks the replication of HSV-1, which would eventually limit its own replication by diminishing the helper virus reservoir. This discrepancy begs the question of how AAV2 and HSV-1 can coexist in a cell population. Here we show that in coinfected cultures, AAV2 DNA replication takes place almost exclusively in S/G 2 -phase cells, while HSV-1 DNA replication is restricted to G 1 phase. Live microscopy revealed that not only wild-type AAV2 (wtAAV2) replication but also reporter gene expression from both single-stranded and double-stranded (self-complementary) recombinant AAV2 vectors preferentially occurs in S/G 2 -phase cells, suggesting that the preference for S/G 2 phase is independent of the nature of the viral genome. Interestingly, however, a substantial proportion of S/G 2 -phase cells transduced by the double-stranded but not the single-stranded recombinant AAV2 vectors progressed through mitosis in the absence of the helper virus. We conclude that cell cycle-dependent AAV2 rep expression facilitates cell cycle-dependent AAV2 DNA replication and inhibits HSV-1 DNA replication. This may limit competition for cellular and viral helper factors and, hence, creates a biological niche for either virus to replicate. IMPORTANCE Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) differs from most other viruses, as it requires not only a host cell for replication but also a helper virus such as an adenovirus or a herpesvirus. This situation inevitably leads to competition for cellular resources. AAV2 has been shown to efficiently inhibit the replication of helper viruses. Here we present a new facet of the interaction between AAV2 and one of its helper viruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). We observed that AAV2 rep gene expression is cell cycle dependent and gives rise to distinct time

  13. Quorum-based Data Replication in Grid Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohaya Latip

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Replication is a useful technique for distributed database systems and can be implemented in a grid computation environment to provide a high availability, fault tolerant, and enhance the performance of the system. This paper discusses a new protocol named Diagonal Data Replication in 2D Mesh structure (DR2M protocol where the performance addressed are data availability which is compared with the previous replication protocols, Read-One Write-All (ROWA, Voting (VT, Tree Quorum (TQ, Grid Configuration (GC, and Neighbor Replication on Grid (NRG. DR2M protocol is organized in a logical two dimensional mesh structure and by using quorums and voting techniques to improve the performance and availability of the replication protocol where it reduce the number of copies of data replication for read or write operations. The data file is copied at the selected node of the diagonal site in a quorum. The selection of a replica depends on the diagonal location of the structured two dimensional mesh quorum where the middle node is selected because it is the best location to get a copy of the data if every node has the equal number of request and data accessing in the network. The algorithm in this paper also calculates the best number of nodes in each quorum and how many quorums are needed for N number of nodes in a network. DR2M protocol also ensures that the data for read and write operations is consistency, by proofing the quorum must not have a nonempty intersection quorum. To evaluate DR2M protocol, we developed a simulation model in Java. Our results prove that DR2M protocol improves the performance of the data availability compare to the previous data replication protocol, ROWA, VT, TQ, GC and NRG.

  14. Mismatch repair balances leading and lagging strand DNA replication fidelity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Lujan

    Full Text Available The two DNA strands of the nuclear genome are replicated asymmetrically using three DNA polymerases, α, δ, and ε. Current evidence suggests that DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε is the primary leading strand replicase, whereas Pols α and δ primarily perform lagging strand replication. The fact that these polymerases differ in fidelity and error specificity is interesting in light of the fact that the stability of the nuclear genome depends in part on the ability of mismatch repair (MMR to correct different mismatches generated in different contexts during replication. Here we provide the first comparison, to our knowledge, of the efficiency of MMR of leading and lagging strand replication errors. We first use the strand-biased ribonucleotide incorporation propensity of a Pol ε mutator variant to confirm that Pol ε is the primary leading strand replicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We then use polymerase-specific error signatures to show that MMR efficiency in vivo strongly depends on the polymerase, the mismatch composition, and the location of the mismatch. An extreme case of variation by location is a T-T mismatch that is refractory to MMR. This mismatch is flanked by an AT-rich triplet repeat sequence that, when interrupted, restores MMR to > 95% efficiency. Thus this natural DNA sequence suppresses MMR, placing a nearby base pair at high risk of mutation due to leading strand replication infidelity. We find that, overall, MMR most efficiently corrects the most potentially deleterious errors (indels and then the most common substitution mismatches. In combination with earlier studies, the results suggest that significant differences exist in the generation and repair of Pol α, δ, and ε replication errors, but in a generally complementary manner that results in high-fidelity replication of both DNA strands of the yeast nuclear genome.

  15. N-terminal Slit2 inhibits HIV-1 replication by regulating the actin cytoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Appakkudal R

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Slit2 is a ~ 200 kDa secreted glycoprotein that has been recently shown to regulate immune functions. However, not much is known about its role in HIV (human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. Results In the present study, we have shown that the N-terminal fragment of Slit2 (Slit2N (~120 kDa inhibits replication of both CXCR4 and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 viruses in T-cell lines and peripheral blood T-cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated inhibition of HIV-1 infection in resting CD4+ T-cells. In addition, we showed that Slit2N blocks cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1. We have shown that Slit2N inhibits HIV-1 infection by blocking viral entry into T-cells. We also ruled out Slit2N-mediated inhibition of various other steps in the life cycle including binding, integration and viral transcription. Elucidation of the molecular mechanism revealed that Slit2N mediates its functional effects by binding to Robo1 receptor. Furthermore, we found that Slit2N inhibited Gp120-induced Robo1-actin association suggesting that Slit2N may inhibit cytoskeletal rearrangements facilitating HIV-1 entry. Studies into the mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 revealed that Slit2N abrogated HIV-1 envelope-induced actin cytoskeletal dynamics in both T-cell lines and primary T-cells. We further showed that Slit2N specifically attenuated the HIV-1 envelope-induced signaling pathway consisting of Rac1, LIMK and cofilin that regulates actin polymerization. Conclusions Taken together, our results show that Slit2N inhibits HIV-1 replication through novel mechanisms involving modulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. Our study, thus, provides insights into the role of Slit2N in HIV-1 infection and underscores its potential in limiting viral replication in T-cells.

  16. Analysis of Wind Tunnel Polar Replicates Using the Modern Design of Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloach, Richard; Micol, John R.

    2010-01-01

    The role of variance in a Modern Design of Experiments analysis of wind tunnel data is reviewed, with distinctions made between explained and unexplained variance. The partitioning of unexplained variance into systematic and random components is illustrated, with examples of the elusive systematic component provided for various types of real-world tests. The importance of detecting and defending against systematic unexplained variance in wind tunnel testing is discussed, and the random and systematic components of unexplained variance are examined for a representative wind tunnel data set acquired in a test in which a missile is used as a test article. The adverse impact of correlated (non-independent) experimental errors is described, and recommendations are offered for replication strategies that facilitate the quantification of random and systematic unexplained variance.

  17. Insights into the architecture of the replicative helicase from the structure of an archaeal MCM homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Brian; Chen, Yi-Hsing; Costa, Alessandro; Onesti, Silvia; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Lin, Yuyen; Cann, Isaac K O; Nair, Satish K

    2009-02-13

    The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins, members of the AAA+ (ATPase associated with diverse cellular activities) superfamily, are believed to constitute the replicative helicase in eukaryotic and archaeal species. Here, we present the 1.9 A resolution crystal structure of a monomeric MCM homolog from Methanopyrus kandleri, the first crystallographic structure of a full-length MCM. We also present an 18 A cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the hexameric MCM from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, and fit the atomic resolution crystal structure into the reconstruction in order to generate an atomic model for the oligomeric assembly. These structural data reveal a distinct active site topology consisting of a unique arrangement of critical determinants. The structures also provide a molecular framework for understanding the functional contributions of trans-acting elements that facilitate intersubunit crosstalk in response to DNA binding and ATP hydrolysis.

  18. Gene dosage imbalance during DNA replication controls bacterial cell-fate decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshin, Oleg

    Genes encoding proteins in a common regulatory network are frequently located close to one another on the chromosome to facilitate co-regulation or couple gene expression to growth rate. Contrasting with these observations, here we demonstrate a functional role for the arrangement of Bacillus subtilis sporulation network genes on opposite sides of the chromosome. We show that the arrangement of two sporulation network genes, one located close to the origin, the other close to the terminus leads to a transient gene dosage imbalance during chromosome replication. This imbalance is detected by the sporulation network to produce cell-cycle coordinated pulses of the sporulation master regulator Spo0A~P. This pulsed response allows cells to decide between sporulation and continued vegetative growth during each cell-cycle spent in starvation. Furthermore, changes in DNA replication and cell-cycle parameters with decreased growth rate in starvation conditions enable cells to indirectly detect starvation without the need for evaluating specific metabolites. The simplicity of the uncovered coordination mechanism and starvation sensing suggests that it may be widely applicable in a variety of gene regulatory and stress-response settings. This work is supported by National Science Foundation Grants MCB-1244135, EAGER-1450867, MCB-1244423, NIH NIGMS Grant R01 GM088428 and HHMI International Student Fellowship.

