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Sample records for facilitate community development

  1. Peer-support writing group in a community family medicine teaching unit: Facilitating professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Imari, Lina; Yang, Jaisy; Pimlott, Nicholas

    2016-12-01

    Aspiring physician writers need an environment that promotes self-reflection and can help them improve their skills and confidence in writing. To create a peer-support writing group for physicians in the Markham-Stouffville community in Ontario to promote professional development by encouraging self-reflection and fostering the concept of physician as writer. The program, designed based on a literature review and a needs assessment, was conducted in 3 sessions over 6 months. Participants included an emergency physician, 4 family physicians, and 3 residents. Four to 8 participants per session shared their projects with guest physician authors. Eight pieces of written work were brought to the sessions, 3 of which were edited. A mixed quantitative and qualitative evaluation model was used with preprogram and postprogram questionnaires and a focus group. This program promoted professional development by increasing participants' frequency of self-reflection and improving their proficiency in writing. Successful elements of this program include creating a supportive group environment and having a physician-writer expert facilitate the peer-feedback sessions. Similar programs can be useful in postgraduate education or continuing professional development. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  2. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that

  3. Empowering People, Facilitating Community Development, and Contributing to Sustainable Development: The Social Work of Sport, Exercise, and Physical Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Hal A.

    2005-01-01

    Do sport, exercise, and physical education (SEPE) professionals empower the people they serve and contribute to community development? Do SEPE policies, programs, and practices contribute to sustainable economic and social development, making them worthwhile governmental investments? These questions frame the ensuing analysis. Empowerment-oriented…

  4. Facilitation of Adult Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Taking an autobiographical approach, I tell the story of my experiences facilitating adult development, in a polytechnic and as a management consultant. I relate these to a developmental framework of Modes of Being and Learning that I created and elaborated with colleagues. I connect this picture with a number of related models, theories,…

  5. Using Comic Books and Graphic Novels to Improve and Facilitate Community College Students' Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Brian Patrick

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated how comic books and graphic novels enhanced the reading comprehension of the students enrolled in the intermediate reading course at Western Pennsylvania Community College. The three research questions are: (1) How can a developmental reading course make use of comics as a learning tool? (2) What impact does reading comics…

  6. Using Comic Books and Graphic Novels to Improve and Facilitate Community College Students' Literacy Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Brian Patrick

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated how comic books and graphic novels enhanced the reading comprehension of the students enrolled in the intermediate reading course at Western Pennsylvania Community College. The three research questions are: (1) How can a developmental reading course make use of comics as a learning tool? (2) What impact does reading comics…

  7. A Citizen Science and Government Collaboration: Developing Tools to Facilitate Community Air Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is actively involved in supporting citizen science projects and providing communities with information and assistance for conducting their own air pollution monitoring. As part of a Regional Applied Research Effort (RARE) project, EP...

  8. The impact of a faculty learning community on professional and personal development: the facilitator training program of the American Academy on Communication in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Calvin L; Hirschmann, Krista; Fortin, Auguste H; Lichstein, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Relationship-centered care attends to the entire network of human relationships essential to patient care. Few faculty development programs prepare faculty to teach principles and skills in relationship-centered care. One exception is the Facilitator Training Program (FTP), a 25-year-old training program of the American Academy on Communication in Healthcare. The authors surveyed FTP graduates to determine the efficacy of its curriculum and the most important elements for participants' learning. In 2007, surveys containing quantitative and narrative elements were distributed to 51 FTP graduates. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The authors analyzed narratives using Burke's dramatistic pentad as a qualitative framework to delineate how interrelated themes interacted in the FTP. Forty-seven respondents (92%) identified two essential acts that happened in the program: an iterative learning process, leading to heightened personal awareness and group facilitation skills; and longevity of learning and effect on career. The structure of the program's learning community provided the scene, and the agents were the participants, who provided support and contributed to mutual success. Methods of developing skills in personal awareness, group facilitation, teaching, and feedback constituted agency. The purpose was to learn skills and to join a community to share common values. The FTP is a learning community that provided faculty with skills in principles of relationship-centered care. Four further features that describe elements of this successful faculty-based learning community are achievement of self-identified goals, distance learning modalities, opportunities to safely discuss workplace issues outside the workplace, and self-renewing membership.

  9. Facilitating HIV testing, care and treatment for orphans and vulnerable children aged five years and younger through community-based early childhood development playcentres in rural Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Diana; Matyanga, Priscilla; Nyamundaya, Tichaona; Chimedza, Delia; Webb, Karen; Engelsmann, Barbara

    2012-07-11

    Early diagnosis of children living with HIV is a prerequisite for accessing timely paediatric HIV care and treatment services and for optimizing treatment outcomes. Testing of HIV-exposed infants at 6 weeks and later is part of the national prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV programme in Zimbabwe, but many opportunities to test infants and children are being missed. Early childhood development (ECD) playcentres can act as an entry point providing multiple health and social services for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) under 5 years, including facilitating access to HIV treatment and care. Sixteen rural community-based, community-run ECD playcentres were established to provide health, nutritional and psychosocial support for OVC aged 5 years and younger exposed to or living with HIV, coupled with family support groups (FSGs) for their families/caregivers. These centres were located in close proximity to health centres giving access to nurse-led monitoring of 697 OVC and their caregivers. Community mobilisers identified OVC within the community, supported their registration process and followed up defaulters. Records profiling each child's attendance, development and health status (including illness episodes), vaccinations and HIV status were compiled at the playcentres and regularly reviewed, updated and acted upon by nurse supervisors. Through FSGs, community cadres and a range of officers from local services established linkages and built the capacity of parents/caregivers and communities to provide protection, aid psychosocial development and facilitate referral for treatment and support. Available data as of September 2011 for 16 rural centres indicate that 58.8% (n=410) of the 697 children attending the centres were tested for HIV; 18% (n=74) tested positive and were initiated on antibiotic prophylaxis. All those deemed eligible for antiretroviral therapy were commenced on treatment and adherence was monitored. This community

  10. Bounded Community: Designing and facilitating learning communities in formal courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent G. Wilson

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Learning communities can emerge spontaneously when people find common learning goals and pursue projects and tasks together in pursuit of those goals. Bounded learning communities (BLCs are groups that form within a structured teaching or training setting, typically a course. Unlike spontaneous communities, BLCs develop in direct response to guidance provided by an instructor, supported by a cumulative resource base. This article presents strategies that help learning communities develop within bounded frameworks, particularly online environments. Seven distinguishing features of learning communities are presented. When developing supports for BLCs, teachers should consider their developmental arc, from initial acquaintance and trust-building, through project work and skill development, and concluding with wind-down and dissolution of the community. Teachers contribute to BLCs by establishing a sense of teaching presence, including an atmosphere of trust and reciprocal concern. The article concludes with a discussion of assessment issues and the need for continuing research.

  11. Pediatric obesity community programs: barriers & facilitators toward sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Po'e, Eli K; Gesell, Sabina B; Lynne Caples, T; Escarfuller, Juan; Barkin, Shari L

    2010-08-01

    Our current generation of young people could become the first generation to live shorter lives than their parents. Families need resources in their community to address this issue. Identifying barriers and facilitators of community organizations to offer obesity-related services is a first step in understanding sustainable community programs. The objective of this study is to identify common barriers and facilitators in community organizational programs designed to prevent or reduce pediatric obesity. We conducted an exploratory qualitative research study based on grounded theory. Thirty-six community organizations were identified based on self-descriptions of goals involving pediatric obesity. Semi-structured, systematic, face-to-face interviews among program directors (n = 24) were recorded, transcribed, and coded for recurrent themes. Relevant themes were abstracted from interviews by a standardized iterative process by two independent reviewers between December 2007 and November 2008. Theme discordance was reconciled by a third reviewer. Seventy percent of organizations indicated that obesity prevention/treatment was their explicit goal with remaining groups indicating healthy lifestyles as a more general goal. Facilitators to provision of these programs included: programmatic enhancements such as improved curriculums (73%), community involvement such as volunteers (62.5%), and partnerships with other programs (54.2%). Barriers that threatened sustainability included lack of consistent funding (43.8%), lack of consistent participation from the target population (41.7%) and lack of support staff (20.8%). New approaches in fostering partnerships between organizations need to be developed. Building coalitions and engaging community members in developing community based programs may be a helpful strategy to strengthen community-based programs to address the pediatric obesity epidemic.

  12. Territorial development and Community currencies : Symbolic meanings in Brazilian Community development banks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Fare (Marie); C. de Freitas (Carlos); C. Meyer (Camille)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBrazilian community development banks (CDBs) have established various coordinated financial mechanisms aiming to restructure poor and peripheral local economies. Their development strategy includes an instrument to facilitate access to microfinance and a community currency, combined with

  13. Territorial development and Community currencies : Symbolic meanings in Brazilian Community development banks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Fare (Marie); C. de Freitas (Carlos); C. Meyer (Camille)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBrazilian community development banks (CDBs) have established various coordinated financial mechanisms aiming to restructure poor and peripheral local economies. Their development strategy includes an instrument to facilitate access to microfinance and a community currency, combined with

  14. Designing and Facilitating a Virtual Homework Community for Third Grade Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory mixed methods research study was to understand how the establishment of an online Community of Practice approach supports the completion of homework for third grade students in an urban school. The study focused on issues of my facilitation and development of such an online community as well as the impacts on…

  15. Barriers and Facilitators to Community Mobility for Assistive Technology Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Layton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobility is frequently described in terms of individual body function and structures however contemporary views of disability also recognise the role of environment in creating disability. Aim. To identify consumer perspectives regarding barriers and facilitators to optimal mobility for a heterogeneous population of impaired Victorians who use assistive technology in their daily lives. Method. An accessible survey investigated the impact of supports or facilitators upon actual and desired life outcomes and health-related quality of life, from 100 AT users in Victoria, Australia. This paper reports upon data pertaining to community mobility. Results. A range of barriers and enablers to community mobility were identified including access to AT devices, environmental interventions, public transport, and inclusive community environs. Substantial levels of unmet need result in limited personal mobility and community participation. Outcomes fall short of many principles enshrined in current policy and human rights frameworks. Conclusion. AT devices as well as accessible and inclusive home and community environs are essential to maximizing mobility for many. Given the impact of the environment upon the capacity of individuals to realise community mobility, this raises the question as to whether rehabilitation practitioners, as well as prescribing AT devices, should work to build accessible communities via systemic advocacy.

  16. Facilitating community building in Learning Networks through peer tutoring in ad hoc transient communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, Liesbeth; Sloep, Peter; Van Rosmalen, Peter; Brouns, Francis; Koné, Malik; Koper, Rob

    2006-01-01

    De volledige referentie is: Kester, L., Sloep, P. B., Van Rosmalen, P., Brouns, F., Koné, M., & Koper, R. (2007). Facilitating Community Building in Learning Networks Through Peer-Tutoring in Ad Hoc Transient Communities. International Journal of Web based Communities, 3(2), 198-205.

  17. Reality based scenarios facilitate knowledge network development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, J; Broughton, V; McConnell, E A

    1995-03-01

    The challenge in nursing education is to create a learning environment that enables students to learn new knowledge, access previously acquired information from a variety of disciplines, and apply this newly constructed knowledge to the complex and constantly changing world of practice. Faculty at the University of South Australia, School of Nursing, City Campus describe the use of reality based scenarios to acquire domain-specific knowledge and develop well connected associative knowledge networks, both of which facilitate theory based practice and the student's transition to the role of registered nurse.

  18. Community Development in lreland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Carey

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Community Development is about enabling people to actively participate in shaping the society of which they area part. Primarily the program focussed mainly on disadvantaged communities. It has been recognized that the ability to participate fully in society is open more to some groups and individuals than others. Social exclusion has many different dimensions: Jack of money, isolation, powerlessness, poor access to basic public services such as health, education, legal aid, arts and culture ... In the first place community development is based on education, being closely related to the local development concept. It recognizes and meets educational needs of the members of certain community. Such programmes result especially in a community's political development, development of its capacities, potentials and creativity, enhancement of the structures, important for the long-term functioning of the community.

  19. The Evolution of a Teacher Community of Practice: Identifying Facilitating and Constraining Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Tracey

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a larger, qualitative study that explored the potential of a school-based teacher community of practice as a model for a transformative form of teacher professional development. This paper reports on initial findings from a grounded theory exploration of the factors that facilitated and constrained the evolution…

  20. The Art and Science of Leadership in Learning Environments: Facilitating a Professional Learning Community across Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hands, Catherine; Guzar, Katlyn; Rodrigue, Anne

    2015-01-01

    A professional learning community (PLC) is one of the most promising strategies for effecting change in educational practices to improve academic achievement and wellbeing for all students. The PLC facilitator's role in developing and leading blended (online and face-to-face) PLCs with members from Ontario's school districts was examined through a…

  1. The Evolution of a Teacher Community of Practice: Identifying Facilitating and Constraining Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Tracey

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a larger, qualitative study that explored the potential of a school-based teacher community of practice as a model for a transformative form of teacher professional development. This paper reports on initial findings from a grounded theory exploration of the factors that facilitated and constrained the evolution…

  2. The legal duty of local government to facilitate development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo Scheepers

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Local government in South Africa is not only facing challenges normally associated with a process of development or transformation, but needs to adjust its focus according to the new development paradigm unfolding in South Africa. Developmental local government has to accomplish this task according to the mandate issued in the Constitution and within a specific legal-institutional and value framework The legal-institutional framework is based on a set of development law principles contained in new generation legislation. The value framework consists of community values as well as constitutional values reflecting individual and community values, norms and principles. This framework imposes a legal and moral duty as well as corresponding obligations on municipalities to plan and implement future socio-economic development of the areas for which they are responsible according to a new set of development principles and values. These principles make it incumbent upon municipalities to manage development through a people-centred and community-driven process. This article briefly deals with the nature and content of the duties and responsibilities of municipalities emanating from a new development paradigm when facilitating the development process within their areas of jurisdiction.

  3. Community facilitation of problem structuring and decision making processes: Experiences from the EU LEADER+ programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2009-01-01

    making processes related to the agreement on action plans. Learning to design, plan, manage and facilitate conferences and workshops have also being another central activity. The main purpose of these conferences and workshops was not only problem structuring and decision making in connection...... contribute to long-term and sustainable development in these regions. The main tasks have been the organisation and facilitation of conferences and workshops to structure the problematic situation of identifying and designing innovative projects for the development of the community and to support decision...

  4. "Stepping Up": A Focus on Facilitator Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostouros, Patricia; Warthe, D. Gaye; Carter-Snell, Catherine; Burnett, Che

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the impact on peer facilitators in "Stepping Up," a dating violence prevention program at a Canadian university. A focus group held eight months following the delivery of the program determined the personal impact of involvement in the program. Results indicate that peer facilitators experienced personal growth as…

  5. Delegation of Authority Under the Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) - Decision Memorandum

    Science.gov (United States)

    This memorandum concerns how the Office of Enforcement (OE) proposed that two new authorities under the Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) be delegated to the Regional Administrators.

  6. Influence of Leadership Styles on Community Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    Key words: Leadership styles, laissez faire, community development, communication ... towards the effectiveness and success of the organisations of which they are ... minimal or no innovation, and virtually no personal or corporate improvement in the ... emphasis on teamwork, while functioning as a facilitator to develop a.

  7. Cultivating a Doctoral Community of Inquiry and Practice: Designing and Facilitating Discussion Board Online Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Linda; Darrow, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a promising and powerful approach used to cultivate a doctoral community of inquiry and practice and harness the intelligence, commitment, and energy of all of its members in a blended learning environment. The discussion board online learning community approach was developed to transform a traditional face-to-face doctoral…

  8. The role of community conversations in facilitating local HIV competence: case study from rural Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Catherine; Nhamo, Mercy; Scott, Kerry; Madanhire, Claudius; Nyamukapa, Constance; Skovdal, Morten; Gregson, Simon

    2013-04-17

    This paper examines the potential for community conversations to strengthen positive responses to HIV in resource-poor environments. Community conversations are an intervention method through which local people work with a facilitator to collectively identify local strengths and challenges and brainstorm potential strategies for solving local problems. We conducted 18 community conversations (with six groups at three points in time) with a total of 77 participants in rural Zimbabwe (20% HIV positive). Participants were invited to reflect on how they were responding to the challenges of HIV, both as individuals and in community groups, and to think of ways to better support openness about HIV, kindness towards people living with HIV and greater community uptake of HIV prevention and treatment. Community conversations contributed to local HIV competence through (1) enabling participants to brainstorm concrete action plans for responding to HIV, (2) providing a forum to develop a sense of common purpose in relation to implementing these, (3) encouraging and challenging participants to overcome fear, denial and passivity, (4) providing an opportunity for participants to move from seeing themselves as passive recipients of information to active problem solvers, and (5) reducing silence and stigma surrounding HIV. Our discussion cautions that community conversations, while holding great potential to help communities recognize their potential strengths and capacities for responding more effectively to HIV, are not a magic bullet. Poverty, poor harvests and political instability frustrated and limited many participants' efforts to put their plans into action. On the other hand, support from outside the community, in this case the increasing availability of antiretroviral treatment, played a vital role in enabling communities to challenge stigma and envision new, more positive, ways of responding to the epidemic.

  9. Importance of effective collaboration between health professionals for the facilitation of optimal community diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville-Smith, Jo; Kendall, Garth E

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes places a significant burden on the individuals concerned, their families and society as a whole. The debilitating sequelae of diabetes can be limited or prevented altogether through strict glycaemic control. Despite the seemingly uncomplicated nature of the disorder, effective management can be elusive, as the impact of having to deal with diabetes on a daily basis can be profound and appropriate professional support is not always readily available. As the roles of general practitioners (GPs) and allied health professionals have evolved, a major issue now facing all is that of developing and maintaining effective collaborative relationships for the facilitation of optimal community diabetes care. Using a simple survey methodology, the present exploratory study investigated the referral patterns of GPs to diabetic educators (DEs) working for a community health service in an Australian town, and reasons for referral and non-referral in order to identify factors that contribute to a sound and sustainable collaborative relationship. The results provide some evidence that GPs and DEs in this town do work collaboratively towards achieving client-centred goals and highlight the need to inform GPs who are new to communities, such as this one, of the available DE services. Most importantly, the study identified that there are many opportunities to strengthen collaboration so as to facilitate optimal community diabetes care. This information is valuable, because there is limited empirical evidence either nationally or internationally about the process of collaboration between health professionals in the management of chronic diseases, such as diabetes.

  10. An Interagency Collaboration to Facilitate Development of Filovirus Medical Countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin O. Nuzum

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Filovirus Animal Non-Clinical Group (FANG is a US interdepartmental and interagency group established to support and facilitate the advanced development of filovirus Medical Countermeasures (MCM, both vaccines and therapeutics. It is co-led by one representative from the Department of Defense (DoD, the first author, and one from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS, the second author. The FANG membership includes operational level program staff and Subject Matter Experts (SME from performing organizations as well as scientific staff and program managers from DoD and HHS funding and regulatory agencies. Focus areas include animal models, assays, reagents, product manufacture and characterization, and other interagency product development issues that will support Food and Drug Administration (FDA licensure of safe and effective filovirus MCMs. The FANG continues to develop strategies to address broadly applicable and interagency product development challenges relevant to filovirus MCM development. This paper summarizes FANG structure and accomplishments and is meant to heighten community awareness of this government-led collaborative effort.

  11. Facilitation as a management discipline to support organizational development processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Laura; Goduscheit, René Chester

    2015-01-01

    Private and public organisations conduct an ever increasing number of Development workshops, and the focus on effective meetings and structured development processes is significant. On the basis of a literature review, this article elucidates the concept of facilitation and demonstrates how...... for facilitation and ensuring backing for the work required. Preparation of the processes is a main focus of the literature in the field, and several studies stress the advantages of using a model to structure the preparation and execution of the process. Facilitation per se and serving as a facilitator both...

  12. Facilitation as a management discipline to support organizational development processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Laura; Goduscheit, René Chester

    2015-01-01

    Private and public organisations conduct an ever increasing number of Development workshops, and the focus on effective meetings and structured development processes is significant. On the basis of a literature review, this article elucidates the concept of facilitation and demonstrates how...... for facilitation and ensuring backing for the work required. Preparation of the processes is a main focus of the literature in the field, and several studies stress the advantages of using a model to structure the preparation and execution of the process. Facilitation per se and serving as a facilitator both...

  13. A Cultural-Historical Model to Understand and Facilitate Children's Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pui Ling

    2015-01-01

    Parents and educators strive to help their children to develop optimally. Given the diversity of values and practices among dynamic modern populations it is important to understand all the dimensions that affect the development of children in their communities. A cultural-historical lens facilitates such a holistic understanding. Taking this lens,…

  14. Facilitating organizational mergers: amalgamation of community care access centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    The development of 14 Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs) in Ontario necessitated the re-organization of Community Care Access Centres (CCACs). The achievement of LHIN objectives was contingent upon the organizations responsible for home and long-term care placement being aligned within the LHIN geographic boundaries. This re-alignment required 42 provincial organizations to re-structure, integrate and reduce to 14. This project was focused on the amalgamation of two CCACs in the Waterloo Wellington LHIN. Both were distinctly different due to their organizational evolution, the composition of the region and leadership approach. The different organizational cultures, if not managed properly, could result in a derailing of several current projects that were underway and were also key to the overall health system transformation agenda. A literature search provided a plethora of critiques of organizational change approaches and practical suggestions. Of particular relevance was a report to the Royal Commission on Health Care in 2002 that authenticates the dismal success in health care to meet change objectives. The project included a joint planning day for the leadership teams of the two organizations followed by an Organizational Readiness Assessment conducted by the Canadian Council on Health Services Accreditation (CCHSA). Both activities brought the leadership and staff of Waterloo and Wellington together, started the integration process and solicited staff participation. A follow-up survey of the leadership teams revealed the effectiveness of the project in advancing integration between the two organizations and recognizing organizational cultural differences. The CCHSA Organizational Readiness Assessment process was viewed as an effective means for advancing the integration of the two organizations, particularly as it relates to allowing the staff groups to define for themselves the benefits of the merger. The lack of hard evidence on the benefits of a

  15. Facilitating Student Engagement: Social Responsibility and Freshmen Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Lindsey N.; MacCartney, Danielle; Miller, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Human rights education is advanced as a method for promoting social responsibility, with an emphasis on promoting ideals of "global citizenship" among undergraduate students. At the same time, the practice of learning communities is widespread on college campuses for retaining freshmen and promoting student success. However, there is…

  16. Community-Based Solid Waste Management: A Training Facilitator's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    Urban environmental management and environmental health issues are of increasing concern worldwide. The need for urban environmental management work at the local level where the Peace Corps works most effectively is significant, but training materials dedicated specifically to community-based solid waste management work in urban areas are lacking.…

  17. Adult Education and Community Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Krajnc

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Community education means a new way of connecting knowledge with what people create. It increases the applicability of knowledge and con­ nects education with the direct needs of people. There are quite few things one can do by him/her­ self. Mainly one is dependent on the things he/she can create together with others. In non-democratic societies people get used to being given solutions from above, which is why they can wait for some­ one else (especially institutions to solve their problems while they remain passive. Socio-economic and political changes require from the people in Slovenia to redefine their attitude to the environment and life in general and to assume an active role. Community education means learning in groups of interested people in order to reach a certain goal or find a solution to a certain problem, e. g. establishing a local museum, publishing a tourist guide, constructing a bypass to decrease the traffic in town, erecting a monument, protecting green areas, introducing new forms of child care, solving problems of the disabled, unemployment and income maintenance, etc. People leam in order to be able to work. There are two goals which are always present: product and knowledge. People leam parallelly with the phases of work in order to achieve certain goal. It is typical of community education that it was developed in order to meet the needs of local people explicitly. It is therefore of great importance for adult educators facilitating problem-solving based on knowledge to get to know the real needs of people first. Generallack of knowledge is manifested in functional illiteracy. As long as people are unable to communicate orally or by writing with the others, their activities are blocked and they cannot help themselves. They can only live a dependent life, based on help expected from others, which nowadays is not possible any more. Each individual has to be responsible for his/her own survival. In the present

  18. Unpacking the Roles of the Facilitator in Higher Education Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalef, Leonor; Pareja Roblin, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Facilitators are central for the success of professional learning communities (PLCs). Yet, their specific roles in supporting teacher learning remain still largely underexplored. To address this gap, the current multiple case study examines the roles of 4 university PLC facilitators, the strategies they used to support teacher learning, and the…

  19. Unpacking the Roles of the Facilitator in Higher Education Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalef, Leonor; Pareja Roblin, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Facilitators are central for the success of professional learning communities (PLCs). Yet, their specific roles in supporting teacher learning remain still largely underexplored. To address this gap, the current multiple case study examines the roles of 4 university PLC facilitators, the strategies they used to support teacher learning, and the…

  20. Coexistence facilitates interspecific biofilm formation in complex microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Røder, Henriette Lyng; Russel, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    , the underlying role of fundamental ecological factors, specifically coexistence and phylogenetic history, in biofilm formation remains unclear. This study examines how social interactions affect biofilm formation in multi-species co-cultures from five diverse environments. We found prevalence of increased......Social interactions in which bacteria respond to one another by modifying their phenotype are central determinants of microbial communities. It is known that interspecific interactions influence the biofilm phenotype of bacteria; a phenotype that is central to the fitness of bacteria. However...

