WorldWideScience

Sample records for facilitate genetic analysis

  1. Cumulative BRCA mutation analysis in the Greek population confirms that homogenous ethnic background facilitates genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigginou, Alexandra; Vlachopoulos, Fotios; Arzimanoglou, Iordanis; Zagouri, Flora; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Screening for BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations has long moved from the research lab to the clinic as a routine clinical genetic testing. BRCA molecular alteration pattern varies among ethnic groups which makes it already a less straightforward process to select the appropriate mutations for routine genetic testing on the basis of known clinical significance. The present report comprises an in depth literature review of the so far reported BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 molecular alterations in Greek families. Our analysis of Greek cumulative BRCA 1 and 2 molecular data, produced by several independent groups, confirmed that six recurrent deleterious mutations account for almost 60 % and 70 % of all BRCA 1 and 2 and BRCA 1 mutations, respectively. As a result, it makes more sense to perform BRCA mutation analysis in the clinic in two sequential steps, first conventional analysis for the six most prevalent pathogenic mutations and if none identified, a second step of New Generation Sequencing-based whole genome or whole exome sequencing would follow. Our suggested approach would enable more clinically meaningful, considerably easier and less expensive BRCA analysis in the Greek population which is considered homogenous.

  2. MaGelLAn 1.0: a software to facilitate quantitative and population genetic analysis of maternal inheritance by combination of molecular and pedigree information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristov, Strahil; Brajkovic, Vladimir; Cubric-Curik, Vlatka; Michieli, Ivan; Curik, Ino

    2016-09-10

    Identification of genes or even nucleotides that are responsible for quantitative and adaptive trait variation is a difficult task due to the complex interdependence between a large number of genetic and environmental factors. The polymorphism of the mitogenome is one of the factors that can contribute to quantitative trait variation. However, the effects of the mitogenome have not been comprehensively studied, since large numbers of mitogenome sequences and recorded phenotypes are required to reach the adequate power of analysis. Current research in our group focuses on acquiring the necessary mitochondria sequence information and analysing its influence on the phenotype of a quantitative trait. To facilitate these tasks we have produced software for processing pedigrees that is optimised for maternal lineage analysis. We present MaGelLAn 1.0 (maternal genealogy lineage analyser), a suite of four Python scripts (modules) that is designed to facilitate the analysis of the impact of mitogenome polymorphism on quantitative trait variation by combining molecular and pedigree information. MaGelLAn 1.0 is primarily used to: (1) optimise the sampling strategy for molecular analyses; (2) identify and correct pedigree inconsistencies; and (3) identify maternal lineages and assign the corresponding mitogenome sequences to all individuals in the pedigree, this information being used as input to any of the standard software for quantitative genetic (association) analysis. In addition, MaGelLAn 1.0 allows computing the mitogenome (maternal) effective population sizes and probability of mitogenome (maternal) identity that are useful for conservation management of small populations. MaGelLAn is the first tool for pedigree analysis that focuses on quantitative genetic analyses of mitogenome data. It is conceived with the purpose to significantly reduce the effort in handling and preparing large pedigrees for processing the information linked to maternal lines. The software source

  3. Population genetic analysis of Bromus tectorum (Poaceae) indicates recent range expansion may be facilitated by specialist genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith R. Merrill; Susan E. Meyer; Craig E. Coleman

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms for range expansion in invasive species depend on how genetic variation is structured in the introduced range. This study examined neutral genetic variation in the invasive annual grass Bromus tectorum in the Intermountain Western United States. Patterns of microsatellite (SSR) genotype distribution in this highly inbreeding species were used to make...

  4. Genetic risks and healthy choices: creating citizen-consumers of genetic services through empowerment and facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Alison

    2010-03-01

    Genetic testing to identify susceptibility to a variety of common complex diseases is increasingly becoming available. In this article, focusing on the development of genetic susceptibility testing for diet-related disease, I examine the emergence of direct-to-the-consumer genetic testing services and the (re)configuration of healthcare provision, both within and outside the specialist genetics service, in the UK. I identify two key techniques within these practices: empowerment and facilitation. Using Foucauldian social theory, I show that empowerment and facilitation are being positioned as tools for the creation of citizen-consumers who will make appropriate dietary choices, based on the results of their genetic analysis. Through these techniques, individuals are transformed into properly entrepreneurial citizens who will, through judicious choices, act to maximise their 'vital capital' (their health) and the capital of the social body. I argue that the user of these services is not purely an economic figure, making rational choices as a consumer, but that her configuration as a citizen-consumer who avails herself of genetic information and services in a proper manner ensures that she is fit to contribute to the economic life of our present.

  5. Combining US and Brazilian microsatellite data for a meta-analysis of sheep (Ovis aries) breed diversity: facilitating the FAO Global Plan of Action for Conserving Animal Genetic Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Samuel Rezende; Mariante, Arthur da Silva; Blackburn, Harvey D

    2011-01-01

    Microsatellites are commonly used to understand genetic diversity among livestock populations. Nevertheless, most studies have involved the processing of samples in one laboratory or with common standards across laboratories. Our objective was to identify an approach to facilitate the merger of microsatellite data for cross-country comparison of genetic resources when samples were not evaluated in a single laboratory. Eleven microsatellites were included in the analysis of 13 US and 9 Brazilian sheep breeds (N = 706). A Bayesian approach was selected and evaluated with and without a shared set of samples analyzed by each country. All markers had a posterior probability of greater than 0.5, which was higher than predicted as reasonable by the software used. Sensitivity analysis indicated no difference between results with or without shared samples. Cluster analysis showed breeds to be partitioned by functional groups of hair, meat, or wool types (K = 7 and 12 of STRUCTURE). Cross-country comparison of hair breeds indicated substantial genetic distances and within breed variability. The selected approach can facilitate the merger and analysis of microsatellite data for cross-country comparison and extend the utility of previously collected molecular markers. In addition, the result of this type of analysis can be used in new and existing conservation programs.

  6. Can Using Human Examples Facilitate Learning Mendelian Genetics Concepts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reports an experimental study of 80 ninth grade biology students randomly assigned to treatment and control groups to determine whether the use of human examples in instructional strategies on Mendelian genetics increases acquisition and retention of genetics concepts. Results indicate that use of human examples in contrast to traditional examples…

  7. GeneLink: a database to facilitate genetic studies of complex traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfsberg Tyra G

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to gene-mapping studies of simple Mendelian disorders, genetic analyses of complex traits are far more challenging, and high quality data management systems are often critical to the success of these projects. To minimize the difficulties inherent in complex trait studies, we have developed GeneLink, a Web-accessible, password-protected Sybase database. Results GeneLink is a powerful tool for complex trait mapping, enabling genotypic data to be easily merged with pedigree and extensive phenotypic data. Specifically designed to facilitate large-scale (multi-center genetic linkage or association studies, GeneLink securely and efficiently handles large amounts of data and provides additional features to facilitate data analysis by existing software packages and quality control. These include the ability to download chromosome-specific data files containing marker data in map order in various formats appropriate for downstream analyses (e.g., GAS and LINKAGE. Furthermore, an unlimited number of phenotypes (either qualitative or quantitative can be stored and analyzed. Finally, GeneLink generates several quality assurance reports, including genotyping success rates of specified DNA samples or success and heterozygosity rates for specified markers. Conclusions GeneLink has already proven an invaluable tool for complex trait mapping studies and is discussed primarily in the context of our large, multi-center study of hereditary prostate cancer (HPC. GeneLink is freely available at http://research.nhgri.nih.gov/genelink.

  8. Facilitating Analysis of Multiple Partial Data Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimone, Mark W.; Liebersbach, Robert R.

    2008-01-01

    Robotic Operations Automation: Mechanisms, Imaging, Navigation report Generation (ROAMING) is a set of computer programs that facilitates and accelerates both tactical and strategic analysis of time-sampled data especially the disparate and often incomplete streams of Mars Explorer Rover (MER) telemetry data described in the immediately preceding article. As used here, tactical refers to the activities over a relatively short time (one Martian day in the original MER application) and strategic refers to a longer time (the entire multi-year MER missions in the original application). Prior to installation, ROAMING must be configured with the types of data of interest, and parsers must be modified to understand the format of the input data (many example parsers are provided, including for general CSV files). Thereafter, new data from multiple disparate sources are automatically resampled into a single common annotated spreadsheet stored in a readable space-separated format, and these data can be processed or plotted at any time scale. Such processing or plotting makes it possible to study not only the details of a particular activity spanning only a few seconds, but also longer-term trends. ROAMING makes it possible to generate mission-wide plots of multiple engineering quantities [e.g., vehicle tilt as in Figure 1(a), motor current, numbers of images] that, heretofore could be found only in thousands of separate files. ROAMING also supports automatic annotation of both images and graphs. In the MER application, labels given to terrain features by rover scientists and engineers are automatically plotted in all received images based on their associated camera models (see Figure 2), times measured in seconds are mapped to Mars local time, and command names or arbitrary time-labeled events can be used to label engineering plots, as in Figure 1(b).

  9. Genetic analysis of bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, E; Konkle, B A; Goodeve, A C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular genetic analysis of inherited bleeding disorders has been practised for over 30 years. Technological changes have enabled advances, from analyses using extragenic linked markers to next-generation DNA sequencing and microarray analysis. Two approaches for genetic analysis are described, each suiting their environment. The Christian Medical Centre in Vellore, India, uses conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis mutation screening of multiplexed PCR products to identify candidate mutations, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmation of variants identified. Specific analyses for F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions are also undertaken. The MyLifeOurFuture US project between the American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network, the National Hemophilia Foundation, Bloodworks Northwest and Biogen uses molecular inversion probes (MIP) to capture target exons, splice sites plus 5' and 3' sequences and to detect F8 intron 1 and 22 inversions. This allows screening for all F8 and F9 variants in one sequencing run of multiple samples (196 or 392). Sequence variants identified are subsequently confirmed by a diagnostic laboratory. After having identified variants in genes of interest through these processes, a systematic procedure determining their likely pathogenicity should be applied. Several scientific societies have prepared guidelines. Systematic analysis of the available evidence facilitates reproducible scoring of likely pathogenicity. Documentation of frequency in population databases of variant prevalence and in locus-specific mutation databases can provide initial information on likely pathogenicity. Whereas null mutations are often pathogenic, missense and splice site variants often require in silico analyses to predict likely pathogenicity and using an accepted suite of tools can help standardize their documentation.

  10. An enhanced archive facilitating climate impacts analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, E.P.; Brekke, L.; Pruitt, T.; Thrasher, B.; Long, J.; Duffy, P.; Dettinger, M.; Cayan, D.; Arnold, J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the expansion of a publicly available archive of downscaled climate and hydrology projections for the United States. Those studying or planning to adapt to future climate impacts demand downscaled climate model output for local or regional use. The archive we describe attempts to fulfill this need by providing data in several formats, selectable to meet user needs. Our archive has served as a resource for climate impacts modelers, water managers, educators, and others. Over 1,400 individuals have transferred more than 50 TB of data from the archive. In response to user demands, the archive has expanded from monthly downscaled data to include daily data to facilitate investigations of phenomena sensitive to daily to monthly temperature and precipitation, including extremes in these quantities. New developments include downscaled output from the new Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) climate model simulations at both the monthly and daily time scales, as well as simulations of surface hydrologi- cal variables. The web interface allows the extraction of individual projections or ensemble statistics for user-defined regions, promoting the rapid assessment of model consensus and uncertainty for future projections of precipitation, temperature, and hydrology. The archive is accessible online (http://gdo-dcp.ucllnl.org/downscaled_ cmip_projections).

  11. A genetic counseling intervention to facilitate family communication about inherited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaff, Clara; Hodgson, Jan

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of the first intervention to facilitate family communication of genetic information based on a genetic counseling model of practice. The intervention is telephone-based and therefore designed to complement face-to-face genetic counseling consultations. It was developed by firstly reviewing the literature and a model of genetic counseling practice, leading to definition of seven core principles underpinning the intervention. A counseling framework based on these principles was developed through iterative role playing and review, tested for consistency with good practice and piloted on ten study participants. It was found to be feasible to implement and consistent with good genetic counseling practice. Implementation included training of the genetic counselors who would deliver the intervention as part of a randomized controlled trial. Noteworthy deviations from good genetic counseling practice were observed, with unexpected additional insights into the 'black box' of genetic counseling that may have wider implications and would benefit from further investigation. The intervention is currently being evaluated in a randomized controlled trial, to assess its impact on the number of family members attending genetic services.

  12. Combining microarrays and genetic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberts, Rudi; Fu, Jingyuan; Swertz, Morris A.; Lubbers, L. Alrik; Albers, Casper J.; Jansen, Ritsert C.

    2005-01-01

    Gene expression can be studied at a genome-wide scale with the aid of modern microarray technologies. Expression profiling of tens to hundreds of individuals in a genetic population can reveal the consequences of genetic variation. In this paper it is argued that the design and analysis of such a

  13. Combining microarrays and genetic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberts, Rudi; Fu, Jingyuan; Swertz, Morris A.; Lubbers, L. Alrik; Albers, Casper J.; Jansen, Ritsert C.

    2005-01-01

    Gene expression can be studied at a genome-wide scale with the aid of modern microarray technologies. Expression profiling of tens to hundreds of individuals in a genetic population can reveal the consequences of genetic variation. In this paper it is argued that the design and analysis of such a st

  14. Cyanobacteria: photosynthetic factories combining biodiversity, radiation resistance, and genetics to facilitate drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Dive, Vincent; Chauvat, Franck

    2017-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are ancient, abundant, and widely diverse photosynthetic prokaryotes, which are viewed as promising cell factories for the ecologically responsible production of chemicals. Natural cyanobacteria synthesize a vast array of biologically active (secondary) metabolites with great potential for human health, while a few genetic models can be engineered for the (low level) production of biofuels. Recently, genome sequencing and mining has revealed that natural cyanobacteria have the capacity to produce many more secondary metabolites than have been characterized. The corresponding panoply of enzymes (polyketide synthases and non-ribosomal peptide synthases) of interest for synthetic biology can still be increased through gene manipulations with the tools available for the few genetically manipulable strains. In this review, we propose to exploit the metabolic diversity and radiation resistance of cyanobacteria, and when required the genetics of model strains, for the production and radioactive ((14)C) labeling of bioactive products, in order to facilitate the screening for new drugs.

  15. Reframed Genome-Scale Metabolic Model to Facilitate Genetic Design and Integration with Expression Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Deqing; Jian, Xingxing; Zhang, Cheng; Hua, Qiang

    2016-06-08

    Genome-scale metabolic network models (GEMs) have played important roles in the design of genetically engineered strains and helped biologists to decipher metabolism. However, due to the complex gene-reaction relationships that exist in model systems, most algorithms have limited capabilities with respect to directly predicting accurate genetic design for metabolic engineering. In particular, methods that predict reaction knockout strategies leading to overproduction are often impractical in terms of gene manipulations. Recently, we proposed a method named LTM (logical transformation of model) to simplify the gene-reaction associations by introducing intermediate pseudo reactions, which makes it possible to generate genetic design. Here, we propose an alternative method to relieve researchers from deciphering complex gene-reactions by adding pseudo gene controlling reactions. In comparison to LTM, this new method introduces fewer pseudo reactions and generates a much smaller model system named as gModel. We showed that gModel allows two seldom reported applications: identification of minimal genomes and design of minimal cell factories within a modified OptKnock framework. In addition, gModel could be used to integrate expression data directly and improve the performance of the E-Fmin method for predicting fluxes. In conclusion, the model transformation procedure will facilitate genetic research based on GEMs, extending their applications.

  16. Attitudes towards genetic testing: analysis of contradictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jallinoja, P; Hakonen, A; Aro, A R

    1998-01-01

    A survey study was conducted among 1169 people to evaluate attitudes towards genetic testing in Finland. Here we present an analysis of the contradictions detected in people's attitudes towards genetic testing. This analysis focuses on the approval of genetic testing as an individual choice...... and on the confidence in control of the process of genetic testing and its implications. Our analysis indicated that some of the respondents have contradictory attitudes towards genetic testing. It is proposed that contradictory attitudes towards genetic testing should be given greater significance both in scientific...... studies on attitudes towards genetic testing as well as in the health care context, e.g. in genetic counselling....

  17. A genetic contribution to cooperation: dopamine-relevant genes are associated with social facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Nora T; Markett, Sebastian A; Montag, Christian; Reuter, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Social loafing and social facilitation are stable behavioral effects that describe increased or decreased motivation, as well as effort and cooperation in teamwork as opposed to individual working situations. Recent twin studies demonstrate the heritability of cooperative behavior. Brain imaging studies have shown that reciprocity, cooperativeness, and social rewards activate reward processing areas with strong dopaminergic input, such as the ventral striatum. Thus, candidate genes for social behavior are hypothesized to affect dopaminergic neurotransmission. In the present study, we investigated the dopaminergic genetic contribution to social cooperation, especially to social loafing and social facilitation. N = 106 healthy, Caucasian subjects participated in the study and were genotyped for three polymorphisms relevant to the dopaminergic system (COMTval158met, DRD2 c957t, DRD2 rs#2283265). In addition to a main effect indicating an increased performance in teamwork situations, we found a significant interaction between a haplotype block covering both DRD2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs#6277 and rs#2283265), henceforth referred to as the DRD2-haplotype block, and the COMT val158met polymorphism (rs#4680) with social facilitation. Carriers of the DRD2 CT-haplotype block and at least one Val-allele showed a greater increase in performance in teamwork settings when compared with carriers of the CT-haplotype block and the Met/Met-genotype. Our results suggest that epistasis between COMTval158met and the two DRD2 SNPs contributes to individual differences in cooperativeness in teamwork settings.

  18. Facilitation at single synapses probed with optical quantal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertner, Thomas G; Sabatini, Bernardo L; Nimchinsky, Esther A; Svoboda, Karel

    2002-07-01

    Many synapses can change their strength rapidly in a use-dependent manner, but the mechanisms of such short-term plasticity remain unknown. To understand these mechanisms, measurements of neurotransmitter release at single synapses are required. We probed transmitter release by imaging transient increases in [Ca(2+)] mediated by synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in individual dendritic spines of CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat brain slices, enabling quantal analysis at single synapses. We found that changes in release probability, produced by paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) or by manipulation of presynaptic adenosine receptors, were associated with changes in glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft, indicating that single synapses can release a variable amount of glutamate per action potential. The relationship between release probability and response size is consistent with a binomial model of vesicle release with several (>5) independent release sites per active zone, suggesting that multivesicular release contributes to facilitation at these synapses.

  19. Barriers and Facilitators for Utilization of Genetic Counseling and Risk Assessment Services in Young Female Breast Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Anderson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Women diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age are more likely to carry a cancer predisposing genetic mutation. Per the current NCCN recommendations, women diagnosed under age 50 should be referred to cancer genetic counseling for further risk evaluation. This study seeks to assess patient-reported barriers and facilitators to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment among a community-based population of young breast cancer survivors (YBCS. Methods. Through the Michigan Cancer Surveillance Program, a state-based cancer registry, 488 women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 50 in 2006-2007 were identified. They received a mail survey regarding family history and facilitators and barriers to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment. Results. Responses were received from 289 women (59.2%. One hundred twenty-two (42.2% reported having received cancer genetic counseling. The most frequent reason identified for receiving services was to benefit their family's future. The top reasons for not attending were “no one recommended it” and “medical insurance coverage issues.” Discussion. This study is the first published report using a state cancer registry to determine facilitators and barriers to receiving genetic counseling and risk assessment among YBCS. These findings demonstrate the need for additional awareness and education about appropriate indications for genetic services.

  20. Applying Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Genetics and CFTR2 Data to Facilitate Diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnay, Patrick R; Salinas, Danieli B; White, Terry B; Ren, Clement L; Farrell, Philip M; Raraigh, Karen S; Girodon, Emmanuelle; Castellani, Carlo

    2017-02-01

    As a Mendelian disease, genetics plays an integral role in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF). The identification of 2 disease-causing mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in an individual with a phenotype provides evidence that the disease is CF. However, not all variations in CFTR always result in CF. Therefore, for CFTR genotype to provide the same level of evidence of CFTR dysfunction as shown by direct tests such as sweat chloride or nasal potential difference, the mutations identified must be known to always result in CF. The use of CFTR genetics in CF diagnosis, therefore, relies heavily on mutation interpretation. Progress that has been made on mutation interpretation and annotation was reviewed at the recent CF Foundation Diagnosis Consensus Conference. A modified Delphi method was used to identify consensus statements on the use of genetic analysis in CF diagnosis. The largest recent advance in CF genetics has come through the Clinical and Functional Translation of CFTR (CFTR2) project. This undertaking seeks to characterize CFTR mutations from patients with CF around the world. The project also established guidelines for the clinical, functional, and population/penetrance criteria that can be used to interpret mutations not yet included in CFTR2's review. The use of CFTR genetics to aid in diagnosis of CF requires that the mutations identified have a known disease liability. The demonstration of 2 in trans mutations known to always result in CF is satisfactory evidence of CFTR dysfunction. However, if the identified mutations are known to be associated with variable outcomes, or have unknown consequence, that genotype may not result in a CF phenotype. In these cases, other tests of CFTR function may help. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team ... may play a role in triggering the disease. Genetic factors are also thought to play a role. ...

  2. Facilitating Neuron-Specific Genetic Manipulations in Drosophila melanogaster Using a Split GAL4 Repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Michael-John; Luan, Haojiang; Shropshire, William C; Sutcliffe, Ben; Cocanougher, Benjamin; Scott, Robert L; Frechter, Shahar; Zlatic, Marta; Jefferis, Gregory S X E; White, Benjamin H

    2017-06-01

    Efforts to map neural circuits have been galvanized by the development of genetic technologies that permit the manipulation of targeted sets of neurons in the brains of freely behaving animals. The success of these efforts relies on the experimenter's ability to target arbitrarily small subsets of neurons for manipulation, but such specificity of targeting cannot routinely be achieved using existing methods. In Drosophila melanogaster, a widely-used technique for refined cell type-specific manipulation is the Split GAL4 system, which augments the targeting specificity of the binary GAL4-UAS (Upstream Activating Sequence) system by making GAL4 transcriptional activity contingent upon two enhancers, rather than one. To permit more refined targeting, we introduce here the "Killer Zipper" (KZip(+)), a suppressor that makes Split GAL4 targeting contingent upon a third enhancer. KZip(+) acts by disrupting both the formation and activity of Split GAL4 heterodimers, and we show how this added layer of control can be used to selectively remove unwanted cells from a Split GAL4 expression pattern or to subtract neurons of interest from a pattern to determine their requirement in generating a given phenotype. To facilitate application of the KZip(+) technology, we have developed a versatile set of LexAop-KZip(+) fly lines that can be used directly with the large number of LexA driver lines with known expression patterns. KZip(+) significantly sharpens the precision of neuronal genetic control available in Drosophila and may be extended to other organisms where Split GAL4-like systems are used. Copyright © 2017 Dolan et al.

  3. Microsatellite data analysis for population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Seok; Sappington, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Theories and analytical tools of population genetics have been widely applied for addressing various questions in the fields of ecological genetics, conservation biology, and any context where the role of dispersal or gene flow is important. Underlying much of population genetics is the analysis of variation at selectively neutral marker loci, and microsatellites continue to be a popular choice of marker. In recent decades, software programs to estimate population genetics parameters have been developed at an increasing pace as computational science and theoretical knowledge advance. Numerous population genetics software programs are presently available to analyze microsatellite genotype data, but only a handful are commonly employed for calculating parameters such as genetic variation, genetic structure, patterns of spatial and temporal gene flow, population demography, individual population assignment, and genetic relationships within and between populations. In this chapter, we introduce statistical analyses and relevant population genetic software programs that are commonly employed in the field of population genetics and molecular ecology.

  4. Genetic analysis of haemophilia A in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kremensky Ivo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haemophilias are the most common hereditary severe disorders of blood clotting. In families afflicted with heamophilia, genetic analysis provides opportunities to prevent recurrence of the disease. This study establishes a diagnostical strategy for carriership determination and prenatal diagnostics of haemophilia A in Bulgarian haemophilic population. Methods A diagnostical strategy consisting of screening for most common mutations in the factor VIII gene and analysis of a panel of eight linked to the factor VIII gene locus polymorphisms was established. Results Polymorphic analysis for carrier status determination of haemophilia A was successful in 30 families out of 32 (94%. Carrier status was determined in 25 of a total of 28 women at risk (89%. Fourteen prenatal diagnoses in women at high risk of having a haemophilia A – affected child were performed, resulting in 6 healthy boys and 5 girls. Conclusion The compound approach proves to be a highly informative and cost-effective strategy for prevention of recurrence of haemophilia A in Bulgaria. DNA analysis facilitates carriership determination and subsequent prenatal diagnosis in the majority of Bulgarian families affected by haemophilia A.

  5. Knowledge base navigator facilitating regional analysis inter-tool communication.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampton, Jeffery Wade; Chael, Eric Paul; Hart, Darren M.; Merchant, Bion John; Chown, Matthew N.

    2004-08-01

    To make use of some portions of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Knowledge Base (KB) for which no current operational monitoring applications were available, Sandia National Laboratories have developed a set of prototype regional analysis tools (MatSeis, EventID Tool, CodaMag Tool, PhaseMatch Tool, Dendro Tool, Infra Tool, etc.), and we continue to maintain and improve these. Individually, these tools have proven effective in addressing specific monitoring tasks, but collectively their number and variety tend to overwhelm KB users, so we developed another application - the KB Navigator - to launch the tools and facilitate their use for real monitoring tasks. The KB Navigator is a flexible, extensible java application that includes a browser for KB data content, as well as support to launch any of the regional analysis tools. In this paper, we will discuss the latest versions of KB Navigator and the regional analysis tools, with special emphasis on the new overarching inter-tool communication methodology that we have developed to make the KB Navigator and the tools function together seamlessly. We use a peer-to-peer communication model, which allows any tool to communicate with any other. The messages themselves are passed as serialized XML, and the conversion from Java to XML (and vice versa) is done using Java Architecture for XML Binding (JAXB).

  6. Microsatellite data analysis for population genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theories and analytical tools of population genetics have been widely applied for addressing various questions in the fields of ecological genetics, conservation biology, and any context where the role of dispersal or gene flow is important. Underlying much of population genetics is the analysis of ...

  7. Genetic analysis of environmental variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hill, W.G.; Mulder, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    Environmental variation (VE) in a quantitative trait – variation in phenotype that cannot be explained by genetic variation or identifiable genetic differences – can be regarded as being under some degree of genetic control. Such variation may be either between repeated expressions of the same trait

  8. Genetic analysis of environmental variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hill, W.G.; Mulder, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    Environmental variation (VE) in a quantitative trait – variation in phenotype that cannot be explained by genetic variation or identifiable genetic differences – can be regarded as being under some degree of genetic control. Such variation may be either between repeated expressions of the same trait

  9. Genetic and Molecular Network Analysis of Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Robert W.; Mulligan, Megan K.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides an introduction into the genetic control and analysis of behavioral variation using powerful online resources. We introduce you to the new field of systems genetics using "case studies" drawn from the world of behavioral genetics that exploit populations of genetically diverse lines of mice. These lines differ very widely in patterns of gene and protein expression in the brain and in patterns of behavior. In this chapter we address the following set of related questions:...

  10. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF ABSCISIC ACID BIOSYNTHESIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCCARTY D R

    2012-01-10

    The carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCD) catalyze synthesis of a variety of apo-carotenoid secondary metabolites in plants, animals and bacteria. In plants, the reaction catalyzed by the 11, 12, 9-cis-epoxy carotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) is the first committed and key regulated step in synthesis of the plant hormone, abscisic acid (ABA). ABA is a key regulator of plant stress responses and has critical functions in normal root and seed development. The molecular mechanisms responsible for developmental control of ABA synthesis in plant tissues are poorly understood. Five of the nine CCD genes present in the Arabidopsis genome encode NCED's involved in control of ABA synthesis in the plant. This project is focused on functional analysis of these five AtNCED genes as a key to understanding developmental regulation of ABA synthesis and dissecting the role of ABA in plant development. For this purpose, the project developed a comprehensive set of gene knockouts in the AtNCED genes that facilitate genetic dissection of ABA synthesis. These mutants were used in combination with key molecular tools to address the following specific objectives: (1) the role of ABA synthesis in root development; (2) developmental control of ABA synthesis in seeds; (3) analysis of ATNCED over-expressers; (4) preliminary crystallography of the maize VP14 protein.

  11. An Analysis of Instructional Facilitators' Relationships with Teachers and Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Range, Bret G.; Pijanowski, John C.; Duncan, Heather; Scherz, Susan; Hvidston, David

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the perspectives of Wyoming instructional facilitators, concerning three coaching constructs--namely, their instructional leadership roles, teachers' instructional practices, and the support that they receive from principals and teachers. Findings suggest that instructional facilitators were positive about their instructional…

  12. Facilitating hydrological data analysis workflows in R: the RHydro package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buytaert, Wouter; Moulds, Simon; Skoien, Jon; Pebesma, Edzer; Reusser, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    The advent of new technologies such as web-services and big data analytics holds great promise for hydrological data analysis and simulation. Driven by the need for better water management tools, it allows for the construction of much more complex workflows, that integrate more and potentially more heterogeneous data sources with longer tool chains of algorithms and models. With the scientific challenge of designing the most adequate processing workflow comes the technical challenge of implementing the workflow with a minimal risk for errors. A wide variety of new workbench technologies and other data handling systems are being developed. At the same time, the functionality of available data processing languages such as R and Python is increasing at an accelerating pace. Because of the large diversity of scientific questions and simulation needs in hydrology, it is unlikely that one single optimal method for constructing hydrological data analysis workflows will emerge. Nevertheless, languages such as R and Python are quickly gaining popularity because they combine a wide array of functionality with high flexibility and versatility. The object-oriented nature of high-level data processing languages makes them particularly suited for the handling of complex and potentially large datasets. In this paper, we explore how handling and processing of hydrological data in R can be facilitated further by designing and implementing a set of relevant classes and methods in the experimental R package RHydro. We build upon existing efforts such as the sp and raster packages for spatial data and the spacetime package for spatiotemporal data to define classes for hydrological data (HydroST). In order to handle simulation data from hydrological models conveniently, a HM class is defined. Relevant methods are implemented to allow for an optimal integration of the HM class with existing model fitting and simulation functionality in R. Lastly, we discuss some of the design challenges

  13. Gene set analysis for interpreting genetic studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pers, Tune H

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation of genome-wide association study (GWAS) results is lacking behind the discovery of new genetic associations. Consequently, there is an urgent need for data-driven methods for interpreting genetic association studies. Gene set analysis (GSA) can identify aetiologic pathways and func......Interpretation of genome-wide association study (GWAS) results is lacking behind the discovery of new genetic associations. Consequently, there is an urgent need for data-driven methods for interpreting genetic association studies. Gene set analysis (GSA) can identify aetiologic pathways...

  14. Genetic diversity analysis in Piper species (Piperaceae) using RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sandeep; Skaria, Reby; Abdul Muneer, P M

    2010-09-01

    The genetic diversity of eight species of Piper (Piperaceae) viz., P. nigrum, P. longum, P. betle, P. chaba, P. argyrophyllum, P. trichostachyon, P. galeatum, and P. hymenophyllum from Kerala state, India were analyzed by Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Out of 22 10-mer RAPD primers screened, 11 were selected for comparative analysis of different species of Piper. High genetic variations were found among different Piper species studied. Among the total of 149 RAPD fragments amplified, 12 bands (8.05%) were found monomorphic in eight species. The remaining 137 fragments were found polymorphic (91.95%). Species-specific bands were found in all eight species studied. The average gene diversity or heterozygosity (H) was 0.33 across all the species, genetic distances ranged from 0.21 to 0.69. The results of this study will facilitate germplasm identification, management, and conservation.

  15. Genetic analysis of rare disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Berg, Stéphanie M; von Bornemann Hjelmborg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Twin concordance rates provide insight into the possibility of a genetic background for a disease. These concordance rates are usually estimated within a frequentistic framework. Here we take a Bayesian approach. For rare diseases, estimation methods based on asymptotic theory cannot be applied due...

  16. Isolation and preservation of schistosome eggs and larvae in RNAlater® facilitates genetic profiling of individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster Bonnie L

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although field-sampling procedures to capture gDNA from individual schistosome larval stages directly from their natural hosts exist, they do pose some technical and logistical challenges hampering certain epidemiological studies. The aim of this study was to develop, refine and evaluate an alternative methodology, which enables better preservation of large numbers of individual schistosome larval stages and eggs collected in low resource endemic areas, to provide PCR-quality DNA for multi-locus genetic analysis. The techniques reported here present simple and effective short-term field and long-term laboratory preservation and storage systems for individually sampled schistosome eggs and larval stages using a commercially available aqueous stabilisation reagent, RNAlater® eliminating the need for more cumbersome resources such as refrigerators, heaters and centrifuge equipment for immediate specimen processing. Adaptations to a general gDNA extraction method are described, that enables the acquisition of a gDNA extract (~50 μl, facilitating multiple molecular analyses of each sampled schistosome. The methodology provided PCR-quality mitochondrial and nuclear DNA from laboratory cercariae, miracidia and eggs that had been stored at up to 37°C for 2 weeks and at 4°C for 6 months and also from field collected samples. This present protocol provides significant epidemiological, ethical and practical advantages over existing sampling methods and has the potential to be transferred to studies on other organisms, especially where specimens are unable to be seen by the naked eye, are difficult to handle and need to be obtained from a field environment.

  17. Exploring the genetic counselor's role in facilitating meaning-making: rare disease diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Benjamin M

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of the constructivist meaning-making framework is to encourage grief adaptation through the search for meaning in loss. Strategies to help patients construct meaning from their experiences may lead to positive adaptation. This strategy has been used in contemporary grief counseling, but it may also be beneficial in the genetic counseling scenario. The diagnosis of a rare genetic disorder often has considerable psychosocial impact as patients and families describe feelings of isolation and hopelessness. Negative experiences with healthcare providers often reinforce these feelings. Genetic counselors continue to provide education and psychosocial support to patients and families with rare genetic disorders, and meaning-making strategies may provide a framework for which to help patients and families adapt to these challenging diagnoses. In this paper I explore the background of meaning-making counseling strategy and describe an experience in which it was used for counseling a family with a child with Mowat-Wilson syndrome. I show how a meaning-making framework can help families explore and construct meaning from their experiences and encourage positive adaptation. I also address the possible limitations of this strategy and the need to share additional experiences with this counseling framework. Meaning-making can be another tool for genetic counselors to help guide families in their grief and adaptation to rare disease diagnoses. I also describe qualities and aspects of counseling through the lens of meaning-making and stress the importance of addressing psychosocial dimensions of rare disease diagnoses.

  18. Integrated analysis of genetic data with R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jing

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic data are now widely available. There is, however, an apparent lack of concerted effort to produce software systems for statistical analysis of genetic data compared with other fields of statistics. It is often a tremendous task for end-users to tailor them for particular data, especially when genetic data are analysed in conjunction with a large number of covariates. Here, R http://www.r-project.org, a free, flexible and platform-independent environment for statistical modelling and graphics is explored as an integrated system for genetic data analysis. An overview of some packages currently available for analysis of genetic data is given. This is followed by examples of package development and practical applications. With clear advantages in data management, graphics, statistical analysis, programming, internet capability and use of available codes, it is a feasible, although challenging, task to develop it into an integrated platform for genetic analysis; this will require the joint efforts of many researchers.

  19. Logistics for Working Together to Facilitate Genomic/Quantitative Genetic Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incorporation of DNA tests into the national cattle evaluation system will require estimation of variances of and covariances among the additive genetic components of the DNA tests and the phenotypic traits they are intended to predict. Populations with both DNA test results and phenotypes will ...

  20. Event History Analysis in Quantitative Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maia, Rafael Pimentel

    Event history analysis is a clas of statistical methods specially designed to analyze time-to-event characteristics, e.g. the time until death. The aim of the thesis was to present adequate multivariate versions of mixed survival models that properly represent the genetic aspects related to a given...... time-to-event characteristic of interest. Real genetic longevity studies based on female animals of different species (sows, dairy cows, and sheep) exemplifies the use of the methods. Moreover these studies allow to understand som genetic mechanisms related to the lenght of the productive life...

  1. Rapid Genetic Analysis in Congenital Hyperinsulinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christesen, Henrik Thybo; Brusgaard, Klaus; Alm, Jan

    2007-01-01

    . METHODS: In 4 patients, a rapid genetic analysis of the ABBC8 and KCNJ11 genes was performed within 2 weeks on request prior to the decision of pancreatic surgery. RESULTS: Two patients had no mutations, rendering the genetic analysis non-informative. Peroperative multiple biopsies showed diffuse disease....... One patient had a paternal KCNJ11 mutation and focal disease confirmed by positron emission tomography scan and biopsies. One patient had a de novo heterozygous ABBC8 mutation and unexplained diffuse disease confirmed by positron emission tomography scan and biopsies. CONCLUSION: A rapid analysis...

  2. Facilitating the analysis of immunological data with visual analytic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, David C; Ho, Kevin C; Melnick, Kyle M; Rensink, Ronald A; Kollmann, Tobias R; Fortuno, Edgardo S

    2011-01-02

    Visual analytics (VA) has emerged as a new way to analyze large dataset through interactive visual display. We demonstrated the utility and the flexibility of a VA approach in the analysis of biological datasets. Examples of these datasets in immunology include flow cytometry, Luminex data, and genotyping (e.g., single nucleotide polymorphism) data. Contrary to the traditional information visualization approach, VA restores the analysis power in the hands of analyst by allowing the analyst to engage in real-time data exploration process. We selected the VA software called Tableau after evaluating several VA tools. Two types of analysis tasks analysis within and between datasets were demonstrated in the video presentation using an approach called paired analysis. Paired analysis, as defined in VA, is an analysis approach in which a VA tool expert works side-by-side with a domain expert during the analysis. The domain expert is the one who understands the significance of the data, and asks the questions that the collected data might address. The tool expert then creates visualizations to help find patterns in the data that might answer these questions. The short lag-time between the hypothesis generation and the rapid visual display of the data is the main advantage of a VA approach.

  3. Genetic, individual, and group facilitation of disease resistance in insect societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Rich, Noah; Spivak, Marla; Fefferman, Nina H; Starks, Philip T

    2009-01-01

    In this review, we provide a current reference on disease resistance in insect societies. We start with the genetics of immunity in the context of behavioral and physiological processes and scale up levels of biological organization until we reach populations. A significant component of this review focuses on Apis mellifera and its role as a model system for studies on social immunity. We additionally review the models that have been applied to disease transmission in social insects and elucidate areas for future study in the field of social immunity.

  4. [Collaborative study on regulatory science for facilitating clinical development of gene therapy products for genetic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Eriko; Igarashi, Yuka; Sato, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy products are expected as innovative medicinal products for intractable diseases such as life-threatening genetic diseases and cancer. Recently, clinical developments by pharmaceutical companies are accelerated in Europe and the United States, and the first gene therapy product in advanced countries was approved for marketing authorization by the European Commission in 2012. On the other hand, more than 40 clinical studies for gene therapy have been completed or ongoing in Japan, most of them are conducted as clinical researches by academic institutes, and few clinical trials have been conducted for approval of gene therapy products. In order to promote the development of gene therapy products, revision of the current guideline and/or preparation of concept paper to address the evaluation of the quality and safety of gene therapy products are necessary and desired to clearly show what data should be submitted before First-in-Human clinical trials of novel gene therapy products. We started collaborative study with academia and regulatory agency to promote regulatory science toward clinical development of gene therapy products for genetic diseases based on lentivirus and adeno-associated virus vectors; National Center for Child Health and Development (NCCHD), Nippon Medical School and PMDA have been joined in the task force. At first, we are preparing pre-draft of the revision of the current gene therapy guidelines in this project.

  5. Facilitating or Restraining Access To Genetic Resources? Procedural Dimensions In Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evanson Chege Kamau

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available States have the right to regulate access to biological resources subject to national legislations. Allowing, restricting or prohibiting access, however, requires a balance to avoid contravention of the objectives of the Convention on Biological Diversity. The Convention requires that, in regulating access, the measures adopted do not become a hindrance to access. In many instances, however, this has been the case. Overreaction to previous cases of bio-piracy and over-enthusiasm to tap into the benefits from discovered genetic resources have caused many provider countries to either over-regulate or extremely complicate access procedures, thus deterring access. In some instances, over-regulation and complex procedures are to be blamed on the users’ reluctance to collaborate with providers in minimising or eliminating abuse. Also, the need to protect certain rights over genetic resources or of an intellectual (property character, for example, might at times complicate regulation. While it is appreciated that such issues must also be taken into account in addressing and creating a balance in access and benefit sharing, a discussion embracing all these aspects cannot be captured within the ambit of this article. Focus is therefore laid on the procedural dimensions of access in Kenya and suggestions for improvement.

  6. Selection in a fluctuating environment leads to decreased genetic variation and facilitates the evolution of phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallsson, L R; Björklund, M

    2012-07-01

    Changes in the environment are expected to induce changes in the quantitative genetic variation, which influences the ability of a population to adapt to environmental change. Furthermore, environmental changes are not constant in time, but fluctuate. Here, we investigate the effect of rapid, continuous and/or fluctuating temperature changes in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, using an evolution experiment followed by a split-brood experiment. In line with expectations, individuals responded in a plastic way and had an overall higher potential to respond to selection after a rapid change in the environment. After selection in an environment with increasing temperature, plasticity remained unchanged (or decreased) and environmental variation decreased, especially when fluctuations were added; these results were unexpected. As expected, the genetic variation decreased after fluctuating selection. Our results suggest that fluctuations in the environment have major impact on the response of a population to environmental change; in a highly variable environment with low predictability, a plastic response might not be beneficial and the response is genetically and environmentally canalized resulting in a low potential to respond to selection and low environmental sensitivity. Interestingly, we found greater variation for phenotypic plasticity after selection, suggesting that the potential for plasticity to evolve is facilitated after exposure to environmental fluctuations. Our study highlights that environmental fluctuations should be considered when investigating the response of a population to environmental change.

  7. Phred-Phrap package to analyses tools: a pipeline to facilitate population genetics re-sequencing studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Moara

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted re-sequencing is one of the most powerful and widely used strategies for population genetics studies because it allows an unbiased screening for variation that is suitable for a wide variety of organisms. Examples of studies that require re-sequencing data are evolutionary inferences, epidemiological studies designed to capture rare polymorphisms responsible for complex traits and screenings for mutations in families and small populations with high incidences of specific genetic diseases. Despite the advent of next-generation sequencing technologies, Sanger sequencing is still the most popular approach in population genetics studies because of the widespread availability of automatic sequencers based on capillary electrophoresis and because it is still less prone to sequencing errors, which is critical in population genetics studies. Two popular software applications for re-sequencing studies are Phred-Phrap-Consed-Polyphred, which performs base calling, alignment, graphical edition and genotype calling and DNAsp, which performs a set of population genetics analyses. These independent tools are the start and end points of basic analyses. In between the use of these tools, there is a set of basic but error-prone tasks to be performed with re-sequencing data. Results In order to assist with these intermediate tasks, we developed a pipeline that facilitates data handling typical of re-sequencing studies. Our pipeline: (1 consolidates different outputs produced by distinct Phred-Phrap-Consed contigs sharing a reference sequence; (2 checks for genotyping inconsistencies; (3 reformats genotyping data produced by Polyphred into a matrix of genotypes with individuals as rows and segregating sites as columns; (4 prepares input files for haplotype inferences using the popular software PHASE; and (5 handles PHASE output files that contain only polymorphic sites to reconstruct the inferred haplotypes including polymorphic and

  8. An integrated system for genetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Xiao

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale genetic mapping projects require data management systems that can handle complex phenotypes and detect and correct high-throughput genotyping errors, yet are easy to use. Description We have developed an Integrated Genotyping System (IGS to meet this need. IGS securely stores, edits and analyses genotype and phenotype data. It stores information about DNA samples, plates, primers, markers and genotypes generated by a genotyping laboratory. Data are structured so that statistical genetic analysis of both case-control and pedigree data is straightforward. Conclusion IGS can model complex phenotypes and contain genotypes from whole genome association studies. The database makes it possible to integrate genetic analysis with data curation. The IGS web site http://bioinformatics.well.ox.ac.uk/project-igs.shtml contains further information.

  9. Examining strategies to facilitate vitamin B1 biofortification of plants by genetic engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucille ePourcel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Thiamin (vitamin B1 is made by plants and microorganisms but is an essential micronutrient in the human diet. All organisms require it as a cofactor in its form as thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP for the activity of key enzymes of central metabolism. In humans, deficiency is widespread particularly in populations where polished rice is a major component of the diet. Considerable progress has been made on the elucidation of the biosynthesis pathway within the last few years enabling concrete strategies for biofortification purposes to be devised, with a particular focus here on genetic engineering. Furthermore, the vitamin has been shown to play a role in both abiotic and biotic stress responses. The precursors for de novo biosynthesis of thiamin differ between microorganisms and plants. Bacteria use intermediates derived from purine and isoprenoid biosynthesis, whereas the pathway in yeast involves the use of compounds from the vitamin B3 and B6 groups. Plants on the other hand use a combination of the bacterial and yeast pathways and there is subcellular partitioning of the biosynthesis steps. Specifically, thiamin biosynthesis occurs in the chloroplast of plants through the separate formation of the pyrimidine and thiazole moieties, which are then coupled to form thiamin monophosphate (TMP. Phosphorylation of thiamin to form TPP occurs in the cytosol. Therefore, thiamin (or TMP must be exported from the chloroplast to the cytosol for the latter step to be executed. The regulation of biosynthesis is mediated through riboswitches, where binding of the product TPP to the pre-mRNA of a biosynthetic gene modulates expression. Here we examine and hypothesize on genetic engineering approaches attempting to increase the thiamin content employing knowledge gained with the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We will discuss the regulatory steps that need to be taken into consideration and can be used a prerequisite for devising such strategies in crop plants.

  10. Analysis of Genetic diversity and reltionships in local Tunisian barley ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    Key words: Barley, RAPD markers, SSR markers, genetic diversity. INTRODUCTION. Barley ... surveyed by each kind of marker, their distribution ..... that belong to the Center. ..... tagged-site facilitated PCR for barley genome mapping. Theor.

  11. Employing Power Graph Analysis to Facilitate Modeling Molecular Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momchil Nenov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling is used to explore and understand complex systems ranging from weather patterns to social networks to gene-expression regulatory mechanisms. There is an upper limit to the amount of details that can be reflected in a model imposed by finite computational resources. Thus, there are methods to reduce the complexity of the modeled system to its most significant parameters. We discuss the suitability of clustering techniques, in particular Power Graph Analysis as an intermediate step of modeling.

  12. Optimization of genetic analysis for single cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hussein mouawia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The molecular genetic analysis of microdissected cells by laser, a method for selecting a starting material of pure DNA or RNA uncontaminated. Our study focuses on technical pre-PCR (polymerase chain reaction for the amplification of DNA from a single cell (leukocyte isolated from human blood after laser microdissection and aims to optimize the yield of DNA extracted of this cell to be amplified without errors and provide reliable genetic analyzes. This study has allowed us to reduce the duration of cell lysis in order to perform the step of expanding genomic PEP (primer extension preamplification directly after lysis the same day and the quality of genomic amplification and eliminate purification step of the product PEP, step with a risk of contamination and risk of loss of genetic material related to manipulation. This approach has shown that the combination of at least 3 STR (short tandem repeat markers for genetic analysis of single cell improves the efficiency and accuracy of PCR and minimizes the loss of allele (allele drop out; ADO. This protocol can be applied to large scale and an effective means suitable for genetic testing for molecular diagnostic from isolated single cell (cancerous - fetal.

  13. Information delivery manuals to facilitate it supported energy analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondrup, Thomas Fænø; Karlshøj, Jan; Vestergaard, Flemming

    In response to continuing Building Information Modeling (BIM) progress, building performance simulation tools such as IESVE are being utilized to explore construction projects and influence design decisions with increasing frequency. To maximize the potential of these tools, a specification...... of information exchange and digital workflows is required. This paper presents the preliminary findings of an ongoing study aimed at developing an Information Delivery Manual (IDM) for IT supported energy analysis at concept design phase. The IDM development is based on: (1) a review of current approaches (2...

  14. Surface acoustic wave nebulization facilitating lipid mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung Hwan; Huang, Yue; Edgar, J Scott; Ting, Ying S; Heron, Scott R; Kao, Yuchieh; Li, Yanyan; Masselon, Christophe D; Ernst, Robert K; Goodlett, David R

    2012-08-07

    Surface acoustic wave nebulization (SAWN) is a novel method to transfer nonvolatile analytes directly from the aqueous phase to the gas phase for mass spectrometric analysis. The lower ion energetics of SAWN and its planar nature make it appealing for analytically challenging lipid samples. This challenge is a result of their amphipathic nature, labile nature, and tendency to form aggregates, which readily precipitate clogging capillaries used for electrospray ionization (ESI). Here, we report the use of SAWN to characterize the complex glycolipid, lipid A, which serves as the membrane anchor component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and has a pronounced tendency to clog nano-ESI capillaries. We also show that unlike ESI SAWN is capable of ionizing labile phospholipids without fragmentation. Lastly, we compare the ease of use of SAWN to the more conventional infusion-based ESI methods and demonstrate the ability to generate higher order tandem mass spectral data of lipid A for automated structure assignment using our previously reported hierarchical tandem mass spectrometry (HiTMS) algorithm. The ease of generating SAWN-MS(n) data combined with HiTMS interpretation offers the potential for high throughput lipid A structure analysis.

  15. TriMEDB: A database to integrate transcribed markers and facilitate genetic studies of the tribe Triticeae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida Takuhiro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent rapid accumulation of sequence resources of various crop species ensures an improvement in the genetics approach, including quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis as well as the holistic population analysis and association mapping of natural variations. Because the tribe Triticeae includes important cereals such as wheat and barley, integration of information on the genetic markers in these crops should effectively accelerate map-based genetic studies on Triticeae species and lead to the discovery of key loci involved in plant productivity, which can contribute to sustainable food production. Therefore, informatics applications and a semantic knowledgebase of genome-wide markers are required for the integration of information on and further development of genetic markers in wheat and barley in order to advance conventional marker-assisted genetic analyses and population genomics of Triticeae species. Description The Triticeae mapped expressed sequence tag (EST database (TriMEDB provides information, along with various annotations, regarding mapped cDNA markers that are related to barley and their homologues in wheat. The current version of TriMEDB provides map-location data for barley and wheat ESTs that were retrieved from 3 published barley linkage maps (the barley single nucleotide polymorphism database of the Scottish Crop Research Institute, the barley transcript map of Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, and HarvEST barley ver. 1.63 and 1 diploid wheat map. These data were imported to CMap to allow the visualization of the map positions of the ESTs and interrelationships of these ESTs with public gene models and representative cDNA sequences. The retrieved cDNA sequences corresponding to each EST marker were assigned to the rice genome to predict an exon-intron structure. Furthermore, to generate a unique set of EST markers in Triticeae plants among the public domain, 3472 markers were

  16. Strategies for Integrated Analysis of Genetic, Epigenetic, and Gene Expression Variation in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Louise B; Andersen, Lars; Makalic, Enes

    2016-01-01

    The development and progression of cancer, a collection of diseases with complex genetic architectures, is facilitated by the interplay of multiple etiological factors. This complexity challenges the traditional single-platform study design and calls for an integrated approach to data analysis. H...

  17. Strategies for Integrated Analysis of Genetic, Epigenetic, and Gene Expression Variation in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Louise B; Andersen, Lars; Makalic, Enes

    2016-01-01

    The development and progression of cancer, a collection of diseases with complex genetic architectures, is facilitated by the interplay of multiple etiological factors. This complexity challenges the traditional single-platform study design and calls for an integrated approach to data analysis. H...

  18. Boosting Principal Component Analysis by Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Somvanshi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method of feature extraction by combining principal component analysis and genetic algorithm. Use of multiple pre-processors in combination with principal component analysis generates alternate feature spaces for data representation. The present method works out the fusion of these multiple spaces to create higher dimensionality feature vectors. The fused feature vectors are given chromosome representation by taking feature components to be genes. Then these feature vectors are allowed to undergo genetic evolution individually. For genetic algorithm, initial population is created by calculating probability distance matrix, and by applying a probability distance metric such that all the genes which lie farther than a defined threshold are tripped to zero. The genetic evolution of fused feature vector brings out most significant feature components (genes as survivours. A measure of significance is adapted on the basis of frequency of occurrence of the surviving genes in the current population. Finally, the feature vector is obtained by weighting the original feature components in proportion to their significance. The present algorithm is validated in combination with a neural network classifier based on error backpropagation algorithm, and by analysing a number of benchmark datasets available in the open sources.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(4, pp.392-398, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.495

  19. Developing Molecular Genetic Tools to Facilitate Economic Production in Green Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    Galactosidase ( Lactobacillus acidophilus ) 480 ± 340 mU/mg 0 1.7 ± 1 mU/mg α-Galactosidase (Trichoderma reesei) 980 ± 200 mU/mg 10 ± 2 mU/mg 580 ± 260...from Lactobaccilus acidophilus and one from T. reesei; a phytase from E. coli, and a phosphatase from C. crescentus (Figure 2). These enzymes were...blot analysis. wt = wild-type; 1 = Xylanase from T. reesei; 2 = manannase from A. sulphureus; 3 = α-galctosidase from L. acidophilus ; 4 = α

  20. Survival analysis with incomplete genetic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D Y

    2014-01-01

    Genetic data are now collected frequently in clinical studies and epidemiological cohort studies. For a large study, it may be prohibitively expensive to genotype all study subjects, especially with the next-generation sequencing technology. Two-phase sampling, such as case-cohort and nested case-control sampling, is cost-effective in such settings but entails considerable analysis challenges, especially if efficient estimators are desired. Another type of missing data arises when the investigators are interested in the haplotypes or the genetic markers that are not on the genotyping platform used for the current study. Valid and efficient analysis of such missing data is also interesting and challenging. This article provides an overview of these issues and outlines some directions for future research.

  1. Genetic Analysis of Nitroaromatic Degradation by Clostridium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    REPORT Final Report on Genetic Analysis of Nitroaromatic Degradation by Clostridium 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene...Among different microorganisms that act in TNT biodegradation, clostridium species were distinguished for their rapid degradation rate. Here we compared...TERMS clostridium , TNT, genes, electron carriers, metabolism George N. Bennett William Marsh Rice University Office of Sponsored Research 6100 Main St

  2. A haploid genetic screen identifies the major facilitator domain containing 2A (MFSD2A) transporter as a key mediator in the response to tunicamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiling, Jan H; Clish, Clary B; Carette, Jan E; Varadarajan, Malini; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Sabatini, David M

    2011-07-19

    Tunicamycin (TM) inhibits eukaryotic asparagine-linked glycosylation, protein palmitoylation, ganglioside production, proteoglycan synthesis, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase activity, and cell wall biosynthesis in bacteria. Treatment of cells with TM elicits endoplasmic reticulum stress and activates the unfolded protein response. Although widely used in laboratory settings for many years, it is unknown how TM enters cells. Here, we identify in an unbiased genetic screen a transporter of the major facilitator superfamily, major facilitator domain containing 2A (MFSD2A), as a critical mediator of TM toxicity. Cells without MFSD2A are TM-resistant, whereas MFSD2A-overexpressing cells are hypersensitive. Hypersensitivity is associated with increased cellular TM uptake concomitant with an enhanced endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Furthermore, MFSD2A mutant analysis reveals an important function of the C terminus for correct intracellular localization and protein stability, and it identifies transmembrane helical amino acid residues essential for mediating TM sensitivity. Overall, our data uncover a critical role for MFSD2A by acting as a putative TM transporter at the plasma membrane.

  3. An automatic scanning method for high throughput microscopic system to facilitate medical genetic diagnosis: an initial study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Zheng; Li, Yuhua; Chen, Wei R.; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Liu, Hong

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report a new automatic scanning scheme for high throughput microscopic systems aiming to facilitate disease diagnosis in genetic laboratories. To minimize the impact of the random vibration and mechanical drifting of the scanning stage in microscopic image acquisition, auto-focusing operations are usually applied repeatedly during the scanning process. Such methods ensure the acquisition of well focused images for clinical diagnosis, but are time consuming. The technique investigated in this preliminary study applies the auto-focusing operations at a limited number of locations on the slide. For the rest of the imaging field, the focusing position is quickly adjusted through linear interpolation. In this initial validation study, blood pathological slides containing both metaphase and interphase cells are scanned. For a selected area of 6.9mm×6.9mm, a number of 2×2, 3×2, 3×3, and 4×4 positions are evenly sampled for auto-focusing operations. Respectively, 25, 29, 40, and 41 clinically meaningful cells are identified for each sampling scheme. For the specific case investigated, the results demonstrate that the 4 position auto-focusing scheme could obtain the adequate number of clinically meaningful cells for the diagnosis. The schemes with more auto-focusing operations provide an option for high reliability diagnosis when clinically necessary. More comprehensive research is planned, and that may lead to optimal design of trade-off for developing the scanning scheme of the high throughput microscopic systems.

  4. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF BLACK SLAVONIAN PIG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Margeta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pairs (18 of microsatelite primers were used in this study to detect the genetic relationship within Black Slavonian Pig and between Turopolje Pig, Mangalitsa breed and Croatian Wild Pigs. The second goal of this study was to determine phylogenetic relationships among these breeds and some Asian and European pigs using the mtDNA D-loop sequence polymorphism. The third goal was to determine the MC1R genotype of Black Slavonian pigs and to find an efficient and simple PCR-RFLP method, based on differences in MC1R genotype, to distinguish between purebred Black Slavonian pigs and their crossings with commercial pig breeds and Wild Boars. Aiming to conduct microsatellite analysis each animal was genotyped for 18 microsatelite markers, chosen based on their quality, size, polymorphism and location on the porcine genome as proposed by the FAO. Two pairs of primers amplified a 511-bp fragment of control region between sites 15 390 and 15 900 (Mit1.F and Mit1.R and a 810-bp fragment between sites 15 825 and 16 634 (Mit2.F and Mi2.R were genotyped for mtDNA. Two primer pairs were used to amplify the majority of the single exon of MC1R gene aiming to determinate MC1R genotype of Black Slavonian pig. The first pair of primers, MERL1 and EPIG2, was used to amplify a 428-bp product from the 5’ half of the exon, whereas EPIG1 and EPIG3 amplified a 405-bp product from the 3’ half. Our results showed that the 18 microsatellites used in this study were useful markers to study genetic diversity among Croatian autochthonous pig breeds. This set of microsatellites may be used for identifying individuals and for genetic diversity studies for selection and conservation of the Black Slavonian pig, Turopolje pig and Mangalitsa breed. Genetic distances between populations made with Principal Component Analysis (PCA method noticed that studied populations are mostly clearly geneticaly defined. mtDNA analysis suggested that Black Slavonian and Turopolje pig showed

  5. A meta-analysis of plant facilitation in coastal dune systems: responses, regions, and research gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanho, Camila de Toledo; Lortie, Christopher J; Zaitchik, Benjamin; Prado, Paulo Inácio

    2015-01-01

    Empirical studies in salt marshes, arid, and alpine systems support the hypothesis that facilitation between plants is an important ecological process in severe or 'stressful' environments. Coastal dunes are both abiotically stressful and frequently disturbed systems. Facilitation has been documented, but the evidence to date has not been synthesized. We did a systematic review with meta-analysis to highlight general research gaps in the study of plant interactions in coastal dunes and examine if regional and local factors influence the magnitude of facilitation in these systems. The 32 studies included in the systematic review were done in coastal dunes located in 13 countries around the world but the majority was in the temperate zone (63%). Most of the studies adopt only an observational approach to make inferences about facilitative interactions, whereas only 28% of the studies used both observational and experimental approaches. Among the factors we tested, only geographic region mediates the occurrence of facilitation more broadly in coastal dune systems. The presence of a neighbor positively influenced growth and survival in the tropics, whereas in temperate and subartic regions the effect was neutral for both response variables. We found no evidence that climatic and local factors, such as life-form and life stage of interacting plants, affect the magnitude of facilitation in coastal dunes. Overall, conclusions about plant facilitation in coastal dunes depend on the response variable measured and, more broadly, on the geographic region examined. However, the high variability and the limited number of studies, especially in tropical region, indicate we need to be cautious in the generalization of the conclusions. Anyway, coastal dunes provide an important means to explore topical issues in facilitation research including context dependency, local versus regional drivers of community structure, and the importance of gradients in shaping the outcome of net

  6. A genetic epidemiological mega analysis of smoking initiation in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maes, H.H.; Prom-Wormley, E.; Eaves, L.J.; Rhee, S.H.; Hewitt, J.K.; Young, S.; Corley, R.; McGue, M.K.; Iacono, W.G.; Legrand, L.; Samek, D.; Murrelle, E.L.; Silberg, J.L.; Miles, D.; Schieken, R.M.; Beunen, G.P.; Thomis, M.; Rose, R.J.; Dick, D.M.; Boomsma, D.I.; Bartels, M.; Vink, J.M.; Lichtenstein, P.; White, V.; Kaprio, J.; Neale, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Previous studies in adolescents were not adequately powered to accurately disentangle genetic and environmental influences on smoking initiation across adolescence. Methods. Mega-analysis of pooled genetically informative data on smoking initiation was performed, with structural

  7. A Generalized Genetic Random Field Method for the Genetic Association Analysis of Sequencing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; He, Zihuai; Zhang, Min; Zhan, Xiaowei; Wei, Changshuai; Elston, Robert C.; Lu, Qing

    2017-01-01

    With the advance of high-throughput sequencing technologies, it has become feasible to investigate the influence of the entire spectrum of sequencing variations on complex human diseases. Although association studies utilizing the new sequencing technologies hold great promise to unravel novel genetic variants, especially rare genetic variants that contribute to human diseases, the statistical analysis of high-dimensional sequencing data remains a challenge. Advanced analytical methods are in great need to facilitate high-dimensional sequencing data analyses. In this article, we propose a generalized genetic random field (GGRF) method for association analyses of sequencing data. Like other similarity-based methods (e.g., SIMreg and SKAT), the new method has the advantages of avoiding the need to specify thresholds for rare variants and allowing for testing multiple variants acting in different directions and magnitude of effects. The method is built on the generalized estimating equation framework and thus accommodates a variety of disease phenotypes (e.g., quantitative and binary phenotypes). Moreover, it has a nice asymptotic property, and can be applied to small-scale sequencing data without need for small-sample adjustment. Through simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed GGRF attains an improved or comparable power over a commonly used method, SKAT, under various disease scenarios, especially when rare variants play a significant role in disease etiology. We further illustrate GGRF with an application to a real dataset from the Dallas Heart Study. By using GGRF, we were able to detect the association of two candidate genes, ANGPTL3 and ANGPTL4, with serum triglyceride. PMID:24482034

  8. Inbreeding and genetic diversity in dogs: results from DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Claire M

    2011-08-01

    This review assesses evidence from DNA analysis to determine whether there is sufficient genetic diversity within breeds to ensure that populations are sustainable in the absence of cross breeding and to determine whether genetic diversity is declining. On average, dog breeds currently retain approximately 87% of the available domestic canine genetic diversity. Requirements that breeding stock must be 'clear' for all genetic disorders may firstly place undue genetic pressure on animals tested as being 'clear' of known genetic disorders, secondly may contribute to loss of diversity and thirdly may result in the dissemination of new recessive disorders for which no genetic tests are available. Global exchange of genetic material may hasten the loss of alleles and this practice should be discussed in relation to the current effective population size of a breed and its expected future popularity. Genomic data do not always support the results from pedigree analysis and possible reasons for this are discussed.