  19. CRISPR/Cas9-Derived Mutations Both Inhibit HIV-1 Replication and Accelerate Viral Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cas9 cleaves specific DNA sequences with the assistance of a programmable single guide RNA (sgRNA. Repairing this broken DNA by the cell’s error-prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ machinery leads to insertions and deletions (indels that often impair DNA function. Using HIV-1, we have now demonstrated that many of these indels are indeed lethal for the virus, but that others lead to the emergence of replication competent viruses that are resistant to Cas9/sgRNA. This unexpected contribution of Cas9 to the development of viral resistance is facilitated by some indels that are not deleterious for viral replication, but that are refractory to recognition by the same sgRNA as a result of changing the target DNA sequences. This observation illustrates two opposite outcomes of Cas9/sgRNA action, i.e., inactivation of HIV-1 and acceleration of viral escape, thereby potentially limiting the use of Cas9/sgRNA in HIV-1 therapy.

  20. Characterization of a coupled DNA replication and translesion synthesis polymerase supraholoenzyme from archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Matthew T; Chu, Aurea M; Baguley, Joshua K; Bauer, Robert J; Trakselis, Michael A

    2017-08-21

    The ability of the replisome to seamlessly coordinate both high fidelity and translesion DNA synthesis requires a means to regulate recruitment and binding of enzymes from solution. Co-occupancy of multiple DNA polymerases within the replisome has been observed primarily in bacteria and is regulated by posttranslational modifications in eukaryotes, and both cases are coordinated by the processivity clamp. Because of the heterotrimeric nature of the PCNA clamp in some archaea, there is potential to occupy and regulate specific polymerases at defined subunits. In addition to specific PCNA and polymerase interactions (PIP site), we have now identified and characterized a novel protein contact between the Y-family DNA polymerase and the B-family replication polymerase (YB site) bound to PCNA and DNA from Sulfolobus solfataricus. These YB contacts are essential in forming and stabilizing a supraholoenzyme (SHE) complex on DNA, effectively increasing processivity of DNA synthesis. The SHE complex can not only coordinate polymerase exchange within the complex but also provides a mechanism for recruitment of polymerases from solution based on multiequilibrium processes. Our results provide evidence for an archaeal PCNA 'tool-belt' recruitment model of multienzyme function that can facilitate both high fidelity and translesion synthesis within the replisome during DNA replication. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang, E-mail: ya-fang.mei@umu.se

    2016-08-15

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. - Highlights: • Africa green monkey cell lines were monitored for human adenovirus 11p GFP vector infection. • Human CD46 molecules were detectable in these monkey cell lines. • Adenovirus 11p GFP vector can be propagated in Vero cells increases the safety of Ad11p-based vectors for clinical trials. • To use Vero cells for preparation of Ad11p vector avoids the potential inclusion of oncogenes from tumor cells.

  2. Teachers as Friendship Facilitators: Respeto and Personalismo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Ann P.; Pereira, Lourdes; Blue-Banning, Martha

    2000-01-01

    This article highlights three teachers who were actively involved as friendship facilitators by illuminating their use of a friendship-facilitator framework with three students with moderate/severe disabilities. The framework includes three strategies: finding opportunities to bring children and youth together, acknowledging individual strengths…

  3. Escaping Homelessness: Anticipated and Perceived Facilitators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Allisha; Tweed, Roger

    2009-01-01

    One study with two distinct sections was conducted to identify factors facilitating escape from homelessness. In Section 1, 58 homeless individuals rated possible facilitators of escape (factors they believed would help them become more independent and self-sufficient). In Section 2, 80 participants who had already exited homelessness rated the…

  4. Oncolytic Replication of E1b-Deleted Adenoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hsin Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Various viruses have been studied and developed for oncolytic virotherapies. In virotherapy, a relatively small amount of viruses used in an intratumoral injection preferentially replicate in and lyse cancer cells, leading to the release of amplified viral particles that spread the infection to the surrounding tumor cells and reduce the tumor mass. Adenoviruses (Ads are most commonly used for oncolytic virotherapy due to their infection efficacy, high titer production, safety, easy genetic modification, and well-studied replication characteristics. Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in and destroy cancer cells and have been used in multiple clinical trials. H101, one of the E1b55K-deleted Ads, has been used for the treatment of late-stage cancers as the first approved virotherapy agent. However, the mechanism of selective replication of E1b-deleted Ads in cancer cells is still not well characterized. This review will focus on three potential molecular mechanisms of oncolytic replication of E1b55K-deleted Ads. These mechanisms are based upon the functions of the viral E1B55K protein that are associated with p53 inhibition, late viralmRNAexport, and cell cycle disruption.

  5. MCM Paradox: Abundance of Eukaryotic Replicative Helicases and Genomic Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitali Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a crucial component of DNA replication licensing system, minichromosome maintenance (MCM 2–7 complex acts as the eukaryotic DNA replicative helicase. The six related MCM proteins form a heterohexamer and bind with ORC, CDC6, and Cdt1 to form the prereplication complex. Although the MCMs are well known as replicative helicases, their overabundance and distribution patterns on chromatin present a paradox called the “MCM paradox.” Several approaches had been taken to solve the MCM paradox and describe the purpose of excess MCMs distributed beyond the replication origins. Alternative functions of these MCMs rather than a helicase had also been proposed. This review focuses on several models and concepts generated to solve the MCM paradox coinciding with their helicase function and provides insight into the concept that excess MCMs are meant for licensing dormant origins as a backup during replication stress. Finally, we extend our view towards the effect of alteration of MCM level. Though an excess MCM constituent is needed for normal cells to withstand stress, there must be a delineation of the threshold level in normal and malignant cells. This review also outlooks the future prospects to better understand the MCM biology.

  6. DATABASE OF MIGRATION AND REPLICATION WITH ORACLE GOLDEN GATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suharjito Suharjito

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this research is to analyze and design a database configuration of migration and replication in PT Metro Batavia. Research methodologies used in this research are data collecting, analysis and design model. Data collecting method is conducted with library research and direct survey in the company. Analysis method is conducted by analyzing hangar system, migration and reflection process and the available problems. Design method is conducted by designing a prototype for migration process with the implementation of Oracle SQL Developer and replication process with implementation of Oracle Golden Gate. The result of this research is a prototype for configuration of migration and replication process by using Oracle Golden Gate, which can produce two sets of identical data for the purpose of backup and recovery, and also design a simple tool that is expected to help active-active or active-passive replication process. The conclusion of this research is migration process of MySQL database to Oracle database by using Oracle Golden Gate hasn’t been conducted, because Oracle Golden Gate still has bug related to binary log, so database of migration is conducted by using Oracle Golden Gate. However, replication of bi-directional in between database of Oracle by using Oracle SQL Developer can guarantee data availability and reduce work burden from primary database.

  7. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, Crystal E.; Kelly, Deborah F. [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); McDonald, Sarah M., E-mail: mcdonaldsa@vtc.vt.edu [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia—Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy.

  8. Phosphorylation of Large T Antigen Regulates Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, Jason; Wang, Xin; Tsang, Sabrina H.; Jiao, Jing; You, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) was recently discovered as a novel human polyomavirus that is associated with ~80% of Merkel Cell Carcinomas. The Large Tumor antigen (LT) is an early viral protein which has a variety of functions, including manipulation of the cell cycle and initiating viral DNA replication. Phosphorylation plays a critical regulatory role for polyomavirus LT proteins, but no investigation of MCPyV LT phosphorylation has been performed to date. In this report mass spectrometry analysis reveals three unique phosphorylation sites: T271, T297 and T299. In vivo replication assays confirm that phosphorylation of T271 does not play a role in viral replication, while modification at T297 and T299 have dramatic and opposing effects on LT’s ability to initiate replication from the viral origin. We test these mutants for their ability to bind, unwind, and act as a functional helicase at the viral origin. These studies provide a framework for understanding how phosphorylation of LT may dynamically regulate viral replication. Although the natural host cell of MCPyV has not yet been established, this work provides a foundation for understanding how LT activity is regulated and provides tools for better exploring this regulation in both natural host cells and Merkel cells

  9. Phosphorylation of Large T Antigen Regulates Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Diaz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV was recently discovered as a novel human polyomavirus that is associated with ~80% of Merkel Cell Carcinomas. The Large Tumor antigen (LT is an early viral protein which has a variety of functions, including manipulation of the cell cycle and initiating viral DNA replication. Phosphorylation plays a critical regulatory role for polyomavirus LT proteins, but no investigation of MCPyV LT phosphorylation has been performed to date. In this report mass spectrometry analysis reveals three unique phosphorylation sites: T271, T297 and T299. In vivo replication assays confirm that phosphorylation of T271 does not play a role in viral replication, while modification at T297 and T299 have dramatic and opposing effects on LT’s ability to initiate replication from the viral origin. We test these mutants for their ability to bind, unwind, and act as a functional helicase at the viral origin. These studies provide a framework for understanding how phosphorylation of LT may dynamically regulate viral replication. Although the natural host cell of MCPyV has not yet been established, this work provides a foundation for understanding how LT activity is regulated and provides tools for better exploring this regulation in both natural host cells and Merkel cells.