  1. Systems design and engineering : facilitating multidisciplinary development projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnema, Gerrit Maarten; Veenvliet, Karel; Broenink, Johannes F.

    2016-01-01

    As its name implies, the aim of Systems Design and Engineering: Facilitating Multidisciplinary Development Projects is to help systems engineers develop the skills and thought processes needed to successfully develop and implement engineered systems. Such expertise typically does not come through

  2. The Facilitator's Role in Elementary Mathematics Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Sandra M.

    2011-01-01

    This study identified qualities of influential facilitators of elementary mathematics professional development. Extensive research relating to elementary mathematics professional development has emerged over the past three decades. Embedded in this body of research are recommendations for effective practices in professional development and…

  3. Primary care physicians' perspectives on facilitating older patients' access to community support services: Qualitative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeg, Jenny; Denton, Margaret; Hutchison, Brian; McAiney, Carrie; Moore, Ainsley; Brazil, Kevin; Tindale, Joseph; Lam, Annie

    2017-01-01

    To understand how family physicians facilitate older patients' access to community support services (CSSs) and to identify similarities and differences across primary health care (PHC) models. Qualitative, multiple-case study design using semistructured interviews. Four models of PHC delivery, specifically 2 family health teams (FHTs), 4 non-FHTs family health organizations, 4 fee-for-service practices, and 2 community health centres in urban Ontario. Purposeful sampling of 23 family physicians in solo and small and large group practices within the 4 models of PHC. A multiple-case study approach was used. Semistructured interviews were conducted and data were analyzed using within- and cross-case analysis. Case study tactics to ensure study rigour included memos and an audit trail, investigator triangulation, and the use of multiple, rather than single, case studies. Three main themes were identified: consulting and communicating with the health care team to create linkages; linking patients and families to CSSs; and relying on out-of-date resources and ineffective search strategies for information on CSSs. All participants worked with their team members; however, those in FHTs and community health centres generally had a broader range of health care providers available to assist them. Physicians relied on home-care case managers to help make linkages to CSSs. Physicians recommended the development of an easily searchable, online database containing available CSSs. This study shows the importance of interprofessional teamwork in primary care settings to facilitate linkages of older patients to CSSs. The study also provides insight into the strategies physicians use to link older persons to CSSs and their recommendations for change. This understanding can be used to develop resources and approaches to better support physicians in making appropriate linkages to CSSs. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  4. Primary care physicians’ perspectives on facilitating older patients’ access to community support services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeg, Jenny; Denton, Margaret; Hutchison, Brian; McAiney, Carrie; Moore, Ainsley; Brazil, Kevin; Tindale, Joseph; Lam, Annie

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To understand how family physicians facilitate older patients’ access to community support services (CSSs) and to identify similarities and differences across primary health care (PHC) models. Design Qualitative, multiple-case study design using semistructured interviews. Setting Four models of PHC delivery, specifically 2 family health teams (FHTs), 4 non-FHTs family health organizations, 4 fee-for-service practices, and 2 community health centres in urban Ontario. Participants Purposeful sampling of 23 family physicians in solo and small and large group practices within the 4 models of PHC. Methods A multiple-case study approach was used. Semistructured interviews were conducted and data were analyzed using within- and cross-case analysis. Case study tactics to ensure study rigour included memos and an audit trail, investigator triangulation, and the use of multiple, rather than single, case studies. Main findings Three main themes were identified: consulting and communicating with the health care team to create linkages; linking patients and families to CSSs; and relying on out-of-date resources and ineffective search strategies for information on CSSs. All participants worked with their team members; however, those in FHTs and community health centres generally had a broader range of health care providers available to assist them. Physicians relied on home-care case managers to help make linkages to CSSs. Physicians recommended the development of an easily searchable, online database containing available CSSs. Conclusion This study shows the importance of interprofessional teamwork in primary care settings to facilitate linkages of older patients to CSSs. The study also provides insight into the strategies physicians use to link older persons to CSSs and their recommendations for change. This understanding can be used to develop resources and approaches to better support physicians in making appropriate linkages to CSSs. PMID:28115458

  5. Clinical skill development for community pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnette, D J; Murphy, C M; Carter, B L

    1996-09-01

    The importance of establishing clinical pharmacy services in the community cannot be understated in light of current challenges to the traditional dispensing role as the primary service of the community pharmacist. Advancements in automated dispensing technology and declining prescription fee reimbursement are rapidly forcing pharmacists to seek alternative sources of revenue. Providing pharmaceutical care is a viable option to increase customer loyalty job satisfaction, and reimbursement. To support the development of clinical services, academic institutions are forming partnerships with individual community practitioners to overcome perceived educational and training barriers. The authors describe the design and development of two unique clinical skill development programs at the University of Illinois at Chicago. This paper also outlines the patient focused services that the participants have established upon completing the training. These programs successfully enhanced participants' therapeutic knowledge base and facilitated development of the clinical skills necessary for direct patient care.

  6. A survey of community gardens in upstate New York: implications for health promotion and community development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, D

    2000-12-01

    Twenty community garden programs in upstate New York (representing 63 gardens) were surveyed to identify characteristics that may be useful to facilitate neighborhood development and health promotion. The most commonly expressed reasons for participating in gardens were access to fresh foods, to enjoy nature, and health benefits. Gardens in low-income neighborhoods (46%) were four times as likely as non low-income gardens to lead to other issues in the neighborhood being addressed; reportedly due to organizing facilitated through the community gardens. Additional research on community gardening can improve our understanding of the interaction of social and physical environments and community health, and effective strategies for empowerment, development, and health promotion.

  7. Academic Professional Development Strategies to Facilitate Educational Changes in Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Alonso, Gloria Amparo

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative within-case study explored how planned educational change in universities can be facilitated through academic professional development strategies. Thus this study attempted to shed some light on the dynamics of educational planned change in universities and their implications for academic professional development of faculty. The…

  8. Neophyte facilitator experiences of interprofessional education: implications for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan-Lee, Eileen; Baker, Lindsay; Tobin, Stasey; Hollenberg, Elisa; Dematteo, Dale; Reeves, Scott

    2011-09-01

    The facilitation of learners from different professional groups requires a range of interprofessional knowledge and skills (e.g. an understanding of possible sources of tension between professions) in addition to those that are more generic, such as how to manage a small group of learners. The development and delivery of interprofessional education (IPE) programs tends to rely on a small cohort of facilitators who have typically gained expertise through 'hands-on' involvement in facilitating IPE and through mentorship from more experienced colleagues. To avoid burn-out and to meet a growing demand for IPE, a larger number of facilitators are needed. However, empirical evidence regarding effective approaches to prepare for this type of work is limited. This article draws on data from a multiple case study of four IPE programs based in an urban setting in North America with a sample of neophyte facilitators and provides insight into their perceptions and experiences in preparing for and delivering IPE. Forty-one semi-structured interviews were conducted before (n = 20) and after (n = 21) program delivery with 21 facilitators. Findings indicated that despite participating in a three-fold faculty development strategy designed to support them in their IPE facilitation work, many felt unprepared and continued to have a poor conceptual understanding of core IPE and interprofessional collaboration principles, resulting in problematic implications (e.g. 'missed teachable moments') within their IPE programs. Findings from this study are discussed in relation to the IPE, faculty development and wider educational literature before implications are offered for the future delivery of interprofessional faculty development activities.

  9. Clinical facilitator learning and development needs: exploring the why, what and how.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Christine E; Ford, Karen

    2013-09-01

    This study explores the practice experiences of clinical facilitators providing a voice for nurses undertaking the role, a group who up until now has been silent. Seven clinical facilitators from acute care areas within Tasmania participated in the interpretive and participatory study. Three core aspects of clinical facilitation identified were the why, what and how of facilitation. The study identified why nurses became clinical facilitators, what their experiences involved - both positive and negative; and enabled exploration as to how the role could be better supported in the future, through addressing ongoing professional development learning needs. Results of this study have provided in depth insight into the world of the clinical facilitator. The importance of key strategies to implement ongoing professional development through mentorship, provision of feedback and the development of communities of practice are seen as imperative to ensure the role of clinical facilitator reaches its full potential to bridge the gap between theory and practice experienced by undergraduates during clinical placements. Such strategies will help ensure quality clinical placements for undergraduate nursing students.

  10. Creativity development in community contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the development of creativity in the context of folk art within an urban and rural community in Romania. It adopts a cultural psychological perspective on development, linking it to children's participation in community activities, as well as creativity, considered in relation...... of developmental tendencies and socialisation practices, as well as their implications for how we understand and foster children's creative expression....

  11. Primary Health Care Providers' Perspectives: Facilitating Older Patients' Access to Community Support Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploeg, Jenny; Denton, Margaret; Hutchison, Brian; McAiney, Carrie; Moore, Ainsley; Brazil, Kevin; Tindale, Joseph; Wu, Amina; Lam, Annie

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the study examined in this article was to understand how non-physician health care professionals working in Canadian primary health care settings facilitate older persons' access to community support services (CSSs). The use of CSSs has positive impacts for clients, yet they are underused from lack of awareness. Using a qualitative description approach, we interviewed 20 health care professionals from various disciplines and primary health care models about the processes they use to link older patients to CSSs. Participants collaborated extensively with interprofessional colleagues within and outside their organizations to find relevant CSSs. They actively engaged patients and families in making these linkages and ensured follow-up. It was troubling to find that they relied on out-of-date resources and inefficient search strategies to find CSSs. Our findings can be used to develop resources and approaches to better support primary health care providers in linking older adults to relevant CSSs.

  12. Developing Critical Reflection in Professional Focused Doctorates: A Facilitator's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambrook, Sally; Stewart, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the challenges and opportunities for expediting critical reflection in management education and development to highlight particularly how critical reflection has been facilitated within the context of a professionally focused doctoral programme. Design/methodology/approach: The paper draws on empirical research…

  13. The Global Career Development Facilitator Credential: An International Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbish, Dale; Neault, Roberta A.; Pickerell, Deirdre

    2009-01-01

    The Global Career Development Facilitator (GCDF) credential was established to provide professional training and standards for individuals working in the career field. GCDF programs are now available in the United States and 10 other countries. The authors highlight the first international GCDF program in New Zealand, new online GCDF training in…

  14. Transcription and the IELTS Speaking Test: Facilitating Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stones, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a transcription task cycle that was designed to facilitate the development of skills for the IELTS (International English Language Testing System) speaking test at a language school in Japan. The cycle involved practice test, transcription, student correction, teacher correction, and retrial of the original test and…

  15. Exploiting the Use of Social Networking to Facilitate Collaboration in the Scientific Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppock, Edrick G. [Information International Associates, Inc.

    2014-04-07

    The goal of this project was to exploit social networking to facilitate scientific collaboration. The project objective was to research and identify scientific collaboration styles that are best served by social networking applications and to model the most effective social networking applications to substantiate how social networking can support scientific collaboration. To achieve this goal and objective, the project was to develop an understanding of the types of collaborations conducted by scientific researchers, through classification, data analysis and identification of unique collaboration requirements. Another technical objective in support of this goal was to understand the current state of technology in collaboration tools. In order to test hypotheses about which social networking applications effectively support scientific collaboration the project was to create a prototype scientific collaboration system. The ultimate goal for testing the hypotheses and research of the project was to refine the prototype into a functional application that could effectively facilitate and grow collaboration within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research community.

  16. Large-scale facilitation of a sessile community by an invasive habitat-forming snail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrring, Jakob; Thomsen, Mads Solgaard; Wernberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We provide an example of extensive facilitation of a sessile community throughout an invaded estuary by the invasive snail Batillaria australis. We show that B. australis greatly increases a limiting resource (attachment space) to a community of sessile organisms and estimate that a large......, as a functional group, has benefitted significantly from this invasion. These results expand the current understanding of how invaded marine systems respond to habitat-forming invaders....

  17. Sustainable Development: The Challenge for Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Dorothy N.; Weil, Marie O.

    1997-01-01

    Five areas of inquiry shape the sustainable development movement: environmental movement, women's movement, overpopulation concerns, critique of development models, and new indicators of social progress. Community development workers are challenged to prepare local development projects within a sustainable development framework. (SK)

  18. Sustainable Development: The Challenge for Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Dorothy N.; Weil, Marie O.

    1997-01-01

    Five areas of inquiry shape the sustainable development movement: environmental movement, women's movement, overpopulation concerns, critique of development models, and new indicators of social progress. Community development workers are challenged to prepare local development projects within a sustainable development framework. (SK)

  19. Integrating Methods for Developing Sustainability Indicators to Facilitate Learning and Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Dougill

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Bossel's (2001 systems-based approach for deriving comprehensive indicator sets provides one of the most holistic frameworks for developing sustainability indicators. It ensures that indicators cover all important aspects of system viability, performance, and sustainability, and recognizes that a system cannot be assessed in isolation from the systems upon which it depends and which in turn depend upon it. In this reply, we show how Bossel's approach is part of a wider convergence toward integrating participatory and reductionist approaches to measure progress toward sustainable development. However, we also show that further integration of these approaches may be able to improve the accuracy and reliability of indicators to better stimulate community learning and action. Only through active community involvement can indicators facilitate progress toward sustainable development goals. To engage communities effectively in the application of indicators, these communities must be actively involved in developing, and even in proposing, indicators. The accuracy, reliability, and sensitivity of the indicators derived from local communities can be ensured through an iterative process of empirical and community evaluation. Communities are unlikely to invest in measuring sustainability indicators unless monitoring provides immediate and clear benefits. However, in the context of goals, targets, and/or baselines, sustainability indicators can more effectively contribute to a process of development that matches local priorities and engages the interests of local people.

  20. Faculty development for community practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, T G

    1996-12-01

    Developing the academic skills of the individuals who will serve as educators and role models in the community is critical to pediatric resident education in community settings. The main focus of any faculty development program must be on teaching, although for a subset of individuals, the development of research skills should also be a consideration. The three key elements that must be considered for an effective faculty development program include: (1) creating a culture of mutual respect between full-time and community faculty; (2) basing the program on sound principles of education theory, especially adult learning theory, using appropriately trained faculty; and (3) establishing ongoing institutional financial and philosophical support. Effectively addressing these elements should create a faculty development program that will help the community practitioner become an effective role model and practitioner- preceptor-educator.

  1. Developing Accessible Cyberinfrastructure-Enabled Knowledge Communities in the National Disability Community: Theory, Practice, and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhill, William N.; Cogburn, Derrick L.; Samant, Deepti

    2008-01-01

    Since publication of the Atkins Commission report 2003, the national scientific community has placed significant emphasis on developing cyberinfrastructure-enabled knowledge communities, which are designed to facilitate enhanced efficiency and collaboration in geographically distributed networks of researchers. This article suggests that the new…

  2. Spatial structure facilitates cooperation in a social dilemma: empirical evidence from a bacterial community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix J H Hol

    Full Text Available Cooperative organisms are ubiquitous in nature, despite their vulnerability to exploitation by cheaters. Although numerous theoretical studies suggest that spatial structure is critical for cooperation to persist, the spatial ecology of microbial cooperation remains largely unexplored experimentally. By tracking the community dynamics of cooperating (rpoS wild-type and cheating (rpoS mutant Escherichia coli in well-mixed flasks and microfabricated habitats, we demonstrate that spatial structure stabilizes coexistence between wild-type and mutant and thus facilitates cooperator maintenance. We develop a method to interpret our experimental results in the context of game theory, and show that the game wild-type and mutant bacteria play in an unstructured environment changes markedly over time, and eventually obeys a prisoner's dilemma leading to cheater dominance. In contrast, when wild-type and mutant E. coli co-inhabit a spatially-structured habitat, cooperators and cheaters coexist at intermediate frequencies. Our findings show that even in microhabitats lacking patchiness or spatial heterogeneities in resource availability, surface growth allows cells to form multi-cellular aggregates, yielding a self-structured community in which cooperators persist.

  3. Spatial structure facilitates cooperation in a social dilemma: empirical evidence from a bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol, Felix J H; Galajda, Peter; Nagy, Krisztina; Woolthuis, Rutger G; Dekker, Cees; Keymer, Juan E

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative organisms are ubiquitous in nature, despite their vulnerability to exploitation by cheaters. Although numerous theoretical studies suggest that spatial structure is critical for cooperation to persist, the spatial ecology of microbial cooperation remains largely unexplored experimentally. By tracking the community dynamics of cooperating (rpoS wild-type) and cheating (rpoS mutant) Escherichia coli in well-mixed flasks and microfabricated habitats, we demonstrate that spatial structure stabilizes coexistence between wild-type and mutant and thus facilitates cooperator maintenance. We develop a method to interpret our experimental results in the context of game theory, and show that the game wild-type and mutant bacteria play in an unstructured environment changes markedly over time, and eventually obeys a prisoner's dilemma leading to cheater dominance. In contrast, when wild-type and mutant E. coli co-inhabit a spatially-structured habitat, cooperators and cheaters coexist at intermediate frequencies. Our findings show that even in microhabitats lacking patchiness or spatial heterogeneities in resource availability, surface growth allows cells to form multi-cellular aggregates, yielding a self-structured community in which cooperators persist.

  4. Achieving Continuity of Care: Facilitators and Barriers in Community Mental Health Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Ian Rees

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of mental health and social services for people diagnosed with severe mental illness (SMI has been a key aspect of attempts to reform mental health services in the UK and aims to minimise user and carer distress and confusion arising from service discontinuities. Community mental health teams (CMHTs are a key component of UK policy for integrated service delivery, but implementing this policy has raised considerable organisational challenges. The aim of this study was to identify and explore facilitators and barriers perceived to influence continuity of care by health and social care professionals working in and closely associated with CMHTs. Methods This study employed a survey design utilising in-depth, semi-structured interviews with a proportionate, random sample of 113 health and social care professionals and representatives of voluntary organisations. Participants worked in two NHS Mental Health Trusts in greater London within eight adult CMHTs and their associated acute in-patient wards, six local general practices, and two voluntary organisations. Results Team leadership, decision making, and experiences of teamwork support were facilitators for cross boundary and team continuity; face-to-face communication between teams, managers, general practitioners, and the voluntary sector were facilitators for information continuity. Relational, personal, and longitudinal continuity were facilitated in some local areas by workforce stability. Barriers for cross boundary and team continuity were specific leadership styles and models of decision making, blurred professional role boundaries, generic working, and lack of training for role development. Barriers for relational, personal, and longitudinal continuity were created by inadequate staffing levels, high caseloads, and administrative duties that could limit time spent with users. Incompatibility of information technology systems hindered information

  5. The Ignorant Facilitator: Education, Politics and Theatre in Co-Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Aladgem, Shulamith

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the book "The Ignorant Schoolmaster: Five Lessons in Intellectual Emancipation" by the French philosopher, Jacques Rancière. Its intention is to study the potential contribution of this text to the discourse of applied theatre (theatre in co-communities) in general, and the role of the facilitator in particular. It…

  6. Effective Developmental Math Instructional Practices That Facilitate Learning and Academic Success of Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Pamela Hilson

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the qualitative study was to discover instructional practices used by developmental math instructors that facilitate learning and academic success of students in developmental math courses at select community colleges in Alabama in order to generate improved instructional practices in the developmental education field. Emergent data…

  7. Contextual Facilitators and Barriers of Community Reintegration among Injured Female Military Veterans: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Brent L; Crowe, Brandi M

    2017-08-30

    To understand the facilitators and barriers to community reintegration (CR) among injured female veterans. Phenomenological qualitative design SETTING: Community PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling female veterans with physical and/or psychological injury (N=13). None MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: None RESULTS: Conventional content analysis revealed three types of facilitators, including: (a) strong social supports; (b) impactful programs; and (c) protective personal beliefs. Six types of barriers included: (a) inadequate services; (b) lack of access to services; (c) poor social support; (d) difficulty trusting others; (e) non-supportive personal beliefs; and (f) injury factors. Multiple environmental and personal factors acted as facilitators and barriers to CR. Findings are relatively consistent with previous veteran and civilian community reintegration research that indicates the importance of health-related services, attitudes of others, and social support. However, females in this study reported being impacted by many of these facilitators and barriers because of their gender. This study supports the need to foster social support among injured female veterans throughout the rehabilitation process to promote CR. Long-term social support can be gained by incorporating services such as adjunctive therapies, recreation, and other social programming into the rehabilitation repertoire to help with CR for all veterans, particularly females. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Large-scale facilitation of a sessile community by an invasive habitat-forming snail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrring, Jakob; Thomsen, Mads Solgaard; Wernberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We provide an example of extensive facilitation of a sessile community throughout an invaded estuary by the invasive snail Batillaria australis. We show that B. australis greatly increases a limiting resource (attachment space) to a community of sessile organisms and estimate that a large...... part of the invaded estuary now contain ca. 50 times more sessile individuals associated with the invader than all native snails combined. We argue that native snails are unlikely to have been dramatically reduced by the invader, and we therefore suggest that the shell-attached sessile community...

  9. The Mindful Coach Seven Roles for Facilitating Leader Development

    CERN Document Server

    Silsbee, Doug

    2010-01-01

    Written for executive coaches, teachers, and other development professionals, the book explores the  seven roles or "Voices" that coaches assume while working with a client. The "Voices" are: Master, Partner, Investigator, Reflector, Teacher, Guide and Contractor. Silsbee illuminates the dynamic relationship between these roles, and integrates them in an intelligent roadmap for any coaching conversation. This book offers a helpful resource for internal and external executive coaches as well as leader coaches, consultants, trainers, teachers, and facilitators.

  10. Facilitators and Barriers for Effective Academic-Community Collaboration for Disaster Preparedness and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Anne L; Logue, Kristi M; Vaidyanathan, Lekshmi; Isakov, Alexander P

    2016-01-01

    For academic institutions to meaningfully contribute to community-disaster preparedness and response, they must effectively collaborate with governmental public health and emergency management agencies. To explore the opinions of leaders of public health and emergency management agencies and academic institutions regarding the facilitators for and barriers to effective collaboration for disaster preparedness and response. We convened focus groups of leaders of state and local public health and emergency management agencies and academic institutions in conjunction with the 2010 Public Health Preparedness Summit and the 2010 Southeastern Center for Emerging Biological Threats Meeting. We employed a semistructured interview guide to elicit information about resources leveraged for community preparedness and response and perceived facilitators and barriers to engagement and on-going collaboration. Focus groups were transcribed verbatim. We performed thematic analysis of the transcripts employing a data-coding scheme based on emergent themes. Academic institutions engaged with public health and emergency management agencies in the provision of an array of resources for community-disaster preparedness and response, ranging from technical expertise to the conduct of training activities, workforce surge capacity, and facility sharing. Recognized barriers to engagement included unfamiliarity of organizational personnel, concerns about ownership of outputs resulting from the collaboration, and differences in organizational culture and modus operandi. On-going relationships through shared training of students and staff and participation in community-level partner meetings facilitated collaboration in disaster response as does having a recognizable point of contact that can comprehensively represent academic institutional resources. Legal issues were identified as both facilitators (eg, contracts) and barriers (eg, liability concerns) to engagement. There are both recognized

  11. Facilitators' perceptions of problem-based learning and community-based education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula P du Rand

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available In 1997 the School for Nursing, University of the Orange Free State, changed from the traditional lecture method of teaching to problem-based learning and from a curative to a community-based approach. Lecturers from a traditional environment became facilitators and new skills such as listening, dialogue, negotiation, counselling and problemsolving were expected from them. Besides the role change, the environment changed from a structural classroom to an unstructured community. The aim of this research was to determine the perceptions and experiences of facilitators in problem-based learning and community-base education. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  12. Modularity functions maximization with nonnegative relaxation facilitates community detection in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Jonathan Q

    2011-01-01

    We show here that the problem of maximizing a family of quantitative functions, encompassing both the modularity (Q-measure) and modularity density (D-measure), for community detection can be uniformly understood as a combinatoric optimization involving the trace of a matrix called modularity Laplacian. Instead of using traditional spectral relaxation, we apply additional nonnegative constraint into this graph clustering problem and design efficient algorithms to optimize the new objective. With the explicit nonnegative constraint, our solutions are very close to the ideal community indicator matrix and can directly assign nodes into communities. The near-orthogonal columns of the solution can be reformulated as the posterior probability of corresponding node belonging to each community. Therefore, the proposed method can be exploited to identify the fuzzy or overlapping communities and thus facilitates the understanding of the intrinsic structure of networks. Experimental results show that our new algorithm ...