  9. Potential of Microsatellites Markers for the Genetic Analysis of Bryophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumy PANDEY

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellites have increasingly being used to study genetic diversity, phylogeny, population genetics, population ecology and genetic mapping of bryophytes. Due to co-dominant and highly reproducible features, microsatellites became markers of choice for several genetic analyses of bryophytes. However, the major limitation is de novo isolation of microsatellites from the interest species which were studied and gave genomic libraries. Initially, traditional methods of microsatellite development were tedious and time consuming, but due to the sequencing of several bryophytes available in public databases, advancement in PCR technologies and computer software, have cumulatively facilitated the development of microsatellites for bryophytes study. This review examines the features, strategies for the development of microsatellites and their utilization in many aspects of genetic and ecological studies of bryophytes.

  10. Toward genetics-based virus taxonomy: comparative analysis of a genetics-based classification and the taxonomy of picornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Chris; Gorbalenya, Alexander E

    2012-04-01

    Virus taxonomy has received little attention from the research community despite its broad relevance. In an accompanying paper (C. Lauber and A. E. Gorbalenya, J. Virol. 86:3890-3904, 2012), we have introduced a quantitative approach to hierarchically classify viruses of a family using pairwise evolutionary distances (PEDs) as a measure of genetic divergence. When applied to the six most conserved proteins of the Picornaviridae, it clustered 1,234 genome sequences in groups at three hierarchical levels (to which we refer as the "GENETIC classification"). In this study, we compare the GENETIC classification with the expert-based picornavirus taxonomy and outline differences in the underlying frameworks regarding the relation of virus groups and genetic diversity that represent, respectively, the structure and content of a classification. To facilitate the analysis, we introduce two novel diagrams. The first connects the genetic diversity of taxa to both the PED distribution and the phylogeny of picornaviruses. The second depicts a classification and the accommodated genetic diversity in a standardized manner. Generally, we found striking agreement between the two classifications on species and genus taxa. A few disagreements concern the species Human rhinovirus A and Human rhinovirus C and the genus Aphthovirus, which were split in the GENETIC classification. Furthermore, we propose a new supergenus level and universal, level-specific PED thresholds, not reached yet by many taxa. Since the species threshold is approached mostly by taxa with large sampling sizes and those infecting multiple hosts, it may represent an upper limit on divergence, beyond which homologous recombination in the six most conserved genes between two picornaviruses might not give viable progeny.

  11. Methods for genetic linkage analysis using trisomies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feingold, E. [Emory Univ. School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lamb, N.E.; Sherman, S.L. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Certain genetic disorders are rare in the general population, but more common in individuals with specific trisomies. Examples of this include leukemia and duodenal atresia in trisomy 21. This paper presents a linkage analysis method for using trisomic individuals to map genes for such traits. It is based on a very general gene-specific dosage model that posits that the trait is caused by specific effects of different alleles at one or a few loci and that duplicate copies of {open_quotes}susceptibility{close_quotes} alleles inherited from the nondisjoining parent give increased likelihood of having the trait. Our mapping method is similar to identity-by-descent-based mapping methods using affected relative pairs and also to methods for mapping recessive traits using inbred individuals by looking for markers with greater than expected homozygosity by descent. In the trisomy case, one would take trisomic individuals and look for markers with greater than expected homozygosity in the chromosomes inherited from the nondisjoining parent. We present statistical methods for performing such a linkage analysis, including a test for linkage to a marker, a method for estimating the distance from the marker to the trait gene, a confidence interval for that distance, and methods for computing power and sample sizes. We also resolve some practical issues involved in implementing the methods, including how to use partially informative markers and how to test candidate genes. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Genetic analysis of captive proboscis monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Mitsuaki; Seino, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Information on the genetic relationships of captive founders is important for captive population management. In this study, we investigated DNA polymorphisms of four microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial control region sequence of five proboscis monkeys residing in a Japanese zoo as captive founders, to clarify their genetic relationship. We found that two of the five monkeys appeared to be genetically related. Furthermore, the haplotypes of the mitochondrial control region of the five monkeys were well differentiated from the haplotypes previously reported from wild populations from the northern area of Borneo, indicating a greater amount of genetic diversity in proboscis monkeys than previously reported. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. WWW portal usage analysis using genetic algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Popelka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes a new method suitable for advanced analysis of web portal visits. This is part of retrieving information and knowledge from web usage data (web usage mining. Such information is necessary in order to gain better insight into visitor’s needs and generally consumer behaviour. By le­ve­ra­ging this information a company can optimize the organization of its internet presentations and offer a better end-user experience. The proposed approach is using Grammatical evolution which is computational method based on genetic algorithms. Grammatical evolution is using a context-free grammar in order to generate the solution in arbitrary reusable form. This allows us to describe visitors’ behaviour in different manners depending on desired further processing. In this article we use description with a procedural programming language. Web server access log files are used as source data.The extraction of behaviour patterns can currently be solved using statistical analysis – specifically sequential analysis based methods. Our objective is to develop an alternative algorithm.The article further describes the basic algorithms of two-level grammatical evolution; this involves basic Grammatical Evolution and Differential Evolution, which forms the second phase of the computation. Grammatical evolution is used to generate the basic structure of the solution – in form of a part of application code. Differential evolution is used to find optimal parameters for this solution – the specific pages visited by a random visitor. The grammar used to conduct experiments is described along with explanations of the links to the actual implementation of the algorithm. Furthermore the fitness function is described and reasons which yield to its’ current shape. Finally the process of analyzing and filtering the raw input data is described as it is vital part in obtaining reasonable results.

  14. Professional support as a facilitator to the development of Iranian nurses' clinical judgment: A content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidi, Jamal; Alhani, Fatemeh; Salsali, Mahvash

    2014-02-01

    Nurses' clinical judgment development is essential for the professional nursing practice. The aim of this study was to explore the facilitators to the development of Iranian nurses' clinical judgment. A qualitative design using conventional content analysis method was employed in the study. A purposive sample of 24 participants was recruited from three hospitals located at Sanandaj, Iran. Study data were collected in 2013 by using semi-structured individual interviews. A content analysis approach was used to analyze the study data and MAXQDA was used for coding and categorizing the data. The main theme of the study was "professional support as a facilitator to the development of nurse's clinical judgment." The sub-themes of this main theme included "provision of direct support to nurses" and "provision of clinical judgment resources." The first sub-theme consisted of different types of managerial, clinical, educational, and social supports. The two categories of the second sub-theme included the provision of necessary clinical evidence and the provision of medical equipments. The study findings highlighted the importance of providing nurses with adequate professional support for facilitating the development of their clinical judgment.

  15. Developments in statistical analysis in quantitative genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    A remarkable research impetus has taken place in statistical genetics since the last World Conference. This has been stimulated by breakthroughs in molecular genetics, automated data-recording devices and computer-intensive statistical methods. The latter were revolutionized by the bootstrap and ...

  16. COMPARITIVE GENETIC DIVERSITY ANALYSIS OF OAT (Avena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    knsccf

    Equivalence was appraised between phenotypic and molecular markers (ISSR) to analyze the genetic diversity of 20 ... Country of origin. Pedigree ... explain between and within geographical variation and granting ..... JM (2008). Development of PCR-based SCAR and ... Genetic. Resources and Crop Evolution, 56:465–480.

  17. Longitudinal Genetic Analysis of Anxiety Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavos, Helena M. S.; Gregory, Alice M.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity is associated with both anxiety and depression and has been shown to be heritable. Little, however, is known about the role of genetic influence on continuity and change of symptoms over time. The authors' aim was to examine the stability of anxiety sensitivity during adolescence. By using a genetically sensitive design, the…

  18. Methods for genetic linkage analysis using trisomies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feingold, E.; Lamb, N.E.; Sherman, S.L. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Certain genetic disorders (e.g. congenital cataracts, duodenal atresia) are rare in the general population, but more common in people with Down`s syndrome. We present a method for using individuals with trisomy 21 to map genes for such traits. Our methods are analogous to methods for mapping autosomal dominant traits using affected relative pairs by looking for markers with greater than expected identity-by-descent. In the trisomy case, one would take trisomic individuals and look for markers with greater than expected reduction to homozygosity in the chromosomes inherited form the non-disjoining parent. We present statistical methods for performing such a linkage analysis, including a test for linkage to a marker, a method for estimating the distance from the marker to the gene, a confidence interval for that distance, and methods for computing power and sample sizes. The methods are described in the context of gene-dosage model for the etiology of the disorder, but can be extended to other models. We also resolve some practical issues involved in implementing the methods, including how to use partially informative markers, how to test candidate genes, and how to handle the effect of reduced recombination associated with maternal meiosis I non-disjunction.

  19. Non-genetic variance in pigs: genetic analysis of reproduction and production traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sell-Kubiak, E.B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sell-Kubiak, E. (2015). Non-genetic variance in pigs: genetic analysis of reproduction and production traits. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, The Netherlands The main objective of this thesis was to study the origin of random variance in reproduction and production trait

  20. Genetic analysis of the Venezuelan Criollo horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cothran, E G; Canelon, J L; Luis, C; Conant, E; Juras, R

    2011-10-07

    Various horse populations in the Americas have an origin in Spain; they are remnants of the first livestock introduced to the continent early in the colonial period (16th and 17th centuries). We evaluated genetic variability within the Venezuelan Criollo horse and its relationship with other horse breeds. We observed high levels of genetic diversity within the Criollo breed. Significant population differentiation was observed between all South American breeds. The Venezuelan Criollo horse showed high levels of genetic diversity, and from a conservation standpoint, there is no immediate danger of losing variation unless there is a large drop in population size.

  1. A Drosophila melanogaster cell line (S2) facilitates post-genome functional analysis of receptors and ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towers, Paula R; Sattelle, David B

    2002-11-01

    The complete sequencing of the genome of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster offers the prospect of detailed functional analysis of the extensive gene families in this genetic model organism. Comprehensive functional analysis of family members is facilitated by access to a robust, stable and inducible expression system in a fly cell line. Here we show how the Schneider S2 cell line, derived from the Drosophila embryo, provides such an expression system, with the bonus that radioligand binding studies, second messenger assays, ion imaging, patch-clamp electrophysiology and gene silencing can readily be applied. Drosophila is also ideal for the study of new control strategies for insect pests since the receptors and ion channels that many new animal health drugs and crop protection chemicals target can be expressed in this cell line. In addition, many useful orthologues of human disease genes are emerging from the Drosophila genome and the study of their functions and interactions is another area for postgenome applications of S2 cell lines.

  2. Integrative Lifecourse and Genetic Analysis of Military Working Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0226 TITLE: Integrative Lifecourse and Genetic Analysis of Military Working Dogs PRINCIPAL...insight into gene environment interactions. It leverages the simplified genetics and detailed records of the military working dog population. There are...regions associated with phenotypic variation between dog breeds using selection mapping. PLoS Genet . 7(10):e1002316. PubMed PMID: 22022279). In the

  3. Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration of citrus leaves: a tool for rapid functional analysis of transgenes in citrus leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hongge; Wang, Nian

    2014-12-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri pretreatment before agroinfiltration could significantly promote transient expression in citrus leaves which were previously recalcitrant to agroinfiltration. Transient expression via agroinfiltration is widely used in biotechnology but remains problematic in many economically important plants. Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc)-facilitated agroinfiltration was employed to promote transient protein expression in Valencia sweet orange leaves, which are recalcitrant to agroinfiltration. However, it is unclear whether Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration has broad application, i.e., whether Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration could be used on other citrus varieties. In addition, we intended to investigate whether Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration could be used to hasten transgene function assays, e.g., Cre/lox system and Cas9/sgRNA system. In this report, Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration was further exploited to enhance β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression in five citrus varieties. Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration also significantly increased GFP expression in six citrus varieties tested. Both GUS and GFP assays indicated that Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration had the best performance in grapefruit. After Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration was carried out in grapefruit, protoplast analysis of the transformed cells indicated that there were more than 20 % leaf cells expressing GFP. In grapefruit, usefulness of Xcc-facilitated agroinfiltration was assayed in three case studies: (1) fast functional analysis of Cre/lox system, (2) the heat shock regulation of HSP70B promoter derived from Arabidopsis, and (3) Cas9/sgRNA-mediated genome modification.

  4. Negotiating identity at the intersection of paediatric and genetic medicine: the parent as facilitator, narrator and patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimond, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This article identifies a significant transformation in the role and identity of parents accompanying their child to clinic. This shift is a product of the intersection between paediatric and genetic medicine, where parents play a critical role in providing information about their child, family and ultimately, about themselves. To provide a context for this matrix, two broad areas of sociological inquiry are highlighted. The first is explanations of the role a parent plays in paediatric medicine and the second is the diagnostic process in paediatric genetics and the implications for parent and child identities. Drawing from an ethnographic study of clinical consultations, attention is paid to the changing role of parenthood and the extended role of patienthood in paediatric genetic medicine.

  5. Situational Analysis of Physical Therapist Clinical Instructors' Facilitation of Students' Emerging Embodiment of Movement in Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, Kyle; Barcinas, Susan J

    2017-02-15

    Physical therapists improve the functional ability of patients after injury and disease. A unique component of their practice is the ability to use the movement of their own bodies to affect change in their patients. This has been recognized as a distinctive attribute of expert physical therapists. The purpose of this qualitative situational analysis study was to examine how physical therapist clinical instructors perceive and facilitate their students' emerging integration of movement in practice. Data collection and analysis was guided by Dall'Alba's theoretical framework for understanding professional ways of being. Data were analyzed using coding and mapping strategies consistent with Clarke's situational analysis techniques. The study included five physical therapist clinical instructors and their respective five physical therapist students. Data were collected during beginning, midterm, and final weeks of the students' clinical internships using participant interviews, observation, and document analysis. Coded data were summarized using situational analysis mapping strategies, resulting in 11 maps. These maps were further analyzed and reduced to five thematic behaviors the clinical instructor enacts as he or she helps facilitate the use of the students' movement in practice: These behaviors are: adapt, prepare, enhance, connect, and develop. The five behaviors are useful when considered as a trajectory of development. This study marks the first description of how physical therapist clinical instructors develop students' use of movement in practice and how to enact behaviors important in students' continued professional development. Findings are important as clinical instructors and academic programs consider how best to prepare students to use movement and develop their skills early in practice.

  6. DNA microsatellite analysis for tomato genetic differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miskoska-Milevska Elizabeta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Commonly used method for determination of the genetic diversity among the populations is the test for genetic differentiation. DNA microsatellite markers are usually used to investigate the genetic structure of natural populations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of eight DNA microsatellite loci (LECH13, LE21085, LEMDDNa, LEEF1Aa, LELEUZIP, LE20592, TMS9 and LE2A11 in genetic differentiation of six morphologically different tomato varieties (var. grandifolium from subsp. cultum; var. cerasiforme - red and yellow, var. pruniforme and var. pyriforme from subsp. subspontaneum; and var. racemigerum from subsp. spontaneum. The fragment analyses was performed using Applied Biosystems DNA analyzer (ABI 3130 and GeneMapper® Software program. The data were analysed using the specific program Power Marker Software. The average number of detected alleles was 3,625. Also, the average PIC value for all 8 DNA microsatellites loci was 0,3571. The genetic differentiation test in the researched tomato subspecies showed minor differentiation for locus LELEUZIP (- 0,0009, modest differentiation for locus LECH13 (0,0896, locus LEMDDNa (0,0896 and locus LE21085 (0,0551 and major differentiation for locus LE2A11 (0,7633, locus LEEF1Aa (0,6167, locus TMS9 (0.4967 and locus LE20592 (0,4263. On the other hand, in the estimated tomato varieties, locus LE21085 (0,0297, locus LECH13 (0,0256 and locus LELEUZIP (0,0005 showed minor differentiation, locus LEMDDNa (0,1333 showed modest differentiation, while locus TMS9 (0,5929, locus LEEF1Aa (0,5006, locus LE2A11 (0,4013 and locus LE20592 (0,2606 showed major differentiation. The eight DNA microsatellite loci can be applicable solution for tomato genetic differentiation. The overall results suggest that these microsatellite loci could be used in further population genetic studies of tomatoes.

  7. Spatio-temporal animation of Army logistics, simulations, facilitating analysis of military deployments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, R. J.; Horsthemke, W.; Macal, C. M.; Van Groningen, C.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2004-01-01

    Visualization techniques for simulations are often limited to statistical reports, graphs, and charts, but simulations can be enhanced through the use of animation. A spatio-temporal animation allows a viewer to observe a simulation operate, rather than deduce it from numerical output. The Route Viewer, developed by Argonne National Laboratory, is a two-dimensional animation model that animates the objects and events produced by a discrete event simulation. It operates in a playback mode, whereby a simulated scenario is animated after the simulation has completed. The Route Viewer is used to verify the simulation's processes and data, but it also benefits the simulation as an analytical tool by facilitating spatial and temporal analysis. By visualizing the events of a simulated scenario in two-dimensional space, it is possible to determine whether the scenario, or simulation model, is reasonable. Further, the Route Viewer provides an awareness of what happens in a scenario, when it happens, and the completeness and efficiency of the scenario and its processes. For Army deployments, it highlights utilization of resources and where bottlenecks are occurring. This paper discusses how the Route Viewer facilitates the analysis of military deployment simulation model results.

  8. On the runtime analysis of the Simple Genetic Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveto, Pietro S.; Witt, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    For many years it has been a challenge to analyze the time complexity of Genetic Algorithms (GAs) using stochastic selection together with crossover and mutation. This paper presents a rigorous runtime analysis of the well-known Simple Genetic Algorithm (SGA) for OneMax. It is proved that the SGA...

  9. On the Analysis of the Simple Genetic Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveto, Pietro S.; Witt, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    For many years it has been a challenge to analyze the time complexity of Genetic Algorithms (GAs) using stochastic selection together with crossover and mutation. This paper presents a rigorous runtime analysis of the well-known Simple Genetic Algorithm (SGA) for OneMax. It is proved that the SGA...

  10. Genetic diversity analysis of pearl millet (Pennisetum glauccum [L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-16

    Nov 16, 2009 ... Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was applied ... ding reliable information for the calculation of genetic dis- tance and pedigree studies. Thus, for genetic diversity assessment, molecular markers offer considerable ad- .... morphism (%) = total number of bands - number of monomorphic.

  11. The potential of high resolution melting analysis (hrma) to streamline, facilitate and enrich routine diagnostics in medical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruskova, Lenka; Raclavsky, Vladislav

    2011-09-01

    Routine medical microbiology diagnostics relies on conventional cultivation followed by phenotypic techniques for identification of pathogenic bacteria and fungi. This is not only due to tradition and economy but also because it provides pure culture needed for antibiotic susceptibility testing. This review focuses on the potential of High Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) of double-stranded DNA for future routine medical microbiology. Search of MEDLINE database for publications showing the advantages of HRMA in routine medical microbiology for identification, strain typing and further characterization of pathogenic bacteria and fungi in particular. The results show increasing numbers of newly-developed and more tailor-made assays in this field. For microbiologists unfamiliar with technical aspects of HRMA, we also provide insight into the technique from the perspective of microbial characterization. We can anticipate that the routine availability of HRMA in medical microbiology laboratories will provide a strong stimulus to this field. This is already envisioned by the growing number of medical microbiology applications published recently. The speed, power, convenience and cost effectiveness of this technology virtually predestine that it will advance genetic characterization of microbes and streamline, facilitate and enrich diagnostics in routine medical microbiology without interfering with the proven advantages of conventional cultivation.

  12. Genetic analysis of yield in peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L.) using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic analysis of yield in peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L.) using mixed model of ... parent) and a variety Yuhua No.4 (male parent) was used in this research. ... No.4 using the method of major gene plus polygene mixed inheritance model.

  13. 1 Hierarchical Approaches to the Analysis of Genetic Diversity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-14

    Apr 14, 2015 ... Keywords: Genetic diversity, Hierarchical approach, Plant, Clustering,. Descriptive ... utilization) or by clustering (based on a phonetic analysis of individual ...... Improvement of Food Crop Preservatives for the next Millennium.

  14. Analysis of genetic diversity and estimation of inbreeding coefficient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of genetic diversity and estimation of inbreeding coefficient within ... The present work is a contribution to the knowledge of population structure and to the ... diversity that may be helpful to horse breeders in designing and managing ...

  15. Genetic Association Analysis of Drusen Progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffman, J.D.; Grinsven, M.J.J.P. van; Li, C.; Brantley, M., Jr.; McGrath, J.; Agarwal, A.; Scott, W.K.; Schwartz, S.G.; Kovach, J.; Pericak-Vance, M.; Sanchez, C.I.; Haines, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Age-related macular degeneration is a common form of vision loss affecting older adults. The etiology of AMD is multifactorial and is influenced by environmental and genetic risk factors. In this study, we examine how 19 common risk variants contribute to drusen progression, a hallmark of

  16. Genetic analysis of morningness and eveningness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.M.; Groot, A.S.; Kerkhof, G.A.; Boomsma, D.H.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the influence of genetic factors on individual differences in morningness-eveningness in a sample of Dutch twin families. Data were collected from adolescent twins (mean age 17.8 yr) and their parents (mean age of fathers 48.0 yr and of mothers 46.0 yr) and a sample of older twins (mean a

  17. Integrative Lifecourse and Genetic Analysis of Military Working Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0226 TITLE: Integrative Lifecourse and Genetic Analysis of Military Working Dogs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kun Huang...Integrative Lifecourse and Genetic Analysis of Military Working Dogs 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0226 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...of the military working dog population. There are several critical aspects to meeting the aims of this proposal. 1) development of data driven

  18. Breeding-season sympatry facilitates genetic exchange among allopatric wintering populations of Northern Pintails in Japan and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, P.L.; Ozaki, K.; Pearce, J.M.; Guzzetti, B.; Higuchi, H.; Fleskes, J.P.; Shimada, T.; Derksen, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    The global redistribution of pathogens, such as highly pathogenic avian influenza, has renewed interest in the connectivity of continental populations of birds. Populations of the Northern Pintail (Anas acuta) wintering in Japan and California are considered separate from a management perspective. We used data from band recoveries and population genetics to assess the degree of biological independence of these wintering populations. Distributions of recoveries in Russia of Northern Pintails originally banded during winter in North America overlapped with distributions of Northern Pintails banded during winter in Japan. Thus these allopatric wintering populations are partially sympatric during the breeding season. The primary areas of overlap were along the Chukotka and Kamchatka peninsulas in Russia. Furthermore, band recoveries demonstrated dispersal of individuals between wintering populations both from North America to Japan and vice versa. Genetic analyses of samples from both wintering populations showed little evidence of population differentiation. The combination of banding and genetic markers demonstrates that these two continental populations are linked by low levels of dispersal as well as likely interbreeding in eastern Russia. Although the levels of dispersal are inconsequential for population dynamics, the combination of dispersal and interbreeding represents a viable pathway for exchange of genes, diseases, and/or parasites. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2009.

  19. Genetic Analysis in Translational Medicine: The 2010 GOLDEN HELIX Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrinos, George P; Innocenti, Federico; Cox, Nancy; Fortina, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    The 2010 GOLDEN HELIX Symposium "Genetic Analysis in Translational Medicine" was held in Athens, Greece, 1-4 December 2010. The scientific program covered all aspects of this discipline, including genome-wide association studies, genomics of cancer and human disorders, molecular cytogenetics, advances in genomic technology, next-generation sequencing applications, pharmacogenomics, and bioinformatics. In addition, various topics on genetics and society and genetic analysis in clinical practice were discussed. We provide an overview of the plenary lectures and the topics discussed in the symposium.

  20. iTRAQ quantitative proteomic analysis reveals the pathways for methanation of propionate facilitated by magnetite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jing, Yuhang; Wan, Jingjing; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-01-01

    by around 44% in batch experiments, and both direct interspecies electron transfer and interspecies H2 transfer were thermodynamically feasible with the addition of magnetite. The methanation of propionate facilitated by magnetite was also demonstrated in a long-term operated continuous reactor. The methane...... enriched with the addition of magnetite. iTRAQ quantitative proteomic analysis, which was used in mixed culture for the first time, showed that magnetite induced the changes of protein expression levels involved in various pathways during the methanation of propionate. The up-regulation of proteins...... electron transfer considering its up-regulation with the addition of magnetite and origination from Thauera. Most of the up-regulated proteins in methane metabolism were originated from Methanosaeta, while most of the enzymes with down-regulated proteins were originated from Methanosarcina. However, the up-regulated...

  1. The role of support groups in facilitating families in coping with a genetic condition and in discussion of genetic risk information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumridge, Gillian; Metcalfe, Alison; Coad, Jane; Gill, Paramjit

    2012-09-01

      Giving children and young people information about genetic conditions and associated risk has been shown to be important to their identity, coping and decision making. Parents, however, find talking to their children difficult, and support from health professionals is often not available to them.   To explore the role of support groups in family coping, and in assisting parents' communication about risk with children in families affected by an inherited genetic condition.   Semi-structured interviews analysed using grounded theory and informed by models focusing on aspects of family communication.   Affected and unaffected children and their parents, from families affected by one of six genetic conditions, that represent different patterns of inheritance, and variations in age of onset, life expectancy and impact on families.   Parents often sought support they did not receive elsewhere from support groups. They identified benefits, but also potential disadvantages to this involvement. These related to the specific condition and also whether groups were run solely by parents or had professional input. Support groups rarely helped directly with family communication, but attendance often stimulated family discussion, and they provided information that improved parents' confidence in discussing the condition.   Support groups should be seen only as additional to the support offered by health and social care professionals. An increased understanding of the role of support groups in assisting families with genetic conditions has been highlighted, but further work is needed to explore more fully how this may be made more sustainable and far-reaching. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Genetic analysis of reproductive development in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Rafael; Giménez, Estela; Cara, Beatriz; Capel, Juan; Angosto, Trinidad

    2009-01-01

    Besides being an important commercial crop, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) constitutes a model species for the study of plant developmental processes. Current research tends to combine classic disciplines such as physiology and genetics with modern approaches coming from molecular biology and genomics with a view to elucidating the biological mechanisms underlying plant architecture, floral transition and development of flowers and fruits. Comparative and functional analyses of tomato regulatory genes such as LATERAL SUPPRESSOR (LS), SELF PRUNING (SP), SINGLE FLOWER TRUSS (SFT) and FALSIFLORA (FA) have revealed mechanisms involved in shoot development and flowering time which are conserved among Arabidopsis, tomato and other plant species. Furthermore, several regulatory genes encoding transcription factors have been characterized as responsible for singular features of vegetative and reproductive development of tomato. Thus, the sympodial growth habit seems to require a specific control of the developmental fate followed by shoot meristems. In this process, novel genetic and molecular interactions involving SP, SFT and FA genes would be essential. Also this latter, but mainly ANANTHA (AN) and COMPOUND INFLORESCENCE (S) have recently been found to regulate the inflorescence architecture of the tomato. Concerning fruit development, genetic and molecular analyses of new genes such as fw2.2, FASCIATED, OVATE and SUN have proved their contribution to the domestication process and most importantly, their function as key regulators of fruit size and shape variation. Tomato ripening is also being elucidated thanks to the characterization of regulatory genes such as RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN), NON-RIPENING (NOR), TDR4 and COLORLESS NON-RIPENING (CNR), which have been found to control early stages of fruit development and maturation. At the same time, much research is dedicated to isolating the targets of the ripening regulators, as well as the key genes promoting the

  3. Genetic analysis of basophil function in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, Brandon M.; Liang, Hong-Erh; Bando, Jennifer K.; Wu, Davina; Cheng, Laurence E.; McKerrow, James K.; Allen, Christopher D.C.; Locksley, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Contributions by basophils to allergic and helminth immunity remain incompletely defined. Using sensitive IL-4 reporter alleles, we demonstrate that basophil IL-4 production occurs by a CD4+ T cell-dependent process restricted to affected peripheral tissues. We genetically marked and specifically deleted basophils and demonstrate that basophils do not mediate TH2 priming in vivo. Two-photon imaging confirmed that basophils do not interact with antigen-specific T cells in lymph nodes, but can ...

  4. The perfect host: a mouse host embryo facilitating more efficient germ line transmission of genetically modified embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Taft

    Full Text Available There is a continual need to improve efficiency in creating precise genetic modifications in mice using embryonic stem cells (ESCs. We describe a novel approach resulting in 100% germline transmission from competent injected ESCs. We developed an F1 mouse host embryo (Perfect Host, PH that selectively ablates its own germ cells via tissue-specific induction of diphtheria toxin. This approach allows competent microinjected ESCs to fully dominate the germline, eliminating competition for this critical niche in the developing and adult animal. This is in contrast to conventional methods, where competition from host germ cells results in offspring derived from host cells and ESCs, necessitating extensive breeding of chimeras and genotyping to identify germline. The germline transmission process is also complicated by variability in the actual number of ESCs that colonize the germline niche and the proportion that are germline competent. To validate the PH approach we used ESC lines derived from 129 F1, BALB/cByJ, and BTBR backgrounds as well as an iPS line. Resulting chimeric males produced 194 offspring, all paternally derived from the introduced stem cells, with no offspring being derived from the host genome. We further tested this approach using eleven genetically modified C57BL/6N ESC lines (International Knockout Mouse Consortium. ESC germline transmission was observed in 9/11 (82% lines using PH blastocysts, compared to 6/11 (55% when conventional host blastocysts were used. Furthermore, less than 35% (83/240 of mice born in the first litters from conventional chimeras were confirmed to be of ESC-origin. By comparison, 100% (137/137 of the first litter offspring of PH chimeras were confirmed as ESC-derived. Together, these data demonstrate that the PH approach increases the probability of germline transmission and speeds the generation of ESC derived animals from chimeras. Collectively, this approach reduces the time and costs inherent in the

  5. Genetic and genomic analysis of RNases in model cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Jeffrey C; Gordon, Gina C; Pfleger, Brian F

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria are diverse photosynthetic microbes with the ability to convert CO2 into useful products. However, metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria remains challenging because of the limited resources for modifying the expression of endogenous and exogenous biochemical pathways. Fine-tuned control of protein production will be critical to optimize the biological conversion of CO2 into desirable molecules. Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are labile intermediates that play critical roles in determining the translation rate and steady-state protein concentrations in the cell. The majority of studies on mRNA turnover have focused on the model heterotrophic bacteria Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. These studies have elucidated many RNA modifying and processing enzymes and have highlighted the differences between these Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. In contrast, much less is known about mRNA turnover in cyanobacteria. We generated a compendium of the major ribonucleases (RNases) and provide an in-depth analysis of RNase III-like enzymes in commonly studied and diverse cyanobacteria. Furthermore, using targeted gene deletion, we genetically dissected the RNases in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, one of the fastest growing and industrially attractive cyanobacterial strains. We found that all three cyanobacterial homologs of RNase III and a member of the RNase II/R family are not essential under standard laboratory conditions, while homologs of RNase E/G, RNase J1/J2, PNPase, and a different member of the RNase II/R family appear to be essential for growth. This work will enhance our understanding of native control of gene expression and will facilitate the development of an RNA-based toolkit for metabolic engineering in cyanobacteria.

  6. Genetic diversity and population structure analysis to construct a core collection from a large Capsicum germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hea-Young; Ro, Na-Young; Jeong, Hee-Jin; Kwon, Jin-Kyung; Jo, Jinkwan; Ha, Yeaseong; Jung, Ayoung; Han, Ji-Woong; Venkatesh, Jelli; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2016-11-14

    Conservation of genetic diversity is an essential prerequisite for developing new cultivars with desirable agronomic traits. Although a large number of germplasm collections have been established worldwide, many of them face major difficulties due to large size and a lack of adequate information about population structure and genetic diversity. Core collection with a minimum number of accessions and maximum genetic diversity of pepper species and its wild relatives will facilitate easy access to genetic material as well as the use of hidden genetic diversity in Capsicum. To explore genetic diversity and population structure, we investigated patterns of molecular diversity using a transcriptome-based 48 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a large germplasm collection comprising 3,821 accessions. Among the 11 species examined, Capsicum annuum showed the highest genetic diversity (HE = 0.44, I = 0.69), whereas the wild species C. galapagoense showed the lowest genetic diversity (HE = 0.06, I = 0.07). The Capsicum germplasm collection was divided into 10 clusters (cluster 1 to 10) based on population structure analysis, and five groups (group A to E) based on phylogenetic analysis. Capsicum accessions from the five distinct groups in an unrooted phylogenetic tree showed taxonomic distinctness and reflected their geographic origins. Most of the accessions from European countries are distributed in the A and B groups, whereas the accessions from Asian countries are mainly distributed in C and D groups. Five different sampling strategies with diverse genetic clustering methods were used to select the optimal method for constructing the core collection. Using a number of allelic variations based on 48 SNP markers and 32 different phenotypic/morphological traits, a core collection 'CC240' with a total of 240 accessions (5.2 %) was selected from within the entire Capsicum germplasm. Compared to the other core collections, CC240 displayed higher genetic

  7. Genome-scale reconstruction and analysis of the Pseudomonas putida KT2440 metabolic network facilitates applications in biotechnology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Puchałka

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A cornerstone of biotechnology is the use of microorganisms for the efficient production of chemicals and the elimination of harmful waste. Pseudomonas putida is an archetype of such microbes due to its metabolic versatility, stress resistance, amenability to genetic modifications, and vast potential for environmental and industrial applications. To address both the elucidation of the metabolic wiring in P. putida and its uses in biocatalysis, in particular for the production of non-growth-related biochemicals, we developed and present here a genome-scale constraint-based model of the metabolism of P. putida KT2440. Network reconstruction and flux balance analysis (FBA enabled definition of the structure of the metabolic network, identification of knowledge gaps, and pin-pointing of essential metabolic functions, facilitating thereby the refinement of gene annotations. FBA and flux variability analysis were used to analyze the properties, potential, and limits of the model. These analyses allowed identification, under various conditions, of key features of metabolism such as growth yield, resource distribution, network robustness, and gene essentiality. The model was validated with data from continuous cell cultures, high-throughput phenotyping data, (13C-measurement of internal flux distributions, and specifically generated knock-out mutants. Auxotrophy was correctly predicted in 75% of the cases. These systematic analyses revealed that the metabolic network structure is the main factor determining the accuracy of predictions, whereas biomass composition has negligible influence. Finally, we drew on the model to devise metabolic engineering strategies to improve production of polyhydroxyalkanoates, a class of biotechnologically useful compounds whose synthesis is not coupled to cell survival. The solidly validated model yields valuable insights into genotype-phenotype relationships and provides a sound framework to explore this versatile

  8. Genetic Structure Analysis of Human Remains from Khitan Noble Necropolis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Ancient DNA was extracted from 13 skeletal remains from the burial groups of Khitan nobles, which were excavated in northeast China. The hypervariable segment I sequences ( HVS Ⅰ ) of the mitochondrial DNA control region, in the 13 individuals, were used as genetic markers to determine the genetic relationships between the individuals and the genetic affinity to other interrelated populations by using the known database of mtDNA. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of these ancient DNA sequences, the genetic structures of two Khitan noble kindreds were obtained, including the Yel Yuzhi's kindred and the Xiao He's kindred. Furthermore, the relationships between the Khitan nobles and some modern interrelated populations were analyzed. On the basis of the result of the analysis, the gene flows of the ancient Khitans and their demographic expansion in history was deduced.

  9. A genetic analysis of senescence in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, K A; Charlesworth, B

    1994-01-06

    Two attractive theories for the evolution of senescence are based on the principle that the force of natural selection decreases with age. The theories differ in the type of age-specific gene action that they assume. Antagonistic pleiotropy postulates that pleiotropic genes with positive effects early in life and negative effects of comparable magnitude late in life are favoured by selection, whereas genes with the reverse pattern of action are selected against. Mutation accumulation assumes that deleterious mutant alleles with age-specific effects will equilibrate at a lower frequency if their effects are expressed early rather than late in life. Explicit models demonstrate that both mechanisms can lead to the evolution of senescent life histories under reasonable conditions. Antagonistic pleiotropy has gained considerable empirical support, but the evidence in support of mutation accumulation is more sparse. Here we report that the genetic variability of mortality in male Drosophila melanogaster increases greatly at very late ages, as predicted by the mutation accumulation hypothesis. The rate of increase in mortality with age exhibits substantial genetic and environmental variability. This result provides a possible explanation for recent observations of non-increasing mortality rates in very old flies.

  10. Polyglot programming in applications used for genetic data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Applications used for the analysis of genetic data process large volumes of data with complex algorithms. High performance, flexibility, and a user interface with a web browser are required by these solutions, which can be achieved by using multiple programming languages. In this study, I developed a freely available framework for building software to analyze genetic data, which uses C++, Python, JavaScript, and several libraries. This system was used to build a number of genetic data processing applications and it reduced the time and costs of development.

  11. High-throughput genome editing and phenotyping facilitated by high resolution melting curve analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly R Thomas

    Full Text Available With the goal to generate and characterize the phenotypes of null alleles in all genes within an organism and the recent advances in custom nucleases, genome editing limitations have moved from mutation generation to mutation detection. We previously demonstrated that High Resolution Melting (HRM analysis is a rapid and efficient means of genotyping known zebrafish mutants. Here we establish optimized conditions for HRM based detection of novel mutant alleles. Using these conditions, we demonstrate that HRM is highly efficient at mutation detection across multiple genome editing platforms (ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPRs; we observed nuclease generated HRM positive targeting in 1 of 6 (16% open pool derived ZFNs, 14 of 23 (60% TALENs, and 58 of 77 (75% CRISPR nucleases. Successful targeting, based on HRM of G0 embryos correlates well with successful germline transmission (46 of 47 nucleases; yet, surprisingly mutations in the somatic tail DNA weakly correlate with mutations in the germline F1 progeny DNA. This suggests that analysis of G0 tail DNA is a good indicator of the efficiency of the nuclease, but not necessarily a good indicator of germline alleles that will be present in the F1s. However, we demonstrate that small amplicon HRM curve profiles of F1 progeny DNA can be used to differentiate between specific mutant alleles, facilitating rare allele identification and isolation; and that HRM is a powerful technique for screening possible off-target mutations that may be generated by the nucleases. Our data suggest that micro-homology based alternative NHEJ repair is primarily utilized in the generation of CRISPR mutant alleles and allows us to predict likelihood of generating a null allele. Lastly, we demonstrate that HRM can be used to quickly distinguish genotype-phenotype correlations within F1 embryos derived from G0 intercrosses. Together these data indicate that custom nucleases, in conjunction with the ease and speed of HRM, will

  12. Genetic associations in diabetic nephropathy: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mooyaart, A. L.; Valk, E. J. J.; van Es, L A; Bruijn, J. A.; De Heer, E.; Freedman, B.I.; Dekkers, O.M.; Baelde, H. J.

    2010-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis This meta-analysis assessed the pooled effect of each genetic variant reproducibly associated with diabetic nephropathy. Methods PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched for articles assessing the association between genes and diabetic nephropathy. All genetic variants statistically associated with diabetic nephropathy in an initial study, then independently reproduced in at least one additional study, were selected. Subsequently, all studies assessing these variants we...

  13. Analysis of radiocarbon, stable isotopes and DNA in teeth to facilitate identification of unknown decedents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanar Alkass

    Full Text Available The characterization of unidentified bodies or suspected human remains is a frequent and important task for forensic investigators. However, any identification method requires clues to the person's identity to allow for comparisons with missing persons. If such clues are lacking, information about the year of birth, sex and geographic origin of the victim, is particularly helpful to aid in the identification casework and limit the search for possible matches. We present here results of stable isotope analysis of (13C and (18O, and bomb-pulse (14C analyses that can help in the casework. The (14C analysis of enamel provided information of the year of birth with an average absolute error of 1.8±1.3 years. We also found that analysis of enamel and root from the same tooth can be used to determine if the (14C values match the rising or falling part of the bomb-curve. Enamel laydown times can be used to estimate the date of birth of individuals, but here we show that this detour is unnecessary when using a large set of crude (14C data of tooth enamel as a reference. The levels of (13C in tooth enamel were higher in North America than in teeth from Europe and Asia, and Mexican teeth showed even higher levels than those from USA. DNA analysis was performed on 28 teeth, and provided individual-specific profiles in most cases and sex determination in all cases. In conclusion, these analyses can dramatically limit the number of possible matches and hence facilitate person identification work.

  14. Improved time complexity analysis of the Simple Genetic Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveto, Pietro S.; Witt, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    A runtime analysis of the Simple Genetic Algorithm (SGA) for the OneMax problem has recently been presented proving that the algorithm with population size μ≤n1/8−ε requires exponential time with overwhelming probability. This paper presents an improved analysis which overcomes some limitations...

  15. Genetic analysis of basophil function in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Brandon M; Liang, Hong-Erh; Bando, Jennifer K; Wu, Davina; Cheng, Laurence E; McKerrow, James K; Allen, Christopher D C; Locksley, Richard M

    2011-06-01

    Contributions by basophils to allergic and helminth immunity remain incompletely defined. Using sensitive interleukin 4 (Il4) reporter alleles, we demonstrate here that basophil IL-4 production occurs by a CD4(+) T cell-dependent process restricted to the peripheral tissues affected. We genetically marked and achieved specific deletion of basophils and found that basophils did not mediate T helper type 2 (T(H)2) priming in vivo. Two-photon imaging confirmed that basophils did not interact with antigen-specific T cells in lymph nodes but engaged in prolonged serial interactions with T cells in lung tissues. Although targeted deletion of IL-4 and IL-13 in either CD4(+) T cells or basophils had a minimal effect on worm clearance, deletion from both lineages demonstrated a nonredundant role for basophil cytokines in primary helminth immunity.

  16. Promoting Utilization of Saccharum spp. Genetic Resources through Genetic Diversity Analysis and Core Collection Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Bhuvan; Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Yang, Xiping; Todd, James; Glynn, Neil C.; Kuhn, David N.; Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert A.; Comstock, Jack C.; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1) genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2) form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance. PMID:25333358

  17. Promoting utilization of Saccharum spp. genetic resources through genetic diversity analysis and core collection construction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spurthi N Nayak

    Full Text Available Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1 genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2 form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance.

  18. Promoting utilization of Saccharum spp. genetic resources through genetic diversity analysis and core collection construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Spurthi N; Song, Jian; Villa, Andrea; Pathak, Bhuvan; Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Yang, Xiping; Todd, James; Glynn, Neil C; Kuhn, David N; Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert A; Comstock, Jack C; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1) genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2) form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance.

  19. A Comparative Analysis of Trade Facilitation in Selected Regional and Bilateral Trade Agreement

    OpenAIRE

    Institute for International Trade

    2006-01-01

    This study compared the treatment of trade facilitation in four selected regional trade agreements, AFTA, APEC, SAFRA and PACER, and in one bilateral free trade agreement being the Australia-Singapore Free Trade Agreement (ASFTA), with a view to determining model trade facilitation principles and measures which may be instructive for developing country negotiations and policy makers.

  20. A Comparative Analysis of Trade Facilitation in Selected Regional and Bilateral Trade Agreement

    OpenAIRE

    Wille, P.; J. Redden

    2006-01-01

    This study compares the treatment of trade facilitation in four selected regional trade agreements, AFTA, APEC, SAFTA and PACER, and in one bilateral free trade agreement being the Australia-Singapore Free Trade Agreement (ASFTA), with a view to determining model trade facilitation principles and measures which may be instructive for developing country negotiators and policy makers.

  1. Timing Analysis of Genetic Logic Circuits using D-VASim

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baig, Hasan; Madsen, Jan

    A genetic logic circuit is a gene regulator network implemented by re-engineering the DNA of a cell, in order to controlgene expression or metabolic pathways, through a logic combination of external signals, such as chemicals or proteins. As for electroniclogic circuits, timing and propagation...... delay analysis may play a very significant role in the designing of genetic logic circuits. In thisdemonstration, we present the capability of D-VASim (Dynamic Virtual Analyzer and Simulator) to perform the timing and propagationdelay analysis of genetic logic circuits. Using D-VASim, the timing...... and propagation delay analysis of single as well as cascaded geneticlogic circuits can be performed. D-VASim allows user to change the circuit parameters during runtime simulation to observe its effectson circuit’s timing behavior. The results obtained from D-VASim can be used not only to characterize the timing...

  2. Strategies for Integrated Analysis of Genetic, Epigenetic, and Gene Expression Variation in Cancer: Addressing the Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Louise Bruun; Andersen, Lars; Makalic, Enes

    2016-01-01

    The development and progression of cancer, a collection of diseases with complex genetic architectures, is facilitated by the interplay of multiple etiological factors. This complexity challenges the traditional single-platform study design and calls for an integrated approach to data analysis....... However, integration of heterogeneous measurements of biological variation is a non-trivial exercise due to the diversity of the human genome and the variety of output data formats and genome coverage obtained from the commonly used molecular platforms. This review article will provide an introduction...... to integration strategies used for analyzing genetic risk factors for cancer. We critically examine the ability of these strategies to handle the complexity of the human genome and also accommodate information about the biological and functional interactions between the elements that have been measured...

  3. Analysis of Variance Components for Genetic Markers with Unphased Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    An ANOVA type general multi-allele (GMA) model was proposed in Wang (2014) on analysis of variance components for quantitative trait loci or genetic markers with phased or unphased genotypes. In this study, by applying the GMA model, we further examine estimation of the genetic variance components for genetic markers with unphased genotypes based on a random sample from a study population. In one locus and two loci cases, we first derive the least square estimates (LSE) of model parameters in fitting the GMA model. Then we construct estimators of the genetic variance components for one marker locus in a Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium population and two marker loci in an equilibrium population. Meanwhile, we explore the difference between the classical general linear model (GLM) and GMA based approaches in association analysis of genetic markers with quantitative traits. We show that the GMA model can retain the same partition on the genetic variance components as the traditional Fisher's ANOVA model, while the GLM cannot. We clarify that the standard F-statistics based on the partial reductions in sums of squares from GLM for testing the fixed allelic effects could be inadequate for testing the existence of the variance component when allelic interactions are present. We point out that the GMA model can reduce the confounding between the allelic effects and allelic interactions at least for independent alleles. As a result, the GMA model could be more beneficial than GLM for detecting allelic interactions.

  4. Genetic analysis of photosynthesis in Rhodospirillum centenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, F H; Gest, H; Bauer, C E

    1991-01-01

    A genetic system has been developed for studying bacterial photosynthesis in the recently described nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum centenum. Nonphotosynthetic mutants of R. centenum were obtained by enrichment for spontaneous mutations, by ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis coupled to penicillin selection on solid medium, and by Tn5 transposition mutagenesis with an IncP plasmid vector containing a temperature-sensitive origin of replication. In vivo and in vitro characterization of individual strains demonstrated that 38 strains contained mutations that blocked bacteriochlorophyll a biosynthesis at defined steps of the biosynthetic pathway. Collectively, these mutations were shown to block seven of eight steps of the pathway leading from protoporphyrin IX to bacteriochlorophyll a. Three mutants were isolated in which carotenoid biosynthesis was blocked early in the biosynthetic pathway; the mutants also exhibited pleiotropic effects on stability or assembly of the photosynthetic apparatus. Five mutants failed to assemble a functional reaction center complex, and seven mutants contained defects in electron transport as shown by an alteration in cytochromes. In addition, several regulatory mutants were isolated that acquired enhanced repression of bacteriochlorophyll in response to the presence of molecular oxygen. The phenotypes of these mutants are discussed in relation to those of similar mutants of Rhodobacter and other Rhodospirillum species of purple photosynthetic bacteria. Images PMID:1648078

  5. Quantitative genetic analysis of injury liability in infants and toddlers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, K.; Matheny, A.P. Jr. [Univ. of Louisville Medical School, KY (United States)

    1995-02-27

    A threshold model of latent liability was applied to infant and toddler twin data on total count of injuries sustained during the interval from birth to 36 months of age. A quantitative genetic analysis of estimated twin correlations in injury liability indicated strong genetic dominance effects, but no additive genetic variance was detected. Because interpretations involving overdominance have little research support, the results may be due to low order epistasis or other interaction effects. Boys had more injuries than girls, but this effect was found only for groups whose parents were prompted and questioned in detail about their children`s injuries. Activity and impulsivity are two behavioral predictors of childhood injury, and the results are discussed in relation to animal research on infant and adult activity levels, and impulsivity in adult humans. Genetic epidemiological approaches to childhood injury should aid in targeting higher risk children for preventive intervention. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Genetic analysis of methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii PLD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahtchev, K; Penkova, R; Ivanova, V; Tuneva, D

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports the initial experiments for genetic analysis of the haploid methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii PLD1. The collection of multiply marked auxotrophic mutants was obtained after treatment with UV-light or X-rays. Protoplasts from several mutants were fused by the PEG-CA2+ technique and five prototrophic hybrids were isolated. The genetic structure of the hybrids was studied by means of spontaneous and induced mitotic segregation. Our data suggest that hybrids are diploids, heterozygous by parental auxotrophic markers. We obtained genetic linkage between mutations lys2-8-met-3 from one hand and ade-17-arg-24 from the other. The genetic maps constructed showed similar characteristics concerning both the order of the markers and their map distances.

  7. A genetic algorithm approach to routine gamma spectra analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlevaro, C M [Instituto de FIsica de LIquidos y Sistemas Biologicos, Calle 59 No 789, B1900BTE La Plata (Argentina); Wilkinson, M V [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Avda. del Libertador 8250, C1429BNP Buenos Aires (Argentina); Barrios, L A [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Avda. del Libertador 8250, C1429BNP Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-01-15

    In this work we present an alternative method for performing routine gamma spectra analysis based on genetic algorithm techniques. The main idea is to search for patterns of single nuclide spectra obtained by simulation in a sample spectrum targeted for analysis. We show how this approach is applied to the analysis of simulated and real target spectra, and also to the study of interference resolution.

  8. Cellular and genetic analysis of mouse blastocyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, R A; Spindle, A I

    1979-01-01

    The development of mouse embryos was studied by both cellular and genetic approaches. In the cellular analysis, determination of cell fate in blastocysts and in cell populations derived from them was studied in an attempt to estimate the time that these cells become committed to their fate. In the genetic analysis, existing mutations that are lethal to mouse embryos were used to discern essential features of early development. In this review, the timing of cell determination in the inner cell mass and the primary ectoderm, and the manifestation of defects in mouse embryos that are homozygous for the A/sup y/ allele of the agouti locus were considered.

  9. MutAIT: an online genetic toxicology data portal and analysis tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avancini, Daniele; Menzies, Georgina E; Morgan, Claire; Wills, John; Johnson, George E; White, Paul A; Lewis, Paul D

    2016-05-01

    Assessment of genetic toxicity and/or carcinogenic activity is an essential element of chemical screening programs employed to protect human health. Dose-response and gene mutation data are frequently analysed by industry, academia and governmental agencies for regulatory evaluations and decision making. Over the years, a number of efforts at different institutions have led to the creation and curation of databases to house genetic toxicology data, largely, with the aim of providing public access to facilitate research and regulatory assessments. This article provides a brief introduction to a new genetic toxicology portal called Mutation Analysis Informatics Tools (MutAIT) (www.mutait.org) that provides easy access to two of the largest genetic toxicology databases, the Mammalian Gene Mutation Database (MGMD) and TransgenicDB. TransgenicDB is a comprehensive collection of transgenic rodent mutation data initially compiled and collated by Health Canada. The updated MGMD contains approximately 50 000 individual mutation spectral records from the published literature. The portal not only gives access to an enormous quantity of genetic toxicology data, but also provides statistical tools for dose-response analysis and calculation of benchmark dose. Two important R packages for dose-response analysis are provided as web-distributed applications with user-friendly graphical interfaces. The 'drsmooth' package performs dose-response shape analysis and determines various points of departure (PoD) metrics and the 'PROAST' package provides algorithms for dose-response modelling. The MutAIT statistical tools, which are currently being enhanced, provide users with an efficient and comprehensive platform to conduct quantitative dose-response analyses and determine PoD values that can then be used to calculate human exposure limits or margins of exposure.

  10. Smoking and caffeine consumption: a genetic analysis of their association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treur, Jorien L; Taylor, Amy E; Ware, Jennifer J; Nivard, Michel G; Neale, Michael C; McMahon, George; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Baselmans, Bart M L; Boomsma, Dorret I; Munafò, Marcus R; Vink, Jacqueline M

    2017-07-01

    Smoking and caffeine consumption show a strong positive correlation, but the mechanism underlying this association is unclear. Explanations include shared genetic/environmental factors or causal effects. This study employed three methods to investigate the association between smoking and caffeine. First, bivariate genetic models were applied to data of 10 368 twins from the Netherlands Twin Register in order to estimate genetic and environmental correlations between smoking and caffeine use. Second, from the summary statistics of meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies on smoking and caffeine, the genetic correlation was calculated by LD-score regression. Third, causal effects were tested using Mendelian randomization analysis in 6605 Netherlands Twin Register participants and 5714 women from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Through twin modelling, a genetic correlation of r0.47 and an environmental correlation of r0.30 were estimated between current smoking (yes/no) and coffee use (high/low). Between current smoking and total caffeine use, this was r0.44 and r0.00, respectively. LD-score regression also indicated sizeable genetic correlations between smoking and coffee use (r0.44 between smoking heaviness and cups of coffee per day, r0.28 between smoking initiation and coffee use and r0.25 between smoking persistence and coffee use). Consistent with the relatively high genetic correlations and lower environmental correlations, Mendelian randomization provided no evidence for causal effects of smoking on caffeine or vice versa. Genetic factors thus explain most of the association between smoking and caffeine consumption. These findings suggest that quitting smoking may be more difficult for heavy caffeine consumers, given their genetic susceptibility. © 2016 The Authors.Addiction Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R; Muruaga-Martínez, José S; Vargas-Vázquez, M L Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-10-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  12. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  13. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R.; Muruaga-Martínez, José S.; Vargas-Vázquez, M.L. Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-01-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation. PMID:22215964

  14. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  15. Next-generation sequencing facilitates quantitative analysis of wild-type and Nrl(-/-) retinal transcriptomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Matthew J; Rajasimha, Harsha K; Roger, Jerome E; Swaroop, Anand

    2011-01-01

    -seq technology. The optimized data analysis workflows reported here should provide a framework for comparative investigations of expression profiles. Our results show that NGS offers a comprehensive and more accurate quantitative and qualitative evaluation of mRNA content within a cell or tissue. We conclude that RNA-seq based transcriptome characterization would expedite genetic network analyses and permit the dissection of complex biologic functions.

  16. A genetic analysis of retinitis pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanker Jayashree

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The data consists of sixty probands affected with Retinitis pigmentosa. Syndromic cases were found in five percent of the RP probands. Segregation analysis was carried out on proband sibship data. The ascertainment probability was estimated at 0.5517. Analysis of the data by parental mating types of proband sibships indicated the presence of dominant forms of RP (2.05%. Analysis of proband sibships indicated the presence of low risk families in the Normal x Normal matings (45% and in the consanguineous matings (40%. The hypothesis of recessive inheritance could be confirmed only in multiplex sibships (p = 0.383 +/- 0.0793. Data on proband matings though incomplete conformed in general to autosomal recessive gene hypothesis.

  17. A genetic analysis of Adh1 regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeling, M.

    1992-01-01

    The overall goal of our research proposal is to understand the meaning of the various cis-acting sites responsible for AdH1 expression in the entire maize plant. Progress is reported in the following areas: Studies on the TATA box and analysis of revertants of the Adh1-3F1124 allele; screening for more different mutants that affect Adh1 expression differentially; studies on cis-acting sequences required for root-specific Adh1 expression; refinement of the use of the particle gun; and functional analysis of a non- glycolytic anaerobic protein.

  18. A Genetic Analysis of Mortality in Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varona, Luis; Sorensen, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of mortality is undertaken in two breeds of pigs: Danish Landrace and Yorkshire. Zero-inflated and standard versions of hierarchical Poisson, binomial, and negative binomial Bayesian models were fitted using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). The objectives of the study were to investig...

  19. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  20. [Current methods in genetic analysis : an approach for genetics-based preventive medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Hans-Georg; Rost, Imma

    2015-02-01

    Modern genetic analysis methods such as DNA arrays (gene chips) or high-throughput DNA sequencing of the next generation (Next Generation Sequencing, NGS) have once again accelerated the pace of innovation that has been powered by genome research over the past 10 years of the "post-genomic era". The present paper introduces array and NGS methods as two important innovation driving methods and provides examples for their application in large-scale scientific projects. However, a broad application of these very powerful technologies for genetic screening for the purpose of disease prevention is currently not yet in sight. The complexity of the interaction of genes, gene products and the environment has so far exceeded all expectations, suggesting that reliable statements about the medical relevance of common genetic variants can presently only be made in a few areas such as pharmacogenetics and oncology. We also discuss ethical issues raised by genetic population screening. The aim of this paper is to provide a brief outline of the development of methods in molecular genetics to the now dominant modern technologies and present their applications in research, in the diagnosis of rare diseases, and in terms of screening approaches.

  1. Genetic Geostatistical Framework for Spatial Analysis of Fine-Scale Genetic Heterogeneity in Modern Populations: Results from the KORA Study

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-Lacava, A. N.; Walier, M; D. Holler; Steffens, M; Gieger, C; C. Furlanello; Lamina, C; Wichmann, H E; Becker, T

    2015-01-01

    Aiming to investigate fine-scale patterns of genetic heterogeneity in modern humans from a geographic perspective, a genetic geostatistical approach framed within a geographic information system is presented. A sample collected for prospective studies in a small area of southern Germany was analyzed. None indication of genetic heterogeneity was detected in previous analysis. Socio-demographic and genotypic data of German citizens were analyzed (212 SNPs; n = 728). Genetic heterogeneity was ev...

  2. SSR Analysis of Genetic Diversity Among 192 Diploid Potato Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Song

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In potato breeding, it is difficult to improve the traits of interest at the tetraploid level due to the tetrasomic inheritance. A promising alternative is diploid breeding. Thus it is necessary to assess the genetic diversity of diploid potato germplasm for efficient exploration and deployment of desirable traits. In this study, we used SSR markers to evaluate the genetic diversity of diploid potato cultivars. To screen polymorphic SSR markers, 55 pairs of SSR primers were employed to amplify 39 cultivars with relatively distant genetic relationships. Among them, 12 SSR markers with high polymorphism located at 12 chromosomes were chosen to evaluate the genetic diversity of 192 diploid potato cultivars. The primers produced 6 to 18 bands with an average of 8.2 bands per primer. In total, 98 bands were amplified from 192 cultivars, and 97 of them were polymorphic. Cluster analysis using UPGMA showed the genetic relationships of all accessions tested: 186 of the 192 accessions could be distinguished by only 12 pairs of SSR primers, and the 192 diploid cultivars were divided into 11 groups, and 83.3% constituted the first group. Clustering results showed relatively low genetic diversity among 192 diploid cultivars, with closer relationship at the molecular level. The results can provide molecular basis for diploid potato breeding.

  3. Genetic analysis in the Collaborative Cross breeding population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Vivek M; Sokoloff, Greta; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Striz, Martin; Branstetter, Lisa; Beckmann, Melissa A; Spence, Jason S; Jackson, Barbara L; Galloway, Leslie D; Barker, Paul; Wymore, Ann M; Hunsicker, Patricia R; Durtschi, David C; Shaw, Ginger S; Shinpock, Sarah; Manly, Kenneth F; Miller, Darla R; Donohue, Kevin D; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Churchill, Gary A; Lariviere, William R; Palmer, Abraham A; O'Hara, Bruce F; Voy, Brynn H; Chesler, Elissa J

    2011-08-01

    Genetic reference populations in model organisms are critical resources for systems genetic analysis of disease related phenotypes. The breeding history of these inbred panels may influence detectable allelic and phenotypic diversity. The existing panel of common inbred strains reflects historical selection biases, and existing recombinant inbred panels have low allelic diversity. All such populations may be subject to consequences of inbreeding depression. The Collaborative Cross (CC) is a mouse reference population with high allelic diversity that is being constructed using a randomized breeding design that systematically outcrosses eight founder strains, followed by inbreeding to obtain new recombinant inbred strains. Five of the eight founders are common laboratory strains, and three are wild-derived. Since its inception, the partially inbred CC has been characterized for physiological, morphological, and behavioral traits. The construction of this population provided a unique opportunity to observe phenotypic variation as new allelic combinations arose through intercrossing and inbreeding to create new stable genetic combinations. Processes including inbreeding depression and its impact on allelic and phenotypic diversity were assessed. Phenotypic variation in the CC breeding population exceeds that of existing mouse genetic reference populations due to both high founder genetic diversity and novel epistatic combinations. However, some focal evidence of allele purging was detected including a suggestive QTL for litter size in a location of changing allele frequency. Despite these inescapable pressures, high diversity and precision for genetic mapping remain. These results demonstrate the potential of the CC population once completed and highlight implications for development of related populations.