  10. Phosphorylation of Large T Antigen Regulates Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Jason; Wang, Xin; Tsang, Sabrina H. [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Jiao, Jing [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); You, Jianxin, E-mail: jianyou@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2014-07-08

    Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) was recently discovered as a novel human polyomavirus that is associated with ~80% of Merkel Cell Carcinomas. The Large Tumor antigen (LT) is an early viral protein which has a variety of functions, including manipulation of the cell cycle and initiating viral DNA replication. Phosphorylation plays a critical regulatory role for polyomavirus LT proteins, but no investigation of MCPyV LT phosphorylation has been performed to date. In this report mass spectrometry analysis reveals three unique phosphorylation sites: T271, T297 and T299. In vivo replication assays confirm that phosphorylation of T271 does not play a role in viral replication, while modification at T297 and T299 have dramatic and opposing effects on LT’s ability to initiate replication from the viral origin. We test these mutants for their ability to bind, unwind, and act as a functional helicase at the viral origin. These studies provide a framework for understanding how phosphorylation of LT may dynamically regulate viral replication. Although the natural host cell of MCPyV has not yet been established, this work provides a foundation for understanding how LT activity is regulated and provides tools for better exploring this regulation in both natural host cells and Merkel cells.

  11. Replication of genetic associations as pseudoreplication due to shared genealogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Noah A; Vanliere, Jenna M

    2009-09-01

    The genotypes of individuals in replicate genetic association studies have some level of correlation due to shared descent in the complete pedigree of all living humans. As a result of this genealogical sharing, replicate studies that search for genotype-phenotype associations using linkage disequilibrium between marker loci and disease-susceptibility loci can be considered as "pseudoreplicates" rather than true replicates. We examine the size of the pseudoreplication effect in association studies simulated from evolutionary models of the history of a population, evaluating the excess probability that both of a pair of studies detect a disease association compared to the probability expected under the assumption that the two studies are independent. Each of nine combinations of a demographic model and a penetrance model leads to a detectable pseudoreplication effect, suggesting that the degree of support that can be attributed to a replicated genetic association result is less than that which can be attributed to a replicated result in a context of true independence.

  12. Identifying Cancer Driver Genes Using Replication-Incompetent Retroviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Bii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying novel genes that drive tumor metastasis and drug resistance has significant potential to improve patient outcomes. High-throughput sequencing approaches have identified cancer genes, but distinguishing driver genes from passengers remains challenging. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have emerged as a powerful tool to identify cancer genes. Unlike replicating retroviruses and transposons, replication-incompetent retroviral vectors lack additional mutagenesis events that can complicate the identification of driver mutations from passenger mutations. They can also be used for almost any human cancer due to the broad tropism of the vectors. Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have the ability to dysregulate nearby cancer genes via several mechanisms including enhancer-mediated activation of gene promoters. The integrated provirus acts as a unique molecular tag for nearby candidate driver genes which can be rapidly identified using well established methods that utilize next generation sequencing and bioinformatics programs. Recently, retroviral vector screens have been used to efficiently identify candidate driver genes in prostate, breast, liver and pancreatic cancers. Validated driver genes can be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. In this review, we describe the emergence of retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors as a novel tool to identify cancer driver genes in different cancer types.

  13. Asymmetrical DNA replication promotes evolution: disparity theory of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, M; Doi, H

    1998-01-01

    Heredity is guaranteed by faithful DNA replication whereas evolution depends upon errors accompanying DNA replication. This contradiction existing between heredity and evolution cannot be resolved in an individual organism, but only in terms of a population, in that a delicate balance exists between wild type and variants in a population which is necessary for the survival of the species. Namely, there seems to be a key in the mechanism of DNA replication to solve some problems of evolution. DNA is replicated semiconservatively using the leading and discontinuous lagging strands. According to our 'disparity theory of evolution', the existence of a sufficient fidelity difference between the leading and lagging strands is advantageous in terms of evolution, because the diversity of genotypes is enlarged but genotypes that have occurred in the past are guaranteed. In theory, by artificially increasing the fidelity difference between the leading and lagging strand ('disparity mutator'), evolution is accelerated while avoiding the extinction of the population. Using a disparity mutator, we should be able to improve living things, including multicellular organisms, within constrained conditions. A double-stranded algorithm, which mimics the structure and replication manner of DNA, is promising for solving optimization problems.

  14. Dissection of a replication origin of Xenopus DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, J.C.; Watanabe, S.; Taylor, J.H.

    1982-09-01

    A previously cloned 503-base pair (bp) EcoRI segment of genomic DNA from Xenopus laevis selected for enhancement of replication of its vector plasmid was moved to the EcoRI site of pBR322. This plasmid designated pJCC31 and five other clones, which were made by cleaving the 503-bp segment in relation to a dispersed repeated sequence and subcloning, were compared with pBR322 for replication by microinjection into Xenopus eggs. The replication measured by incorporation of a /sup 32/P-labeled nucleotide as well as semiconservative segregation and dilution of N/sup 6/-methyladenine at the EcoRI sites showed pJCC31 to be about 15 times as efficient as pBR322. The next most efficient subclone, pJCC31-2, contains an insert with a complete 320-bp dispersed repeated sequence bracketed by an 8-bp direct repeat. This observation, along with the authors' previous report that repeated sequences of the Alu family in the human genome enhanced replication of the vector plasmid nearly as much as that of the presumptive Xenopus origin, leads to the hypothesis that members of a subset of the short dispersed repeated sequences in vertebrates function as origins for chromosomal replication. Preliminary studies also show that the presumptive Xenopus origin contains a RNA polymerase promoter that increases the transcription of the plasmid when it is microinjected into Xenopus oocytes.

  15. Poliovirus Polymerase Leu420 Facilitates RNA Recombination and Ribavirin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Brian J; Peersen, Olve B; Barton, David J

    2016-10-01

    RNA recombination is important in the formation of picornavirus species groups and the ongoing evolution of viruses within species groups. In this study, we examined the structure and function of poliovirus polymerase, 3D(pol), as it relates to RNA recombination. Recombination occurs when nascent RNA products exchange one viral RNA template for another during RNA replication. Because recombination is a natural aspect of picornavirus replication, we hypothesized that some features of 3D(pol) may exist, in part, to facilitate RNA recombination. Furthermore, we reasoned that alanine substitution mutations that disrupt 3D(pol)-RNA interactions within the polymerase elongation complex might increase and/or decrease the magnitudes of recombination. We found that an L420A mutation in 3D(pol) decreased the frequency of RNA recombination, whereas alanine substitutions at other sites in 3D(pol) increased the frequency of recombination. The 3D(pol) Leu420 side chain interacts with a ribose in the nascent RNA product 3 nucleotides from the active site of the polymerase. Notably, the L420A mutation that reduced recombination also rendered the virus more susceptible to inhibition by ribavirin, coincident with the accumulation of ribavirin-induced G→A and C→U mutations in viral RNA. We conclude that 3D(pol) Leu420 is critically important for RNA recombination and that RNA recombination contributes to ribavirin resistance. Recombination contributes to the formation of picornavirus species groups and the emergence of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs). The recombinant viruses that arise in nature are occasionally more fit than either parental strain, especially when the two partners in recombination are closely related, i.e., members of characteristic species groups, such as enterovirus species groups A to H or rhinovirus species groups A to C. Our study shows that RNA recombination requires conserved features of the viral polymerase. Furthermore, a polymerase

  16. Using facilitative skills in project management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard; Hansen, Mette Sanne; Jacobsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    , for example disappointing project performance and lack of an appropriate project cooperation method due to new forms of cooperation possibilities. More and more organizations are engaged in contractual joint ventures, alliances and other forms of inter-organizational relationships. In addition, virtual....... The outcome of facilitation depends on at least four interrelated sets of conditions: a) The available time and resources in comparison to the complexity of the aim(s), b) the composition of the participants, c) the skills of the facilitator and d) the methods available to the facilitator. In this paper...... have come to learn and practise facilitating skills as international students at Technical University of Denmark. The paper identifies facilitation skills at three different levels: the intellectual, emotional and synergistic level. An analysis is conducted based on a practical example of how...

  17. Influenza virus replication in macrophages: balancing protection and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Troy D; Beck, Donald; Bianchini, Elizabeth

    2017-10-01

    Macrophages are essential for protection against influenza A virus infection, but are also implicated in the morbidity and mortality associated with severe influenza disease, particularly during infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus. While influenza virus infection of macrophages was once thought to be abortive, it is now clear that certain virus strains can replicate productively in macrophages. This may have important consequences for the antiviral functions of macrophages, the course of disease and the outcome of infection for the host. In this article, we review findings related to influenza virus replication in macrophages and the impact of productive replication on macrophage antiviral functions. A clear understanding of the interactions between influenza viruses and macrophages may lead to new antiviral therapies to relieve the burden of severe disease associated with influenza viruses.

  18. Topography measurements for determining the decay factors in surface replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J; Zheng, A; Vorburger, T V; Rubert, P

    2008-01-01

    The electro-forming technique is used at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for the production of standard reference material (SRM) 2461 standard casings to support nationwide ballistics measurement traceability and measurement quality control in the US. In order to ensure that the SRM casings are produced with virtually the same surface topography, it is necessary to test the decay factors of the replication process. Twenty-six replica casings are replicated from the same master casing for the decay factor tests. The NIST topography measurement system is used for measurements and correlations of surface topography. The topography decays are quantified by the cross-correlation function maximum CCF max . Based on the test, it is expected that 256 SRM casings can be replicated from the same master with CCF max values higher than 95%

  19. STUDIES ON CHLOROPLAST DEVELOPMENT AND REPLICATION IN EUGLENA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carell, Edgar F.