  13. Effective Regional Community Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Rebecca; Merkowitz, Rose Fisher

    2014-01-01

    Times are changing, and so are Extension programs. These changes affect every aspect of the educational effort, including program development, project funding, educational delivery, partnership building, marketing, sharing impacts, and revenue generation. This article is not about how Extension is restructuring to adapt to changes; instead, it…

  14. Implementation of a mental health medication management intervention in Australian community pharmacies: Facilitators and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattingh, H Laetitia; Kelly, Fiona; Fowler, Jane; Wheeler, Amanda J

    Community pharmacists are in an ideal position to promote and provide mental health medication management services. However, formalised or structured pharmacy services to support consumers with mental health conditions are scarce. Australian mental health consumers indicated a need for targeted community pharmacy mental health services which presented an opportunity to develop an intervention that were integrated with remunerated professional services. The study aimed to pilot a mental health medication management intervention in Australian community pharmacies. Pharmacists worked in partnership with consumers, carers and mental health workers over three to six months to set and support achievement of individual goals related to medicines use, physical health and mental wellbeing. This paper provides a comparison of community pharmacies that successfully delivered the intervention with those that did not and identifies facilitators and challenges to service implementation. One hundred pharmacies opted to pilot the delivery of the intervention in three Australian states (Queensland, Western Australia and northern New South Wales). Of those, 55 successfully delivered the intervention (completers) whilst 45 were unsuccessful (non-completers). A mixed methods approach, including quantitative pharmacy surveys and qualitative semi-structured interviews, was used to gather data from participating pharmacies. Following intervention development, 142 pharmacists and 21 pharmacy support staff attended training workshops, received resource kits and ongoing support from consumer and pharmacist mentors throughout intervention implementation. Baseline quantitative data was collected from each pharmacy on staff profile, volume of medicines dispensed, the range of professional services delivered and relationships with health professionals. At the completion of the study participants were invited to complete an online exit survey and take part in a semi-structured interview that

  15. Facilitators and Barriers to Traditional Food Consumption in the Cree Community of Mistissini, Northern Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge Gaudin, Véronique; Receveur, Olivier; Girard, Félix; Potvin, Louise

    2015-01-01

    To identify barriers to traditional food consumption and factors that facilitate it among the Cree community of Mistissini, a series of four focus groups was conducted with a total of twenty-three people. Two ecological models were created, one for facilitating factors and a second for obstacles, illustrating the role of numerous interconnected influences of traditional food consumption. Environmental impact project, laws and regulation, local businesses, traditional knowledge, youth influence, employment status, and nonconvenience of traditional food were named among numerous factors influencing traditional food consumption. The findings of this study can be used by political and public health organizations to promote traditional food where more emphasis should be invested in community and environmental strategies.

  16. Relational grounding facilitates development of scientifically useful multiscale models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Tai

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We review grounding issues that influence the scientific usefulness of any biomedical multiscale model (MSM. Groundings are the collection of units, dimensions, and/or objects to which a variable or model constituent refers. To date, models that primarily use continuous mathematics rely heavily on absolute grounding, whereas those that primarily use discrete software paradigms (e.g., object-oriented, agent-based, actor typically employ relational grounding. We review grounding issues and identify strategies to address them. We maintain that grounding issues should be addressed at the start of any MSM project and should be reevaluated throughout the model development process. We make the following points. Grounding decisions influence model flexibility, adaptability, and thus reusability. Grounding choices should be influenced by measures, uncertainty, system information, and the nature of available validation data. Absolute grounding complicates the process of combining models to form larger models unless all are grounded absolutely. Relational grounding facilitates referent knowledge embodiment within computational mechanisms but requires separate model-to-referent mappings. Absolute grounding can simplify integration by forcing common units and, hence, a common integration target, but context change may require model reengineering. Relational grounding enables synthesis of large, composite (multi-module models that can be robust to context changes. Because biological components have varying degrees of autonomy, corresponding components in MSMs need to do the same. Relational grounding facilitates achieving such autonomy. Biomimetic analogues designed to facilitate translational research and development must have long lifecycles. Exploring mechanisms of normal-to-disease transition requires model components that are grounded relationally. Multi-paradigm modeling requires both hyperspatial and relational grounding.

  17. Artificially accelerating the reversal of desertification: cyanobacterial inoculation facilitates the succession of vegetation communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shubin; Zhang, Qingyi; Wu, Li; Liu, Yongding; Zhang, Delu; Hu, Chunxiang

    2014-01-01

    Desertification has been recognized as a global environmental problem, and one region experiencing ongoing desertification is the eastern edge of Qubqi Desert (Inner Mongolia). To investigate the facilitating effects of cyanobacterial inoculation technology on the desertification control along this steppe-desert transition region, artificial cyanobacterial crusts were constructed with two filamentous cyanobacteria 3 and 8 years ago combined with Salix planting. The results showed that no crusts formed after 3 years of fixation only with Salix planting, whereas after cyanobacterial inoculation, the crusts formed quickly and gradually succeed to moss crusts. During that course, topsoil environments were gradually improved, providing the necessary material basis for the regeneration of vascular plants. In this investigation, total 27 species of vascular plants had regenerated in the experimental region, mainly belonging to Asteraceae, Poaceae, Chenopodiaceae and Leguminosae. Using space time substitution, the dominant species along with the application of cyanobacterial inoculation technology succeeded from Agriophyllum squarrosum ultimately to Leymus chinensis. In addition, it was found that the shady side of the dunes is more conducive to crust development and succession of vegetation communities. Conclusively, our results indicate artificial cyanobacterial inoculation technology is an effective and desirable path for desertification control.

  18. Using consecutive Rapid Participatory Appraisal studies to assess, facilitate and evaluate health and social change in community settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Scott A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate how a relatively socio-economically deprived community's needs have changed over time, assess which recommendations from an earlier assessment were implemented and sustained, and consider whether serial Rapid Participatory Appraisal is an effective health research tool that can promote community development and has utility in assessing longitudinal change. Methods Rapid Participatory Appraisal involves communities in identifying and challenging their own health-related needs. Information on ten health and social aspects was collated from existing documentation, neighbourhood observations, and interviews with a range of residents and key informants, providing a composite picture of the community's structure, needs and services. Results The perceived needs after 10 years encompassed a wide construct of health, principally the living environment, housing, and lack of finance. Most identified upstream determinants of health rather than specific medical conditions as primary concerns. After the initial Rapid Participatory Appraisal many interviewees took the recommendations forward, working to promote a healthier environment and advocate for local resources. Interventions requiring support from outwith the community were largely not sustained. Conclusion Rapid Participatory Appraisal proved valuable in assessing long-term change. The community's continuing needs were identified, but they could not facilitate and sustain change without the strategic support of key regional and national agencies. Many repeatedly voiced concerns lay outwith local control: local needs assessment must be supported at higher levels to be effective.

  19. Large-scale facilitation of a sessile community by an invasive habitat-forming snail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyrring, Jakob; Thomsen, Mads Solgaard; Wernberg, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    We provide an example of extensive facilitation of a sessile community throughout an invaded estuary by the invasive snail Batillaria australis. We show that B. australis greatly increases a limiting resource (attachment space) to a community of sessile organisms and estimate that a large part of the invaded estuary now contain ca. 50 times more sessile individuals associated with the invader than all native snails combined. We argue that native snails are unlikely to have been dramatically reduced by the invader, and we therefore suggest that the shell-attached sessile community, as a functional group, has benefitted significantly from this invasion. These results expand the current understanding of how invaded marine systems respond to habitat-forming invaders.

  20. Barriers and facilitators to Veterans Administration collaboration with community providers: the Lodge Project for homeless veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretzmeyer, Margaret; Moeckli, Jane; Liu, William Ming

    2014-01-01

    Since 2009, the U.S. Veterans Administration has made concentrated efforts to end homelessness among veterans. As part of these efforts, the Iowa City, Iowa, VA Health Care System in collaboration with local community providers deployed a supportive housing program aimed at homeless veterans. Called the Lodge program, it is intended to serve a Mid-Western mid-size city and its surrounding rural communities. This article presents qualitative findings from a mixed-method, two-year formative evaluation of the Lodge's implementation. Primary barriers to the effectiveness of the Lodge program were regulations hindering cooperation between service programs, followed by problems regarding information sharing and client substance abuse. Facilitators included personal communication and cooperation between individuals within and among service groups. The feasibility of implementing a Lodge program in a more rural community than Iowa City was also discussed.

  1. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN FRESHWATER MICROCOSMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, John T.

    1978-01-01

    Two cylindrical freshwater microcosms with a volume of 700 {ell} were maintained under controlled laboratory conditions for 190 days. The two microcosms were identical with regard to initial chemical composition and biological inocula, with the exceptions that in one microcosm (designated Tank 2) mosquitofish (Gambusia) and herbivorous catfish (Placostomas) were added. Three distinct communities developed in the tanks: (1) a phytoplankton-zooplankton assemblage and (2) two periphyton-zoobenthos communities associated with the sides and bottom of the tank, respectively. Community development and successional patterns were similar in both tanks. Major differences between the tanks involved timing of succession of the zooplankton and zoobenthos, attributable to predation by fish, principally Gambusia. A major drawback for these microcosms as use for experimental analogs such as lakes was a luxuriant periphyton growth which eventually overwhelmed the biomass of the system. The tanks displayed a degree of successional replicability, a large number of species, and a diversity of community development. Microcosms of this size could find use as experimental systems for higher level trophic manipulation and observation of life cycles not amenable to field studies.

  2. Communities of Practice: Professional Development Through Fostering Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N. A.; Raftery, C.; Shackleford, R.; Nelson, A.; Turney, D.

    2015-11-01

    A community of practice is a group of people informally bound together by shared expertise and passion for a joint enterprise. Through facilitated discussion, we will share best practices and research about communities of practice, and explore how they evolve as they grow. The target audience for this Special Interest Group session is Education and Public Outreach professionals who are interested in using communities of practice as a way to support the professional development of their audiences. This session will be of interest to people who want to learn more about communities of practice as well as those who are currently coordinating similar efforts. Participants will have the opportunity to share their challenges and success, as well as gain new ideas for the planning, implementation, and expansion of efforts. This session will be facilitated by the coordinators of NASA's SMD Heliophysics EPO Forum online community of practice for middle and high school science teachers.

  3. Culture change in care homes: development and facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela

    2016-09-29

    This article is the second of a two-part series that explores a programme of culture change in care homes. In this article, the authors describe their independent development and facilitation of a flexible learning programme for care homes, designed to meet a quality improvement request made by a care home company. The two selected care homes' staff conducted a review of their care culture, as a precursor to their creation of a new care philosophy. These activities provided a firm foundation from which the homes could, in theory, become a Remedial Enterprise Active Learning care home. Although the learning programme was not completed due to unavoidable circumstances, the staff's experiences highlight some of the challenges and successes that may be experienced when seeking to improve care homes' learning culture and practice.

  4. Community Development in Brazil: Two Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Frances; Speyer, Anne Marie; Tedrus, Maria Aparecida L.

    1998-01-01

    O'Gorman provides "Five Points for Reflection" on nongovernmental and community organizations in Brazil. Speyer and Tedrus discuss "Community Libraries: An Experience in Community Development in the Periphery of Sao Paulo." (SK)

  5. Competition and facilitation between the marine nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece and its associated bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Verena S; Stomp, Maayke; Bouvier, Thierry; Fouilland, Eric; Leboulanger, Christophe; Confurius-Guns, Veronique; Weissing, Franz J; Stal, LucasJ; Huisman, Jef

    2014-01-01

    N2-fixing cyanobacteria represent a major source of new nitrogen and carbon for marine microbial communities, but little is known about their ecological interactions with associated microbiota. In this study we investigated the interactions between the unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. Miami BG043511 and its associated free-living chemotrophic bacteria at different concentrations of nitrate and dissolved organic carbon and different temperatures. High temperature strongly stimulated the growth of Cyanothece, but had less effect on the growth and community composition of the chemotrophic bacteria. Conversely, nitrate and carbon addition did not significantly increase the abundance of Cyanothece, but strongly affected the abundance and species composition of the associated chemotrophic bacteria. In nitrate-free medium the associated bacterial community was co-dominated by the putative diazotroph Mesorhizobium and the putative aerobic anoxygenic phototroph Erythrobacter and after addition of organic carbon also by the Flavobacterium Muricauda. Addition of nitrate shifted the composition toward co-dominance by Erythrobacter and the Gammaproteobacterium Marinobacter. Our results indicate that Cyanothece modified the species composition of its associated bacteria through a combination of competition and facilitation. Furthermore, within the bacterial community, niche differentiation appeared to play an important role, contributing to the coexistence of a variety of different functional groups. An important implication of these findings is that changes in nitrogen and carbon availability due to, e.g., eutrophication and climate change are likely to have a major impact on the species composition of the bacterial community associated with N2-fixing cyanobacteria.

  6. Barriers and facilitators to diabetes self-management: perspectives of older community dwellers and health professionals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huixia; Edwards, Helen; Courtney, Mary; McDowell, Jan; Wei, Juan

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about self-management among people with Type 2 diabetes living in mainland China. Understanding the experiences of this target population is needed to provide socioculturally relevant education to effectively promote self-management. The aim of this study was to explore perceived barriers and facilitators to diabetes self-management for both older community dwellers and health professionals in China. Four focus groups, two for older people with diabetes and two for health professionals, were conducted. All participants were purposively sampled from two communities in Shanghai, China. Six barriers were identified: overdependence on but dislike of western medicine, family role expectations, cuisine culture, lack of trustworthy information sources, deficits in communication between clients and health professionals, and restriction of reimbursement regulations. Facilitators included family and peer support, good relationships with health professionals, simple and practical instruction and a favourable community environment. The findings provide valuable information for diabetes self-management intervention development in China, and have implications for programmes tailored to populations in similar sociocultural circumstances.

  7. Developing a facilitation model to promote organisational development in primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhydderch, Melody; Edwards, Adrian; Marshall, Martin; Elwyn, Glyn; Grol, Richard

    2006-06-19

    The relationship between effective organisation of general practices and health improvement is widely accepted. The Maturity Matrix is an instrument designed to assess organisational development in general practice settings and to stimulate quality improvement. It is undertaken by a practice team with the aid of a facilitator. There is a tradition in the primary care systems in many countries of using practice visitors to educate practice teams about how to improve. However the role of practice visitors as facilitators who enable teams to plan practice-led organisational development using quality improvement instruments is less well understood. The objectives of the study were to develop and explore a facilitation model to support practice teams in stimulating organisational development using a quality improvement instrument called the Maturity Matrix. A qualitative study based on transcript analysis was adopted. A model of facilitation was constructed based on a review of relevant literature. Audio tapes of Maturity Matrix assessment sessions with general practices were transcribed and facilitator skills were compared to the model. The sample consisted of two facilitators working with twelve general practices based in UK primary care. The facilitation model suggested that four areas describing eighteen skills were important. The four areas are structuring the session, obtaining consensus, handling group dynamics and enabling team learning. Facilitators effectively employed skills associated with the first three areas, but less able to consistently stimulate team learning. This study suggests that facilitators need careful preparation for their role and practices need protected time in order to make best use of practice-led quality improvement instruments. The role of practice visitor as a facilitator is becoming important as the need to engender ownership of the quality improvement process by practices increases.

  8. Developing a facilitation model to promote organisational development in primary care practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elwyn Glyn

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between effective organisation of general practices and health improvement is widely accepted. The Maturity Matrix is an instrument designed to assess organisational development in general practice settings and to stimulate quality improvement. It is undertaken by a practice team with the aid of a facilitator. There is a tradition in the primary care systems in many countries of using practice visitors to educate practice teams about how to improve. However the role of practice visitors as facilitators who enable teams to plan practice-led organisational development using quality improvement instruments is less well understood. The objectives of the study were to develop and explore a facilitation model to support practice teams in stimulating organisational development using a quality improvement instrument called the Maturity Matrix. A qualitative study based on transcript analysis was adopted. Method A model of facilitation was constructed based on a review of relevant literature. Audio tapes of Maturity Matrix assessment sessions with general practices were transcribed and facilitator skills were compared to the model. The sample consisted of two facilitators working with twelve general practices based in UK primary care. Results The facilitation model suggested that four areas describing eighteen skills were important. The four areas are structuring the session, obtaining consensus, handling group dynamics and enabling team learning. Facilitators effectively employed skills associated with the first three areas, but less able to consistently stimulate team learning. Conclusion This study suggests that facilitators need careful preparation for their role and practices need protected time in order to make best use of practice-led quality improvement instruments. The role of practice visitor as a facilitator is becoming important as the need to engender ownership of the quality improvement process by

  9. A framework for community mobilization to promote healthy youth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Thompson, Jomella; Fawcett, Stephen B; Schultz, Jerry A

    2008-03-01

    In community mobilization to prevent youth violence, local people take action to create conditions under which youth are healthy and safe. This manuscript outlines a framework for supporting and evaluating community mobilization to promote healthy youth development as an approach to preventing youth violence. The framework highlights 12 key community processes to facilitate change and improvement. A descriptive case study of the Ivanhoe Neighborhood Council Youth Project (INCYP) is used to illustrate the application of this framework in an inner-city, predominantly African-American neighborhood in Kansas City, Missouri. Data are presented on community change (i.e., new or modified programs, policies, and practices) facilitated by the INCYP between 2001 and 2003, as an intermediate measure used to assess the mobilization effort. The INCYP facilitated 26 community changes during the project period, and was an effective catalyst for mobilizing the community to support change in outcomes and conditions that support healthy youth development. This case study suggests the importance of early and ongoing engagement of youth as change agents in the community mobilization effort.

  10. Developing Learning Communities: Using Communities of Practice within Community Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawthom, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The idea that communities need to be inclusive is almost axiomatic. The process, whereby, community members engage in inclusive practices is far less understood. Similarly, UK universities are being encouraged to include the wider community and extent campus boundaries. Here, I suggest a particular theoretical lens which sheds light on engagement…

  11. Barriers and facilitators to partnership working between Early Intervention Services and the voluntary and community sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Helen; Birchwood, Max; Tait, Lynda; Shah, Sonal; England, Elizabeth; Smith, Jo

    2008-09-01

    Partnership working between health and the voluntary and community sector has become an increasing political priority. This paper describes and explores the extent and patterns of partnership working between health and the voluntary and community sector in the context of Early Intervention Services for young people with a first episode of psychosis. Data were collected from 12 Early Intervention Services and through semistructured interviews with 47 voluntary and community sector leads and 42 commissioners across the West Midlands of England. Most partnerships were described as ad hoc and informal in nature although four formal partnerships between Early Intervention Services and voluntary and community sector organizations had been established. Shared agendas, the ability to refer clients onto an organization that could provide a service they could not and shared training facilitated partnership working in this context. Barriers to closer working included differences in culture such as managing risk, the time required to make and maintain relationships and recognition of the advantages of remaining a small and autonomous organization. The four more formal partnerships were also built on the organizations' experience of working together informally, in one case through a specific pilot project. The voluntary and community organizations involved were also branches of larger national organizations for whom finding sustainable funding was less of an issue. In theoretical terms, eight Early Intervention Service: voluntary and community sector partnerships were at a stage of 'pre-partnership collaboration', three at 'partnership creation and consolidation' and one at 'partnership programme delivery'. The empirical data viewed through the lens of the partnership life-cycle model could help early intervention services, and voluntary and community sector professionals better understand where they are, why they are there and the conditions needed to realise the full

  12. Facilitators and inhibitors in developing professional values in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafakhah, Mahnaz; Molazem, Zahra; Khademi, Mojgan; Sharif, Farkhondeh

    2016-09-22

    Values are the basis of nursing practice, especially in making decisions about complicated ethical issues. Despite their key role in nursing, little information exists on the factors affecting their development and manifestation in nursing students. This study identifies and describes the facilitators and inhibitors of the development and manifestation of professional values based on the experiences of nursing students and instructors and nurses. Data were collected through 29 semi-structured interviews and two focus group interviews in 2013-2015 and were analyzed using the conventional content analysis method of Elo and Kyngäs. In total, 18 nursing undergraduates, five nursing instructors, and five nurses from Shiraz University of Medical Sciences and one of the teaching hospitals in Shiraz were selected through purposive sampling. The research was approved by the Ethics Committee of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences and the teaching hospital examined. The findings consisted of two categories: personal and environmental factors. Personal factors consisted of the two subcategories of personal stimuli (work experience and past relationships, inner beliefs and acting on values, belief in God and a divine worldview) and personal inhibitors (the lack of professional motivation and enthusiasm, negative emotions). Environmental factors consisted of the two subcategories of environmental stimuli (cooperation, order and discipline) and environmental inhibitors (unfavorable work environment, society's negative attitude toward nursing, the violation of rights). Given the impact of personal and environmental factors on the development and manifestation of professional values in nursing students, it is upon the education authorities to take account of them in their planning, and nursing managers are also recommended to further address these factors in their development of a proper work environment, provision of standard facilities and removal of barriers. © The Author

  13. Biofilms: a developing microscopic community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera Sandra Patricia

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities composed by different microbiota embebbed in a special adaptive environment. These communities show different characteristics such as heterogeneity, diversity in microenvironments, capacity to resist antimicrobial therapy and ability to allow bacterial communication. These characteristics convert them in complex organizations that are difficult to eradicate in their own environment. In the man, biofilms are associated to a great number of slow-development infectious processes which greatly difficulties their eradication. In the industry and environment, biofilms are centered in processes known as biofouling and bioremediation. The former is the contamination of a system due to the microbial activity of a biofilm. The latter uses biofilms to improve the conditions of a contaminated system. The study of biofilms is a new and exciting field which is constantly evolving and whose implications in medicine and industry would have important repercussions for the humankind.

  14. Imagining and Moving beyond the ESL Bubble: Facilitating Communities of Practice through the ELL Ambassadors Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przymus, Steve Daniel

    2016-01-01

    When educators do not facilitate English language learners' (ELLs) social integration in schools, this can perpetuate ELLs' marginalized status and the plateauing of ELLs' English language development. This study highlights a program for secondary ELLs called the ELL Ambassadors program, which partnered ELLs with non-ELLs based on shared…

  15. Moving forward on facilitation research : Response to changing environments and effects on the diversity, functioning and evolution of plant communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soliveres, Santiago; Smit, Christian; Maestre, Fernando T

    2015-01-01

    Once seen as anomalous, facilitative interactions among plants and their importance for community structure and functioning are now widely recognized. The growing body of modelling, descriptive and experimental studies on facilitation covers a wide variety of terrestrial and aquatic systems througho

  16. [Factors facilitating development of degenerative aortic valvular stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andropova, O V; Polubentseva, E I; Anokhin, V N

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine factors of risk and progress of aortal valvular calcinosis (AVC) and aortic ostium stenosis (AOS). The subjects were 85 patients with AVC (42--with aortic valvular stenosis (AVS), and 43--without AOS). The study, which included analysis of the lipid and mineral metabolism, and immunological tests, shows that potential factors of AVC are: age (p dislipidemia (high serum level of total cholesterol, cholesterol of low density lipoproteins, and apoB, atherogenic shift of apoB/apoA-1 ratio, low level of cholesterol of high density lipoproteins (CHDLP)), disbalance between intecellular matrix synthesis and destruction (high concentration of alkaline phosphatase and its bone fraction, and accelerated deoxypyridinoline excretion), inflammation (high concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and interleukin-6 (IL-6)). The factors of AOS were: age (p dislipidemia (high levels of cholesterol of low density and very low density lipoproteins, low concentrations of CHDLP, and apoA-1), degradation of extracellular matrix, and inflammation (high concentrations of CRP, fibrinogen, IL-6, and IL-8). Thus, atherogenic dislipidemia and mineral dysmetabolism disorder facilitate AVC. The revealed immune status changes imply the role of inflammation in the development and progress of AVS.