  4. A genetic analysis of Adhl regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeling, M.

    1992-01-01

    Several separate but related studies are reported on the mechanism of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh-1) are reported. A study of a deletion mutation in the TATA box region which resulted in an increase from 6--60% of wildtype Adh-1 expression in the revertant has led to a focus on trans-acting protein factors that bind the TATA box. Analysis of another revertant has led to study of cis-acting sequences in Adh-1 expression. Screening efforts aimed at defining different mutants affecting Adh-1 expression are reported.

  5. The power of multiplexed functional analysis of genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Molly; Starita, Lea; Shendure, Jay

    2016-10-01

    New technologies have recently enabled saturation mutagenesis and functional analysis of nearly all possible variants of regulatory elements or proteins of interest in single experiments. Here we discuss the past, present, and future of such multiplexed (functional) assays for variant effects (MAVEs). MAVEs provide detailed insight into sequence-function relationships, and they may prove critical for the prospective clinical interpretation of genetic variants.

  6. Software architecture and design of the web services facilitating climate model diagnostic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, L.; Lee, S.; Zhang, J.; Tang, B.; Zhai, C.; Jiang, J. H.; Wang, W.; Bao, Q.; Qi, M.; Kubar, T. L.; Teixeira, J.

    2015-12-01

    Climate model diagnostic analysis is a computationally- and data-intensive task because it involves multiple numerical model outputs and satellite observation data that can both be high resolution. We have built an online tool that facilitates this process. The tool is called Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer (CMDA). It employs the web service technology and provides a web-based user interface. The benefits of these choices include: (1) No installation of any software other than a browser, hence it is platform compatable; (2) Co-location of computation and big data on the server side, and small results and plots to be downloaded on the client side, hence high data efficiency; (3) multi-threaded implementation to achieve parallel performance on multi-core servers; and (4) cloud deployment so each user has a dedicated virtual machine. In this presentation, we will focus on the computer science aspects of this tool, namely the architectural design, the infrastructure of the web services, the implementation of the web-based user interface, the mechanism of provenance collection, the approach to virtualization, and the Amazon Cloud deployment. As an example, We will describe our methodology to transform an existing science application code into a web service using a Python wrapper interface and Python web service frameworks (i.e., Flask, Gunicorn, and Tornado). Another example is the use of Docker, a light-weight virtualization container, to distribute and deploy CMDA onto an Amazon EC2 instance. Our tool of CMDA has been successfully used in the 2014 Summer School hosted by the JPL Center for Climate Science. Students had positive feedbacks in general and we will report their comments. An enhanced version of CMDA with several new features, some requested by the 2014 students, will be used in the 2015 Summer School soon.

  7. Castor bean organelle genome sequencing and worldwide genetic diversity analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximo Rivarola

    Full Text Available Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade.

  8. Castor bean organelle genome sequencing and worldwide genetic diversity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivarola, Maximo; Foster, Jeffrey T; Chan, Agnes P; Williams, Amber L; Rice, Danny W; Liu, Xinyue; Melake-Berhan, Admasu; Huot Creasy, Heather; Puiu, Daniela; Rosovitz, M J; Khouri, Hoda M; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M; Allan, Gerard J; Keim, Paul; Ravel, Jacques; Rabinowicz, Pablo D

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade.

  9. Castor Bean Organelle Genome Sequencing and Worldwide Genetic Diversity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Agnes P.; Williams, Amber L.; Rice, Danny W.; Liu, Xinyue; Melake-Berhan, Admasu; Huot Creasy, Heather; Puiu, Daniela; Rosovitz, M. J.; Khouri, Hoda M.; Beckstrom-Sternberg, Stephen M.; Allan, Gerard J.; Keim, Paul; Ravel, Jacques; Rabinowicz, Pablo D.

    2011-01-01

    Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade. PMID:21750729

  10. Understanding genetics: Analysis of secondary students' conceptual status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Chi-Yan; Treagust, David F.

    2007-02-01

    This article explores the conceptual change of students in Grades 10 and 12 in three Australian senior high schools when the teachers included computer multimedia to a greater or lesser extent in their teaching of a genetics course. The study, underpinned by a multidimensional conceptual-change framework, used an interpretive approach and a case-based design with multiple data collection methods. Over 4-8 weeks, the students learned genetics in classroom lessons that included BioLogica activities, which feature multiple representations. Results of the online tests and interview tasks revealed that most students improved their understanding of genetics as evidenced in the development of genetics reasoning. However, using Thorley's (1990) status analysis categories, a cross-case analysis of the gene conceptions of 9 of the 26 students interviewed indicated that only 4 students' postinstructional conceptions were intelligible-plausible-fruitful. Students' conceptual change was consistent with classroom teaching and learning. Findings suggested that multiple representations supported conceptual understanding of genetics but not in all students. It was also shown that status can be a viable hallmark enabling researchers to identify students' conceptual change that would otherwise be less accessible. Thorley's method for analyzing conceptual status is discussed.

  11. Kinetic Model Facilitates Analysis of Fibrin Generation and Its Modulation by Clotting Factors: Implications for Hemostasis-Enhancing Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    facilitates analysis of fibrin generation and its modulation by clotting factors: implications for hemostasis-enhancing therapies† Alexander Y...Syst. Biol.Med., 2011, 3, 136–146. 62 M. Schneider, N. Brufatto, E. Neill and M. Nesheim, J. Biol. Chem., 2004, 279, 13340–13345. 63 J. H. Foley, P. F

  12. Does your gene need a background check? How genetic background impacts the analysis of mutations, genes, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Christopher H; Chari, Sudarshan; Dworkin, Ian

    2013-06-01

    The premise of genetic analysis is that a causal link exists between phenotypic and allelic variation. However, it has long been documented that mutant phenotypes are not a simple result of a single DNA lesion, but are instead due to interactions of the focal allele with other genes and the environment. Although an experimentally rigorous approach focused on individual mutations and isogenic control strains has facilitated amazing progress within genetics and related fields, a glimpse back suggests that a vast complexity has been omitted from our current understanding of allelic effects. Armed with traditional genetic analyses and the foundational knowledge they have provided, we argue that the time and tools are ripe to return to the underexplored aspects of gene function and embrace the context-dependent nature of genetic effects. We assert that a broad understanding of genetic effects and the evolutionary dynamics of alleles requires identifying how mutational outcomes depend upon the 'wild type' genetic background. Furthermore, we discuss how best to exploit genetic background effects to broaden genetic research programs.

  13. Genetic associations in diabetic nephropathy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooyaart, A L; Valk, E J J; van Es, L A; Bruijn, J A; de Heer, E; Freedman, B I; Dekkers, O M; Baelde, H J

    2011-03-01

    This meta-analysis assessed the pooled effect of each genetic variant reproducibly associated with diabetic nephropathy. PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched for articles assessing the association between genes and diabetic nephropathy. All genetic variants statistically associated with diabetic nephropathy in an initial study, then independently reproduced in at least one additional study, were selected. Subsequently, all studies assessing these variants were included. The association between these variants and diabetic nephropathy (defined as macroalbuminuria/proteinuria or end-stage renal disease [ESRD]) was calculated at the allele level and the main measure of effect was a pooled odds ratio. Pre-specified subgroup analyses were performed, stratifying for type 1/type 2 diabetes mellitus, proteinuria/ESRD and ethnic group. The literature search yielded 3,455 citations, of which 671 were genetic association studies investigating diabetic nephropathy. We identified 34 replicated genetic variants. Of these, 21 remained significantly associated with diabetic nephropathy in a random-effects meta-analysis. These variants were in or near the following genes: ACE, AKR1B1 (two variants), APOC1, APOE, EPO, NOS3 (two variants), HSPG2, VEGFA, FRMD3 (two variants), CARS (two variants), UNC13B, CPVL and CHN2, and GREM1, plus four variants not near genes. The odds ratios of associated genetic variants ranged from 0.48 to 1.70. Additional variants were detected in subgroup analyses: ELMO1 (Asians), CCR5 (Asians) and CNDP1 (type 2 diabetes). This meta-analysis found 24 genetic variants associated with diabetic nephropathy. The relative contribution and relevance of the identified genes in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy should be the focus of future studies.

  14. Interactive, open source, travel time scenario modelling: tools to facilitate participation in health service access analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Rohan; Lassa, Jonatan

    2017-04-18

    Modelling travel time to services has become a common public health tool for planning service provision but the usefulness of these analyses is constrained by the availability of accurate input data and limitations inherent in the assumptions and parameterisation. This is particularly an issue in the developing world where access to basic data is limited and travel is often complex and multi-modal. Improving the accuracy and relevance in this context requires greater accessibility to, and flexibility in, travel time modelling tools to facilitate the incorporation of local knowledge and the rapid exploration of multiple travel scenarios. The aim of this work was to develop simple open source, adaptable, interactive travel time modelling tools to allow greater access to and participation in service access analysis. Described are three interconnected applications designed to reduce some of the barriers to the more wide-spread use of GIS analysis of service access and allow for complex spatial and temporal variations in service availability. These applications are an open source GIS tool-kit and two geo-simulation models. The development of these tools was guided by health service issues from a developing world context but they present a general approach to enabling greater access to and flexibility in health access modelling. The tools demonstrate a method that substantially simplifies the process for conducting travel time assessments and demonstrate a dynamic, interactive approach in an open source GIS format. In addition this paper provides examples from empirical experience where these tools have informed better policy and planning. Travel and health service access is complex and cannot be reduced to a few static modeled outputs. The approaches described in this paper use a unique set of tools to explore this complexity, promote discussion and build understanding with the goal of producing better planning outcomes. The accessible, flexible, interactive and

  15. Fusion genetic analysis of jasmonate-signalling mutants in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Bøgh; Raventos, D.; Mundy, John Williams

    2002-01-01

    Jasmonates induce plant-defence responses and act to regulate defence-related genes including positive feedback of the lipoxygenase 2 (LOX2) gene involved in jasmonate synthesis. To identify jasmonate-signalling mutants, we used a fusion genetic strategy in which the firefly luciferase (FLUC...... as two recessive mutants, designated joe1 and 2, that overexpress the reporter. Genetic analysis indicated that reporter overexpression in the joe mutants requires COI. joe1 responded to MeJA with increased anthocyanin accumulation, while joe2 responded with decreased root growth inhibition. In addition...

  16. Genetic diversity analysis of fruit characteristics of hawthorn germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, K; Guo, Y S; Wang, G; Zhao, Y H; Dong, W X

    2015-12-07

    One hundred and six accessions of hawthorn intraspecific resources, from the National Germplasm Repository at Shenyang, were subjected to genetic diversity and principal component analysis based on evaluation data of 15 fruit traits. Results showed that the genetic diversity of hawthorn fruit traits varied. Among the 15 traits, the fruit shape variable coefficient had the most obvious evaluation, followed by fruit surface state, dot color, taste, weight of single fruit, sepal posture, peduncle form, and metula traits. These are the primary traits by which hawthorn could be classified in the future. The principal component demonstrated that these traits are the most influential factors of hawthorn fruit characteristics.

  17. Genetic analysis of repeated, biparental, diploid, hydatidiform moles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunde, L; Vejerslev, L O; Jensen, M P;

    1993-01-01

    A woman presented with five consecutive pregnancies displaying molar morphology. In the fifth pregnancy, a non-malformed, liveborn infant was delivered. Genetic analyses (RFLP analysis, cytogenetics, flow cytometry) were performed in pregnancies II-V. It was demonstrated that these pregnancies...... for the abnormal development can be envisaged, environmental as well as genetic. To conform to current ideas of molar pathogenesis, it is suggested that the present conceptuses might have arisen from imbalances in imprinted genomic regions. This could be a consequence of uniparental disomy in critical regions...

  18. Stellar Population Analysis of Galaxies based on Genetic Algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdel-Fattah Attia; H.A.Ismail; I.M.Selim; A.M.Osman; I.A.Isaa; M.A.Marie; A.A.Shaker

    2005-01-01

    We present a new method for determining the age and relative contribution of different stellar populations in galaxies based on the genetic algorithm.We apply this method to the barred spiral galaxy NGC 3384, using CCD images in U, B, V, R and I bands. This analysis indicates that the galaxy NGC 3384 is mainly inhabited by old stellar population (age > 109 yr). Some problems were encountered when numerical simulations are used for determining the contribution of different stellar populations in the integrated color of a galaxy. The results show that the proposed genetic algorithm can search efficiently through the very large space of the possible ages.

  19. Error analysis on heading determination via genetic algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Bing; Xu Jiangning; Ma Heng

    2006-01-01

    A new error analysis method is presented via genetic algorithms for high precise heading determination model based on two total positioning stations (TPSs). The method has the ability to search all possible solution space by the genetic operators of elitist model and restriction. The result of analyzing the error of this model shows that the accuracy of this model is precise enough to meet the need of calibration for navigation systems on ship, and the search space is only 0.03% of the total search space, and the precision of heading determination is 4" in a general dock.

  20. Strains and stressors: an analysis of touchscreen learning in genetically diverse mouse strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Graybeal

    Full Text Available Touchscreen-based systems are growing in popularity as a tractable, translational approach for studying learning and cognition in rodents. However, while mouse strains are well known to differ in learning across various settings, performance variation between strains in touchscreen learning has not been well described. The selection of appropriate genetic strains and backgrounds is critical to the design of touchscreen-based studies and provides a basis for elucidating genetic factors moderating behavior. Here we provide a quantitative foundation for visual discrimination and reversal learning using touchscreen assays across a total of 35 genotypes. We found significant differences in operant performance and learning, including faster reversal learning in DBA/2J compared to C57BL/6J mice. We then assessed DBA/2J and C57BL/6J for differential sensitivity to an environmental insult by testing for alterations in reversal learning following exposure to repeated swim stress. Stress facilitated reversal learning (selectively during the late stage of reversal in C57BL/6J, but did not affect learning in DBA/2J. To dissect genetic factors underlying these differences, we phenotyped a family of 27 BXD strains generated by crossing C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. There was marked variation in discrimination, reversal and extinction learning across the BXD strains, suggesting this task may be useful for identifying underlying genetic differences. Moreover, different measures of touchscreen learning were only modestly correlated in the BXD strains, indicating that these processes are comparatively independent at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Finally, we examined the behavioral structure of learning via principal component analysis of the current data, plus an archival dataset, totaling 765 mice. This revealed 5 independent factors suggestive of "reversal learning," "motivation-related late reversal learning," "discrimination learning," "speed to respond," and

  1. Strains and stressors: an analysis of touchscreen learning in genetically diverse mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybeal, Carolyn; Bachu, Munisa; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Saksida, Lisa M; Bussey, Timothy J; Sagalyn, Erica; Williams, Robert W; Holmes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Touchscreen-based systems are growing in popularity as a tractable, translational approach for studying learning and cognition in rodents. However, while mouse strains are well known to differ in learning across various settings, performance variation between strains in touchscreen learning has not been well described. The selection of appropriate genetic strains and backgrounds is critical to the design of touchscreen-based studies and provides a basis for elucidating genetic factors moderating behavior. Here we provide a quantitative foundation for visual discrimination and reversal learning using touchscreen assays across a total of 35 genotypes. We found significant differences in operant performance and learning, including faster reversal learning in DBA/2J compared to C57BL/6J mice. We then assessed DBA/2J and C57BL/6J for differential sensitivity to an environmental insult by testing for alterations in reversal learning following exposure to repeated swim stress. Stress facilitated reversal learning (selectively during the late stage of reversal) in C57BL/6J, but did not affect learning in DBA/2J. To dissect genetic factors underlying these differences, we phenotyped a family of 27 BXD strains generated by crossing C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. There was marked variation in discrimination, reversal and extinction learning across the BXD strains, suggesting this task may be useful for identifying underlying genetic differences. Moreover, different measures of touchscreen learning were only modestly correlated in the BXD strains, indicating that these processes are comparatively independent at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Finally, we examined the behavioral structure of learning via principal component analysis of the current data, plus an archival dataset, totaling 765 mice. This revealed 5 independent factors suggestive of "reversal learning," "motivation-related late reversal learning," "discrimination learning," "speed to respond," and "motivation during

  2. Genetic analysis of population differentiation and adaptation in Leuciscus waleckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yumei; Tang, Ran; Sun, Xiaowen; Liang, Liqun; Chen, Jinping; Huang, Jinfeng; Dou, Xinjie; Tao, Ran

    2013-12-01

    Demographic events and natural selection both influence animal phenotypic and genetic variation; exploring the effects of demography and selection on population divergence is of great significance in evolutionary biology. To uncover the causes behind the patterns of genetic differentiation and adaptation among six populations of Leuciscus waleckii from Dali Basin (two populations, alkaline vs. freshwater) and Amur Basin (four populations, freshwater rivers vs. alkaline lake), a set of 21 unlinked polymorphic microsatellite markers and two mitochondrial DNA sequences (Cytb and D-loop) were applied to examine whether populations from different environments or habitats have distinct genetic differentiation and whether alkalinity is the major factor that caused population divergence. Bayesian analysis and principal component analysis as well as haplotype network analysis showed that these populations are primarily divided into two groups, which are congruent with geographic separation but not inconsistent with the habitat environment (alkalinity). Using three different approaches, outlier detection indicated that one locus, HLJYL017, may be under directional selection and involved in local adaptation processes. Overall, this study suggested that demographic events and selection of local environmental conditions including of alkalinity are jointly responsible for population divergence. These findings constitute an important step towards the understanding of the genetic basis of differentiation and adaptation, as well as towards the conservation of L. waleckii.

  3. Segregation Analysis on Genetic System of Quantitative Traits in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gai Junyi

    2006-01-01

    Based on the traditional polygene inheritance model of quantitative traits,the author suggests the major gene and polygene mixed inheritance model.The model was considered as a general one,while the pure major gene and pure polygene inheritance model was a specific case of the general model.Based on the proposed theory,the author established the segregation analysis procedure to study the genetic system of quantitative traits of plants.At present,this procedure can be used to evaluate the genetic effect of individual major genes (up to two to three major genes),the collective genetic effect of polygene,and their heritability value.This paper introduces how to establish the procedure,its main achievements,and its applications.An example is given to illustrate the steps,methods,and effectiveness of the procedure.

  4. RAPD analysis of genetic relationships among Sphaeropsis sapinea isolates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xiaoqin; XIONG Dabin; WANG Yu

    2007-01-01

    Genetic relationships were studied among 23 isolates of Sphaeropsis sapinea collected from China,the United States,England,South Africa and Chile by using a random amplification of a polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analytical method.One hundred and 35 DNA fragments were amplified with 12 random primers by a polymerase chain reaction PCR technique and 96.3% were polymorphic.The genetic dendrogram based on RAPD analysis showed that the S.sapinea isolates could be divided into three types.Isolate CWS41 from Chile was separated genetically as the first type that was different from other isolates and isolates F2 and J2 from China comprised the second group.The third RAPD group accommodated other isolates including the B morphotype isolate CWS43 from the United States.

  5. Seedling test and genetic analysis of white poplar hybrid clones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bo; JIANG Xi-bing; ZHANG You-hui; ZHANG Zhi-yi; LI Shan-wen; AN Xin-min

    2008-01-01

    Cross breeding strategies are very efficient for gaining new and superior genotypes. Ninety-eight new white poplar hybrid clones produced from 12 cross combinations within the Section Leuce Duby were studied using genetic analysis and seedling tests. We exploited the wide variation that exists in this population and found that the differences among diameter at breast height (DBH), root collar diameter (RCD) and height (H) were statistically extremely significant. The repeatability of clones of these measured traits ranged from 0.947-0.967, which indicated that these Waits were strongly controlled by genetic factors. Based on multiple comparisons, a total of 25 clones showed better performance in growth than the conlrol cultivar. These 25 clones were from six different cross combinations, which can guarantee a larger genetic background for future new clone promotion projects. This study provides a simple overview on these clones and can guide us to carry out subsequent selection plans.

  6. Analysis of genetic diversity in Bolivian llama populations using microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreta, J; Gutiérrez-Gil, B; Iñiguez, V; Romero, F; Saavedra, V; Chiri, R; Rodríguez, T; Arranz, J J

    2013-08-01

    South American camelids (SACs) have a major role in the maintenance and potential future of rural Andean human populations. More than 60% of the 3.7 million llamas living worldwide are found in Bolivia. Due to the lack of studies focusing on genetic diversity in Bolivian llamas, this analysis investigates both the genetic diversity and structure of 12 regional groups of llamas that span the greater part of the range of distribution for this species in Bolivia. The analysis of 42 microsatellite markers in the considered regional groups showed that, in general, there were high levels of polymorphism (a total of 506 detected alleles; average PIC across per marker: 0.66), which are comparable with those reported for other populations of domestic SACs. The estimated diversity parameters indicated that there was high intrapopulational genetic variation (average number of alleles and average expected heterozygosity per marker: 12.04 and 0.68, respectively) and weak genetic differentiation among populations (FST range: 0.003-0.052). In agreement with these estimates, Bolivian llamas showed a weak genetic structure and an intense gene flow between all the studied regional groups, which is due to the exchange of reproductive males between the different flocks. Interestingly, the groups for which the largest pairwise FST estimates were observed, Sud Lípez and Nor Lípez, showed a certain level of genetic differentiation that is probably due to the pattern of geographic isolation and limited communication infrastructures of these southern localities. Overall, the population parameters reported here may serve as a reference when establishing conservation policies that address Bolivian llama populations.

  7. Repeated measurement sampling in genetic association analysis with genotyping errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Renzhen; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Yaning

    2007-02-01

    Genotype misclassification occurs frequently in human genetic association studies. When cases and controls are subject to the same misclassification model, Pearson's chi-square test has the correct type I error but may lose power. Most current methods adjusting for genotyping errors assume that the misclassification model is known a priori or can be assessed by a gold standard instrument. But in practical applications, the misclassification probabilities may not be completely known or the gold standard method can be too costly to be available. The repeated measurement design provides an alternative approach for identifying misclassification probabilities. With this design, a proportion of the subjects are measured repeatedly (five or more repeats) for the genotypes when the error model is completely unknown. We investigate the applications of the repeated measurement method in genetic association analysis. Cost-effectiveness study shows that if the phenotyping-to-genotyping cost ratio or the misclassification rates are relatively large, the repeat sampling can gain power over the regular case-control design. We also show that the power gain is not sensitive to the genetic model, genetic relative risk and the population high-risk allele frequency, all of which are typically important ingredients in association studies. An important implication of this result is that whatever the genetic factors are, the repeated measurement method can be applied if the genotyping errors must be accounted for or the phenotyping cost is high.

  8. A sequential analysis of procedural meeting communication: How teams facilitate their meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Allen, J.A.; Kauffeld, S.

    2013-01-01

    How do teams facilitate their own meetings? Unmanaged (or free) social interaction often leads to poor decision-making, unnecessary conformity, social loafing, and ineffective communication processes, practices, and products. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential benefits of

  9. A sequential analysis of procedural meeting communication: How teams facilitate their meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann-Willenbrock, N.K.; Allen, J.A.; Kauffeld, S.

    2013-01-01

    How do teams facilitate their own meetings? Unmanaged (or free) social interaction often leads to poor decision-making, unnecessary conformity, social loafing, and ineffective communication processes, practices, and products. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential benefits of proc

  10. [Primary failure of eruption (PFE). Clinical and molecular genetics analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellzig-Eisenhauer, Angelika; Decker, Eva; Meyer-Marcotty, Philipp; Rau, Christiane; Fiebig, Britta S; Kress, Wolfram; Saar, Kathrin; Rüschendorf, Franz; Hubner, Norbert; Grimm, Tiemo; Witt, Emil; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2013-09-01

    The term "primary failure of eruption" (PFE) refers to the complete or partial failure of a primary non-ankylosed tooth to erupt due to a disturbance of the eruption mechanism. Up to now, the molecular basis for this failure was unknown. Four families were studied in whom at least two members were affected by non-syndromic PFE as part of a clinical and molecular genetics study. Radiological diagnostics (OPTs) were carried out in all patients and their unaffected relatives (control group). The genetic analysis included a genomewide linkage analysis followed by direct DNA sequencing of positional candidate genes. Starting from the index patients, we were able to reconstruct pedigrees over two and/or three generations in the families that indicated an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance of non-syndromic PFE. Fifteen patients were diagnosed with PFE. Gender distribution was nearly equal (7 female, 8 male). Molecular genetic analysis of the PTHR1 gene revealed three distinct heterozygous mutations (c.1050-3C>G; c.543 + 1G>A; c.463G>T). Unaffected persons exhibited no mutations. Knowledge of the genetic causes of non-syndromic PFE can now be used for the differential diagnosis of eruption failure. It permits affected family members to be identified early and may lead to new treatment possibilities in the long term. The genetically-verified diagnosis of "primary failure of eruption" can protect patients and orthodontists from years of futile treatment, because orthodontic treatment alone does not lead to success. Moreover, it has a negative influence on unaffected teeth and areas of the jaw. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2013.

  11. Adventitious shoot regeneration of Platanus acerifolia Willd.facilitated by Timentin, an antibiotic for suppression of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in genetic transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhi-neng; Liu Guo-feng; Fang Fang; Bao Man-zhu

    2007-01-01

    The effects of Timentin and cefotaxime (Cef) on shoot regeneration of the London plane tree (Platanus acerifolia Willd.) and their use for the suppression of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation were compared.Shoot regeneration was significantly reduced on the media with Cef at concentrations from 100 to 500 mg·L-1. Timentin showed negative effect on plant regeneration at concentrations of 100 and 500 mg·L-1; however, 300 mg·L-1 Timentin was shown to facilitate shoot regeneration significantly and the regeneration frequency increased from 64% (control) to 88%. Effective suppression of A.tumefaciens could be obtained with 500 mg·L-1 Cef, but plant regeneration was completely inhibited at this level. The A. tumefaciens on infected P. acerifolia leaf tissues was visually undetectable after three subcultures on a medium with 300 mg·L-1 Timentin. Considering the effect of Cef and Timentin on plant regeneration and suppression of Agrobacteria, Timentin at 300 mg·L-1 is the preferred application in A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation of P.acerifolia.

  12. BisoGenet: a new tool for gene network building, visualization and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda Jamilet

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing availability and diversity of omics data in the post-genomic era offers new perspectives in most areas of biomedical research. Graph-based biological networks models capture the topology of the functional relationships between molecular entities such as gene, protein and small compounds and provide a suitable framework for integrating and analyzing omics-data. The development of software tools capable of integrating data from different sources and to provide flexible methods to reconstruct, represent and analyze topological networks is an active field of research in bioinformatics. Results BisoGenet is a multi-tier application for visualization and analysis of biomolecular relationships. The system consists of three tiers. In the data tier, an in-house database stores genomics information, protein-protein interactions, protein-DNA interactions, gene ontology and metabolic pathways. In the middle tier, a global network is created at server startup, representing the whole data on bioentities and their relationships retrieved from the database. The client tier is a Cytoscape plugin, which manages user input, communication with the Web Service, visualization and analysis of the resulting network. Conclusion BisoGenet is able to build and visualize biological networks in a fast and user-friendly manner. A feature of Bisogenet is the possibility to include coding relations to distinguish between genes and their products. This feature could be instrumental to achieve a finer grain representation of the bioentities and their relationships. The client application includes network analysis tools and interactive network expansion capabilities. In addition, an option is provided to allow other networks to be converted to BisoGenet. This feature facilitates the integration of our software with other tools available in the Cytoscape platform. BisoGenet is available at http://bio.cigb.edu.cu/bisogenet-cytoscape/.

  13. A genetic study and meta-analysis of the genetic predisposition of prostate cancer in a Chinese population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shan-Chao; Ren, Guoping; Yu, Yongwei; Wu, Yudong; Wu, Ji; Xue, Yao; Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Yanling; Xu, Xingxing; Li, Jie; He, Weiyang; Benlloch, Sara; Ross-Adams, Helen; Chen, Li; Li, Jucong; Hong, Yingqia; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Cui, Xingang; Hou, Jianguo; Guo, Jianming; Xu, Lei; Yin, Changjun; Zhou, Yuanping; Neal, David E.; Oliver, Tim; Cao, Guangwen; Zhang, Zhengdong; Easton, Douglas F.; Chelala, Claude; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Zhang, Hongwei; Lu, Yong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer predisposition has been extensively investigated in European populations, but there have been few studies of other ethnic groups. To investigate prostate cancer susceptibility in the under-investigated Chinese population, we performed single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis on a cohort of Chinese cases and controls and then meta-analysis with data from the existing Chinese prostate cancer genome-wide association study (GWAS). Genotyping 211,155 SNPs in 495 cases and 640 controls of Chinese ancestry identified several new suggestive Chinese prostate cancer predisposition loci. However, none of them reached genome-wide significance level either by meta-analysis or replication study. The meta-analysis with the Chinese GWAS data revealed that four 8q24 loci are the main contributors to Chinese prostate cancer risk and the risk alleles from three of them exist at much higher frequencies in Chinese than European populations. We also found that several predisposition loci reported in Western populations have different effect on Chinese men. Therefore, this first extensive single-nucleotide polymorphism study of Chinese prostate cancer in comparison with European population indicates that four loci on 8q24 contribute to a great risk of prostate cancer in a considerable large proportion of Chinese men. Based on those four loci, the top 10% of the population have six- or two-fold prostate cancer risk compared with men of the bottom 10% or median risk respectively, which may facilitate the design of prostate cancer genetic risk screening and prevention in Chinese men. These findings also provide additional insights into the etiology and pathogenesis of prostate cancer. PMID:26881390

  14. The S-leut anthropometric traits: genetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganini-Hill, A; Martin, A O; Spence, M A

    1981-05-01

    Genetic analyses were conducted on 51 anthropometric measurements and on four factors derived from them by factor analysis. These variables were obtained on 784 members of a religious isolate, the S-leut. Correlations were computed between relatives, and heritabilities were estimates using information on extended families. Longitudinal measurements generally exhibited the highest heritabilities. The test for fit of a major gene model was significant for 13 of the 55 variables, the circumferential and breadth measurements giving the strongest evidence for major gene control. In another approach to establishment of genetic control, linkage analysis was performed between the anthropometric variables and blood group and serum protein polymorphisms. Several traits showed some evidence for linkage but none achieved statistical significance.

  15. Genetic Analysis of Haploids from Industrial Strains of Baker's Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Y; Ouchi, K

    1989-07-01

    Strains of baker's yeast conventionally used by the baking industry in Japan were tested for the ability to sporulate and produce viable haploid spores. Three isolates which possessed the properties of baker's yeasts were obtained from single spores. Each strain was a haploid, and one of these strains, YOY34, was characterized. YOY34 fermented maltose and sucrose, but did not utilize galactose, unlike its parental strain. Genetic analysis showed that YOY34 carried two MAL genes, one functional and one cryptic; two SUC genes; and one defective gal gene. The genotype of YOY34 was identified as MATalpha MAL1 MAL3g SUC2 SUC4 gall. The MAL1 gene from this haploid was constitutively expressed, was dominant over other wild-type MAL tester genes, and gave a weak sucrose fermentation. YOY34 was suitable for both bakery products, like conventional baker's yeasts, and for genetic analysis, like laboratory strains.

  16. Describing the genetic architecture of epilepsy through heritability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Doug; O'Brien, Terence J; Palotie, Aarno; Shkura, Kirill; Marson, Anthony G; Balding, David J; Johnson, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Epilepsy is a disease with substantial missing heritability; despite its high genetic component, genetic association studies have had limited success detecting common variants which influence susceptibility. In this paper, we reassess the role of common variants on epilepsy using extensions of heritability analysis. Our data set consists of 1258 UK patients with epilepsy, of which 958 have focal epilepsy, and 5129 population control subjects, with genotypes recorded for over 4 million common single nucleotide polymorphisms. Firstly, we show that on the liability scale, common variants collectively explain at least 26% (standard deviation 5%) of phenotypic variation for all epilepsy and 27% (standard deviation 5%) for focal epilepsy. Secondly we provide a new method for estimating the number of causal variants for complex traits; when applied to epilepsy, our most optimistic estimate suggests that at least 400 variants influence disease susceptibility, with potentially many thousands. Thirdly, we use bivariate analysis to assess how similar the genetic architecture of focal epilepsy is to that of non-focal epilepsy; we demonstrate both significant differences (P = 0.004) and significant similarities (P = 0.01) between the two subtypes, indicating that although the clinical definition of focal epilepsy does identify a genetically distinct epilepsy subtype, there is also scope to improve the classification of epilepsy by incorporating genotypic information. Lastly, we investigate the potential value in using genetic data to diagnose epilepsy following a single epileptic seizure; we find that a prediction model explaining 10% of phenotypic variation could have clinical utility for deciding which single-seizure individuals are likely to benefit from immediate anti-epileptic drug therapy.

  17. Genetic mapping of complex discrete human diseases by discriminant analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to propose and evaluate a novel multivariate approach for genetic mapping of complex categorical diseases. This approach results from an application of standard stepwise discriminant analysis to detect linkage based on the differential marker identity-by-descent (IBD) distributions among the different groups of sib pairs. Two major advantages of this method are that it allows for simultaneously testing all markers, together with other genetic and environmental factors in a single multivariate setting and it avoids explicitly modeling the complex relationship between the affection status of sib pairs and the underlying genetic determinants. The efficiency and properties of the method are demonstrated via simulations. The proposed multivariate approach has successfully located the true position(s) under various genetic scenarios. The more important finding is that using highly densely spaced markers (1~2 cM) leads to only a marginal loss of statistical efficiency of the proposed methods in terms of gene localization and statistical power. These results have well established its utility and advantages as a fine-mapping tool. A unique property of the proposed method is the ability to map multiple linked trait loci to their precise positions due to its sequential nature, as demonstrated via simulations.

  18. Genetic Analysis of the Lambda Spanins Rz and Rz1: Identification of Functional Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Cahill

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Coliphage lambda proteins Rz and Rz1 are the inner membrane and outer membrane subunits of the spanin complex—a heterotetramer that bridges the periplasm and is essential for the disruption of the outer membrane during phage lysis. Recent evidence suggests the spanin complex functions by fusing the inner and outer membrane. Here, we use a genetics approach to investigate and characterize determinants of spanin function. Because Rz1 is entirely embedded in the +1 reading frame of Rz, the genes were disembedded before using random mutagenesis to construct a library of lysis-defective alleles for both genes. Surprisingly, most of the lysis-defective missense mutants exhibited normal accumulation or localization in vivo, and also were found to be normal for complex formation in vitro. Analysis of the distribution and nature of single missense mutations revealed subdomains that resemble key motifs in established membrane-fusion systems, i.e., two coiled-coil domains in Rz, a proline-rich region of Rz1, and flexible linkers in both proteins. When coding sequences are aligned respective to the embedded genetic architecture of Rz1 within Rz, genetically silent domains of Rz1 correspond to mutationally sensitive domains in Rz, and vice versa, suggesting that the modular structure of the two subunits facilitated the evolutionary compression that resulted in the unique embedded gene architecture.

  19. Genetic Analysis and Gene Mapping of Light Brown Spotted Leaf Mutant in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Bao-hua; YANG Yang; SHI Yong-feng; LIN Lu; CHEN Jie; WEI Yan-lin; Hei LEUNG

    2013-01-01

    A light brown spotted-leaf mutant of rice was isolated from an ethane methyl sulfonate (EMS)induced IR64 mutant bank.The mutant,designated as Ibsl1 (light brown spotted-leaf 1),displayed light brown spot in the whole growth period from the first leaf to the flag leaf under natural summer field conditions.Agronomic traits including plant height,growth duration,number of filled grains per panicle,seed-setting rate and 1000-grain weight of the mutant were significantly affected.Genetic analysis showed that the mutation was controlled by a single recessive gene,tentatively named Ibsl1(t),which was mapped to the short arm of chromosome 6.By developing simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers,the gene was finally delimited to an interval of 130 kb between markers RM586 and RM588.The Ibsl1(t) gene is likely a novel rice spotted-leaf gene since no other similar genes have been identified near the chromosomal region.The genetic data and recombination populations provided will facilitate further fine-mapping and cloning of the gene.

  20. Genetic analysis of HIV-1 subtypes in Nairobi, Kenya.

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    Suhail Khoja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic analysis of a viral infection helps in following its spread in a given population, in tracking the routes of infection and, where applicable, in vaccine design. Additionally, sequence analysis of the viral genome provides information about patterns of genetic divergence that may have occurred during viral evolution. OBJECTIVE: In this study we have analyzed the subtypes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus -1 (HIV-1 circulating in a diverse sample population of Nairobi, Kenya. METHODOLOGY: 69 blood samples were collected from a diverse subject population attending the Aga Khan University Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya. Total DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, and used in a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR to amplify the HIV gag gene. The PCR amplimers were partially sequenced, and alignment and phylogenetic analysis of these sequences was performed using the Los Alamos HIV Database. RESULTS: Blood samples from 69 HIV-1 infected subjects from varying ethnic backgrounds were analyzed. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed 39 isolates to be subtype A, 13 subtype D, 7 subtype C, 3 subtype AD and CRF01_AE, 2 subtype G and 1 subtype AC and 1 AG. Deeper phylogenetic analysis revealed HIV subtype A sequences to be highly divergent as compared to subtypes D and C. CONCLUSION: Our analysis indicates that HIV-1 subtypes in the Nairobi province of Kenya are dominated by a genetically diverse clade A. Additionally, the prevalence of highly divergent, complex subtypes, intersubtypes, and the recombinant forms indicates viral mixing in Kenyan population, possibly as a result of dual infections.

  1. Improved Runtime Analysis of the Simple Genetic Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveto, Pietro S.; Witt, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    A runtime analysis of the Simple Genetic Algorithm (SGA) for the OneMax problem has recently been presented proving that the algorithm requires exponential time with overwhelming probability. This paper presents an improved analysis which overcomes some limitations of our previous one. Firstly...... improvement towards the reusability of the techniques in future systematic analyses of GAs. Finally, we consider the more natural SGA using selection with replacement rather than without replacement although the results hold for both algorithmic versions. Experiments are presented to explore the limits...

  2. Improved time complexity analysis of the Simple Genetic Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveto, Pietro S.; Witt, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    A runtime analysis of the Simple Genetic Algorithm (SGA) for the OneMax problem has recently been presented proving that the algorithm with population size μ≤n1/8−ε requires exponential time with overwhelming probability. This paper presents an improved analysis which overcomes some limitations...... this is a major improvement towards the reusability of the techniques in future systematic analyses of GAs. Finally, we consider the more natural SGA using selection with replacement rather than without replacement although the results hold for both algorithmic versions. Experiments are presented to explore...

  3. A strategy analysis for genetic association studies with known inbreeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Giacco Stefano

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association studies consist in identifying the genetic variants which are related to a specific disease through the use of statistical multiple hypothesis testing or segregation analysis in pedigrees. This type of studies has been very successful in the case of Mendelian monogenic disorders while it has been less successful in identifying genetic variants related to complex diseases where the insurgence depends on the interactions between different genes and the environment. The current technology allows to genotype more than a million of markers and this number has been rapidly increasing in the last years with the imputation based on templates sets and whole genome sequencing. This type of data introduces a great amount of noise in the statistical analysis and usually requires a great number of samples. Current methods seldom take into account gene-gene and gene-environment interactions which are fundamental especially in complex diseases. In this paper we propose to use a non-parametric additive model to detect the genetic variants related to diseases which accounts for interactions of unknown order. Although this is not new to the current literature, we show that in an isolated population, where the most related subjects share also most of their genetic code, the use of additive models may be improved if the available genealogical tree is taken into account. Specifically, we form a sample of cases and controls with the highest inbreeding by means of the Hungarian method, and estimate the set of genes/environmental variables, associated with the disease, by means of Random Forest. Results We have evidence, from statistical theory, simulations and two applications, that we build a suitable procedure to eliminate stratification between cases and controls and that it also has enough precision in identifying genetic variants responsible for a disease. This procedure has been successfully used for the beta-thalassemia, which is

  4. DMPD: The Toll-like receptors: analysis by forward genetic methods. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16001129 The Toll-like receptors: analysis by forward genetic methods. Beutler B. I...mmunogenetics. 2005 Jul;57(6):385-92. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The Toll-like receptors: analysis b...y forward genetic methods. PubmedID 16001129 Title The Toll-like receptors: analysis by forward genetic meth

  5. Parametric analysis of architectural volumes through genetic algorithms

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    Pedro Salcedo Lagos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last time, architectural design has developed partly due to new digital design techniques, which allow the generation of geometries based on the definition of initial parameters and the programming of formal relationship between them. Design processes based on these technologies allow to create shapes with the capacity to modify and adapt to multiple constrains or specific evaluation criteria, which raises the problem of identifying the best architectural solution. Several experiences have set up the utilization of genetic algorithm to face this problem. This paper demonstrates the possibility to implement a parametric analysis of architectural volumes with genetic algorithm, in order to combine functional, environmental and structural requirements, with an effective search method to select a variety of proper solutions through digital technologies.

  6. Multivariate Survival Mixed Models for Genetic Analysis of Longevity Traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel Maia, Rafael; Madsen, Per; Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    A class of multivariate mixed survival models for continuous and discrete time with a complex covariance structure is introduced in a context of quantitative genetic applications. The methods introduced can be used in many applications in quantitative genetics although the discussion presented...... concentrates on longevity studies. The framework presented allows to combine models based on continuous time with models based on discrete time in a joint analysis. The continuous time models are approximations of the frailty model in which the hazard function will be assumed to be piece-wise constant....... The discrete time models used are multivariate variants of the discrete relative risk models. These models allow for regular parametric likelihood-based inference by exploring a coincidence of their likelihood functions and the likelihood functions of suitably defined multivariate generalized linear mixed...

  7. Multivariate Survival Mixed Models for Genetic Analysis of Longevity Traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel Maia, Rafael; Madsen, Per; Labouriau, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    A class of multivariate mixed survival models for continuous and discrete time with a complex covariance structure is introduced in a context of quantitative genetic applications. The methods introduced can be used in many applications in quantitative genetics although the discussion presented...... concentrates on longevity studies. The framework presented allows to combine models based on continuous time with models based on discrete time in a joint analysis. The continuous time models are approximations of the frailty model in which the hazard function will be assumed to be piece-wise constant....... The discrete time models used are multivariate variants of the discrete relative risk models. These models allow for regular parametric likelihood-based inference by exploring a coincidence of their likelihood functions and the likelihood functions of suitably defined multivariate generalized linear mixed...

  8. Genetic Analysis on Bent Characters of Cucumber Fruit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Peng; QIN Zhiwei; WANG Lili; ZHOU Xiuyan

    2011-01-01

    Bent varieties and straight varieties were made as parents for the genetic analysis to investigate cucumber bending genetic mechanism. The results showed that the bent characters of the cucumber fruit (BCCF) were quantitative inheritance controlled by multiple genes and major genes. The additive effect played the main role and the dominance effect played the lesser role. Compared with the additive environmental variance, the dominant-environmental variance was more important and the cucumber fruit was more easily affected by the additive effect. The broad heritability and the narrow heritability of BCCF were both higher. The varieties of D0455 and D07299 could be used as parents which were benefit for improving the straight characters of the cucumber fruit

  9. Morphological characterization and genetic analysis of Drechslera teres isolates

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    Frazzon A.P.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Net blotch, caused by the phytopathogen Drechslera teres, is a common disease of barley (Hordeum vulgare L and is responsible for large economic losses in some barley growing areas. In this study the morphology and genetic variability of eight D. teres isolates from different regions of the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul were investigated. Colony morphology was studied on potato-dextrose-agar (PDA and genetic variability investigated using the random amplified polymorphic-DNA (RAPD technique. 27 commercially available primers were tested of which 16 were selected for use in polymorphic analysis due to their good resolution and reproducibility. Similarity coefficients were used to construct dendrograms based on colony morphology and RAPD data showing the relationship between the eight isolates studied. Colony morphology showed variability between the isolates while RAPD assays showed high similarity coefficients, but grouping of the isolates according to the geographic origins of the seeds from which they were isolated was not possible.

  10. An adult multifocal medulloblastoma with diffuse acute postoperative cerebellar swelling: immunohistochemical and molecular genetics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balik, Vladimir; Trojanec, Radek; Holzerova, Milena; Tuckova, Lucie; Sulla, Igor; Megova, Magdalena; Vaverka, Miroslav; Hrabalek, Lumir; Ehrmann, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB), the most common malignant tumor typically affecting children, occurs only exceptionally in adults. Multifocal presentation of this malignancy in adulthood is even much rarer—only four cases with favorable postoperative course have been reported, so far. The study illustrates a very rare rapid postoperative clinical deterioration due to diffuse cerebellar swelling (DCS) in an adult multifocal MB (MMB). To the best of their knowledge, authors for the first time performed genetic analysis of MMB and demonstrated expression patterns of selected markers that put the patient within the sonic hedgehog (SHH) molecular subgroup and at least partially explain her unsatisfactory clinical course. Herein, authors summarized the relevant literature concerning this issue with the aim to determine features that would facilitate diagnosis and therapy of such a scarce clinical entity.

  11. Synchronous Onset of Breast and Pancreatic Cancers: Results of Germline and Somatic Genetic Analysis

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    Michael Castro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Synchronous cancers have occasionally been detected at initial diagnosis among patients with breast and ovarian cancer. However, simultaneous coexistence and diagnosis of breast and pancreas cancer has not previously been reported. Case Report: Paternal transmission of a germline BRCA2 mutation to a patient who was diagnosed at age 40 with locally advanced breast and pancreas cancer is presented. Somatic genomic analysis of both cancers with next-generation DNA sequencing confirmed the germline result and reported a variety of variants of unknown significance alterations, of which two were present in both the breast and pancreas cancers. Discussion: The possibility that genomic alterations could have been responsible for modulating the phenotypic or clinical expression of this rare presentation is considered. The authors call attention to the practice of privatizing the clinicogenetic information gained from genetic testing and call for health policy that will facilitate sharing in order to advance the outcomes of patients diagnosed with hereditary cancers.

  12. DNA degradation and genetic analysis of empty puparia: genetic identification limits in forensic entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzanti, Morena; Alessandrini, Federica; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Wells, Jeffrey D; Campobasso, Carlo P

    2010-02-25

    Puparial cases are common remnants of necrophagous flies in crime investigations. They usually represent the longest developmental time and, therefore, they can be very useful for the estimation of the post-mortem interval (PMI). However, before any PMI estimate, it is crucial to identify the species of fly eclosed from each puparium associated with the corpse. Morphological characteristics of the puparium are often distinctive enough to permit a species identification. But, even an accurate morphological analysis of empty puparia cannot discriminate among different species of closely related flies. Furthermore, morphological identification may be impossible if the fly puparia are poorly preserved or in fragments. This study explores the applicability of biomolecular techniques on empty puparia and their fragments for identification purposes. A total of 63 empty puparia of necrophagous Diptera resulting from forensic casework were examined. Samples were divided into three groups according to size, type and time of eclosion in order to verify whether the physical characteristics and puparia weathering can influence the amount of DNA extraction. The results suggest that a reliable genetic identification of forensically important flies may also be performed from empty puparia and/or their fragments. However, DNA degradation can deeply compromise the genetic analysis since the older the fly puparia, the smaller are the amplified fragments.

  13. Facilitators and barriers to quality of care in maternal, newborn and child health: a global situational analysis through metareview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Manisha; Yoshida, Sachiyo; Lambrechts, Thierry; Boschi-Pinto, Cynthia; Bose, Krishna; Mason, Elizabeth Mary; Mathai, Matthews

    2014-05-22

    Conduct a global situational analysis to identify the current facilitators and barriers to improving quality of care (QoC) for pregnant women, newborns and children. Metareview of published and unpublished systematic reviews and meta-analyses conducted between January 2000 and March 2013 in any language. Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) is used to assess the methodological quality of systematic reviews. Health systems of all countries. Study outcome: QoC measured using surrogate indicators--effective, efficient, accessible, acceptable/patient centred, equitable and safe. Conducted in two phases (1) qualitative synthesis of extracted data to identify and group the facilitators and barriers to improving QoC, for each of the three population groups, into the six domains of WHO's framework and explore new domains and (2) an analysis grid to map the common facilitators and barriers. We included 98 systematic reviews with 110 interventions to improve QoC from countries globally. The facilitators and barriers identified fitted the six domains of WHO's framework--information, patient-population engagement, leadership, regulations and standards, organisational capacity and models of care. Two new domains, 'communication' and 'satisfaction', were generated. Facilitators included active and regular interpersonal communication between users and providers; respect, confidentiality, comfort and support during care provision; engaging users in decision-making; continuity of care and effective audit and feedback mechanisms. Key barriers identified were language barriers in information and communication; power difference between users and providers; health systems not accounting for user satisfaction; variable standards of implementation of standard guidelines; shortage of resources in health facilities and lack of studies assessing the role of leadership in improving QoC. These were common across the three population groups. The barriers to good

  14. Functional and Genetic Analysis of Spectraplakins in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Ines; Ronshaugen, Matthew; Sánchez-Soriano, Natalia; Prokop, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a dynamic network of filamentous protein polymers required for virtually all cellular processes. It consists of three major classes, filamentous actin (F-actin), intermediate filaments, and microtubules, all displaying characteristic structural properties, functions, cellular distributions, and sets of interacting regulatory proteins. One unique class of proteins, the spectraplakins, bind, regulate, and integrate the functions of all three classes of cytoskeleton proteins. Spectraplakins are giant, evolutionary conserved multidomain proteins (spanning up to 9000 aa) that are true members of the plakin, spectrin, and Gas2-like protein families. They have OMIM-listed disease links to epidermolysis bullosa and hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy. Their role in disease is likely underrepresented since studies in model animal systems have revealed critical roles in polarity, morphogenesis, differentiation and maintenance, migration, signaling, and intracellular trafficking in a variety of tissues. This enormous diversity of spectraplakin function is consistent with the numerous isoforms produced from single genomic loci that combine different sets of functional domains in distinct cellular contexts. To study the broad range of functions and complexity of these proteins, Drosophila is a powerful model. Thus, the fly spectraplakin Short stop (Shot) acts as an actin-microtubule linker and plays important roles in many developmental processes, which provide experimentally amenable and relevant contexts in which to study spectraplakin functions. For these studies, a versatile range of relevant experimental resources that facilitate genetics and transgenic approaches, highly refined genomics tools, and an impressive set of spectraplakin-specific genetic and molecular tools are readily available. Here, we use the example of Shot to illustrate how the various tools and strategies available for Drosophila can be employed to decipher and dissect

  15. Genetic Geostatistical Framework for Spatial Analysis of Fine-Scale Genetic Heterogeneity in Modern Populations: Results from the KORA Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Diaz-Lacava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to investigate fine-scale patterns of genetic heterogeneity in modern humans from a geographic perspective, a genetic geostatistical approach framed within a geographic information system is presented. A sample collected for prospective studies in a small area of southern Germany was analyzed. None indication of genetic heterogeneity was detected in previous analysis. Socio-demographic and genotypic data of German citizens were analyzed (212 SNPs; n=728. Genetic heterogeneity was evaluated with observed heterozygosity (HO. Best-fitting spatial autoregressive models were identified, using socio-demographic variables as covariates. Spatial analysis included surface interpolation and geostatistics of observed and predicted patterns. Prediction accuracy was quantified. Spatial autocorrelation was detected for both socio-demographic and genetic variables. Augsburg City and eastern suburban areas showed higher HO values. The selected model gave best predictions in suburban areas. Fine-scale patterns of genetic heterogeneity were observed. In accordance to literature, more urbanized areas showed higher levels of admixture. This approach showed efficacy for detecting and analyzing subtle patterns of genetic heterogeneity within small areas. It is scalable in number of loci, even up to whole-genome analysis. It may be suggested that this approach may be applicable to investigate the underlying genetic history that is, at least partially, embedded in geographic data.

  16. Systematic analysis, comparison, and integration of disease based human genetic association data and mouse genetic phenotypic information

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    Wang S Alex

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic contributions to human common disorders and mouse genetic models of disease are complex and often overlapping. In common human diseases, unlike classical Mendelian disorders, genetic factors generally have small effect sizes, are multifactorial, and are highly pleiotropic. Likewise, mouse genetic models of disease often have pleiotropic and overlapping phenotypes. Moreover, phenotypic descriptions in the literature in both human and mouse are often poorly characterized and difficult to compare directly. Methods In this report, human genetic association results from the literature are summarized with regard to replication, disease phenotype, and gene specific results; and organized in the context of a systematic disease ontology. Similarly summarized mouse genetic disease models are organized within the Mammalian Phenotype ontology. Human and mouse disease and phenotype based gene sets are identified. These disease gene sets are then compared individually and in large groups through dendrogram analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis. Results Human disease and mouse phenotype gene sets are shown to group into disease and phenotypically relevant groups at both a coarse and fine level based on gene sharing. Conclusion This analysis provides a systematic and global perspective on the genetics of common human disease as compared to itself and in the context of mouse genetic models of disease.

  17. Genetic polymorphisms in the nucleotide excision repair pathway and lung cancer risk: A meta-analysis

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    Chikako Kiyohara, Kouichi Yoshimasu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Various DNA alterations can be caused by exposure to environmental and endogenous carcinogens. Most of these alterations, if not repaired, can result in genetic instability, mutagenesis and cell death. DNA repair mechanisms are important for maintaining DNA integrity and preventing carcinogenesis. Recent lung cancer studies have focused on identifying the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in candidate genes, among which DNA repair genes are increasingly being studied. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes are thought to modulate DNA repair capacity and are suggested to be related to lung cancer risk. We identified a sufficient number of epidemiologic studies on lung cancer to conduct a meta-analysis for genetic polymorphisms in nucleotide excision repair pathway genes, focusing on xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA, excision repair cross complementing group 1 (ERCC1, ERCC2/XPD, ERCC4/XPF and ERCC5/XPG. We found an increased risk of lung cancer among subjects carrying the ERCC2 751Gln/Gln genotype (odds ratio (OR = 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.14 - 1.49. We found a protective effect of the XPA 23G/G genotype (OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.59 - 0.95. Considering the data available, it can be conjectured that if there is any risk association between a single SNP and lung cancer, the risk fluctuation will probably be minimal. Advances in the identification of new polymorphisms and in high-throughput genotyping techniques will facilitate the analysis of multiple genes in multiple DNA repair pathways. Therefore, it is likely that the defining feature of future epidemiologic studies will be the simultaneous analysis of large samples.

  18. An improved Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system for the functional genetic analysis of Penicillium marneffei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummasook, Aksarakorn; Cooper, Chester R; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch

    2010-12-01

    We have developed an improved Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) system for the functional genetic analysis of Penicillium marneffei, a thermally dimorphic, human pathogenic fungus. Our AMT protocol included the use of conidia or pre-germinated conidia of P. marneffei as the host recipient for T-DNA from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and co-cultivation at 28°C for 36 hours. Bleomycin-resistant transformants were selected as yeast-like colonies following incubation at 37°C. The efficiency of transformation was approximately 123 ± 3.27 and 239 ± 13.12 transformants per plate when using 5 × 10(4) conidia and pre-germinated conidia as starting materials, respectively. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that 95% of transformants contained single copies of T-DNA. Inverse PCR was employed for identifying flanking sequences at the T-DNA insertion sites. Analysis of these sequences indicated that integration occurred as random recombination events. Among the mutants isolated were previously described stuA and gasC defective strains. These AMT-derived mutants possessed single T-DNA integrations within their particular coding sequences. In addition, other morphological and pigmentation mutants possessing a variety of gene-specific defects were isolated, including two mutants having T-DNA integrations within putative promoter regions. One of the latter integration events was accompanied by the deletion of the entire corresponding gene. Collectively, these results indicated that AMT could be used for large-scale, functional genetic analyses in P. marneffei. Such analyses can potentially facilitate the identification of those genetic elements related to morphogenesis, as well as pathogenesis in this medically important fungus.

  19. Genetic analysis and mapping of gene fzp(t) controlling spikelet differentiation in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段远霖; 李维明; 吴为人; 潘润森; 周元昌; 祁建民; 林荔辉; 陈志伟; 毛大梅; 刘华清; 张丹凤; 薛勇彪

    2003-01-01

    A mutant of spikelet differentiation in rice called frizzle panicle (fzp) was discovered in the progeny of a cross between Oryza sativa ssp. indica cv. V20B and cv. Hua1B. The mutant exhibits normal plant morphology but has apparently fewer tillers. The most striking change in fzp is that its spikelet differentiation is completely blocked, with unlimited subsequent rachis branches generated from the positions where spikelets normally develop in wild-type plants. Genetic analysis suggests that fzp is controlled by a single recessive gene, which is temporarily named fzp (t). Based on its mutant phenotype, fzp (t) represents a key gene controlling spikelet differentiation. Some F2 mutant plants derived from various genetic background appeared as the "middle type", suggesting that the action of fzp (t) is influenced by the presence of redundant, modifier or interactive genes. By using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and bulked segregant analysis (BSA) method, fzp (t) gene was mapped in the terminal region of the long arm of chromosome 7, with RM172 and RM248 on one side, 3.2 cM and 6.4 cM from fzp (t), and RM18 and RM234 on the other side, 23.1 cM and 26.3 cM from fzp(t), respectively. These results will facilitate the positional cloning and function studies of the gene.

  20. Genetic Analysis of Oncorhynchus Nerka : Life History and Genetic Analysis of Redfish Lake Oncorhynchus Nerka, 1993-1994 Completion Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brannon, E.L.; Thorgaard, G.H.; Cummings, S.A.

    1994-10-01

    The study has shown through life history examination and DNA analysis that three forms of O. nerka are present in Redfish Lake. The three forms are closely related, but may be sufficiently different to be considered three separate stocks. Fishhook Creek kokanee are temporally isolated from the beach spawners, and may represent the gene pool most similar to the historic sockeye population that once spawned there. Fishhook Creek offers the best spawning area available in the lake system, and should be considered for use in reestablishing an anadromous Fishhook Creek sockeye swain. The resident beach spawning strain of O. nerka is likewise the most similar genetic form of the companion anadromous beach spawning O. nerka, and needs to be considered the most appropriate genetic source to help minimize reduced fitness of the sockeye from inbreeding.

  1. Overview of genetic analysis of human opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spampinato, Santi M

    2015-01-01

    The human μ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), due to its genetic and structural variation, has been a target of interest in several pharmacogenetic studies. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR), encoded by OPRM1, contributes to regulate the analgesic response to pain and also controls the rewarding effects of many drugs of abuse, including opioids, nicotine, and alcohol. Genetic polymorphisms of opioid receptors are candidates for the variability of clinical opioid effects. The non-synonymous polymorphism A118G of the OPRM1 has been repeatedly associated with the efficacy of opioid treatments for pain and various types of dependence. Genetic analysis of human opioid receptors has evidenced the presence of numerous polymorphisms either in exonic or in intronic sequences as well as the presence of synonymous coding variants that may have important effects on transcription, mRNA stability, and splicing, thus affecting gene function despite not directly disrupting any specific residue. Genotyping of opioid receptors is still in its infancy and a relevant progress in this field can be achieved by using advanced gene sequencing techniques described in this review that allow the researchers to obtain vast quantities of data on human genomes and transcriptomes in a brief period of time and with affordable costs.

  2. Estimation of genetic distance of rabbit by morphometric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Brahmantiyo

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The observation on morphological body conformation of English Spot (ES, Flemish Giant (FG, New Zealand White (NZWm, and Rex (Rexm from Magelang, Central Java, and New Zealand White (NZWb, Rex (Rexb, Satin (Satin and RS (RS from Balitnak-Ciawi, were carried out to determine estimation of Mahalanobis genetic distance. This research was held in Magelang (Central Java and Balitnak-Ciawi (West Java, 237 heads of Rabbits were used. Eleven different body parts were measured, those were head (length and width, ear (length and width, chest (girth, depth, and width, humerus length, radius-ulna length, tibia length and body length. General Linear Models were used in this observation (SAS package program. Simple discriminant analyses as further analyses were done for head (length and width, chest (girth, depth, and width, humerus length, radius-ulna length, tibia length and body length. ES, FG and NZWm rabbits had morphological size bigger than others. Mahalanobis genetic distance showed that NZWm and NZWb, Rexm and Rexb were had differences with genetic distances of 5.89139 and 6.75571 respectively. Rabbits from Magelang and from Balitnak were different on morphometric with mahalanobis distance of that region ranges were 4.89426 to 6.96749. Results from canonical analysis showed that the most discriminant variables were obtained by chest girth, chest width and humerus length on first canonical and head length on second cannonical.

  3. Genetic analysis of a congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus pedigree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yunfeng; Lai, Xiaoyang; Xiao, Xinlan; Li, Jing; Yu, Rong; Gao, Hui; Zhang, Meiying

    2014-01-01

    As an X-linked recessive way, arginine vasopressin receptor 2 (AVPR2) gene mutation resulted in a hereditary disease - congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (CNDI). We found a suspect clinical CNDI pedigree. In order to identify the genetic etiology, we performed the genetic analysis. The clinical features of the proband and his family members were recorded. The laboratory tests and imaging inspections were analyzed. The water deprivation and pituitrin loading test were performed in the proband and his brother. The genomic DNA of all the members of the pedigree was extracted and then PCR amplification on AVPR2 gene was carried out. Sequencing in both directions was performed to identify mutation on AVPR2 gene. Both the proband and his brother were diagnosed as CNDI, meanwhile the other members of this pedigree were normal. No severe biochemical abnormality was found in the two CNDI patients. Both the patients had moderate urinary retention, severe megaloureter and hydronephrosis, and mild renal insufficiency. Two mutations of AVPR2 gene were discovered in the 3rd exon in the patients, a silent mutation L309L and a nonsense mutation R337X. The AVPR2 gene R337X mutation was co-segregated with CNDI. R337X mutation was not a reported mutation in the mainland of China. The AVPR2 gene R337X mutation was also a genetic etiology of CNDI patients in the mainland of China.