    1969-01-01

    When Euglena gracilis is grown under vitamin B12 deficiency conditions, the amount of protein and of chlorophyll per cell increase with decrease of B12 in the medium and consequently in the cell. The increase in cell protein is proportional to and precedes an increase in the number of chloroplasts per cell. This replication of the chloroplasts under deficiency conditions is not accompanied by nuclear or cell division. It is concluded that chloroplast replication in Euglena gracilis is independent of nuclear and cellular replication, at least under B12 deficiency conditions. We established a graph of the growth of Euglena under different concentrations of vitamin B12 added to the growth medium, which permitted us to calculate that at least 22,000 molecules of vitamin B12 per cell are required to give normal growth. PMID:5783865

  20. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics of Self-Replicating Protocells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellermann, Harold; Corominas-Murtra, Bernat; Hansen, Per Lyngs

    2018-01-01

    We provide a non-equilibrium thermodynamic description of the life-cycle of a droplet based, chemically feasible, system of protocells. By coupling the protocells metabolic kinetics with its thermodynamics, we demonstrate how the system can be driven out of equilibrium to ensure protocell growth...... and replication. This coupling allows us to derive the equations of evolution and to rigorously demonstrate how growth and replication life-cycle can be understood as a non-equilibrium thermodynamic cycle. The process does not appeal to genetic information or inheritance, and is based only on non......-equilibrium physics considerations. Our non-equilibrium thermodynamic description of simple, yet realistic, processes of protocell growth and replication, represents an advance in our physical understanding of a central biological phenomenon both in connection to the origin of life and for modern biology....

  1. New histone supply regulates replication fork speed and PCNA unloading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejlvang, Jakob; Feng, Yunpeng; Alabert, Constance

    2014-01-01

    Correct duplication of DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin is central to genome function and stability. However, it remains unclear how cells coordinate DNA synthesis with provision of new histones for chromatin assembly to ensure chromosomal stability. In this paper, we show...... that replication fork speed is dependent on new histone supply and efficient nucleosome assembly. Inhibition of canonical histone biosynthesis impaired replication fork progression and reduced nucleosome occupancy on newly synthesized DNA. Replication forks initially remained stable without activation...... of conventional checkpoints, although prolonged histone deficiency generated DNA damage. PCNA accumulated on newly synthesized DNA in cells lacking new histones, possibly to maintain opportunity for CAF-1 recruitment and nucleosome assembly. Consistent with this, in vitro and in vivo analysis showed that PCNA...

  2. Addressing voice recording replications for tracking Parkinson's disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Lizbeth; Pérez, Carlos J; Martín, Jacinto

    2017-03-01

    Tracking Parkinson's disease symptom severity by using characteristics automatically extracted from voice recordings is a very interesting and challenging problem. In this context, voice features are automatically extracted from multiple voice recordings from the same subjects. In principle, for each subject, the features should be identical at a concrete time, but the imperfections in technology and the own biological variability result in nonidentical replicated features. The involved within-subject variability must be addressed since replicated measurements from voice recordings can not be directly used in independence-based pattern recognition methods as they have been routinely used through the scientific literature. Besides, the time plays a key role in the experimental design. In this paper, for the first time, a Bayesian linear regression approach suitable to handle replicated measurements and time is proposed. Moreover, a version favoring the best predictors and penalizing the worst ones is also presented. Computational difficulties have been avoided by developing Gibbs sampling-based approaches.

  3. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Replication by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodchild, John; Agrawal, Sudhir; Civeira, Maria P.; Sarin, Prem S.; Sun, Daisy; Zamecnik, Paul C.

    1988-08-01

    Twenty different target sites within human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA were selected for studies of inhibition of HIV replication by antisense oligonucleotides. Target sites were selected based on their potential capacity to block recognition functions during viral replication. Antisense oligomers complementary to sites within or near the sequence repeated at the ends of retrovirus RNA (R region) and to certain splice sites were most effective. The effect of antisense oligomer length on inhibiting virus replication was also investigated, and preliminary toxicity studies in mice show that these compounds are toxic only at high levels. The results indicate potential usefulness for these oligomers in the treatment of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and AIDS-related complex either alone or in combination with other drugs.

  4. External facilitators and interprofessional facilitation teams: a qualitative study of their roles in supporting practice change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, Sylvie; Bareil, Céline; Lalonde, Lyne; Duhamel, Fabie; Hudon, Eveline; Goudreau, Johanne; Lévesque, Lise

    2016-07-16

    Facilitation is a powerful approach to support practice change. The purpose of this study is to better understand the facilitation roles exercised by both external facilitators and interprofessional facilitation teams to foster the implementation of change. Building on Dogherty et al.'s taxonomy of facilitation activities, this study uses an organizational development lens to identify and analyze facilitation roles. It includes a concise definition of what interprofessional facilitation teams actually do, thus expanding our limited knowledge of teams that act as change agents. We also investigate the facilitation dynamics between change actors. We carried out a qualitative analysis of a 1-year process of practice change implementation. We studied four family medicine groups, in which we constituted interprofessional facilitation teams. Each team was supported by one external facilitator and included at least one family physician, one case manager nurse, and health professionals located on or off the family medicine group's site (one pharmacist, plus at least one nutritionist, kinesiologist, or psychologist). We collected our data through focus group interviews with the four teams, individual interviews with the two external facilitators, and case audit documentation. We analyzed both predetermined (as per Dogherty et al., 2012) and emerging facilitation roles, as well as facilitation dynamics. A non-linear framework of facilitation roles emerged from our data, based on four fields of expertise: change management, project management, meeting management, and group/interpersonal dynamics. We identified 72 facilitation roles, grouped into two categories: "implementation-oriented" and "support-oriented." Each category was subdivided into themes (n = 6; n = 5) for clearer understanding (e.g., legitimation of change/project, management of effective meetings). Finally, an examination of facilitation dynamics revealed eight relational ties occurring within and/or between

  5. Replication Study of the Milwaukee Inventory for Subtypes of Trichotillomania–Adult Version in a Clinically Characterized Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuthen, Nancy J.; Tung, Esther S.; Woods, Douglas W.; Franklin, Martin E.; Altenburger, Erin M.; Pauls, David L.; Flessner, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the Milwaukee Inventory for Subtypes of Trichotillomania–Adult Version (MIST-A) in a replication sample of clinically characterized hair pullers using exploratory factor analysis (EFA; N = 193). EFA eigenvalues and visual inspection of our scree plot revealed a two-factor solution. Factor structure coefficients and internal consistencies suggested a 13-item scale with an 8-item “Intention” scale and a 5-item “Emotion” scale. Both scales displayed good construct and discriminant validity. These findings indicate the need for a revised scale that provides a more refined assessment of pulling phenomenology that can facilitate future treatment advances. PMID:25868534

  6. Replication study of the milwaukee inventory for subtypes of trichotillomania-adult version in a clinically characterized sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuthen, Nancy J; Tung, Esther S; Woods, Douglas W; Franklin, Martin E; Altenburger, Erin M; Pauls, David L; Flessner, Christopher A

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the Milwaukee Inventory for Subtypes of Trichotillomania-Adult Version (MIST-A) in a replication sample of clinically characterized hair pullers using exploratory factor analysis (EFA; N = 193). EFA eigenvalues and visual inspection of our scree plot revealed a two-factor solution. Factor structure coefficients and internal consistencies suggested a 13-item scale with an 8-item "Intention" scale and a 5-item "Emotion" scale. Both scales displayed good construct and discriminant validity. These findings indicate the need for a revised scale that provides a more refined assessment of pulling phenomenology that can facilitate future treatment advances. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Redefining bacterial origins of replication as centralized information processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczynski, Gregory T; Rolain, Thomas; Taylor, James A

    2015-01-01

    In this review we stress the differences between eukaryotes and bacteria with respect to their different cell cycles, replication mechanisms and genome organizations. One of the most basic and underappreciated differences is that a bacterial chromosome uses only one ori while eukaryotic chromosome uses multiple oris. Consequently, eukaryotic oris work redundantly in a cell cycle divided into separate phases: First inactive replication proteins assemble on eukaryotic oris, and then they await conditions (in the separate "S-phase") that activate only the ori-bound and pre-assembled replication proteins. S-phase activation (without re-assembly) ensures that a eukaryotic ori "fires" (starts replication) only once and that each chromosome consistently duplicates only once per cell cycle. This precise chromosome duplication does not require precise multiple ori firing in S-phase. A eukaryotic ori can fire early, late or not at all. The single bacterial ori has no such margin for error and a comparable imprecision is lethal. Single ori usage is not more primitive; it is a totally different strategy that distinguishes bacteria. We further argue that strong evolutionary pressures created more sophisticated single ori systems because bacteria experience extreme and rapidly changing conditions. A bacterial ori must rapidly receive and process much information in "real-time" and not just in "cell cycle time." This redefinition of bacterial oris as centralized information processors makes at least two important predictions: First that bacterial oris use many and yet to be discovered control mechanisms and second that evolutionarily distinct bacteria will use many very distinct control mechanisms. We review recent literature that supports both predictions. We will highlight three key examples and describe how negative-feedback, phospho-relay, and chromosome-partitioning systems act to regulate chromosome replication. We also suggest future studies and discuss using replication

  8. Inhibition of Monkeypox virus replication by RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahrling Peter B

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Orthopoxvirus genus of Poxviridae family is comprised of several human pathogens, including cowpox (CPXV, Vaccinia (VACV, monkeypox (MPV and Variola (VARV viruses. Species of this virus genus cause human diseases with various severities and outcome ranging from mild conditions to death in fulminating cases. Currently, vaccination is the only protective measure against infection with these viruses and no licensed antiviral drug therapy is available. In this study, we investigated the potential of RNA interference pathway (RNAi as a therapeutic approach for orthopox virus infections using MPV as a model. Based on genome-wide expression studies and bioinformatic analysis, we selected 12 viral genes and targeted them by small interference RNA (siRNA. Forty-eight siRNA constructs were developed and evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit viral replication. Two genes, each targeted with four different siRNA constructs in one pool, were limiting to viral replication. Seven siRNA constructs from these two pools, targeting either an essential gene for viral replication (A6R or an important gene in viral entry (E8L, inhibited viral replication in cell culture by 65-95% with no apparent cytotoxicity. Further analysis with wild-type and recombinant MPV expressing green fluorescence protein demonstrated that one of these constructs, siA6-a, was the most potent and inhibited viral replication for up to 7 days at a concentration of 10 nM. These results emphasis the essential role of A6R gene in viral replication, and demonstrate the potential of RNAi as a therapeutic approach for developing oligonucleotide-based drug therapy for MPV and other orthopox viruses.