  17. The Evaluation of Facilitation Process in Building Community Capacity about OVOP Concept in Kenjeran Coastal Area, Surabaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handayeni, K. D. M. E.; Santoso, E. B.; Siswanto, V. K.

    2017-07-01

    The concept of One Village One Product (OVOP) is an approach to the development potential of the area in the region to produce products that can compete in the global market, while still having unique characteristics of the area. Bulak District is one of the Kenjeran coastal area in Surabaya, Indonesia. Bulak District has had a great potential of marine products, but still contribute greatly in improving the people's welfare. Total activities of SMEs in the District of Bulak quite a lot, but the resulting product unknown to the wider community and the global marketplace. Activity of facilitation for SMEs society do to build community capacity in the implementation of the concept of OVOP. Based on the results of the evaluation assistance through Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test result an increased understanding of the community regarding to the five subjects related OVOP concept. There are six factors to note in mentoring activities that need to be considered for the sustainability of community capacity building programs on OVOP.

  18. The Neuroscience of Teaching Narratives: Facilitating Social and Emotional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Whalen

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Humanities and the sciences have long been considered polar opposites that exist in separate realms of academia and require different cognitive skills. However, neuroscience has brought about renewed interest in what we can learn about the human brain by investigating links between disciplines. For example, studies related to English literature have revealed that the benefits of reading narratives (fiction and nonfiction stories extend far beyond language development and include increased competence in social and emotional functioning. By combining the results of an original dissertation study and a review of past and current research in education, psychology, linguistics, and neuroscience, this essay explores how reading narratives serves as practice for managing emotions and social interactions in everyday life. In fact, several studies suggest that reading narratives strengthens nearly every part of the brain because the brain is designed—or “wired”—to think and learn in terms of narratives, regardless of subject matter. This essay provides several types of support for the claim that reading narratives facilitates social and emotional development. Research discussed includes studies showing that reading narratives is not a solitary activity but “a surprisingly social process” (Krakovsky, 2006, p. 1 and is linked to increased ability to view people and events from multiple perspectives, increased empathy for others, and increased ability to interpret social cues (Atkins, 2000; Courtright, Mackey, & Packard, 2005; Davis, 1980; Greif & Hogan, 1973; Harrison, 2008; Mar, 2004; Mar, Oatley, Hirsh, dela Paz, & Peterson, 2006; Stanovich & West, 1989. Understanding how the brain processes narratives and relates them to real life functioning has important implications for many disciplines, such as psychology, in its attempt to understand and treat post-traumatic stress disorder. This essay, however, focuses on the implications for education

  19. Competition and facilitation between the marine nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece and its associated bacterial community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Verena S.; Stomp, Maayke; Bouvier, Thierry; Fouilland, Eric; Leboulanger, Christophe; Confurius-Guns, Veronique; Weissing, Franz J.; Stal, LucasJ.; Huisman, Jef

    2014-01-01

    N2-fixing cyanobacteria represent a major source of new nitrogen and carbon for marine microbial communities, but little is known about their ecological interactions with associated microbiota. In this study we investigated the interactions between the unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. Miami BG043511 and its associated free-living chemotrophic bacteria at different concentrations of nitrate and dissolved organic carbon and different temperatures. High temperature strongly stimulated the growth of Cyanothece, but had less effect on the growth and community composition of the chemotrophic bacteria. Conversely, nitrate and carbon addition did not significantly increase the abundance of Cyanothece, but strongly affected the abundance and species composition of the associated chemotrophic bacteria. In nitrate-free medium the associated bacterial community was co-dominated by the putative diazotroph Mesorhizobium and the putative aerobic anoxygenic phototroph Erythrobacter and after addition of organic carbon also by the Flavobacterium Muricauda. Addition of nitrate shifted the composition toward co-dominance by Erythrobacter and the Gammaproteobacterium Marinobacter. Our results indicate that Cyanothece modified the species composition of its associated bacteria through a combination of competition and facilitation. Furthermore, within the bacterial community, niche differentiation appeared to play an important role, contributing to the coexistence of a variety of different functional groups. An important implication of these findings is that changes in nitrogen and carbon availability due to, e.g., eutrophication and climate change are likely to have a major impact on the species composition of the bacterial community associated with N2-fixing cyanobacteria. PMID:25642224

  20. Developing a sense of virtual community measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Anita L

    2007-12-01

    Sense of virtual community is an important feature of virtual communities. This study develops a sense of virtual community (SOVC) measure, building off the strengths of a widely used measure of sense of community (SOC) for face-to-face communities. Although there is overlap between the senses of community for face-to-face and virtual communities, there are significant differences. The new SOVC measure is compared to the SOC measure on 265 members of seven online groups, explaining at least 7% more of the variance from exchanging support and member identification. This study represents an important step in developing a valid measure of SOCV.

  1. TRAINING OF RURAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AGENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Ionescu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Community development might be a solution to reduce delays, and it was implemented by the involved players of the community. It asks to identify the common problems, community response, and network partnership. Sustainable development means to refuse fatality, community entropy and to undertake negentropic actions. Its finality is the respect for the human being, not compromising the capacity of the future generations to live at least as we do, if not better. We can identify on the field the necessary elements for (reconstructing some sustainable developed communities. The author identifies successful experiences, examples of good practices in the context of globalization and communitization, homogenization and heterogenization. Rural community development starts with acknowledging importance of the village and of its capacities to use opportunities to act in a constructive manner. After providing definitions for community development, social and solidary economy and sustainable development, the associations` role, the author dwells on the training, profile and tasks of the rural community development agent.

  2. Issues for Community Development: Some Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Quintin; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Includes "Community Development in Areas of Political and Social Conflict" (Oliver); "Women and Development in Peru" (Barrig); "Some Reflections on Community Development Experiences in Brazil" (O'Gorman); "Informal Networks for Pre-School Children in a Black Community in South Africa" (Lines); "The…

  3. Understanding Barriers and Facilitators to Healthy Eating and Active Living in Rural Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Seguin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Studies demonstrate that people’s food and physical activity (PA environments influence behavior, yet research examining this in rural communities is limited. Methods. Focus groups of 8–15 women were conducted in rural communities in seven US states. Questions were designed to identify factors within residents’ food and PA environments they felt helped or hindered them from eating healthfully and being physically active. Results. Participants were aged 30–84 years; mean (SD = 61 (14 (N=95. On average, communities had fewer than 5,000 residents. Limited time, social norms, and distances from or lack of exercise facilities were common PA barriers. Facilitators for PA included social support, dog walking, and availability of affordable facilities. Healthy eating barriers included the perception that healthy foods were too expensive; calorically dense large portion sizes served at family meals; and frequency of eating foods away from home, which were perceived as generally unhealthy. Healthy eating supports included culture/value around local food gathering (e.g., hunting and gardening and preservation (e.g., canning and smoking. Friends and family were frequently identified as key influencers of eating and PA behavior. Conclusions. Targeting both social and built environment factors, particularly those unique to rural locales, may enhance support for healthy eating and PA behavior change interventions.

  4. Developing inquiry-based teaching and learning in Family Maths programme facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pam Austin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The inquiry-based Family Maths professional development programme, offered by the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, attempts not only to support the transformative education practices targeted by the South African National Department of Education, but also to extend them beyond the school walls to the community at large. This study investigates the extent to which this programme develops facilitators’ ability to implement inquiry-based learning. The research undertaken uses both qualitative and quantitative methods in an empirical study of 39 facilitators. The facilitators’ inquiry beliefs and ability to implement inquiry learning was measured by means of questionnaires, observation schedules and interviews. Data generated by the study reveal that both the facilitators’ understanding and practice of inquiry improved as they progressed through the novice, intermediate and veteran categories of the Family Maths professional development programme.

  5. Developing a Strategy Menu for Community-Level Obesity Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahr, Christopher; Wells, Alexandra; Christens, Brian D; Pollard, Ethen; LaGro, James; Morales, Alfonso; Dennis, Samuel; Hilgendorf, Amy; Meinen, Amy; Korth, Amy; Gaddis, Jennifer; Schoeller, Dale; Tomayko, Emily J; Carrel, Aaron; Adams, Alexandra

    2016-11-01

    Childhood obesity is a complex problem influenced by policies, systems, and environments across multiple settings. The prevention of childhood obesity requires changes across a range of community settings. To describe the development of an obesity prevention strategy menu that incorporates effective policy, systems, and environmental changes for reducing and preventing childhood obesity, and which offers the flexibility to consider local community needs and capacity. We describe the development of a strategy menu and some of the challenges of this process. We then elaborate on how communities will interact with the strategy menu and the development of a website to facilitate this interaction. No single discipline has all of the expertise needed to identify strategies for childhood obesity prevention. Therefore, a multidisciplinary team of researchers and practitioners reviewed evidence and organized a menu that assists communities in choosing complementary strategies tailored for efficacy in specific community settings. The strategies will eventually be part of a web-based point of access that complements the foundational relationships built between communities, researchers, and practitioners. The strategy menu is comprised of a set of effective approaches that communities can use to develop tailored, context-specific health interventions. By developing a framework to engage communities in the selection and implementation of multi-setting obesity prevention strategies, we aim to create and sustain momentum toward a long-term reduction in obesity in Wisconsin children.

  6. Chronic constipation: Facilitator factor for development of varicocele

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guldem Kilciler; Ahmet Ali Sancaktutar; Ali Avci; Mete Kilciler; Engin Kaya; Murat Dayanc

    2011-01-01

    constipation 9 had internal/external hemorrhoids. In this regard, there was no statistical significance between chronic constipation and healthy controls (P = 0.80). CONCLUSION: Chronic constipation may not be a major predictive factor for the development of varicocele, but it may be a facilitator factor for varicocele.

  7. Developing and establishing online student learning communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Donna Scott; Boswell, Carol; Cannon, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Developing effective learning communities is an important component of Web-based courses. Learning communities offer a social context for learning that greatly enhances the knowledge acquisition of all involved parties. This article describes the development of an effective learning community among Web-based RN-BSN students. The characteristics of the cohort leading to an effective learning community included supportiveness, open sharing of oneself, and socialization.

  8. A Tool and Process that Facilitate Community Capacity Building and Social Learning for Natural Resource Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Raymond

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a self-assessment tool and process that facilitate community capacity building and social learning for natural resource management. The tool and process provide opportunities for rural landholders and project teams both to self-assess their capacity to plan and deliver natural resource management (NRM programs and to reflect on their capacities relative to other organizations and institutions that operate in their region. We first outline the tool and process and then present a critical review of the pilot in the South Australian Arid Lands NRM region, South Australia. Results indicate that participants representing local, organizational, and institutional tiers of government were able to arrive at a group consensus position on the strength, importance, and confidence of a variety of capacities for NRM categorized broadly as human, social, physical, and financial. During the process, participants learned a lot about their current capacity as well as capacity needs. Broad conclusions are discussed with reference to the iterative process for assessing and reflecting on community capacity.

  9. Portal for Families Overcoming Neurodevelopmental Disorders (PFOND): Implementation of a Software Framework for Facilitated Community Website Creation by Nontechnical Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin Cynthia; Ng, Isaiah; Seid-Karbasi, Puya; Imam, Tuhina; Lee, Cheryl E; Chen, Shirley Yu; Herman, Adam; Sharma, Balraj; Johal, Gurinder; Gu, Bobby; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2013-08-06

    The Portal for Families Overcoming Neurodevelopmental Disorders (PFOND) provides a structured Internet interface for the sharing of information with individuals struggling with the consequences of rare developmental disorders. Large disease-impacted communities can support fundraising organizations that disseminate Web-based information through elegant websites run by professional staff. Such quality resources for families challenged by rare disorders are infrequently produced and, when available, are often dependent upon the continued efforts of a single individual. The project endeavors to create an intuitive Web-based software system that allows a volunteer with limited technical computer skills to produce a useful rare disease website in a short time period. Such a system should provide access to emerging news and research findings, facilitate community participation, present summary information about the disorder, and allow for transient management by volunteers who are likely to change periodically. The prototype portal was implemented using the WordPress software system with both existing and customized supplementary plug-in software modules. Gamification scoring features were implemented in a module, allowing editors to measure progress. The system was installed on a Linux-based computer server, accessible across the Internet through standard Web browsers. A prototype PFOND system was implemented and tested. The prototype system features a structured organization with distinct partitions for background information, recent publications, and community discussions. The software design allows volunteer editors to create a themed website, implement a limited set of topic pages, and connect the software to dynamic RSS feeds providing information about recent news or advances. The prototype was assessed by a fraction of the disease sites developed (8 out of 27), including Aarskog-Scott syndrome, Aniridia, Adams-Oliver syndrome, Cat Eye syndrome, Kabuki syndrome

  10. Facilitating learning and action for food sovereignty on family and community levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaarst, Mette

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on strengthening local communities in West Uganda, where an approach focusing on building up social capital and sharing responsibilities for own development within and between families. We see it as an approach to reach food sovereignty because it takes its roots within...... the family itself, where the responsibility for both family food and cash crops exists and is not always shared equally. When families start working together and use the resources in a group of both men and women, elders and youth, a local community becomes stronger and can match the capacities within...... and addressing issues to the local and regional politicians, authorities and civil societies, - Many strategies can strengthen the families’ and community groups’ control over their own food; two of them are 1) selling surplus of own production on local markets, and 2) forming cooperatives of the same product...

  11. Tennis Shoes Required: The Role of the Facilitator in Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Kevin; Parker, Melissa; Neutzling, Misti M.

    2012-01-01

    Reform efforts to improve physical education often rely on facilitators to promote positive change. Although it is becoming more common, little is currently understood about the facilitation role. Our purpose was to examine facilitators' collective knowledge and experience with ongoing physical education professional development (PD), specifically…

  12. Facilitating Progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals through Open Scientific Data and Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. S.; Levy, M. A.; de Sherbinin, A. M.; Fischer, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) represent an unprecedented international commitment to a shared future encompassing sustainable management of the planet and significant improvement in the human condition around the world. The scientific community has both an ethical responsibility and substantial self-interest—as residents of this planet—to help the world community to better understand the complex, interlinked behavior of human and environmental systems and to elucidate pathways to achieve long-term sustainability. Critical to making progress towards the SDGs is the open availability of timely, reliable, usable, and well integrated data and indicators relevant to all SDGs and associated targets. Such data and indicators will not only be valuable in monitoring and evaluation of progress, but also in developing policies and making decisions on environmental and societal issues affecting sustainability from local to global scales. The open availability of such data and indicators can help motivate performance, promote accountability, and facilitate cooperation. A range of scientific, technical, organizational, political, and resource challenges need to be addressed in developing a coherent SDG monitoring and indicator framework. For example, assembling and integrating diverse data on consistent spatial and temporal scales across the relevant natural, social, health, and engineering sciences pose both scientific and technical difficulties, and may require new ways to interlink and organize existing cyberinfrastructure, reconcile different data policy regimes, and fund integration efforts. New information technologies promise more timely and efficient ways of collecting many types of data, but may also raise privacy, control, and equity issues. Scientific review processes to ensure data quality need to be coordinated with the types of quality control and review employed by national statistical agencies for trusted economic and social statistics. Although

  13. Medication reviews led by community pharmacists in Switzerland: a qualitative survey to evaluate barriers and facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niquille A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: 1 To evaluate the participation rate and identify the practical barriers to implementing a community pharmacist-led medication review service in francophone Switzerland and, 2 To assess the effectiveness of external support.Methods: A qualitative survey was undertaken to identify barriers to patient inclusion and medication review delivery in daily practice among all contactable independent pharmacists working in francophone Switzerland (n=78 who were members of a virtual chain (pharmacieplus, regardless of their participation in a simultaneous cross-sectional study. This study analyzed the dissemination of a medication review service including a prescription and drug utilization review with access to clinical data, a patient interview and a pharmaceutical report to the physicians. In addition, we observed an exploratory and external coaching for pharmacists that we launched seven months after the beginning of the cross-sectional study. Results: Poor motivation on the part of pharmacists and difficulties communicating with physicians and patients were the primary obstacles identified. Lack of time and lack of self-confidence in administering the medication review process were the most commonly perceived practical barriers to the implementation of the new service. The main facilitators to overcome these issues may be well-planned workflow organization techniques, strengthened by an adequate remuneration scheme and a comprehensive and practice-based training course that includes skill-building in pharmacotherapy and communication. External support may partially compensate for a weak organizational framework.Conclusions: To facilitate the implementation of a medication review service, a strong local networking with physicians, an effective workflow management and a practice- and communications-focused training for pharmacists and their teams seem key elements required. External support can be useful to help some pharmacists improve their

  14. Premises of Sustainable Development on Rural Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Turtureanu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors want to highlight the opportunity on rural areas and development in termsof durability. The content of sustainable development offers to local communities real and lasting solutions.In this sense for a community to be truly sustainable, it must adopt a holistic approach, taking into accountshort-term environmental and economic sustainability of natural and cultural resources. The authors believethat a sustainable community among its objectives to include their major environmental issues, povertyeradication, improvement of quality of life, developing and maintaining an effective and viable localeconomies, leading to a global vision of sustainable development of all sectors of the community.

  15. Economic Development Capacity amongst Small Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    Examines indigenous capacity for local community development. Examines new economic development initiatives by communities, nature of relationships between local and larger economies, and how relationships affect local capacity for new economic activities. Discusses benefits of spatial framework in rural development and planning. (TES)

  16. 75 FR 10561 - Request for Public Comment: Community Development Financial Institutions Fund, Community...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Request for Public Comment: Community Development Financial Institutions Fund, Community Development Financial and Technical Assistance Awards, Native Initiatives, and Bank Enterprise Awards AGENCY: Community Development Financial Institutions Fund,...

  17. Architecting Ourselves: Schema to Facilitate Growth of the International Space Architecture Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Brent

    2006-01-01

    This paper develops a conceptual model, adapted from the way research and development non-profits and universities tend to be organized, that could help amplify the reach and effectiveness of the international space architecture community. The model accommodates current activities and published positions, and increases involvement by allocating accountability for necessary professional and administrative activities. It coordinates messaging and other outreach functions to improve brand management. It increases sustainability by balancing volunteer workload. And it provides an open-ended structure that can be modified gracefully as needs, focus, and context evolve. Over the past 20 years, Space Architecture has attained some early signs of legitimacy as a discipline: an active, global community of practicing and publishing professionals; university degree programs; a draft undergraduate curriculum; and formal committee establishment within multiple professional organizations. However, the nascent field has few outlets for expression in built architecture, which exacerbates other challenges the field is experiencing in adolescence: obtaining recognition and inclusion as a unique contributor by the established aerospace profession; organizing and managing outreach by volunteers; striking a balance between setting admittance or performance credentials and attaining a critical mass of members; and knowing what to do, beyond sharing common interests, to actually increase the market demand for space architecture. This paper develops a conceptual model, adapted from the way research-anddevelopment non-profits and universities tend to be organized, that could help amplify the reach and effectiveness of the international space architecture community. The model accommodates current activities and published positions, and increases involvement by allocating accountability for necessary professional and administrative activities. It coordinates messaging and other outreach

  18. The Career Development Facilitator Project: Then and Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppin, Judith M.; Splete, Howard H.

    2013-01-01

    The National Career Development Association (NCDA) has consistently been involved in the professional training of individuals who provide career development services for youth and adults. It has provided outstanding leadership in the field of career development. NCDA's impact on the training of professionals and paraprofessionals working in the…

  19. Using a CBT-Based Therapeutic Community Program to Facilitate Healthy Relationships among Military Veterans and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush-Ossenbeck, Marilyn; West-Olatunji, Cirecie

    2014-01-01

    The authors propose a CBT-based Therapeutic Community (TC) program designed to facilitate healthy relationships between military veterans and their families. In many military veteran families, there is a struggle to maintain a healthy and balanced life both outside and inside the household. This struggle affects both spouses and children and is…

  20. Mental Health Facilitator (MHF) Service Implementation in Schools in Malawi, Africa: A Strategy for Increasing Community Human Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Melissa; Hinkle, J. Scott; Schweiger, Wendi; Henderson, Donna

    2016-01-01

    The Mental Health Facilitator (MHF) program utilizes a population-based curriculum and has been implemented in Malawi for the past seven years. This article reports findings from an ethnographic study that explored how 40 MHF stakeholders have experienced the MHF program. This transdisciplinary program is a 30-hour training in community mental…

  1. Community Entrepreneurship in Deprived Neighbourhoods: Comparing UK Community Enterprises with US Community Development Corporations (discussion paper)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varady, D.P.; Kleinhans, R.J.; Van Ham, M.

    2015-01-01

    Through a review of the recent American community development literature, this paper tests the assertion that British community enterprises (CEs) are fundamentally similar to American community development corporations (CDCs), and therefore, that CEs can learn from CDCs. In the context of the curren

  2. PFLOTRAN: Recent Developments Facilitating Massively-Parallel Reactive Biogeochemical Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    With the recent shift towards modeling carbon and nitrogen cycling in support of climate-related initiatives, emphasis has been placed on incorporating increasingly mechanistic biogeochemistry within Earth system models to more accurately predict the response of terrestrial processes to natural and anthropogenic climate cycles. PFLOTRAN is an open-source subsurface code that is specialized for simulating multiphase flow and multicomponent biogeochemical transport on supercomputers. The object-oriented code was designed with modularity in mind and has been coupled with several third-party simulators (e.g. CLM to simulate land surface processes and E4D for coupled hydrogeophysical inversion). Central to PFLOTRAN's capabilities is its ability to simulate tightly-coupled reactive transport processes. This presentation focuses on recent enhancements to the code that enable the solution of large parameterized biogeochemical reaction networks with numerous chemical species. PFLOTRAN's "reaction sandbox" is described, which facilitates the implementation of user-defined reaction networks without the need for a comprehensive understanding of PFLOTRAN software infrastructure. The reaction sandbox is written in modern Fortran (2003-2008) and leverages encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism to provide the researcher with a flexible workspace for prototyping reactions within a massively parallel flow and transport simulation framework. As these prototypical reactions mature into well-accepted implementations, they can be incorporated into PFLOTRAN as native biogeochemistry capability. Users of the reaction sandbox are encouraged to upload their source code to PFLOTRAN's main source code repository, including the addition of simple regression tests to better ensure the long-term code compatibility and validity of simulation results.

  3. Facilitating Students' Career Development in Psychology Courses: A Portfolio Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Judith E.; Pines, Harvey A.; Bechtel, Kate M.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the use of a career exploration portfolio in an Industrial/Organizational psychology course (n = 22) to address students' career needs and to develop academic competencies. Students independently completed a series of assignments outside of class, which led to the construction of a personalized career development portfolio. Evaluations…

  4. Using an Art Technique To Facilitate Leadership Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ciantis, Cheryl

    This book describes a training technique in which an art activity called a touchstone exercise serves as the basis of an action-oriented leadership development program. Part 1 describes the context in which the touchstone exercise was developed and details the process of setting the stage for and conducting it. Two case studies illustrating the…

  5. Cable Television: Developing Community Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter-Huffman, Polly; And Others

    The final volume of a four-volume study focuses on community use of cable television systems. Four separate aspects are discussed extensively: the possibilities of public access, use in municipal service applications, uses in education, and a guide for education planners. Each section contains several appendixes and the education sections include…

  6. Barriers and facilitators to childhood obesity prevention among culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyril, Sheila; Nicholson, Jan M; Agho, Kingsley; Polonsky, Michael; Renzaho, Andre M

    2017-06-01

    Childhood obesity is rising among culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups who show poor engagement in obesity prevention initiatives. We examined the barriers and facilitators to the engagement of CALD communities in obesity prevention initiatives. We used the nominal group technique to collect data from 39 participants from Vietnamese, Burmese, African, Afghani and Indian origins living in disadvantaged areas of Victoria, Australia. Data analysis revealed ranked priorities for barriers and facilitators for CALD community engagement in obesity prevention initiatives. CALD parents identified key barriers as being: competing priorities in the post-migration settlement phase; language, cultural and program accessibility barriers; low levels of food and health literacy; junk food advertisement targeting children; and lack of mandatory weight checks for schoolchildren. Key facilitators emerged as: bicultural playgroup leaders; ethnic community groups; and school-based healthy lunch box initiatives. This study has identified several policy recommendations including: the implementation of robust food taxation policies; consistent control of food advertising targeting children; improving CALD health literacy using bicultural workers; and matching health promotional materials with CALD community literacy levels. Implications for Public Health: These recommendations can directly influence public health policy to improve the engagement of CALD communities in obesity prevention services and ultimately reduce the widening obesity disparities in Australia. © 2017 The Authors.