  4. Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of feline calicivirus isolates in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yaxin; Deng, Mingliang; Peng, Zhong; Hu, Ruiming; Chen, Huanchun; Wu, Bin

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of Chinese feline calicivirus (FCV) isolates and their phylogenetic relationship with isolates from elsewhere in the world. Phylogenetic analysis was performed based on the partial open reading frame (ORF) 2 sequences (regions B-F) of 21 Chinese FCV isolates and 30 global isolates. The Chinese isolates included 13 isolates from Wuhan, which were isolated in this study, and eight previously published isolates. Sixteen Chinese isolates and two Japanese isolates formed a distinct phylogenetic cluster. Phylogenetic analysis based on the sequences of the complete genome, ORF1, ORF2 and ORF3 of selected isolates supported the above findings. Genogroup analysis revealed that FCV genogroup II is present in China. These findings suggest that Chinese FCV isolates are closely related to Japanese FCV isolates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic Analysis of Early Generation Stability in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Jun; Ao Guang-Hui; XIAO Yi; WU Xian-Jun; LI Shi-Gui

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of early generation stability (EGS) in rice was studied via genetic analysis. Three types of crosses were made, namely between EGS varieties, EGS and conventional rice variety, and conventional rice varieties. The genetic analysis was based on the stable lines in F2 population. The stable lines may appear from some combinations of EGS rice crossing with each other and EGS rice crossing with conventional varieties at different frequencies, but stable lines didn't appear in conventional varieties crossing with conventional varieties. Genetic analysis results indicated that the EGS phenomena should just exist in special rice materials, and the frequency of stable lines was closely related to the EGS traits of parents. The EGS traits were neither qualitative nor quantitative traits, and they were controlled by neither dominant genes nor recessive genes. The EGS traits might be inherited by F1 single plant, and the traits of F3 and F4 were corresponded to those of F2 population, i.e. F3 and F4 lines derived from non-segregating F2 showed uniform agronomic traits, and those from segregating F2.did not. The agronomic traits of EGS lines were consistent with those of F1 single plant. On the other hand, when EGS lines occurred, the segregating lines in Mendelian manner were also observed in all F2 population of the same combination. It was suggested that the reason why the stable strains occurred might be a special factor to control (open/close) gene at the beginning of cell division in zygote, resulting in closing mitosis and opening somatic reduction. The somatic reduction of zygote resulted in recombination and homozygosity forming in F1 single plant,and some lines with uniform agronomic traits were observed in some lines of F2 population.

  6. The challenges of facilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika

    and at the same time make closures in order to secure progress in the process? The analysis draws upon theoretical perspectives on deliberative democracy and facilitation. Whereas, the scholarly literature on deliberative democracy is rich in describing potential outcomes and criteria for deliberative processes...... hours transcriptions of three table deliberations; questionnaires of 91 participants, 2 focus group interviews with participants and facilitators....

  7. A cluster analysis on road traffic accidents using genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharan, Sabariah; Baragona, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    The analysis of traffic road accidents is increasingly important because of the accidents cost and public road safety. The availability or large data sets makes the study of factors that affect the frequency and severity accidents are viable. However, the data are often highly unbalanced and overlapped. We deal with the data set of the road traffic accidents recorded in Christchurch, New Zealand, from 2000-2009 with a total of 26440 accidents. The data is in a binary set and there are 50 factors road traffic accidents with four level of severity. We used genetic algorithm for the analysis because we are in the presence of a large unbalanced data set and standard clustering like k-means algorithm may not be suitable for the task. The genetic algorithm based on clustering for unknown K, (GCUK) has been used to identify the factors associated with accidents of different levels of severity. The results provided us with an interesting insight into the relationship between factors and accidents severity level and suggest that the two main factors that contributes to fatal accidents are "Speed greater than 60 km h" and "Did not see other people until it was too late". A comparison with the k-means algorithm and the independent component analysis is performed to validate the results.

  8. EMBO Course “Formal Analysis of Genetic Regulation”

    CERN Document Server

    1979-01-01

    The E M B 0 course on "Formal Analysis of Genetic Regulation" A course entitled "Formal analysis of Genetic Regulation" was held at the University of Brussels from 6 to 16 September 1977 under the auspices of EMBO (European Molecular Biology Organization). As indicated by the title of the book (but not explicitly enough by the title of the course), the main emphasis was put on a dynamic analysis of systems using logical methods, that is, methods in which functions and variables take only a limited number of values - typically two. In this respect, this course was complementary to an EMBO course using continuous methods which was held some months later in Israel by Prof. Segel. People from four very different laboratories took an active part in teaching our course in Brussels : Drs Anne LEUSSLER and Philippe VAN HAM, from the Laboratory of Prof. Jean FLORINE (Laboratoire des Systemes logiques et numeriques, Faculte des Sciences appliquees, Universite Libre de Bruxelles). Dr Stuart KAUFFMAN (Dept. of Biochemist...

  9. Implementation of a health care policy: An analysis of barriers and facilitators to practice change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sword Wendy

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Governments often create policies that rely on implementation by arms length organizations and require practice changes on the part of different segments of the health care system without understanding the differences in and complexities of these agencies. In 2000, in response to publicity about the shortening length of postpartum hospital stay, the Ontario government created a universal program offering up to a 60-hour postpartum stay and a public health follow-up to mothers and newborn infants. The purpose of this paper is to examine how a health policy initiative was implemented in two different parts of a health care system and to analyze the barriers and facilitators to achieving practice change. Methods The data reported came from two studies of postpartum health and service use in Ontario Canada. Data were collected from newly delivered mothers who had uncomplicated vaginal deliveries. The study samples were drawn from the same five purposefully selected hospitals for both studies. Questionnaires prior to discharge and structured telephone interviews at 4-weeks post discharge were used to collect data before and after policy implementation. Qualitative data were collected using focus groups with hospital and community-based health care practitioners and administrators at each site. Results In both studies, the respondents reflected a population of women who experienced an "average" or non-eventful hospital-based, singleton vaginal delivery. The findings of the second study demonstrated wide variance in implementation of the offer of a 60-hour stay among the sites and focus groups revealed that none of the hospitals acknowledged the 60-hour stay as an official policy. The uptake of the offer of a 60-hour stay was unrelated to the rate of offer. The percentage of women with a hospital stay of less than 25 hours and the number with the guideline that the call be within 48 hours of hospital discharge. Public health

  10. Haplotype sharing analysis with SNPs in candidate genes : The genetic analysis workshop 12 example

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, C; Beckmann, L; Majoram, P; Meerman, GT; Chang-Claude, J

    2003-01-01

    Haplotype sharing analysis was used to investigate the association of affection status with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotypes within candidate gene 1 in one sample each from the isolated and the general population of Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 12 simulated data. Gene 1 has direct

  11. Stability and parameter dependency analysis of a facilitation tectal column (FTC) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Pérez, F; Arbib, M A

    1990-01-01

    Mathematical models and computer simulations have been widely used to study the spatio-temporal characteristics of the processing of information carried out by the central nervous system. When trying to show whether or not a neural model accounts for the phenomena under study, if the number of parameters whose values need to be calculated becomes large, then computer simulations alone become very inefficient to define such values. Here, we developed stability and parameter dependency analyses of the mathematical representation of a single facilitation tectal column (FTC) model, to show how by using techniques from non-linear systems theory we can define the ranges of parameter values under which the model would explain the required performance of the neural net model. The benefits of these analyses can be grouped in two parts: first, the advantage of using non-linear systems techniques to analyze, analytically, the dynamics of neural net models; and second, we get a deeper understanding of why the hypotheses embedded in the models yield the appropriate behaviors and what are the critical situations (parametric combinations) under which these behaviors are displayed.

  12. Dielectrophoretic capture and genetic analysis of single neuroblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Carpenter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the diversity of cells that escape the primary tumor and seed micrometastases remains rudimentary, and approaches for studying circulating and disseminated tumor cells have been limited by low throughput and sensitivity, reliance on single parameter sorting, and a focus on enumeration rather than phenotypic and genetic characterization. Here we utilize a highly sensitive microfluidic and dielectrophoretic approach for the isolation and genetic analysis of individual tumor cells. We employed fluorescence labeling to isolate 208 single cells from spiking experiments conducted with 11 cell lines, including 8 neuroblastoma cell lines, and achieved a capture sensitivity of 1 tumor cell per 106 white blood cells. Sample fixation or freezing had no detectable effect on cell capture. Point mutations were accurately detected in the whole genome amplification product of captured single tumor cells but not in negative control white blood cells. We applied this approach to capture 144 single tumor cells from 10 bone marrow samples from patients suffering from neuroblastoma. In this pediatric malignancy, high-risk patients often exhibit wide-spread hematogenous metastasis, but access to primary tumor can be difficult or impossible. Here we used flow-based sorting to pre-enrich samples with tumor involvement below 0.02%. For all patients for whom a mutation in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase gene had already been detected in their primary tumor, the same mutation was detected in single cells from their marrow. These findings demonstrate a novel, non-invasive, and adaptable method for the capture and genetic analysis of single tumor cells from cancer patients.

  13. Genetic analysis of growth curves using the SAEM algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavielle Marc

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The analysis of nonlinear function-valued characters is very important in genetic studies, especially for growth traits of agricultural and laboratory species. Inference in nonlinear mixed effects models is, however, quite complex and is usually based on likelihood approximations or Bayesian methods. The aim of this paper was to present an efficient stochastic EM procedure, namely the SAEM algorithm, which is much faster to converge than the classical Monte Carlo EM algorithm and Bayesian estimation procedures, does not require specification of prior distributions and is quite robust to the choice of starting values. The key idea is to recycle the simulated values from one iteration to the next in the EM algorithm, which considerably accelerates the convergence. A simulation study is presented which confirms the advantages of this estimation procedure in the case of a genetic analysis. The SAEM algorithm was applied to real data sets on growth measurements in beef cattle and in chickens. The proposed estimation procedure, as the classical Monte Carlo EM algorithm, provides significance tests on the parameters and likelihood based model comparison criteria to compare the nonlinear models with other longitudinal methods.

  14. Genetic analysis of growth traits in Harnali sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present investigation was to study genetic characteristics of Harnali sheep with respect to growth performance and to estimate genetic parameters. Materials and Methods: The 22 years (1992-2013 data of growth traits of a 1603 synthetic population of Harnali sheep maintained at Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Hisar, was utilized for this study. A mixed methodology with regression on their dam’s weight was used to study the effect of non-genetic factors on growth traits. Heritability, genetic and phenotypic correlations were estimated using paternal half-sib analysis for body weight at various ages and average daily gain (ADG for different growth periods. Result: The overall least squares mean of body weights recorded for birth weight (BW, weaning weight (WW, six months body weight (SMW, one yearling body weight (YBW, average daily gain from birth to 3 months (ADG1 and average daily gain from 3 to 12 months (ADG2 were 3.35±0.05 kg, 12.41±0.08 kg, 16.30±0.12 kg, 21.88±0.08 kg, 100.66±0.86 g/day and 35.07±0.39 g/day, respectively. The effects of year of birth significantly (p<0.01 influenced the BW, WW, SMW, YWB, ADG1 and ADG2. The effects of sex of lamb significantly (p<0.01 influenced the BW, WW SMW, YWB, ADG1 and ADG2. The effects of dam’s weight at lambing significantly (p<0.01 influenced BW, WW, SMW, YWB, ADG1 and ADG2. No definite trend was observed over the years for the averages of body weight and gain. The heritability estimates of BW, WW, SMW, YBW, ADG1 and ADG2 were 0.40±0.05, 0.38±0.05, 0.45±0.06, 0.29±0.05, 0.40±0.06 and 0.33±0.02, respectively. The male lambs were significantly heavier than females at all stages of growth. The heritability estimates were moderate for all the growth traits and high genetic correlations of BW and WW with SMW were found. Conclusion: Due to high heritability and positive correlations of SMW with other body weights and daily gain, it was concluded that

  15. Whole genome SNP discovery and analysis of genetic diversity in Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslam Muhammad L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The turkey (Meleagris gallopavo is an important agricultural species and the second largest contributor to the world’s poultry meat production. Genetic improvement is attributed largely to selective breeding programs that rely on highly heritable phenotypic traits, such as body size and breast muscle development. Commercial breeding with small effective population sizes and epistasis can result in loss of genetic diversity, which in turn can lead to reduced individual fitness and reduced response to selection. The presence of genomic diversity in domestic livestock species therefore, is of great importance and a prerequisite for rapid and accurate genetic improvement of selected breeds in various environments, as well as to facilitate rapid adaptation to potential changes in breeding goals. Genomic selection requires a large number of genetic markers such as e.g. single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs the most abundant source of genetic variation within the genome. Results Alignment of next generation sequencing data of 32 individual turkeys from different populations was used for the discovery of 5.49 million SNPs, which subsequently were used for the analysis of genetic diversity among the different populations. All of the commercial lines branched from a single node relative to the heritage varieties and the South Mexican turkey population. Heterozygosity of all individuals from the different turkey populations ranged from 0.17-2.73 SNPs/Kb, while heterozygosity of populations ranged from 0.73-1.64 SNPs/Kb. The average frequency of heterozygous SNPs in individual turkeys was 1.07 SNPs/Kb. Five genomic regions with very low nucleotide variation were identified in domestic turkeys that showed state of fixation towards alleles different than wild alleles. Conclusion The turkey genome is much less diverse with a relatively low frequency of heterozygous SNPs as compared to other livestock species like chicken and pig. The

  16. Characteristic analysis and prevention on premature convergence in genetic algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐宗本; 高勇

    1997-01-01

    The identification and characteristics of premature convergence in genetic algorithms (GAs) are investigated Through a detailed quantitative analysis on the search capability and the degree of population diversity, the cause of premature convergence in GAs is recognized, and attributed to the maturation effect of the GAs: The minimum schema deduced from current population, which is the largest search space of a GA, converges to a homogeneous population in probability 1 ( so the search capability of the GA decreases and premature convergence occurs). It is shown that, as quantitative features of the maturation effect, the degree of population diversity converges to zero with probability 1, and the tendency for premature convergence is inversely proportional to the population size and directly proportional to the variance of the fitness ratio of zero allele at any gene position of the current population. Based on the theoretical analysis, several strategies for preventing premature convergence are suggest

  17. Analysis of Japanese newspaper articles on genetic modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuma Shineha

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The rapid spread of technologies involving the application of “Genetic Modification (GM” raised the need for science communication on this new technology in society. To consider the communication on GM in the society, an understanding of the current mass media is required. This paper shows the whole picture of newspaper discourses on GM in Japan. For the Japanese public, newspapers represent one of the major sources of information on GM. We subjected the two Japanese newspapers with the largest circulation, the Asahi Shimbun and Yomiuri Shimbun, to an analysis of the full text of approximately 4000 articles on GM published over the past to perform an assessment of the change of reportage on GM. As for the most important results, our analysis shows that there are two significant shifts with respect to the major topics addressed in articles on GM by Japanese newspapers.

  18. Facilitators and barriers for the adoption, implementation and monitoring of child safety interventions: a multinational qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtes, Beatrice; Schröder-Bäck, Peter; MacKay, J Morag; Vincenten, Joanne; Förster, Katharina; Brand, Helmut

    2017-06-01

    The efficiency and effectiveness of child safety interventions are determined by the quality of the implementation process. This multinational European study aimed to identify facilitators and barriers for the three phases of implementation: adoption, implementation and monitoring (AIM process). Twenty-seven participants from across the WHO European Region were invited to provide case studies of child safety interventions from their country. Cases were selected by the authors to ensure broad coverage of injury issues, age groups and governance level of implementation (eg, national, regional or local). Each participant presented their case and provided a written account according to a standardised template. Presentations and question and answer sessions were recorded. The presentation slides, written accounts and the notes taken during the workshops were analysed using thematic content analysis to elicit facilitators and barriers. Twenty-six cases (from 26 different countries) were presented and analysed. Facilitators and barriers were identified within eight general themes, applicable across the AIM process: management and collaboration; resources; leadership; nature of the intervention; political, social and cultural environment; visibility; nature of the injury problem and analysis and interpretation. The importance of the quality of the implementation process for intervention effectiveness, coupled with limited resources for child safety makes it more difficult to achieve successful actions. The findings of this study, divided by phase of the AIM process, provide practitioners with practical suggestions, where proactive planning might help increase the likelihood of effective implementation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Genetic analysis of superovulatory response of Holstein cows in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaton, C; Koeck, A; Sargolzaei, M; Malchiodi, F; Price, C A; Schenkel, F S; Miglior, F

    2016-05-01

    Superovulation of dairy cattle is frequently used in Canada. The cost of this protocol is high, and so is the variability of the outcome. Knowing the superovulatory potential of a donor cow could influence the breeder's decision to superovulate it or not. The main objective of this study was to perform a genetic analysis for superovulatory response of Holstein cows in Canada using data recorded by Holstein Canada, and to investigate if these data could be used for genetic evaluation. Data contained the total number of embryos and the number of viable embryos from every successful flushing performed across Canada. After editing, 137,446 records of superovulation performed between 1992 and 2014 were analyzed. A univariate repeatability animal model analysis was performed for both total number of embryos and number of viable embryos. Because both data and residuals did not follow a normal distribution, records were subject to either logarithmic or Anscombe transformation. Using logarithmic transformation, heritability estimates (SE) of 0.15 (0.01) and 0.14 (0.01) were found for total number of embryos and number of viable embryos, respectively. Using Anscombe transformation, heritability estimates (SE) of 0.17 (0.01) and 0.14 (0.01) were found for total number of embryos and number of viable embryos, respectively. The genetic correlation between the 2 traits was estimated at 0.97 using logarithmic transformation and 0.95 using Anscombe transformation. Breeding values were estimated for 54,463 cows, and 3,513 sires. Only estimated breeding values of sires having a reliability higher than 40% were considered for estimated breeding values correlations with other routinely evaluated traits. The results showed that selection for a higher response to superovulation would lead to a slight decrease in milk production, but an improvement for functional traits, including all reproduction traits. In all cases, the estimated correlations are either low or modest. We conclude that

  20. Strategies for integrated analysis of genetic, epigenetic and gene expression variation in cancer: addressing the challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Bruun Thingholm

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The development and progression of cancer, a collection of diseases with complex genetic architectures, is facilitated by the interplay of multiple etiological factors. This complexity challenges the traditional single-platform study design and calls for an integrated approach to data analysis. However, integration of heterogeneous measurements of biological variation is a non-trivial exercise due to the diversity of the human genome and the variety of output data formats and genome coverage obtained from the commonly used molecular platforms. This review article will provide an introduction to integration strategies used for analyzing genetic risk factors for cancer. We critically examine the ability of these strategies to handle the complexity of the human genome and also accommodate information about the biological and functional interactions between the elements that have been measured – making the assessment of disease risk against a composite genomic factor possible. The focus of this review is to provide an overview and introduction to the main strategies and to discuss where there is a need for further development.

  1. Molecular and Genetic Analysis of Hormone-Regulated Differential Cell Elongation in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, Joseph R.

    2002-12-03

    The authors have utilized the response of Arabidopsis seedlings to the plant hormone ethylene to identify new genes involved in the regulation of ethylene biosynthesis, perception, signal transduction and differential cell growth. In building a genetic framework for the action of these genes, they developed a molecular model that has facilitated the understanding of the molecular requirements of ethylene for cell elongation processes. The ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis appears to be primarily linear and is defined by the genes: ETR1, ETR2, ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, CTR1, EIN2, EIN3, EIN5 EIN6, and EIN. Downstream branches identified by the HLS1, EIR1, and AUX1 genes involve interactions with other hormonal (auxin) signals in the process of differential cell elongation in the hypocotyl hook. Cloning and characterization of HLS1 and three HLS1-LIKE genes in the laboratory has been supported under this award. HLS1 is required for differential elongation of cells in the hypocotyl and may act in the establishment of hormone gradients. Also during the award period, they have identified and begun preliminary characterization of two genes that genetically act upstream of the ethylene receptors. ETO1 and RAN1 encode negative regulators of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling respectively. Progress on the analysis of these genes along with HOOKLESS1 is described.

  2. Hardware Genetic Algorithm Optimization by Critical Path Analysis using a Custom VLSI Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farouk Smith

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper propose a Virtual-Field Programmable Gate Array (V-FPGA architecture that allows direct access to its configuration bits to facilitate hardware evolution, thereby allowing any combinational or sequential digital circuit to be realized. By using the V-FPGA, this paper investigates two possible ways of making evolutionary hardware systems more scalable: by optimizing the system’s genetic algorithm (GA; and by decomposing the solution circuit into smaller, evolvable sub-circuits. GA optimization is done by: omitting a canonical GA’s crossover operator (i.e. by using a 1+λ algorithm; applying evolution constraints; and optimizing the fitness function. A noteworthy contribution this research has made is the in-depth analysis of the phenotypes’ CPs. Through analyzing the CPs, it has been shown that a great amount of insight can be gained into a phenotype’s fitness. We found that as the number of columns in the Cartesian Genetic Programming array increases, so the likelihood of an external output being placed in the column decreases. Furthermore, the number of used LEs per column also substantially decreases per added column. Finally, we demonstrated the evolution of a state-decomposed control circuit. It was shown that the evolution of each state’s sub-circuit was possible, and suggest that modular evolution can be a successful tool when dealing with scalability.

  3. Covalently deposited dyes: a new chromogen paradigm that facilitates analysis of multiple biomarkers in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, William A; Lefever, Mark R; Ochs, Robert L; Pedata, Anne; Behman, Lauren J; Ashworth-Sharpe, Julia; Johnson, Donald D; May, Eric J; Grille, James G; Roberts, Esteban A; Kosmeder, Jerry W; Morrison, Larry E

    2017-01-01

    Multiplexed analysis of multiple biomarkers in a tissue sample requires use of reporter dyes with specific spectral properties that enable discrimination of signals. Conventional chromogens with broad absorbance spectra, widely used in immunohistochemistry (IHC), offer limited utility for multiplexed detection. Many dyes with narrow absorbance spectra, eg rhodamines, fluoresceins, and cyanines, potentially useful for multiplexed detection are well-characterized; however, generation of a chromogenic reagent useful for IHC analysis has not been demonstrated. Studies reported herein demonstrate utility of tyramine-chemistry for synthesis of a wide variety of new chromogenic dye conjugates useful for multiplexed in situ analysis using conventional light microscopes. The dyes, useful individually or in blends to generate new colors, provide signal sensitivity and dynamic range similar to conventional DAB chromogen, while enabling analysis of co-localized biomarkers. It is anticipated that this new paradigm will enable generation of a wide variety of new chromogens, useful for both research and clinical biomarker analysis that will benefit clinicians and patients.

  4. Reliable Quantitative SERS Analysis Facilitated by Core-Shell Nanoparticles with Embedded Internal Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei; Lin, Xuan; Jiang, Chaoyang; Li, Chaoyu; Lin, Haixin; Huang, Jingtao; Wang, Shuo; Liu, Guokun; Yan, Xiaomei; Zhong, Qiling; Ren, Bin

    2015-06-15

    Quantitative analysis is a great challenge in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Core-molecule-shell nanoparticles with two components in the molecular layer, a framework molecule to form the shell, and a probe molecule as a Raman internal standard, were rationally designed for quantitative SERS analysis. The signal of the embedded Raman probe provides effective feedback to correct the fluctuation of samples and measuring conditions. Meanwhile, target molecules with different affinities can be adsorbed onto the shell. The quantitative analysis of target molecules over a large concentration range has been demonstrated with a linear response of the relative SERS intensity versus the surface coverage, which has not been achieved by conventional SERS methods.

  5. Facilitation of the PED analysis of large molecules by using global coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamróz, Michał H; Ostrowski, Sławomir; Dobrowolski, Jan Cz

    2015-10-01

    Global coordinates have been found to be useful in the potential energy distribution (PED) analyses of the following large molecules: [13]-acene and [33]-helicene. The global coordinate is defined based on much distanced fragments of the analysed molecule, whereas so far, the coordinates used in the analysis were based on stretchings, bendings, or torsions of the adjacent atoms. It has been shown that the PED analyses performed using the global coordinate and the classical ones can lead to exactly the same PED contributions. The global coordinates may significantly improve the facility of the analysis of the vibrational spectra of large molecules.

  6. fullfact: an R package for the analysis of genetic and maternal variance components from full factorial mating designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houde, Aimee Lee S; Pitcher, Trevor E

    2016-03-01

    Full factorial breeding designs are useful for quantifying the amount of additive genetic, nonadditive genetic, and maternal variance that explain phenotypic traits. Such variance estimates are important for examining evolutionary potential. Traditionally, full factorial mating designs have been analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance, which may produce negative variance values and is not suited for unbalanced designs. Mixed-effects models do not produce negative variance values and are suited for unbalanced designs. However, extracting the variance components, calculating significance values, and estimating confidence intervals and/or power values for the components are not straightforward using traditional analytic methods. We introduce fullfact - an R package that addresses these issues and facilitates the analysis of full factorial mating designs with mixed-effects models. Here, we summarize the functions of the fullfact package. The observed data functions extract the variance explained by random and fixed effects and provide their significance. We then calculate the additive genetic, nonadditive genetic, and maternal variance components explaining the phenotype. In particular, we integrate nonnormal error structures for estimating these components for nonnormal data types. The resampled data functions are used to produce bootstrap-t confidence intervals, which can then be plotted using a simple function. We explore the fullfact package through a worked example. This package will facilitate the analyses of full factorial mating designs in R, especially for the analysis of binary, proportion, and/or count data types and for the ability to incorporate additional random and fixed effects and power analyses.

  7. Genetic analysis of a congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus pedigree

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Yunfeng; Lai Xiaoyang; Xiao Xinlan; Li Jing; Yu Rong; Gao Hui; Zhang Meiying

    2014-01-01

    Background As an X-linked recessive way,arginine vasopressin receptor 2 (AVPR2) gene mutation resulted in a hereditary disease-congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (CNDI).We found a suspect clinical CNDI pedigree.In order to identify the genetic etiology,we performed the genetic analysis.Methods The clinical features of the proband and his family members were recorded.The laboratory tests and imaging inspections were analyzed.The water deprivation and pituitrin loading test were performed in the proband and his brother.The genomic DNA of all the members of the pedigree was extracted and then PCR amplification on AVPR2 gene was carried out.Sequencing in both directions was performed to identify mutation on AVPR2 gene.Results Both the proband and his brother were diagnosed as CNDI,meanwhile the other members of this pedigree were normal.No severe biochemical abnormality was found in the two CNDI patients.Both the patients had moderate urinary retention,severe megaloureter and hydronephrosis,and mild renal insufficiency.Two mutations of AVPR2 gene were discovered in the 3rd exon in the patients,a silent mutation L309L and a nonsense mutation R337X.The AVPR2 gene R337X mutation was co-segregated with CNDI.R337X mutation was not a reported mutation in the mainland of China.Conclusion The AVPR2 gene R337X mutation was also a genetic etiology of CNDI patients in the mainland of China.

  8. SNPs ANALYSIS AS A TOOL IN MOLECULAR GENETICS DIAGNOSTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Rusnita

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakSingle Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP merupakan variasi genetik yang ditemukan pada lebih dari 1% populasi. Haplotipe, yang merupakan sekelompok SNP atau alel dalam satu kromosom, dapat di turunkan ke generasi selanjutnya dan dapat digunakan untuk menelusuri gen penyebab penyakit (marker genetik. Artikel ini bertujuan menjelaskan aplikasi analisis SNP dalam diagnosis beberapa sindrom yang disebabkan gangguan genetik. Berdasarkan laporan studi terdahulu, sindrom yang disebabkan oleh UPD (uniparental disomy maupun penyakit autosomal resesif yang muncul sebagai akibat perkawinan sedarah dapat dideteksi dengan SNP array melalui analisis block of homozygosity dalam kromosom. Kelebihan lain SNP array adalah kemampuannya dalam mendeteksi mosaicism level rendah yang tidak terdeteksi dengan pemeriksaan sitogenetik konvensional. Bahkan saat ini, SNP array sedang diujicobakan dalam IVF untuk mendapatkan bayi yang sehat. Hal ini dapat dilakukan dengan mendeteksi ada atau tidaknya gen tunggal penyebab penyakit pada embrio hasil bayi tabung sebelum embrio ditanamkan ke uterus. Analisis SNP dengan SNP array mempunyai banyak kelebihan dibanding metode pemeriksaan SNP lainnya dan diharapkan dapat digunakan secara luas dalam bidang diagnostik molekuler genetik di masa mendatang.AbstractSingle Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP is a genetic variant with a frequency of >1% of a large population. Haplotypes, a combination of a set of SNPs/alleles that appear as “associated blocks” on one chromosome, tend to be inherited together to the next offspring and can be used as genetic markers to trace particular diseases. This article aimed at explaining of SNP analysis application in diagnosis of genetic-disorder related syndrome. Previous studies showed that syndromes caused by UPD or autosomal recessive disorder as a result of consanguineous marriage can be identified by SNP array through analysing block of homozygosity region in a chromosome. Another advantage of SNP

  9. Genetic analysis of processed in-line mastitis indicator data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Peter; Løvendahl, Peter

    2013-01-01

    on exponential smoothing of the SCC values followed by factor analysis for estimation of the latent variable EMR was used. Finally, EMR was expressed as a continuum on the interval [0;1] using sigmoid transformation. Thus, an EMR value close to zero indicates low risk of mastitis and a value close to one...... indicates high risk of mastitis. The EMR values were summarized for each cow using the log-transformed median EMR. A second trait was defined as the median of the log-transformed SCC values from 5 to 305 d in milk. A bivariate animal model was used for estimation of co-variance components for the 2 traits....... The fixed part of the model included herd and parity. Estimates of heritability were 0.08 (SE = 0.04) and 0.14 (SE = 0.05) for EMR and SCC, respectively. The genetic correlation between the 2 traits was 0.97 (SE = 0.08). The high genetic correlation indicates that the 2 traits are influenced by common genes...

  10. Hereditary hemochromatosis: HFE mutation analysis in Greeks reveals genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, G; Politou, M; Terpos, E; Fourlemadis, S; Sakellaropoulos, N; Loukopoulos, D

    2000-04-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is common among Caucasians; reported disease frequencies vary from 0.3 to 0.8%. Identification of a candidate HFE gene in 1996 was soon followed by the description of two ancestral mutations, i.e., c.845G-->A (C282Y) and c.187C-->G (H63D). To these was recently added the mutation S65C, which may represent a simple polymorphism. The incidence of HH in Greece is unknown but clinical cases are rare. Also unknown is the carrier frequency of the two mutant alleles. A first estimate of the latter is given in the present report. It is based on data from the genetic analysis of 10 unrelated patients of Greek origin who were referred to our center for genotyping and 158 unselected male blood donors. The allele frequencies for the C282Y and H63D mutations were 0.003 and 0.145, respectively. The C282Y allele was detected in 50% of HH patients. This is considerably lower than the frequencies reported for HH patients in the U.S.A. (82%) and France (91 %) and closer to that reported in Italy (64%). Five patients did not carry any known HFE mutation; three may represent cases of juvenile hemochromatosis, given their early onset with iron overload, hypogonadism, and heart disease. We suggest that genetic heterogeneity is more prominent in Southern Europe. It is also possible that the penetrance of the responsible genes is different across the Mediterranean.

  11. The Nanomaterial Registry: facilitating the sharing and analysis of data in the diverse nanomaterial community

    OpenAIRE

    Ostraat ML; Mills KC; Guzan KA; Murry D

    2013-01-01

    Michele L Ostraat, Karmann C Mills, Kimberly A Guzan, Damaris MurryRTI International, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: The amount of data being generated in the nanotechnology research space is significant, and the coordination, sharing, and downstream analysis of the data is complex and consistently deliberated. The complexities of the data are due in large part to the inherently complicated characteristics of nanomaterials. Also, testing protocols and assays used for nanomaterials are diverse and l...

  12. The teacher is a facilitator: Reflecting on ESL teacher beliefs through metaphor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S. C. Farrell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metaphors offer a lens through which language teachers express their understanding of their work. Metaphor analysis can be a powerful reflective tool for expressing meanings that underpin ways of thinking about teaching and learning English as a second/foreign language. Through reflecting on their personal teaching metaphors, teachers become more aware of the beliefs that underpin their work. This paper reports the reflections on the prior beliefs of three experienced ESL teachers in Canada through the use of metaphor analysis. The paper attempts to explore the prior beliefs of the three experienced ESL teachers in Canada through metaphor analysis by using the Oxford et al. (1998 framework as a theoretical lens in which to gain understanding of the use and meaning of these metaphors. Results indicated that all three teachers used a total of 94 metaphors throughout the period of the group discussions and interviews, and that the metaphors used most were those related to learner-centered growth, followed by social order, then social reform.

  13. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  14. Burden Analysis of Rare Microdeletions Suggests a Strong Impact of Neurodevelopmental Genes in Genetic Generalised Epilepsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lal, Dennis; Ruppert, Ann-Kathrin; Trucks, Holger; Schulz, Herbert; de Kovel, Carolien G.; Trenite, Dorothee Kasteleijn-Nolst; Sonsma, Anja C. M.; Koeleman, Bobby P.; Lindhout, Dick; Weber, Yvonne G.; Lerche, Holger; Kapser, Claudia; Schankin, Christoph J.; Kunz, Wolfram S.; Surges, Rainer; Elger, Christian E.; Gaus, Verena; Schmitz, Bettina; Helbig, Ingo; Muhle, Hiltrud; Stephani, Ulrich; Klein, Karl M.; Rosenow, Felix; Neubauer, Bernd A.; Reinthaler, Eva M.; Zimprich, Fritz; Feucht, Martha; Moller, Rikke S.; Hjalgrim, Helle; De Jonghe, Peter; Suls, Arvid; Lieb, Wolfgang; Franke, Andre; Strauch, Konstantin; Gieger, Christian; Schurmann, Claudia; Schminke, Ulf; Nuernberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Genetic generalised epilepsy (GGE) is the most common form of genetic epilepsy, accounting for 20% of all epilepsies. Genomic copy number variations (CNVs) constitute important genetic risk factors of common GGE syndromes. In our present genome-wide burden analysis, large (>= 400 kb) and rare (= 200

  15. Genetic analysis of seed development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Léon-Kloosterziel, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis deals with the genetic aspects of seed development in Arabidopsisthaliana. Mutants affected in several aspects of seed development and, more specifically, in seed maturation have been isolated by various selection procedures. The mutants have been analyzed genetically, physiologically,

  16. Genetic diversity analysis of some exotic, Indian and mutant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-28

    Jun 28, 2010 ... Genetic make-up of Brassica crops has been playing a major contributory role towards its enhanced ... morphological and biochemical characteristics. The .... The genetic associations between genotypes were evaluated by.

  17. Genetic analysis of Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome in a large cohort of families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lacey S; Demir Eksi, Durkadin; Shen, Yiping; Lossie, Amy C; Chorich, Lynn P; Sullivan, Megan E; Phillips, John A; Erman, Munire; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Alper, Ozgul M; Layman, Lawrence C

    2017-07-01

    To study the genetic cause of Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome (MRKH). Although a few candidate genes and genomic domains for have been reported for MRKH, the genetic underpinnings remain largely unknown. Some of the top candidate genes are WNT4, HNF1B, and LHX1. The goals of this study were to: 1) determine the prevalence of WNT4, HNF1B, and LHX1 point mutations, as well as new copy number variants (CNVs) in people with MRKH; and 2) identify and characterize MRKH cohorts. Laboratory- and community-based study. Academic medical centers. A total of 147 MRKH probands and available family members. DNA sequencing of WNT4, HNF1B, and LHX1 in 100 MRKH patients, chromosomal microarray analysis in 31 North American MRKH patients, and characterization and sample collection of 147 North American and Turkish MRKH probands and their families. DNA sequence variants and CNVs; pedigree structural analysis. We report finding CNVs in 6/31 people (∼19%) with MRKH, but no point mutations or small indels in WNT4, HNF1B, or LHX1 in 100 MRKH patients. Our MRKH families included 43 quads, 26 trios, and 30 duos. Of our MRKH probands, 87/147 (59%) had MRKH type 1 and 60/147 (41%) had type 2 with additional anomalies. Although the prevalence of WNT4, HNF1B, and LHX1 point mutations is low in people with MRKH, the prevalence of CNVs was ∼19%. Further analysis of our large familial cohort of patients will facilitate gene discovery to better understand the complex etiology of MRKH. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  18. Darwin Meets Einstein: LISA Data Analysis Using Genetic Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Crowder, J; Reddinger, L; Cornish, Neil J.; Crowder, Jeff; Reddinger, Lucas

    2006-01-01

    This work presents the first application of the method of Genetic Algorithms (GAs) to data analysis for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). In the low frequency regime of the LISA band there are expected to be tens of thousands galactic binary systems that will be emitting gravitational waves detectable by LISA. The challenge of parameter extraction of such a large number of sources in the LISA data stream requires a search method that can efficiently explore the large parameter spaces involved. As signals of many of these sources will overlap, a global search method is desired. GAs represent such a global search method for parameter extraction of multiple overlapping sources in the LISA data stream. We find that GAs are able to correctly extract source parameters for overlapping sources. Several optimizations of a basic GA are presented with results derived from applications of the GA searches to simulated LISA data.

  19. Genetic analysis of the cytoplasmic dynein subunit families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Kevin Pfister

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles.

  20. Caprine plasma proteinase inhibitors--II. Genetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankan, D M; Bell, K

    1993-01-01

    1. Analysis of the inheritances of the variants of five caprine plasma proteinase inhibitor systems in families demonstrated a genetic control of codominant alleles at five loci. 2. The PIA, B, C, D and E proteins are controlled by four (PIA1,2,3,4), three (PIB1,4,0), three (PIC2,3,0), five (PID1,2,3,4,0) and two (PIE1,2) alleles respectively. Null alleles were postulated for the PIB, PIC and PID systems. 3. The frequencies of the alleles differed substantially between the Australian and Texan Angoras and Cashmere breeds of goats. 4. The combined exclusion probability for the five PI systems was as high as 0.82 in the Cashmere breed, indicating the potential of the proteinase inhibitor proteins for parentage control purposes.

  1. Analysis of malaria parasite phenotypes using experimental genetic crosses of Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa C; Mwangi, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    We review the principles of linkage analysis of experimental genetic crosses and their application to Plasmodium falciparum. Three experimental genetic crosses have been performed using the human malaria parasite P. falciparum. Linkage analysis of the progeny of these crosses has been used to identify parasite genes important in phenotypes such as drug resistance, parasite growth and virulence, and transmission to mosquitoes. The construction and analysis of genetic maps has been used to char...

  2. Development of a leafy Brassica rapa fixed line collection for genetic diversity and population structure analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pang, W.; Li, X.; Choi, S.R.; Dhandapani, V.; Im, S.; Park, M.Y.; Jang, C.S.; Yang, M.S.; Ham, I.K.; Lee, E.M.; Kim, W.; Lee, S.S.; Bonnema, A.B.; Park, S.; Piao, Z.; Lim, Y.P.

    2015-01-01

    Brassica rapa is an economically important crop with a wide range of morphologies. Developing a set of fixed lines and understanding their diversity has been challenging, but facilitates resource conservation. We investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of 238 fixed lines of leafy

  3. Single-cell bacteria growth monitoring by automated DEP-facilitated image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitz, Ingmar; van Leeuwen, Rien

    2010-11-07

    Growth monitoring is the method of choice in many assays measuring the presence or properties of pathogens, e.g. in diagnostics and food quality. Established methods, relying on culturing large numbers of bacteria, are rather time-consuming, while in healthcare time often is crucial. Several new approaches have been published, mostly aiming at assaying growth or other properties of a small number of bacteria. However, no method so far readily achieves single-cell resolution with a convenient and easy to handle setup that offers the possibility for automation and high throughput. We demonstrate these benefits in this study by employing dielectrophoretic capturing of bacteria in microfluidic electrode structures, optical detection and automated bacteria identification and counting with image analysis algorithms. For a proof-of-principle experiment we chose an antibiotic susceptibility test with Escherichia coli and polymyxin B. Growth monitoring is demonstrated on single cells and the impact of the antibiotic on the growth rate is shown. The minimum inhibitory concentration as a standard diagnostic parameter is derived from a dose-response plot. This report is the basis for further integration of image analysis code into device control. Ultimately, an automated and parallelized setup may be created, using an optical microscanner and many of the electrode structures simultaneously. Sufficient data for a sound statistical evaluation and a confirmation of the initial findings can then be generated in a single experiment.

  4. Evaluating the Factors that Facilitate a Deep Understanding of Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Burmeister

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available Ideally the product of tertiary informatic study is more than a qualification, it is a rewarding experience of learning in a discipline area. It should build a desire for a deeper understanding and lead to fruitful research both personally and for the benefit of the wider community. This paper asks: 'What are the factors that lead to this type of quality (deep learning in data analysis?' In the study reported in this paper, students whose general approach to learning was achieving or surface oriented adopted a deep approach when the context encouraged it. An overseas study found a decline in deep learning at this stage of a tertiary program; the contention of this paper is that the opposite of this expected outcome was achieved due to the enhanced learning environment. Though only 15.1% of students involved in this study were deep learners, the data analysis instructional context resulted in 38.8% of students achieving deep learning outcomes. Other factors discovered that contributed to deep learning outcomes were an increase in the intrinsic motivation of students to study the domain area; their prior knowledge of informatics; assessment that sought an integrated, developed yet comprehensive understanding of analytical concepts and processes; and, their learning preferences. The preferences of deep learning students are analyzed in comparison to another such study of professionals in informatics, examining commonalties and differences between this and the wider professional study.

  5. Computed tomography texture analysis to facilitate therapeutic decision making in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanjie; Liu, Zaiyi; Chen, Shuting; Lu, Ligong; Liang, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the potential of computed tomography (CT) textural feature analysis for the stratification of single large hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) > 5 cm, and the subsequent determination of patient suitability for liver resection (LR) or transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). Wavelet decomposition was performed on portal-phase CT images with three bandwidth responses (filter 0, 1.0, and 1.5). Nine textural features of each filter were extracted from regions of interest. Wavelet-2-H (filter 1.0) in LR and wavelet-2-V (filter 0 and 1.0) in TACE were related to survival. Subsequently, LR and TACE patients were divided based on the wavelet-2-H and wavelet-2-V median at filter 1.0 into two subgroups (+ or −). LR+ patients showed the best survival, followed by LR-, TACE+, and TACE-. We estimated that LR+ patients treated using TACE would exhibit a survival similar to TACE- patients and worse than TACE+ patients, with a severe compromise in overall survival. LR was recommended for TACE- patients, whereas TACE was preferred for LR- and TACE+ patients. Independent of tumor size, CT textural features showed positive and negative correlations with survival after LR and TACE, respectively. Although further validation is needed, texture analysis demonstrated the feasibility of using HCC patient stratification for determining the suitability of LR vs. TACE. PMID:26910890

  6. Genetic Analysis of Mice Skin Exposed by Hyper-Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Rika; Terada, Masahiro; Seki, Masaya; Higashibata, Akira; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Ohira, Yoshinobu; Mukai, Chiaki; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2013-02-01

    In the space environment, physiological alterations, such as low bone density, muscle weakness and decreased immunity, are caused by microgravity and cosmic radiation. On the other hand, it is known that the leg muscles are hypertrophy by 2G-gravity. An understanding of the effects on human body from microgravity to hyper-gravity is very important. Recently, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has started a project to detect the changes on gene expression and mineral metabolism caused by microgravity by analyzing the hair of astronauts who stay in the international Space Station (ISS) for a long time. From these results of human hair’s research, the genetic effects of human hair roots by microgravity will become clear. However, it is unclear how the gene expression of hair roots was effected by hypergravity. Therefore, in this experiment, we analyzed the effect on mice skin contained hair roots by comparing microgravity or hypergravity exposed mice. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the genetic effects on mice skin by microgravity or 2G-gravity. The samples were taken from mice exposed to space flight (FL) or hypergravity environment (2G) for 3-months, respectively. The extracted and amplified RNA from these mice skin was used to DNA microarray analysis. in this experiment, we analyzed the effect of gravity by using mice skin contained hair roots, which exposed space (FL) and hyper-gravity (2G) for 3 months and each control. By DNA microarray analysis, we found the common 98 genes changed in both FL and 2G. Among these 98 genes, the functions and pathways were identified by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software. Next, we focused the one of the identified pathways and compared the effects on each molecules in this pathways by the different environments, such as FL and 2G. As the results, we could detect some interesting molecules, which might be depended on the gravity levels. In addition, to investigate

  7. Genetic diversity in the Yangtze finless porpoise by RAPD analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Shunping; Wang Ding; Wang Wei; Chen Daoquan; Zhao Qingzhong; Gong Weiming

    2005-01-01

    To estimate the genetic diversity in the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaenaphocaenoides asiaeorientalis), the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA techniquewas applied to examine ten animals captured from the Yangtze River. Out of 20 arbitrary primers used in the experiment, seventeen produced clearly reproducible bged from 0.0986 to 0.5634. Compared with other cetacean populations, this genetic distance is quite low. Such a low genetic diversity suggests that this population may be suffering from reduced genetic variation, and be very fragile. More studiesare needed for understanding the basis for this apparent low genetic diversity and to help protect this endangered, unique population.

  8. The Nanomaterial Registry: facilitating the sharing and analysis of data in the diverse nanomaterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostraat, Michele L; Mills, Karmann C; Guzan, Kimberly A; Murry, Damaris

    2013-01-01

    The amount of data being generated in the nanotechnology research space is significant, and the coordination, sharing, and downstream analysis of the data is complex and consistently deliberated. The complexities of the data are due in large part to the inherently complicated characteristics of nanomaterials. Also, testing protocols and assays used for nanomaterials are diverse and lacking standardization. The Nanomaterial Registry has been developed to address such challenges as the need for standard methods, data formatting, and controlled vocabularies for data sharing. The Registry is an authoritative, web-based tool whose purpose is to simplify the community's level of effort in assessing nanomaterial data from environmental and biological interaction studies. Because the Registry is meant to be an authoritative resource, all data-driven content is systematically archived and reviewed by subject-matter experts. To support and advance nanomaterial research, a set of minimal information about nanomaterials (MIAN) has been developed and is foundational to the Registry data model. The MIAN has been used to create evaluation and similarity criteria for nanomaterials that are curated into the Registry. The Registry is a publicly available resource that is being built through collaborations with many stakeholder groups in the nanotechnology community, including industry, regulatory, government, and academia. Features of the Registry website (http://www.nanomaterialregistry.org) currently include search, browse, side-by-side comparison of nanomaterials, compliance ratings based on the quality and quantity of data, and the ability to search for similar nanomaterials within the Registry. This paper is a modification and extension of a proceedings paper for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

  9. The Nanomaterial Registry: facilitating the sharing and analysis of data in the diverse nanomaterial community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostraat ML

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Michele L Ostraat, Karmann C Mills, Kimberly A Guzan, Damaris MurryRTI International, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: The amount of data being generated in the nanotechnology research space is significant, and the coordination, sharing, and downstream analysis of the data is complex and consistently deliberated. The complexities of the data are due in large part to the inherently complicated characteristics of nanomaterials. Also, testing protocols and assays used for nanomaterials are diverse and lacking standardization. The Nanomaterial Registry has been developed to address such challenges as the need for standard methods, data formatting, and controlled vocabularies for data sharing. The Registry is an authoritative, web-based tool whose purpose is to simplify the community's level of effort in assessing nanomaterial data from environmental and biological interaction studies. Because the registry is meant to be an authoritative resource, all data-driven content is systematically archived and reviewed by subject-matter experts. To support and advance nanomaterial research, a set of minimal information about nanomaterials (MIAN has been developed and is foundational to the Registry data model. The MIAN has been used to create evaluation and similarity criteria for nanomaterials that are curated into the Registry. The Registry is a publicly available resource that is being built through collaborations with many stakeholder groups in the nanotechnology community, including industry, regulatory, government, and academia. Features of the Registry website (https://www.nanomaterialregistry.org/ currently include search, browse, side-by-side comparison of nanomaterials, compliance ratings based on the quality and quantity of data, and the ability to search for similar nanomaterials within the Registry. This paper is a modification and extension of a proceedings paper for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.Keywords: nanoinformatics

  10. Stress relaxation analysis facilitates a quantitative approach towards antimicrobial penetration into biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Peterson, Brandon W; Jongsma, Marije A; Ren, Yijin; Sharma, Prashant K; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm-related infections can develop everywhere in the human body and are rarely cleared by the host immune system. Moreover, biofilms are often tolerant to antimicrobials, due to a combination of inherent properties of bacteria in their adhering, biofilm mode of growth and poor physical penetration of antimicrobials through biofilms. Current understanding of biofilm recalcitrance toward antimicrobial penetration is based on qualitative descriptions of biofilms. Here we hypothesize that stress relaxation of biofilms will relate with antimicrobial penetration. Stress relaxation analysis of single-species oral biofilms grown in vitro identified a fast, intermediate and slow response to an induced deformation, corresponding with outflow of water and extracellular polymeric substances, and bacterial re-arrangement, respectively. Penetration of chlorhexidine into these biofilms increased with increasing relative importance of the slow and decreasing importance of the fast relaxation element. Involvement of slow relaxation elements suggests that biofilm structures allowing extensive bacterial re-arrangement after deformation are more open, allowing better antimicrobial penetration. Involvement of fast relaxation elements suggests that water dilutes the antimicrobial upon penetration to an ineffective concentration in deeper layers of the biofilm. Next, we collected biofilms formed in intra-oral collection devices bonded to the buccal surfaces of the maxillary first molars of human volunteers. Ex situ chlorhexidine penetration into two weeks old in vivo formed biofilms followed a similar dependence on the importance of the fast and slow relaxation elements as observed for in vitro formed biofilms. This study demonstrates that biofilm properties can be derived that quantitatively explain antimicrobial penetration into a biofilm.

  11. Genetic hotels for the standard genetic code: evolutionary analysis based upon novel three-dimensional algebraic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    José, Marco V; Morgado, Eberto R; Govezensky, Tzipe

    2011-07-01

    Herein, we rigorously develop novel 3-dimensional algebraic models called Genetic Hotels of the Standard Genetic Code (SGC). We start by considering the primeval RNA genetic code which consists of the 16 codons of type RNY (purine-any base-pyrimidine). Using simple algebraic operations, we show how the RNA code could have evolved toward the current SGC via two different intermediate evolutionary stages called Extended RNA code type I and II. By rotations or translations of the subset RNY, we arrive at the SGC via the former (type I) or via the latter (type II), respectively. Biologically, the Extended RNA code type I, consists of all codons of the type RNY plus codons obtained by considering the RNA code but in the second (NYR type) and third (YRN type) reading frames. The Extended RNA code type II, comprises all codons of the type RNY plus codons that arise from transversions of the RNA code in the first (YNY type) and third (RNR) nucleotide bases. Since the dimensions of remarkable subsets of the Genetic Hotels are not necessarily integer numbers, we also introduce the concept of algebraic fractal dimension. A general decoding function which maps each codon to its corresponding amino acid or the stop signals is also derived. The Phenotypic Hotel of amino acids is also illustrated. The proposed evolutionary paths are discussed in terms of the existing theories of the evolution of the SGC. The adoption of 3-dimensional models of the Genetic and Phenotypic Hotels will facilitate the understanding of the biological properties of the SGC.

  12. Mendelian randomization analysis with multiple genetic variants using summarized data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Stephen; Butterworth, Adam; Thompson, Simon G

    2013-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies, which typically report regression coefficients summarizing the associations of many genetic variants with various traits, are potentially a powerful source of data for Mendelian randomization investigations. We demonstrate how such coefficients from multiple variants can be combined in a Mendelian randomization analysis to estimate the causal effect of a risk factor on an outcome. The bias and efficiency of estimates based on summarized data are compared to those based on individual-level data in simulation studies. We investigate the impact of gene-gene interactions, linkage disequilibrium, and 'weak instruments' on these estimates. Both an inverse-variance weighted average of variant-specific associations and a likelihood-based approach for summarized data give similar estimates and precision to the two-stage least squares method for individual-level data, even when there are gene-gene interactions. However, these summarized data methods overstate precision when variants are in linkage disequilibrium. If the P-value in a linear regression of the risk factor for each variant is less than 1×10⁻⁵, then weak instrument bias will be small. We use these methods to estimate the causal association of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) on coronary artery disease using published data on five genetic variants. A 30% reduction in LDL-C is estimated to reduce coronary artery disease risk by 67% (95% CI: 54% to 76%). We conclude that Mendelian randomization investigations using summarized data from uncorrelated variants are similarly efficient to those using individual-level data, although the necessary assumptions cannot be so fully assessed. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  13. Personality endophenotypes for bipolar affective disorder: a family-based genetic association analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz, J; van der Merwe, L; Ramesar, R

    2008-11-01

    Genetic analyses of complex conditions such as bipolar disorder (BD) may be facilitated by the use of intermediate phenotypes. Various personality traits are overrepresented in people with BD and their unaffected relatives, and may constitute genetically transmitted risk factors or endophenotypes of the illness. In this study, we administered a battery of seven different personality questionnaires comprising 19 subscales to 31 Caucasian BD families (n = 241). Ten of these personality traits showed significant evidence of heritability and were therefore selected as candidate endophenotypes. In addition, a principal components analysis produced two heritable components (negative affect and appetitive drive), which accounted for a considerable proportion of the variance (29% + 12%) and were also used in the analysis. A family-based quantitative association study was carried out using the orthogonal model from the quantitative transmission disequilibrium tests (QTDT) program. Monte Carlo permutations (M = 500), which allow for non-normal data and provide a global P value, corrected for multiple testing, were used to calculate empirical P values for the within-family component of association. The 3' untranslated region repeat polymorphism of the dopamine transporter gene (SLC6A3) was associated with self-directedness (P personality traits, 'Spirituality' (P = 0.040) and irritable temperament (P = 0.022). Furthermore, the met allele of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor val66met polymorphism was associated with higher hyperthymic temperament scores. We raise the possibility that the 10R allele of the SLC6A3 repeat polymorphism and the short allele of the SLC6A4 promoter variant constitute risk factors for irritable-aggressive and anxious-dysthymic subtypes of BD, respectively.

  14. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals the genetic basis of skin color variation in common carp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanliang Jiang

    Full Text Available The common carp is an important aquaculture species that is widely distributed across the world. During the long history of carp domestication, numerous carp strains with diverse skin colors have been established. Skin color is used as a visual criterion to determine the market value of carp. However, the genetic basis of common carp skin color has not been extensively studied.In this study, we performed Illumina sequencing on two common carp strains: the reddish Xingguo red carp and the brownish-black Yellow River carp. A total of 435,348,868 reads were generated, resulting in 198,781 assembled contigs that were used as reference sequences. Comparisons of skin transcriptome files revealed 2,012 unigenes with significantly different expression in the two common carp strains, including 874 genes that were up-regulated in Xingguo red carp and 1,138 genes that were up-regulated in Yellow River carp. The expression patterns of 20 randomly selected differentially expressed genes were validated using quantitative RT-PCR. Gene pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that melanin biosynthesis, along with the Wnt and MAPK signaling pathways, is highly likely to affect the skin pigmentation process. Several key genes involved in the skin pigmentation process, including TYRP1, SILV, ASIP and xCT, showed significant differences in their expression patterns between the two strains.In this study, we conducted a comparative transcriptome analysis of Xingguo red carp and Yellow River carp skins, and we detected key genes involved in the common carp skin pigmentation process. We propose that common carp skin pigmentation depends upon at least three pathways. Understanding fish skin color genetics will facilitate future molecular selection of the fish skin colors with high market values.

  15. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals the Genetic Basis of Skin Color Variation in Common Carp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanliang; Zhang, Songhao; Xu, Jian; Feng, Jianxin; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A.; Sun, Xiaowen; Xu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Background The common carp is an important aquaculture species that is widely distributed across the world. During the long history of carp domestication, numerous carp strains with diverse skin colors have been established. Skin color is used as a visual criterion to determine the market value of carp. However, the genetic basis of common carp skin color has not been extensively studied. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we performed Illumina sequencing on two common carp strains: the reddish Xingguo red carp and the brownish-black Yellow River carp. A total of 435,348,868 reads were generated, resulting in 198,781 assembled contigs that were used as reference sequences. Comparisons of skin transcriptome files revealed 2,012 unigenes with significantly different expression in the two common carp strains, including 874 genes that were up-regulated in Xingguo red carp and 1,138 genes that were up-regulated in Yellow River carp. The expression patterns of 20 randomly selected differentially expressed genes were validated using quantitative RT-PCR. Gene pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that melanin biosynthesis, along with the Wnt and MAPK signaling pathways, is highly likely to affect the skin pigmentation process. Several key genes involved in the skin pigmentation process, including TYRP1, SILV, ASIP and xCT, showed significant differences in their expression patterns between the two strains. Conclusions In this study, we conducted a comparative transcriptome analysis of Xingguo red carp and Yellow River carp skins, and we detected key genes involved in the common carp skin pigmentation process. We propose that common carp skin pigmentation depends upon at least three pathways. Understanding fish skin color genetics will facilitate future molecular selection of the fish skin colors with high market values. PMID:25255374

  16. Genetic mouse models for behavioral analysis through transgenic RNAi technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delic, S; Streif, S; Deussing, J M; Weber, P; Ueffing, M; Hölter, S M; Wurst, W; Kühn, R

    2008-10-01

    Pharmacological inhibitors and knockout mice have developed into routine tools to analyze the role of specific genes in behavior. Both strategies have limitations like the availability of inhibitors for only a subset of proteins and the large efforts required to construct specific mouse mutants. The recent emergence of RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing provides a fast alternative that can be applied to any coding gene. We established an approach for the efficient generation of transgenic knockdown mice by targeted insertion of short hairpin (sh) RNA vectors into a defined genomic locus and studied the efficiency of gene silencing in the adult brain and the utility of such mice for behavioral analysis. We generated shRNA knockdown mice for the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (Crhr1), the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (Lrkk2) and the purinergic receptor P2X ligand-gated ion channel 7 (P2rx7) genes and show the ubiquitous expression of shRNA and efficient suppression of the target mRNA and protein in the brain of young and 11-month-old knockdown mice. Knockdown mice for the Crhr1 gene exhibited decreased anxiety-related behavior, an impaired stress response, and thereby recapitulate the phenotype of CRHR1 knockout mice. Our results show the feasibility of gene silencing in the adult brain and validate knockdown mice as new genetic models suitable for behavioral analysis.

  17. Feature selection using genetic algorithms for fetal heart rate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Redman, Christopher W G; Payne, Stephen J; Georgieva, Antoniya

    2014-07-01

    The fetal heart rate (FHR) is monitored on a paper strip (cardiotocogram) during labour to assess fetal health. If necessary, clinicians can intervene and assist with a prompt delivery of the baby. Data-driven computerized FHR analysis could help clinicians in the decision-making process. However, selecting the best computerized FHR features that relate to labour outcome is a pressing research problem. The objective of this study is to apply genetic algorithms (GA) as a feature selection method to select the best feature subset from 64 FHR features and to integrate these best features to recognize unfavourable FHR patterns. The GA was trained on 404 cases and tested on 106 cases (both balanced datasets) using three classifiers, respectively. Regularization methods and backward selection were used to optimize the GA. Reasonable classification performance is shown on the testing set for the best feature subset (Cohen's kappa values of 0.45 to 0.49 using different classifiers). This is, to our knowledge, the first time that a feature selection method for FHR analysis has been developed on a database of this size. This study indicates that different FHR features, when integrated, can show good performance in predicting labour outcome. It also gives the importance of each feature, which will be a valuable reference point for further studies.

  18. A Preliminary Genetic Analysis of Complement 3 Gene and Schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianliang Ni

    Full Text Available Complement pathway activation was found to occur frequently in schizophrenia, and complement 3 (C3 plays a major role in this process. Previous studies have provided evidence for the possible role of C3 in the development of schizophrenia. In this study, we hypothesized that the gene encoding C3 (C3 may confer susceptibility to schizophrenia in Han Chinese. We analyzed 7 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of C3 in 647 schizophrenia patients and 687 healthy controls. Peripheral C3 mRNA expression level was measured in 23 drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia and 24 controls. Two SNPs (rs1047286 and rs2250656 that deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were excluded for further analysis. Among the remaining 5 SNPs, there was no significant difference in allele and genotype frequencies between the patient and control groups. Logistic regression analysis showed no significant SNP-gender interaction in either dominant model or recessive model. There was no significant difference in the level of peripheral C3 expression between the drug-naïve schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. In conclusion, the results of this study do not support C3 as a major genetic susceptibility factor in schizophrenia. Other factors in AP may have critical roles in schizophrenia and be worthy of further investigation.

  19. [A Method for Protein Photo-cross-linking in Living Cells Facilitating Analysis of Physiological Interactions of Proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Nobumasa

    2015-01-01

    In living cells, most proteins form complexes with other proteins to exert their functions. Since protein functions are regulated in response to changes in the cellular environment, the components of the complexes can vary; therefore, proteins often interact in a weak and transient manner. To capture such labile protein interactions, we have developed a method for photo-cross-linking of proteins directly interacting in mammalian cells; this method involves expansion of the genetic code and site-specific incorporation of photoreactive amino acids into proteins. Upon cross-linking, protein complexes are stabilized by a covalent bond and can be readily isolated from cell extracts without the problems usually associated with simple affinity purification methods such as co-immunoprecipitation. Photo-cross-linkers have another benefit: they react exclusively with molecules within a range defined by the linker length. This property becomes useful for determining the binding interface of two proteins because the linkers can be introduced in a site-directed manner with our method. In this review, we first describe the expansion of the genetic code of mammalian cells for the incorporation of non-natural amino acids into proteins. Then, we introduce our recent applications and developments of the cross-linking method: identification of intracellular binding partners of the signaling protein growth factor receptor binding protein 2; analysis of the binding between membrane proteins on the cell surface; and a novel photoreactive amino acid that enables wide-ranging photo-cross-linking.

  20. Analysis of the optimality of the standard genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Balaji; Saini, Supreet

    2016-07-19

    Many theories have been proposed attempting to explain the origin of the genetic code. While strong reasons remain to believe that the genetic code evolved as a frozen accident, at least for the first few amino acids, other theories remain viable. In this work, we test the optimality of the standard genetic code against approximately 17 million genetic codes, and locate 29 which outperform the standard genetic code at the following three criteria: (a) robustness to point mutation; (b) robustness to frameshift mutation; and (c) ability to encode additional information in the coding region. We use a genetic algorithm to generate and score codes from different parts of the associated landscape, which are, as a result, presumably more representative of the entire landscape. Our results show that while the genetic code is sub-optimal for robustness to frameshift mutation and the ability to encode additional information in the coding region, it is very strongly selected for robustness to point mutation. This coupled with the observation that the different performance indicator scores for a particular genetic code are negatively correlated makes the standard genetic code nearly optimal for the three criteria tested in this work.