  9. Cell size and the initiation of DNA replication in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert S Hill

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, DNA replication is coupled to the cell cycle through the actions of cyclin-dependent kinases and associated factors. In bacteria, the prevailing view, based primarily from work in Escherichia coli, is that growth-dependent accumulation of the highly conserved initiator, DnaA, triggers initiation. However, the timing of initiation is unchanged in Bacillus subtilis mutants that are ~30% smaller than wild-type cells, indicating that achievement of a particular cell size is not obligatory for initiation. Prompted by this finding, we re-examined the link between cell size and initiation in both E. coli and B. subtilis. Although changes in DNA replication have been shown to alter both E. coli and B. subtilis cell size, the converse (the effect of cell size on DNA replication has not been explored. Here, we report that the mechanisms responsible for coordinating DNA replication with cell size vary between these two model organisms. In contrast to B. subtilis, small E. coli mutants delayed replication initiation until they achieved the size at which wild-type cells initiate. Modest increases in DnaA alleviated the delay, supporting the view that growth-dependent accumulation of DnaA is the trigger for replication initiation in E. coli. Significantly, although small E. coli and B. subtilis cells both maintained wild-type concentration of DnaA, only the E. coli mutants failed to initiate on time. Thus, rather than the concentration, the total amount of DnaA appears to be more important for initiation timing in E. coli. The difference in behavior of the two bacteria appears to lie in the mechanisms that control the activity of DnaA.

  10. Initiation of chromosomal replication in predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Makowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a small Gram-negative predatory bacterium that attacks other Gram-negative bacteria, including many animal, human, and plant pathogens. This bacterium exhibits a peculiar biphasic life cycle during which two different types of cells are produced: non-replicating highly motile cells (the free-living phase and replicating cells (the intracellular-growth phase. The process of chromosomal replication in B. bacteriovorus must therefore be temporally and spatially regulated to ensure that it is coordinated with cell differentiation and cell cycle progression. Recently, B. bacteriovorus has received considerable research interest due to its intriguing life cycle and great potential as a prospective antimicrobial agent. Although we know that chromosomal replication in bacteria is mainly regulated at the initiation step, no data exists about this process in B. bacteriovorus. We report the first characterization of key elements of initiation of chromosomal replication – DnaA protein and oriC region from the predatory bacterium, B. bacteriovorus. In vitro studies using different approaches demonstrate that the B. bacteriovorus oriC (BdoriC is specifically bound and unwound by the DnaA protein. Sequence comparison of the DnaA-binding sites enabled us to propose a consensus sequence for the B. bacteriovorus DnaA box (5’-NN(A/TTCCACA-3’. Surprisingly, in vitro analysis revealed that BdoriC is also bound and unwound by the host DnaA proteins (relatively distantly related from B. bacteriovorus. We compared the architecture of the DnaA–oriC complexes (orisomes in homologous (oriC and DnaA from B. bacteriovorus and heterologous (BdoriC and DnaA from prey, E. coli or P. aeruginosa systems. This work provides important new entry points toward improving our understanding of the initiation of chromosomal replication in this predatory bacterium.

  11. Replication of urban innovations - prioritization of strategies for the replication of Dhaka's community-based decentralized composting model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedla, Sudhakar

    2012-01-01

    Dhaka's community-based decentralized composting (DCDC) is a successful demonstration of solid waste management by adopting low-cost technology, local resources community participation and partnerships among the various actors involved. This paper attempts to understand the model, necessary conditions, strategies and their priorities to replicate DCDC in the other developing cities of Asia. Thirteen strategies required for its replication are identified and assessed based on various criteria, namely transferability, longevity, economic viability, adaptation and also overall replication. Priority setting by multi-criteria analysis by applying analytic hierarchy process revealed that immediate transferability without long-term and economic viability consideration is not advisable as this would result in unsustainable replication of DCDC. Based on the analysis, measures to ensure the product quality control; partnership among stakeholders (public-private-community); strategies to achieve better involvement of the private sector in solid waste management (entrepreneurship in approach); simple and low-cost technology; and strategies to provide an effective interface among the complementing sectors are identified as important strategies for its replication.

  12. Power and precision of replicated helicopter surveys in mixed bushveld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K. Reilly

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that aerial game counts in South Africa are often applied in a non-standardised, unreplicated fashion. They contribute to poor management decisions based on their results as they may be subject to large statistical Type I and II errors. Replicate counts of large herbivores were conducted in a 8 500 ha sample site in the Loskop Dam Nature Reserve in July 1991. These data were used to estimate precision of the counts and estimate statistical power to detect population changes for different combinations of replications and significance levels.

  13. The Interstellar Ethics of Self-Replicating Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K.

    Robotic spacecraft have been our primary means of exploring the Universe for over 50 years. Should interstellar travel become reality it seems unlikely that humankind will stop using robotic probes. These probes will be able to replicate themselves ad infinitum by extracting raw materials from the space resources around them and reconfiguring them into replicas of themselves, using technology such as 3D printing. This will create a colonising wave of probes across the Galaxy. However, such probes could have negative as well as positive consequences and it is incumbent upon us to factor self-replicating probes into our interstellar philosophies and to take responsibility for their actions.

  14. Replication of avian influenza A viruses in mammals.

    OpenAIRE

    Hinshaw, V S; Webster, R G; Easterday, B C; Bean, W J

    1981-01-01

    The recent appearance of an avian influenza A virus in seals suggests that viruses are transmitted from birds to mammals in nature. To examine this possibility, avian viruses of different antigenic subtypes were evaluated for their ability to replicate in three mammals-pigs, ferrets, and cats. In each of these mammals, avian strains replicated to high titers in the respiratory tract (10(5) to 10(7) 50% egg infective doses per ml of nasal wash), with peak titers at 2 to 4 days post-inoculation...

  15. Reliable self-replicating machines in asynchronous cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jia; Adachi, Susumu; Peper, Ferdinand

    2007-01-01

    We propose a self-replicating machine that is embedded in a two-dimensional asynchronous cellular automaton with von Neumann neighborhood. The machine dynamically encodes its shape into description signals, and despite the randomness of cell updating, it is able to successfully construct copies of itself according to the description signals. Self-replication on asynchronously updated cellular automata may find application in nanocomputers, where reconfigurability is an essential property, since it allows avoidance of defective parts and simplifies programming of such computers.

  16. Sabin-to-Mahoney Transition Model of Quasispecies Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-05-31

    Qspp is an agent-based stochastic simulation model of the Poliovirus Sabin-to-Mahoney transition. This code simulates a cell-to-cell model of Poliovirus replication. The model tracks genotypes (virus genomes) as they are replicated in cells, and as the cells burst and release particles into the medium of a culture dish. An inoculum is then taken from the pool of virions and is used to inoculate cells on a new dish. This process repeats. The Sabin genotype comprises the initial inoculum. Nucleotide positions that match the Sabin1 (vaccine strain) and Mahoney (wild type) genotypes, as well as the neurovirulent phenotype (from the literature) are enumerated as constants.

  17. Plasmid P1 replication: negative control by repeated DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Chattoraj, D; Cordes, K; Abeles, A

    1984-01-01

    The incompatibility locus, incA, of the unit-copy plasmid P1 is contained within a fragment that is essentially a set of nine 19-base-pair repeats. One or more copies of the fragment destabilizes the plasmid when present in trans. Here we show that extra copies of incA interfere with plasmid DNA replication and that a deletion of most of incA increases plasmid copy number. Thus, incA is not essential for replication but is required for its control. When cloned in a high-copy-number vector, pi...

  18. Role enactment of facilitation in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Tina Drud; Thorsen, Thorkil; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2017-01-01

    basis for discussing and refining facilitation as an implementation method. Methods: The facilitation intervention under study was conducted in general practice in the Capital Region of Denmark in order to support an overall strategy for implementing chronic disease management programmes. We observed 30...... and process manager. Thus, apart from trying to keep the process structured and focused the facilitators were engaged in didactic presentations and hands-on learning as they tried to pass on factual information and experienced based knowledge as well as their own enthusiasm towards implementing practice...