  7. Facilitation of neocortical presynaptic terminal development by NMDA receptor activation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Neocortical circuits are established through the formation of synapses between cortical neurons, but the molecular mechanisms of synapse formation are only beginning to be understood. The mechanisms that control synaptic vesicle (SV) and active zone (AZ) protein assembly at developing presynaptic terminals have not yet been defined. Similarly, the role of glutamate receptor activation in control of presynaptic development remains unclear. Results Here, we use confocal imag...

  8. Facilitation of neocortical presynaptic terminal development by NMDA receptor activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sceniak Michael P

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neocortical circuits are established through the formation of synapses between cortical neurons, but the molecular mechanisms of synapse formation are only beginning to be understood. The mechanisms that control synaptic vesicle (SV and active zone (AZ protein assembly at developing presynaptic terminals have not yet been defined. Similarly, the role of glutamate receptor activation in control of presynaptic development remains unclear. Results Here, we use confocal imaging to demonstrate that NMDA receptor (NMDAR activation regulates accumulation of multiple SV and AZ proteins at nascent presynaptic terminals of visual cortical neurons. NMDAR-dependent regulation of presynaptic assembly occurs even at synapses that lack postsynaptic NMDARs. We also provide evidence that this control of presynaptic terminal development is independent of glia. Conclusions Based on these data, we propose a novel NMDAR-dependent mechanism for control of presynaptic terminal development in excitatory neocortical neurons. Control of presynaptic development by NMDARs could ultimately contribute to activity-dependent development of cortical receptive fields.

  9. How NASA is building and sustaining a community of scientist-communicators through virtual technology, graphic facilitation and other community-building tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, S.; Bovaird, E.; Stewart, N.; Reaves, J.; Tenenbaum, L. F.; Betz, L.; Kuchner, M. J.; Dodson, K. E.; Miller, A.

    2013-12-01

    In 2013 NASA launched its first agency-wide effort to cultivate and support scientist-communicators. The multiple motivations behind this effort are complex and overlapping, and include a desire to connect the agency's workforce to its mission and to each other in the post-Space Shuttle era; a shift in how the agency and the world communicates about science; the current public perception of science and of NASA, and a desire to share the stories of the real people behind the agency's technical work. Leaders in the NASA science, communications and public outreach communities partnered with the agency's training and leadership development organization to: identify and fully characterize the need for training and development in science communication, experiment with various learning models, and invite early-adopter scientists to evaluate these models for future agency investment. Using virtual collaboration technology, graphic facilitation, and leadership development methods, we set out to create an environment where scientist-communicators can emerge and excel. First, we asked scientists from across the agency to identify their motivations, opportunities, barriers and areas of interest in science communication. Scientists identified a need to go beyond traditional media training, a need for continuous practice and peer feedback, and a need for agency incentives and sustained support for this kind of work. This community-driven approach also uncovered a serious need for communication support in the wake of diminishing resources for travel and conference attendance. As a first step, we offered a series of virtual learning events - highly collaborative working sessions for scientists to practice their communication technique, develop and apply new skills to real-world situations, and gain valuable feedback from external subject matter experts and fellow scientists from across the agency in a supportive environment. Scientists from ten NASA centers and a broad range of

  10. Essence of Black Colleges in Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Assistance Consortium To Improve Coll. Services, Washington, DC.

    The response of black colleges and universities in the area of community development are discussed in relation to management and organization development, telecommunication, human resource development, educational innovations, and environmental services. Management and organization development encompasses small business development, public service…

  11. Chronic Stress Facilitates the Development of Deep Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing pressure of modern social life intensifies the impact of stress on the development of cardiovascular diseases, which include deep venous thrombosis (DVT. Renal sympathetic denervation has been applied as one of the clinical approaches for the treatment of drug-resistant hypertension. In addition, the close relationship between oxidative stress and cardiovascular diseases has been well documented. The present study is designed to explore the mechanism by which the renal sympathetic nerve system and the oxidative stress affect the blood coagulation system in the development of DVT. Chronic foot shock model in rats was applied to mimic a state of physiological stress similar to humans. Our results showed that chronic foot shock procedure could promote DVT which may be through the activation of platelets aggregation. The aggravation of DVT and activation of platelets were alleviated by renal sympathetic denervation or antioxidant (Tempol treatment. Concurrently, the denervation treatment could also reduce the levels of circulating oxidation factors in rats. These results demonstrate that both the renal sympathetic nerve system and the oxidative stress contribute to the development of DVT in response to chronic stress, which may provide novel strategy for treatment of clinic DVT patients.

  12. Epigenetic mechanisms facilitating oligodendrocyte development, maturation, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copray, Sjef; Huynh, Jimmy Long; Sher, Falak; Casaccia-Bonnefil, Patrizia; Boddeke, Erik

    2009-11-15

    The process of oligodendrocyte differentiation is regulated by a dynamic interaction between a genetic and an epigenetic program. Recent studies, addressing nucleosomal histone modifications have considerably increased our knowledge regarding epigenetic regulation of gene expression during oligodendrocyte development and aging. These results have generated new hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying the decreased efficiency of endogenous remyelination in response to demyelinating injuries with increasing age. In this review, we present an overview of the epigenetic mechanisms regulating gene expression at specific stages of oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation as well as the changes that occur with aging.

  13. Developing Community Health Worker Diabetes Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, W. J.; Lemay, C. A.; Hargraves, J. L.; Gorodetsky, T.; Calista, J.

    2012-01-01

    We designed, implemented and evaluated a 48-hour training program for community health workers (CHWs) deployed to diabetes care teams in community health centers (CHCs). The curriculum included core knowledge/skills with diabetes content to assist CHWs in developing patient self-management goals. Our qualitative evaluation included…

  14. Tennis shoes required: the role of the facilitator in professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Kevin; Parker, Melissa; Neutzling, Misti M

    2012-12-01

    Reform efforts to improve physical education often rely on facilitators to promote positive change. Although it is becoming more common, little is currently understood about the facilitation role. Our purpose was to examine facilitators' collective knowledge and experience with ongoing physical education professional development (PD), specifically regarding conceptions of their role in the process. Participants included 12 experienced PD facilitators. Data sources included formal semistructured and informal conversational interviews and participants' curriculum vitae. Results indicated that facilitators held common beliefs about teacher learning and self-identified actions aligned with those beliefs. Adhering to constructivist views of learning, facilitators underscored the role of prior knowledge and the active and social nature of learning. Their remarkably similar views emphasized multiple aspects of teacher capacity building.

  15. Teacher Design Teams as a Strategy for Professional Development: The Role of the Facilitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becuwe, Heleen; Tondeur, Jo; Pareja Roblin, Natalie; Thys, Jeroen; Castelein, Els

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to explore the role and importance of the facilitator in teacher design teams. The study took place in the context of a pre-service teacher education institution in Belgium, where teacher design teams were set up to facilitate the professional development of teacher educators. The findings from focus-group…

  16. Teacher Design Teams as a Strategy for Professional Development: The Role of the Facilitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becuwe, Heleen; Tondeur, Jo; Pareja Roblin, Natalie; Thys, Jeroen; Castelein, Els

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to explore the role and importance of the facilitator in teacher design teams. The study took place in the context of a pre-service teacher education institution in Belgium, where teacher design teams were set up to facilitate the professional development of teacher educators. The findings from focus-group…

  17. The Role of A Facilitated Online Workspace Component of A Community of Practice: Knowledge Building and Value Creation for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, B.

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the role of an online workspace component of a community in the work of a community of practice. Much has been studied revealing the importance of communities of practice to organizations, project success, and knowledge management and some of these same successes hold true for virtual communities of practice. Study participants were 75 Education and Public Outreach community members of NASA's Science Mission Directorate Earth Forum. In this mixed methods study, online workspace metrics were used to track participation and a survey completed by 21 members was used to quantify participation. For a more detailed analysis, 15 community members (5 highly active users, 5 average users, and 5 infrequent users) selected based on survey responses, were interviewed. Finally, survey data was gathered from 7 online facilitators to understand their role in the community. Data collected from these 21 community members and 5 facilitating members suggest that highly active users (logging into the workspace daily), were more likely to have transformative experiences, co-create knowledge, feel ownership of community knowledge, have extended opportunities for community exchange, and find new forms of evaluation. Average users shared some similar characteristics with both the highly active members and infrequent users, representing a group in transition as they become more engaged and active in the online workspace. Inactive users viewed the workspace as having little value, being difficult to navigate, being mainly for gaining basic information about events and community news, and as another demand on their time. Results show the online workspace component of the Earth Science Education and Outreach Forum is playing an important and emerging role for this community by supporting knowledge building and knowledge sharing, and growing in value for those that utilizing it more frequently. The evidence suggests that with increased participation or "usage" comes

  18. 75 FR 7990 - Use of Community Development Loans by Community Financial Institutions To Secure Advances...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ...'s separate rulemaking addressing Bank membership for community development financial institutions... Use of Community Development Loans by Community Financial Institutions To Secure Advances; Secured... eligible collateral that community financial institution (CFI) members may pledge to secure Federal...

  19. Developing Communication Access Standards to Maximize Community Inclusion for People with Communication Support Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solarsh, Barbara; Johnson, Hilary

    2017-01-01

    People with communication support needs experience barriers that limit their social inclusion in society. A community approach such as "communication access" that targets changing attitudes, skills, and resources may assist in facilitating community participation. The authors describe the development of communication access from 2008 in…

  20. Identifying Success Factors of ICT in Developing a Learning Community: Case Study Charles Sturt University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Matthew; Uys, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: A learning community has been developing in a distributed environment amongst the members of the Centre for Enhancing of Learning and Teaching (CELT) located in the Bathurst, Goulburn and Orange campuses of Charles Sturt University. This group is known by the acronym of GDMOB, with the purpose of the community to facilitate the…

  1. Extending Content-Focused Professional Development through Online Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavasseur, Cynthia B.; MacGregor, S. Kim

    2008-01-01

    This mixed method case study provides insights about how the professional development of middle school teachers is facilitated through their participation in content-focused online communities of practice. A key finding from this research reveals that the online community provided teachers with enhanced opportunities to share ideas, to discuss…

  2. Public Marketing: An Alternative Policy Decision-Making Idea for Small Cities. Community Development Research Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, James; And Others

    The concept of public marketing presents a strategy for the systems approach to community development that would facilitate the community decision making process via improved communication. Basic aspects of the social marketing process include: (1) product policy; (2) channels of distribution; (3) pricing (perceived price vs quality and quantity…

  3. The GETE approach to facilitating the commercialization and use of DOE-developed environmental technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, T.N. [Global Environment & Technology Foundation, Annandale, VA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Global Environmental Technology Enterprise (GETE) was conceived to develop and implement strategies to facilitate the commercialization of innovative, cost-effective Department of Energy (DOE)-developed environmental technologies. These strategies are needed to aid DOE`s clean-up mission; to break down barriers to commercialization; and to build partnerships between the federal government and private industry in order to facilitate the development and use of innovative environmental technologies.

  4. Can Massive Communities of Teachers Facilitate Collaborative Reflection? Fractal Design as a Possible Answer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarà, Marc; Kelly, Nick; Mauri, Teresa; Danaher, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the possibility that virtual communities of teachers with large numbers of members (referred to as "massive communities of teachers") can offer support to novice teachers by means of collaborative reflection. The paper examines and conceptualises some problems found in professional massive communities and proposes…

  5. Fun, animal welfare or community development? Understanding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding young tourists' preferences for a wildlife tourism package. ... This paper explores the impact of young travellers' value orientations on their ... to biospheric values; one enhancing the cultural and community development aspect ...

  6. Participatory Research for a Radical Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenga, Derek C.

    1994-01-01

    Critically examines community development assumptions through historical analysis and mapping of political discourse. Using the methods of Foucault, Said, and Gramsci, demonstrates how participatory research, concerned with releasing people's knowledge through transformation, can expose and resist dominant discourses. (SK)

  7. Community Participation and Sustainable Development of Ecotourism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community Participation and Sustainable Development of Ecotourism: The Case of the ... and sustainable use of the naturebased tourism resources of Wechiau. ... conservation and sustainable ecotourism but exhibit a negative relationship ...

  8. The Nanomaterial Registry: facilitating the sharing and analysis of data in the diverse nanomaterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostraat, Michele L; Mills, Karmann C; Guzan, Kimberly A; Murry, Damaris

    2013-01-01

    The amount of data being generated in the nanotechnology research space is significant, and the coordination, sharing, and downstream analysis of the data is complex and consistently deliberated. The complexities of the data are due in large part to the inherently complicated characteristics of nanomaterials. Also, testing protocols and assays used for nanomaterials are diverse and lacking standardization. The Nanomaterial Registry has been developed to address such challenges as the need for standard methods, data formatting, and controlled vocabularies for data sharing. The Registry is an authoritative, web-based tool whose purpose is to simplify the community's level of effort in assessing nanomaterial data from environmental and biological interaction studies. Because the Registry is meant to be an authoritative resource, all data-driven content is systematically archived and reviewed by subject-matter experts. To support and advance nanomaterial research, a set of minimal information about nanomaterials (MIAN) has been developed and is foundational to the Registry data model. The MIAN has been used to create evaluation and similarity criteria for nanomaterials that are curated into the Registry. The Registry is a publicly available resource that is being built through collaborations with many stakeholder groups in the nanotechnology community, including industry, regulatory, government, and academia. Features of the Registry website (http://www.nanomaterialregistry.org) currently include search, browse, side-by-side comparison of nanomaterials, compliance ratings based on the quality and quantity of data, and the ability to search for similar nanomaterials within the Registry. This paper is a modification and extension of a proceedings paper for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

  9. The Nanomaterial Registry: facilitating the sharing and analysis of data in the diverse nanomaterial community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostraat ML

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Michele L Ostraat, Karmann C Mills, Kimberly A Guzan, Damaris MurryRTI International, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: The amount of data being generated in the nanotechnology research space is significant, and the coordination, sharing, and downstream analysis of the data is complex and consistently deliberated. The complexities of the data are due in large part to the inherently complicated characteristics of nanomaterials. Also, testing protocols and assays used for nanomaterials are diverse and lacking standardization. The Nanomaterial Registry has been developed to address such challenges as the need for standard methods, data formatting, and controlled vocabularies for data sharing. The Registry is an authoritative, web-based tool whose purpose is to simplify the community's level of effort in assessing nanomaterial data from environmental and biological interaction studies. Because the registry is meant to be an authoritative resource, all data-driven content is systematically archived and reviewed by subject-matter experts. To support and advance nanomaterial research, a set of minimal information about nanomaterials (MIAN has been developed and is foundational to the Registry data model. The MIAN has been used to create evaluation and similarity criteria for nanomaterials that are curated into the Registry. The Registry is a publicly available resource that is being built through collaborations with many stakeholder groups in the nanotechnology community, including industry, regulatory, government, and academia. Features of the Registry website (https://www.nanomaterialregistry.org/ currently include search, browse, side-by-side comparison of nanomaterials, compliance ratings based on the quality and quantity of data, and the ability to search for similar nanomaterials within the Registry. This paper is a modification and extension of a proceedings paper for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.Keywords: nanoinformatics

  10. Uplifting developing communities through sustained technology transfer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashiri, M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available feedback mechanisms to both the local Integrated Development Plan and the Provincial Growth and Development Strategy, was able to navigate potential conflict areas such as negotiating acceptable wage rates [below minimum wage] with the community... to mobilize and galvanize the community around the benefits of the project, as well as to explain and to iron out potential mine fields, such as the level of funding available, wage rate and payment policy, technology issues and project implementation...

  11. Elderly migration and development in small communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowles, G D; Watkins, J F

    1993-01-01

    "This paper develops a conceptual model of the process of community change [in the United States] in response to elderly inmigration. Analysis of intra-regional variation in elderly migration patterns in Appalachia, and synthesis of an emergent literature on the benefits and costs of attracting elderly migrants, serve as a backdrop for case studies, based on field observations and interviews, of three contrasting Appalachian communities at different stages of development as retirement destinations."

  12. Applying community engagement to disaster planning: developing the vision and design for the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Kenneth B; Tang, Jennifer; Lizaola, Elizabeth; Jones, Felica; Brown, Arleen; Stayton, Alix; Williams, Malcolm; Chandra, Anita; Eisenman, David; Fogleman, Stella; Plough, Alonzo

    2013-07-01

    Community resilience (CR) is a priority for preparedness, but few models exist. A steering council used community-partnered participatory research to support workgroups in developing CR action plans and hosted forums for input to design a pilot demonstration of implementing CR versus enhanced individual preparedness toolkits. Qualitative data describe how stakeholders viewed CR, how toolkits were developed, and demonstration design evolution. Stakeholders viewed community engagement as facilitating partnerships to implement CR programs when appropriately supported by policy and CR resources. Community engagement exercises clarified motivations and informed action plans (e.g., including vulnerable populations). Community input identified barriers (e.g., trust in government) and CR-building strategies. A CR toolkit and demonstration comparing its implementation with individual preparedness were codeveloped. Community-partnered participatory research was a useful framework to plan a CR initiative through knowledge exchange.

  13. Facilitating access to voluntary and community services for patients with psychosocial problems: a before-after evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leibowitz Judy

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with psychosocial problems may benefit from a variety of community, educational, recreational and voluntary sector resources, but GPs often under-refer to these through lack of knowledge and time. This study evaluated the acceptability and effectiveness of graduate primary care mental health workers (GPCMHWs facilitating access to voluntary and community sector services for patients with psychosocial problems. Methods Patients with psychosocial problems from 13 general practices in London were referred to a GPCMHW Community Link scheme providing information and support to access voluntary and community resources. Patient satisfaction, mental health and social outcomes, and use of primary care resources, were evaluated. Results 108 patients consented to take part in the study. At three-month follow-up, 63 (58% had made contact with a community service identified as suitable for their needs. Most were satisfied with the help provided by the GPCMHW in identifying and supporting access to a suitable service. There was a reduction in the number of patients with a probable mental health problem on the GHQ-12 from 83% to 52% (difference 31% (95% CI, 17% – 44%. Social adjustment improved and frequencies of primary care consultations and of prescription of psychotropic medications were reduced. Conclusion Graduates with limited training in mental health and no prior knowledge of local community resources can help patients with psychosocial problems access voluntary and community services, and patients value such a scheme. There was some evidence of effectiveness in reducing psychosocial and mental health problems.

  14. Community OR and OR for development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. du T. Fourie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview is given of Community Operations Research and of the connection between OR and development. The RDP is the main framework for development in South Africa, and its present state is described. Some suggestions are made as to ways in which ORSSA could support the RDP and development in South Africa.

  15. Service delivery, community development, and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John W

    2010-01-01

    Service delivery has traditionally been based on market forces. When this is the case, the community becomes a silent partner in this process. Services, accordingly, are directed mostly to correcting personal ills and have little to do with community uplift. Another model, based on the work of Amartya Sen, is available that conceptualizes interventions in a very different way. If understood in the context of community development, the focus of services is social change, rather than merely personal rehabilitation. This reorientation is discussed in this article.

  16. Preparing Future Faculty for Community Engagement: Barriers, Facilitators, Models, and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, KerryAnn; Jaeger, Audrey J.

    2016-01-01

    This article considers the historical and current national context for integrating community engagement into graduate education. While it might be argued that most graduate education contributes generally to society by advancing knowledge, we are referring here to community engagement that involves some reciprocal interaction between graduate…

  17. Integrate Web 2.0 Technology to Facilitate Online Professional Community: EMI Special Editing Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chih-Hsiung; Blocher, Michael; Ntoruru, Joshua

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the collaborative journal review of an online professional community that was established to prepare this special edition for publication. The focus is on how Web 2.0 technology can be used to support a professional journal review community and to enhance active social interaction among reviewers. The theme of this special…

  18. Community nutrition programmes, globalization and sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Herrera, José Carlos

    2006-08-01

    On an international scale, the last seventy-five years have been a period of deep social, economic and political transformation for the developing countries. They have been especially influenced by the international phenomenon of globalization, the benefits of which have been unequally distributed among countries. In this context, the strategies used to improve the general nutritional health of the population of developing countries include broad approaches integrating nutritional interventions in a context of sustainable community development, while valuing the existing relations between fields as diverse as agriculture, education, sociology, economy, health, environment, hygiene and nutrition. The community nutrition programmes are emblematic of these initiatives. Nevertheless, in spite of the increasing evidence of the potential possibilities offered by these programmes to improve the nutritional status and contribute to the development and the self-sufficiency of the community, their success is relatively limited, due to the inappropriate planning, implementation and evaluation of the programmes. In the present article, I attempt to emphasie the importance of community participation of the population of developing countries in the community nutrition programmes within the context of globalization. This process is not only an ethical imperative, but a pragmatic one. It is a crucial step in the process of liberation, democratization and equality that will lead to true sustainable development.

  19. Building relationships and facilitating immigrant community integration: An evaluation of a Cultural Navigator Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rebecca L; Chiarelli-Helminiak, Christina M; Ferraj, Brunilda; Barrette, Kyle

    2016-04-01

    Despite the long history of immigration in the United States, communities around the country struggle to integrate newcomers into the economic, cultural, and political spheres of society. Utilizing results from the program evaluation of one public library's Cultural Navigator Program, the authors illustrate how communities and public institutions can promote integration and relationship-building between newly arrived immigrants and long-time residents. Existing social networks within receiving communities, conceptualized in this article as social capital, were leveraged to build capacity among newly arrived immigrants and foster inclusivity and integration at the community level. As a place of intervention, public libraries are suggested as a safe and shared space where community integration can be fostered. Insights derived from the evaluation inform a discussion on engaging approaches to immigrant integration. Lessons learned and recommendations for program evaluators and administrators are provided.

  20. Facilitation may not be an adequate mechanism of community succession on carrion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Jean-Philippe; Moreau, Gaétan

    2017-04-01

    The facilitation model of ecological succession was advanced by plant ecologists in the late 1970s and was then introduced to carrion ecology in the late 1980s, without empirical evidence of its applicability. Ecologists in both disciplines proposed removing early colonists, in this case fly eggs and larvae, from the substrate to determine whether other species could still colonize, which to our knowledge has never been attempted. Here, we tested the facilitation model in a carrion system by removing fly eggs and larvae from carcasses that were exposed in agricultural fields and assigned to one of the following treatment levels of removal intensity: 0, carrion systems. Although results showed, in part, that the removal of fly eggs and larvae decreased the decomposition rate of carcasses, the removal did not prevent colonization by secondary colonizers. Finally, we discuss future studies and make recommendations as to how the facilitation model could be improved, firstly by being more specific about the scale where facilitation is believed to be occurring, secondly by clearly stating what environmental modification is believed to be involved, and thirdly by disentangling facilitation from priority effects.

  1. Using consecutive Rapid Participatory Appraisal studies to assess, facilitate and evaluate health and social change in community settings

    OpenAIRE

    Murray Scott A; Lloyd Simon; Brown Colin S

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background To investigate how a relatively socio-economically deprived community's needs have changed over time, assess which recommendations from an earlier assessment were implemented and sustained, and consider whether serial Rapid Participatory Appraisal is an effective health research tool that can promote community development and has utility in assessing longitudinal change. Methods Rapid Participatory Appraisal involves communities in identifying and challenging their own hea...

  2. SUSTAINABLE URBAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT THROUGH AGENDA 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Md Zan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The much-talked about issues such as the rising of heavy crime cases, problems in solid waste management, air and water pollution as well as traffic congestion detering the quality of life among urban community members. Urgent and proactive measure is highly desireable in order to preserve and maintain the integral parts of urban’s higher quality of life. All parties should take part in ongoing efforts to achieve sustainable development through various means. Local Agenda 21 (LA21 serves as one of the efforts in achieveing the ultimate goal of sustainable development through better collaboration and cooperation among stakeholders including local government, non-governmental organisations and the community at large. The core principle of the LA21 program lies in the spirit of cooperation among community members, local authorities and the private sectors. This could be achieved through various activities including from the beginning such as through a comprehensive planning for the local area to achieve the sustainable development. Community members should be involved in brainstorming of the ideas and expressing their views so that authorities would be able to identify the real and arising issues in the community. Through this way a sustainable town and municipal planning could be developed and initiated. This paper discusses the importance of urbancommunity participation in achieving sustainable development as practicedthrough LA21 in Seberang Perai Municipal Council, Penang.