  1. Incomplete APOBEC3G/F Neutralization by HIV-1 Vif Mutants Facilitates the Genetic Evolution from CCR5 to CXCR4 Usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alteri, Claudia; Surdo, Matteo; Bellocchi, Maria Concetta; Saccomandi, Patrizia; Continenza, Fabio; Armenia, Daniele; Parrotta, Lucia; Carioti, Luca; Costa, Giosuè; Fourati, Slim; Di Santo, Fabiola; Scutari, Rossana; Barbaliscia, Silvia; Fedele, Valentina; Carta, Stefania; Balestra, Emanuela; Alcaro, Stefano; Marcelin, Anne Genevieve; Calvez, Vincent; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Artese, Anna; Perno, Carlo Federico; Svicher, Valentina

    2015-08-01

    Incomplete APOBEC3G/F neutralization by a defective HIV-1Vif protein can promote genetic diversification by inducing G-to-A mutations in the HIV-1 genome. The HIV-1 Env V3 loop, critical for coreceptor usage, contains several putative APOBEC3G/F target sites. Here, we determined if APOBEC3G/F, in the presence of Vif-defective HIV-1 virus, can induce G-to-A mutations at V3 positions critical to modulation of CXCR4 usage. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) from 2 HIV-1-negative donors were infected with CCR5-using 81.A-VifWT virus (i.e., with wild-type [WT] Vif protein), 81.A-VifE45G, or 81.A-VifK22E (known to incompletely/partially neutralize APOBEC3G/F). The rate of G-toA mutations was zero or extremely low in 81.A-VifWT- and 81.A-VifE45G-infected PBMC from both donors. Conversely, G-to-A enrichment was detected in 81.A-VifK22E-infected PBMC (prevalence ranging from 2.18% at 7 days postinfection [dpi] to 3.07% at 21 dpi in donor 1 and from 10.49% at 7 dpi to 8.69% at 21 dpi in donor 2). A similar scenario was found in MDM. G-to-A mutations occurred at 8 V3 positions, resulting in nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions. Of them, G24E and E25K strongly correlated with phenotypically/genotypically defined CXCR4-using viruses (P = 0.04 and 5.5e-7, respectively) and increased the CXCR4 N-terminal binding affinity for V3 (WT, -40.1 kcal/mol; G24E, -510 kcal/mol; E25K, -522 kcal/mol). The analysis of paired V3 and Vif DNA sequences from 84 HIV-1-infected patients showed that the presence of a Vif-defective virus correlated with CXCR4 usage in proviral DNA (P = 0.04). In conclusion, incomplete APOBEC3G/F neutralization by a single Vif amino acid substitution seeds a CXCR4-using proviral reservoir. This can have implications for the success of CCR5 antagonist-based therapy, as well as for the risk of disease progression.

  2. Genetic analysis in patients with left ventricular noncompaction and evidence for genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yanlin; Ichida, Fukiko; Matsuoka, Taro; Isobe, Takeshi; Ikemoto, Yumiko; Higaki, Takashi; Tsuji, Tohru; Haneda, Noriyuki; Kuwabara, Atsushi; Chen, Rui; Futatani, Takeshi; Tsubata, Shinichi; Watanabe, Sayaka; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Hirono, Keiichi; Uese, Keiichiro; Miyawaki, Toshio; Bowles, Karla R; Bowles, Neil E; Towbin, Jeffrey A

    2006-05-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a cardiomyopathy characterized by numerous excessively trabeculations and deep intertrabecular recesses. This study was performed to investigate Japanese LVNC patients for disease-causing mutations in a series of selected candidate genes. DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood of 79 cases including 20 familial cases and 59 sporadic cases. DNA samples were screened for mutations in the genes encoding G4.5 (TAZ), alpha-dystrobrevin (DTNA), alpha1-syntrophin (SNTA1), FK506 Binding protein 1A (FKBP1A or FKPB12: FKBP1A), and LIM Domain Binding protein 3 (Cypher/ZASP: LDB3), using single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. DNA variants were identified in 6 of the 79 cases, including four familial cases and two sporadic cases. A splice acceptor mutation of intron 8 in TAZ (IVS8-1G>C) was identified in one family with isolated LVNC, resulting in deletion of exon 9 from mRNA. In a sporadic case of isolated LVNC and Barth syndrome (BTHS), a 158insC in exon 2 of TAZ resulting in a frame-shift mutation was identified. A 1876G>A substitution changing an aspartic acid to asparagine (D626N) was identified in LDB3 in four members of two families with LVNC. A 163G>A polymorphism was identified in LDB3, which changed a valine to isoleucine (V55I) in one patient with isolated LVNC. In addition, in a family with nonisolated LVNC, a 362C>T mutation was identified in DTNA. LVNC, like other forms of inherited cardiomyopathy, is a genetically heterogeneous disease, associated with variable clinical symptoms and can be inherited as an autosomal or X-linked recessive disorder.

  3. The genetic correlation between cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking among Chinese adult male twins: an ordinal bivariate genetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Gao, Wenjing; Cao, Weihua; Zhan, Siyan; Lv, Jun; Pang, Zengchang; Wang, Shaojie; Chen, Rongfu; Hu, Yonghua; Li, Liming

    2012-08-01

    Though multiple policies have been implemented, the cigarette control in China is still facing a great challenge. At the same time, alcohol drinking has increasingly become a public health problem. Considering cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking often co-occur, a few studies tested the covariance of these phenotypes. However, the genetic and environmental correlation between them among Chinese population has not been determined. The main aim of this study is to fill this gap. From the Chinese National Twin Registry, we obtained the data on cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking behaviors. The ordinal bivariate genetic analysis was performed to fit the categorical variables. After identifying the best decomposition among the Cholesky, common, and independent pathway model, we established the most parsimonious submodel. The correlation between current tobacco and alcohol use could be explained by Cholesky model. The shared environmental variances for both phenotypes were dropped to construct the most parsimonious submodel. Furthermore, the most parsimonious submodel showed a moderate correlation (0.32, 95%CI=0.17-0.46) between the genetic components and a negligible non-shared environmental correlation. As the first bivariate genetic analysis on current tobacco smoking and current alcohol drinking in China, this study suggested a common genetic vulnerability to tobacco and alcohol use in male twins. Further studies should be carried out to track the pertinent genes that are related to the comorbidity of smoking and drinking in Chinese population. Another urgent need is to recognize the behavior-specific environmental risk factors.

  4. Genetic Architecture of Atherosclerosis in Mice: A Systems Genetics Analysis of Common Inbred Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Bennett

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Common forms of atherosclerosis involve multiple genetic and environmental factors. While human genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci contributing to coronary artery disease and its risk factors, these studies are unable to control environmental factors or examine detailed molecular traits in relevant tissues. We now report a study of natural variations contributing to atherosclerosis and related traits in over 100 inbred strains of mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP. The mice were made hyperlipidemic by transgenic expression of human apolipoprotein E-Leiden (APOE-Leiden and human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP. The mice were examined for lesion size and morphology as well as plasma lipid, insulin and glucose levels, and blood cell profiles. A subset of mice was studied for plasma levels of metabolites and cytokines. We also measured global transcript levels in aorta and liver. Finally, the uptake of acetylated LDL by macrophages from HMDP mice was quantitatively examined. Loci contributing to the traits were mapped using association analysis, and relationships among traits were examined using correlation and statistical modeling. A number of conclusions emerged. First, relationships among atherosclerosis and the risk factors in mice resemble those found in humans. Second, a number of trait-loci were identified, including some overlapping with previous human and mouse studies. Third, gene expression data enabled enrichment analysis of pathways contributing to atherosclerosis and prioritization of candidate genes at associated loci in both mice and humans. Fourth, the data provided a number of mechanistic inferences; for example, we detected no association between macrophage uptake of acetylated LDL and atherosclerosis. Fifth, broad sense heritability for atherosclerosis was much larger than narrow sense heritability, indicating an important role for gene-by-gene interactions. Sixth, stepwise linear

  5. The efficacy of a standardized questionnaire in facilitating personalized communication about problems encountered in cancer genetic counseling: design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Eijzenga; N.K. Aaronson; I. Kluijt; G.N. Sidharta; D.E.E. Hahn; M.G.E.M. Ausems; E.M.A. Bleiker

    2014-01-01

    Background: Individuals with a personal or family history of cancer, can opt for genetic counseling and DNA-testing. Approximately 25% of these individuals experience clinically relevant levels of psychosocial distress, depression and/or anxiety after counseling. These problems are frequently left u

  6. Micropatterning Facilitates the Long-Term Growth and Analysis of iPSC-Derived Individual Human Neurons and Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbulla, Lena F; Beaumont, Kristin G; Mrksich, Milan; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and their application to patient-specific disease models offers new opportunities for studying the pathophysiology of neurological disorders. However, current methods for culturing iPSC-derived neuronal cells result in clustering of neurons, which precludes the analysis of individual neurons and defined neuronal networks. To address this challenge, cultures of human neurons on micropatterned surfaces are developed that promote neuronal survival over extended periods of time. This approach facilitates studies of neuronal development, cellular trafficking, and related mechanisms that require assessment of individual neurons and specific network connections. Importantly, micropatterns support the long-term stability of cultured neurons, which enables time-dependent analysis of cellular processes in living neurons. The approach described in this paper allows mechanistic studies of human neurons, both in terms of normal neuronal development and function, as well as time-dependent pathological processes, and provides a platform for testing of new therapeutics in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  7. A quantitative genetic analysis of intermediate asthma phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S.F.; Ferreira, M.A.R.; Kyvik, K.O.

    2009-01-01

    to the observed data using maximum likelihood methods. RESULTS: Additive genetic factors explained 67% of the variation in FeNO, 43% in airway responsiveness, 22% in airway obstruction, and 81% in serum total IgE. In general, traits had genetically and environmentally distinct variance structures. The most...

  8. Analysis of Molecular Genetics Content in Spanish Secondary School Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Gracia, M. V.; Gil-Quilez, M. J.; Osada, J.

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of molecular biology in thirty-four Spanish high school biology textbooks has been analysed using a check-list made up of twenty-three items. The study showed a tendency to confuse the genetic code with genetic information. The treatment of DNA transcription, regulation of gene expression and translation were presented as masses of…

  9. Genetic analysis of teosinte for kernel composition traits in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teosinte (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis) is the wild ancestor of modern maize (Zea mays ssp. mays). Teosinte contains greater genetic diversity compared to maize inbreds and landraces, but its use is limited by insufficient genetic resources to evaluate its value. A population of teosinte near isogenic ...

  10. Analysis of genetic structure of white croaker using amplified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... The population with the highest Nei's genetic diversity and. Shannon diversity index ... fish assemblages off the coasts of China and Japan, supporting an ..... genetic distances. graphic structure of populations may be influenced by ... the sea-level-induced environmental signal was amplified in the marginal ...

  11. A roadmap for the genetic analysis of renal aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordmans, Gerda A.; van Goor, Harry; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Korstanje, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Several studies show evidence for the genetic basis of renal disease, which renders some individuals more prone than others to accelerated renal aging. Studying the genetics of renal aging can help us to identify genes involved in this process and to unravel the underlying pathways. First, this opin

  12. Integrative genetic analysis of transcription modules: towards filling the gap between genetic lociand inherited traits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongqiang [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Chen, Hao [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Bao, Lei [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Manly, Kenneth [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Lu, Lu [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Wang, Jintao [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Zhou, Mi [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Williams, Robert [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Cui, Yan [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis

    2005-01-01

    Genetic loci that regulate inherited traits are routinely identified using quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping methods. However, the genotype-phenotype associations do not provide information on the gene expression program through which the genetic loci regulate the traits. Transcription modules are 'selfconsistent regulatory units' and are closely related to the modular components of gene regulatory network [Ihmels, J., Friedlander, G., Bergmann, S., Sarig, O., Ziv, Y. and Barkai, N. (2002) Revealing modular organization in the yeast transcriptional network. Nat. Genet., 31, 370-377; Segal, E., Shapira, M., Regev, A., Pe'er, D., Botstein, D., Koller, D. and Friedman, N. (2003) Module networks: identifying regulatory modules and their condition-specific regulators from gene expression data. Nat. Genet., 34, 166-176]. We used genome-wide genotype and gene expression data of a genetic reference population that consists of mice of 32 recombinant inbred strains to identify the transcription modules and the genetic loci regulating them. Twenty-nine transcription modules defined by genetic variations were identified. Statistically significant associations between the transcription modules and 18 classical physiological and behavioral traits were found. Genome-wide interval mapping showed that major QTLs regulating the transcription modules are often co-localized with the QTLs regulating the associated classical traits. The association and the possible co-regulation of the classical trait and transcription module indicate that the transcription module may be involved in the gene pathways connecting the QTL and the classical trait. Our results show that a transcription module may associate with multiple seemingly unrelated classical traits and a classical trait may associate with different modules. Literature mining results provided strong independent evidences for the relations among genes of the transcription modules, genes in the regions of the QTLs

  13. Regulation and Genetic Analysis of Leaf Source Capacity in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Shu-qing; ZHANG Rong-xian; LU Wei; CHEN Guo-xiang; DENG Zhi-rui; TANG Yun-lai; GONG Hong-bing; YANG Tu-nan

    2002-01-01

    The highest value of photosynthetic rate and active photosynthesis duration in flag leaves could be increased in a range of 3.55% and 3 d by dressing N (112.5 kg/ha) at heading stage in hybrid rice variety cv. Shanyou63 compared with control (no dressing N at heading), respectively. This resulted in the 7.93 percentage and 5.70 percentage increases of its leaf source capacity (LSC) and yield, respectively. Furthermore,genetic analysis of LSC was made by 4 × 4 incomplete diallel cross-design with 4 sterility lines and 4 resilience lines. The results showed that hB2 and hN2 in LSC for rice were higher than 70 percentage and 30 percentage,respectively, suggesting that it may be used as an index for selecting varieties with high photosynthetic efficiency in rice breeding. There were the similar effects of the additive and non-additive variations on LSC in hybrid rice. LSC was mainly influenced by sterility line and resilience interactions. The adding effect value of general combining ability for its parents may be used to forecast the phenotype of LSC in hybrid rice.

  14. Comparative mapping of canine and human proximal Xq and genetic analysis of canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschenes, S.M.; Puck, J.M.; Dutra, A.S. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Parallel genetic analysis of animal and human genetic diseases can facilitate the identification and characterization of the causative gene defects. For example, canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is characterized by clinical, pathological, and immunological manifestations similar to the most common form of human SCID. To derive a canine syntenic map including genes that in humans are located in proximal Xq, near human X-linked SCID, poly (TG) polymorphisms were identified at the canine phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and choroideremia (CHM) loci. These plus a polymorphic poly (CAG) sequence in exon 1 of the canine androgen receptor gene (AR) were used to genotype members of the colony informative for X-linked SCID. No recombinations among SCIDX1, AR, PGK, or CHM were observed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized PGK and CHM to proximal Xq in the dog, in the same chromosomal location occupied by the human genes. Somatic cell hybrid analysis and methylation differences at AR demonstrated that female dogs carrying X-linked SCID have the same lymphocyte-limited skewed X-chromosome inactivation patterns as human carriers. These genetic and phenotypic findings provide evidence that mutations in the same gene, now identified as the {gamma} chain of the IL-2 receptor, cause canine and human X-linked SCID. This approach is an efficient method for comparative gene mapping and disease identification. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Simulation Approach for Timing Analysis of Genetic Logic Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Hasan; Madsen, Jan

    2017-02-01

    Constructing genetic logic circuits is an application of synthetic biology in which parts of the DNA of a living cell are engineered to perform a dedicated Boolean function triggered by an appropriate concentration of certain proteins or by different genetic components. These logic circuits work in a manner similar to electronic logic circuits, but they are much more stochastic and hence much harder to characterize. In this article, we introduce an approach to analyze the threshold value and timing of genetic logic circuits. We show how this approach can be used to analyze the timing behavior of single and cascaded genetic logic circuits. We further analyze the timing sensitivity of circuits by varying the degradation rates and concentrations. Our approach can be used not only to characterize the timing behavior but also to analyze the timing constraints of cascaded genetic logic circuits, a capability that we believe will be important for design automation in synthetic biology.

  16. Repeated measures from FIA data facilitates analysis across spatial scales of tree growth responses to nitrogen deposition from individual trees to whole ecoregions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. (Hobie) Perry; Kevin J. Horn; R. Quinn Thomas; Linda H. Pardo; Erica A.H. Smithwick; Doug Baldwin; Gregory B. Lawrence; Scott W. Bailey; Sabine Braun; Christopher M. Clark; Mark Fenn; Annika Nordin; Jennifer N. Phelan; Paul G. Schaberg; Sam St. Clair; Richard Warby; Shaun Watmough; Steven S. Perakis

    2015-01-01

    The abundance of temporally and spatially consistent Forest Inventory and Analysis data facilitates hierarchical/multilevel analysis to investigate factors affecting tree growth, scaling from plot-level to continental scales. Herein we use FIA tree and soil inventories in conjunction with various spatial climate and soils data to estimate species-specific responses of...

  17. Analysis of Plasminogen Genetic Variants in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnick, A. Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony L.; Bernales, Cecily Q.; Ross, Jay P.; Forwell, Amanda L.; Yee, Irene M.; Guillot-Noel, Lena; Fontaine, Bertrand; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Hilven, Kelly; Dubois, Bénédicte; Goris, An; Astobiza, Ianire; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Akkad, Denis A.; Aktas, Orhan; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Epplen, Joerg T.; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Lohse, Peter; Rieckmann, Peter; Zettl, Uwe K.; Zipp, Frauke; Bertram, Lars; Lill, Christina M; Fernandez, Oscar; Urbaneja, Patricia; Leyva, Laura; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Arroyo, Rafael; Garagorri, Aroa M.; García-Martínez, Angel; Villar, Luisa M.; Urcelay, Elena; Malhotra, Sunny; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel; Berger, Thomas; Fazekas, Franz; Reindl, Markus; Schmied, Mascha C.; Zimprich, Alexander; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a prevalent neurological disease of complex etiology. Here, we describe the characterization of a multi-incident MS family that nominated a rare missense variant (p.G420D) in plasminogen (PLG) as a putative genetic risk factor for MS. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D (rs139071351) in 2160 MS patients, and 886 controls from Canada, identified 10 additional probands, two sporadic patients and one control with the variant. Segregation in families harboring the rs139071351 variant, identified p.G420D in 26 out of 30 family members diagnosed with MS, 14 unaffected parents, and 12 out of 30 family members not diagnosed with disease. Despite considerably reduced penetrance, linkage analysis supports cosegregation of PLG p.G420D and disease. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D in 14446 patients, and 8797 controls from Canada, France, Spain, Germany, Belgium, and Austria failed to identify significant association with disease (P = 0.117), despite an overall higher prevalence in patients (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 0.93–1.87). To assess whether additional rare variants have an effect on MS risk, we sequenced PLG in 293 probands, and genotyped all rare variants in cases and controls. This analysis identified nine rare missense variants, and although three of them were exclusively observed in MS patients, segregation does not support pathogenicity. PLG is a plausible biological candidate for MS owing to its involvement in immune system response, blood-brain barrier permeability, and myelin degradation. Moreover, components of its activation cascade have been shown to present increased activity or expression in MS patients compared to controls; further studies are needed to clarify whether PLG is involved in MS susceptibility. PMID:27194806

  18. Molecular and structural analysis of genetic variations in congenital cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Tushar; Kaur, Punit; Kumar, Manoj; Khokhar,, Sudarshan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the relative contributions of mutations in congenital cataract cases in an Indian population by systematic screening of genes associated with cataract. Methods We enrolled 100 congenital cataract cases presenting at the Dr. R. P. Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, a tertiary research and referral hospital (AIIMS, New Delhi, India). Crystallin, alpha A (CRYAA), CRYAB, CRYGs, CRYBA1, CRYBA4, CRYBB1, CRYBB2, CRYBB3, beaded filament structural protein 1 (BFSP1), gap function protein, alpha 3 (GJA3), GJA8, and heat shock transcription factor 4 gene genes were amplified. Protein structure differences analysis was performed using Discovery Studio (DS) 2.0. Results The mean age of the patients was 17.45±16.51 months, and the age of onset was 1.618±0.7181 months. Sequencing analysis of 14 genes identified 18 nucleotide variations. Fourteen variations were found in the crystallin genes, one in Cx-46 (GJA3), and three in BFSP1. Conclusions Congenital cataract shows marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Five nucleotide variations (CRYBA4:p.Y67N, CRYBB1:p.D85N, CRYBB1:p.E75K, CRYBB1:p.E155K, and GJA3:p.M1V) were predicted to be pathogenic. Variants in other genes might also be involved in maintaining lens development, growth, and transparency. The study confirms that the crystallin beta cluster on chromosome 22, Cx-46, and BFSP1 plays a major role in maintaining lens transparency. This study also expands the mutation spectrum of the genes associated with congenital cataract. PMID:24319337

  19. Genetic and physiological analysis of iron biofortification in maize kernels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercy G Lung'aho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Maize is a major cereal crop widely consumed in developing countries, which have a high prevalence of iron (Fe deficiency anemia. The major cause of Fe deficiency in these countries is inadequate intake of bioavailable Fe, where poverty is a major factor. Therefore, biofortification of maize by increasing Fe concentration and or bioavailability has great potential to alleviate this deficiency. Maize is also a model system for genomic research and thus allows the opportunity for gene discovery. Here we describe an integrated genetic and physiological analysis of Fe nutrition in maize kernels, to identify loci that influence grain Fe concentration and bioavailability. METHODOLOGY: Quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis was used to dissect grain Fe concentration (FeGC and Fe bioavailability (FeGB from the Intermated B73 × Mo17 (IBM recombinant inbred (RI population. FeGC was determined by ion coupled argon plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP. FeGB was determined by an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell line bioassay. CONCLUSIONS: Three modest QTL for FeGC were detected, in spite of high heritability. This suggests that FeGC is controlled by many small QTL, which may make it a challenging trait to improve by marker assisted breeding. Ten QTL for FeGB were identified and explained 54% of the variance observed in samples from a single year/location. Three of the largest FeGB QTL were isolated in sister derived lines and their effect was observed in three subsequent seasons in New York. Single season evaluations were also made at six other sites around North America, suggesting the enhancement of FeGB was not specific to our farm site. FeGB was not correlated with FeGC or phytic acid, suggesting that novel regulators of Fe nutrition are responsible for the differences observed. Our results indicate that iron biofortification of maize grain is achievable using specialized phenotyping tools and conventional plant breeding techniques.

  20. Analysis of Plasminogen Genetic Variants in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dessa Sadovnick

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a prevalent neurological disease of complex etiology. Here, we describe the characterization of a multi-incident MS family that nominated a rare missense variant (p.G420D in plasminogen (PLG as a putative genetic risk factor for MS. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D (rs139071351 in 2160 MS patients, and 886 controls from Canada, identified 10 additional probands, two sporadic patients and one control with the variant. Segregation in families harboring the rs139071351 variant, identified p.G420D in 26 out of 30 family members diagnosed with MS, 14 unaffected parents, and 12 out of 30 family members not diagnosed with disease. Despite considerably reduced penetrance, linkage analysis supports cosegregation of PLG p.G420D and disease. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D in 14446 patients, and 8797 controls from Canada, France, Spain, Germany, Belgium, and Austria failed to identify significant association with disease (P = 0.117, despite an overall higher prevalence in patients (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 0.93–1.87. To assess whether additional rare variants have an effect on MS risk, we sequenced PLG in 293 probands, and genotyped all rare variants in cases and controls. This analysis identified nine rare missense variants, and although three of them were exclusively observed in MS patients, segregation does not support pathogenicity. PLG is a plausible biological candidate for MS owing to its involvement in immune system response, blood-brain barrier permeability, and myelin degradation. Moreover, components of its activation cascade have been shown to present increased activity or expression in MS patients compared to controls; further studies are needed to clarify whether PLG is involved in MS susceptibility.

  1. Analysis of genetic and non genetic risk factors for cisplatin ototoxicity in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgun, Yüksel; Aktaş, Safiye; Altun, Zekiye; Kırkım, Günay; Kızmazoğlu, Deniz Çakır; Erçetin, Ayşe Pınar; Demir, Banu; İnce, Dilek; Mutafoğlu, Kamer; Demirağ, Bengü; Ellidokuz, Hülya; Olgun, Nur; Güneri, Enis Alpin

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the genetic and non genetic risk factors for cisplatin ototoxicity. This study was conducted on 72 children who received cisplatin based chemotherapy. Brock and Muenster classifications were used to evaluate ototoxicity seen in these children. 6 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP); ERCC1 rs 11615, GSTP1 rs1138272, GSTP1 rs1695, LRP2 rs 2075252, TPMT rs 12201199, COMT rs 9332377, were evaluated as genetic factors by real time PCR. Non genetic factors such as cranial irradiation, cumulative doses of cisplatin, age, gender, administration of other ototoxic drugs were analysed as well. By using Chi-square test, risk factors were matched with the ototoxicity classifications. Significant risk factors were reevaluated using logistic regression modelling. According to univariate analyses, male gender, co-treatment with aminoglycosides and mutant genotype of GSTP1 rs1695 were significantly related with cisplatin ototoxicity. Logistic regression modelling analyses also showed that male gender, co-treatment with aminoglycosides were found to be significantly related with cisplatin ototoxicity. Mutant genotype of GSTP1 rs1695 was not found to be significant, but close to the level of statistical significance. Male gender, co-treatment with aminoglycosides are significant risk factors for cisplatin ototoxicity in pediatric patients. Mutant genotype of GSTP1 rs1695 seems to be a genetic risk factor in univariate analyses, although not confirmed by multivariate analyses. Therefore, GSTP1 rs1695 SNP needs to be studied in larger series. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic and evolutionary analysis of the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Megan

    Although evolution of brains and behaviors is of fundamental biological importance, we lack comprehensive understanding of the general principles governing these processes or the specific mechanisms and molecules through which the evolutionary changes are effected. Because synapses are the basic structural and functional units of nervous systems, one way to address these problems is to dissect the genetic and molecular pathways responsible for morphological evolution of a defined synapse. I have undertaken such an analysis by examining morphology of the larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in wild caught D. melanogaster as well as in over 20 other species of Drosophila. Whereas variation in NMJ morphology within a species is limited, I discovered a surprisingly extensive variation among different species. Compared with evolution of other morphological traits, NMJ morphology appears to be evolving very rapidly. Moreover, my data indicate that natural selection rather than genetic drift is primarily responsible for evolution of NMJ morphology. To dissect underlying molecular mechanisms that may govern NMJ growth and evolutionary divergence, I focused on a naturally occurring variant in D. melanogaster that causes NMJ overgrowth. I discovered that the variant mapped to Mob2, a gene encoding a kinase adapter protein originally described in yeast as a member of the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN). I have subsequently examined mutations in the Drosophila orthologs of all the core components of the yeast MEN and found that all of them function as part of a common pathway that acts presynaptically to negatively regulate NMJ growth. As in the regulation of yeast cytokinesis, these components of the MEN appear to act ultimately by regulating actin dynamics during the process of bouton growth and division. These studies have thus led to the discovery of an entirely new role for the MEN---regulation of synaptic growth---that is separate from its function in cell division. This work

  3. Two-phase analysis in consensus genetic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronin, Y; Mester, D; Minkov, D; Belotserkovski, R; Jackson, B N; Schnable, P S; Aluru, S; Korol, A

    2012-05-01

    Numerous mapping projects conducted on different species have generated an abundance of mapping data. Consequently, many multilocus maps have been constructed using diverse mapping populations and marker sets for the same organism. The quality of maps varies broadly among populations, marker sets, and software used, necessitating efforts to integrate the mapping information and generate consensus maps. The problem of consensus genetic mapping (MCGM) is by far more challenging compared with genetic mapping based on a single dataset, which by itself is also cumbersome. The additional complications introduced by consensus analysis include inter-population differences in recombination rate and exchange distribution along chromosomes; variations in dominance of the employed markers; and use of different subsets of markers in different labs. Hence, it is necessary to handle arbitrary patterns of shared sets of markers and different level of mapping data quality. In this article, we introduce a two-phase approach for solving MCGM. In phase 1, for each dataset, multilocus ordering is performed combined with iterative jackknife resampling to evaluate the stability of marker orders. In this phase, the ordering problem is reduced to the well-known traveling salesperson problem (TSP). Namely, for each dataset, we look for order that gives minimum sum of recombination distances between adjacent markers. In phase 2, the optimal consensus order of shared markers is selected from the set of allowed orders and gives the minimal sum of total lengths of nonconflicting maps of the chromosome. This criterion may be used in different modifications to take into account the variation in quality of the original data (population size, marker quality, etc.). In the foregoing formulation, consensus mapping is considered as a specific version of TSP that can be referred to as "synchronized TSP." The conflicts detected after phase 1 are resolved using either a heuristic algorithm over the

  4. Hierarchical linear modeling of longitudinal pedigree data for genetic association analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qihua; B Hjelmborg, Jacob V; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Andreas Kryger; Christiansen, Lene; Christensen, Kaare; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kruse, Torben A

    2014-01-01

    Genetic association analysis on complex phenotypes under a longitudinal design involving pedigrees encounters the problem of correlation within pedigrees, which could affect statistical assessment of the genetic effects. Approaches have been proposed to integrate kinship correlation into the mixed-effect models to explicitly model the genetic relationship. These have proved to be an efficient way of dealing with sample clustering in pedigree data. Although current algorithms implemented in popular statistical packages are useful for adjusting relatedness in the mixed modeling of genetic effects on the mean level of a phenotype, they are not sufficiently straightforward to handle the kinship correlation on the time-dependent trajectories of a phenotype. We introduce a 2-level hierarchical linear model to separately assess the genetic associations with the mean level and the rate of change of a phenotype, integrating kinship correlation in the analysis. We apply our method to the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 genome-wide association studies data on chromosome 3 to estimate the genetic effects on systolic blood pressure measured over time in large pedigrees. Our method identifies genetic variants associated with blood pressure with estimated inflation factors of 0.99, suggesting that our modeling of random effects efficiently handles the genetic relatedness in pedigrees. Application to simulated data captures important variants specified in the simulation. Our results show that the method is useful for genetic association studies in related samples using longitudinal design.

  5. Discriminant analysis of principal components: a new method for the analysis of genetically structured populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balloux François

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dramatic progress in sequencing technologies offers unprecedented prospects for deciphering the organization of natural populations in space and time. However, the size of the datasets generated also poses some daunting challenges. In particular, Bayesian clustering algorithms based on pre-defined population genetics models such as the STRUCTURE or BAPS software may not be able to cope with this unprecedented amount of data. Thus, there is a need for less computer-intensive approaches. Multivariate analyses seem particularly appealing as they are specifically devoted to extracting information from large datasets. Unfortunately, currently available multivariate methods still lack some essential features needed to study the genetic structure of natural populations. Results We introduce the Discriminant Analysis of Principal Components (DAPC, a multivariate method designed to identify and describe clusters of genetically related individuals. When group priors are lacking, DAPC uses sequential K-means and model selection to infer genetic clusters. Our approach allows extracting rich information from genetic data, providing assignment of individuals to groups, a visual assessment of between-population differentiation, and contribution of individual alleles to population structuring. We evaluate the performance of our method using simulated data, which were also analyzed using STRUCTURE as a benchmark. Additionally, we illustrate the method by analyzing microsatellite polymorphism in worldwide human populations and hemagglutinin gene sequence variation in seasonal influenza. Conclusions Analysis of simulated data revealed that our approach performs generally better than STRUCTURE at characterizing population subdivision. The tools implemented in DAPC for the identification of clusters and graphical representation of between-group structures allow to unravel complex population structures. Our approach is also faster than

  6. Genetic analysis of maternal ability in Iberian pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, C; Rodrigañez, J; Silio, L

    1994-01-12

    A practical measure of milk yield of the sow is the weight of the litter at three weeks of age when the piglet growth is entirely dependent on the milking ability of the dam. Genetic parameters of litter size at birth (LS) and litter weight at 21 days (LW21) were estimated using a DFREML procedure from records of 4883 litters (2,049 for LW21) of Iberian breed. Preliminary analysis showed negligible maternal genetic effects. The model for both traits included the fixed effects of farrowing period (86 levels), parity (6) and inbreeding coefficients of dam (Fd) and litter (F(1) ) as co-variables, and three random effects-additive genetic value, permanent environmental effect and residual on both traits. Heritability and repeatability estimates were 0.064 and 0.126 (LS) and 0.163 and 0.270 (LW21) respectively. Estimated genetic and phenotypic correlations were 0.214 and 0.043. The inbreeding depression per 10 % increase of Fd or F(1) was -0.150 or -0.170 in live piglets and -0.983 or -1.023 kg of litter weight. When the model for LW21 included the dam inbreeding and the number of suckling piglets as co-variables, the heritability and repeatability estimates were 0.243 and 0.431 respectively. A complementary analysis was carried out on individual records (weight at 21 days) of 26206 piglets farrowed by 1317 sows. The model included the fixed effects of sex, farrowing period, parity, and the inbreeding coefficients of dam and individual, as co-variables. A total of four random effects were also included: direct and maternal genetic effects, common environmental effects and residual. Estimates of heritability, maternal heritability and common environmental coefficient were, respectively, 0.019, 0.163 and 0.128, reinforcing the evidence of genetic variance for milk producing ability in Iberian sows. The estimated values of inbreeding depression for piglet weight at 21 days were -0.072 and -0.098 kg per 10 % increase in dam or litter inbreeding. ZUSAMMENFASSUNG: Genetische

  7. DAVID Knowledgebase: a gene-centered database integrating heterogeneous gene annotation resources to facilitate high-throughput gene functional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baseler Michael W

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the complex and distributed nature of biological research, our current biological knowledge is spread over many redundant annotation databases maintained by many independent groups. Analysts usually need to visit many of these bioinformatics databases in order to integrate comprehensive annotation information for their genes, which becomes one of the bottlenecks, particularly for the analytic task associated with a large gene list. Thus, a highly centralized and ready-to-use gene-annotation knowledgebase is in demand for high throughput gene functional analysis. Description The DAVID Knowledgebase is built around the DAVID Gene Concept, a single-linkage method to agglomerate tens of millions of gene/protein identifiers from a variety of public genomic resources into DAVID gene clusters. The grouping of such identifiers improves the cross-reference capability, particularly across NCBI and UniProt systems, enabling more than 40 publicly available functional annotation sources to be comprehensively integrated and centralized by the DAVID gene clusters. The simple, pair-wise, text format files which make up the DAVID Knowledgebase are freely downloadable for various data analysis uses. In addition, a well organized web interface allows users to query different types of heterogeneous annotations in a high-throughput manner. Conclusion The DAVID Knowledgebase is designed to facilitate high throughput gene functional analysis. For a given gene list, it not only provides the quick accessibility to a wide range of heterogeneous annotation data in a centralized location, but also enriches the level of biological information for an individual gene. Moreover, the entire DAVID Knowledgebase is freely downloadable or searchable at http://david.abcc.ncifcrf.gov/knowledgebase/.

  8. The Root Hair Assay Facilitates the Use of Genetic and Pharmacological Tools in Order to Dissect Multiple Signalling Pathways That Lead to Programmed Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Kacprzyk; Aoife Devine; McCabe, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    The activation of programmed cell death (PCD) is often a result of complex signalling pathways whose relationship and intersection are not well understood. We recently described a PCD root hair assay and proposed that it could be used to rapidly screen genetic or pharmacological modulators of PCD. To further assess the applicability of the root hair assay for studying multiple signalling pathways leading to PCD activation we have investigated the crosstalk between salicylic acid, autophagy an...

  9. Targeted genetic dependency screen facilitates identification of actionable mutations in FGFR4, MAP3K9, and PAK5 in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawdar, Shameem; Trotter, Eleanor W; Li, Yaoyong; Stephenson, Natalie L; Hanke, Franziska; Marusiak, Anna A; Edwards, Zoe C; Ientile, Sara; Waszkowycz, Bohdan; Miller, Crispin J; Brognard, John

    2013-07-23

    Approximately 70% of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer present with late-stage disease and have limited treatment options, so there is a pressing need to develop efficacious targeted therapies for these patients. This remains a major challenge as the underlying genetic causes of ~50% of non-small-cell lung cancers remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that a targeted genetic dependency screen is an efficient approach to identify somatic cancer alterations that are functionally important. By using this approach, we have identified three kinases with gain-of-function mutations in lung cancer, namely FGFR4, MAP3K9, and PAK5. Mutations in these kinases are activating toward the ERK pathway, and targeted depletion of the mutated kinases inhibits proliferation, suppresses constitutive activation of downstream signaling pathways, and results in specific killing of the lung cancer cells. Genomic profiling of patients with lung cancer is ushering in an era of personalized medicine; however, lack of actionable mutations presents a significant hurdle. Our study indicates that targeted genetic dependency screens will be an effective strategy to elucidate somatic variants that are essential for lung cancer cell viability.

  10. Genetic analysis of seedling resistance to crown rust in five diploid oat (Avena strigosa) accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, A L; Park, R F

    2016-02-01

    Crown rust, caused by Puccinia coronata Corda f. sp. avenae Eriks., is a serious menace in oats, for which resistance is an effective means of control. Wild diploid oat accessions are a source of novel resistances that first need to be characterised prior to introgression into locally adapted oat cultivars. A genetic analysis of resistance to crown rust was carried out in three diverse diploid oat accessions (CIav6956, CIav9020, PI292226) and two cultivars (Saia and Glabrota) of A. strigosa. A single major gene conditioning resistance to Australian crown rust pathotype (Pt) 0000-2 was identified in each of the three accessions. Allelism tests suggested that these genes are either the same, allelic, or tightly linked with less than 1 % recombination. Similarly, a single gene was identified in Glabrota, and possibly two genes in Saia; both cultivars previously reported to carry two and three crown rust resistance genes, respectively. The identified seedling resistance genes could be deployed in combination with other resistance gene(s) to enhance durability of resistance to crown rust in hexaploid oat. Current diploid and hexaploid linkage maps and molecular anchor markers (simple sequence repeat [SSR] and diversity array technology [DArT] markers) should facilitate their mapping and introgression into hexaploid oat.

  11. Global annealing genetic algorithm and its convergence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张讲社; 徐宗本; 梁怡

    1997-01-01

    A new selection mechanism termed global annealing selection (GAnS) is proposed for the genetic algorithm. It is proved that the GAnS genetic algorithm converges to the global optimums if and only if the parents are allowed to compete for reproduction, and that the variance of population’s fitness can be used as a natural stopping criterion. Numerical simulations show that the new algorithm has stronger ability to escape from local maximum and converges more rapidly than canonical genetic algorithm.

  12. Facilitating neuronal connectivity analysis of evoked responses by exposing local activity with principal component analysis preprocessing: simulation of evoked MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin; Zhang, Tongsheng; Wang, Jue; Stephen, Julia

    2013-04-01

    When connectivity analysis is carried out for event related EEG and MEG, the presence of strong spatial correlations from spontaneous activity in background may mask the local neuronal evoked activity and lead to spurious connections. In this paper, we hypothesized PCA decomposition could be used to diminish the background activity and further improve the performance of connectivity analysis in event related experiments. The idea was tested using simulation, where we found that for the 306-channel Elekta Neuromag system, the first 4 PCs represent the dominant background activity, and the source connectivity pattern after preprocessing is consistent with the true connectivity pattern designed in the simulation. Improving signal to noise of the evoked responses by discarding the first few PCs demonstrates increased coherences at major physiological frequency bands when removing the first few PCs. Furthermore, the evoked information was maintained after PCA preprocessing. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that the first few PCs represent background activity, and PCA decomposition can be employed to remove it to expose the evoked activity for the channels under investigation. Therefore, PCA can be applied as a preprocessing approach to improve neuronal connectivity analysis for event related data.

  13. Accelerating epistasis analysis in human genetics with consumer graphics hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cancare Fabio

    2009-07-01

    performance while leaving the CPU available for other tasks. The GPU workstation containing three GPUs costs $2000 while obtaining similar performance on a Beowulf cluster requires 150 CPU cores which, including the added infrastructure and support cost of the cluster system, cost approximately $82,500. Conclusion Graphics hardware based computing provides a cost effective means to perform genetic analysis of epistasis using MDR on large datasets without the infrastructure of a computing cluster.

  14. Comprehensive assessment and network analysis of the emerging genetic susceptibility landscape of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Chindo; Miele, Lucio; Koganti, Tejaswi; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput genotyping have made possible identification of genetic variants associated with increased risk of developing prostate cancer using genome-wide associations studies (GWAS). However, the broader context in which the identified genetic variants operate is poorly understood. Here we present a comprehensive assessment, network, and pathway analysis of the emerging genetic susceptibility landscape of prostate cancer. We created a comprehensive catalog of genetic variants and associated genes by mining published reports and accompanying websites hosting supplementary data on GWAS. We then performed network and pathway analysis using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-containing genes to identify gene regulatory networks and pathways enriched for genetic variants. We identified multiple gene networks and pathways enriched for genetic variants including IGF-1, androgen biosynthesis and androgen signaling pathways, and the molecular mechanisms of cancer. The results provide putative functional bridges between GWAS findings and gene regulatory networks and biological pathways.

  15. PlanetPack: a radial-velocity time-series analysis tool facilitating exoplanets detection, characterization, and dynamical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Baluev, Roman V

    2013-01-01

    We present PlanetPack, a new software tool that we developed to facilitate and standardize the advanced analysis of radial velocity (RV) data for the goal of exoplanets detection, characterization, and basic dynamical $N$-body simulations. PlanetPack is a command-line interpreter, that can run either in an interactive mode or in a batch mode of automatic script interpretation. Its major abilities include: (i) Advanced RV curve fitting with the proper maximum-likelihood treatment of unknown RV jitter; (ii) User-friendly multi-Keplerian as well as Newtonian $N$-body RV fits; (iii) Use of more efficient maximum-likelihood periodograms that involve the full multi-planet fitting (sometimes called as ``residual'' or ``recursive'' periodograms); (iv) Easily calculatable parametric 2D likelihood function level contours, reflecting the asymptotic confidence regions; (v) Fitting under some useful functional constraints is user-friendly; (vi) Basic tasks of short- and long-term planetary dynamical simulation using a fas...

  16. Elective ventilation to facilitate organ donation in infants with anencephaly: perinatal professionals' views and an ethical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jivraj, Alisa; Scales, Angie; Brierley, Joe

    2016-05-01

    Following the elective ventilation and referral for organ donation of an infant with anencephaly, we sought local perinatal professionals' views of this practice. Anonymous online survey: demographics, ethical viewpoints and potential public/maternal perceptions (standard 5-part Likert scale and free text). 49 replies (38 female): 4 obstetricians, 14 neonatologists, 6 foetal clinicians, 23 nurses, 1 anaesthetist and 1 reproductive specialist. 0.5-33 years (average 12). Twenty-one had experience of anencephalic delivery, and 10 reported pregnancy continued for religious reasons. (i) 73% thought anencephalic donation acceptable, of which 64% supported elective ventilation, 20% neutral and 16% disagreed. (ii) Provision of treatments not in infant's strict best interest to facilitate donation: 22% strongly agreed, 36% agreed, 33% neutral and 9% disagreed. (iii) Accept ventilation to permit donation if societal benefit: 53% agreed, 33% neutral and 13% disagreed. (iv) Public opinion: 59% disagreed anencephalic donation would harm public opinion about donation and 19% agreed. We found a supportive local environment for donation in the setting of anencephaly, including support for elective ventilation. Given this, and our ethical analysis, we recommend provision of organ donation information as part of palliative care counselling for women carrying a foetus with a condition likely to be fatal in infancy. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Genetic Analysis of Micro-environmental Plasticity in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgante, Fabio; Sorensen, Daniel A; Sørensen, Peter

    Quantitative genetic models recognize the potential for genotype by environment interaction, whereby different genotypes have different plastic responses to changes in macro-environmental conditions. Recently, it has been recognized that micro-environmental plasticity (‘residual’ variance) may also...... be genetically variable. This study utilized the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) to accurately estimate the genetic variance of micro-environmental plasticity for chill coma recovery time and startle response. Estimates of broad sense heritabilities for both traits are substantial (from 0.51 to 0.......77), of the same order as the heritability at the level of the trait mean for startle response and even larger for chill coma recovery. Genome wide association analyses identified molecular variants (from 15 to 31 depending on the sex and the trait) associated with micro-environmental plasticity. These findings...

  18. RAPD analysis for genetic diversity of two populations of Mystus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... Figure 4. Phylogenetic tree constructed by similarity coefficient (Jaccard's). ... Its cost effectiveness provides an advantage in popula- tion genetic .... in Chatla Haor, a floodplain wetland in Cachar district of Assam. Environ.

  19. Genetic Analysis of Micro-environmental Plasticity in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgante, Fabio; Sorensen, Daniel A; Sørensen, Peter;

    Quantitative genetic models recognize the potential for genotype by environment interaction, whereby different genotypes have different plastic responses to changes in macro-environmental conditions. Recently, it has been recognized that micro-environmental plasticity (‘residual’ variance) may also...... be genetically variable. This study utilized the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) to accurately estimate the genetic variance of micro-environmental plasticity for chill coma recovery time and startle response. Estimates of broad sense heritabilities for both traits are substantial (from 0.51 to 0.......77), of the same order as the heritability at the level of the trait mean for startle response and even larger for chill coma recovery. Genome wide association analyses identified molecular variants (from 15 to 31 depending on the sex and the trait) associated with micro-environmental plasticity. These findings...

  20. Killer Whale Genetic Data - Southern resident killer whale pedigree analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In this project, we are using genetic variation to infer mating patterns in the southern killer whale community. In Canada, this population was listed as threatened...

  1. analysis of genetic diversity in linseed using aflp markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    environments, enhanced resistance to pathogens, pests and other ... parental genotypes are often selected on the basis of phenotypic ..... M. Sc. Thesis, ... Genotype-environment interactions and ... genetic diversity assessment among wheat.

  2. Smoking and caffeine consumption: A genetic analysis of their association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treur, J.L.; Taylor, A.E.; Ware, J.J.; Nivard, M.G.; Neale, M.C.; McMahon, G.; Hottenga, J.J.; Baselmans, B.M.L.; Boomsma, D.I.; Munafò, M.R.; Vink, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Smoking and caffeine consumption show a strong positive correlation, but the mechanism underlying this association is unclear. Explanations include shared genetic/environmental factors or causal effects. This study employed three methods to investigate the association between smoking and caffeine.

  3. Morphological characterization and genetic analysis of Drechslera teres isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Frazzon, A.P.G.; A.T.S. Matsumura; S.T.Van Der Sand

    2002-01-01

    Net blotch, caused by the phytopathogen Drechslera teres, is a common disease of barley (Hordeum vulgare L) and is responsible for large economic losses in some barley growing areas. In this study the morphology and genetic variability of eight D. teres isolates from different regions of the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul were investigated. Colony morphology was studied on potato-dextrose-agar (PDA) and genetic variability investigated using the random amplified polymorphic-DNA (RAPD) t...

  4. Development of Pineapple Microsatellite Markers and Germplasm Genetic Diversity Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suping Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two methods were used to develop pineapple microsatellite markers. Genomic library-based SSR development: using selectively amplified microsatellite assay, 86 sequences were generated from pineapple genomic library. 91 (96.8% of the 94 Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR loci were dinucleotide repeats (39 AC/GT repeats and 52 GA/TC repeats, accounting for 42.9% and 57.1%, resp., and the other three were mononucleotide repeats. Thirty-six pairs of SSR primers were designed; 24 of them generated clear bands of expected sizes, and 13 of them showed polymorphism. EST-based SSR development: 5659 pineapple EST sequences obtained from NCBI were analyzed; among 1397 nonredundant EST sequences, 843 were found containing 1110 SSR loci (217 of them contained more than one SSR locus. Frequency of SSRs in pineapple EST sequences is 1SSR/3.73 kb, and 44 types were found. Mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats dominate, accounting for 95.6% in total. AG/CT and AGC/GCT were the dominant type of dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeats, accounting for 83.5% and 24.1%, respectively. Thirty pairs of primers were designed for each of randomly selected 30 sequences; 26 of them generated clear and reproducible bands, and 22 of them showed polymorphism. Eighteen pairs of primers obtained by the one or the other of the two methods above that showed polymorphism were selected to carry out germplasm genetic diversity analysis for 48 breeds of pineapple; similarity coefficients of these breeds were between 0.59 and 1.00, and they can be divided into four groups accordingly. Amplification products of five SSR markers were extracted and sequenced, corresponding repeat loci were found and locus mutations are mainly in copy number of repeats and base mutations in the flanking region.

  5. Basic principles and laboratory analysis of genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus; Chanock, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    With the draft of the human genome and advances in technology, the approach toward mapping complex diseases and traits has changed. Human genetics has evolved into the study of the genome as a complex structure harbouring clues for multifaceted disease risk with the majority still unknown. The discovery of new candidate regions by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has changed strategies for the study of genetic predisposition. More genome-wide, "agnostic" approaches, with increasing numbers of participants from high-quality epidemiological studies are for the first time replicating results in different settings. However, new-found regions (which become the new candidate "genes") require extensive follow-up and investigation of their functional significance. Understanding the true effect of genetic variability on the risk of complex diseases is paramount. The importance of designing high-quality studies to assess environmental contributions, as well as the interactions between genes and exposures, cannot be stressed enough. This chapter will address the basic issues of genetic variation, including population genetics, as well as analytical platforms and tools needed to investigate the contribution of genetics to human diseases and traits.

  6. Participatory design facilitates Person Centred Nursing in service improvement with older people: a secondary directed content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolstenholme, Daniel; Ross, Helen; Cobb, Mark; Bowen, Simon

    2017-05-01

    To explore, using the example of a project working with older people in an outpatient setting in a large UK NHS Teaching hospital, how the constructs of Person Centred Nursing are reflected in interviews from participants in a Co-design led service improvement project. Person Centred Care and Person Centred Nursing are recognised terms in healthcare. Co-design (sometimes called participatory design) is an approach that seeks to involve all stakeholders in a creative process to deliver the best result, be this a product, technology or in this case a service. Co-design practice shares some of the underpinning philosophy of Person Centred Nursing and potentially has methods to aid in Person Centred Nursing implementation. The research design was a qualitative secondary Directed analysis. Seven interview transcripts from nurses and older people who had participated in a Co-design led improvement project in a large teaching hospital were transcribed and analysed. Two researchers analysed the transcripts for codes derived from McCormack & McCance's Person Centred Nursing Framework. The four most expressed codes were as follows: from the pre-requisites: knowing self; from care processes, engagement, working with patient's beliefs and values and shared Decision-making; and from Expected outcomes, involvement in care. This study describes the Co-design theory and practice that the participants responded to in the interviews and look at how the co-design activity facilitated elements of the Person Centred Nursing framework. This study adds to the rich literature about using emancipatory and transformational approaches to Person Centred Nursing development, and is the first study exploring explicitly the potential contribution of Co-design to this area. Methods from Co-design allow older people to contribute as equals in a practice development project, co-design methods can facilitate nursing staff to engage meaningfully with older participants and develop a shared

  7. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers and analysis of genetic diversity in Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqi Wang

    Full Text Available Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill, 2n = 2× = 24, Rhamnaceae is an economically important Chinese native species. It has high nutritional value, and its medicinal properties have led to extensive use in traditional oriental medicine. The characterization of genotypes using molecular markers is important for genetic studies and plant breeding. However, few simple sequence repeat (SSR markers are available for this species. In this study, 1,488 unique SSR clones were isolated from Z. jujuba 'Dongzao' using enriched genomic libraries coupled with a three-primer colony PCR screening strategy, yielding a high enrichment rate of 73.3%. Finally, 1,188 (80.87% primer pairs were amplified successfully in the size expected for 'Dongzao'. A total of 350 primer pairs were further selected and evaluated for their ability to detect polymorphisms across a panel of six diverse cultivars; among these, 301 primer pairs detected polymorphisms, and the polymorphism information content (PIC value across all loci ranged from 0.15 to 0.82, with an average of 0.52. An analysis of 76 major cultivars employed in Chinese jujube production using 31 primer pairs revealed comparatively high genetic diversity among these cultivars. Within-population differences among individuals accounted for 98.2% of the observed genetic variation. Neighbor-joining clustering divided the cultivars into three main groups, none of which correspond to major geographic regions, suggesting that the genetics and geographical origin of modern Chinese jujube cultivars might not be linked. The current work firstly reports the large-scale development of Chinese jujube SSR markers. The development of these markers and their polymorphic information represent a significant improvement in the available Chinese jujube genomic resources and will facilitate both genetic and breeding applications, further accelerating the development of new cultivars.

  8. The optimal design for hypothesis test and its application in genetic linkage analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE; Minyu(谢民育); LI; Zhaohai(李照海)

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes a class of linear models with inequable variance, based on background in genetic linkage analysis, and considers the optimal design problem for the hypothesis test of the parameters in such models. To assess a design for the test, a frame of decision theory is established. Under this frame, an admissible minimax design is obtained. It is shown to be not only admissible and minimax in genetic linkage analysis, but best among a reasonable subclass of designs. The power of the test in genetic linkage analysis is substantially improved by using this optimal design.

  9. Genetic analysis of the complete maintainer for genetic-male-sterility in upland cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛正轩; 黄观武; 孙贞; 苟云高; 杨泽湖; 江卫; 毛素珍

    1995-01-01

    The inheritance of the complete maintainer for Dong A-type genetic-male-sterility (GMS) in cotton was controlled by one pair of recessive major genes for male-sterility and polygenic system for pollen-spreading character together. When a dominant major gene for fertility was present, the action of the polygenic system was concealed and GMS was inherited as a qualitative character conditioned by one pair of recessive genes. But when the major genes were homozygous recessive, the polygenic system manifested modificatory effects on GMS, making GMS plants spread some pollen or partially fertile Among the genie effects of polygenic system on pollen-spreading character, additive [d], dominance [h] and additive ×dominance epistasis [j] were all very significant, [d] and [j] were positive and [h] was negative. This type of genetic model is referred to as Major Gene-Polygene Interaction Model in Crops.

  10. A Behaviour-Genetic Analysis of Orthographic Learning, Spelling and Decoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Brian; Coventry, William L.; Olson, Richard K.; Hulslander, Jacqueline; Wadsworth, Sally; DeFries, John C.; Corley, Robin; Willcutt, Erik G.; Samuelsson, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    As part of a longitudinal twin study of literacy and language, we conducted a behaviour-genetic analysis of orthographic learning, spelling and decoding in Grade 2 children (225 identical and 214 fraternal twin pairs) in the United States and Australia. Each variable showed significant genetic and unique environment influences. Multivariate…

  11. A Behaviour-Genetic Analysis of Orthographic Learning, Spelling and Decoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Brian; Coventry, William L.; Olson, Richard K.; Hulslander, Jacqueline; Wadsworth, Sally; DeFries, John C.; Corley, Robin; Willcutt, Erik G.; Samuelsson, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    As part of a longitudinal twin study of literacy and language, we conducted a behaviour-genetic analysis of orthographic learning, spelling and decoding in Grade 2 children (225 identical and 214 fraternal twin pairs) in the United States and Australia. Each variable showed significant genetic and unique environment influences. Multivariate…

  12. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D.; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H.; Koller, Daniel L.; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J.; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S.; Aitman, Tim J.; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E. Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We i

  13. Advancing genetic theory and application by metabolic quantitative trait loci analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliebenstein, Danielj

    2009-06-01

    This review describes recent advances in the analysis of metabolism using quantitative genetics. It focuses on how recent metabolic quantitative trait loci (QTL) studies enhance our understanding of the genetic architecture underlying naturally variable phenotypes and the impact of this fundamental research on agriculture, specifically crop breeding. In particular, the role of whole-genome duplications in generating quantitative genetic variation within a species is highlighted and the potential uses of this phenomenon presented. Additionally, the review describes how new observations from metabolic QTL mapping analyses are helping to shape and expand the concepts of genetic epistasis.

  14. Stochastic analysis and convergence velocity estimation of genetic algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭观七; 喻寿益

    2003-01-01

    Formulizations of mutation and crossover operators independent of representation of solutions are proposed. A kind of precisely quantitative Markov chain of populations of standard genetic algorithms is modeled. It is proved that inadequate parameters of mutation and crossover probabilities degenerate standard genetic algorithm to a class of random search algorithms without selection bias toward any solution based on fitness. After introducing elitist reservation, the stochastic matrix of Markov chain of the best-so-far individual with the highest fitness is derived.The average convergence velocity of genetic algorithms is defined as the mathematical expectation of the mean absorbing time steps that the best-so-far individual transfers from any initial solution to the global optimum. Using the stochastic matrix of the best-so-far individual, a theoretic method and the computing process of estimating the average convergence velocity are proposed.

  15. [THE FAILURE MODES AND EFFECTS ANALYSIS FACILITATES A SAFE, TIME AND MONEY SAVING OPEN ACCESS COLONOSCOPY SERVICE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Niv, Yaron; Horev, Nehama; Gross, Shuli; Sahar, Nadav; Dickman, Ram

    2017-04-01

    Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) is used for the identification of potential risks in health care processes. We used a specific FMEA - based form for direct referral for colonoscopy and assessed it for procedurerelated perforations. Ten experts in endoscopy evaluated and computed the entire referral process, modes of preparation for the endoscopic procedure, the endoscopic procedure itself and the discharge process. We used FMEA assessing for likelihood of occurrence, detection and severity and calculated the risk profile number (RPN) for each of the above points. According to the highest RPN results we designed a specific open access referral form and then compared the occurrence of colonic perforations (between 2010 and 2013) in patients who were referred through the open access arm (Group 1) to those who had a prior clinical consultation (non-open access, Group 2). Our experts in endoscopy (5 physicians and 5 nurses) identified 3 categories of failure modes that, on average, reached the highest RPNs. We identified 9,558 colonoscopies in group 1, and 12,567 in group 2. Perforations were identified in three patients from the open access group (1:3186, 0.03%) and in 10 from group 2 (1:1256, 0.07%) (p = 0.024). Direct referral for colonoscopy saved 9,558 pre-procedure consultations and the sum of $850,000. The FMEA tool-based specific referral form facilitates a safe, time and money saving open access colonoscopy service. Our form may be adopted by other gastroenterological clinics in Israel.

  16. Genetic definition and sequence analysis of Arabidopsis centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copenhaver, G P; Nickel, K; Kuromori, T; Benito, M I; Kaul, S; Lin, X; Bevan, M; Murphy, G; Harris, B; Parnell, L D; McCombie, W R; Martienssen, R A; Marra, M; Preuss, D

    1999-12-24

    High-precision genetic mapping was used to define the regions that contain centromere functions on each natural chromosome in Arabidopsis thaliana. These regions exhibited dramatic recombinational repression and contained complex DNA surrounding large arrays of 180-base pair repeats. Unexpectedly, the DNA within the centromeres was not merely structural but also encoded several expressed genes. The regions flanking the centromeres were densely populated by repetitive elements yet experienced normal levels of recombination. The genetically defined centromeres were well conserved among Arabidopsis ecotypes but displayed limited sequence homology between different chromosomes, excluding repetitive DNA. This investigation provides a platform for dissecting the role of individual sequences in centromeres in higher eukaryotes.

  17. Systems genetics analysis of pharmacogenomics variation during antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M. B.; Kogelman, L. J. A.; Kadarmideen, H. N.

    2017-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most widely used antidepressants, but the efficacy of the treatment varies significantly among individuals. It is believed that complex genetic mechanisms play a part in this variation. We have used a network based approach to unravel the in...... genes involved in calcium homeostasis. In conclusion, we suggest a difference in genetic interaction networks between initial and subsequent SSRI response.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 18 October 2016; doi:10.1038/tpj.2016.68....

  18. Genetic and Molecular Analysis of Suppressors of Ras Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    fication of vulval cell fates have defined many of the genes necessary for normal vulval differentiation (Korn- feld 1997; Stemberg and Han 1998... Stemberg . 1993. C. e]- egans Un-45 raf gene participates in let-60 ros-stimulated vulval differentiation. Nature 363: 133-140. Horvitz, H.R. and P.W... Stemberg , P.W. and M. Han. 1998. Genetics of Ras signaling in C. elegazss. Tiettds Genet. 14:466-472. Stewart, S., M. Sundaram, Y. Zhang, J. Lee, Y

  19. Genetic Analysis on Isoflavone Content in Soybean Seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jun-ming; DING An-lin; CHANG Ru-zhen

    2002-01-01

    Fifteen combinations with six soybean cultivars of different isoflavone content were formulated and planted in a randomized complete-block design model; genetic factors of isoflavone quantity were analyzed. Resuits indicated that genetic factors of isoflavone contents in F2 population inherited quantitatively. Isoflavone content of F1, F2 seeds normally trended. There were heterosis in F1, F2 of most combinations, and also heterobeltiosis in part of the crosses. The broad sense heritability of F2 was higher in parts of the crosses. It predicted the selection might be carried out preliminarily in F2 hybrids. There was significant positive correlation between hybrids and mid-parent.