  19. Human Cytomegalovirus Exploits Interferon-Induced Transmembrane Proteins To Facilitate Morphogenesis of the Virion Assembly Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Maorong; Xuan, Baoqin; Shan, Jiaoyu; Pan, Deng; Sun, Yamei; Shan, Zhao; Zhang, Jinping; Yu, Dong

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recently, interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) have been identified to be key effector molecules in the host type I interferon defense system. The invasion of host cells by a large range of RNA viruses is inhibited by IFITMs during the entry step. However, the roles of IFITMs in DNA virus infections have not been studied in detail. In this study, we report that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a large human DNA virus, exploits IFITMs to facilitate the formation of the virion assembly compartment (vAC) during infection of human fibroblasts. We found that IFITMs were expressed constitutively in human embryonic lung fibroblasts (MRC5 cells). HCMV infection inhibited IFITM protein accumulation in the later stages of infection. Overexpression of an IFITM protein in MRC5 cells slightly enhanced HCMV production and knockdown of IFITMs by RNA interference reduced the virus titer by about 100-fold on day 8 postinfection, according to the findings of a virus yield assay at a low multiplicity of infection. Virus gene expression and DNA synthesis were not affected, but the typical round structure of the vAC was not formed after the suppression of IFITMs, thereby resulting in defective virion assembly and the production of less infectious virion particles. Interestingly, the replication of herpes simplex virus, a human herpesvirus that is closely related to HCMV, was not affected by the suppression of IFITMs in MRC5 cells. These results indicate that IFITMs are involved in a specific pathway required for HCMV replication. IMPORTANCE HCMV is known to repurpose the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) viperin and tetherin to facilitate its replication. Our results expand the range of ISGs that can be exploited by HCMV for its replication. This is also the first report of a proviral function of IFITMs in DNA virus replication. In addition, whereas previous studies showed that IFITMs modulate virus entry, which is a very early stage in the virus life cycle, we

  20. Spatio-temporal re-organization of replication foci accompanies replication domain consolidation during human pluripotent stem cell lineage specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Korey A.; Elefanty, Andrew G.; Stanley, Edouard G.; Gilbert, David M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lineage specification of both mouse and human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is accompanied by spatial consolidation of chromosome domains and temporal consolidation of their replication timing. Replication timing and chromatin organization are both established during G1 phase at the timing decision point (TDP). Here, we have developed live cell imaging tools to track spatio-temporal replication domain consolidation during differentiation. First, we demonstrate that the fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (Fucci) system is incapable of demarcating G1/S or G2/M cell cycle transitions. Instead, we employ a combination of fluorescent PCNA to monitor S phase progression, cytokinesis to demarcate mitosis, and fluorescent nucleotides to label early and late replication foci and track their 3D organization into sub-nuclear chromatin compartments throughout all cell cycle transitions. We find that, as human PSCs differentiate, the length of S phase devoted to replication of spatially clustered replication foci increases, coincident with global compartmentalization of domains into temporally clustered blocks of chromatin. Importantly, re-localization and anchorage of domains was completed prior to the onset of S phase, even in the context of an abbreviated PSC G1 phase. This approach can also be employed to investigate cell fate transitions in single PSCs, which could be seen to differentiate preferentially from G1 phase. Together, our results establish real-time, live-cell imaging methods for tracking cell cycle transitions during human PSC differentiation that can be applied to study chromosome domain consolidation and other aspects of lineage specification. PMID:27433885

  1. The rolling-circle melting-pot model for porcine circovirus DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stem-loop structure, formed by a pair of inverted repeats during DNA replication, is a conserved feature at the origin of DNA replication (Ori) among plant and animal viruses, bacteriophages and plasmids that replicate their genomes via the rolling-circle replication (RCR) mechanism. Porcine circo...

  2. Nascent chromatin capture proteomics determines chromatin dynamics during DNA replication and identifies unknown fork components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Lee, Sung-Po

    2014-01-01

    replication in human cells. NCC relies on biotin-dUTP labelling of replicating DNA, affinity purification and quantitative proteomics. Comparing nascent chromatin with mature post-replicative chromatin, we provide association dynamics for 3,995 proteins. The replication machinery and 485 chromatin factors...

  3. Discussing the Need of Experimental Replication with 5th Grade Students Conducting a Mealworm Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asshoff, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Scientific inquiry requires the replication of results in experimental studies. Recent studies draw a severe picture on the need of replication and the difficulties in replicating already published studies. As replicated confirmation of results is the basis of scientific and medical research, there may be a need to introduce the topic of…

  4. Host factors in HIV-1 replication: The good, the bad and the ugly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booiman, T.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of HIV-1 to replicate in its target cells is influenced by numerous host factors that act on different steps of the viral replication cycle. The effects of these host factors on the replication cycle can be cell type specific and they can either support or restrict viral replication.

  5. Facilitating climate change adaptation through communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaas, Erik; Gammelgaard Ballantyne, Anne; Neset, Tina Simone

    2015-01-01

    Climate change communication on anticipated impacts and adaptive responses is frequently presented as an effective means to facilitate implementation of adaptation to mitigate risks to residential buildings. However, it requires that communication is developed in a way that resonates...

  6. Familiarity facilitates feature-based face processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Kelsey G.; Cipolli, Carlo; Gobbini, M. Ida

    2017-01-01

    Recognition of personally familiar faces is remarkably efficient, effortless and robust. We asked if feature-based face processing facilitates detection of familiar faces by testing the effect of face inversion on a visual search task for familiar and unfamiliar faces. Because face inversion disrupts configural and holistic face processing, we hypothesized that inversion would diminish the familiarity advantage to the extent that it is mediated by such processing. Subjects detected personally familiar and stranger target faces in arrays of two, four, or six face images. Subjects showed significant facilitation of personally familiar face detection for both upright and inverted faces. The effect of familiarity on target absent trials, which involved only rejection of unfamiliar face distractors, suggests that familiarity facilitates rejection of unfamiliar distractors as well as detection of familiar targets. The preserved familiarity effect for inverted faces suggests that facilitation of face detection afforded by familiarity reflects mostly feature-based processes. PMID:28582439

  7. Recruitment of Brd4 to the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 DNA Replication Complex Is Essential for Replication of Viral DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin; Helfer, Christine M.; Pancholi, Neha; Bradner, James E.; You, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    Replication of the human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA genome relies on viral factors E1 and E2 and the cellular replication machinery. Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (Brd4) interacts with viral E2 protein to mediate papillomavirus (PV) genome maintenance and viral transcription. However, the functional role of Brd4 in the HPV life cycle remains to be clearly defined. In this study, we provide the first look into the E2-Brd4 interaction in the presence of other important viral factors, such as t...

  8. Rapid Transient Production in Plants by Replicating and Non-Replicating Vectors Yields High Quality Functional Anti-HIV Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Frank; Sack, Markus; Stadlmann, Johannes; Quendler, Heribert; Fischer, Rainer; Lomonossoff, George P.

    2010-01-01

    Background The capacity of plants and plant cells to produce large amounts of recombinant protein has been well established. Due to advantages in terms of speed and yield, attention has recently turned towards the use of transient expression systems, including viral vectors, to produce proteins of pharmaceutical interest in plants. However, the effects of such high level expression from viral vectors and concomitant effects on host cells may affect the quality of the recombinant product. Methodology/Principal Findings To assess the quality of antibodies transiently expressed to high levels in plants, we have expressed and characterised the human anti-HIV monoclonal antibody, 2G12, using both replicating and non-replicating systems based on deleted versions of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) RNA-2. The highest yield (approximately 100 mg/kg wet weight leaf tissue) of affinity purified 2G12 was obtained when the non-replicating CPMV-HT system was used and the antibody was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Glycan analysis by mass-spectrometry showed that the glycosylation pattern was determined exclusively by whether the antibody was retained in the ER and did not depend on whether a replicating or non-replicating system was used. Characterisation of the binding and neutralisation properties of all the purified 2G12 variants from plants showed that these were generally similar to those of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell-produced 2G12. Conclusions Overall, the results demonstrate that replicating and non-replicating CPMV-based vectors are able to direct the production of a recombinant IgG similar in activity to the CHO-produced control. Thus, a complex recombinant protein was produced with no apparent effect on its biochemical properties using either high-level expression or viral replication. The speed with which a recombinant pharmaceutical with excellent biochemical characteristics can be produced transiently in plants makes CPMV-based expression vectors

  9. Chromatin Dynamics in Genome Stability: Roles in Suppressing Endogenous DNA Damage and Facilitating DNA Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nidhi; Shoaib, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote access of relevant enzymes to specific DNA regions for signaling and repair. Furthermore, recent data highlight genome maintenance roles of chromatin through the regulation of endogenous DNA-templated processes including transcription and replication. Here, we review research that shows the importance of chromatin structure regulation in maintaining genome integrity by multiple mechanisms including facilitating DNA repair and directly suppressing endogenous DNA damage. PMID:28698521

  10. Chimpanzee lip-smacking facilitates cooperative behaviour.

    OpenAIRE

    Fedurek Pawel; Slocombe Katie E.; Hartel Jessica A.; Zuberbühler Klaus

    2015-01-01

    PF was funded by Swiss National Science Foundation and European Research Council project grants (Prilang 283871) to KZ. Signalling plays an important role in facilitating and maintaining affiliative or cooperative interactions in social animals. Social grooming in primates is an example of an interaction that requires coordination between partners but little is known about communicative behaviours facilitating this activity. In this study, we analysed the communication of wild chimpanzees ...