  3. Community-Based Services that Facilitate Interoperability and Intercomparison of Precipitation Datasets from Multiple Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong; Kempler, Steven; Teng, William; Leptoukh, Gregory; Ostrenga, Dana

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 12 years, large volumes of precipitation data have been generated from space-based observatories (e.g., TRMM), merging of data products (e.g., gridded 3B42), models (e.g., GMAO), climatologies (e.g., Chang SSM/I derived rain indices), field campaigns, and ground-based measuring stations. The science research, applications, and education communities have greatly benefited from the unrestricted availability of these data from the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) and, in particular, the services tailored toward precipitation data access and usability. In addition, tools and services that are responsive to the expressed evolving needs of the precipitation data user communities have been developed at the Precipitation Data and Information Services Center (PDISC) (http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/precipitation or google NASA PDISC), located at the GES DISC, to provide users with quick data exploration and access capabilities. In recent years, data management and access services have become increasingly sophisticated, such that they now afford researchers, particularly those interested in multi-data set science analysis and/or data validation, the ability to homogenize data sets, in order to apply multi-variant, comparison, and evaluation functions. Included in these services is the ability to capture data quality and data provenance. These interoperability services can be directly applied to future data sets, such as those from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. This presentation describes the data sets and services at the PDISC that are currently used by precipitation science and applications researchers, and which will be enhanced in preparation for GPM and associated multi-sensor data research. Specifically, the GES-DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (Giovanni) will be illustrated. Giovanni enables scientific exploration of Earth science data without researchers having to

  4. Developing a Discourse of the Postmodern Community Development Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Karen; Mansfield, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to promote the generation of a discourse of the postmodern community work professional. A shared discourse will lead, we propose to shared capital. We argue that there is a tension between the modern and postmodern for those of us engaged in the profession of community learning and development (CL&D). We need to value…

  5. Developing a community-based genetic nomenclature for anole lizards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusumi Kenro

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative studies of amniotes have been hindered by a dearth of reptilian molecular sequences. With the genomic assembly of the green anole, Anolis carolinensis available, non-avian reptilian genes can now be compared to mammalian, avian, and amphibian homologs. Furthermore, with more than 350 extant species in the genus Anolis, anoles are an unparalleled example of tetrapod genetic diversity and divergence. As an important ecological, genetic and now genomic reference, it is imperative to develop a standardized Anolis gene nomenclature alongside associated vocabularies and other useful metrics. Results Here we report the formation of the Anolis Gene Nomenclature Committee (AGNC and propose a standardized evolutionary characterization code that will help researchers to define gene orthology and paralogy with tetrapod homologs, provide a system for naming novel genes in Anolis and other reptiles, furnish abbreviations to facilitate comparative studies among the Anolis species and related iguanid squamates, and classify the geographical origins of Anolis subpopulations. Conclusions This report has been generated in close consultation with members of the Anolis and genomic research communities, and using public database resources including NCBI and Ensembl. Updates will continue to be regularly posted to new research community websites such as lizardbase. We anticipate that this standardized gene nomenclature will facilitate the accessibility of reptilian sequences for comparative studies among tetrapods and will further serve as a template for other communities in their sequencing and annotation initiatives.

  6. Linking case management and community development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Carol D; McClelland, Robert W; Gursansky, Di

    2006-01-01

    Case management, in various forms, is now institutionalized as a core part of policy and programs designed to deliver home- and community-based services to older adults. The case management role, in theory, requires attention to both client and system goals, although in practice the system goals that have received most attention have been gatekeeping and resource allocation. While case managers have been admonished to find and develop resources in the community, this has primarily taken the form of including informal services in individual client care plans. What has been missing is focused attention to the potential of the community as a nurturing environment with the capacity to support older adults and their caregivers. Sustainable care for older adults cannot be achieved by formal service and family support alone. This article proposes the creation of linkages between case managers, who build the service arrangements for older people, and community developers, who are responsible for building community capacity and social capital. It is argued that this linkage is essential for establishing the foundations of a caring community with the capacity to support older people.

  7. Letting Go and Letting the Angels Grow: Using Etienne Wenger's Community of Practice Theory to Facilitate Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale qualitative research study conducted within a community of English Language teachers, and explores how teacher development workshops can be used to foster or cultivate Communities of Practice. The study was situated in a Language Centre within the domain of UK Higher Education where there was an institutional…

  8. Developing a virtual interdisciplinary research community in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Barbara; Cooper, Neil

    2003-05-01

    As multidisciplinary collaboration in both clinical and research settings is becoming a key aspect of contemporary health care, strategies to enhance interprofessional interaction in postgraduate research programmes can offer important experiences to facilitate ongoing interprofessional relationships. This paper provides a retrospective appraisal of a strategy which used computer-mediated communication to develop a virtual community network, known as'health_voice' accessed through a web page. The rationale for developing the network is presented, and the process of designing and establishing the web-site through an action research approach is described The outcome of the strategy is reviewed with regard to the relationships between the real' and 'virtual' community. Reflections on the developmental process contextualise the initiative within a concept of a community-of-practice. It is acknowledged that the use of a virtual arena for communication within a research community involves a cultural change in the dynamics of higher degree teaching and learning. Future plans to further embed the virtual environment within a postgraduate research culture are given.

  9. New Developments in Mental Health and Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Fazenda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The community mental health model implies a bio‐psycho‐social perspective of mental health/illness issues, as well as a set of values that advocate equity in service access, community treatment, respect for human rights, a recovery vision, promotion of independent living, social integration and user and family participation. In accordance with the priorities set by the European Union, mental health services must guarantee that these principles are applied in the prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and promotion of mental health. Inter‐sector cooperation is an essential part of developing transversal policies that ensure society’s involvement in mental health promotion. Advances in community mental health in‐ dicate the relevance of considering human rights both in policy development and in practice, of the recovery perspective and of the need to promote the participation of user and carer organizations.

  10. Examining How Model Youth Sport Coaches Learn to Facilitate Positive Youth Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camiré, Martin; Trudel, Pierre; Forneris, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Background: Research indicates that some youth sport coaches have specific strategies in their coaching plan to facilitate positive youth development (PYD) while others struggle in articulating how they promote the development of their athletes in actual practice. These variations can be largely attributed to the fact that coaching is a complex…

  11. Facilitating Trainees' Multicultural Development and Social Justice Advocacy through a Refugee/Immigrant Mental Health Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johanna E.; Schale, Codi L.; Khamphakdy-Brown, Supavan

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study explored trainees' experiences in an outreach program for refugee/immigrant women to examine if those experiences facilitated the development of multicultural competency and social justice advocacy. Twelve students were interviewed, and their responses yielded 3 categories: development of cultural knowledge,…

  12. Pioneer CESA Guidance Project: A Staff Development Program for School Counselors. Group Facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbach, Robert F.

    This document on group facilitation is one of seven staff development programs which target performance skills of school counselors. The staff development programs are designed to be used by students who aspire to become school counselors, by entry level counselors who are seeking to demonstrate their skill for certification purposes, and by…

  13. The Effect of a Teacher Professional Development in Facilitating Students' Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Afzal S.; Watt, Anthony P.

    2010-01-01

    The Iranian educational system would benefit from major refinement in order to better develop the creativity of children. The extension of teachers' understanding of creativity is one of the main factors in facilitating change. A theory and practice based professional development program was designed, therefore, to assist teachers to acquire…

  14. Testing the importance of plant strategies on facilitation using congeners in a coastal community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiang; Cui, Baoshan; Bertness, Mark D; An, Yuan

    2012-09-01

    Much is known about how environmental stress mediates the strength of facilitation, but less is known about how different plant traits affect facilitation. We examined interactions between the shrub Tamarix chinensis and two congeneric forbs (Suaeda salsa and S. glauca) on the Chinese coast. Although S. salsa and S. glauca are both annuals, morphologically similar, and have synchronous phenologies, they have contrasting adaptive strategies. S. glauca is salt intolerant but competitively superior, and S. salsa is salt tolerant but competitively inferior. Field surveys showed that S. glauca was associated with T. chinensis canopies while S. salsa was more abundant in open areas. A T. chinensis removal experiment showed that S. glauca cover was lower and soil salinity higher after two years in removal than in control plots. Transplant experiments showed that S. salsa performance under T. chinensis canopies was reduced by competition from S. glauca and T. chinensis, while in open areas S. glauca was not affected by S. salsa competition. Thus, contrasting competitive abilities and stress tolerances of S. glauca and S. salsa underlie their facilitative and competitive interactions with T. chinensis, suggesting that plant strategies are critical to the outcome of species interactions.

  15. [Facilitating team development for nursing staff--prospects, effects and benefits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittich, Andrea; Dieterle, Wilfried E; Schüpbach, Heinz; Wirsching, Michael

    2006-11-01

    Facilitating team development is a frequent intervention in hospitals and seen as a probate mean to support the staff. As the method spreads, a need for scientific evidence is articulated. At Freiburg University Hospital, facilitating team development for nursing teams has been empirically evaluated on a broad data basis. The studies focussed on how nurses in a university centre of high tech medicine experience their work situation, what (psychological) stress they feel exposed to and how they appraise the contribution of facilitating team development to prevent and come to terms with that stress. Results prove the effects and benefits of the intervention, particularly with regard to communicational difficulties within the nursing staff and to problems of interdisciplinary cooperation. The sine qua non of successful intervention, as notifying future participants about this particular method or the adequate formation of the group is highlighted.

  16. The San Francisco Community Vital Signs: using web-based tools to facilitate the mobilizing for action through planning and partnerships process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovsky, Andrey; Katz, Mitchell H

    2011-01-01

    A coalition of local public health system stakeholders in San Francisco developed a community assessment and strategic planning tool, the San Francisco Community Vital Signs (SFCVS). The SFCVS builds on the Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships (MAPP) model by incorporating Internet-based technology into local public health system evaluation and strengthening. This article describes the overlap between the SFCVS and MAPP processes, the manner in which information technology facilitated the SFCVS process, and a template for infusing a Web-based platform into the MAPP model. Internet-based applications helped to implement many (16 of 41; 39%) of the components of the SFCVS process. Of these 16 process measures, the majority (10; 63%) required the use of Web-based technology. The SFCVS demonstrates that a MAPP-like process can leverage the Internet to augment the functionality of public health activities.

  17. The Sangre Por Salud Biobank: Facilitating Genetic Research in an Underrepresented Latino Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaibi, Gabriel; Singh, Davinder; De Filippis, Eleanna; Hernandez, Valentina; Rosenfeld, Bill; Otu, Essen; Montes de Oca, Gregorio; Levey, Sharon; Radecki Breitkopf, Carmen; Sharp, Richard; Olson, Janet; Cerhan, James; Thibodeau, Stephen; Winkler, Erin; Mandarino, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    The Sangre Por Salud (Blood for Health; SPS) Biobank was created for the purpose of expanding precision medicine research to include underrepresented Latino patients. It is the result of a unique collaboration between Mayo Clinic and Mountain Park Health Center, a federally qualified community health center in Phoenix, Arizona. This report describes the rationale, development, implementation, and characteristics of the SPS Biobank. Latino adults (ages 18-85 years) who were active patients within Mountain Park Health Center's internal medicine practice in Phoenix, Ariz., and had no history of diabetes were eligible. Participants provided a personal and family history of chronic disease, completed a sociodemographic, psychosocial, and behavioral questionnaire, underwent a comprehensive cardiometabolic risk assessment (anthropometrics, blood pressure and labs), and provided blood samples for banking. Laboratory results of cardiometabolic testing were returned to the participants and their providers through the electronic health record. During the first 2 years of recruitment into the SPS Biobank, 2,335 patients were approached and 1,432 (61.3%) consented to participate; 1,354 (94.5%) ultimately completed all requisite questionnaires and medical evaluations. The cohort is primarily Spanish-speaking (72.9%), female (73.3%), with a mean age of 41.3 ± 12.5 years. Most participants were born outside of the US (77.9%) and do not have health insurance (77.5%). The prevalence of overweight (35.5%) and obesity (45.0%) was high, as was previously unidentified prediabetes (55.9%), type 2 diabetes (7.4%), prehypertension (46.8%), and hypertension (16.2%). The majority of participants rated their health as good to excellent (72.1%) and, as a whole, described their overall quality of life as high (7.9/10). Collaborative efforts such as the SPS Biobank are critical for ensuring that underrepresented minority populations are included in precision medicine initiatives and biomedical

  18. Continuity and discontinuity in community development theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.W. Kuitenbrouwer (Joost)

    1973-01-01

    textabstractFew experienced fieldwerkers in community development who attend advanced training programmes have any expectation of acquiring a cut-and-dried solution that can be applied to problems in the field. Moreover, it is now wellknown that the advanced nations cannot provide the so-called dev

  19. Developing patient education in community pharmacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, A.T.G.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of patient education in the community pharmacy. The research questions concentrate on the determinants of technicians’ patient education behavior and the effects of a one-year lasting intervention program on the patient education activities in the pharmacy. Thi

  20. Towards a New Paradigm of Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mike

    1995-01-01

    The new model of community development focuses on the following: participatory methodologies of research; practical and generalist skills; local-driven revenues in small business and nongovernmental organizations; rethinking all products, processes, and services; international small business trade networks; and the integration of leisure and work.…

  1. Towards a New Paradigm of Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mike

    1995-01-01

    The new model of community development focuses on the following: participatory methodologies of research; practical and generalist skills; local-driven revenues in small business and nongovernmental organizations; rethinking all products, processes, and services; international small business trade networks; and the integration of leisure and work.…

  2. Facilitating Student Success for Entering California Community College Students: How One Institution Can Make an Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Esau; Simon, Merril A.

    As the need to serve a broader and larger population of students at the community college level increases, the rate of student success is decreasing at many institutions. There is a greater need to deliver in-class and co-curricular experiences that satisfy the students currently entering college. The Student Success Project at Santa Monica…

  3. New Interoperable Tools to Facilitate Decision-Making to Support Community Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communities, regional planning authorities, regulatory agencies, and other decision-making bodies do not currently have adequate access to spatially explicit information crucial to making decisions that allow them to consider a full accounting of the costs, benefits, and trade-of...

  4. Resilience of arctic mycorrhizal fungal communities after wildfire facilitated by resprouting shrubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Hewitt; Elizabeth Bent; Teresa N. Hollingsworth; F. Stuart Chapin; D. Lee. Taylor

    2013-01-01

    Climate-induced changes in the tundra fire regime are expected to alter shrub abundance and distribution across the Arctic. However, little is known about how fire may indirectly impact shrub performance by altering mycorrhizal symbionts. We used molecular tools, including ARISA and ITS sequencing, to characterize the mycorrhizal communities on resprouting ...

  5. Competition and facilitation between the marine nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece and its associated bacterial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauer, Verena S; Stomp, Maayke; Bouvier, Thierry; Fouilland, Eric; Leboulanger, Christophe; Confurius-Guns, Veronique; Weissing, Franz J; Stal, Lucas J; Huisman, Jef

    2015-01-01

    N2-fixing cyanobacteria represent a major source of new nitrogen and carbon for marine microbial communities, but little is known about their ecological interactions with associated microbiota. In this study we investigated the interactions between the unicellular N2-fixing cyanobacterium Cyanothece

  6. Facilitator and Participant Use of Facebook in a Community-Based Intervention for Parents: The InFANT Extend Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Katherine L; Campbell, Karen J; van der Pligt, Paige; Hesketh, Kylie D

    2017-07-24

    Social networking sites such as Facebook afford new opportunities for behavior-change interventions. Although often used as a recruitment tool, few studies have reported the use of Facebook as an intervention component to facilitate communication between researchers and participants. The aim of this study was to examine facilitator and participant use of a Facebook component of a community-based intervention for parents. First-time parent groups participating in the intervention arm of the extended Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT Extend) Program were invited to join their own private Facebook group. Facilitators mediated the Facebook groups, using them to share resources with parents, arrange group sessions, and respond to parent queries. Parents completed process evaluation questionnaires reporting on the usefulness of the Facebook groups. A total of 150 parents (from 27 first-time parent groups) joined their private Facebook group. There were a mean of 36.9 (standard deviation 11.1) posts/group, with the majority being facilitator posts. Facilitator administration posts (e.g., arranging upcoming group sessions) had the highest average comments (4.0), followed by participant health/behavior questions (3.5). The majority of participants reported that they enjoyed being a part of their Facebook group; however, the frequency of logging on to their groups' page declined over the 36 months of the trial, as did their perceived usefulness of the group. Facebook appears to be a useful administrative tool in this context. Parents enjoyed being part of their Facebook group, but their reported use of and engagement with Facebook declined over time.

  7. Enhanced facilitation at the extreme end of the aridity gradient in the Atacama Desert: a community-level approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Ramiro Pablo; Squeo, Francisco A; Armas, Cristina; Kelt, Douglas A; Gutiérrez, Julio R

    2016-06-01

    Plant facilitation is now recognized as an important process in severe environments. However, there is still no agreement on how facilitation changes as conditions become increasingly severe. The classic stress gradient hypothesis (SGH) predicts a monotonic increase in facilitation, which rises in frequency as conditions approach the extreme end of the environmental gradient. However, few studies have evaluated the validity of the SGH at the community level, the level at which it was formulated. Moreover, few studies have tested the SGH at either extreme of the gradient, and very few have excluded the effect of livestock on community response to stress. In line with the SGH, we hypothesized that several spatial pattern summary statistics would change monotonically from the least to the most arid sites, indicating increasingly aggregated patterns. In this study, we performed an evaluation of the SGH both within communities of shrub species and across a large portion of the Atacama Desert, and we isolated the abiotic component of the SGH. Our environmental gradient covered an extreme aridity gradient (< 20-130 mm annual precipitation). To perform point pattern analysis, we established 13 sites with environmental conditions representing four distinct levels of this gradient. Further, we conducted species co-occurrence analyses at 19 sites along the gradient. Both sets of analyses showed stronger positive spatial associations among plants at the most extreme end of the gradient. This was true regardless of whether we included all individuals, only small individuals located around large ones, or individuals in species pairs. Moreover, species tended to show greater co-occurrence as environmental severity increased. This increase in aggregation in the plant community seems to correlate with an increase in the strength of positive interspecific interactions, rather than greater clustering within each species. These monotonic increases in species co-occurrence and spatial

  8. Developing Ornamental Plants for Promoting Community Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritsana Khonphian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study aimed to investigate the development of ornamental plants for promoting community economy in marketing and product selling. The study area was Ban Mai Udom, Tambon Ban Mai, Amphoe Nong Bunmak, Changwat Nakhon Ratchasima. Approach: This qualitative research study collected documentary data and field data using survey, observations, interviews and focused group discussion. The sample consisted of totally 33 community leaders, ornamental plant producers sellers and buyers and state and private sector officials involving promotion of ornamental plant production and selling, obtained using the simple random sampling technique. The collected data were checked using the triangulation technique. The data were analyzed and the study findings were presented by means of a descriptive analysis. Results: The study findings revealed that the production of ornamental plants in Ban Mai Udom community had 2 types of development for promoting community economy: At the household level and the organizational level. At the household kevel, the problems of marketing and selling, in which prices could be bargained, by selling by themselves and haring their relatives sell the products a local markets both inside and outside the community. At the organization level, the patterns of promoting community economy were developed. The marketing problems were solved by using the concept of media through indigenous knowledge, setting up groups as an organization through ethnicity of Thai Khorat and using the Thai Khorat dialect. Conclusion: In solving the selling problems, all of the group members sold the products at local markets and foreign markets such as France, Hong Kong and Dubai. When they had got money, every group member could borrow some money as welfare at an interest rate of 2% year. Dividends were given to all group members every year. The methods mentioned could solve different problems involved.

  9. Animal Research Practices and Doctoral Student Identity Development in a Scientific Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Karri

    2009-01-01

    This article examines doctoral student identity development in regard to engagement with research practices. Using animal research as a contextual lens, it considers how students develop an identity congruent to their perception of the community which facilitates their social and cognitive activities. The shared, interpretive understanding among…

  10. International migration and development in Mexican communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, J; Kandel, W; Parrado, E A; Massey, D S

    1996-05-01

    The theoretical and empirical literature generally regards international migration as producing a cycle of dependency and stunted development in sending communities. Most migrants' earnings are spent on consumption; few funds are channeled into productive investment. We argue that this view is misleading because it ignores the conditions under which productive investment is likely to be possible and profitable. We analyze the determinants of migrants' savings and remittance decisions, using variables defined at the individual, household, community, and macroeconomic levels. We identify the conditions under which U.S. earnings are repatriated to Mexico as remittances and savings, and indicate the factors leading to their productive investment.

  11. Exploring the effects of developing collaboration in a primary science teacher community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillasen, Martin Krabbe

    2010-01-01

    ’s collective work in schools and developing network between schools. The objective is to improve the collaboration within primary science teacher communities on sharing best practice and developing new ways of teaching. This study represents an in-depth approach to explore possibilities and constraints for how...... learning communities is introduced to investigate factors that may facilitate sustainable changes of the collective work in science teacher communities. Examples on how McLaughlin and Talbert’s analytical framework is used as a diagnostic tool are presented. Such an analysis provides a vantage point......This paper presents findings from a qualitative study to explore factors that may facilitate sustainable changes of collaboration in a primary science teacher community in one school. The context for this study is a development project aimed at improving science teaching by changing teacher...

  12. Professional Learning Communities Facilitator's Guide for the What Works Clearinghouse Practice Guide: Foundational Skills to Support Reading for Understanding in Kindergarten through 3rd Grade. REL 2016-277

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosanovich, Marcia; Foorman, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Southeast developed a Professional Learning Community (PLC) Facilitators Guide to support educators in the implementation of recommendations from the What Works Clearinghouse's. The practice guide focuses on the foundational reading skills that enable students to read words, relate those words to their…

  13. A Hardy Plant Facilitates Nitrogen Removal via Microbial Communities in Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetlands in Winter

    OpenAIRE

    Penghe Wang; Hui Zhang; Jie Zuo; Dehua Zhao; Xiangxu Zou; Zhengjie Zhu; Nasreen Jeelani; Xin Leng; Shuqing An

    2016-01-01

    The plants effect in subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SSF-CWs) is controversial, especially at low temperatures. Consequently, several SSF-CWs planted with Iris pseudacorus (CWI) or Typha orientalis Presl. (CWT) and several unplanted ones (CWC) were set up and fed with secondary effluent of sewage treatment plant during the winter in Eastern China. The 16S rDNA Illumina Miseq sequencing analysis indicated the positive effects of I. pseudacorus on the bacterial community richness and dive...

  14. Mutualism between co-introduced species facilitates invasion and alters plant community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Kirsten M.; Robinson, Jennifer M.; Meadley Dunphy, Shannon A.; Frederickson, Megan E.

    2015-01-01

    Generalized mutualisms are often predicted to be resilient to changes in partner identity. Variation in mutualism-related traits between native and invasive species however, can exacerbate the spread of invasive species (‘invasional meltdown’) if invasive partners strongly interact. Here we show how invasion by a seed-dispersing ant (Myrmica rubra) promotes recruitment of a co-introduced invasive over native ant-dispersed (myrmecochorous) plants. We created experimental communities of invasive (M. rubra) or native ants (Aphaenogaster rudis) and invasive and native plants and measured seed dispersal and plant recruitment. In our mesocosms, and in laboratory and field trials, M. rubra acted as a superior seed disperser relative to the native ant. By contrast, previous studies have found that invasive ants are often poor seed dispersers compared with native ants. Despite belonging to the same behavioural guild, seed-dispersing ants were not functionally redundant. Instead, native and invasive ants had strongly divergent effects on plant communities: the invasive plant dominated in the presence of the invasive ant and the native plants dominated in the presence of the native ant. Community changes were not due to preferences for coevolved partners: variation in functional traits of linked partners drove differences. Here, we show that strongly interacting introduced mutualists can be major drivers of ecological change. PMID:25540283

  15. Seizing Community Participation in Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev Clausen, Helene; Gyimóthy, Szilvia

    2015-01-01

    and cultural sustainability defined in the Mexican national tourism program Pueblos Mágicos are put into practice. The analysis is focused on how citizenship, local participation and democracy are operationalized and what are the local consequences of this governmental program in the community of Álamos......Despite ten years of strategic focus on growth through sustainable tourism, few research projects generated understanding of how development policy initiatives contributed to community benefits locally. This article addresses this research gap and explores how the aims of local development....... By following the constitution and decision-making processes in the local Pueblos Mágicos committee, we demonstrate how different groups bargain on behalf of the ‘community’ and how they seize the opportunity to promote different development priorities. In particular, we address the role of a North American...