  20. The root hair assay facilitates the use of genetic and pharmacological tools in order to dissect multiple signalling pathways that lead to programmed cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kacprzyk

    Full Text Available The activation of programmed cell death (PCD is often a result of complex signalling pathways whose relationship and intersection are not well understood. We recently described a PCD root hair assay and proposed that it could be used to rapidly screen genetic or pharmacological modulators of PCD. To further assess the applicability of the root hair assay for studying multiple signalling pathways leading to PCD activation we have investigated the crosstalk between salicylic acid, autophagy and apoptosis-like PCD (AL-PCD in Arabidopsis thaliana. The root hair assay was used to determine rates of AL-PCD induced by a panel of cell death inducing treatments in wild type plants treated with chemical modulators of salicylic acid synthesis or autophagy, and in genetic lines defective in autophagy or salicylic acid signalling. The assay demonstrated that PCD induced by exogenous salicylic acid or fumonisin B1 displayed a requirement for salicylic acid signalling and was partially dependent on the salicylic acid signal transducer NPR1. Autophagy deficiency resulted in an increase in the rates of AL-PCD induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1, but not by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. The phenylalanine ammonia lyase-dependent salicylic acid synthesis pathway contributed only to death induced by salicylic acid and fumonisin B1. 3-Methyladenine, which is commonly used as an inhibitor of autophagy, appeared to influence PCD induction in all treatments suggesting a possible secondary, non-autophagic, effect on a core component of the plant PCD pathway. The results suggest that salicylic acid signalling is negatively regulated by autophagy during salicylic acid and mycotoxin-induced AL-PCD. However, this crosstalk does not appear to be directly involved in PCD induced by gibberellic acid or abiotic stress. This study demonstrates that the root hair assay is an effective tool for relatively rapid investigation of complex signalling pathways leading to

  1. [Molecular genetic bases of adaptation processes and approaches to their analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmenkova, E A

    2013-01-01

    Great interest in studying the molecular genetic bases of the adaptation processes is explained by their importance in understanding evolutionary changes, in the development ofintraspecific and interspecific genetic diversity, and in the creation of approaches and programs for maintaining and restoring the population. The article examines the sources and conditions for generating adaptive genetic variability and contribution of neutral and adaptive genetic variability to the population structure of the species; methods for identifying the adaptive genetic variability on the genome level are also described. Considerable attention is paid to the potential of new technologies of genome analysis, including next-generation sequencing and some accompanying methods. In conclusion, the important role of the joint use of genomics and proteomics approaches in understanding the molecular genetic bases of adaptation is emphasized.

  2. Genetic Analysis of Pinus sylvestris L. and Pinus sylvestris forma turfosa L. Using RAPD Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beáta ÁBRAHÁM

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to determine the level of genetic diversity within and among Ciuc basin, Romania (populations from Mohos and Luci raised bogs in Harghita Mountain and Sumuleu in Ciuc Mountain Pinus sylvestris populations using molecular markers. Two of populations (Mohos and Luci seems to be the descendants that survived the continental glaciation. Genetic diversity was analyzed by RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA. Nine primers were selected for analysis, which generated reproducible bands. On base of presence or absence of homologues bands Nei’s gene diversity, the percentage of polymorphic loci and Nei’s unbiased genetic distance were calculated. The level of genetic variation among populations was found to be low. For both populations the variation values among populations were higher than within populations. The fossil records and geological historical data explain the extremely low genetic diversity of this species. Pinus sylvestris experienced strong bottlenecks during its evolutionary history, which caused the loss of genetic variation. Genetic drift and breeding in post-bottlenecked small populations may be the major forces that contribute to low genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of populations. Human activities may have accelerated the loss of genetic diversity in Pinus sylvestris.

  3. Genetic and environmental influences on impulsivity: A meta-analysis of twin, family and adoption studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezdjian, Serena; Baker, Laura A.; Tuvblad, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    A meta-analysis of twin, family and adoption studies was conducted to estimate the magnitude of genetic and environmental influences on impulsivity. The best fitting model for 41 key studies (58 independent samples from 14 month old infants to adults; N = 27,147) included equal proportions of variance due to genetic (0.50) and non-shared environmental (0.50) influences, with genetic effects being both additive (0.38) and non-additive (0.12). Shared environmental effects were unimportant in explaining individual differences in impulsivity. Age, sex, and study design (twin vs. adoption) were all significant moderators of the magnitude of genetic and environmental influences on impulsivity. The relative contribution of genetic effects (broad sense heritability) and unique environmental effects were also found to be important throughout development from childhood to adulthood. Total genetic effects were found to be important for all ages, but appeared to be strongest in children. Analyses also demonstrated that genetic effects appeared to be stronger in males than in females. Method of assessment (laboratory tasks vs. questionnaires), however, was not a significant moderator of the genetic and environmental influences on impulsivity. These results provide a structured synthesis of existing behavior genetic studies on impulsivity by providing a clearer understanding of the relative genetic and environmental contributions in impulsive traits through various stages of development. PMID:21889436

  4. Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saffer, Shelley (Sam) I.

    2014-12-01

    This is a final report of the DOE award DE-SC0001132, Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation. This document describes the achievements of the goals, and resulting research made possible by this award.

  5. Genetic analysis reveals diversity and genetic relationship among Trichoderma isolates from potting media, cultivated soil and uncultivated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sadi, Abdullah M; Al-Oweisi, Fatma A; Edwards, Simon G; Al-Nadabi, Hamed; Al-Fahdi, Ahmed M

    2015-07-28

    Trichoderma is one of the most common fungi in soil. However, little information is available concerning the diversity of Trichoderma in soil with no previous history of cultivation. This study was conducted to investigate the most common species and the level of genetic relatedness of Trichoderma species from uncultivated soil in relation to cultivated soil and potting media. A total of 24, 15 and 13 Trichoderma isolates were recovered from 84 potting media samples, 45 cultivated soil samples and 65 uncultivated soil samples, respectively. Analysis based on the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and the translation elongation factor gene (EF1) indicated the presence of 9 Trichoderma species: T. harzianum (16 isolates), T. asperellum (13), T. citrinoviride (9), T. orientalis (3), T. ghanense (3), T. hamatum (3), T. longibrachiatum (2), T. atroviride (2), and T. viride (1). All species were found to occur in potting media samples, while five Trichoderma species were recovered from the cultivated soils and four from the uncultivated soils. AFLP analysis of the 52 Trichoderma isolates produced 52 genotypes and 993 polymorphic loci. Low to moderate levels of genetic diversity were found within populations of Trichoderma species (H = 0.0780 to 0.2208). Analysis of Molecular Variance indicated the presence of very low levels of genetic differentiation (Fst = 0.0002 to 0.0139) among populations of the same Trichoderma species obtained from the potting media, cultivated soil and uncultivated soil. The study provides evidence for occurrence of Trichoderma isolates in soil with no previous history of cultivation. The lack of genetic differentiation among Trichoderma populations from potting media, cultivated soil and uncultivated soil suggests that some factors could have been responsible for moving Trichoderma propagules among the three substrates. The study reports for the first time the presence of 4 Trichoderma species in Oman: T

  6. Analysis of genetic relationships of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.) landraces from Zimbabwe, using microsatellites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chakauya, E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available and indigenous farmer given names. Analysis was done by PAGE stained with ethidium bromide. Simple matching coefficients were compared and the genetic relationships between genotypes were clarified on dendrograms by unweighted pair-group averages (UPGMA). Two...

  7. Bayesian methods for meta-analysis of causal relationships estimated using genetic instrumental variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Genetic markers can be used as instrumental variables, in an analogous way to randomization in a clinical trial, to estimate the causal relationship between a phenotype and an outcome variable. Our purpose is to extend the existing methods for such Mendelian randomization studies to the context...... of multiple genetic markers measured in multiple studies, based on the analysis of individual participant data. First, for a single genetic marker in one study, we show that the usual ratio of coefficients approach can be reformulated as a regression with heterogeneous error in the explanatory variable....... This can be implemented using a Bayesian approach, which is next extended to include multiple genetic markers. We then propose a hierarchical model for undertaking a meta-analysis of multiple studies, in which it is not necessary that the same genetic markers are measured in each study. This provides...

  8. Genetic analysis of threatened Australian grayling Prototroctes maraena suggests recruitment to coastal rivers from an unstructured marine larval source population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, D J; Crook, D A; O'Connor, J P; Hughes, J M

    2011-01-01

    Population genetic variation of Australian grayling Prototroctes maraena was examined to determine whether the dispersal strategy of this amphidromous species favours retention of larvae and juveniles in close proximity to their natal river, or mixing of populations via marine dispersal. Variation in microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA markers was unstructured and differentiation was indistinguishable from zero across four coastal rivers spanning approximately one-quarter of the continental range of the species. This result indicates that the marine larval and juvenile phase probably facilitates extensive gene flow among coastal rivers and agrees with a previous analysis of otolith chemistry that suggested larvae probably move into the sea rather than remain in estuaries. It appears likely that the dispersal strategy of P. maraena would enable recolonization of rivers that experience localized extinction provided that connectivity between freshwater habitats and the sea is sufficient to permit migration and that enough source populations remain intact to support viability of the wider population.

  9. Genetic analysis of protein composition of bovine milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schopen, G.C.B.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is part of the Dutch Milk Genomics Initiative, and the general aim was to obtain more insight into the genetic background of bovine milk protein composition. Morning milk samples from roughly 2000 cows were analyzed for the six major milk proteins (αS1-casein, αS2-casein, β-casein,

  10. Genetic analysis of calf and heifer losses in Danish Holstein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuerst-Walti, B; Sørensen, Morten Kargo

    2010-01-01

    of genetic parameters, linear and threshold sire models were applied. Effects accounted for were the random effects herd × year × season and sire as well as the fixed effects year × month, number of dam's parity (parities >5 were set to 5), calf size, and calving ease. In total, the pedigree consisted of 4...

  11. Genetic analysis of body weight of Takifugu rubripes at different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-11-09

    Nov 9, 2016 ... 2Laboratory for Marine Biology and Biotechnology, Qingdao ... weight trait was mainly controlled by dominance effects from 8 to 17 months ... Key words: Takifugu rubripes, body weight, genetic parameters, .... The quantity of fish and the environment were standardized to ..... models of evolutionary change.

  12. Analysis of genetic structure in Melia volkensii (Gurke.) populations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    between populations in the eastern and the coastal regions with 21.1%, (P < 0.0002) of the total variation attributed to differences ... especially in the highly settled areas. ... to rapidly estimate the patterns and distribution of genetic variation for ... Altitude (m) Region .... application to human mitochondrial DNA restriction data.

  13. Genetic diversity analysis and conservation of the Chinese herb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... were to (i) examine levels and distribution of genetic vari- ability within and .... TSL-4X only, which is located in the south part of the. Qinling region of .... tation of facilities, it was impossible to conserve all acces- sions in in situ ...

  14. (Cyto)genetic analysis of (oligodendro)glial tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeuken, Judith Willem Marie

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the studies described in this thesis was to identify genetic markers with prognostic or therapeutic implications for the less common glial tumors, the oligodendroglial tumors (OTs), including both pure oligodendrogliomas (Os) and mixed oligo-astrocytomas (OAs), and the ependymal tumors (

  15. Genetic and biochemical analysis of solvent formation in Clostridium acetobutylicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, G.N.; Rudolph, F.B.

    1998-05-01

    The anaerobic organism Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used for commercial production of important organic solvents due to its ability to convert a wide variety of crude substrates to acids and alcohols. Current knowledge concerning the molecular genetics, cell regulation and metabolic engineering of this organism is still rather limited. The objectives are to improve the knowledge of the molecular genetics and enzymology of Clostridia in order to make genetic alterations which will more effectively channel cell metabolism toward production of desired products. Two factors that limit butanol production in continuous cultures are: (1) The degeneration of the culture, with an increase in the proportion of cells which are incapable of solvent production. Currently isolated degenerate strains are being evaluated to analyze the molecular mechanism of degeneration to determine if it is due to a genetic loss of solvent related genes, loss of a regulatory element, or an increase in general mutagenesis. Recent studies show two general types of degenerates, one which seems to have lost essential solvent pathway genes and another which has not completely lost all solvent production capability and retains the DNA bearing solvent pathway genes. (2) The production of hydrogen which uses up reducing equivalents in the cell. If the reducing power were more fully directed to the reduction reactions involved in butanol production, the process would be more efficient. The authors have studied oxidation reduction systems related to this process. These studies focus on ferredoxin and rubredoxin and their oxidoreductases.

  16. Standardization of RAPD assay for genetic analysis of olive

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... for thousands of years and it meets not only the edible .... ethanol. DNA's were dried and re-suspended in 50 µl EDTA. RNA ase (1 µl) was added against the possibility of contamination, in the .... Olive genetic diversity.

  17. Simulation Approach for Timing Analysis of Genetic Logic Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baig, Hasan; Madsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    in a manner similar to electronic logic circuits, but they are much more stochastic and hence much harder to characterize. In this article, we introduce an approach to analyze the threshold value and timing of genetic logic circuits. We show how this approach can be used to analyze the timing behavior...

  18. SNP and haplotype mapping for genetic analysis in the rat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saar, K.; Beck, A.; Bihoreau, M.; Birney, E.; Brocklebank, D.; Chen, Y.; Cuppen, E.; Demonchy, S.; Dopazo, J.; Flicek, P.; Foglio, M.; Fujiyama, A.; Gut, I.G.; Gauguier, D.; Guigo, R.; Guryev, V.; Heinig, M.; Hummel, O.; Jahn, N.; Klages, S.; Kren, V.; Kube, M.; Kuhl, H.; Kuramoto, T.; Kuroki, Y.; Lechner, D.; Lee, Y.A.; Lopez-Bigas, N.; Lathrop, G.M.; Mashimo, T.; Medina, I.; Mott, R.; Patone, G.; Perrier-Cornet, J.A.; Platzer, M.; Pravenec, M.; Reinhardt, R.; Sakaki, Y.; Schilhabel, M.; Schulz, H.; Serikawa, T.; Shikhagaie, M.; Tatsumoto, S.; Taudien, S.; Toyoda, A.; Voigt, B.; Zelenika, D.; Zimdahl, H.; Hubner, N.

    2008-01-01

    The laboratory rat is one of the most extensively studied model organisms. Inbred laboratory rat strains originated from limited Rattus norvegicus founder populations, and the inherited genetic variation provides an excellent resource for the correlation of genotype to phenotype. Here, we report a s

  19. Finite-time performance analysis for genetic algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Finite-time performance of genetic algorithm with elitist operator in finite solution space is studied, and the relationship between evolution generation and the quality of the solution found best so far is analyzed. The estimating formulations of the expectation value as well as upper bound and lower bound for the evolution generation earliest achieving specific performance are provided.

  20. Seasonal Time Series Analysis Based on Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Pattern discovery from the seasonal time-series is of importance. Traditionally, most of the algorithms of pattern discovery in time series are similar. A novel mode of time series is proposed which integrates the Genetic Algorithm (GA) for the actual problem. The experiments on the electric power yield sequence models show that this algorithm is practicable and effective.

  1. SNP and haplotype mapping for genetic analysis in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saar, Kathrin; Beck, Alfred; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Birney, Ewan; Brocklebank, Denise; Chen, Yuan; Cuppen, Edwin; Demonchy, Stephanie; Dopazo, Joaquin; Flicek, Paul; Foglio, Mario; Fujiyama, Asao; Gut, Ivo G; Gauguier, Dominique; Guigo, Roderic; Guryev, Victor; Heinig, Matthias; Hummel, Oliver; Jahn, Niels; Klages, Sven; Kren, Vladimir; Kube, Michael; Kuhl, Heiner; Kuramoto, Takashi; Kuroki, Yoko; Lechner, Doris; Lee, Young-Ae; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Lathrop, G Mark; Mashimo, Tomoji; Medina, Ignacio; Mott, Richard; Patone, Giannino; Perrier-Cornet, Jeanne-Antide; Platzer, Matthias; Pravenec, Michal; Reinhardt, Richard; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Schilhabel, Markus; Schulz, Herbert; Serikawa, Tadao; Shikhagaie, Medya; Tatsumoto, Shouji; Taudien, Stefan; Toyoda, Atsushi; Voigt, Birger; Zelenika, Diana; Zimdahl, Heike; Hubner, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    The laboratory rat is one of the most extensively studied model organisms. Inbred laboratory rat strains originated from limited Rattus norvegicus founder populations, and the inherited genetic variation provides an excellent resource for the correlation of genotype to phenotype. Here, we report a s

  2. Potato leafroll virus : molecular analysis and genetically engineered resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilk, van der F.

    1995-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the genomic RNA of potato leafroll virus (PLRV) was elucidated and its genetic organization deduced (Chapter 2). Six open reading frames (ORFs) were shown to be present on the genome. Both the PLRV coat protein gene and the RNA- dependent RNA polymerase gene were

  3. Genetic analysis of protein composition of bovine milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schopen, G.C.B.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is part of the Dutch Milk Genomics Initiative, and the general aim was to obtain more insight into the genetic background of bovine milk protein composition. Morning milk samples from roughly 2000 cows were analyzed for the six major milk proteins (αS1-casein, αS2-casein, β-casein, κ-cas

  4. Genetic analysis of Trichinella populations by 'cold' single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Robin B; Hu, Min; El-Osta, Youssef Abs; Zarlenga, Dante S; Pozio, Edoardo

    2005-09-05

    A non-isotopic single-strand conformation polymorphism ('cold' SSCP) technique has been assessed for the analysis of sequence variability in the expansion segment 5 (ES5) of domain IV and the D3 domain of nuclear ribosomal DNA within and/or among isolates and individual muscle (first-stage) larvae representing all currently recognized species/genotypes of Trichinella. Data are consistent with the ability of cold SSCP to identify intra-specific as well as inter-specific variability among Trichinella genotypes. The cold SSCP approach should be applicable to a range of other genetic markers for comparative studies of Trichinella populations globally.

  5. Methods of Sports Genetics: dermatoglyphic analysis of human fingerprints (information 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhiyenko L.P.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The article provides data on the dermatoglyphic analysis of human fingerprints. The most informative dermatoglyphic traits of fingerprints are defined. They can be used as genetic markers to prognosticate sports endowments. The recommendations to use the technology of dermatoglyphic analysis of human fingerprints in sports genetics are given. There are certain national and racial differences in phenotypical expressed of dermatoglyphics of digit patterns.

  6. Large, Prospective Analysis of the Reasons Patients Do Not Pursue BRCA Genetic Testing Following Genetic Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Sommer; Mange, Sarah; Duquette, Debra; Petrucelli, Nancie; Raymond, Victoria M

    2017-01-16

    Genetic counseling (GC) and genetic testing (GT) identifies high-risk individuals who benefit from enhanced medical management. Not all individuals undergo GT following GC and understanding the reasons why can impact clinical efficiency, reduce GT costs through appropriate identification of high-risk individuals, and demonstrate the value of pre-GT GC. A collaborative project sponsored by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services prospectively collects anonymous data on BRCA-related GC visits performed by providers in Michigan, including demographics, patient/family cancer history, GT results, and reasons for declining GT. From 2008 to 2012, 10,726 patients underwent GC; 3476 (32.4%) did not pursue GT. Primary reasons included: not the best test candidate (28.1%), not clinically indicated (23.3%), and insurance/out of pocket cost concerns (13.6%). Patient disinterest was the primary reason for declining in 17.1%. Insurance/out of pocket cost concerns were the primary reason for not testing in 13.4% of untested individuals with private insurance. Among untested individuals with breast and/or ovarian cancer, 22.5% reported insurance/out of pocket cost concerns as the primary reason for not testing and 6.6% failed to meet Medicare criteria. In a five-year time period, nearly one-third of patients who underwent BRCA GC did not pursue GT. GT was not indicated in almost half of patients. Insurance/out of pocket cost concerns continue to be barriers.

  7. Comparative analysis of phenotypes features in two common genetic variants of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Sharkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The algorithm of differential diagnosis of the two most common genetic variants the limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2A and DMD, developed on the basis of a comprehensive survey of 85 patients with a diagnosis specification using techniques of DNA analysis. It is shown that the accurate diagnosis of LGMD genetic types should be based on the results of the clinical and genealogical, biochemical and molecular genetic analysis. The proposed algorithm will significantly reduces the economic and time costs with expensive DNA testing.

  8. Developmental quantitative genetic analysis of body weights and morphological traits in the turbot, Scophthalmusmaximus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xinan; MA Aijun; MA Deyou

    2015-01-01

    In order to elucidate the genetic mechanism of growth traits in turbot during ontogeny, developmental genetic analysis of the body weights, total lengths, standard lengths and body heights of turbots was conducted by mixed genetic models with additive-dominance effects, based on complete diallel crosses with four different strains of Scophthalmus maximus from Denmark, Norway, Britain, and France. Unconditional genetic analysis revealed that the unconditional additive effects for the four traits were more significant than unconditional dominance effects, meanwhile, the alternative expressions were also observed between the additive and dominant effects for body weights, total lengths and standard lengths. Conditional analysis showed that the developmental periods with active gene expression for body weights, total lengths, standard lengths and body heights were 15–18, 15 and 21–24, 15 and 24, and 21 and 27 months of age, respectively. The proportions of unconditional/conditional variances indicated that the narrow-sense heritabilities of body weights, total lengths and standard lengths were all increased systematically. The accumulative effects of genes controlling the four quantitative traits were mainly additive effects, suggesting that the selection is more efficient for the genetic improvement of turbots. The conditional genetic procedure is a useful tool to understand the expression of genes controlling developmental quantitative traits at a specific developmental period (t-1→t) during ontogeny. It is also important to determine the appropriate developmental period (t-1→t) for trait measurement in developmental quantitative genetic analysis in fish.

  9. Genetic Variation among 11 Abies concolor Populations Based on Allozyme Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jin-feng; Li Hui; Dong Jian-sheng; Wang Jun-hui

    2005-01-01

    In order to obtain information on the genetic structure of Abies concolor and the genetic variation among 11 populations introduced from America to China, allozyme analysis based on starch gel electrophoresis technology was used. 24 loci of 10allozyme systems were mensurated, and the genetic structure and genetic diversity of the 11 populations of A. concolor evaluated.The results show that the genetic variation among is significant, and the genetic variation within A. concolor populations is more important. In contrast with other conifers, the variation of A. concolor is above the average level of conifers, and higher than the same level ofAbies. The percentage of polymorphic loci (P) was 62.5%, the number of alleles per locus (A) 2.08, the number of effective alleles per locus (Ae) was 1.37, the expected heterozygosity (H) 0.204, and the Shannon information index (I) 0.351 7. There is a short genetic distance (D=0.061) and a low gene flow (Nm=0.839 4) among the 11 introduced populations of A. concolor with high genetic variation. The genetic differentiation coefficient (Gst) was 0.229 5, which is higher than that of the mean in Abies or Pinus.

  10. Genetic diversity based on SSR analysis of the cultured snakehead fish, Channa argus, (Channidae) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S-R; Li, J-L; Xie, N; Zhu, L-M; Wang, Q; Yue, G-H

    2014-02-13

    The snakehead fish Channa argus is an important food fish in China. We identified six microsatellite loci for C. argus. These six microsatellite loci and four other microsatellite markers were used to analyze genetic diversity in four cultured populations of C. argus (SD, JX, HN, and ZJ) and determine their relationships. A total of 154 alleles were detected at the 10 microsatellite loci. The average expected and observed heterozygosities varied from 0.70-0.84 and 0.69-0.83, respectively, and polymorphism information content ranged between 0.66 and 0.82 in the four populations, indicating high genetic diversity. Population JX deviated from mutation-drift equilibrium and may have experienced a recent bottleneck. Analysis of pairwise genetic differentiation revealed FST values that ranged from 0.028 to 0.100, which indicates a moderate level of genetic differentiation. The largest distances were observed between populations HN and SD, whereas the smallest distances were obtained between populations HN and JX. Genetic clustering analysis demonstrated that the ZJ and HN populations probably share the same origin. This information about the genetic diversity within each of the four populations, and their genetic relationships will be useful for future genetic improvement of C. argus through selective breeding.

  11. Genetic analysis of familial spontaneous pneumothorax in an Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anindita; Paul, Suman; Chattopadhyay, Esita; Kundu, Susmita; Roy, Bidyut

    2015-06-01

    Familial spontaneous pneumothorax is one of the phenotypes of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS), an autosomal dominant condition associated with folliculin (FLCN). We investigated clinical and genetic data of an Indian family having two patients suffering from spontaneous pneumothorax in the absence of skin lesions or renal tumors. HRCT scan of patient's lung revealed paracardiac cysts, and DNA sequencing of all 14 exons of FLCN from patients showed the presence of heterozygous "C allele" deletion in the poly-cytosine (poly-C) tract of exon 11 leading to truncated folliculin. This mutation was also observed in four asymptomatic members of the family. Our results confirmed the presence of deletion mutation in poly-C tract of FLCN in members of BHDS family. This is the first report of genetic insight in a BHDS family from India but in-depth studies with a larger sample set are necessary to understand mechanism of familial pneumothorax.

  12. Load Flow Analysis Using Real Coded Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himakar Udatha

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Real Coded Genetic Algorithm (RCGA for finding the load flow solution of electrical power systems. The proposed method is based on the minimization of the real and reactive power mismatches at various buses. The traditional methods such as Gauss-Seidel method and Newton-Raphson (NR method have certain drawbacks under abnormal operating condition. In order to overcome these problems, the load flow solution based on Real Coded Genetic Algorithm (RCGA is presented in this paper. Two cross over techniques, Arithmetic crossover and heuristic crossover are used to solve the power flow problem. The proposed method is applied for 3-bus, 5-bus and 6-bus systems and the results are presented.

  13. Engineering and Functional Analysis of Mitotic Kinases Through Chemical Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mathew J K; Jallepalli, Prasad V

    2016-01-01

    During mitosis, multiple protein kinases transform the cytoskeleton and chromosomes into new and highly dynamic structures that mediate the faithful transmission of genetic information and cell division. However, the large number and strong conservation of mammalian kinases in general pose significant obstacles to interrogating them with small molecules, due to the difficulty in identifying and validating those which are truly selective. To overcome this problem, a steric complementation strategy has been developed, in which a bulky "gatekeeper" residue within the active site of the kinase of interest is replaced with a smaller amino acid, such as glycine or alanine. The enlarged catalytic pocket can then be targeted in an allele-specific manner with bulky purine analogs. This strategy provides a general framework for dissecting kinase function with high selectivity, rapid kinetics, and reversibility. In this chapter we discuss the principles and techniques needed to implement this chemical genetic approach in mammalian cells.

  14. Genetic analysis of Phytophthora infestans populations in the Nordic European countries reveals high genetic variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brurberg, May Bente; Elameen, Abdelhameed; Le, Ving Hong

    2011-01-01

    Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is the most important disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum). The pathogen is highly adaptable and to get an overview of the genetic variation in the Nordic countries, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden we have analyzed 200 isolates from...... different fields using nine simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Forty-nine alleles were detected among the nine SSR loci and isolates from all four Nordic countries shared the most common alleles across the loci. In total 169 multilocus genotypes (based on seven loci) were identified among 191 isolates....... The genotypic diversities, quantified by a normalized Shannon’s diversity index (Hs), were 0.95 for the four Nordic countries. The low FST value of 0.04 indicates that the majority of variation is found within the four Nordic countries. The large number of genotypes and the frequency distribution of mating...

  15. Genetic Analysis of Histamine Signaling in Larval Zebrafish Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomou, Grigorios

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pharmacological studies in mammals and zebrafish suggest that histamine plays an important role in promoting arousal. However, genetic studies using rodents with disrupted histamine synthesis or signaling have revealed only subtle or no sleep/wake phenotypes. Studies of histamine function in mammalian arousal are complicated by its production in cells of the immune system and its roles in humoral and cellular immunity, which can have profound effects on sleep/wake states. To avoid this potential confound, we used genetics to explore the role of histamine in regulating sleep in zebrafish, a diurnal vertebrate in which histamine production is restricted to neurons in the brain. Similar to rodent genetic studies, we found that zebrafish that lack histamine due to mutation of histidine decarboxylase (hdc) exhibit largely normal sleep/wake behaviors. Zebrafish containing predicted null mutations in several histamine receptors also lack robust sleep/wake phenotypes, although we are unable to verify that these mutants are completely nonfunctional. Consistent with some rodent studies, we found that arousal induced by overexpression of the neuropeptide hypocretin (Hcrt) or by stimulation of hcrt-expressing neurons is not blocked in hdc or hrh1 mutants. We also found that the number of hcrt-expressing or histaminergic neurons is unaffected in animals that lack histamine or Hcrt signaling, respectively. Thus, while acute pharmacological manipulation of histamine signaling has been shown to have profound effects on zebrafish and mammalian sleep, our results suggest that chronic loss of histamine signaling due to genetic mutations has only subtle effects on sleep in zebrafish, similar to rodents. PMID:28275716

  16. Genetic diversity analysis of salinity related germplasm in cotton

    OpenAIRE

    Lina Zhang; Wuwei Ye; Junjuan Wang; Baoxiang Fan; Delong Wang

    2010-01-01

    In order to study the genetic variation of salinity related cotton germplasm, 47 upland cotton accessions including 23 salinity tolerant materials and 24 salinity sensitive materials were explored using 88 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. We detected a total of 338 alleles at 88 SSR loci with an average of 3.841 alleles per locus, 333 of these alleles were detected in salinity tolerant germplasm and 312 alleles in salinity sensitive germplasm. Mean polymorphism information content (PIC),...

  17. Bioinformatics analysis and genetic diversity of the poliovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanhan; Ma, Tengfei; Liu, Jianzhu; Zhao, Xiaona; Cheng, Ziqiang; Guo, Huijun; Wang, Shujing; Xu, Ruixue

    2014-12-01

    Poliomyelitis, a disease which can manifest as muscle paralysis, is caused by the poliovirus, which is a human enterovirus and member of the family Picornaviridae that usually transmits by the faecal-oral route. The viruses of the OPV (oral poliovirus attenuated-live vaccine) strains can mutate in the human intestine during replication and some of these mutations can lead to the recovery of serious neurovirulence. Informatics research of the poliovirus genome can be used to explain further the characteristics of this virus. In this study, sequences from 100 poliovirus isolates were acquired from GenBank. To determine the evolutionary relationship between the strains, we compared and analysed the sequences of the complete poliovirus genome and the VP1 region. The reconstructed phylogenetic trees for the complete sequences and the VP1 sequences were both divided into two branches, indicating that the genetic relationships of the whole poliovirus genome and the VP1 sequences are very similar. This branching indicates that the virulence and pathogenicity of poliomyelitis may be associated with the VP1 region. Sequence alignment of the VP1 region revealed numerous mutation sites in which mutation rates of >30 % were detected. In a group of strains recorded in the USA, mutation sites and mutation types were the same and this may be associated with their distribution in the evolutionary tree and their genetic relationship. In conclusion, the genetic evolutionary relationships of poliovirus isolate sequences are determined to a great extent by the VP1 protein, and poliovirus strains located on the same branch of the phylogenetic tree contain the same mutation spots and mutation types. Hence, the genetic characteristics of the VP1 region in the poliovirus genome should be analysed to identify the transmission route of poliovirus and provide the basis of viral immunity development.

  18. Genetic analysis of 7 medieval skeletons from the Aragonese Pyrenees

    OpenAIRE

    Núńez, Carolina; Sosa, Cecilia; Baeta, Miriam; Geppert, Maria; Turnbough, Meredith; Phillips, Nicole; Casalod, Yolanda; Bolea, Miguel; Roby, Rhonda; Budowle, Bruce; Martínez-Jarreta, Begońa

    2011-01-01

    Aim To perform a genetic characterization of 7 skeletons from medieval age found in a burial site in the Aragonese Pyrenees. Methods Allele frequencies of autosomal short tandem repeats (STR) loci were determined by 3 different STR systems. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome haplogroups were determined by sequencing of the hypervariable segment 1 of mtDNA and typing of phylogenetic Y chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (YSNP) markers, respectively. Po...

  19. Genetic analysis of 7 medieval skeletons from Aragonese Pyrenees

    OpenAIRE

    Núńez, Carolina; Sosa, Cecilia; Baeta, Miriam; Geppert, Maria; Turnbough, Meredith; Phillips, Nicole; Casalod, Yolanda; Bolea, Miguel; Roby, Rhonda; Budowle, Bruce; Martínez-Jarreta, Begońa

    2011-01-01

    Aim To perform a genetic characterization of 7 skeletons from medieval age found in a burial site in the Aragonese Pyrenees. Methods Allele frequencies of autosomal short tandem repeats (STR) loci were determined by 3 different STR systems. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome haplogroups were determined by sequencing of the hypervariable segment 1 of mtDNA and typing of phylogenetic Y chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNP) markers, respectively. Possible familial relationsh...

  20. Genetic analysis of frontotemporal dementia and progressive supra nuclear palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, R.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association study (GWAS) is an effective method for mapping genetic variants underlying common and complex diseases. This thesis describes the investigation of the disorders, frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). FTD affects the frontal/temporal lobes and presents behavioural changes (bvFTD), cognitive decline or language dysfunction (primary progressive aphasia [PPA]), whilst PSP affects predominantly the brain stem resulting in loss of balance, ...

  1. Software for analysis and manipulation of genetic linkage data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, R; Helms, C; Mishra, S K; Donis-Keller, H

    1992-06-01

    We present eight computer programs written in the C programming language that are designed to analyze genotypic data and to support existing software used to construct genetic linkage maps. Although each program has a unique purpose, they all share the common goals of affording a greater understanding of genetic linkage data and of automating tasks to make computers more effective tools for map building. The PIC/HET and FAMINFO programs automate calculation of relevant quantities such as heterozygosity, PIC, allele frequencies, and informativeness of markers and pedigrees. PREINPUT simplifies data submissions to the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) data base by creating a file with genotype assignments that CEPH's INPUT program would otherwise require to be input manually. INHERIT is a program written specifically for mapping the X chromosome: by assigning a dummy allele to males, in the nonpseudoautosomal region, it eliminates falsely perceived noninheritances in the data set. The remaining four programs complement the previously published genetic linkage mapping software CRI-MAP and LINKAGE. TWOTABLE produces a more readable format for the output of CRI-MAP two-point calculations; UNMERGE is the converse to CRI-MAP's merge option; and GENLINK and LINKGEN automatically convert between the genotypic data file formats required by these packages. All eight applications read input from the same types of data files that are used by CRI-MAP and LINKAGE. Their use has simplified the management of data, has increased knowledge of the content of information in pedigrees, and has reduced the amount of time needed to construct genetic linkage maps of chromosomes.

  2. Genetic Analysis of Stellate Elements of Drosophila Melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Palumbo, G.; Bonaccorsi, S.; Robbins, L. G.; Pimpinelli, S.

    1994-01-01

    Repeated elements are remarkably important for male meiosis and spermiogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. Pairing of the X and Y chromosomes is mediated by the ribosomal RNA genes of the Y chromosome and X chromosome heterochromatin, spermiogenesis depends on the fertility factors of the Y chromosome. Intriguingly, a peculiar genetic system of interaction between the Y-linked crystal locus and the X-linked Stellate elements seem to be also involved in male meiosis and spermiogenesis. Deletio...

  3. A genetic analysis of Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis from Ecuador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meekums, Hayley; Hawash, Mohamed B F; Sparks, Alexandra M;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the nematodes Trichuris trichiura and T. suis are morphologically indistinguishable, genetic analysis is required to assess epidemiological cross-over between people and pigs. This study aimed to clarify the transmission biology of trichuriasis in Ecuador. FINDINGS: Adult...... Trichuris worms were collected during a parasitological survey of 132 people and 46 pigs in Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. Morphometric analysis of 49 pig worms and 64 human worms revealed significant variation. In discriminant analysis morphometric characteristics correctly classified male worms according...... to genetically analyse Trichuris parasites. Although T. trichiura does not appear to be zoonotic in Ecuador, there is evidence of genetic exchange between T. trichiura and T. suis warranting more detailed genetic sampling....

  4. Genetic Evidence of Contemporary Dispersal of the Intermediate Snail Host of Schistosoma japonicum: Movement of an NTD Host Is Facilitated by Land Use and Landscape Connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Head

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available While the dispersal of hosts and vectors-through active or passive movement-is known to facilitate the spread and re-emergence of certain infectious diseases, little is known about the movement ecology of Oncomelania spp., intermediate snail host of the parasite Schistosoma japonicum, and its consequences for the spread of schistosomiasis in East and Southeast Asia. In China, despite intense control programs aimed at preventing schistosomiasis transmission, there is evidence in recent years of re-emergence and persistence of infection in some areas, as well as an increase in the spatial extent of the snail host. A quantitative understanding of the dispersal characteristics of the intermediate host can provide new insights into the spatial dynamics of transmission, and can assist public health officials in limiting the geographic spread of infection.Oncomelania hupensis robertsoni snails (n = 833 were sampled from 29 sites in Sichuan, China, genotyped, and analyzed using Bayesian assignment to estimate the rate of recent snail migration across sites. Landscape connectivity between each site pair was estimated using the geographic distance distributions derived from nine environmental models: Euclidean, topography, incline, wetness, land use, watershed, stream use, streams and channels, and stream velocity. Among sites, 14.4% to 32.8% of sampled snails were identified as recent migrants, with 20 sites comprising >20% migrants. Migration rates were generally low between sites, but at 8 sites, over 10% of the overall host population originated from one proximal site. Greater landscape connectivity was significantly associated with increased odds of migration, with the minimum path distance (as opposed to median or first quartile emerging as the strongest predictor across all environmental models. Models accounting for land use explained the largest proportion of the variance in migration rates between sites. A greater number of irrigation channels

  5. Ventilatory long-term facilitation is evident after initial and repeated exposure to intermittent hypoxia in mice genetically depleted of brain serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickner, Stephen; Hussain, Najaah; Angoa-Perez, Mariana; Francescutti, Dina M; Kuhn, Donald M; Mateika, Jason H

    2014-02-01

    Our study was designed to determine if central nervous system (CNS) serotonin is required for the induction of ventilatory long-term facilitation (LTF) in intact, spontaneously breathing mice. Nineteen tryptophan hydroxylase 2-deficient (Tph2(-/-)) mice, devoid of serotonin in the CNS, and their wild-type counterparts (Tph2(+/+)) were exposed to intermittent hypoxia each day for 10 consecutive days. The ventilatory response to intermittent hypoxia was greater in the Tph2(+/+) compared with the Tph2(-/-) mice (1.10 ± 0.10 vs. 0.77 ± 0.01 ml min(-1)·percent(-1) oxygen; P ≤ 0.04). Ventilatory LTF, caused by increases in breathing frequency, was evident in Tph2(+/+) and Tph2(-/-) mice following exposure to intermittent hypoxia each day; however, the magnitude of the response was greater in the Tph2(+/+) compared with the Tph2(-/-) mice (1.11 ± 0.02 vs. 1.05 ± 0.01 normalized to baseline on each day; P ≤ 0.01). The magnitude of ventilatory LTF increased significantly from the initial to the finals days of the protocol in the Tph2(-/-) (1.06 ± 0.02 vs. 1.11 ± 0.03 normalized to baseline on the initial days; P ≤ 0.004) but not in the Tph2(+/+) mice. This enhanced response was mediated by increases in tidal volume. Body temperature and metabolic rate did not account for differences in the magnitude of ventilatory LTF observed between groups after acute and repeated daily exposure to intermittent hypoxia. We conclude that ventilatory LTF, after acute exposure to intermittent hypoxia, is mediated by increases in breathing frequency and occurs in the absence of serotonin, although the magnitude of the response is diminished. This weakened response is enhanced following repeated daily exposure to intermittent hypoxia, via increases in tidal volume, to a similar magnitude evident in Tph2(+/+) mice. Thus the magnitude of ventilatory LTF following repeated daily exposure to intermittent hypoxia is not dependent on the presence of CNS serotonin.

  6. Genetic Analysis of the Henry Mountains Bison Herd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin H Ranglack

    Full Text Available Wild American plains bison (Bison bison populations virtually disappeared in the late 1800s, with some remnant animals retained in what would become Yellowstone National Park and on private ranches. Some of these private bison were intentionally crossbred with cattle for commercial purposes. This forced hybridization resulted in both mitochondrial and nuclear introgression of cattle genes into some of the extant bison genome. As the private populations grew, excess animals, along with their history of cattle genetics, provided founders for newly established public bison populations. Of the US public bison herds, only those in Yellowstone and Wind Cave National Parks (YNP and WCNP appear to be free of detectable levels of cattle introgression. However, a small free-ranging population (~350 animals exists on public land, along with domestic cattle, in the Henry Mountains (HM of southern Utah. This isolated bison herd originated from a founder group translocated from YNP in the 1940s. Using genetic samples from 129 individuals, we examined the genetic status of the HM population and found no evidence of mitochondrial or nuclear introgression of cattle genes. This new information confirms it is highly unlikely for free-living bison to crossbreed with cattle, and this disease-free HM bison herd is valuable for the long-term conservation of the species. This bison herd is a subpopulation of the YNP/WCNP/HM metapopulation, within which it can contribute significantly to national efforts to restore the American plains bison to more of its native range.

  7. Genetic analysis of wheat domestication and evolution under domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Zvi; Fahima, Tzion; Korol, Abraham B; Abbo, Shahal; Saranga, Yehoshua

    2011-10-01

    Wheat is undoubtedly one of the world's major food sources since the dawn of Near Eastern agriculture and up to the present day. Morphological, physiological, and genetic modifications involved in domestication and subsequent evolution under domestication were investigated in a tetraploid recombinant inbred line population, derived from a cross between durum wheat and its immediate progenitor wild emmer wheat. Experimental data were used to test previous assumptions regarding a protracted domestication process. The brittle rachis (Br) spike, thought to be a primary characteristic of domestication, was mapped to chromosome 2A as a single gene, suggesting, in light of previously reported Br loci (homoeologous group 3), a complex genetic model involved in spike brittleness. Twenty-seven quantitative trait loci (QTLs) conferring threshability and yield components (kernel size and number of kernels per spike) were mapped. The large number of QTLs detected in this and other studies suggests that following domestication, wheat evolutionary processes involved many genomic changes. The Br gene did not show either genetic (co-localization with QTLs) or phenotypic association with threshability or yield components, suggesting independence of the respective loci. It is argued here that changes in spike threshability and agronomic traits (e.g. yield and its components) are the outcome of plant evolution under domestication, rather than the result of a protracted domestication process. Revealing the genomic basis of wheat domestication and evolution under domestication, and clarifying their inter-relationships, will improve our understanding of wheat biology and contribute to further crop improvement.

  8. Genetic analysis of amino acid content in wheat grain

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiaoling Jiang; Peng Wu; Jichun Tian

    2014-08-01

    Complete diallel crosses with five parents of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were conducted to analyse inheritance of 17 amino acid contents by using the genetic model including seed, cytoplasmic, maternal and environment interaction effects on quantitative traits of seeds in cereal crops. The results showed that inheritance of 17 amino acid contents, except tyrosine, was controlled by several genetic systems including seed, cytoplasmic, and maternal effects, and by significant gene × environment interaction effects. Seed-direct additive and maternal effects constituted a major part of genetic effects for lysine, tyrosine, arginine, methionine, and glutamic acid content. Seed-direct additive effect formed main part in inheritance of isoleucine and serine contents. Threonine content was mainly governed by maternal additive effect. The other nine amino acid contents were almost entirely controlled by dominance effects. High general heritability of tyrosine (36.3%), arginine (45.8%), lysine (24.7%) and threonine (21.4%) contents, revealed that it could be effective to improve them by direct selection in progenies from appropriate crosses. Interaction heritability for phenylalanine, proline, and histidine content, which was 36.1%, 39.5% and 25.7%, respectively, was higher than for the other amino acids.

  9. Analysis of Genetic Diversity Among Sweetpotato Landraces in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xue-qin; LIU Qing-chang; WANG Yu-ping; ZHAI Hong

    2004-01-01

    Genetic diversity of 48 sweetpotato landraces randomly sampled from Anhui,Fujian, Henan and Guangdong provinces in China was analyzed using RAPD, ISSR and AFLP markers. Thirty RAPD primers, 14 ISSR primers and 9 AFLP primer pairs generated 227, 249 and 260 polymorphic bands, respectively. AFLP markers were better than RAPD and ISSR markers in terms of the number of polymorphic bands detected and the experimental stability. These three molecular markers revealed the similar results that Chinese landraces exhibited a high level of genetic diversity, and the genetic variation of Guangdong landraces was significantly higher than those of the landraces from the other three regions. These results supported the hypothesis that China was a secondary center of sweetpotato diversity. The present results also supported the view that sweetpotato was first introduced to Guangdong and from there spread to other regions of China. The dendrogram based on the combined RAPD, ISSR and AFLP dataset could separate the 48 landraces into two groups: One mainly including 8 landraces from Guangdong and the other consisting of the remaining landraces from Guangdong and landraces from the other three regions. Thus, the utilization of Guangdong landraces should be specially considered in sweetpotato breeding.

  10. Facilitators and barriers of adopting healthy lifestyle in rural China: a qualitative analysis through social capital perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Defu; Cui, Renzhe; Haregot Hilawe, Esayas; Chiang, Chifa; Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Hu, Yonghua; Wang, Peiyu; Iso, Hiroyasu; Aoyama, Atsuko

    2016-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the major public health concerns in China. However, little has been known yet about the background social factors that influence lifestyles as possible NCD risk factors. This qualitative study aimed to explore facilitators and barriers of adopting healthy lifestyles among residents in a rural community of China. Three age-stratified focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted in Fangshan district of Beijing in 2013. A FGD guide was designed to elicit the participants' perception and experience regarding their lifestyles. The audio-records were transcribed, and data were qualitatively analyzed through thematic approach. Through social capital framework with bonding, bridging, and linking classifications, we identified the following facilitators and barriers to adopt healthy lifestyles. (1) Facilitators: mutual support from family/friends and motivation to participate in regular exercises (bonding); cooperative relationships with community health workers (bridging); and nationwide high level of healthy lifestyle awareness (linking). (2) Barriers: negative influence from family/friends, insufficient support from family/friends, peer pressure and tolerance towards unhealthy lifestyles (bonding); insufficient support from health professionals (bridging); and inequity in allocation of public resources (linking). This study revealed that bonding, bridging and linking social capital would work as facilitators and barriers to adopt healthy lifestyles among rural residents in China.

  11. Shortest-path network analysis is a useful approach toward identifying genetic determinants of longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J R Managbanag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of genes that modulate longevity is a major focus of aging-related research and an area of intense public interest. In addition to facilitating an improved understanding of the basic mechanisms of aging, such genes represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention in multiple age-associated diseases, including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. To date, however, targeted efforts at identifying longevity-associated genes have been limited by a lack of predictive power, and useful algorithms for candidate gene-identification have also been lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have utilized a shortest-path network analysis to identify novel genes that modulate longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Based on a set of previously reported genes associated with increased life span, we applied a shortest-path network algorithm to a pre-existing protein-protein interaction dataset in order to construct a shortest-path longevity network. To validate this network, the replicative aging potential of 88 single-gene deletion strains corresponding to predicted components of the shortest-path longevity network was determined. Here we report that the single-gene deletion strains identified by our shortest-path longevity analysis are significantly enriched for mutations conferring either increased or decreased replicative life span, relative to a randomly selected set of 564 single-gene deletion strains or to the current data set available for the entire haploid deletion collection. Further, we report the identification of previously unknown longevity genes, several of which function in a conserved longevity pathway believed to mediate life span extension in response to dietary restriction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work demonstrates that shortest-path network analysis is a useful approach toward identifying genetic determinants of longevity and represents the first application of

  12. SSR ANALYSIS IN THE STUDY OF GENETIC DIVERSITY AND SIMILARITY OF BARLEY CULTIVARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. R. Lakhneko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of research was to develop an evaluation system of the genetic polymorphism for barley cultivars of Ukrainian and foreign origin based on the analysis of simple sequence repeats and valuable agricultural trait loci as well as to compose the molecular genetic passports for those cultivars. PCRs with the following separation of amplification products by agarose and polyacrylamide electrophoresis were performed to find out genetic polymorphism. Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean was used for phylogenetic relationship detection. The dandrogram of phylogenetic relationships of 55 barley cultivars was constructed and molecular genetic passports were developed. Molecular genetic passports can be involved in verification for the compliance with standards cultivars, stability and seed purity.

  13. Logic analysis and verification of n-input genetic logic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baig, Hasan; Madsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Nature is using genetic logic circuits to regulate the fundamental processes of life. These genetic logic circuits are triggered by a combination of external signals, such as chemicals, proteins, light and temperature, to emit signals to control other gene expressions or metabolic pathways...... accordingly. As compared to electronic circuits, genetic circuits exhibit stochastic behavior and do not always behave as intended. Therefore, there is a growing interest in being able to analyze and verify the logical behavior of a genetic circuit model, prior to its physical implementation in a laboratory....... In this paper, we present an approach to analyze and verify the Boolean logic of a genetic circuit from the data obtained through stochastic analog circuit simulations. The usefulness of this analysis is demonstrated through different case studies illustrating how our approach can be used to verify the expected...

  14. Two-level mixed modeling of longitudinal pedigree data for genetic association analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic association analysis on complex phenotypes under a longitudinal design involving pedigrees encounters the problem of correlation within pedigrees which could affect statistical assessment of the genetic effects on both the mean level of the phenotype and its rate of change over the time...... assess the genetic associations with the mean level and the rate of change in a phenotype both with kinship correlation integrated in the mixed effect models. We apply our method to longitudinal pedigree data to estimate the genetic effects on systolic blood pressure measured over time in large pedigrees....... Our results show that the method efficiently handles relatedness in detecting genetic variations that affect the mean level or the rate of change for a phenotype of interest....

  15. Identification of common genetic modifiers of neurodegenerative diseases from an integrative analysis of diverse genetic screens in model organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An array of experimental models have been developed in the small model organisms C. elegans, S. cerevisiae and D. melanogaster for the study of various neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and expanded polyglutamine diseases as exemplified by Huntington's disease (HD and related ataxias. Genetic approaches to determine the nature of regulators of the disease phenotypes have ranged from small scale to essentially whole genome screens. The published data covers distinct models in all three organisms and one important question is the extent to which shared genetic factors can be uncovered that affect several or all disease models. Surprisingly it has appeared that there may be relatively little overlap and that many of the regulators may be organism or disease-specific. There is, however, a need for a fully integrated analysis of the available genetic data based on careful comparison of orthologues across the species to determine the real extent of overlap. Results We carried out an integrated analysis using C. elegans as the baseline model organism since this is the most widely studied in this context. Combination of data from 28 published studies using small to large scale screens in all three small model organisms gave a total of 950 identifications of genetic regulators. Of these 624 were separate genes with orthologues in C. elegans. In addition, 34 of these genes, which all had human orthologues, were found to overlap across studies. Of the common genetic regulators some such as chaperones, ubiquitin-related enzymes (including the E3 ligase CHIP which directly links the two pathways and histone deacetylases were involved in expected pathways whereas others such as the peroxisomal acyl CoA-oxidase suggest novel targets for neurodegenerative disease therapy Conclusions We identified a significant number of overlapping regulators of neurodegenerative disease models. Since the diseases

  16. The multi-niche crowding genetic algorithm: Analysis and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cedeno, Walter [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The ability of organisms to evolve and adapt to the environment has provided mother nature with a rich and diverse set of species. Only organisms well adapted to their environment can survive from one generation to the next, transferring on the traits, that made them successful, to their offspring. Competition for resources and the ever changing environment drives some species to extinction and at the same time others evolve to maintain the delicate balance in nature. In this disertation we present the multi-niche crowding genetic algorithm, a computational metaphor to the survival of species in ecological niches in the face of competition. The multi-niche crowding genetic algorithm maintains stable subpopulations of solutions in multiple niches in multimodal landscapes. The algorithm introduces the concept of crowding selection to promote mating among members with qirnilar traits while allowing many members of the population to participate in mating. The algorithm uses worst among most similar replacement policy to promote competition among members with similar traits while allowing competition among members of different niches as well. We present empirical and theoretical results for the success of the multiniche crowding genetic algorithm for multimodal function optimization. The properties of the algorithm using different parameters are examined. We test the performance of the algorithm on problems of DNA Mapping, Aquifer Management, and the File Design Problem. Applications that combine the use of heuristics and special operators to solve problems in the areas of combinatorial optimization, grouping, and multi-objective optimization. We conclude by presenting the advantages and disadvantages of the algorithm and describing avenues for future investigation to answer other questions raised by this study.

  17. Analysis of Dengue Virus Genetic Diversity during Human and Mosquito Infection Reveals Genetic Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, October M; Wilm, Andreas; Kamaraj, Uma Sangumathi; Choy, Milly M; Chow, Angelia; Chong, Yuwen; Ong, Xin Mei; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Cook, Alex R; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) cause debilitating and potentially life-threatening acute disease throughout the tropical world. While drug development efforts are underway, there are concerns that resistant strains will emerge rapidly. Indeed, antiviral drugs that target even conserved regions in other RNA viruses lose efficacy over time as the virus mutates. Here, we sought to determine if there are regions in the DENV genome that are not only evolutionarily conserved but genetically constrained in their ability to mutate and could hence serve as better antiviral targets. High-throughput sequencing of DENV-1 genome directly from twelve, paired dengue patients' sera and then passaging these sera into the two primary mosquito vectors showed consistent and distinct sequence changes during infection. In particular, two residues in the NS5 protein coding sequence appear to be specifically acquired during infection in Ae. aegypti but not Ae. albopictus. Importantly, we identified a region within the NS3 protein coding sequence that is refractory to mutation during human and mosquito infection. Collectively, these findings provide fresh insights into antiviral targets and could serve as an approach to defining evolutionarily constrained regions for therapeutic targeting in other RNA viruses.

  18. Population genetic analysis and trichothecene profiling of Fusarium graminearum from wheat in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, D; Mionetto, A; Calero, N; Reynoso, M M; Torres, A; Bettucci, L

    2016-03-11

    Fusarium graminearum sensu stricto (F. graminearum s.s.) is the major causal agent of Fusarium head blight of wheat worldwide, and contaminates grains with trichothecene mycotoxins that cause serious threats to food safety and animal health. An important aspect of managing this pathogen and reducing mycotoxin contamination of wheat is knowledge regarding its population genetics. Therefore, isolates of F. graminearum s.s. from the major wheat-growing region of Uruguay were analyzed by amplified fragment length polymorphism assays, PCR genotyping, and chemical analysis of trichothecene production. Of the 102 isolates identified as having the 15-ADON genotype via PCR genotyping, all were DON producers, but only 41 strains were also 15-ADON producers, as determined by chemical analysis. The populations were genotypically diverse but genetically similar, with significant genetic exchange occurring between them. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that most of the genetic variability resulted from differences between isolates within populations. Multilocus linkage disequilibrium analysis suggested that the isolates had a panmictic population genetic structure and that there is significant recombination occurs in F. graminearum s.s. In conclusion, tour findings provide the first detailed description of the genetic structure and trichothecene production of populations of F. graminearum s.s. from Uruguay, and expands our understanding of the agroecology of F. graminearum and of the correlation between genotypes and trichothecene chemotypes.

  19. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Candida isolates obtained from diabetic patients and kidney transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volmir Pitt Benedetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts of the genus Candida have high genetic variability and are the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi in humans. In this study, we evaluated the genetic diversity among 120 isolates of Candida spp. obtained from diabetic patients, kidney transplant recipients and patients without any immune deficiencies from Paraná state, Brazil. The analysis was performed using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and a partial sequence of 28S rDNA. In the phylogenetic analysis, we observed a consistent separation of the species C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, however with low intraspecific variability. In the analysis of the C. albicans species, two clades were formed. Clade A included the largest number of isolates (91.2% and the majority of isolates from GenBank (71.4%. The phylogenetic analysis showed low intraspecific genetic diversity, and the genetic polymorphisms between C. albicans isolates were similar to genetic divergence found in other studies performed with isolates from Brazil. This low genetic diversity of isolates can be explained by the geographic proximity of the patients evaluated. It was observed that yeast colonisation was highest in renal transplant recipients and diabetic patients and that C. albicans was the species most frequently isolated.

  20. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Candida isolates obtained from diabetic patients and kidney transplant recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Volmir Pitt; Savi, Daiani Cristina; Aluizio, Rodrigo; Adamoski, Douglas; Kava-Cordeiro, Vanessa; Galli-Terasawa, Lygia V; Glienke, Chirlei

    2016-01-01

    Yeasts of the genus Candida have high genetic variability and are the most common opportunistic pathogenic fungi in humans. In this study, we evaluated the genetic diversity among 120 isolates of Candida spp. obtained from diabetic patients, kidney transplant recipients and patients without any immune deficiencies from Paraná state, Brazil. The analysis was performed using the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and a partial sequence of 28S rDNA. In the phylogenetic analysis, we observed a consistent separation of the species C. albicans, C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis, however with low intraspecific variability. In the analysis of the C. albicans species, two clades were formed. Clade A included the largest number of isolates (91.2%) and the majority of isolates from GenBank (71.4%). The phylogenetic analysis showed low intraspecific genetic diversity, and the genetic polymorphisms between C. albicans isolates were similar to genetic divergence found in other studies performed with isolates from Brazil. This low genetic diversity of isolates can be explained by the geographic proximity of the patients evaluated. It was observed that yeast colonisation was highest in renal transplant recipients and diabetic patients and that C. albicans was the species most frequently isolated. PMID:27276363

  1. Collinearity Analysis and High-Density Genetic Mapping of the Wheat Powdery Mildew Resistance Gene Pm40 in PI 672538.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shengfu; Ma, Lixia; Fatima, Syeda Akash; Yang, Jiezhi; Chen, Wanquan; Liu, Taiguo; Hu, Yuting; Li, Qing; Guo, Jingwei; Zhang, Min; Lei, Li; Li, Xin; Tang, Shengwen; Luo, Peigao

    2016-01-01

    The wheat powdery mildew resistance gene Pm40, which is located on chromosomal arm 7BS, is effective against nearly all prevalent races of Blumeria graminis f. sp tritici (Bgt) in China and is carried by the common wheat germplasm PI 672538. A set of the F1, F2 and F2:3 populations from the cross of the resistant PI 672538 with the susceptible line L1034 were used to conduct genetic analysis of powdery mildew resistance and construct a high-density linkage map of the Pm40 gene. We constructed a high-density linkage genetic map with a total length of 6.18 cM and average spacing between markers of 0.48 cM.Pm40 is flanked by Xwmc335 and BF291338 at genetic distances of 0.58 cM and 0.26 cM, respectively, in deletion bin C-7BS-1-0.27. Comparative genomic analysis based on EST-STS markers established a high level of collinearity of the Pm40 genomic region with a 1.09-Mbp genomic region on Brachypodium chromosome 3, a 1.16-Mbp genomic region on rice chromosome 8, and a 1.62-Mbp genomic region on sorghum chromosome 7. We further anchored the Pm40 target intervals to the wheat genome sequence. A putative linear index of 85 wheat contigs containing 97 genes on 7BS was constructed. In total, 9 genes could be considered as candidates for the resistances to powdery mildew in the target genomic regions, which encoded proteins that were involved in the plant defense and response to pathogen attack. These results will facilitate the development of new markers for map-based cloning and marker-assisted selection of Pm40 in wheat breeding programs.

  2. Collinearity Analysis and High-Density Genetic Mapping of the Wheat Powdery Mildew Resistance Gene Pm40 in PI 672538

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Syeda Akash; Yang, Jiezhi; Chen, Wanquan; Liu, Taiguo; Hu, Yuting; Li, Qing; Guo, Jingwei; Zhang, Min; Lei, Li; Li, Xin; Tang, Shengwen; Luo, Peigao

    2016-01-01

    The wheat powdery mildew resistance gene Pm40, which is located on chromosomal arm 7BS, is effective against nearly all prevalent races of Blumeria graminis f. sp tritici (Bgt) in China and is carried by the common wheat germplasm PI 672538. A set of the F1, F2 and F2:3 populations from the cross of the resistant PI 672538 with the susceptible line L1034 were used to conduct genetic analysis of powdery mildew resistance and construct a high-density linkage map of the Pm40 gene. We constructed a high-density linkage genetic map with a total length of 6.18 cM and average spacing between markers of 0.48 cM.Pm40 is flanked by Xwmc335 and BF291338 at genetic distances of 0.58 cM and 0.26 cM, respectively, in deletion bin C-7BS-1-0.27. Comparative genomic analysis based on EST-STS markers established a high level of collinearity of the Pm40 genomic region with a 1.09-Mbp genomic region on Brachypodium chromosome 3, a 1.16-Mbp genomic region on rice chromosome 8, and a 1.62-Mbp genomic region on sorghum chromosome 7. We further anchored the Pm40 target intervals to the wheat genome sequence. A putative linear index of 85 wheat contigs containing 97 genes on 7BS was constructed. In total, 9 genes could be considered as candidates for the resistances to powdery mildew in the target genomic regions, which encoded proteins that were involved in the plant defense and response to pathogen attack. These results will facilitate the development of new markers for map-based cloning and marker-assisted selection of Pm40 in wheat breeding programs. PMID:27755575

  3. Identification of genetic markers for Mycobacterium pinnipedii through genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, Fabiana; Garcia-Pelayo, M Carmen; Nuñez-García, Javier; Peralta, Andrea; Caimi, Karina C; Golby, Paul; Hinds, Jason; Cataldi, Angel; Gordon, Stephen V; Romano, Maria I

    2005-07-15

    Tuberculosis in seals is caused by Mycobacterium pinnipedii, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. In this study, we evaluated the extent of genetic variability among Mycobacterium bovis and M. pinnipedii by microarray-based comparative genomics. We identified two deletions that are exclusive to M. pinnipedii: PiD1 that removes the orthologues of the M. tuberculosis genes Rv3530c and Rv3531c, and PiD2 that encompasses genes Rv1977 and Rv1978. Interestingly, a deletion overlapping the previously described RD2 region was identified in some isolates of Mycobacterium microti and further characterised.

  4. Genetic Analysis of Digestive Physiology Using Fluorescent Phospholipid Reporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Steven A.; Pack, Michael; Ho, Shiu-Ying; Johnson, Iain D.; Wagner, Daniel S.; Dosch, Roland; Mullins, Mary C.; Hendrickson, H. Stewart; Hendrickson, Elizabeth K.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2001-05-01

    Zebrafish are a valuable model for mammalian lipid metabolism; larvae process lipids similarly through the intestine and hepatobiliary system and respond to drugs that block cholesterol synthesis in humans. After ingestion of fluorescently quenched phospholipids, endogenous lipase activity and rapid transport of cleavage products results in intense gall bladder fluorescence. Genetic screening identifies zebrafish mutants, such as fat free, that show normal digestive organ morphology but severely reduced phospholipid and cholesterol processing. Thus, fluorescent lipids provide a sensitive readout of lipid metabolism and are a powerful tool for identifying genes that mediate vertebrate digestive physiology.