  11. The big five as tendencies in situations : A replication study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, AAJ

    1996-01-01

    Van Heck, Perugini, Caprara and Froger (1994) report the average generalizability coefficient reflecting the consistent ordering of persons across different situations and different trait markers (items) to be in the order of 0.70. We performed a replication study in which we improved on their

  12. Modeling HIV-1 intracellular replication: two simulation approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarrabi, N.; Mancini, E.; Tay, J.; Shahand, S.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Many mathematical and computational models have been developed to investigate the complexity of HIV dynamics, immune response and drug therapy. However, there are not many models which consider the dynamics of virus intracellular replication at a single level. We propose a model of HIV intracellular

  13. Localization of adenovirus DNA replication in KB cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlak, J.M.; Rozijn, Th.H.; Spies, F.

    1975-01-01

    The localization of adenovirus type 5 DNA replication has been investigated by both fractionation of isolated nuclei and electron-microscope autoradiography. Nuclear fractionation by means of the M-band-technique of Tremblay et al. (Tremblay, G. Y., Daniels, M. J., and Schaechter, M. (1969). J. Mol.

  14. Failure to Replicate the "Work Ethic" Effect in Pigeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Marco; Urcuioli, Peter J.; Lionello-DeNolf, Karen M.

    2007-01-01

    We report six unsuccessful attempts to replicate the "work ethic" phenomenon reported by Clement, Feltus, Kaiser, and Zentall (2000). In Experiments 1-5, pigeons learned two simultaneous discriminations in which the S+ and S- stimuli were obtained by pecking an initial stimulus once or multiple (20 or 40) times. Subsequent preference tests between…

  15. Replicating Data for Better Performances in X10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrić, Marina; De Nicola, Rocco; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    used to experiment with X10, a parallel programming language primarily targeting clusters of multi-core processors linked in a large-scale system via high-performance networks. Our approach aims at allowing the programmer to specify and coordinate the replication of shared data items by taking...

  16. Timing, Coordination, and Rhythm : Acrobatics at the DNA Replication Fork

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdan, Samir M.; Oijen, Antoine M. van

    2010-01-01

    In DNA replication, the antiparallel nature of the parental duplex imposes certain constraints on the activity of the DNA polymerases that synthesize new DNA. The leading-strand polymerase advances in a continuous fashion, but the lagging-strand polymerase is forced to restart at short intervals. In

  17. Across-Task Conflict Regulation: A Replication Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runger, Dennis; Schwager, Sabine; Frensch, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Fernandez-Duque and Knight (2008, Experiment 4) described an across-task effect of endogenously generated, anticipatory control: A cue that predicted conflict in an upcoming Eriksen flanker task modulated conflict regulation in a subsequent number Stroop task. In 3 experiments, 1 of which included an exact replication condition, we failed to…

  18. DNA breaks early in replication in B cell cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research by scientists at the NCI has identified a new class of DNA sites in cells that break early in the replication process. They found that these break sites correlate with damage often seen in B cell cancers, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  19. Children's Understanding of Their Emotionally Disturbed Peers: A Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Despite increasing recognition of the early importance of peer relations, virtually no systematic information exists on the way in which normal children view their emotionally disturbed peers. This research reports a replication of recent findings on children's use of the concept of emotional disturbance. (Editor/RK)

  20. Quality of topographical micro replication in injection moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arlø, Uffe Rolf; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Bariani, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    surface with Sq = 4.6 ƒÝm manufactured by EDM and a commercial polypropylene grade. 3D surface characterisation was carried out with a laser focus detection profiler. The investigation reveals that replication quality indices as measured with several established 3D topographical parameters...

  1. Automated Anxiety Control Promotes Student Retention: A Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Richard; Holt, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to replicate prior findings in which a test-anxiety control training produced substantial test gains among students on academic probation. Twelve first semester students with marginal achievement were identified, screened for test anxiety, and found to have substantially higher anxiety than other students. Ten of the…

  2. On Node Replication Attack in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Qabulio

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available WSNs (Wireless Sensor Networks comprise a large number of small, inexpensive, low power and memory constrained sensing devices (called sensor nodes that are densely deployed to measure a given physical phenomenon. Since WSNs are commonly deployed in a hostile and unattended environment, it is easy for an adversary to physically capture one or more legitimate sensor nodes, re-program and redeploy them in the network. As a result, the adversary becomes able to deploy several identical copies of physically captured nodes in the network in order to perform illegitimate activities. This type of attack is referred to as Node Replication Attack or Clone Node Attack. By launching node replication attack, an adversary can easily get control on the network which consequently is the biggest threat to confidentiality, integrity and availability of data and services. Thus, detection and prevention of node replication attack in WSNs has become an active area of research and to date more than two dozen schemes have been proposed, which address this issue. In this paper, we present a comprehensive review, classification and comparative analysis of twenty five of these schemes which help to detect and/or prevent node replication attack in WSNs

  3. Evolution of DNA replication protein complexes in eukaryotes and Archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Chia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The replication of DNA in Archaea and eukaryotes requires several ancillary complexes, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, replication factor C (RFC, and the minichromosome maintenance (MCM complex. Bacterial DNA replication utilizes comparable proteins, but these are distantly related phylogenetically to their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts at best. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While the structures of each of the complexes do not differ significantly between the archaeal and eukaryotic versions thereof, the evolutionary dynamic in the two cases does. The number of subunits in each complex is constant across all taxa. However, they vary subtly with regard to composition. In some taxa the subunits are all identical in sequence, while in others some are homologous rather than identical. In the case of eukaryotes, there is no phylogenetic variation in the makeup of each complex-all appear to derive from a common eukaryotic ancestor. This is not the case in Archaea, where the relationship between the subunits within each complex varies taxon-to-taxon. We have performed a detailed phylogenetic analysis of these relationships in order to better understand the gene duplications and divergences that gave rise to the homologous subunits in Archaea. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This domain level difference in evolution suggests that different forces have driven the evolution of DNA replication proteins in each of these two domains. In addition, the phylogenies of all three gene families support the distinctiveness of the proposed archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota.

  4. Registered Replication Report: Dijksterhuis and van Knippenberg (1998).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Michael; Nelson, Leif D; Ackermann, Evi; Aczel, Balazs; Akhtar, Athfah; Aldrovandi, Silvio; Alshaif, Nasseem; Andringa, Ronald; Aveyard, Mark; Babincak, Peter; Balatekin, Nursena; Baldwin, Scott A; Banik, Gabriel; Baskin, Ernest; Bell, Raoul; Białobrzeska, Olga; Birt, Angie R; Boot, Walter R; Braithwaite, Scott R; Briggs, Jessie C; Buchner, Axel; Budd, Desiree; Budzik, Kathryn; Bullens, Lottie; Bulley, Richard L; Cannon, Peter R; Cantarero, Katarzyna; Cesario, Joseph; Chambers, Stephanie; Chartier, Christopher R; Chekroun, Peggy; Chong, Clara; Cleeremans, Axel; Coary, Sean P; Coulthard, Jacob; Cramwinckel, Florien M; Denson, Thomas F; Díaz-Lago, Marcos; DiDonato, Theresa E; Drummond, Aaron; Eberlen, Julia; Ebersbach, Titus; Edlund, John E; Finnigan, Katherine M; Fisher, Justin; Frankowska, Natalia; García-Sánchez, Efraín; Golom, Frank D; Graves, Andrew J; Greenberg, Kevin; Hanioti, Mando; Hansen, Heather A; Harder, Jenna A; Harrell, Erin R; Hartanto, Andree; Inzlicht, Michael; Johnson, David J; Karpinski, Andrew; Keller, Victor N; Klein, Olivier; Koppel, Lina; Krahmer, Emiel; Lantian, Anthony; Larson, Michael J; Légal, Jean-Baptiste; Lucas, Richard E; Lynott, Dermot; Magaldino, Corey M; Massar, Karlijn; McBee, Matthew T; McLatchie, Neil; Melia, Nadhilla; Mensink, Michael C; Mieth, Laura; Moore-Berg, Samantha; Neeser, Geraldine; Newell, Ben R; Noordewier, Marret K; Ali Özdoğru, Asil; Pantazi, Myrto; Parzuchowski, Michał; Peters, Kim; Philipp, Michael C; Pollmann, Monique M H; Rentzelas, Panagiotis; Rodríguez-Bailón, Rosa; Philipp Röer, Jan; Ropovik, Ivan; Roque, Nelson A; Rueda, Carolina; Rutjens, Bastiaan T; Sackett, Katey; Salamon, Janos; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Ángel; Saunders, Blair; Schaafsma, Juliette; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Michael; Shanks, David R; Sherman, Martin F; Steele, Kenneth M; Steffens, Niklas K; Sun, Jessie; Susa, Kyle J; Szaszi, Barnabas; Szollosi, Aba; Tamayo, Ricardo M; Tinghög, Gustav; Tong, Yuk-Yue; Tweten, Carol; Vadillo, Miguel A; Valcarcel, Deisy; Van der Linden, Nicolas; van Elk, Michiel; van Harreveld, Frenk; Västfjäll, Daniel; Vazire, Simine; Verduyn, Philippe; Williams, Matt N; Willis, Guillermo B; Wood, Sarah E; Yang, Chunliang; Zerhouni, Oulmann; Zheng, Robert; Zrubka, Mark

    2018-03-01

    Dijksterhuis and van Knippenberg (1998) reported that participants primed with a category associated with intelligence ("professor") subsequently performed 13% better on a trivia test than participants primed with a category associated with a lack of intelligence ("soccer hooligans"). In two unpublished replications of this study designed to verify the appropriate testing procedures, Dijksterhuis, van Knippenberg, and Holland observed a smaller difference between conditions (2%-3%) as well as a gender difference: Men showed the effect (9.3% and 7.6%), but women did not (0.3% and -0.3%). The procedure used in those replications served as the basis for this multilab Registered Replication Report. A total of 40 laboratories collected data for this project, and 23 of these laboratories met all inclusion criteria. Here we report the meta-analytic results for those 23 direct replications (total N = 4,493), which tested whether performance on a 30-item general-knowledge trivia task differed between these two priming conditions (results of supplementary analyses of the data from all 40 labs, N = 6,454, are also reported). We observed no overall difference in trivia performance between participants primed with the "professor" category and those primed with the "hooligan" category (0.14%) and no moderation by gender.