  16. Developing a sustainable foot care clinic in a homeless shelter within an academic-community partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoon, Patricia M; Champlin, Barbara E; Hunt, Roberta J

    2012-12-01

    Nursing faculty are confronted with the need to design community learning activities with vulnerable populations to prepare students for nursing practice. The creation of sustainable academic-community partnerships with agencies providing care to underserved populations meets this challenge. This article describes the development and implementation of a foot care clinic in a homeless shelter, created through a model of curricular integration, faculty engagement, and a long-term academic-community partnership. A transformative pedagogical approach based on service-learning was used to facilitate student understanding of social justice through activities that promote citizenship, develop advocacy skills, and increase knowledge and skills related to the role of the public health nurse in the community. The process of designing and developing a community clinical learning activity and the essential components for sustainability are discussed. Student outcomes are addressed. Recommendations for implementing a foot care clinic within an academic–community partnership are outlined.

  17. Using a Critical Service-Learning Approach to Facilitate Civic Identity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Tania D.

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights elements of civic engagement programs that have the rich potential to facilitate civic identity development. Focusing on research with alumni, the study examines 3 civic engagement programs, the approaches of which are guided by critical service-learning. It explores elements of the experiences that alumni name as…

  18. When "Simon Says" Doesn't Work: Alternatives to Imitation for Facilitating Early Speech Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeThorne, Laura S.; Johnson, Cynthia J.; Walder, Louise; Mahurin-Smith, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To provide clinicians with evidence-based strategies to facilitate early speech development in young children who are not readily imitating sounds. Relevant populations may include, but are not limited to, children with autism spectrum disorders, childhood apraxia of speech, and late-talking toddlers. Method: Through multifaceted search…

  19. National Offshore Wind Strategy: Facilitating the Development of the Offshore Wind Industry in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, Patrick [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Maurer, Ben [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Feinberg, Luke [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Duerr, Alana [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peterson, Lauren [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Musial, Walt [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beiter, Phillipp [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Golladay, Jennifer [Dept. of the Interior (DOI), Washington DC (United States); Stromberg, Jessica [Dept. of the Interior (DOI), Washington DC (United States); Johnson, Isis [Dept. of the Interior (DOI), Washington DC (United States); Boren, Doug [Dept. of the Interior (DOI), Washington DC (United States); Moore, Annette [Dept. of the Interior (DOI), Washington DC (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, through its Wind Energy Technologies Office, and U.S. Department of the Interior, through its Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, have jointly produced this updated national strategy to facilitate the responsible development of offshore wind energy in the United States.

  20. When "Simon Says" Doesn't Work: Alternatives to Imitation for Facilitating Early Speech Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeThorne, Laura S.; Johnson, Cynthia J.; Walder, Louise; Mahurin-Smith, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To provide clinicians with evidence-based strategies to facilitate early speech development in young children who are not readily imitating sounds. Relevant populations may include, but are not limited to, children with autism spectrum disorders, childhood apraxia of speech, and late-talking toddlers. Method: Through multifaceted search…

  1. Consecutive Course Modules Developed with Simple Materials to Facilitate the Learning of Basic Concepts in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okulu, Hasan Zuhtu; Oguz-Unver, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    From the perspective of teaching, the huge natural laboratory that astronomy provides constitutes the most prominent connection between astronomy and other branches of science. The purpose of this research was to provide educators with activities of observation using simple materials that were developed to facilitate the teaching of basic concepts…

  2. Embodied Typology of Positive Emotions: The Development of a Tool to Facilitate Emotional Granularity in Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoon, J.; Desmet, P.M.A.; Pohlmeyer, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a tool that has been developed to facilitate emotional granularity in design: ‘Embodied Typology of Positive Emotions’. Emotional granularity reflects individual differences in the ability to precisely represent and interpret one’s own and others’ emotional states, referring to

  3. Using Video for Professional Development: The Role of the Discussion Facilitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Alf

    2013-01-01

    Past research into the use of video for professional development has failed to problematise or theorise sufficiently the role of the discussion facilitator. It has been reported consistently that it can be hard or take time to establish norms for discussion of video but little has been said about reasons why, or the role of the discussion…

  4. Making Learning Meaningful: Facilitating Interest Development and Transfer in At-Risk College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddy, Benjamin C.; Sinatra, Gale M.; Seli, Helena; Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Mukhopadhyay, Ananya

    2017-01-01

    The Teaching for Transformative Experience in Science (TTES) model has shown to be a useful tool to generate learning and engagement in science. We investigated the effectiveness of TTES for facilitating transformative experience (TE), learning, the development of topic interest and transfer of course concepts to other courses employing a…

  5. Curriculum Change in Universities: Conditions that Facilitate Education for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Harpe, Barbara; Thomas, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Many universities have begun to introduce curriculum innovation and change to facilitate the curricular integration of generic skills underlying education for sustainable development (ESD). However, the literature and research in the area to date show few successful examples of comprehensive large-scale curriculum change. From the literature on…

  6. Mobilizing and Managing Social Capital: On Roles and Responsibilities of Local Facilitators in Territorial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Markus; Kirchengast, Christoph; Petit, Sandrine; Magnani, Natalia; Mieville-Ott, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the difficulties and challenges in mobilizing and managing social capital in concrete local and territorial directed rural development project activities. The main focus is put on the roles of local facilitators working with farmers and other local stakeholders during project implementation. The EU 5th framework project IMALP…

  7. Embodied Typology of Positive Emotions: The Development of a Tool to Facilitate Emotional Granularity in Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoon, J.; Desmet, P.M.A.; Pohlmeyer, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a tool that has been developed to facilitate emotional granularity in design: ‘Embodied Typology of Positive Emotions’. Emotional granularity reflects individual differences in the ability to precisely represent and interpret one’s own and others’ emotional states, referring to

  8. Conceptualising Discursive Communities: Developing Community in Contemporary Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzopardi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    What happens when people find themselves left out of communities? Who is missing and why does it matter? What can one do to narrow the gap? What is community? How has community been represented in theory? The quality of life of a population is an important concern in so many areas, and a significant part of our standard of living is measured by…

  9. Retirement Migration as a Community Development Option. Attracting Retirees as a Community Development Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Annabel Kirschner; Glasgow, Nina L.

    1990-01-01

    Cook explores the feasibility of a strategy to attract retirees to rural areas using amenities, service availability, and cost-of-living factors. Glasgow examines growth in nonmetropolitan retirement counties and considers strategies for community development. (SK)

  10. Experiences of parents regarding a school-readiness intervention for pre-school children facilitated by Community Health Nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Prinsloo

    2015-01-01

    When CHN students engage with communities through service learning, a school-readiness intervention may serve as a powerful tool to provide parents with the support that is needed to empower them with the skills to contribute towards their children’s early childhood development. It may improve the parent–child relationship which is critical in the development of children.

  11. A Hardy Plant Facilitates Nitrogen Removal via Microbial Communities in Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetlands in Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Penghe; Zhang, Hui; Zuo, Jie; Zhao, Dehua; Zou, Xiangxu; Zhu, Zhengjie; Jeelani, Nasreen; Leng, Xin; An, Shuqing

    2016-09-01

    The plants effect in subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SSF-CWs) is controversial, especially at low temperatures. Consequently, several SSF-CWs planted with Iris pseudacorus (CWI) or Typha orientalis Presl. (CWT) and several unplanted ones (CWC) were set up and fed with secondary effluent of sewage treatment plant during the winter in Eastern China. The 16S rDNA Illumina Miseq sequencing analysis indicated the positive effects of I. pseudacorus on the bacterial community richness and diversity in the substrate. Moreover, the community compositions of the bacteria involved with denitrification presented a significant difference in the three systems. Additionally, higher relative abundances of nitrifying bacteria (0.4140%, 0.2402% and 0.4318% for Nitrosomonas, Nitrosospira and Nitrospira, respectively) were recorded in CWI compared with CWT (0.2074%, 0.0648% and 0.0181%, respectively) and CWC (0.3013%, 0.1107% and 0.1185%, respectively). Meanwhile, the average removal rates of NH4+-N and TN in CWI showed a prominent advantage compared to CWC, but no distinct advantage was found in CWT. The hardy plant I. pseudacorus, which still had active root oxygen release in cold temperatures, positively affected the abundance of nitrifying bacteria in the substrate, and accordingly was supposed to contribute to a comparatively high nitrogen removal efficiency of the system during the winter.

  12. A Hardy Plant Facilitates Nitrogen Removal via Microbial Communities in Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetlands in Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Penghe; Zhang, Hui; Zuo, Jie; Zhao, Dehua; Zou, Xiangxu; Zhu, Zhengjie; Jeelani, Nasreen; Leng, Xin; An, Shuqing

    2016-01-01

    The plants effect in subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SSF-CWs) is controversial, especially at low temperatures. Consequently, several SSF-CWs planted with Iris pseudacorus (CWI) or Typha orientalis Presl. (CWT) and several unplanted ones (CWC) were set up and fed with secondary effluent of sewage treatment plant during the winter in Eastern China. The 16S rDNA Illumina Miseq sequencing analysis indicated the positive effects of I. pseudacorus on the bacterial community richness and diversity in the substrate. Moreover, the community compositions of the bacteria involved with denitrification presented a significant difference in the three systems. Additionally, higher relative abundances of nitrifying bacteria (0.4140%, 0.2402% and 0.4318% for Nitrosomonas, Nitrosospira and Nitrospira, respectively) were recorded in CWI compared with CWT (0.2074%, 0.0648% and 0.0181%, respectively) and CWC (0.3013%, 0.1107% and 0.1185%, respectively). Meanwhile, the average removal rates of NH4+-N and TN in CWI showed a prominent advantage compared to CWC, but no distinct advantage was found in CWT. The hardy plant I. pseudacorus, which still had active root oxygen release in cold temperatures, positively affected the abundance of nitrifying bacteria in the substrate, and accordingly was supposed to contribute to a comparatively high nitrogen removal efficiency of the system during the winter. PMID:27646687

  13. Social Aspects Of Rural Community Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majerová Věra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A well-balanced relationship between economic and social progress is the main prerequisite of rural community stability. Economic development is influenced by many factors. Some of these are statistically discoverable and quantifiable, while others, which fall within the sphere of social relations and their identification, are more difficult to measure and interpret. Czech rural areas face many problems which arise from their specific features – socio-demographic structure, job possibility of various social groups, provision of the proper level of public services, transport accessibility, etc. However, there is no direct connection between economic factors and mutual relations within the rural community. Values, opinions and the behavioural patterns of people are immediately displayed in a locality, but their character is shaped by the regional and national assumptions of every stage of development. Contributions are drawn from the accessible literature and secondary data of empirical research projects.

  14. Facilitating a transition from compulsory detention of people who use drugs towards voluntary community-based drug dependence treatment and support services in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanguay, Pascal; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Aramrattana, Apinun; Wodak, Alex; Thomson, Nicholas; Ali, Robert; Vumbaca, Gino; Lai, Gloria; Chabungbam, Anand

    2015-10-16

    Evidence indicates that detention of people who use drugs in compulsory centers in the name of treatment is common in Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. The expansion of such practices has been costly, has not generated positive health outcomes, and has not reduced supply or demand for illicit drugs. United Nations agencies have convened several consultations with government and civil society stakeholders in order to facilitate a transition to voluntary evidence- and community-based drug dependence treatment and support services. In an effort to support such efforts, an informal group of experts proposes a three-step process to initiate and accelerate national-level transitions. Specifically, the working group recommends the establishment of a national multisectoral decision-making committee to oversee the development of national transition plans, drug policy reform to eliminate barriers to community-based drug dependence treatment and support services, and the integration of community-based drug dependence treatment in existing national health and social service systems.In parallel, the working group recommends that national-level transitions should be guided by overarching principles, including ethics, human rights, meaningful involvement of affected communities, and client safety, as well as good governance, transparency, and accountability. The transition also represents an opportunity to review the roles and responsibilities of various agencies across the public health and public security sectors in order to balance the workload and ensure positive results. The need to accelerate national-level transitions to voluntary community-based drug dependence treatment and support services is compelling--on economic, medical, sustainable community development, and ethical grounds--as extensively documented in the literature. In this context, the expert working group fully endorses initiation of a transition

  15. The Internet's Multiple Roles in Facilitating the Sexual Orientation Identity Development of Gay and Bisexual Male Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Gary W; Serrano, Pedro A; Bruce, Douglas; Bauermeister, Jose A

    2016-09-01

    One emerging avenue for the exploration of adolescents' sexual orientation identity development is the Internet, since it allows for varying degrees of anonymity and exploration. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the role of the Internet in facilitating the sexual orientation identity development process of gay and bisexual male adolescents. Qualitative interviews were conducted with an ethnically diverse sample of 63 gay/bisexual male adolescents (ages 15-23). Participants reported using a range of Internet applications as they explored and came to accept their sexual orientation identity, with the intended purpose and degree of anonymity desired determining which applications were used. Youth reported that the Internet provided a range of functions with regard to the exploration and acceptance of their sexual orientation identity, including (1) increasing self-awareness of sexual orientation identity, (2) learning about gay/bisexual community life, (3) communicating with other gay/bisexual people, (4) meeting other gay/bisexual people, (5) finding comfort and acceptance with sexual orientation, and (6) facilitating the coming out process. Future research and practice may explore the Internet as a platform for promoting the healthy development of gay and bisexual male adolescents by providing a developmentally and culturally appropriate venue for the exploration and subsequent commitment to an integrated sexual orientation identity.

  16. Protocol for ACCESS: a qualitative study exploring barriers and facilitators to accessing the emergency contraceptive pill from community pharmacies in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussainy, Safeera Yasmeen; Ghosh, Ayesha; Taft, Angela; Mazza, Danielle; Black, Kirsten Isla; Clifford, Rhonda; Mc Namara, Kevin Peter; Ryan, Kath; Jackson, John Keith

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The rate of unplanned pregnancy in Australia remains high, which has contributed to Australia having one of the highest abortion rates of developed countries with an estimated 1 in 5 women having an abortion. The emergency contraceptive pill (ECP) offers a safe way of preventing unintended pregnancy after unprotected sex has occurred. While the ECP has been available over-the-counter in Australian pharmacies for over a decade, its use has not significantly increased. This paper presents a protocol for a qualitative study that aims to identify the barriers and facilitators to accessing the ECP from community pharmacies in Australia. Methods and analysis Data will be collected through one-on-one interviews that are semistructured and in-depth. Partnerships have been established with 2 pharmacy groups and 2 women's health organisations to aid with the recruitment of women and pharmacists for data collection purposes. Interview questions explore domains from the Theoretical Domains Framework in order to assess the factors aiding and/or hindering access to ECP from community pharmacies. Data collected will be analysed using deductive content analysis. The expected benefits of this study are that it will help develop evidence-based workforce interventions to strengthen the capacity and performance of community pharmacists as key ECP providers. Ethics and dissemination The findings will be disseminated to the research team and study partners, who will brainstorm ideas for interventions that would address barriers and facilitators to access identified from the interviews. Dissemination will also occur through presentations and peer-reviewed publications and the study participants will receive an executive summary of the findings. The study has been evaluated and approved by the Monash Human Research Ethics Committee. PMID:26656987

  17. Trial of an electronic decision support system to facilitate shared decision making in community mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woltmann, Emily M; Wilkniss, Sandra M; Teachout, Alexandra; McHugo, Gregory J; Drake, Robert E

    2011-01-01

    Involvement of community mental health consumers in mental health decision making has been consistently associated with improvements in health outcomes. Electronic decision support systems (EDSSs) that support both consumer and provider decision making may be a sustainable way to improve dyadic communication in a field with approximately 50% workforce turnover per year. This study examined the feasibility of such a system and investigated proximal outcomes of the system's performance. A cluster randomized design was used to evaluate an EDSS at three urban community mental health sites. Case managers (N=20) were randomly assigned to the EDSS-supported planning group or to the usual care planning group. Consumers (N=80) were assigned to the same group as their case managers. User satisfaction with the care planning process was assessed for consumers and case managers (possible scores range from 1 to 5, with higher summary scores indicating more satisfaction). Recall of the care plan was assessed for consumers. Linear regression with adjustment for grouping by worker was used to assess satisfaction scores. A Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to examine knowledge of the care plan. Compared with case managers in the control group, those in the intervention group were significantly more satisfied with the care planning process (mean ± SD score=4.0 ± .5 versus 3.3 ± .5; adjusted p=.01). Compared with consumers in the control group, those in the intervention group had significantly greater recall of their care plans three days after the planning session (mean proportion of plan goals recalled=75% ± 28% versus 57% ± 32%; p=.02). There were no differences between the clients in the intervention and control groups regarding satisfaction. This study demonstrated that clients can build their own care plans and negotiate and revise them with their case managers using an EDSS.

  18. The Unity Council at 40: a pioneering community development and service organization (1967-2007).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Gabriel; Schwartz, Sara L; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The Spanish Speaking Unity Council (Unity Council) is a community development nonprofit organization that was established in 1964, during the civil rights movement, by a group of community members who wanted to ensure the political representation of the Latino community. Over its 45-year history, the Unity Council has grown into a $12 million community development organization that delivers a range of programming, including social services and employment training as well as facilitating the development and support of local businesses, low-income housing, and neighborhood improvement activities. The history of the agency presents the multiple challenges and rewards associated with development in an underserved community and an example of the important role that leadership plays in the growth of a nonprofit.

  19. The Development of Professional Learning Community in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sompong, Samoot; Erawan, Prawit; Dharm-tad-sa-na-non, Sudharm

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) To study the current situation and need for developing professional learning community in primary schools; (2) To develop the model for developing professional learning community, and (3) To study the findings of development for professional learning community based on developed model related to knowledge,…

  20. Barriers and facilitators to the implementation of a community-based, multidisciplinary, family-focused childhood weight management programme in Ireland: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Emily; Harrington, Janas M; Shiely, Frances; Perry, Ivan J; McHugh, Sheena M

    2017-08-28

    To explore the barriers and facilitators experienced by those implementing a government-funded, community-based childhood weight management programme. Qualitative using semistructured interviews. Two geographical regions in the south and west of Ireland. 29 national-level and local-level stakeholders responsible for implementing the programme, including professionals from dietetics, psychology, public health nursing, physiotherapy, health promotion and administration. Framework analysis was used to identify barriers and facilitators, which were mapped onto six levels of factors influencing implementation outlined by Grol and Wensing: the innovation, the individual professional, the patient, the social context, the organisational context and the external environment. Most barriers occurred at the level of the organisational context. For all stakeholders, barriers arose due to the multidisciplinary nature of the programme, including the lack of role clarity and added complexity of working in different locations. Health professionals' low-perceived self-efficacy in approaching the subject of weight with parents and parental resistance to hearing about their child's weight status were barriers to programme implementation at the individual professional and patient levels, respectively. The main facilitators of implementation, occurring at the level of the health professional, included stakeholders' recognition of the need for a weight management programme and personal interest in the area of childhood obesity. Having a local lead and supportive colleagues were further implementation drivers. This study highlights the complexities associated with implementing a multidisciplinary childhood weight management programme, particularly translating such a programme to a community setting. Our results suggest the assignment of clear roles and responsibilities, the provision of sufficient practical training and resources, and organisational support play pivotal roles in

  1. How microbial community composition regulates coral disease development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Mao-Jones

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Reef coral cover is in rapid decline worldwide, in part due to bleaching (expulsion of photosynthetic symbionts and outbreaks of infectious disease. One important factor associated with bleaching and in disease transmission is a shift in the composition of the microbial community in the mucus layer surrounding the coral: the resident microbial community-which is critical to the healthy functioning of the coral holobiont-is replaced by pathogenic microbes, often species of Vibrio. In this paper we develop computational models for microbial community dynamics in the mucus layer in order to understand how the surface microbial community responds to changes in environmental conditions, and under what circumstances it becomes vulnerable to overgrowth by pathogens. Some of our model's assumptions and parameter values are based on Vibrio spp. as a model system for other established and emerging coral pathogens. We find that the pattern of interactions in the surface microbial community facilitates the existence of alternate stable states, one dominated by antibiotic-producing beneficial microbes and the other pathogen-dominated. A shift to pathogen dominance under transient stressful conditions, such as a brief warming spell, may persist long after environmental conditions have returned to normal. This prediction is consistent with experimental findings that antibiotic properties of Acropora palmata mucus did not return to normal long after temperatures had fallen. Long-term loss of antibiotic activity eliminates a critical component in coral defense against disease, giving pathogens an extended opportunity to infect and spread within the host, elevating the risk of coral bleaching, disease, and mortality.

  2. Becoming Music Teacher Educators: Learning from and with Each Other in a Professional Development Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Kristen; Sweet, Bridget; Derges Kastner, Julie; Russell, Heather A.; Reese, Jill

    2014-01-01

    During this heuristic phenomenological inquiry, we examined our lived experiences as five women (three doctoral students, two early career faculty) in the process of becoming music teacher educators participating in a year-long, online, group-facilitated professional development community (PDC). Data included recorded meetings via Skype, journal…

  3. Using Wikis to Develop Collaborative Communities in an Environmental Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Laura E.; Pence, Harry E.

    2015-01-01

    Group construction of wikis in an environmental chemistry course provided an effective framework for students to develop and to manage collaborative communities, characterized by interactive projects designed to deepen learning. A sequence of assignments facilitated improvement of the students' wiki construction and editing skills and these…

  4. The Principal's Role in Fostering Collaborative Learning Communities through Faculty Study Group Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Carol A.; Hutinger, Janice L.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the leadership of school principals with respect to faculty study group development as a key element of the professional learning community. Questions asked concern the approaches that principals use to facilitate study group processes that, in turn. foster teacher learning and student achievement, and ways in which…

  5. Becoming Music Teacher Educators: Learning from and with Each Other in a Professional Development Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Kristen; Sweet, Bridget; Derges Kastner, Julie; Russell, Heather A.; Reese, Jill

    2014-01-01

    During this heuristic phenomenological inquiry, we examined our lived experiences as five women (three doctoral students, two early career faculty) in the process of becoming music teacher educators participating in a year-long, online, group-facilitated professional development community (PDC). Data included recorded meetings via Skype, journal…

  6. Blogging through the Music Student Teaching Experience: Developing Virtual Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Kate R.

    2014-01-01

    Within educational settings, well-developed web-based social networking technologies such as interactive weblogs (blogs) can serve to effectively facilitate and mediate interactions among members of a "community of practice" (Chong, 2008; Wenger, White, & Smith, 2009). The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of an…

  7. Changing Places, Changing Plates? A Binational Comparison of Barriers and Facilitators to Healthful Eating Among Central American Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Melissa; Colón-Ramos, Uriyoán

    2017-04-19

    To understand the process by which immigrants adopt dietary practices, this study offers a binational comparison of factors that predispose, enable, and reinforce healthful eating in the sending and receiving countries. Data are from two qualitative studies that examined barriers and facilitators to healthful eating in El Salvador (four focus groups, n = 28 adults) and in the US (30 in-depth interviews n = 15 mothers recently migrated from Central America). There was a strong emphasis on hygiene and vitamin-content of foods among participants in El Salvador. In both settings, participants perceived that their respective community food environments (schools, food stores) exposed their families to highly processed, unhealthful foods. In both settings, they described similar struggles to encourage their families to eat foods healthfully (traditional, home-made foods). These results underscore the importance of acknowledging the changing food environment in sending countries where people may already be exposed to processed foods.