  5. Genetic variants associated with gestational diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis and subgroup analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling; Cui, Long; Tam, Wing Hung; Ma, Ronald C. W.; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) share common genetic polymorphisms. We conducted meta-analysis and subgroup analysis of all available variants and determined the effects of confounding and experimental components on the genetic association of GDM. Any case-controlled or cohort studies with genotype distribution compared GDM cases with controls were included. In total, 28 articles including 8,204 cases and 15,221 controls for 6 polymorphisms were studied. rs10830963(MTNR1B), rs7903146(TCF7L2), and rs1801278(IRS1) were significantly associated with the increased GDM risk. The association of rs4402960(IGF2BP2) and rs1800629(TNF-α) was significant only when the studies with control allele frequency deviation and publication bias were excluded. Further subgroup analysis showed the risk alleles of rs7903146(TCF7L2) and rs1801282(PPARG) were significantly associated with the GDM risk only in Asian, but not in Caucasian population. The OGTT test using 100 g, but not 75 g; and genotype detection by other assays, but not Taqman method, were also significantly associated with increased GDM risk in rs1801278(IRS1) and rs7903146(TCF7L2). Overall GDM was associated with rs10830963(MTNR1B), rs7903146(TCF7L2), and rs1801278(IRS1), but only rs7903146(TCF7L2) and rs1801282(PPARG) were significant in Asian populations. While rs1801278(IRS1) and rs7903146(TCF7L2) were significantly affected by OGTT protocol and genotyping methods. PMID:27468700

  6. Facilitering som styringsredskab

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, Karen Overgaard

    2006-01-01

    #This thesis surveys facilitation as a new tool of steering within the public sector in Denmark. It is explored how facilitation is articulated and practiced among facilitators from the public, private and voluntary sector. Furthermore, the facilitator’s challenges by using facilitation are examined. The thesis is based on the presumption that facilitation is articulated by rationalities, which influence how facilitation is practiced and performed. Also, a facilitator is seen as a performer a...

  7. High Genetic Diversity in a Rare, Narrowly Endemic Primrose Species: Primula interjacens by ISSR Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUEDa-Wei; GEXue-Jun; HAOGang; ZHANGChang-Qin

    2004-01-01

    Prirnula interjacens Chen (Primulaceae) is a rare and narrow endemic species of centralsouth of Yunnan Province in China. This species consists of two varieties: P.interjacens var. interjacens known with only one population, and P.interjacens var. epilosa with two populations. Intersimple sequence repeat (ISSR) marker was used to detect the genetic diversity of the three extant populations. We expected a low genetic diversity level, but our results revealed a high level of intraspecific genetic diversity (at population level: P=59.75%, HE=0.2368, and Hpop=0.3459; at species level: P=75.47%, HT= 0.320 5, and Hsp = 0.4618), probably resulting from floral heteromorphism and preferring outcrossing. A moderate level of genetic differentiation among populations was detected based on Nei's genetic diversity analysis (26.13%) and Shannon's diversity index (25.09%). Although P./ntedacens var. intedacens and P. interjacens var. epilosa were morphologically distinct, UPGMA cluster analysis showed that the two varieties had no distinct genetic differentiation and may be treated as a single taxon. Conservation measures are suggested, including in situ and ex situ strategies, based on the observed population genetic information.

  8. Economic methods for valuing the outcomes of genetic testing: beyond cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Scott D; Wordsworth, Sarah; Payne, Katherine

    2008-09-01

    Genetic testing in health care can provide information to help with disease prediction, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Assessing the clinical utility of genetic testing requires a process to value and weight different outcomes. This article discusses the relative merits of different economic measures and methods to inform recommendations relative to genetic testing for risk of disease, including cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-benefit analysis. Cost-effectiveness analyses refer to analyses that calculate the incremental cost per unit of health outcomes, such as deaths prevented or life-years saved because of some intervention. Cost-effectiveness analyses that use preference-based measures of health state utility such as quality-adjusted life-years to define outcomes are referred to as cost-utility analyses. Cost-effectiveness analyses presume that health policy decision makers seek to maximize health subject to resource constraints. Cost-benefit analyses can incorporate monetary estimates of willingness-to-pay for genetic testing, including the perceived value of information independent of health outcomes. These estimates can be derived from contingent valuation or discrete choice experiments. Because important outcomes of genetic testing do not fit easily within traditional measures of health, cost-effectiveness analyses do not necessarily capture the full range of outcomes of genetic testing that are important to decision makers and consumers. We recommend that health policy decision makers consider the value to consumers of information and other nonhealth attributes of genetic testing strategies.

  9. Adaptive divergence despite strong genetic drift: genomic analysis of the evolutionary mechanisms causing genetic differentiation in the island fox (Urocyon littoralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, W Chris; Lovich, Robert E; Hohenlohe, Paul A; Hofman, Courtney A; Morrison, Scott A; Sillett, T Scott; Ghalambor, Cameron K; Maldonado, Jesus E; Rick, Torben C; Day, Mitch D; Polato, Nicholas R; Fitzpatrick, Sarah W; Coonan, Timothy J; Crooks, Kevin R; Dillon, Adam; Garcelon, David K; King, Julie L; Boser, Christina L; Gould, Nicholas; Andelt, William F

    2016-05-01

    The evolutionary mechanisms generating the tremendous biodiversity of islands have long fascinated evolutionary biologists. Genetic drift and divergent selection are predicted to be strong on islands and both could drive population divergence and speciation. Alternatively, strong genetic drift may preclude adaptation. We conducted a genomic analysis to test the roles of genetic drift and divergent selection in causing genetic differentiation among populations of the island fox (Urocyon littoralis). This species consists of six subspecies, each of which occupies a different California Channel Island. Analysis of 5293 SNP loci generated using Restriction-site Associated DNA (RAD) sequencing found support for genetic drift as the dominant evolutionary mechanism driving population divergence among island fox populations. In particular, populations had exceptionally low genetic variation, small Ne (range = 2.1-89.7; median = 19.4), and significant genetic signatures of bottlenecks. Moreover, islands with the lowest genetic variation (and, by inference, the strongest historical genetic drift) were most genetically differentiated from mainland grey foxes, and vice versa, indicating genetic drift drives genome-wide divergence. Nonetheless, outlier tests identified 3.6-6.6% of loci as high FST outliers, suggesting that despite strong genetic drift, divergent selection contributes to population divergence. Patterns of similarity among populations based on high FST outliers mirrored patterns based on morphology, providing additional evidence that outliers reflect adaptive divergence. Extremely low genetic variation and small Ne in some island fox populations, particularly on San Nicolas Island, suggest that they may be vulnerable to fixation of deleterious alleles, decreased fitness and reduced adaptive potential.

  10. Genetic analysis of benzoquinone production in Tribolium confusum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yezerski, Ann; Gilmor, Timothy P; Stevens, Lori

    2004-05-01

    Many species of tenebrionid beetles produce and secrete benzoquinones from specialized prothoracic and postabdominal glands. Tribolium confusum produces two compounds methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (MBQ) and ethyl-1,4-benzoquinone (EBQ). These compounds are hypothesized to function as external defense compounds, killing microbes and deterring predators, and their ability to evolve by natural selection depends on both selection and the genetic vs. environmental contribution to phenotypic variation. We crossed a strain of T. confusum that produces high quantities of benzoquinones, b-Pakistan, with a low-producing strain, b-+, and measured both the internal and external quantities of MBQ and EBQ for the two extreme strains and their F1 progeny. Internal amounts show a clear pattern of inheritance, with at least 50% of the phenotypic variation attributed to genotype. Additive and dominance coefficients for internal amounts indicate that the trait is additive with no significant dominance. In contrast, external quantities show little pattern of inheritance. The role of genetics and environment in determining quantities of secretory defensive compounds is important to elucidating the ecology and evolutionary potential of chemical defenses.

  11. Personality and coping with professional demands: a behavioral genetics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Heike; Spinath, Frank M

    2012-07-01

    Work-related mental health problems lead to individual ill-being but also absenteeism and early retirement from work. As such, it is desirable to diagnose strain and coping deficits before mental or physical symptoms occur in order to provide interventions early. Work engagement, resistance to stress, and occupational attitude toward life are three facets of coping with professional demands that are related to psychological health (Kieschke & Schaarschmidt, 2003). Personality, defined as characteristic patterns of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors over time and across situations, is also associated with health and well-being. To understand who becomes ill and why and to provide adequate interventions, we investigated the relations between personality and coping with professional demands, as well as the etiological basis of this relation. Personality and coping with professional demands (work engagement, resistance to stress, and occupational attitude toward life) were assessed in a sample of 302 monozygotic and dizygotic adult twin pairs. Correlations between personality and coping with professional demands were moderate (r range: -0.61 to 0.37). All scales except occupational attitude toward life showed significant heritabilities. Genetic and environmental influences on coping with professional demands were largely independent of genetic and environmental effects on personality. These findings suggest that interventions should focus on work engagement, resistance to stress, and occupational attitude toward life without specific considering of personality.

  12. Genetic analysis of earliness indicators in upland cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Shakeel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetic bases of earliness in upland cotton were investigated by recording and analyzing data on different phenological and morphological traits related to earliness. All traits inclusive of days to squaring, days to flowering, vertical flowering interval, horizontal flowering interval, days to first boll opening, boll maturity period, node number for the first fruiting branch and height for first fruiting showed significant variation. Additive components D was significant for all the traits studied and more than the values of dominance components H1 and H2 thus confirming the presence of additive gene action. Estimates of narrow sense heritability were low for days to squaring, moderate in the boll maturity period and high for all other traits. Degree of dominance was less than unity hence partial dominance is found in almost all the traits. The predominance of additive genetic effects along with reasonable estimates of heritability suggested early generation selection and pedigree method of selection may be followed for almost all the traits.

  13. Analysis of the Effective Degrees of Freedom in Genetic Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Stephens, C R

    1998-01-01

    An evolution equation for a population of strings evolving under the genetic operators: selection, mutation and crossover is derived. The corresponding equation describing the evolution of schematas is found by performing an exact coarse graining of this equation. In particular exact expressions for schemata reconstruction are derived which allows for a critical appraisal of the ``building-block hypothesis'' of genetic algorithms. A further coarse-graining is made by considering the contribution of all length-l schematas to the evolution of population observables such as fitness growth. As a test function for investigating the emergence of structure in the evolution the increase per generation of the in-schemata fitness averaged over all schematas of length l, $\\Delta_l$, is introduced. In finding solutions of the evolution equations we concentrate more on the effects of crossover, in particular we consider crossover in the context of Kauffman Nk models with k=0,2. For k=0, with a random initial population, i...

  14. A Genetic Analysis of Aluminium Tolerance in Cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeba Navakode

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium (Al toxicity is a major threat to agricultural production world wide wherever acid soil exists. Wheat and barley, the major food and feed crops, are severely affected and this necessitates investigations that could help to improve the yield by utilising the available genetic diversity for Al tolerance with the aid of several molecular platforms. We investigated the quantitative trait loci (QTL conferring tolerance to Al toxicity in three different mapping populations of wheat and barley.Using a set of D genome (Ae. tauschii introgression lines, a major Al tolerance locus was assigned to chromosome arm 4DL, explaining 31% of the phenotypic variation displayed by the population. A second major QTL was mapped to chromosome arm 3BL using a set of doubled haploid progeny lines. This major QTL, QaltCS.ipk-3B, originated from ‘Chinese Spring’ accounted for 49% of the variation in the population. The inheritance for Al tolerance in barley was dissected based on a genetic map constructed with genic markers. QTLs were identified on chromosomes 2H, 3H and 4H. A sequence homology search was used to derive the putative function of the genes linked to the QTL, in order to identify potential candidate genes for Al tolerance. Some of these candidates are implicated in stress/defence responses, in particular, stress signal transduction, transcription regulation factors and cell metabolism.

  15. A Genetic Analysis of Aluminium Tolerance in Cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeba Navakode

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium (Al toxicity is a major threat to agricultural production world wide wherever acid soil exists. Wheat and barley, the major food and feed crops, are severely affected and this necessitates investigations that could help to improve the yield by utilising the available genetic diversity for Al tolerance with the aid of several molecular platforms. We investigated the quantitative trait loci (QTL conferring tolerance to Al toxicity in three different mapping populations of wheat and barley. Using a set of D genome (Ae. tauschii introgression lines, a major Al tolerance locus was assigned to chromosome arm 4DL, explaining 31% of the phenotypic variation displayed by the population. A second major QTL was mapped to chromosome arm 3BL using a set of doubled haploid progeny lines. This major QTL, QaltCS.ipk-3B, originated from ‘Chinese Spring’ accounted for 49% of the variation in the population. The inheritance for Al tolerance in barley was dissected based on a genetic map constructed with genic markers. QTLs were identified on chromosomes 2H, 3H and 4H. A sequence homology search was used to derive the putative function of the genes linked to the QTL, in order to identify potential candidate genes for Al tolerance. Some of these candidates are implicated in stress/defence responses, in particular, stress signal transduction, transcription regulation factors and cell metabolism.

  16. Negative electron-transfer dissociation nLC-MS/MS facilitates the analysis of thousands of acidic peptides

    OpenAIRE

    McAlister, Graeme C.; Russell, Jason D.; Rumachik, Neil G.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Syka, John E. P.; Geer, Lewis Y.; Westphall, Michael S.; Pagliarini, David J; Coon, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the first implementation of negative electron-transfer dissociation (NETD) on a hybrid ion trap-orbitrap mass spectrometer and its application to high-throughput sequencing of peptide anions. NETD – coupled with high pH separations, negative electrospray ionization (ESI), and an NETD compatible version of OMSSA – is part of a complete workflow that includes the formation, interrogation and sequencing of peptide anions. Together these interlocking pieces facilitated the identificat...

  17. Genetic analysis of seven Italian horse breeds based on mitochondrial DNA D-loop variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, D; Perrotta, G; Zambonelli, P

    2014-08-01

    To understand the origin and genetic diversity of Italian horses, mitochondrial DNA D-loop sequences were generated for 163 horses from seven breeds. Sequence analysis of a 480-bp segment revealed a total of 84 haplotypes with 57 polymorphic sites, indicating multiple maternal origins and high genetic diversity. Comparison of the haplotypes with the equine mtDNA haplotype/haplogroup nomenclature showed a haplogroup distribution in the Italian breeds more similar to that found in the Middle East breeds than in the European breeds, probably due to the economic and cultural relationship with the Middle East in the past centuries. © 2014 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  18. A Systematic Meta-Analysis of Genetic Association Studies for Diabetic Retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Abhary, Sotoodeh; Hewitt, Alex W.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Craig, Jamie E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetic retinopathy is a sight-threatening microvascular complication of diabetes with a complex multifactorial pathogenesis. A systematic meta-analysis was undertaken to collectively assess genetic studies and determine which previously investigated polymorphisms are associated with diabetic retinopathy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS All studies investigating the association of genetic variants with the development of diabetic retinopathy were identified in PubMed and ISI Web of Kno...

  19. Analysis of the Genetic Diversity and Origin of Some Chinese Domestic Duck Breeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yang; CHEN Guo-hong; CHEN Yang; ZHEN Ting; HUANG Zheng-yang; CHEN Chang-yi; LI Xin-yu; DUAN Xiu-jun; DONG Biao; XU Qi

    2014-01-01

    Twelve lfuorescence-labeled microsatellite markers were used to analyze the genetic diversity of 12 domestic duck breeds and 2 wild duck breeds to determine the relationship and origin of Chinese domestic duck breeds. Gene frequency, effective number of alleles (Ne), expected heterozygosity (He), polymorphism information contents (PIC), inbreeding coefficient in population (Fis), standard genetic distance (DS), and genetic distance (DA) were calculated by FSTAT and distance and phylogenetic analysis after the dates which were output from the Microsatellite-Toolkit software. Genetic distances between 12 domestic duck breeds and 2 wild duck breeds were analyzed by variance analysis. Unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) and phylogenetic trees used for cluster analysis were structured. The results indicated that 11 loci had medium-or high-level genetic diversity among the 12 loci, which could be efifciently used in the detection of the genetic parameters of each population. The values of He were 0.5414 to 0.7343, those of PIC proved similar, and those of Fis were 0.1101 to 0.3381 among all populations. All breeds were clustered into three groups by UPGMA phylogenetic trees. Banzui duck was clustered into a separate group. Differences of the DA were analysed by t-test. The results showed that difference in DA between the 12 domestic duck breeds and Lvtou duck and the Banzui duck were very signiifcant (P<0.01), indicating that these 12 domestic duck breeds originated from Lvtou wild duck, but not Banzui duck.

  20. Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third funding period, we will concentrate on the genetical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of these new mutants. Construction of double mutants between the new mutants and the previously characterized morphological mutants should allow us to construct a pathway for light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  1. Genetic analysis of Ras genes in epidermal development and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosten, Matthias; Lechuga, Carmen G; Barbacid, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes are tightly controlled to ensure proper development and homeostasis of the epidermis. The Ras family of small GTPases has emerged as a central node in the coordination of cell proliferation in the epidermis. Recent genetic evidence from mouse models has revealed that the intensity of Ras signaling modulates the proliferative capacity of epidermal keratinocytes. Interfering with Ras signaling either by combined elimination of the 3 Ras genes from the basal layer of the epidermis or by overexpression of dominant-negative Ras isoforms caused epidermal thinning due to hypoproliferation of keratinocytes. In contrast, overexpression of oncogenic Ras mutants in different epidermal cell layers led to hyperproliferative phenotypes including the development of papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Here, we discuss the value of loss- and gain-of-function studies in mouse models to assess the role of Ras signaling in the control of epidermal proliferation.

  2. Metabolic Engineering: Techniques for analysis of targets for genetic manipulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1998-01-01

    enzymes. Despite the prospect of obtaining major improvement through metabolic engineering, this approach is, however, not expected to completely replace the classical approach to strain improvement-random mutagenesis followed by screening. Identification of the optimal genetic changes for improvement......Metabolic engineering has been defined as the purposeful modification of intermediary metabolism using recombinant DNA techniques. With this definition metabolic engineering includes: (1) inserting new pathways in microorganisms with the aim of producing novel metabolites, e.g., production...... of polyketides by Streptomyces; (2) production of heterologous peptides, e.g., production of human insulin, erythropoitin, and tPA; and (3) improvement of both new and existing processes, e.g., production of antibiotics and industrial enzymes. Metabolic engineering is a multidisciplinary approach, which involves...

  3. Analysis of Shrinkage on Thick Plate Part using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najihah S.N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Injection moulding is the most widely used processes in manufacturing plastic products. Since the quality of injection improves plastic parts are mostly influenced by process conditions, the method to determine the optimum process conditions becomes the key to improving the part quality. This paper presents a systematic methodology to analyse the shrinkage of the thick plate part during the injection moulding process. Genetic Algorithm (GA method was proposed to optimise the process parameters that would result in optimal solutions of optimisation goals. Using the GA, the shrinkage of the thick plate part was improved by 39.1% in parallel direction and 17.21% in the normal direction of melt flow.

  4. Genetic analysis of Ras genes in epidermal development and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosten, Matthias; Lechuga, Carmen G; Barbacid, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of epidermal keratinocytes are tightly controlled to ensure proper development and homeostasis of the epidermis. The Ras family of small GTPases has emerged as a central node in the coordination of cell proliferation in the epidermis. Recent genetic evidence from mouse models has revealed that the intensity of Ras signaling modulates the proliferative capacity of epidermal keratinocytes. Interfering with Ras signaling either by combined elimination of the 3 Ras genes from the basal layer of the epidermis or by overexpression of dominant-negative Ras isoforms caused epidermal thinning due to hypoproliferation of keratinocytes. In contrast, overexpression of oncogenic Ras mutants in different epidermal cell layers led to hyperproliferative phenotypes including the development of papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Here, we discuss the value of loss- and gain-of-function studies in mouse models to assess the role of Ras signaling in the control of epidermal proliferation. PMID:24150175

  5. A Genetic Analysis of Aluminium Tolerance in Cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeba Navakode

    2010-12-01

    Using a set of D genome (Ae. tauschii introgression lines, a major Al tolerance locus was assigned to chromosome arm 4DL, explaining 31% of the phenotypic variation displayed by the population. A second major QTL was mapped to chromosome arm 3BL using a set of doubled haploid progeny lines. This major QTL, QaltCS.ipk-3B, originated from ‘Chinese Spring’ accounted for 49% of the variation in the population. The inheritance for Al tolerance in barley was dissected based on a genetic map constructed with genic markers. QTLs were identified on chromosomes 2H, 3H and 4H. A sequence homology search was used to derive the putative function of the genes linked to the QTL, in order to identify potential candidate genes for Al tolerance. Some of these candidates are implicated in stress/defence responses, in particular, stress signal transduction, transcription regulation factors and cell metabolism.

  6. [Clinical and molecular genetic analysis of hereditary optic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetisov, S É; Sheremet, N L; Vorob'eva, O K; Eliseeva, É G; Chukhrova, A L; Loginova, A N; Khanakova, N A; Poliakov, A V

    2013-01-01

    DNA samples of 50 patients with optic neuropathy (ON) associated with congenital cataract were studied to find 3 major mt-DNA mutations (m.11778G>A, m.3460G>A, m.14484T>C), mutations in "hot" regions of OPA 1 gene (exons 8, 14, 15, 16, 18, 27, 28) and in the entire coding sequence of OPA3 gene for molecular genetic confirmation of diagnosis of hereditary Leber and autosomal dominant ON. Primary mutations of mtDNA responsible for hereditary Leber ON were found in 16 patients (32%). Pathogenic mutations of OPAl gene (c.869G>A and c. 2850delT) were identified in 2 patients (4%), these mutations were not found in the literature. OPA3 gene mutations were not revealed.

  7. Sucrose accumulation in watermelon fruits: genetic variation and biochemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yativ, Merav; Harary, Idan; Wolf, Shmuel

    2010-05-15

    Sugar accumulation, the key process determining fruit quality, is controlled by both the translocation of sugars and their metabolism in developing fruits. Sugar composition in watermelon, as in all cucurbit fruits, includes sucrose, fructose and glucose. The proportions of these three sugars are determined primarily by three enzyme families: invertases, sucrose synthases (SuSys) and sucrose phosphate synthases (SPSs). The goal of the present research was to explore the process of sugar metabolism in watermelon fruits. Crosses between the domestic watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and three wild species provided a wide germplasm to explore genetic variability in sugar composition and metabolism. This survey demonstrated great genetic variability in sugar content and in the proportions of sucrose, glucose and fructose in mature fruits. Genotypes accumulating high and low percentage of sucrose provided an experimental system to study sugar metabolism in developing fruits. Insoluble invertase activity was high and constant throughout fruit development in control lines and in genotypes accumulating low levels of sucrose, while in genotypes accumulating high levels of sucrose, activity declined sharply 4 weeks after pollination. Soluble acid invertase activity was significantly lower in genotypes accumulating high levels of sucrose than in low-sucrose-accumulating genotypes. Conversely, activities of SuSy and SPS were higher in the high-sucrose-accumulating genotypes. The present results establish that, within the genus Citrullus, there are genotypes that accumulate a high percentage of sucrose in the fruit, while others accumulate high percentages of glucose and fructose. The significant negative correlation between insoluble invertase activity and fruit sucrose level suggests that sucrose accumulation is affected by both phloem unloading and sugar metabolism. (c) 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Cross-Disorder Genetic Analysis of Tic Disorders, Obsessive-Compulsive, and Hoarding Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilhão, Nuno R; Smit, Dirk J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cath, Danielle C

    2016-01-01

    Hoarding, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and Tourette's disorder (TD) are psychiatric disorders that share symptom overlap, which might partly be the result of shared genetic variation. Population-based twin studies have found significant genetic correlations between hoarding and OCD symptoms, with genetic correlations varying between 0.1 and 0.45. For tic disorders, studies examining these correlations are lacking. Other lines of research, including clinical samples and GWAS or CNV data to explore genetic relationships between tic disorders and OCD, have only found very modest if any shared genetic variation. Our aim was to extend current knowledge on the genetic structure underlying hoarding, OC symptoms (OCS), and lifetime tic symptoms and, in a trivariate analysis, assess the degree of common and unique genetic factors contributing to the etiology of these disorders. Data have been gathered from participants in the Netherlands Twin Register comprising a total of 5293 individuals from a sample of adult monozygotic (n = 2460) and dizygotic (n = 2833) twin pairs (mean age 33.61 years). The data on Hoarding, OCS, and tic symptoms were simultaneously analyzed in Mplus. A liability threshold model was fitted to the twin data, analyzing heritability of phenotypes and of their comorbidity. Following the criteria for a probable clinical diagnosis in all phenotypes, 6.8% of participants had a diagnosis of probable hoarding disorder (HD), 6.3% of OCS, and 12.8% of any probable lifetime tic disorder. Genetic factors explained 50.4, 70.1, and 61.1% of the phenotypic covariance between hoarding-OCS, hoarding-tics, and OCS-tics, respectively. Substantial genetic correlations were observed between hoarding and OCS (0.41), hoarding and tics (0.35), and between OCS and tics (0.37). These results support the contribution of genetic factors in the development of these disorders and their comorbidity. Furthermore, tics were mostly influenced by specific

  9. Impact of genetic notification on smoking cessation: systematic review and pooled-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Viron, Sylviane; Van der Heyden, Johan; Ambrosino, Elena; Arbyn, Marc; Brand, Angela; Van Oyen, Herman

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetic notification of smoking-related disease risk on smoking cessation in the general population. Secondary objectives were to assess the impact of genetic notification on intention-to-quit smoking and on emotional outcomes as well as the understanding and the recall of this notification. A systematic review of articles from inception to August 2011 without language restriction was realized using PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, PsycINFO and Toxnet. Other publications were identified using hand search. The pooled-analysis included only randomized trials. Comparison groups were (i) high and low genetic risk versus control, and (ii) high versus low genetic risk. For the pooled-analysis random effect models were applied and sensitivity analyses were conducted. Eight papers from seven different studies met the inclusion criteria of the review. High genetic risk notification was associated with short-term increased depression and anxiety. Four randomized studies were included in the pooled-analysis, which revealed a significant impact of genetic notification on smoking cessation in comparison to controls (clinical risk notification or no intervention) in short term follow-up less than 6 months (RR = 1.55, 95% CI 1.09-2.21). In short term follow-up, genetic notification increased smoking cessation in comparison to control interventions. However, there is no evidence of long term effect (up to 12 month) on smoking cessation. Further research is needed to assess more in depth how genetic notification of smoking-related disease could contribute to smoking cessation.

  10. Genetic analysis of gravity signal transduction in roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Baldwin, Katherine

    To grow downward into the soil, roots use gravity as a guide. Specialized cells, named stato-cytes, enable this directional growth response by perceiving gravity. Located in the columella region of the cap, these cells sense a reorientation of the root within the gravity field through the sedimentation of, and/or tension/pressure exerted by, dense amyloplasts. This process trig-gers a gravity signal transduction pathway that leads to a fast alkalinization of the cytoplasm and a change in the distribution of the plasma membrane-associated auxin-efflux carrier PIN3. The latter protein is uniformly distributed within the plasma membrane on all sides of the cell in vertically oriented roots. However, it quickly accumulates at the bottom side upon gravis-timulation. This process correlates with a preferential transport of auxin to the bottom side of the root cap, resulting in a lateral gradient across the tip. This gradient is then transported to the elongation zone where it promotes differential cellular elongation, resulting in downward curvature. We isolated mutations that affect gravity signal transduction at a step that pre-cedes cytoplasmic alkalinization and/or PIN3 relocalization and lateral auxin transport across the cap. arg1 and arl2 mutations identify a common genetic pathway that is needed for all three gravity-induced processes in the cap statocytes, indicating these genes function early in the pathway. On the other hand, adk1 affects gravity-induced PIN3 relocalization and lateral auxin transport, but it does not interfere with cytoplasmic alkalinization. ARG1 and ARL2 encode J-domain proteins that are associated with membranes of the vesicular trafficking path-way whereas ADK1 encodes adenosine kinase, an enzyme that converts adenosine derived from nucleic acid metabolism and the AdoMet cycle into AMP, thereby alleviating feedback inhibi-tion of this important methyl-donor cycle. Because mutations in ARG1 (and ARL2) do not completely eliminate

  11. The effect of close relatives on unsupervised Bayesian clustering algorithms in population genetic structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ramilo, Silvia T; Wang, Jinliang

    2012-09-01

    The inference of population genetic structures is essential in many research areas in population genetics, conservation biology and evolutionary biology. Recently, unsupervised Bayesian clustering algorithms have been developed to detect a hidden population structure from genotypic data, assuming among others that individuals taken from the population are unrelated. Under this assumption, markers in a sample taken from a subpopulation can be considered to be in Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium. However, close relatives might be sampled from the same subpopulation, and consequently, might cause Hardy-Weinberg and linkage disequilibrium and thus bias a population genetic structure analysis. In this study, we used simulated and real data to investigate the impact of close relatives in a sample on Bayesian population structure analysis. We also showed that, when close relatives were identified by a pedigree reconstruction approach and removed, the accuracy of a population genetic structure analysis can be greatly improved. The results indicate that unsupervised Bayesian clustering algorithms cannot be used blindly to detect genetic structure in a sample with closely related individuals. Rather, when closely related individuals are suspected to be frequent in a sample, these individuals should be first identified and removed before conducting a population structure analysis.

  12. A theoretical analysis of population genetics of plants on restored habitats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogoliubov, A.G. [Botanical Institute, Russian Academy of Science, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Loehle, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Seed and propagules used for habitat restoration are not likely to be closely adapted to local site conditions. Rapid changes of genotypes frequencies on local microsites and/or microevolution would allow plants to become better adapted to a site. These same factors would help to maintain genetic diversity and ensure the survival of small endangered populations. We used population genetics models to examine the selection of genotypes during establishment on restored sites. Vegetative spread was shown to affect selection and significantly reduce genetic diversity. To study general microevolution, we linked a model of resource usage with a genetics model and analyzed competition between genotypes. A complex suite of feasible ecogenetic states was shown to result. The state actually resulting would depend strongly on initial conditions. This analysis indicated that genetic structure can vary locally and can produce overall genetic variability that is not simply the result of microsite adaptations. For restoration activities, the implication is that small differences in seed source could lead to large differences in local genetic structure after selection.

  13. A theoretical analysis of population genetics of plants on restored habitats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogoliubov, A.G. [Russian Academy of Science, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation). Botanical Inst.; Loehle, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Research Div.

    1997-07-01

    Seed and propagules used for habitat restoration are not likely to be closely adapted to local site conditions. Rapid changes of genotypes frequencies on local microsites and/or microevolution would allow plants to become better adapted to a site. These same factors would help to maintain genetic diversity and ensure the survival of small endangered populations. The authors used population genetics models to examine the selection of genotypes during establishment on restored sites. Vegetative spread was shown to affect selection and significantly reduce genetic diversity. To study general microevolution, the authors linked a model of resource usage with a genetics model and analyzed competition between genotypes. A complex suite of feasible ecogenetic states was shown to result. The state actually resulting would depend strongly on initial conditions. This analysis indicated that genetic structure can vary locally and can produce overall genetic variability that is not simply the result of microsite adaptations. For restoration activities, the implication is that small differences in seed source could lead to large differences in local genetic structure after selection.

  14. Genetic diversity in cultivated carioca common beans based on molecular marker analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso Perseguini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide array of molecular markers has been used to investigate the genetic diversity among common bean species. However, the best combination of markers for studying such diversity among common bean cultivars has yet to be determined. Few reports have examined the genetic diversity of the carioca bean, commercially one of the most important common beans in Brazil. In this study, we examined the usefulness of two molecular marker systems (simple sequence repeats - SSRs and amplified fragment length polymorphisms - AFLPs for assessing the genetic diversity of carioca beans. The amount of information provided by Roger's modified genetic distance was used to analyze SSR data and Jaccards similarity coefficient was used for AFLP data. Seventy SSRs were polymorphic and 20 AFLP primer combinations produced 635 polymorphic bands. Molecular analysis showed that carioca genotypes were quite diverse. AFLPs revealed greater genetic differentiation and variation within the carioca genotypes (Gst = 98% and Fst = 0.83, respectively than SSRs and provided better resolution for clustering the carioca genotypes. SSRs and AFLPs were both suitable for assessing the genetic diversity of Brazilian carioca genotypes since the number of markers used in each system provided a low coefficient of variation. However, fingerprint profiles were generated faster with AFLPs, making them a better choice for assessing genetic diversity in the carioca germplasm.

  15. Identification and Preliminary Analysis of the Genetic Diversity of Cenococcum geophilum Fr.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Li-hong; YAN Wei; XU Yan

    2007-01-01

    To identify Cenococcum geophilum Fr., estimate their genetic diversity and study the effects on their genetic variation,27 Chinese C. geophilum isolates from 6 host plant species and 5 French C. geophilum isolates were analyzed using morphological and molecular methods. The universal primers ITS1/ITS4 were used in PCR-RFLP to amplify the rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of tested C. geophilum isolates. The amplified products were digested with EcoR Ⅰ,Hinf Ⅰ, and Mbo Ⅰ, and the digested fragments of PCR products showed that there were obvious differences. A random primer (5'-CGCACCGCAC-3') was employed in RAPD to amplify the genomic DNA of C. geophilum, and 19 detectable and reliable DNA bands of 300-2 000 bp size were observed. According to the number, position, and strength of the DNA bands in agarose gel, the genetic distance and the genetic similarity among C. geophilum isolates were calculated using the PopGen Ver. 1.31 dendrogram analysis software. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on the genetic distance by the Neighbor-Joining/UPGMA in PHYLIP. The results suggest the high level of genetic diversity among C. geophilum isolates from the same or different hosts. The effects of geographical factors or host plant species on C. geophilum genetic variation are not obvious.

  16. Analysis of genetic diversity and differentiation of seven stocks of Litopenaeus vannamei using microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Weiji; Li, Weiya; Zhang, Quanqi; Kong, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Seven microsatellite markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity and differentiation of seven stocks of Litopenaeus vannamei, which were introduced from Central and South America to China. All seven microsatellite loci were polymorphic, with polymorphism information content ( PIC) values ranging from 0.593 to 0.952. Totally 92 alleles were identified, and the number of alleles ( Na) and effective alleles ( Ne) varied between 4 and 21 and 2.7 and 14.6, respectively. Observed heterozygosity ( H o) values were lower than the expected heterozygosity ( H e) values (0.526-0.754), which indicated that the seven stocks possessed a rich genetic diversity. Thirty-seven tests were detected for reasonable significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. F is values were positive at five loci, suggesting that there was a relatively high degree of inbreeding within stocks. Pairwise F st values ranged from 0.0225 to 0.151, and most of the stock pairs were moderately differentiated. Genetic distance and cluster analysis using UPGMA revealed a close genetic relationship of L. vannamei between Pop2 and Pop3. AMOVA indicated that the genetic variation among stocks (11.3%) was much lower than that within stocks (88.7%). Although the seven stocks had a certain degree of genetic differentiation and a rich genetic diversity, there is an increasing risk of decreased performance due to inbreeding in subsequent generations.

  17. Genome-Wide Pathway Analysis Identifies Genetic Pathways Associated with Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aterido, Adrià; Julià, Antonio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Fonseca, Eduardo; Fernández-López, Emilia; Dauden, Esteban; Sánchez-Carazo, José Luís; López-Estebaranz, José Luís; Moreno-Ramírez, David; Vanaclocha, Francisco; Herrera, Enrique; de la Cueva, Pablo; Dand, Nick; Palau, Núria; Alonso, Arnald; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; García-Montero, Andrés; Codó, Laia; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Absher, Devin; Capon, Francesca; Myers, Richard M; Barker, Jonathan N; Marsal, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a complex genetic architecture. To date, the psoriasis heritability is only partially explained. However, there is increasing evidence that the missing heritability in psoriasis could be explained by multiple genetic variants of low effect size from common genetic pathways. The objective of this study was to identify new genetic variation associated with psoriasis risk at the pathway level. We genotyped 598,258 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a discovery cohort of 2,281 case-control individuals from Spain. We performed a genome-wide pathway analysis using 1,053 reference biological pathways. A total of 14 genetic pathways (PFDR ≤ 2.55 × 10(-2)) were found to be significantly associated with psoriasis risk. Using an independent validation cohort of 7,353 individuals from the UK, a total of 6 genetic pathways were significantly replicated (PFDR ≤ 3.46 × 10(-2)). We found genetic pathways that had not been previously associated with psoriasis risk such as retinol metabolism (Pcombined = 1.84 × 10(-4)), the transport of inorganic ions and amino acids (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)), and post-translational protein modification (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)). In the latter pathway, MGAT5 showed a strong network centrality, and its association with psoriasis risk was further validated in an additional case-control cohort of 3,429 individuals (P psoriasis susceptibility.

  18. Molecular genetic analysis of activation-tagged transcription factors thought to be involved in photomorphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, Michael M.

    2011-06-23

    This is a final report for Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER15927 entitled “Molecular Genetic Analysis of Activation-Tagged Transcription Factors Thought to be Involved in Photomorphogenesis”. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob1-D mutant, we hypothesized that OBP3 is a transcription factor involved in both phytochrome and cryptochrome-mediated signal transduction. In addition, we hypothesized that OBP3 is involved in auxin signaling and root development. Based on our preliminary photobiological and genetic analysis of the sob2-D mutant, we also hypothesized that a related gene, LEP, is involved in hormone signaling and seedling development.

  19. Development of mapping populations for genetic analysis in yams ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Success in hybridization was validated based on DNA analysis with SSR markers on agarose ... Traits for which the populations were developed included multiple tuber ... Key words: Dioscorea alata, Dioscorea rotundata, hybrid identification, ...

  20. Genetic diversity analysis in the Hypericum perforatum populations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2014-01-01

    Jan 1, 2014 ... Analysis of molecular variance by ISSR markers indicated that over half of the .... spacer; Rp, resolving power; PIC, polymorphic information content; MI, marker index ..... ISSR 07 revealed 24 monomorphic loci existed in all of.

  1. Genetic analysis of field and physiological indicators of drought ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-10

    Oct 10, 2011 ... In order to study the inheritance of field, physiological and metabolite indicators of drought tolerance in wheat .... and the quantum yield was recorded after dark adaptation using a ..... The theory and analysis of diallel crosses.

  2. Three autism candidate genes: a synthesis of human genetic analysis with other disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Christopher W; Gharani, Neda; Millonig, James H; Brzustowicz, Linda M

    2005-01-01

    Autism is a particularly complex disorder when considered from virtually any methodological framework, including the perspective of human genetics. We first present a review of the genetic analysis principles relevant for discussing autism genetics research. From this body of work we highlight results from three candidate genes, REELIN (RELN), SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER (5HTT), and ENGRAILED 2 (EN2) and discuss the relevant neuroscience, molecular genetics, and statistical results that suggest involvement of these genes in autism susceptibility. As will be shown, the statistical results from genetic analysis, when considered alone, are in apparent conflict across research groups. We use these three candidate genes to illustrate different problems in synthesizing results from non-overlapping research groups examining the same problem. However, when basic genetic principles and results from other scientific disciplines are incorporated into a unified theoretical framework, at least some of the difficulties with interpreting results can be understood and potentially overcome as more data becomes available to the field of autism research. Integrating results from several scientific frameworks provides new hypotheses and alternative data collection strategies for future work.

  3. [Molecular genetic analysis of wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. & Zucc.) population structure in anthropogenic and natural landscapes of Primorskii krai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedoluzhko, A V; Tikhonov, A V; Dorokhov, D B

    2008-08-01

    The data are presented on genetic population structure of wild soybean growing in natural and anthropogenically disturbed landscapes of Primorskii krai of the Russian Federation. Comparative analysis showed that wild soybean populations exposed to anthropogenic influence exhibited lower genetic diversity than natural populations. Recommendations on conservation of the wild plant gene pools using comparative data on population genetic structures are made.

  4. Marker-aided genetic divergence analysis in Brassica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V. Arunachalam; Shefali Verma; V. Sujata; K. V. Prabhu

    2005-08-01

    Genetic divergence was evaluated in 31 breeding lines from four Brassica species using Mahalanobis’ $D^{2}$. A new method of grouping using $D^{2}$ values was used to group the 31 lines, based on diagnostic morphological traits (called morphoqts). Isozyme variation of the individual enzymes esterase and glutamate oxaloacetate was quantified by five parameters (called isoqts) developed earlier. Grouping by the same method was also done based on the isoqts, and the grouping by isozymes was compared with that by morphoqts. Overall, there was an agreement of 73% suggesting that isoqts can be used in the choice of parents and also first stage selection of segregants in the laboratory. It was suggested that such an exercise would help to take care of season-bound and field-related problems of breeding. The new isozyme QTs, within lane variance of relative mobility and relative absorption, accounted for about 50% of the total divergence. The utility of the new method and isoqts in cost-effective breeding were highlighted.

  5. [Genetic analysis of an individual with para-Bombay phenotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-jin; Huang, Ying; Zhu, Sui-yong

    2013-04-01

    To study genetic characteristics of an individual with para-Bombay phenotype and her family members. ABO and H antigens were detected with routine serological techniques.The entire coding region of FUT1 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR products was purified with enzymes digestion and directly sequenced. The RBCs of the proband did not agglutinate with H antibody. The proband therefore has a para-Bombay phenotype (Bmh). Direct sequencing indicated the FUT1 sequence of the proband contained a homozygous 547-552 del AG and heterozygous 814A>G mutation, which gave rise to two haplotypes of 547-552delAG, 547-552delAG and 814A>G. The ABO blood type of the proband' s mother and sisters were all B.Sequencing of the FUT1 gene has found heterozygous 547-552 del AG, 814A>G mutations in the mother and elder sister, and heterozygous 547-552 del AG mutation in her younger sister. The FUT1 547-552 del AG and 814 A>G mutations of the proband were inherited from her mother. A complex mutation of the FUT1 gene consisting of 547-55 del AG and 814 A>G has been identified in an individual with para-Bombay phenotype.

  6. [Molecular, genetic and physiological analysis of photoinhibition and photosynthetic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    A major goal of this project is to use a combined molecular genetic, biochemical and physiological approach to understand the relationship between photosynthetic performance and the structure of the multifunctional D1 reaction center protein of Photosystem II encoded by the chloroplast psbA gene. Relative to other chloroplast proteins, turover of D1 is rapid and highly light dependent and de novo synthesis of D1 is required for a plant's recovery from short term exposure to irradiances which induce photoinhibitory damage. These observations have led to models for a damage/repair cycle of PSII involving the targeted degradation and replacement of photodamaged D1. To investigate the effects of perturbing the D1 cycle on photosynthesis and autotrophic growth under high and low irradiance, we have examined the consequences of site-specific mutations of the psbA and 16S rRNA genes affecting synthesis, maturation and function/stability of the D1 protein introduced into the chloroplast genome of wildtype strain of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using biolistic transformation.

  7. How genetic analysis tests theories of animal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekimi, Siegfried

    2006-09-01

    Each animal species displays a specific life span, rate of aging and pattern of development of age-dependent diseases. The genetic bases of these related features are being studied experimentally in invertebrate and vertebrate model systems as well as in humans through medical records. Three types of mutants are being analyzed: (i) short-lived mutants that are prone to age-dependent diseases and might be models of accelerated aging; (ii) mutants that show overt molecular defects but that do not live shorter lives than controls, and can be used to test specific theories about the molecular causes of aging and age-dependent diseases; and (iii) long-lived mutants that might advance the understanding of the molecular physiology of slow-aging animals and aid the discovery of molecular targets that could be used to manipulate rates of aging to benefit human health. Here, I analyze some of what we know today and discuss what we should try to find out in the future to understand the aging phenomenon.

  8. Distribution of Grain Hardness in Chinese Wheats and Genetic Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yan-hua; HE Zhong-hu; YAN Jun; ZHANG Yan; WANG De-sen; ZHOU Gui-ying

    2002-01-01

    A hundred winter wheat and 41 spring wheat cultivars and advanced lines were used to investigate the distribution of grain hardness in Chinese wheats and correlations between grain hardness and other kernel traits. P1, P2, F1, F2 and F3 from three crosses, i. e. , Liken2/Yumai2, 85Zhong33/Wenmai6 and 85Zhong33/95Zhong459 were sown to study the genetics of grain hardness. Significant correlation was observed between hardness measured by Single Kernel Characteristic System 4100 (SKCS 4100) and Near Infrared (NIR) Spectroscopy, r ranging from 0. 85 to 0.94. Chinese wheat is a mixed population in terms of hardness, ranging from very soft to very hard. For autumn-sown wheat, on average, grain hardness decreases from north to south and spring-sown wheat is dominant with hard type. Hardness is negatively associated with flour color, and its associations with flour yield and ash content differ in winter and spring wheats. Grain hardness is controlled by a major gene and several minor genes with additive effect mostly, but dominant effect is also observed, with heritability of 0.78.

  9. Genetic analysis of presbycusis by arrayed primer extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Paris, Juan; Ballay, Charles; Inserra, Michelle; Stidham, Katrina; Colen, Tahl; Roberson, Joseph; Gardner, Phyllis; Schrijver, Iris

    2008-01-01

    Using the Hereditary Hearing Loss arrayed primer extension (APEX) array, which contains 198 mutations across 8 hearing loss-associated genes (GJB2, GJB6, GJB3, GJA1, SLC26A4, SLC26A5, 12S-rRNA, and tRNA Ser), we compared the frequency of sequence variants in 94 individuals with early presbycusis to 50 unaffected controls and aimed to identify possible genetic contributors. This cross-sectional study was performed at Stanford University with presbycusis samples from the California Ear Institute. The patients were between ages 20 and 65 yr, with adult-onset sensorineural hearing loss of unknown etiology, and carried a clinical diagnosis of early presbycusis. Exclusion criteria comprised known causes of hearing loss such as significant noise exposure, trauma, ototoxic medication, neoplasm, and congenital infection or syndrome, as well as congenital or pediatric onset. Sequence changes were identified in 11.7% and 10% of presbycusis and control alleles, respectively. Among the presbycusis group, these solely occurred within the GJB2 and SLC26A4 genes. Homozygous and compound heterozygous pathogenic mutations were exclusively seen in affected individuals. We were unable to detect a statistically significant difference between our control and affected populations regarding the frequency of sequence variants detected with the APEX array. Individuals who carry two mild mutations in the GJB2 gene possibly have an increased risk of developing early presbycusis.

  10. Viral Genetic Linkage Analysis in the Presence of Missing Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley H Liu

    Full Text Available Analyses of viral genetic linkage can provide insight into HIV transmission dynamics and the impact of prevention interventions. For example, such analyses have the potential to determine whether recently-infected individuals have acquired viruses circulating within or outside a given community. In addition, they have the potential to identify characteristics of chronically infected individuals that make their viruses likely to cluster with others circulating within a community. Such clustering can be related to the potential of such individuals to contribute to the spread of the virus, either directly through transmission to their partners or indirectly through further spread of HIV from those partners. Assessment of the extent to which individual (incident or prevalent viruses are clustered within a community will be biased if only a subset of subjects are observed, especially if that subset is not representative of the entire HIV infected population. To address this concern, we develop a multiple imputation framework in which missing sequences are imputed based on a model for the diversification of viral genomes. The imputation method decreases the bias in clustering that arises from informative missingness. Data from a household survey conducted in a village in Botswana are used to illustrate these methods. We demonstrate that the multiple imputation approach reduces bias in the overall proportion of clustering due to the presence of missing observations.

  11. Analysis of genetics and risk factors of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panpalli Ates, M; Karaman, Y; Guntekin, S; Ergun, M A

    2016-06-14

    Alzheimer's Disease is the leading neurodegenerative cause of dementia. The pathogenesis is not clearly understood yet, is believed to be the complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Consequently vascular risk factors and Apolipoprotein E genotyping are increasingly gaining importance. This study aimed at assessing the relationships between Alzheimer's Disease and Apolipoprotein E phenotype and vascular risk factors. Patients diagnosed with "possible Alzheimer's Disease" in the Gazi University, Department of Neurology, were included in the study and age-matched volunteer patients who attended the polyclinic were included as a control group. In this study, the risk factors including low education level, smoking, hyperlipidemia, higher serum total cholesterol levels, and hyperhomocysteinemia were found to be statistically significantly more common in the Alzheimer's Disease group in comparison to the Control Group, while all Apolipoprotein E ε4/ε4 genotypes were found in the Alzheimer's Disease group. The presence of the Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele is believed to increase vascular risk factors as well as to affect Alzheimer's Disease directly. The biological indicators which are used in identifying the patients' genes will be probably used in the treatment plan of the patients in the future.

  12. Functional analysis of the Gonococcal Genetic Island of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Pachulec

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an obligate human pathogen that is responsible for the sexually-transmitted disease gonorrhea. N. gonorrhoeae encodes a T4SS within the Gonococcal Genetic Island (GGI, which secretes ssDNA directly into the external milieu. Type IV secretion systems (T4SSs play a role in horizontal gene transfer and delivery of effector molecules into target cells. We demonstrate that GGI-like T4SSs are present in other β-proteobacteria, as well as in α- and γ-proteobacteria. Sequence comparison of GGI-like T4SSs reveals that the GGI-like T4SSs form a highly conserved unit that can be found located both on chromosomes and on plasmids. To better understand the mechanism of DNA secretion by N. gonorrhoeae, we performed mutagenesis of all genes encoded within the GGI, and studied the effects of these mutations on DNA secretion. We show that genes required for DNA secretion are encoded within the yaa-atlA and parA-parB regions, while genes encoded in the yfeB-exp1 region could be deleted without any effect on DNA secretion. Genes essential for DNA secretion are encoded within at least four different operons.

  13. Genetic analysis of fertility restoration of Maxie cytoplasmic male sterility im rice (Oryza sativa L. )

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGXiaoguo; ZHUYingguo; MEIQiming

    1996-01-01

    The genetic behavior of fertility restoration genes of the cytoplasmic male sterile line Maxie A was studied to facilitate the use of Maweizhan male sterile cytoplasm. The F1,F2, and F1 of Maxie A / Minhui 63 were grown in paddy field, 1993-1995.

  14. Factor analysis models for structuring covariance matrices of additive genetic effects: a Bayesian implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianola Daniel

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Multivariate linear models are increasingly important in quantitative genetics. In high dimensional specifications, factor analysis (FA may provide an avenue for structuring (covariance matrices, thus reducing the number of parameters needed for describing (codispersion. We describe how FA can be used to model genetic effects in the context of a multivariate linear mixed model. An orthogonal common factor structure is used to model genetic effects under Gaussian assumption, so that the marginal likelihood is multivariate normal with a structured genetic (covariance matrix. Under standard prior assumptions, all fully conditional distributions have closed form, and samples from the joint posterior distribution can be obtained via Gibbs sampling. The model and the algorithm developed for its Bayesian implementation were used to describe five repeated records of milk yield in dairy cattle, and a one common FA model was compared with a standard multiple trait model. The Bayesian Information Criterion favored the FA model.

  15. Moving towards system genetics through multiple trait analysis in genome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eShriner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Association studies are a staple of genotype-phenotype mapping studies, whether they are based on single markers, haplotypes, candidate genes, genome-wide genotypes, or whole genome sequences. Although genetic epidemiological studies typically contain data collected on multiple traits which themselves are often correlated, most analyses have been performed on single traits. Here, I review several methods that have been developed to perform multiple trait analysis. These methods range from traditional multivariate models for systems of equations to recently developed graphical approaches based on network theory. The application of network theory to genetics is termed systems genetics and has the potential to address long-standing questions in genetics about complex processes such as coordinate regulation, homeostasis, and pleiotropy.

  16. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W.; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D.; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H.; Koller, Daniel L.; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A.; Worley, Kim C.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J.; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S.; Aitman, Tim J.; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E. Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming our understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating novel genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relation between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ significantly from those of inbred mice, and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species. PMID:23708188

  17. Combined sequence-based and genetic mapping analysis of complex traits in outbred rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Amelie; Hermsen, Roel; Guryev, Victor; Stridh, Pernilla; Graham, Delyth; McBride, Martin W; Foroud, Tatiana; Calderari, Sophie; Diez, Margarita; Ockinger, Johan; Beyeen, Amennai D; Gillett, Alan; Abdelmagid, Nada; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb; Jagodic, Maja; Tuncel, Jonatan; Norin, Ulrika; Beattie, Elisabeth; Huynh, Ngan; Miller, William H; Koller, Daniel L; Alam, Imranul; Falak, Samreen; Osborne-Pellegrin, Mary; Martinez-Membrives, Esther; Canete, Toni; Blazquez, Gloria; Vicens-Costa, Elia; Mont-Cardona, Carme; Diaz-Moran, Sira; Tobena, Adolf; Hummel, Oliver; Zelenika, Diana; Saar, Kathrin; Patone, Giannino; Bauerfeind, Anja; Bihoreau, Marie-Therese; Heinig, Matthias; Lee, Young-Ae; Rintisch, Carola; Schulz, Herbert; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lathrop, Mark; Lansu, Nico; Toonen, Pim; Ruzius, Frans Paul; de Bruijn, Ewart; Hauser, Heidi; Adams, David J; Keane, Thomas; Atanur, Santosh S; Aitman, Tim J; Flicek, Paul; Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne; Ekman, Diana; Lopez-Aumatell, Regina; Dominiczak, Anna F; Johannesson, Martina; Holmdahl, Rikard; Olsson, Tomas; Gauguier, Dominique; Hubner, Norbert; Fernandez-Teruel, Alberto; Cuppen, Edwin; Mott, Richard; Flint, Jonathan

    2013-07-01

    Genetic mapping on fully sequenced individuals is transforming understanding of the relationship between molecular variation and variation in complex traits. Here we report a combined sequence and genetic mapping analysis in outbred rats that maps 355 quantitative trait loci for 122 phenotypes. We identify 35 causal genes involved in 31 phenotypes, implicating new genes in models of anxiety, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. The relationship between sequence and genetic variation is unexpectedly complex: at approximately 40% of quantitative trait loci, a single sequence variant cannot account for the phenotypic effect. Using comparable sequence and mapping data from mice, we show that the extent and spatial pattern of variation in inbred rats differ substantially from those of inbred mice and that the genetic variants in orthologous genes rarely contribute to the same phenotype in both species.

  18. Targeted analysis of whole genome sequence data to diagnose genetic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbus, Jessica R; Puckelwartz, Megan J; Dellefave-Castillo, Lisa; Fahrenbach, John P; Nelakuditi, Viswateja; Pesce, Lorenzo L; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-12-01

    Cardiomyopathy is highly heritable but genetically diverse. At present, genetic testing for cardiomyopathy uses targeted sequencing to simultaneously assess the coding regions of >50 genes. New genes are routinely added to panels to improve the diagnostic yield. With the anticipated $1000 genome, it is expected that genetic testing will shift toward comprehensive genome sequencing accompanied by targeted gene analysis. Therefore, we assessed the reliability of whole genome sequencing and targeted analysis to identify cardiomyopathy variants in 11 subjects with cardiomyopathy. Whole genome sequencing with an average of 37× coverage was combined with targeted analysis focused on 204 genes linked to cardiomyopathy. Genetic variants were scored using multiple prediction algorithms combined with frequency data from public databases. This pipeline yielded 1 to 14 potentially pathogenic variants per individual. Variants were further analyzed using clinical criteria and segregation analysis, where available. Three of 3 previously identified primary mutations were detected by this analysis. In 6 subjects for whom the primary mutation was previously unknown, we identified mutations that segregated with disease, had clinical correlates, and had additional pathological correlation to provide evidence for causality. For 2 subjects with previously known primary mutations, we identified additional variants that may act as modifiers of disease severity. In total, we identified the likely pathological mutation in 9 of 11 (82%) subjects. These pilot data demonstrate that ≈30 to 40× coverage whole genome sequencing combined with targeted analysis is feasible and sensitive to identify rare variants in cardiomyopathy-associated genes. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. The complex genetics of gait speed: genome-wide meta-analysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Eicher, John D.; Vered, Rotem; Deelen, Joris; Arnold, Alice M.; Buchman, Aron S.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Faul, Jessica D.; Nethander, Maria; Fornage, Myriam; Adams, Hieab H.; Matteini, Amy M.; Callisaya, Michele L.; Smith, Albert V.; Yu, Lei; De Jager, Philip L.; Evans, Denis A.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Pattie, Alison; Corley, Janie; Launer, Lenore J.; Knopman, Davis S.; Parimi, Neeta; Turner, Stephen T.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beekman, Marian; Gutman, Danielle; Sharvit, Lital; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Liewald, David C.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Ohlsson, Claes; Moed, Matthijs; Verlinden, Vincent J.; Mellström, Dan; van der Geest, Jos N.; Karlsson, Magnus; Hernandez, Dena; McWhirter, Rebekah; Liu, Yongmei; Thomson, Russell; Tranah, Gregory J.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Weir, David R.; Zhao, Wei; Starr, John M.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Bennett, David A.; Cummings, Steven R.; Deary, Ian J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Srikanth, Velandai K.; Windham, Beverly G.; Newman, Ann B.; Walston, Jeremy D.; Davies, Gail; Evans, Daniel S.; Slagboom, Eline P.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kiel, Douglas P.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Atzmon, Gil

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the basis for variation in late-life mobility is attributable, in part, to genetic factors, which may become increasingly important with age. Our objective was to systematically assess the contribution of genetic variation to gait speed in older individuals. We conducted a meta-analysis of gait speed GWASs in 31,478 older adults from 17 cohorts of the CHARGE consortium, and validated our results in 2,588 older adults from 4 independent studies. We followed our initial discoveries with network and eQTL analysis of candidate signals in tissues. The meta-analysis resulted in a list of 536 suggestive genome wide significant SNPs in or near 69 genes. Further interrogation with Pathway Analysis placed gait speed as a polygenic complex trait in five major networks. Subsequent eQTL analysis revealed several SNPs significantly associated with the expression of PRSS16, WDSUB1 and PTPRT, which in addition to the meta-analysis and pathway suggested that genetic effects on gait speed may occur through synaptic function and neuronal development pathways. No genome-wide significant signals for gait speed were identified from this moderately large sample of older adults, suggesting that more refined physical function phenotypes will be needed to identify the genetic basis of gait speed in aging. PMID:28077804

  20. Methods of Sports Genetics: toe and plantar dermatoglyphic analysis (information 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhiyenko L.P.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The article summarized the data and dermatoglyphic analysis of human toe and plantar prints. It is defined that toe and plantar triradii, papillary ridge patterns, the main plantar lines, the types of dermatoglyphic patterns can be the objects of the dermatoglyphic analysis. The recommendations to use the technology of dermatoglyphic analysis of human toe and plantar prints in sport genetics are given.

  1. CONSUMER RESPONSE TO GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS: MARKET SEGMENT ANALYSIS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRODUCERS AND POLICY MAKERS

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Gregory A.; Burnham, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    Conjoint analysis is used to elicit consumer preferences for attributes of genetically modified foods. Market segments are identified based on a cluster analysis of respondents' preferences for brand, price, and GMO content. A logit analysis is used to analyze consumer characteristics associated with the acceptance of GMO foods. Those consumers who were most risk averse, most likely to believe that GMOs improved the quality or safety of food, and most knowledgeable about biotechnology were th...

  2. Methods of sports genetics: dermatoglyphic analysis of human palmarprints (information 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhiyenko L.P.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Information is generalized about the dermatoglyphic analysis of hands of hands of man. The quantitative dermatoglyphic indexes of hands of hands are presented for youths and girls of the Podol region of Ukraine. The quantitative indexes of palm's dermatoglyphics are rotined for youths and girls of Ukrainian and Russian nationality in Kharkov. The most informing dermatoglyphic indexes of hands of hands which it is possible to use in sporting genetics are certain. Formed recommendation on technology of dermatoglyphic analysis of hands of hands of man in sporting genetics.

  3. Meta-analysis of susceptibility of woody plants to loss of genetic diversity through habitat fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranckx, Guy; Jacquemyn, Hans; Muys, Bart; Honnay, Olivier

    2012-04-01

    Shrubs and trees are assumed less likely to lose genetic variation in response to habitat fragmentation because they have certain life-history characteristics such as long lifespans and extensive pollen flow. To test this assumption, we conducted a meta-analysis with data on 97 woody plant species derived from 98 studies of habitat fragmentation. We measured the weighted response of four different measures of population-level genetic diversity to habitat fragmentation with Hedge's d and Spearman rank correlation. We tested whether the genetic response to habitat fragmentation was mediated by life-history traits (longevity, pollination mode, and seed dispersal vector) and study characteristics (genetic marker and plant material used). For both tests of effect size habitat fragmentation was associated with a substantial decrease in expected heterozygosity, number of alleles, and percentage of polymorphic loci, whereas the population inbreeding coefficient was not associated with these measures. The largest proportion of variation among effect sizes was explained by pollination mechanism and by the age of the tissue (progeny or adult) that was genotyped. Our primary finding was that wind-pollinated trees and shrubs appeared to be as likely to lose genetic variation as insect-pollinated species, indicating that severe habitat fragmentation may lead to pollen limitation and limited gene flow. In comparison with results of previous meta-analyses on mainly herbaceous species, we found trees and shrubs were as likely to have negative genetic responses to habitat fragmentation as herbaceous species. We also found that the genetic variation in offspring was generally less than that of adult trees, which is evidence of a genetic extinction debt and probably reflects the genetic diversity of the historical, less-fragmented landscape. ©2011 Society for Conservation Biology.