  5. Gender Effects on Loyalty: A Replication in an Emerging Market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babah Daouda, Falylath; Ingenbleek, Paul T.M.; Trijp, van Hans C.M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper replicates the gender-effect on object of loyalty found by
    Melnyk et al. (2009), suggesting that females are more loyal towards
    individuals and males are more loyal to groups and organizations. Results
    from Benin (West Africa) support this but find that the results

  6. Global bifurcations at the onset of pulse self-replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Baozeng

    2007-11-01

    In this work, we carried out an extensive numerical exploration of the delicate global dynamics of pulse self-replication and analyzed the stability of singular homoclinic stationary solutions and their bifurcations in the one-dimensional Gray-Scott model. This stability analysis has several implications for understanding the recently discovered phenomena of self-replicating pulses. The solutions of the ordinary differential equation are organized around a codimension-2 global bifurcation from which two or N branches of homoclinic orbits originate, corresponding to solitary pulse solutions in the partial differential equation. A careful analysis of the bifurcation scenarios in the global bifurcation diagram suggests that the dynamics of the self-replicating system are related to a hierarchy structure of folding bifurcation branches in parameter space. The numerical simulation suggests that the Bogdanov-Takens points, together with the presence of critical points emanating from a particular codimension-2 homoclinic orbit, play a central role for the global bifurcation of periodic orbits, the homoclinic solutions, and the complex chaotic dynamics. The numerical simulation also reveals the existence of a modulating two-pulse or multipulse, which accompanies the procedure of pulse self-replication in reaction-diffusion systems.

  7. Timeless links replication termination to mitotic kinase activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaraju Dheekollu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that coordinate the termination of DNA replication with progression through mitosis are not completely understood. The human Timeless protein (Tim associates with S phase replication checkpoint proteins Claspin and Tipin, and plays an important role in maintaining replication fork stability at physical barriers, like centromeres, telomeres and ribosomal DNA repeats, as well as at termination sites. We show here that human Tim can be isolated in a complex with mitotic entry kinases CDK1, Auroras A and B, and Polo-like kinase (Plk1. Plk1 bound Tim directly and colocalized with Tim at a subset of mitotic structures in M phase. Tim depletion caused multiple mitotic defects, including the loss of sister-chromatid cohesion, loss of mitotic spindle architecture, and a failure to exit mitosis. Tim depletion caused a delay in mitotic kinase activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as a reduction in global histone H3 S10 phosphorylation during G2/M phase. Tim was also required for the recruitment of Plk1 to centromeric DNA and formation of catenated DNA structures at human centromere alpha satellite repeats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tim coordinates mitotic kinase activation with termination of DNA replication.

  8. A non-replicative adenovirus vaccine platform for poultry diseases ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-04-09

    Apr 9, 2018 ... Using a non-replicative adenovirus to transfer genetic material into cells, researchers will generate two proteins (HN and F) that are known targets of protective immunity against ND. Unlike traditional ND vaccines that are produced using eggs, the resulting vaccine will be produced in a cell culture system, ...

  9. Chromosomal replication incompatibility in Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiesleben, Ulrik Von

    1996-01-01

    Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells containing minichromosomes were constructed. Free plasmid DNA could not be detected in these cells and the minichromosomes were found to be integrated in multiple copies in the origin of replication (oriC) region of the host chromosome...

  10. Replication initiatives will not salvage the trustworthiness of psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, James C

    2016-05-31

    Replication initiatives in psychology continue to gather considerable attention from far outside the field, as well as controversy from within. Some accomplishments of these initiatives are noted, but this article focuses on why they do not provide a general solution for what ails psychology. There are inherent limitations to mass replications ever being conducted in many areas of psychology, both in terms of their practicality and their prospects for improving the science. Unnecessary compromises were built into the ground rules for design and publication of the Open Science Collaboration: Psychology that undermine its effectiveness. Some ground rules could actually be flipped into guidance for how not to conduct replications. Greater adherence to best publication practices, transparency in the design and publishing of research, strengthening of independent post-publication peer review and firmer enforcement of rules about data sharing and declarations of conflict of interest would make many replications unnecessary. Yet, it has been difficult to move beyond simple endorsement of these measures to consistent implementation. Given the strong institutional support for questionable publication practices, progress will depend on effective individual and collective use of social media to expose lapses and demand reform. Some recent incidents highlight the necessity of this.

  11. Psychological type and attitude toward Christianity: a replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Leslie J; Robbins, Mandy; Boxer, Anna; Lewis, Christopher Alan; McGuckin, Conor; McDaid, Charles J

    2003-02-01

    A sample of 149 university students completed the Francis Psychological Type Scales together with the Francis Scale of Attitude Toward Christianity. The data indicated that university students classified as Feeling Types hold a more positive attitude toward Christianity than those classified as Thinking Types. These findings replicate the 1999 report of Jones and Francis.

  12. Personality and attitude toward Christianity among churchgoers: a replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Emyr; Francis, Leslie J

    2006-08-01

    A sample of 158 churchgoers attending eight Anglican churches in the United Kingdom completed the abbreviated Revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire together with the Francis Scale of Attitude toward Christianity to replicate a 1996 study by Carter, Kay, and Francis. Data confirm that scores on Attitude toward Christianity were significantly negatively related to Psychoticism, but to neither Extraversion nor Neuroticism scores.

  13. Web Services Solution on Replication Oriented Architecture (ROA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ROA an acronym for Replication Oriented Architecture is speculated as capable of attenuating the scalability defect of Web Services and help application programmers build scalable Web Services solution. For this claim to be considered, it is ordinarily necessary to establish that Web Services solution can be built on ROA; ...

  14. Autonomous Technology: Rhetoric of the Replicants in Contemporary Cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentz, Thomas S.; Rushing, Janice H.

    Developing a theme drawn from speculative writing of the nineteenth century--that technology, like biological species, undergoes a process of evolution--this paper explores the thesis that if technology divides from its human creators and perfects itself until it gains the capacity for self replication, it cannot return to its creator. Using…

  15. Clade-specific differences in active viral replication and compartmentalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala, Monica; Centlivre, Mireille; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2006-01-01

    This review focuses on the impact of HIV-1 clade-specific polymorphisms on the dynamics of viral replication and compartmentalization in vivo. HIV-1 transcription and compartmentalization are essentially modulated by interconnected parameters: cellular activation by T-cell receptor engagement or

  16. Lytic Replication of Epstein-Barr Virus During Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Barrett, A. D. T.

    1999-01-01

    Reactivation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may be an important threat to crew health during extended space missions. Cellular immunity, which is decreased during and after space flight, is responsible for controlling EBV replication in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of short-term space flight on latent EBV reactivation.

  17. The hunt for origins of DNA replication in multicellular eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, J. M.; Foulk, M. S.; Casella, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Origins of DNA replication (ORIs) occur at defined regions in the genome. Although DNA sequence defines the position of ORIs in budding yeast, the factors for ORI specification remain elusive in metazoa. Several methods have been used recently to map ORIs in metazoan genomes with the hope...

  18. Revisiting Mental Simulation in Language Comprehension: Six Replication Attempts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Zwaan (Rolf); D. Pecher (Diane)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe notion of language comprehension as mental simulation has become popular in cognitive science. We revisit some of the original empirical evidence for this. Specifically, we attempted to replicate the findings from earlier studies that examined the mental simulation of object

  19. Can Coloring Mandalas Reduce Anxiety? A Replication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vennet, Renee; Serice, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This experimental study replicated Curry and Kasser's (2005) research that tested whether coloring a mandala would reduce anxiety. After inducing an anxious mood via a writing activity, participants were randomly assigned to three groups that colored either on a mandala design, on a plaid design, or on a blank paper. Anxiety level was measured…

  20. DnaA and ORC : more than DNA replication initiators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholefield, Graham; Veening, Jan-Willem; Murray, Heath

    Mutations in DNA replication initiator genes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes lead to a pleiotropic array of phenotypes, including defects in chromosome segregation, cytokinesis, cell cycle regulation and gene expression. For years, it was not clear whether these diverse effects were indirect