  4. Barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary stroke prevention medications after stroke: analysis of survivors and caregivers views from an online stroke forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, James; Sutton, Stephen; Mant, Jonathan; Simoni, Anna De

    2017-01-01

    Objective To identify barriers and facilitators of medication adherence in patients with stroke along with their caregivers. Design Qualitative thematic analysis of posts about secondary prevention medications, informed by Perceptions and Practicalities Approach. Setting Posts written by the UK stroke survivors and their family members taking part in the online forum of the Stroke Association, between 2004 and 2011. Participants 84 participants: 49 stroke survivors, 33 caregivers, 2 not stated, identified using the keywords ‘taking medication’, ‘pills’, ‘size’, ‘side-effects’, ‘routine’, ‘blister’ as well as secondary prevention medication terms. Results Perceptions reducing the motivation to adhere included dealing with medication side effects, questioning doctors’ prescribing practices and negative publicity about medications, especially in regard to statins. Caregivers faced difficulties with ensuring medications were taken while respecting the patient’s decisions not to take tablets. They struggled in their role as advocates of patient’s needs with healthcare professionals. Not experiencing side effects, attributing importance to medications, positive personal experiences of taking tablets and obtaining modification of treatment to manage side effects were facilitators of adherence. Key practical barriers included difficulties with swallowing tablets, dealing with the burden of treatment and drug cost. Using medication storage devices, following routines and getting help with medications from caregivers were important facilitators of adherence. Conclusions An online stroke forum is a novel and valuable resource to investigate use of secondary prevention medications. Analysis of this forum highlighted significant barriers and facilitators of medication adherence faced by stroke survivors and their caregivers. Addressing perceptual and practical barriers highlighted here can inform the development of future interventions aimed at

  5. Barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary stroke prevention medications after stroke: analysis of survivors and caregivers views from an online stroke forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, James; Sutton, Stephen; Mant, Jonathan; De Simoni, Anna

    2017-07-16

    To identify barriers and facilitators of medication adherence in patients with stroke along with their caregivers. Qualitative thematic analysis of posts about secondary prevention medications, informed by Perceptions and Practicalities Approach. Posts written by the UK stroke survivors and their family members taking part in the online forum of the Stroke Association, between 2004 and 2011. 84 participants: 49 stroke survivors, 33 caregivers, 2 not stated, identified using the keywords 'taking medication', 'pills', 'size', 'side-effects', 'routine', 'blister' as well as secondary prevention medication terms. Perceptions reducing the motivation to adhere included dealing with medication side effects, questioning doctors' prescribing practices and negative publicity about medications, especially in regard to statins. Caregivers faced difficulties with ensuring medications were taken while respecting the patient's decisions not to take tablets. They struggled in their role as advocates of patient's needs with healthcare professionals. Not experiencing side effects, attributing importance to medications, positive personal experiences of taking tablets and obtaining modification of treatment to manage side effects were facilitators of adherence. Key practical barriers included difficulties with swallowing tablets, dealing with the burden of treatment and drug cost. Using medication storage devices, following routines and getting help with medications from caregivers were important facilitators of adherence. An online stroke forum is a novel and valuable resource to investigate use of secondary prevention medications. Analysis of this forum highlighted significant barriers and facilitators of medication adherence faced by stroke survivors and their caregivers. Addressing perceptual and practical barriers highlighted here can inform the development of future interventions aimed at improving adherence to secondary prevention medication after stroke. © Article author

  6. Centromeric DNA Facilitates Nonconventional Yeast Genetic Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Mingfeng; Gao, Meirong; Lopez-Garcia, Carmen Lorena; Wu, Yutong; Seetharam, Arun Somwarpet; Severin, Andrew Josef; Shao, Zengyi

    2017-08-18

    Many nonconventional yeast species have highly desirable features that are not possessed by model yeasts, despite that significant technology hurdles to effectively manipulate them lay in front. Scheffersomyces stipitis is one of the most important exemplary nonconventional yeasts in biorenewables industry, which has a high native xylose utilization capacity. Recent study suggested its much better potential than Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a well-suited microbial biomanufacturing platform for producing high-value compounds derived from shikimate pathway, many of which are associated with potent nutraceutical or pharmaceutical properties. However, the broad application of S. stipitis is hampered by the lack of stable episomal expression platforms and precise genome-editing tools. Here we report the success in pinpointing the centromeric DNA as the partitioning element to guarantee stable extra-chromosomal DNA segregation. The identified centromeric sequence not only stabilized episomal plasmid, enabled homogeneous gene expression, increased the titer of a commercially relevant compound by 3-fold, and also dramatically increased gene knockout efficiency from <1% to more than 80% with the expression of CRISPR components on the new stable plasmid. This study elucidated that establishment of a stable minichromosome-like expression platform is key to achieving functional modifications of nonconventional yeast species in order to expand the current collection of microbial factories.

  7. Genetic analysis of Eclosion hormone action during Drosophila larval ecdysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Eileen; Mena, Wilson; Lahr, Eleanor C; Johnson, Erik C; Ewer, John

    2015-12-15

    Insect growth is punctuated by molts, during which the animal produces a new exoskeleton. The molt culminates in ecdysis, an ordered sequence of behaviors that causes the old cuticle to be shed. This sequence is activated by Ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH), which acts on the CNS to activate neurons that produce neuropeptides implicated in ecdysis, including Eclosion hormone (EH), Crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) and Bursicon. Despite more than 40 years of research on ecdysis, our understanding of the precise roles of these neurohormones remains rudimentary. Of particular interest is EH; although it is known to upregulate ETH release, other roles for EH have remained elusive. We isolated an Eh null mutant in Drosophila and used it to investigate the role of EH in larval ecdysis. We found that null mutant animals invariably died at around the time of ecdysis, revealing an essential role in its control. Further analyses showed that these animals failed to express the preparatory behavior of pre-ecdysis while directly expressing the motor program of ecdysis. Although ETH release could not be detected, the lack of pre-ecdysis could not be rescued by injections of ETH, suggesting that EH is required within the CNS for ETH to trigger the normal ecdysial sequence. Using a genetically encoded calcium probe, we showed that EH configured the response of the CNS to ETH. These findings show that EH plays an essential role in the Drosophila CNS in the control of ecdysis, in addition to its known role in the periphery of triggering ETH release.

  8. Genetic analysis of desiccation tolerance in Sachharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahan, Dean; Dunham, Maitreya; DeSevo, Chris; Koshland, Douglas E

    2011-10-01

    Desiccation tolerance, the ability to survive nearly total dehydration, is a rare strategy for survival and reproduction observed in all taxa. However, the mechanism and regulation of this phenomenon are poorly understood. Correlations between desiccation tolerance and potential effectors have been reported in many species, but their physiological significance has not been established in vivo. Although the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits extreme desiccation tolerance, its usefulness has been hampered by an inability to reduce tolerance more than a few fold by physiological or genetic perturbations. Here we report that fewer than one in a million yeast cells from low-density logarithmic cultures survive desiccation, while 20-40% of cells from saturated cultures survive. Using this greatly expanded metric, we show that mutants defective in trehalose biosynthesis, hydrophilins, responses to hyperosmolarity, and hypersalinity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and DNA damage repair nevertheless retain wild-type levels of desiccation tolerance, suggesting that this trait involves a unique constellation of stress factors. A genome-wide screen for mutants that render stationary cells as sensitive as log phase cells identifies only mutations that block respiration. Respiration as a prerequisite for acquiring desiccation tolerance is corroborated by respiration inhibition and by growth on nonfermentable carbon sources. Suppressors bypassing the respiration requirement for desiccation tolerance reveal at least two pathways, one of which, involving the Mediator transcription complex, is associated with the shift from fermentative to respiratory metabolism. Further study of these regulators and their targets should provide important clues to the sensors and effectors of desiccation tolerance.

  9. Genetic Analysis of Desiccation Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calahan, Dean; Dunham, Maitreya; DeSevo, Chris; Koshland, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Desiccation tolerance, the ability to survive nearly total dehydration, is a rare strategy for survival and reproduction observed in all taxa. However, the mechanism and regulation of this phenomenon are poorly understood. Correlations between desiccation tolerance and potential effectors have been reported in many species, but their physiological significance has not been established in vivo. Although the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits extreme desiccation tolerance, its usefulness has been hampered by an inability to reduce tolerance more than a few fold by physiological or genetic perturbations. Here we report that fewer than one in a million yeast cells from low-density logarithmic cultures survive desiccation, while 20–40% of cells from saturated cultures survive. Using this greatly expanded metric, we show that mutants defective in trehalose biosynthesis, hydrophilins, responses to hyperosmolarity, and hypersalinity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and DNA damage repair nevertheless retain wild-type levels of desiccation tolerance, suggesting that this trait involves a unique constellation of stress factors. A genome-wide screen for mutants that render stationary cells as sensitive as log phase cells identifies only mutations that block respiration. Respiration as a prerequisite for acquiring desiccation tolerance is corroborated by respiration inhibition and by growth on nonfermentable carbon sources. Suppressors bypassing the respiration requirement for desiccation tolerance reveal at least two pathways, one of which, involving the Mediator transcription complex, is associated with the shift from fermentative to respiratory metabolism. Further study of these regulators and their targets should provide important clues to the sensors and effectors of desiccation tolerance. PMID:21840858

  10. Transcriptomic and genetic analysis of direct interspecies electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Summers, Zarath M

    2013-01-01

    The possibility that metatranscriptomic analysis could distinguish between direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) and H2 interspecies transfer (HIT) in anaerobic communities was investigated by comparing gene transcript abundance in cocultures in which Geobacter sulfurreducens was the elect......The possibility that metatranscriptomic analysis could distinguish between direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) and H2 interspecies transfer (HIT) in anaerobic communities was investigated by comparing gene transcript abundance in cocultures in which Geobacter sulfurreducens....... These results demonstrate that there are unique gene expression patterns that distinguish DIET from HIT and suggest that metatranscriptomics may be a promising route to investigate interspecies electron transfer pathways in more-complex environments....

  11. High-density SNP assay development for genetic analysis in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomion, C; Bartholomé, J; Lesur, I; Boury, C; Rodríguez-Quilón, I; Lagraulet, H; Ehrenmann, F; Bouffier, L; Gion, J M; Grivet, D; de Miguel, M; de María, N; Cervera, M T; Bagnoli, F; Isik, F; Vendramin, G G; González-Martínez, S C

    2016-03-01

    Maritime pine provides essential ecosystem services in the south-western Mediterranean basin, where it covers around 4 million ha. Its scattered distribution over a range of environmental conditions makes it an ideal forest tree species for studies of local adaptation and evolutionary responses to climatic change. Highly multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays are increasingly used to study genetic variation in living organisms and for practical applications in plant and animal breeding and genetic resource conservation. We developed a 9k Illumina Infinium SNP array and genotyped maritime pine trees from (i) a three-generation inbred (F2) pedigree, (ii) the French breeding population and (iii) natural populations from Portugal and the French Atlantic coast. A large proportion of the exploitable SNPs (2052/8410, i.e. 24.4%) segregated in the mapping population and could be mapped, providing the densest ever gene-based linkage map for this species. Based on 5016 SNPs, natural and breeding populations from the French gene pool exhibited similar level of genetic diversity. Population genetics and structure analyses based on 3981 SNP markers common to the Portuguese and French gene pools revealed high levels of differentiation, leading to the identification of a set of highly differentiated SNPs that could be used for seed provenance certification. Finally, we discuss how the validated SNPs could facilitate the identification of ecologically and economically relevant genes in this species, improving our understanding of the demography and selective forces shaping its natural genetic diversity, and providing support for new breeding strategies.

  12. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Iranian Jujube Ecotypes (Ziziphus spp. Using RAPD Molecular Marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Abbasi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Mill. is a valuable medicinal plant which is important in Iranian traditional medicines. Although the regional plants such as jujube play an important role in our economy, but they are forgotten in research and technology. Considering the economic and medicinal importance of jujube, the first step in breeding programs is determination of the genetic diversity among the individuals. 34 ecotypes of jujube, which have been collected from eight provinces of Iran, were used in this study. The genetic relationships of Iranian jujube ecotypes were analyzed using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD marker. Six out of 15 random decamer primers applied for RAPD analysis, showed an informative polymorphism. According to clustering analysis using UPGMA's methods, the ecotypes were classified into two major groups at the 0.81 level of genetic similarity. The highest value of similarity coefficient (0.92 was detected between Mazandaran and Golestan ecotypes and the most genetic diversity was observed in ecotypes of Khorasan-Jonoubi. The affinity of Khorasan-Jonoubi and Esfahan ecotypes indicated a possible common origin for the variation in these areas. Results indicated that RAPD analysis could be successfully used for the estimation of genetic diversity among Ziziphus ecotypes and it can be useful for further investigations.

  13. Genetic diversity analysis of highly incomplete SNP genotype data with imputations: an empirical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yong-Bi

    2014-03-13

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) recently has emerged as a promising genomic approach for assessing genetic diversity on a genome-wide scale. However, concerns are not lacking about the uniquely large unbalance in GBS genotype data. Although some genotype imputation has been proposed to infer missing observations, little is known about the reliability of a genetic diversity analysis of GBS data, with up to 90% of observations missing. Here we performed an empirical assessment of accuracy in genetic diversity analysis of highly incomplete single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes with imputations. Three large single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype data sets for corn, wheat, and rice were acquired, and missing data with up to 90% of missing observations were randomly generated and then imputed for missing genotypes with three map-independent imputation methods. Estimating heterozygosity and inbreeding coefficient from original, missing, and imputed data revealed variable patterns of bias from assessed levels of missingness and genotype imputation, but the estimation biases were smaller for missing data without genotype imputation. The estimates of genetic differentiation were rather robust up to 90% of missing observations but became substantially biased when missing genotypes were imputed. The estimates of topology accuracy for four representative samples of interested groups generally were reduced with increased levels of missing genotypes. Probabilistic principal component analysis based imputation performed better in terms of topology accuracy than those analyses of missing data without genotype imputation. These findings are not only significant for understanding the reliability of the genetic diversity analysis with respect to large missing data and genotype imputation but also are instructive for performing a proper genetic diversity analysis of highly incomplete GBS or other genotype data.

  14. Multilocus spacer analysis revealed highly homogeneous genetic background of Asian type of Borrelia miyamotoi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhacheva, Tatyana A; Salikhova, Irina I; Kovalev, Sergey Y

    2015-04-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi, a member of the relapsing fever group borreliae, was first isolated in Japan and subsequently found in Ixodes ticks in North America, Europe and Russia. Currently, there are three types of B. miyamotoi: Asian or Siberian (transmitted mainly by Ixodes persulcatus), European (Ixodesricinus) and American (Ixodesscapularis and Ixodespacificus). Despite the great genetic distances between B. miyamotoi types, isolates within a type are characterised by an extremely low genetic variability. In particular, strains of B. miyamotoi of Asian type, isolated in Russia from the Baltic sea to the Far East, have been shown to be identical based on the analysis of several conventional genetic markers, such as 16S rRNA, flagellin, outer membrane protein p66 and glpQ genes. Thus, protein or rRNA - coding genes were shown not to be informative enough in studying genetic diversity of B. miyamotoi within a type. In the present paper, we have attempted to design a new multilocus technique based on eight non-coding intergenic spacers (3686bp in total) and have applied it to the analysis of intra-type genetic variability of В. miyamotoi detected in different regions of Russia and from two tick species, I. persulcatus and Ixodespavlovskyi. However, even though potentially the most variable loci were selected, no genetic variability between studied DNA samples was found, except for one nucleotide substitution in two of them. The sequences obtained were identical to those of the reference strain FR64b. Analysis of the data obtained with the GenBank sequences indicates a highly homogeneous genetic background of B. miyamotoi from the Baltic Sea to the Japanese Islands. In this paper, a hypothesis of clonal expansion of B. miyamotoi is discussed, as well as possible mechanisms for the rapid dissemination of one B. miyamotoi clone over large distances.

  15. Genetic analysis of seasonal runoff based on automatic techniques of hydrometeorological data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireeva, Maria; Sazonov, Alexey; Rets, Ekaterina; Ezerova, Natalia; Frolova, Natalia; Samsonov, Timofey

    2017-04-01

    Detection of the rivers' feeding type is a complex and multifactor task. Such partitioning should be based, on the one hand, on the genesis of the feeding water, on the other hand, on its physical path. At the same time it should consider relationship of the feeding type with corresponding phase of the water regime. Due to the above difficulties and complexity of the approach, there are many different variants of separation of flow hydrograph for feeding types. The most common method is extraction of so called basic component which in one way or another reflects groundwater feeding of the river. In this case, the selection most often is based on the principle of local minima or graphic separation of this component. However, in this case neither origin of the water nor corresponding phase of water regime is considered. In this paper, the authors offer a method of complex automated analysis of genetic components of the river's feeding together with the separation of specific phases of the water regime. The objects of the study are medium and large rivers of European Russia having a pronounced spring flood, formed due to melt water, and summer-autumn and winter low water which is periodically interrupted by rain or thaw flooding. The method is based on genetic separation of hydrograph proposed in 1960s years by B. I. Kudelin. This technique is considered for large rivers having hydraulic connection with groundwater horizons during flood. For better detection of floods genesis the analysis involves reanalysis data on temperature and precipitation. Separation is based on the following fundamental graphic-analytical principles: • Ground feeding during the passage of flood peak tends to zero • Beginning of the flood is determined as the exceeding of critical value of low water discharge • Flood periods are determined on the basis of exceeding the critical low-water discharge; they relate to thaw in case of above-zero temperatures • During thaw and rain floods

  16. High efficiency regeneration and genetic stability analysis of somatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-07

    Sep 7, 2011 ... polymorphic DNA (RAPD), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers and flow cytometry. ... random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), regeneration. .... Detailed information on the primers used in the RAPD and ISSR analysis of ..... monomorphic bands comparing all the regenerated plants.

  17. Clinical, immunohistochemical, Western blot, and genetic analysis in dystrophinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Sang-Jun; Kim, Won-Joo; Kim, Seung Min; Lee, Kee Ook; Yoon, Bora; Choi, Young-Chul

    2013-08-01

    Dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophies (dystrophinopathies) are the most common form of muscular dystrophy, with variable clinical phenotypes ranging from the severe Duchenne (DMD) to the milder Becker (BMD) forms. In this study, we investigated the relationship between clinical characteristics, findings at immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot, and the pattern of exon deletions in 24 male patients with dystrophinopathies. We retrospectively reviewed findings from clinical and laboratory examinations, IHC for dystrophin of muscle biopsy tissue, Western blot analysis, and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) examination of genomic DNA. All tests were performed in every patient. PCR examination revealed exon deletions in 13 patients (54.2%). At Western blot analysis, 15 patients (62.5%) were negative at all three dystrophin domains. Most of these patients had a clinical presentation consistent with the DMD phenotype. Nine (37.5%) others were weakly positive at one or more domains. Most of these patients presented clinically as BMD phenotype. One patient whose clinical presentation was consistent with BMD phenotype had normal findings at IHC and was weakly positive at all three domains on Western blot analysis; however, with the exception of this patient, the findings at IHC and Western blot were consistent for individual patients. Based on these findings, we conclude that Western blot analysis appears useful for confirmation of dystrophinopathy in BMD patients with normal staining on IHC. Exon deletion analysis by multiplex PCR using peripheral blood is also a simple and useful test for the diagnosis of dystrophinopathy, although it has limited sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of genetic diversity of maize hybrids in the regional tests in Sichuan and Southwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study,analyses of phenotypic characters,SSR molecular markers and pedigrees were done to study the genetic diversity in 186 maize hybrids that were tested in regional trials in Sichuan and Southwest China.The results showed that there were differences in the variation coefficients of different characteristics,but all of the variation coefficients changed within a narrow range.Sixty pairs of simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer distributed on the ten chromosomes of maize produced stable amplified bands and 608 alleles were detected among the hybrids.The average number of alleles per locus was 10.1 ranging from 3 to 23.The values of polymorphism information content (PIC) for each SSR locus varied from 0.5179 to 0.9256 with an average of 0.7826.The genetic similarities of SSR marker pattern among the 186 hybrids ranged from 0.6067 to 0.9162,with an average of 0.7722.There were 16499 pairs of genetic similarity,in which 96.9% were 0.70000 to 0.9256.The cluster analysis showed that the hybrids could be classified into ten clusters,with 88.2% of the hybrids included in Cluster 4,Cluster 8 and Cluster 10.The analysis of pedigree sources of 51 hybrids showed that 36 hybrids had close genetic relationships with the hybrids developed by the Pioneer Company in the late 1980s and early 1990s in the United States,such as Y78599,Y7865 and Y78698,accounting for 70.58%.Meanwhile,13 hybrids had close genetic relationships with Y78599,accounting for 8.66%.The genetic similarities of SSR marker pattern among the 51 hybrids ranged from 0.66192 to 0.8799,with an average of 0.7686.There were 1196 pairs of genetic similarity ranged between 0.7000 to 0.8796,accounting for 93.80% of all the genetic similarity pairs.The cluster analysis showed that 88.2% of the 51 hybrids were in Cluster 4,Cluster 8 and Cluster 10,which indicated that similarity was high and genetic diversity narrow among the 186 hybrids.This showed that it is necessary to broaden the genetic basis of breeding

  19. Genetic analysis on three South Indian sympatric hipposiderid bats (Chiroptera, Hipposideridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanagaraj, C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In mitochondrial DNA, variations in the sequence of 16S rRNA region were analyzed to infer the genetic relationship and population history of three sympatric hipposiderid bats, Hipposideros speoris, H. fulvus and H. ater. Based on the DNA sequence data, we observed relatively lower haplotype and higher nucleotide diversity in H. speoris than in the other two species. The pairwise comparisons of the genetic divergence inferred a genetic relationship between the three hipposiderid bats. We used haplotype sequences to construct a phylogenetic tree. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference analysis generated a tree with similar topology. H. fulvus and H. ater formed one cluster and H. speoris formed another cluster. Analysis of the demographic history of populations using Jajima’s D test revealed past changes in populations. Comparison of the observed distribution of pairwise differences in the nucleotides with expected sudden expansion model accepts for H. fulvus and H. ater but not for H. speoris populations.

  20. Classical mechanics approach applied to analysis of genetic oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasylchenkova, Anastasiia; Mraz, Miha; Zimic, Nikolaj; Moskon, Miha

    2016-04-05

    Biological oscillators present a fundamental part of several regulatory mechanisms that control the response of various biological systems. Several analytical approaches for their analysis have been reported recently. They are, however, limited to only specific oscillator topologies and/or to giving only qualitative answers, i.e., is the dynamics of an oscillator given the parameter space oscillatory or not. Here we present a general analytical approach that can be applied to the analysis of biological oscillators. It relies on the projection of biological systems to classical mechanics systems. The approach is able to provide us with relatively accurate results in the meaning of type of behaviour system reflects (i.e. oscillatory or not) and periods of potential oscillations without the necessity to conduct expensive numerical simulations. We demonstrate and verify the proposed approach on three different implementations of amplified negative feedback oscillator.

  1. Construction and genetic analysis of mutator insertion mutant population in maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wenting; GAO Youjun; TENG Feng; SHI Qing; ZHENG Yonglian

    2006-01-01

    A total of 26718 M1 plants were obtained by crossing the active mutator transposon donor parents (Q105, WW51, 115F, V26-2 and 919J)with the recipient parents (Hz85,W328 with Bz gene and S-Mo17Rf3Rf3). The phenotypes of M1 plants were observed in the field. M1 plants were self-pollinated to develop the mutator insertion-mutagenized M2 seeds. The transposition frequency of the mutator in the genome was calculated based on the spotted aleurone phenotype of the M2 seeds. The results showed that: (1) the mutation frequency of M1 phenotypes in the field was 0.07 in the population of W328×Mu; (2) the mutation frequency of spotted aleurone seeds on the M2 ears was 0.122 in the population of W328×Mu; (3) five S-cytoplasm male-sterile plants were found among 22500 M1 plants of S-Mo17Rf3Rf3×Mu, with the transposition frequency about 2.2×10-4 per locus. 99 flanking sequences of mutator transposition were amplified by the modified MuTAIL-PCR, and 59 non-redundant sequences with length around 400 bp were obtained.After bioinformatic analysis, 27 sequences of them could be annotated, using non-redundant nucleotide database of maize, rice, and Arabidopsis. 36 sequences of them were located on the genetic map of maize by comparative genomics, and several flanking sequences of mutator insertion were mapped on the single marker locus. Hotspot sequences of mutator transposition were revealed by comparing the homologies between the 9-bp target site duplication of the mutator insertion. The putative functions of 8 flanking sequences of rnutator transposition had identity with the functions of their corresponding marker. The constructed mutator insertion mutant population in maize will facilitate the new gene discovery and functional genomics study in maize.

  2. Identification and Analysis of Genetic Diversity Structure Within Pisum Genus Based on Microsatellite Markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Xu-xiao; Rebecca Ford; Robert R Redden; GUAN Jian-ping; WANG Shu-min

    2009-01-01

    To assesse the genetic diversity among wild and cultivated accessions of 8 taxonomic groups in 2 species, and 5 subspecies under Pisum genus, and to analyze population structure and their genetic relationships among various groups of taxonomy,the study tried to verify the fitness of traditionally botanical taxonomic system under Pisum genus and to provide essential information for the exploration and utilization of wild relatives of pea genetic resources. 197 Pisum accessions from 62 counties of 5 continents were employed for SSR analysis using 21 polymorphic primer pairs in this study. Except for cultivated field pea Pisum sativum ssp. sativum vat. sativum (94 genotypes), also included were wild relative genotypes that were classified as belonging to P. fulvum, P. sativum ssp.abyssinicum, P. sativum ssp. asiaticum, P. sativum ssp. transcaucasicum, P. sativum ssp. elatius vat. elatius, P. sativum ssp. elatius vat. pumilio and P. sativum ssp.sativum vat. arvense (103 genotypes). The PCA analyses and 3-dimension PCA graphs were conducted and drawn by NTSYSpe 2.2d statistical package. Nei78 genetic distances among groups of genetic resources were calculated, and cluster analysis using UPGMA method was carried out by using Popgene V1.32 statistical package, the dendrogram was drawn by MEGA3.1 statistical package. Allelie statistics were carried out by Popgene V1.32. The significance test between groups of genotypes was carried out by Fstat V2.9.3.2 statistical package. 104 polymorphic bands were amplified using 21 SSR primer pairs with unambiguous unique polymorphic bands. 4.95 alleles were detected by each SSR primer pair in average, of which 65.56% were effective alleles for diversity. PSAD270, PSAC58, PSAA18, PSAC75, PSAA175 and PSAB72 were the most effective SSR pairs. SSR alleles were uniformly distributed among botanical taxon units under Pisum genus, but significant difference appeared in most pairwise comparisons for genetic diversity between taxon unit based

  3. Microsatellite marker-based genetic analysis of relatedness between commercial and heritage turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamara, D; Gyenai, K B; Geng, T; Hammade, H; Smith, E J

    2007-01-01

    The turkey is second only to the chicken in importance as an agriculturally important poultry species. Unlike the chicken, however, genetic studies of the turkey continue to be limited. For example, to date, many genomic investigations have been conducted to characterize genetic relationships between commercial (CO) and non-CO chicken breeds, whereas the nature of the genetic relatedness between CO and heritage turkeys remains unknown. The objective of the current research was to use microsatellites to analyze the genetic relatedness between CO and heritage domestic turkeys including Narragansett, Bourbon Red, Blue Slate, Spanish Black, and Royal Palm. Primer pairs specific for 10 previously described turkey microsatellite markers were used. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the Blue Slate, Bourbon Red, and Narragansett were genetically closely related to the CO strain, with a Nei distance of 0.30, and the Royal Palm and Spanish Black were the least related to the CO strain, with Nei distances of 0.41 and 0.40, respectively. The present work provides a foundation for the basis of using heritage turkeys to genetically improve CO populations by introgression.

  4. Genetic variation and population structure of the mushroom Pleurotusferulae in China inferred from nuclear DNA analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Meng-ran; HUANG Chen-yang; WU Xiang-li; CHEN Qiang; QU Ji-bin; LI Yan-chun; GAO Wei; ZHANG Jin-xia

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the genetic diversity of an edible fungusPleurotus ferulae, a total of 89 wild samples colected from six geographical locations in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China and two geographical locations in Italy, were analyzed using three DNA fragments including the translation elongation factor (EF1α), the second largest subunit of the RNA polymerase II (RPB2) and the largest subunit of the RNA polymerase II (RPB1). The results indicated relatively abundant genetic variability in the wild resources ofP.ferulae.The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that the vast majority of the genetic variation was found within geographical populations. Both the Chinese populations and the Italian populations ofP. ferulaedisplayed a limited genetic differentiation. The degree of differentiation between the Chinese populations and the Italian populations was obviously higher than that between the populations from the same region, and moreover the genetic differentiation among al the tested populations was correlated to the geographical dis-tance. The phylogeny analyses conifrmed that samples from China and Italy belonged to another genetic group separated fromPleurotus eryngi. They were closely related to each other but were clustered according to their geographical origins, which implied the Chinese populations were highly differentiated from the Italian populations because of distance isolation, and the two populations from different regions might be stil in the process of alopatric divergence.

  5. RAPD-SCAR marker and genetic relationship analysis of three Demodex species (Acari: Demodicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-E; Wu, Li-Ping

    2012-06-01

    For a long time, classification of Demodex mites has been mainly based on their hosts and phenotype characteristics. The study was the first to conduct molecular identification and genetic relationship analysis for six isolates of three Demodex species by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker. Totally, 239 DNA fragments were amplified from six Demodex isolates with 10 random primers in RAPD, of which 165 were polymorphic. Using a single primer, at least five fragments and at most 40 in the six isolates were amplified, whereas within a single isolate, a range of 35-49 fragments were amplified. DNA fingerprints of primers CZ 1-9 revealed intra- and interspecies difference in six Demodex isolates, whereas primer CZ 10 only revealed interspecies difference. The genetic distance and dendrogram showed the intraspecific genetic distances were closer than the interspecific genetic distances. The interspecific genetic distances of Demodex folliculorum and Demodex canis (0.7931-0.8140) were shorter than that of Demodex brevis and D. canis (0.8182-0.8987). The RAPD-SCAR marker displayed primer CZ 10 could be applied to identify the three Demodex species. The 479-bp fragment was specific for D. brevis, and the 261-bp fragment was specific for D. canis. The conclusion was that the RAPD-SCAR multi-marker was effective in molecular identification of three Demodex species. The genetic relationship between D. folliculorum and D. canis was nearer than that between D. folliculorum and D. brevis.

  6. Analysis of genetic variation and potential applications in genome-scale metabolic modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gonçalo Rocha Cardoso

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation is the motor of evolution and allows organisms to overcome the environmental challenges they encounter. It can be both beneficial and harmful in the process of engineering cell factories for the production of proteins and chemicals. Throughout the history of biotechnology, there have been efforts to exploit genetic variation in our favor to create strains with favorable phenotypes. Genetic variation can either be present in natural populations or it can be artificially created by mutagenesis and selection or adaptive laboratory evolution. On the other hand, unintended genetic variation during a long term production process may lead to significant economic losses and it is important to understand how to control this type of variation. With the emergence of next-generation sequencing technologies, genetic variation in microbial strains can now be determined on an unprecedented scale and resolution by re-sequencing thousands of strains systematically. In this article, we review challenges in the integration and analysis of large-scale re-sequencing data, present an extensive overview of bioinformatics methods for predicting the effects of genetic variants on protein function, and discuss approaches for interfacing existing bioinformatics approaches with genome-scale models of cellular processes in order to predict effects of sequence variation on cellular phenotypes.

  7. Capturing the spectrum of interaction effects in genetic association studies by simulated evaporative cooling network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A McKinney

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from human genetic studies of several disorders suggests that interactions between alleles at multiple genes play an important role in influencing phenotypic expression. Analytical methods for identifying Mendelian disease genes are not appropriate when applied to common multigenic diseases, because such methods investigate association with the phenotype only one genetic locus at a time. New strategies are needed that can capture the spectrum of genetic effects, from Mendelian to multifactorial epistasis. Random Forests (RF and Relief-F are two powerful machine-learning methods that have been studied as filters for genetic case-control data due to their ability to account for the context of alleles at multiple genes when scoring the relevance of individual genetic variants to the phenotype. However, when variants interact strongly, the independence assumption of RF in the tree node-splitting criterion leads to diminished importance scores for relevant variants. Relief-F, on the other hand, was designed to detect strong interactions but is sensitive to large backgrounds of variants that are irrelevant to classification of the phenotype, which is an acute problem in genome-wide association studies. To overcome the weaknesses of these data mining approaches, we develop Evaporative Cooling (EC feature selection, a flexible machine learning method that can integrate multiple importance scores while removing irrelevant genetic variants. To characterize detailed interactions, we construct a genetic-association interaction network (GAIN, whose edges quantify the synergy between variants with respect to the phenotype. We use simulation analysis to show that EC is able to identify a wide range of interaction effects in genetic association data. We apply the EC filter to a smallpox vaccine cohort study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and infer a GAIN for a collection of SNPs associated with adverse events. Our results suggest an important

  8. Whole-genome sequencing and genetic variant analysis of a Quarter Horse mare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Ryan; Cohen, Noah D; Sawyer, Jason; Ghaffari, Noushin; Johnson, Charlie D; Dindot, Scott V

    2012-02-17

    The catalog of genetic variants in the horse genome originates from a few select animals, the majority originating from the Thoroughbred mare used for the equine genome sequencing project. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertion/deletion polymorphisms (INDELs), and copy number variants (CNVs) in the genome of an individual Quarter Horse mare sequenced by next-generation sequencing. Using massively parallel paired-end sequencing, we generated 59.6 Gb of DNA sequence from a Quarter Horse mare resulting in an average of 24.7X sequence coverage. Reads were mapped to approximately 97% of the reference Thoroughbred genome. Unmapped reads were de novo assembled resulting in 19.1 Mb of new genomic sequence in the horse. Using a stringent filtering method, we identified 3.1 million SNPs, 193 thousand INDELs, and 282 CNVs. Genetic variants were annotated to determine their impact on gene structure and function. Additionally, we genotyped this Quarter Horse for mutations of known diseases and for variants associated with particular traits. Functional clustering analysis of genetic variants revealed that most of the genetic variation in the horse's genome was enriched in sensory perception, signal transduction, and immunity and defense pathways. This is the first sequencing of a horse genome by next-generation sequencing and the first genomic sequence of an individual Quarter Horse mare. We have increased the catalog of genetic variants for use in equine genomics by the addition of novel SNPs, INDELs, and CNVs. The genetic variants described here will be a useful resource for future studies of genetic variation regulating performance traits and diseases in equids.

  9. Whole-Genome sequencing and genetic variant analysis of a quarter Horse mare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doan Ryan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The catalog of genetic variants in the horse genome originates from a few select animals, the majority originating from the Thoroughbred mare used for the equine genome sequencing project. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, insertion/deletion polymorphisms (INDELs, and copy number variants (CNVs in the genome of an individual Quarter Horse mare sequenced by next-generation sequencing. Results Using massively parallel paired-end sequencing, we generated 59.6 Gb of DNA sequence from a Quarter Horse mare resulting in an average of 24.7X sequence coverage. Reads were mapped to approximately 97% of the reference Thoroughbred genome. Unmapped reads were de novo assembled resulting in 19.1 Mb of new genomic sequence in the horse. Using a stringent filtering method, we identified 3.1 million SNPs, 193 thousand INDELs, and 282 CNVs. Genetic variants were annotated to determine their impact on gene structure and function. Additionally, we genotyped this Quarter Horse for mutations of known diseases and for variants associated with particular traits. Functional clustering analysis of genetic variants revealed that most of the genetic variation in the horse's genome was enriched in sensory perception, signal transduction, and immunity and defense pathways. Conclusions This is the first sequencing of a horse genome by next-generation sequencing and the first genomic sequence of an individual Quarter Horse mare. We have increased the catalog of genetic variants for use in equine genomics by the addition of novel SNPs, INDELs, and CNVs. The genetic variants described here will be a useful resource for future studies of genetic variation regulating performance traits and diseases in equids.

  10. The IMAGE project: methodological issues for the molecular genetic analysis of ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraone Stephen V

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genetic mechanisms involved in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD are being studied with considerable success by several centres worldwide. These studies confirm prior hypotheses about the role of genetic variation within genes involved in the regulation of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin neurotransmission in susceptibility to ADHD. Despite the importance of these findings, uncertainties remain due to the very small effects sizes that are observed. We discuss possible reasons for why the true strength of the associations may have been underestimated in research to date, considering the effects of linkage disequilibrium, allelic heterogeneity, population differences and gene by environment interactions. With the identification of genes associated with ADHD, the goal of ADHD genetics is now shifting from gene discovery towards gene functionality – the study of intermediate phenotypes ('endophenotypes'. We discuss methodological issues relating to quantitative genetic data from twin and family studies on candidate endophenotypes and how such data can inform attempts to link molecular genetic data to cognitive, affective and motivational processes in ADHD. The International Multi-centre ADHD Gene (IMAGE project exemplifies current collaborative research efforts on the genetics of ADHD. This European multi-site project is well placed to take advantage of the resources that are emerging following the sequencing of the human genome and the development of international resources for whole genome association analysis. As a result of IMAGE and other molecular genetic investigations of ADHD, we envisage a rapid increase in the number of identified genetic variants and the promise of identifying novel gene systems that we are not currently investigating, opening further doors in the study of gene functionality.

  11. Whole-genome sequencing and genetic variant analysis of a Quarter Horse mare.

    KAUST Repository

    Doan, Ryan

    2012-02-17

    BACKGROUND: The catalog of genetic variants in the horse genome originates from a few select animals, the majority originating from the Thoroughbred mare used for the equine genome sequencing project. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertion/deletion polymorphisms (INDELs), and copy number variants (CNVs) in the genome of an individual Quarter Horse mare sequenced by next-generation sequencing. RESULTS: Using massively parallel paired-end sequencing, we generated 59.6 Gb of DNA sequence from a Quarter Horse mare resulting in an average of 24.7X sequence coverage. Reads were mapped to approximately 97% of the reference Thoroughbred genome. Unmapped reads were de novo assembled resulting in 19.1 Mb of new genomic sequence in the horse. Using a stringent filtering method, we identified 3.1 million SNPs, 193 thousand INDELs, and 282 CNVs. Genetic variants were annotated to determine their impact on gene structure and function. Additionally, we genotyped this Quarter Horse for mutations of known diseases and for variants associated with particular traits. Functional clustering analysis of genetic variants revealed that most of the genetic variation in the horse\\'s genome was enriched in sensory perception, signal transduction, and immunity and defense pathways. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first sequencing of a horse genome by next-generation sequencing and the first genomic sequence of an individual Quarter Horse mare. We have increased the catalog of genetic variants for use in equine genomics by the addition of novel SNPs, INDELs, and CNVs. The genetic variants described here will be a useful resource for future studies of genetic variation regulating performance traits and diseases in equids.

  12. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Barker, Richard; Su, Shih-Heng

    Like most other plant organs, roots use gravity as a directional guide for growth. Specialized cells within the columella region of the root cap (the statocytes) sense the direction of gravity through the sedimentation of starch-filled plastids (amyloplasts). Amyloplast movement and/or pressure on sensitive membranes triggers a gravity signal transduction pathway within these cells, which leads to a fast transcytotic relocalization of plasma-membrane associated auxin-efflux carrier proteins of the PIN family (PIN3 and PIN7) toward the bottom membrane. This leads to a polar transport of auxin toward the bottom flank of the cap. The resulting lateral auxin gradient is then transmitted toward the elongation zones where it triggers a curvature that ultimately leads to a restoration of vertical downward growth. Our laboratory is using strategies derived from genetics and systems biology to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that modulate gravity sensing and signal transduction in the columella cells of the root cap. Our previous research uncovered two J-domain-containing proteins, ARG1 and ARL2, as contributing to this process. Mutations in the corresponding paralogous genes led to alterations of root and hypocotyl gravitropism accompanied by an inability for the statocytes to develop a cytoplasmic alkalinization, relocalize PIN3, and transport auxin laterally, in response to gravistimulation. Both proteins are associated peripherally to membranes belonging to various compartments of the vesicular trafficking pathway, potentially modulating the trafficking of defined proteins between plasma membrane and endosomes. MAR1 and MAR2, on the other end, are distinct proteins of the plastidic outer envelope protein import TOC complex (the transmembrane channel TOC75 and the receptor TOC132, respectively). Mutations in the corresponding genes enhance the gravitropic defects of arg1. Using transformation-rescue experiments with truncated versions of TOC132 (MAR2), we have shown

  13. Genetic analysis of processed in-line mastitis indicator data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Peter; Løvendahl, Peter

    2013-01-01

    on exponential smoothing of the SCC values followed by factor analysis for estimation of the latent variable EMR was used. Finally, EMR was expressed as a continuum on the interval [0;1] using sigmoid transformation. Thus, an EMR value close to zero indicates low risk of mastitis and a value close to one...... indicates high risk of mastitis. The EMR values were summarized for each cow using the log-transformed median EMR. A second trait was defined as the median of the log-transformed SCC values from 5 to 305 d in milk. A bivariate animal model was used for estimation of co-variance components for the 2 traits...

  14. Genetic analysis of pod dehiscence in pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeden, Norman F; Brauner, Soren; Przyborowski, Jerzy A

    2002-01-01

    The inheritance of the dehiscent pod character was investigated in two recombinant inbred populations using a simplified correlation analysis. The approach identified three regions on the pea genome that affect the expression of pod dehiscence. The region on linkage group III corresponded to the expected position of Dpo, a gene known to influence pod dehiscence. A locus on linkage group V appeared to have a slightly smaller effect on expression of the phenotype. The third region was observed only in one cross, had a greater effect than Dpo, and was postulated to be yellow pod allele at the Gp locus

  15. Population and genomic lessons from genetic analysis of two Indian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juyal, Garima; Mondal, Mayukh; Luisi, Pierre; Laayouni, Hafid; Sood, Ajit; Midha, Vandana; Heutink, Peter; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Thelma, B K; Casals, Ferran

    2014-10-01

    Indian demographic history includes special features such as founder effects, interpopulation segregation, complex social structure with a caste system and elevated frequency of consanguineous marriages. It also presents a higher frequency for some rare mendelian disorders and in the last two decades increased prevalence of some complex disorders. Despite the fact that India represents about one-sixth of the human population, deep genetic studies from this terrain have been scarce. In this study, we analyzed high-density genotyping and whole-exome sequencing data of a North and a South Indian population. Indian populations show higher differentiation levels than those reported between populations of other continents. In this work, we have analyzed its consequences, by specifically assessing the transferability of genetic markers from or to Indian populations. We show that there is limited genetic marker portability from available genetic resources such as HapMap or the 1,000 Genomes Project to Indian populations, which also present an excess of private rare variants. Conversely, tagSNPs show a high level of portability between the two Indian populations, in contrast to the common belief that North and South Indian populations are genetically very different. By estimating kinship from mates and consanguinity in our data from trios, we also describe different patterns of assortative mating and inbreeding in the two populations, in agreement with distinct mating preferences and social structures. In addition, this analysis has allowed us to describe genomic regions under recent adaptive selection, indicating differential adaptive histories for North and South Indian populations. Our findings highlight the importance of considering demography for design and analysis of genetic studies, as well as the need for extending human genetic variation catalogs to new populations and particularly to those with particular demographic histories.

  16. Longitudinal Analysis of Somatic Cell Count for Joint Genetic Evaluation of Mastitis and Recovery Liability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welderufael, Berihu Gebremedhin; de Koning, D J; Janss, Luc;

    Abstract Text: Better models of genetic evaluation for mastitis can be developed through longitudinal analysis of somatic cell count (SCC) which usually is used as a proxy for mastitis. Mastitis and recovery data with weekly observations of SCC were simulated for daughter groups of 60 and 240 per...

  17. Calibration of Uncertainty Analysis of the SWAT Model Using Genetic Algorithms and Bayesian Model Averaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper, the Genetic Algorithms (GA) and Bayesian model averaging (BMA) were combined to simultaneously conduct calibration and uncertainty analysis for the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). In this hybrid method, several SWAT models with different structures are first selected; next GA i...

  18. Genetic analysis of inbreeding of two strains of the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, M.H.; Otsen, M.; Hoekstra, R.; Veenstra, J.G.; Lenstra, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus is a sheep parasitic nematode that causes severe economic losses. Previous studies have indicated a high degree of genetic heterogeneity, which is hardly affected by selection for drug resistance. As a tool for the analysis of the population dynamics of H. contortus and its resp

  19. QTL analysis of the genetic architecture determining resistance to fire blight in an apple progeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calenge, F.; Drouet, D.; Weg, van de W.E.; Brisset, M.N.; Paulin, J.P.; Durel, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora, is one of the most destructive diseases of apple (Malus x domestica). In order to analyse the genetic determinism of resistance to fire blight in apple, a quantitative trait analysis (QTL) approach was used. A F1 progeny of 164

  20. Scarlet Fever Upsurge in England and Molecular-Genetic Analysis in North-West London, 2014

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-08-16

    Sarah Gregory reads an abridged version of the article, Scarlet Fever Upsurge in England and Molecular-Genetic Analysis in North-West London, 2014.  Created: 8/16/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/16/2016.

  1. Clinical Significance of UGT1A1 Genetic Analysis in Chinese Neonates with Severe Hyperbilirubinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yang

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Besides G6PD-deficiency screening, UGT1A1 genetic analysis, and especially the UGT1A1*6(c.211G>A, p.Arg71Gly polymorphism detection, may be taken into consideration for early diagnosis and treatment of severe hyperbilirubinemic newborns in southern China.

  2. Genetic Analysis of Health-Related Secondary Metabolites in a Brassica rapa Recombinant Inbred Line Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagheri, H.; Soda, El M.; Kim, H.K.; Fritsche, S.; Jung, C.; Aarts, M.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic basis of the wide variation for nutritional traits in Brassica rapa is largely unknown. A new Recombinant Inbred Line (RIL) population was profiled using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) analysis to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) c

  3. QTL analysis of the genetic architecture determining resistance to fire blight in an apple progeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calenge, F.; Drouet, D.; Weg, van de W.E.; Brisset, M.N.; Paulin, J.P.; Durel, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora, is one of the most destructive diseases of apple (Malus x domestica). In order to analyse the genetic determinism of resistance to fire blight in apple, a quantitative trait analysis (QTL) approach was used. A F1 progeny of 164 individ

  4. Automatic Case-Based Reasoning Approach for Landslide Detection: Integration of Object-Oriented Image Analysis and a Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Dou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an automatic method for detecting landslides by using an integrated approach comprising object-oriented image analysis (OOIA, a genetic algorithm (GA, and a case-based reasoning (CBR technique. It consists of three main phases: (1 image processing and multi-image segmentation; (2 feature optimization; and (3 detecting landslides. The proposed approach was employed in a fast-growing urban region, the Pearl River Delta in South China. The results of detection were validated with the help of field surveys. The experimental results indicated that the proposed OOIA-GA-CBR (0.87 demonstrates higher classification performance than the stand-alone OOIA (0.75 method for detecting landslides. The area under curve (AUC value was also higher than that of the simple OOIA, indicating the high efficiency of the proposed landslide detection approach. The case library created using the integrated model can be reused for time-independent analysis, thus rendering our approach superior in comparison to other traditional methods, such as the maximum likelihood classifier. The results of this study thus facilitate fast generation of accurate landslide inventory maps, which will eventually extend our understanding of the evolution of landscapes shaped by landslide processes.

  5. Genetic Diversity Analysis of South and East Asian Duck Populations Using Highly Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dongwon; Bhuiyan, Md Shamsul Alam; Sultana, Hasina; Heo, Jung Min; Lee, Jun Heon

    2016-04-01

    Native duck populations have lower productivity, and have not been developed as much as commercials duck breeds. However, native ducks have more importance in terms of genetic diversity and potentially valuable economic traits. For this reason, population discriminable genetic markers are needed for conservation and development of native ducks. In this study, 24 highly polymorphic microsatellite (MS) markers were investigated using commercial ducks and native East and South Asian ducks. The average polymorphic information content (PIC) value for all MS markers was 0.584, indicating high discrimination power. All populations were discriminated using 14 highly polymorphic MS markers by genetic distance and phylogenetic analysis. The results indicated that there were close genetic relationships among populations. In the structure analysis, East Asian ducks shared more haplotypes with commercial ducks than South Asian ducks, and they had more independent haplotypes than others did. These results will provide useful information for genetic diversity studies in ducks and for the development of duck traceability systems in the market.

  6. Genetic Diversity Analysis of South and East Asian Duck Populations Using Highly Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongwon Seo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Native duck populations have lower productivity, and have not been developed as much as commercials duck breeds. However, native ducks have more importance in terms of genetic diversity and potentially valuable economic traits. For this reason, population discriminable genetic markers are needed for conservation and development of native ducks. In this study, 24 highly polymorphic microsatellite (MS markers were investigated using commercial ducks and native East and South Asian ducks. The average polymorphic information content (PIC value for all MS markers was 0.584, indicating high discrimination power. All populations were discriminated using 14 highly polymorphic MS markers by genetic distance and phylogenetic analysis. The results indicated that there were close genetic relationships among populations. In the structure analysis, East Asian ducks shared more haplotypes with commercial ducks than South Asian ducks, and they had more independent haplotypes than others did. These results will provide useful information for genetic diversity studies in ducks and for the development of duck traceability systems in the market.

  7. [Analysis of genetic variations in different goose breeds using microsatellite markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Li, Peng; Song, Yi; Li, Shi-Ze; Wei, Chun-Bo; Yang, Huan-Min

    2006-11-01

    The genetic diversity of six goose breeds (White Goose, Zi Goose, Huoyan Goose, Wanxi Goose, Rhin, Landoise) was analyzed using microsatellite markers. Heterozygosity(H), polymorphism information content (PIC) and genetic distances were calculated for each breed based on the allele frequency. Results showed that 7 microsatellite sites were highly polymorphic, and could be used as effective markers for analysis of genetic relationship among different goose breeds. The mean heterozygosityies of were between 0.6617 (Rhin) and 0.8814 (Zi goose), among six goose breeds, the lowest was Rhin goose (0.6617) and the highest was Zi goose (0.8814). The range of mean PIC was between 0.6145 and 0.7814, which was in the similar range as the mean heterozygosities. Based on the UPGMA cluster analysis results, six goose breeds were grouped into classes, White, Zi, Huoyan and Wanxi Goose in one class, and the foreign breeds of Rhin and Landoise goose in another class. These results indicated that the dendrogram obtain from genetic distance could be used to correctly reflect the phylogenetic relationship among the six goose breeds, suggesting that microsatellite DNA marker is a useful tool to determine the genetic diversity in closely related breeds.

  8. Genetic and molecular analysis of wild-derived arrhythmic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Watanabe

    Full Text Available A new circadian variant was isolated by screening the intercross offspring of wild-caught mice (Mus musculus castaneus. This variant was characterized by an initial maintenance of damped oscillations and subsequent loss of rhythmicity after being transferred from light-dark (LD cycles to constant darkness (DD. To map the genes responsible for the persistence of rhythmicity (circadian ratio and the length of free-running period (tau, quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis was performed using F(2 mice obtained from an F(1 cross between the circadian variant and C57BL/6J mice. As a result, a significant QTL with a main effect for circadian ratio (Arrhythmicity; Arrh-1 was mapped on Chromosome (Chr 8. For tau, four significant QTLs, Short free-running period (Sfp-1 (Chr 1, Sfp-2 (Chr 6, Sfp-3 (Chr 8, Sfp-4 (Chr 11 were determined. An epistatic interaction was detected between Chr 3 (Arrh-2 and Chr 5 (Arrh-3. An in situ hybridization study of clock genes and mouse Period1::luciferase (mPer1::luc real-time monitoring analysis in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN suggested that arrhythmicity in this variant might not be attributed to core circadian mechanisms in the SCN neurons. Our strategy using wild-derived variant mice may provide a novel opportunity to evaluate circadian and its related disorders in human that arise from the interaction between multiple variant genes.

  9. Development of a Matlab/Simulink tool to facilitate system analysis and simulation via the adjoint and covariance methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucco, D.; Weiss, M.

    2007-01-01

    The COVariance and ADjoint Analysis Tool (COVAD) is a specially designed software tool, written for the Matlab/Simulink environment, which allows the user the capability to carry out system analysis and simulation using the adjoint, covariance or Monte Carlo methods. This paper describes phase one o

  10. Development of a Matlab/Simulink tool to facilitate system analysis and simulation via the adjoint and covariance methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucco, D.; Weiss, M.

    2007-01-01

    The COVariance and ADjoint Analysis Tool (COVAD) is a specially designed software tool, written for the Matlab/Simulink environment, which allows the user the capability to carry out system analysis and simulation using the adjoint, covariance or Monte Carlo methods. This paper describes phase one

  11. Barriers to and facilitators of long term weight loss maintenance in adult UK people: A thematic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult obesity and overweight is affecting every region of the world and is described as one of today′s most significant and neglected public health problems. The problem has taken the shape of an epidemic not only because the prevalence of obesity has witnessed a dramatic progress in a short period of time, but also because obesity has paved the way for increased risks for morbidity and mortality associated with it. It has been predicted that about half of the adult men and more than a quarter of adult women would be obese by 2030 in the UK and this figure could rise up to 50% in 2050 for whole of the adult UK population. Although a modest 5-10% weight loss maintained in the long term can significantly decrease health risk, few people engage in weight loss activities. Against this background, this review paper aims to investigate the reasons helping and/or hindering adults in the UK maintain weight loss in the long term; using online and organizational data sources and thematically analyzing the data. Self-body perception, enhanced self-confidence, social support, self-motivation, incentives and rewards, increased physical activity levels and healthy eating habits facilitated people in maintaining weight loss in the long term and overall quality of life. Extreme weather conditions, natural phenomena such as accidents, injuries and ill-health, work commitments, inability for time management and to resist the temptation for food constrained the successful long-term weight loss maintenance.

  12. Power spectral analysis of hypoglossal nerve activity during intermittent hypoxia-induced long-term facilitation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElMallah, Mai K; Stanley, David A; Lee, Kun-Ze; Turner, Sara M F; Streeter, Kristi A; Baekey, David M; Fuller, David D

    2016-03-01

    Power spectral analyses of electrical signals from respiratory nerves reveal prominent oscillations above the primary rate of breathing. Acute exposure to intermittent hypoxia can induce a form of neuroplasticity known as long-term facilitation (LTF), in which inspiratory burst amplitude is persistently elevated. Most evidence indicates that the mechanisms of LTF are postsynaptic and also that high-frequency oscillations within the power spectrum show coherence across different respiratory nerves. Since the most logical interpretation of this coherence is that a shared presynaptic mechanism is responsible, we hypothesized that high-frequency spectral content would be unchanged during LTF. Recordings of inspiratory hypoglossal (XII) activity were made from anesthetized, vagotomized, and ventilated 129/SVE mice. When arterial O2 saturation (SaO2) was maintained >96%, the XII power spectrum and burst amplitude were unchanged for 90 min. Three, 1-min hypoxic episodes (SaO2 = 50 ± 10%), however, caused a persistent (>60 min) and robust (>400% baseline) increase in burst amplitude. Spectral analyses revealed a rightward shift of the signal content during LTF, with sustained increases in content above ∼125 Hz following intermittent hypoxia and reductions in power at lower frequencies. Changes in the spectral content during LTF were qualitatively similar to what occurred during the acute hypoxic response. We conclude that high-frequency content increases during XII LTF in this experimental preparation; this may indicate that intermittent hypoxia-induced plasticity in the premotor network contributes to expression of XII LTF.

  13. Building and evaluating an informatics tool to facilitate analysis of a biomedical literature search service in an academic medical center library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Elizabeth G; Oelschlegel, Sandra; Vaughn, Cynthia J; Lindsay, J Michael; Hurst, Sachiko M; Earl, Martha

    2013-01-01

    This study utilizes an informatics tool to analyze a robust literature search service in an academic medical center library. Structured interviews with librarians were conducted focusing on the benefits of such a tool, expectations for performance, and visual layout preferences. The resulting application utilizes Microsoft SQL Server and .Net Framework 3.5 technologies, allowing for the use of a web interface. Customer tables and MeSH terms are included. The National Library of Medicine MeSH database and entry terms for each heading are incorporated, resulting in functionality similar to searching the MeSH database through PubMed. Data reports will facilitate analysis of the search service.

  14. A genetic analysis of Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis from Ecuador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meekums, Hayley; Hawash, Mohamed B F; Sparks, Alexandra M

    2015-01-01

    Trichuris worms were collected during a parasitological survey of 132 people and 46 pigs in Esmeraldas Province, Ecuador. Morphometric analysis of 49 pig worms and 64 human worms revealed significant variation. In discriminant analysis morphometric characteristics correctly classified male worms according...... to genetically analyse Trichuris parasites. Although T. trichiura does not appear to be zoonotic in Ecuador, there is evidence of genetic exchange between T. trichiura and T. suis warranting more detailed genetic sampling....

  15. Whakapapa, genealogy and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Donald

    2012-05-01

    This paper provides part of an analysis of the use of the Maori term whakapapa in a study designed to test the compatibility and commensurability of views of members of the indigenous culture of New Zealand with other views of genetic technologies extant in the country. It is concerned with the narrow sense of whakapapa as denoting biological ancestry, leaving the wider sense of whakapapa as denoting cultural identity for discussion elsewhere. The phenomenon of genetic curiosity is employed to facilitate this comparison. Four levels of curiosity are identified, in the Maori data, which penetrate more or less deeply into the psyche of individuals, affecting their health and wellbeing. These phenomena are compared with non-Maori experiences and considerable commonalities are discovered together with a point of marked difference. The results raise important questions for the ethical application of genetic technologies.

  16. Genetic identification of missing persons: DNA analysis of human remains and compromised samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Cubero, M J; Saiz, M; Martinez-Gonzalez, L J; Alvarez, J C; Eisenberg, A J; Budowle, B; Lorente, J A

    2012-01-01

    Human identification has made great strides over the past 2 decades due to the advent of DNA typing. Forensic DNA typing provides genetic data from a variety of materials and individuals, and is applied to many important issues that confront society. Part of the success of DNA typing is the generation of DNA databases to help identify missing persons and to develop investigative leads to assist law enforcement. DNA databases house DNA profiles from convicted felons (and in some jurisdictions arrestees), forensic evidence, human remains, and direct and family reference samples of missing persons. These databases are essential tools, which are becoming quite large (for example the US Database contains 10 million profiles). The scientific, governmental and private communities continue to work together to standardize genetic markers for more effective worldwide data sharing, to develop and validate robust DNA typing kits that contain the reagents necessary to type core identity genetic markers, to develop technologies that facilitate a number of analytical processes and to develop policies to make human identity testing more effective. Indeed, DNA typing is integral to resolving a number of serious criminal and civil concerns, such as solving missing person cases and identifying victims of mass disasters and children who may have been victims of human trafficking, and provides information for historical studies. As more refined capabilities are still required, novel approaches are being sought, such as genetic testing by next-generation sequencing, mass spectrometry, chip arrays and pyrosequencing. Single nucleotide polymorphisms offer the potential to analyze severely compromised biological samples, to determine the facial phenotype of decomposed human remains and to predict the bioancestry of individuals, a new focus in analyzing this type of markers.

  17. Usefulness of repeat coronary angiography 24 hours after balloon angioplasty to evaluate early lminal deterioration and facilitate quantitative analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.R. Heyndrickx (Guy); G-J. Laarman (GertJan); H. Suryapranata (Harry); F. Zijlstra (Felix); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); D.P. Foley (David); A.A. van den Bos (Arjan); J.W. Deckers (Jaap)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractBecause of the unavoidable occurrence of vessel disruption after successful coronary balloon angioplasty, the reliability of quantitative angiographic analysis in that setting has been questioned. For this reason and the suggested occurrence of delayed elastic recoil, repeat angiography

  18. YODA: Software to facilitate high-throughput analysis of chronological life span, growth rate, and survival in budding yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami Christopher J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most widely studied model organisms in aging-related science. Although several genetic modifiers of yeast longevity have been identified, the utility of this system for longevity studies has been limited by a lack of high-throughput assays for quantitatively measuring survival of individual yeast cells during aging. Results Here we describe the Yeast Outgrowth Data Analyzer (YODA, an automated system for analyzing population survival of yeast cells based on the kinetics of outgrowth measured by optical density over time. YODA has been designed specifically for quantification of yeast chronological life span, but can also be used to quantify growth rate and survival of yeast cells in response to a variety of different conditions, including temperature, nutritional composition of the growth media, and chemical treatments. YODA is optimized for use with a Bioscreen C MBR shaker/incubator/plate reader, but is also amenable to use with any standard plate reader or spectrophotometer. Conclusions We estimate that use of YODA as described here reduces the effort and resources required to measure chronological life span and analyze the resulting data by at least 15-fold.

  19. GPFrontend and GPGraphics: graphical analysis tools for genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebe, Steffen; Pasutto, Francesca; Krumbiegel, Mandy; Schanze, Denny; Ekici, Arif B; Reis, André

    2010-09-21

    Most software packages for whole genome association studies are non-graphical, purely text based programs originally designed to run with UNIX-like operating systems. Graphical output is often not intended or supposed to be performed with other command line tools, e.g. gnuplot. Using the Microsoft .NET 2.0 platform and Visual Studio 2005, we have created a graphical software package to analyze data from microarray whole genome association studies, both for a DNA-pooling based approach as well as regular single sample data. Part of this package was made to integrate with GenePool 0.8.2, a previously existing software suite for GNU/Linux systems, which we have modified to run in a Microsoft Windows environment. Further modifications cause it to generate some additional data. This enables GenePool to interact with the .NET parts created by us. The programs we developed are GPFrontend, a graphical user interface and frontend to use GenePool and create metadata files for it, and GPGraphics, a program to further analyze and graphically evaluate output of different WGA analysis programs, among them also GenePool. Our programs enable regular MS Windows users without much experience in bioinformatics to easily visualize whole genome data from a variety of sources.

  20. Lipidomic analysis of Arabidopsis seed genetically engineered to contain DHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Rong eZhou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic engineering of omega-3 long-chain (≥C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3 LC-PUFA in oilseeds has been one of the key metabolic engineering targets in recent years. By expressing a transgenic pathway for enhancing the synthesis of the ω3 LC-PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA from endogenous -linolenic acid (ALA, we obtained the production of fish oil-like proportions of DHA in Arabidopsis seed oil. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS was used to characterize the triacylglycerol (TAG, diacylglycerol (DAG and phospholipid (PL lipid classes in the transgenic and wild type Arabidopsis seeds at both developing and mature stages. The analysis identified the appearance of several abundant DHA-containing phosphatidylcholine (PC, DAG and TAG molecular species in mature seeds. The relative abundances of PL, DAG and TAG species showed a preferred combination of LC-PUFA with ALA in the transgenic seeds, where LC-PUFA were esterified in positions usually occupied by 20:1ω9. Trace amounts of di-DHA PC and tri-DHA TAG were identified, and confirmed by high resolution MS/MS. Studying the lipidome in transgenic seeds provides insights into where DHA accumulated and composed with other fatty acids of neutral and phospholipids from the developing and mature seeds.