  8. Professional support as a facilitator to the development of Iranian nurses' clinical judgment: A content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidi, Jamal; Alhani, Fatemeh; Salsali, Mahvash

    2014-02-01

    Nurses' clinical judgment development is essential for the professional nursing practice. The aim of this study was to explore the facilitators to the development of Iranian nurses' clinical judgment. A qualitative design using conventional content analysis method was employed in the study. A purposive sample of 24 participants was recruited from three hospitals located at Sanandaj, Iran. Study data were collected in 2013 by using semi-structured individual interviews. A content analysis approach was used to analyze the study data and MAXQDA was used for coding and categorizing the data. The main theme of the study was "professional support as a facilitator to the development of nurse's clinical judgment." The sub-themes of this main theme included "provision of direct support to nurses" and "provision of clinical judgment resources." The first sub-theme consisted of different types of managerial, clinical, educational, and social supports. The two categories of the second sub-theme included the provision of necessary clinical evidence and the provision of medical equipments. The study findings highlighted the importance of providing nurses with adequate professional support for facilitating the development of their clinical judgment.

  9. Barriers and facilitators to voluntary HIV testing uptake among communities at high risk of HIV exposure in Chennai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Michael R; Chakrapani, Venkatesan; Newman, Peter A; Shunmugam, Murali

    2015-08-28

    In India, increasing uptake of voluntary HIV testing among 'core risk groups' is a national public health priority. While HIV testing uptake has been studied among key populations in India, limited information is available on multi-level barriers and facilitators to HIV testing, and experiences with free, publicly available testing services, among key populations. We conducted 12 focus groups (n = 84) and 12 key informant interviews to explore these topics among men who have sex with men, transgender women, cisgender female sex workers, and injecting drug users in the city of Chennai. We identified inter-related barriers at social-structural, health-care system, interpersonal, and individual levels. Barriers included HIV stigma, marginalised-group stigma, discrimination in health-care settings, including government testing centres, and fears of adverse social consequences of testing HIV positive. Facilitators included outreach programmes operated by community-based/non-governmental organisations, accurate HIV knowledge and risk perception for HIV, and access to drug dependence treatment for injecting drug users. Promoting HIV testing among these key populations requires interventions at several levels: reducing HIV-related and marginalised-group stigma, addressing the fears of consequences of testing, promoting pro-testing peer and social norms, providing options for rapid and non-blood-based HIV tests, and ensuring non-judgmental and culturally competent HIV counselling and testing services.

  10. Facilitative-competitive interactions in an old-growth forest: the importance of large-diameter trees as benefactors and stimulators for forest community assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Fichtner

    Full Text Available The role of competition in tree communities is increasingly well understood, while little is known about the patterns and mechanisms of the interplay between above- and belowground competition in tree communities. This knowledge, however, is crucial for a better understanding of community dynamics and developing adaptive near-natural management strategies. We assessed neighbourhood interactions in an unmanaged old-growth European beech (Fagus sylvatica forest by quantifying variation in the intensity of above- (shading and belowground competition (crowding among dominant and co-dominant canopy beech trees during tree maturation. Shading had on average a much larger impact on radial growth than crowding and the sensitivity to changes in competitive conditions was lowest for crowding effects. We found that each mode of competition reduced the effect of the other. Increasing crowding reduced the negative effect of shading, and at high levels of shading, crowding actually had a facilitative effect and increased growth. Our study demonstrates that complementarity in above- and belowground processes enable F. sylvatica to alter resource acquisition strategies, thus optimising tree radial growth. As a result, competition seemed to become less important in stands with a high growing stock and tree communities with a long continuity of anthropogenic undisturbed population dynamics. We suggest that growth rates do not exclusively depend on the density of potential competitors at the intraspecific level, but on the conspecific aggregation of large-diameter trees and their functional role for regulating biotic filtering processes. This finding highlights the potential importance of the rarely examined relationship between the spatial aggregation pattern of large-diameter trees and the outcome of neighbourhood interactions, which may be central to community dynamics and the related forest ecosystem services.

  11. Moving Into Communities: Developing Cultural Competence with Pre-service Educators through Community Service-Learning Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Coffey

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Research in teacher education suggests that field experiences in community settings can offer pre-service teachers a context for understanding the link between theory and practice. This paper documents the experiences of pre-service educators who participated in service-learning partnerships for thirty hours in multiple community settings in the southeast United States. Pre-service teachers not only volunteered in the community, but they also engaged in critically reflective journal writing and participated in evaluative class discussions. Students praised the benefits of a service experience in both school and community placements and discussed how interactions with the community agencies gave them the insight into how community organizations often play a significant role in the lives of the underserved students they will eventually teach. The author argues that the inclusion of a service-learning component in early pre-service teacher education field experiences has the potential to facilitate the examination of the relationships between community organizations and schools and encourage development of cultural competence among pre-service teachers. KEYWORDSservice-learning, pre-service teacher preparation, community partnerships

  12. Developing a survey of barriers and facilitators to recruitment in randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur Geetinder

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recruitment to randomized controlled trials is known to be challenging. It is important to understand and identify predictors of good or poor accrual to a clinical trial so that appropriate strategies can be put in place to overcome these problems and facilitate successful trial completion. We have developed a survey tool to establish the recruitment experience of clinical teams regarding facilitators and barriers to recruitment in a clinical trial and describe herein the method of developing the questionnaire. Methods A literature search was conducted to identify studies that have explored facilitators and barriers to recruitment, and a list of potential factors affecting recruitment to a clinical trial was generated. These factors were categorized in terms relating to the (i trial, (ii site, (iii patient, (iv clinical team, (v information and consent and (vi study team. A list was provided for responders to grade these factors as weak, intermediate or strong facilitators or barriers to recruitment. Results A web-based survey questionnaire was developed. This survey was designed to establish the recruitment experience of clinical teams with regard to the perceived facilitators and barriers to recruitment, to identify strategies applied to overcome these problems, and to obtain suggestions for change in the organization of future trials. The survey tool can be used to assess the recruitment experience of clinical teams in a single/multicenter trial in any clinical setting or speciality involving adults or children either in an ongoing trial or at trial completion. The questionnaire is short, easy to administer and to complete, with an estimated completion time of 11 minutes. Conclusions We have presented a robust methodology for developing this survey tool that provides an evidence-based list of potential factors that can affect recruitment to a clinical trial. We recommend that all clinical trialists should consider using

  13. Facilitating dental student reflections: using mentor groups to discuss clinical experiences and personal development

    OpenAIRE

    Koole, Sebastiaan; Christiaens, Véronique; Cosyn, Jan; De Bruyn, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Despite the consensus on the importance of reflection for dental professionals, a lack of understanding remains about how students and clinicians should develop their ability to reflect. The aim of this study was to investigate dental students’ and mentors’ perceptions of mentor groups as an instructional method to facilitate students’ reflection in terms of the strategy’s learning potential, role of the mentor, group dynamics, and feasibility. At Ghent University in Belgium, third- and fourt...

  14. Structures of Community and Democratic Practices in Graduate Teacher Education, Teacher Change, and Linkages Facilitating Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, Julie A.; Guyton, Edith M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined practices in a constructivist graduate teacher education program, documenting changes in teachers and their practice and analyzing connections between program practices and teacher change. Data from field notes, teacher and faculty interviews, classroom observations, faculty ratings of teachers, and artifacts helped develop a model for…

  15. Facilitating community water supply treatment : from transferring filtration technology to multi-stakeholder learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, J.T.

    2006-01-01

    For more than a quarter of a century, IRC has been supporting the development of Slow Sand Filtration (SSF) and more recently, together with CINARA, the pioneering of Multi-Stage Filtration (MSF) - a combination of Gravel Filtration and SSF that has been shown to have great potential as an effective

  16. Facilitating community water supply treatment : from transferring filtration technology to multi-stakeholder learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, J.T.

    2006-01-01

    For more than a quarter of a century, IRC has been supporting the development of Slow Sand Filtration (SSF) and more recently, together with CINARA, the pioneering of Multi-Stage Filtration (MSF) - a combination of Gravel Filtration and SSF that has been shown to have great potential as an effective

  17. Structures of Community and Democratic Practices in Graduate Teacher Education, Teacher Change, and Linkages Facilitating Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, Julie A.; Guyton, Edith M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined practices in a constructivist graduate teacher education program, documenting changes in teachers and their practice and analyzing connections between program practices and teacher change. Data from field notes, teacher and faculty interviews, classroom observations, faculty ratings of teachers, and artifacts helped develop a model for…

  18. Communication and community development: early child development programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, F; Reinhold, A J

    1993-01-01

    Community-based groups are organized around particular aspects of early childhood development (ECD), such as literacy, parent education, and early childhood activities. In the Colombian national program, community households call upon women to devote a portion of their home to organized child care for minimal material reward. The Indian Child Development Service subsidizes the payment of organizers; and Kenyan parents construct basic preschool facilities, provide school lunches, and subsidize a teacher. In such cases the government plays a subordinate role, while the burden of program maintenance is carried by the community. These programs share the characteristics that children and adults learn side by side; adult learning ranges from women's literacy, to health, organizational issues, or small-scale economic development; a strong cultural component emphasizes mother tongue language learning, indigenous child-rearing practices, and local working models; physical structures are in homes; capacity-building for the adults is central which will be transferred to other spheres of community life. In the remote coastal villages of Colombia, an organization called Promesa works with mothers on designing their preschool children's educational activities. Promesa began to confront other priority needs in the villages, especially in environmental health and malaria control. A 1990 assessment related that participants' pride, self-confidence, and ability to solve problems regarding the healthy development of their children increased; groups learned to make use of the physical, human, and institutional resources from their environments; and participants' children remained in school and performed better. Conclusions from a decade of loose experimentation suggest that through communication community women can be organized to provide basic early education and early childhood activities can help rural children over the cultural barrier of school.

  19. A system for household enumeration and re-identification in densely populated slums to facilitate community research, education, and advocacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana R Thomson

    Full Text Available We devised and implemented an innovative Location-Based Household Coding System (LBHCS appropriate to a densely populated informal settlement in Mumbai, India.LBHCS codes were designed to double as unique household identifiers and as walking directions; when an entire community is enumerated, LBHCS codes can be used to identify the number of households located per road (or lane segment. LBHCS was used in community-wide biometric, mental health, diarrheal disease, and water poverty studies. It also facilitated targeted health interventions by a research team of youth from Mumbai, including intensive door-to-door education of residents, targeted follow-up meetings, and a full census. In addition, LBHCS permitted rapid and low-cost preparation of GIS mapping of all households in the slum, and spatial summation and spatial analysis of survey data.LBHCS was an effective, easy-to-use, affordable approach to household enumeration and re-identification in a densely populated informal settlement where alternative satellite imagery and GPS technologies could not be used.

  20. Resilience Thinking as a Framing Mechanism to Facilitate Collective Community Response to Various Implications of Global Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Y.; Sharifi, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Future Earth initiative highlights single-disciplinary focus as a serious problem on the way of full utilization of the large body of existing knowledge and calls for "co-design", "co-production", and "co-dissemination" of knowledge. Resilience thinking is an approach to stewardship of social-ecological systems that seeks to bring the (often) fragmented diverse efforts and practices under an integrated framework. The notion of resilience is rapidly gaining ground in the sustainability literature. As a concept with broad scope and increasing popularity, resilience can be utilized to frame various problems related to different climate- and non-climate-induced disruptions in urban areas. Acknowledging that resilience thinking can provide a platform for communication between different parties operating in diverse research areas related to cities, this presentation describes the meaning of resilience in human communities. It emphasizes the essential role of social capital in mobilizing residents for collective action and facilitating collaboration between various groups and organizations that exist in an urban setting. It is argues that diffusion and implementation of such a collective and bottom-up approach to address the consequences of global environmental change warrants a governance shift from the conventional "persuasive communication processes" to "emergent dialogue" mechanisms that acknowledge the existence of complexities and uncertainties and advocate adopting a participatory process to create desired future communities that are capable of coping with the adverse consequences of global environmental change.

  1. 76 FR 67021 - Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Proposed Collection; Comment Request ACTION: Notice and... Financial Institutions Fund (the ``CDFI Fund'') within the Department of the Treasury is soliciting comments... Mia Sowell, Policy and Program Officer, at the Community Development Financial Institutions Fund,...

  2. Preparing and Developing Community College International Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raby, Rosalind Latiner; Valeau, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Leadership training for future senior United States (US) community college leaders is an ongoing focus of US community college education. Leadership training is also a focus of US university international educators. Community college literature has assumed that full-time positions at community colleges devoted to overseeing and implementing…

  3. An educational portal to facilitate statistical literacy for the Malaysian community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahardin, Nadiah; Ismail, Zaleha; Abidin, Nur Liyana Zainal

    2015-02-01

    In the last decades, a considerable number of studies investigated the teaching and learning of statistics. The implications of these studies have changed the content and structure of statistics. Hence, the applications of statistics to understand the world around us should be followed by the learning of statistical concepts so that the students are aware that statistics is an important tool to solve practical life problems. There must be some platform such as materials or articles that discuss explicitly the applications of statistics in various area that reach of students. An educational web portal by the name of Dunia Matematik has been delegated to meet this need. Apart from the sections which provide numerous articles that portray statistics in real life, the portal also provides articles on history in mathematics, popular mathematicians, online quizzes, technology in mathematics education and arts in mathematics. Based on ARCS model on motivation, the four components of the model, namely attention, relevance, confidence and satisfaction are integrated in the design of the articles and activities. A rich collection of such resources which present authentic data could supplement text book materials which heavily focus onto statistical concepts and procedures. Besides motivating learning, it is expected that the web portal has the potential to develop statistical literacy, an ability to comprehend and infer the data. The final part of the paper will describe some resources that have been developed.

  4. Bacterial community development in experimental gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, James O; Booth, Veronica; Bradshaw, David J; Wade, William G

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities. This study used 454-pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of 16S rRNA genes (approximately 500 bp), and bacterial culture, to characterize the composition of plaque during the transition from periodontal health to gingivitis. A total of 20 healthy volunteers abstained from oral hygiene for two weeks, allowing plaque to accumulate and gingivitis to develop. Plaque samples were analyzed at baseline, and after one and two weeks. In addition, plaque samples from 20 chronic periodontitis patients were analyzed for cross-sectional comparison to the experimental gingivitis cohort. All of the healthy volunteers developed gingivitis after two weeks. Pyrosequencing yielded a final total of 344,267 sequences after filtering, with a mean length of 354 bases, that were clustered into an average of 299 species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) per sample. Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) plots revealed significant shifts in the bacterial community structure of plaque as gingivitis was induced, and community diversity increased significantly after two weeks. Changes in the relative abundance of OTUs during the transition from health to gingivitis were correlated to bleeding on probing (BoP) scores and resulted in the identification of new health- and gingivitis-associated taxa. Comparison of the healthy volunteers to the periodontitis patients also confirmed the association of a number of putative periodontal pathogens with chronic periodontitis. Taxa associated with gingivitis included Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, Lachnospiraceae [G-2] sp. HOT100, Lautropia sp. HOTA94, and Prevotella oulorum, whilst Rothia dentocariosa was associated with periodontal health. Further study of these taxa is warranted and may lead to new therapeutic approaches

  5. Developing inquiry-based teaching and learning in Family Maths programme facilitators

    OpenAIRE

    Pam Austin; Paul Webb

    2007-01-01

    The inquiry-based Family Maths professional development programme, offered by the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, attempts not only to support the transformative education practices targeted by the South African National Department of Education, but also to extend them beyond the school walls to the community at large. This study investigates the extent to which this programme develops facilitators’ ability to implement inquiry-based learning. The research undertaken uses both qualit...

  6. In Vitro Cultivation of 'Unculturable' Oral Bacteria, Facilitated by Community Culture and Media Supplementation with Siderophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartoukian, Sonia R; Adamowska, Aleksandra; Lawlor, Megan; Moazzez, Rebecca; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Wade, William G

    2016-01-01

    Over a third of oral bacteria are as-yet-uncultivated in-vitro. Siderophores have been previously shown to enable in-vitro growth of previously uncultivated bacteria. The objective of this study was to cultivate novel oral bacteria in siderophore-supplemented culture media. Various compounds with siderophore activity, including pyoverdines-Fe-complex, desferricoprogen and salicylic acid, were found to stimulate the growth of difficult-to-culture strains Prevotella sp. HOT-376 and Fretibacterium fastidiosum. Furthermore, pyrosequencing analysis demonstrated increased proportions of the as-yet-uncultivated phylotypes Dialister sp. HOT-119 and Megasphaera sp. HOT-123 on mixed culture plates supplemented with siderophores. Therefore a culture model was developed, which incorporated 15 μg siderophore (pyoverdines-Fe-complex or desferricoprogen) or 150 μl neat subgingival-plaque suspension into a central well on agar plates that were inoculated with heavily-diluted subgingival-plaque samples from subjects with periodontitis. Colonies showing satellitism were passaged onto fresh plates in co-culture with selected helper strains. Five novel strains, representatives of three previously-uncultivated taxa (Anaerolineae bacterium HOT-439, the first oral taxon from the Chloroflexi phylum to have been cultivated; Bacteroidetes bacterium HOT-365; and Peptostreptococcaceae bacterium HOT-091) were successfully isolated. All novel isolates required helper strains for growth, implying dependence on a biofilm lifestyle. Their characterisation will further our understanding of the human oral microbiome.

  7. Developing communities of practice in health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus; Edwards, Kasper

    the use of SOPs. A CoP is a social community formed around a practice (e.g. ICU nursing) which induce a propensity to share experiences and thereby constitute knowledge sharing (Lave & Wenger 1991; Brown & Duguid 1991). CoP was conceived as a descriptive construct but has gained popularity and is found...... to improve practice performance, but knowledge about developing and measuring CoP is lacking (Ison et al. 2014). We propose a method to develop a CoP and the method is tested in a blood analysis unit at ‘Nordsjællands Hospital’ in Denmark. Design/methodology/approach The interventions were identified from...... current CoP research. Interventions were initiated just after baseline measurement.  The following interventions took place: The practice was operationalized narrowly as employees performing a specific operational task. The practice was chosen due to a high frequency and recurring problems. A voluntary Co...

  8. Professional Development on a Budget: Facilitating Learning Opportunities for Information Literacy Instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Shamchuk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available How do you stay on top of evolving trends and changes to information literacy delivery, especially while coping with shrinking professional development allocations? This article details various in-house, professional development opportunities created for MacEwan University’s library staff. Low-cost, practical ideas are given to help jump-start a library's information literacy professional development offerings. Included are details about organizing an Information Literacy Community, internal Library Professional Development Days and an information literacy event open to local library professionals.

  9. A Participatory Systemic Approach To Rural Community Development In Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan M. Ha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Various failures of the traditional approach in community development in developing countries have led to the development of a more appropriate and holistic approach to address complex development issues. Systems approaches and cutting-edge tools have recently been embraced to deal with such complexities under contexts of interwoven relationships amongst social economic political cultural and environmental factors. This paper provides reflections on practical value of the Evolutionary Learning Laboratory ELLab through a case study on improving the quality of life for women farmers in northern Vietnam where gender-bias labour hardship and poor living-standard are evident. The first five steps of the participatory systems-based ELLab were implemented during 2013-2014 providing valuable results that have made both practical and theoretical contributions with substantial implications to community development. Our study finds that the context-based results reshaped the original project goal. The approach and framework helped to identify and engage right stakeholders in problem analyses and decision making activities. Fuzzy problems within the complex web of life of the women and rural households were uncovered using relevant systems tools to develop a big picture systems model of the current situation defining levers for systemic interventions. The ELLab helps to build capacity of local people for taking ownership of the process and outcomes to guarantee sustainability and long-term impacts. It also facilitates true participation and co-learning amongst stakeholders triggering transformative learning. Contributions to action research and an innovative mechanism for sharing reflections and lessons at both local and global levels via the online Think2ImpactTM are discussed.

  10. Programmatic effects of a large-scale multiple-micronutrient supplementation trial in Indonesia: using community facilitators as intermediaries for behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Anita V; Asrilla, Zaitu; Kadha, Josephine K; Sebayang, Susy; Apriatni, Mandri; Sulastri, Ari; Sunarsih, Euis; Shankar, Anuraj H

    2009-06-01

    Clinical trials can serve as an opportunity gateway for enhanced health benefits to the target population, above and beyond the specific intervention being tested. The Supplementation with Multiple Micronutrients Intervention Trial (SUMMIT), a randomized, controlled clinical trial in Lombok, Indonesia, found that supplementation during pregnancy with multiple micronutrients reduced 90-day infant mortality by nearly 20% as compared with iron-folic acid. This trial was designed as both a program and research trial and used community facilitators to serve as liaisons between the study and the pregnant women. This analysis documents the programmatic impacts of SUMMIT on health-seeking and early infant mortality resulting from community facilitators' field activities. Data on compliance, human resource practices, health-seeking, and health outcomes from the 31,290 SUMMIT enrollees were analyzed. Overall compliance with either iron-folic acid or multiple micronutrients was high in the program, at 85.0%. Early prenatal care visits increased significantly. Sixty-three percent of primiparous women used a skilled birth attendant (SBA); among multiparous women, the rate of use of a SBA rose from 35% for the last birth to 53%. Use of a SBA resulted in a 30% reduction in early infant mortality (RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.83; p < .0001), independently of any reductions due to multiple micronutrients. The community facilitators played a central role in improving health-seeking; however, the quality of the community facilitators' performance was associated with the impact of the micronutrient supplement on infant health. In a subsample of community facilitators, better-performing facilitators were found to markedly improve the overall impact of the multiple micronutrients on early infant mortality (RR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.92; p = .0117). In contrast, infants of women with poorly performing community facilitators were found to derive no additional benefit from the multiple

  11. Factors enabling and inhibiting facilitator development: lessons learned from Essentials of Care in South Eastern Sydney Local Health District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamera Watling

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Building and sustaining facilitation capacity for the creation of person-centred workplace cultures is a strategic priority of the South Eastern Sydney Local Health District Nursing and Midwifery Practice and Workforce Unit. Skilled facilitation is considered critical to the successful implementation and sustainability of practice development-based programmes, including Essentials of Care. Review of facilitator activity across the district revealed that less than half of those who had participated in a facilitation development programme were actively applying their knowledge to the facilitation of Essentials of Care. Aim: To understand the enablers and barriers to the development and application of facilitation skills and the implementation of Essentials of Care from the perspective of the programme’s facilitators. The purpose was to inform ongoing strategies to build and sustain facilitation capacity for its effective implementation. Method: A 21-question qualitative survey was designed using Survey Monkey. Questions were framed to allow free text responses for qualitative content analysis. Ethics approval was applied for and deemed unnecessary by the local health district ethics committee; the committee deemed the project to be a quality improvement activity not requiring independent ethical review. The survey was distributed electronically to 230 health professionals who had participated in the facilitation development programme between 2008 and 2013. Findings: The key enablers for both facilitator development and implementation of Essentials of Care were time, engagement of staff and leadership support. Additional enablers for facilitation development included access to development opportunities and practical application of skills. Facilitation was an enabler of Essentials of Care implementation. Leadership support is pivotal, especially where time and patient acuity impinge on the release of staff for facilitated activities

  12. 1 COMMUNITY THEATRE AND DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Alex C Asigbo

    Critical Foundations of Community Theatre. Theatre was born societal. ... analysis-which treats theatre as if it were independent of its social ... community predicated on highly participatory methodologies. This ..... discourses. This implies that ...

  13. Bio-Intelligence: A Research Program Facilitating the Development of New Paradigms for Tomorrow's Patient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Sieu; Famili, Fazel; Liu, Ziying; Peña-Castillo, Lourdes

    The advancement of omics technologies in concert with the enabling information technology development has accelerated biological research to a new realm in a blazing speed and sophistication. The limited single gene assay to the high throughput microarray assay and the laborious manual count of base-pairs to the robotic assisted machinery in genome sequencing are two examples to name. Yet even more sophisticated, the recent development in literature mining and artificial intelligence has allowed researchers to construct complex gene networks unraveling many formidable biological puzzles. To harness these emerging technologies to their full potential to medical applications, the Bio-intelligence program at the Institute for Information Technology, National Research Council Canada, aims to develop and exploit artificial intelligence and bioinformatics technologies to facilitate the development of intelligent decision support tools and systems to improve patient care - for early detection, accurate diagnosis/prognosis of disease, and better personalized therapeutic management.

  14. Transitions to Care in the Community for Prison Releasees with HIV: a Qualitative Study of Facilitators and Challenges in Two States

    OpenAIRE

    Theodore M Hammett; Donahue, Sara; LeRoy, Lisa; Montague, Brian T.; Rosen, David L.; Solomon, Liza; Costa, Michael; Wohl, David; Rich, Josiah D.

    2015-01-01

    One in seven people living with HIV in the USA passes through a prison or jail each year, and almost all will return to the community. Discharge planning and transitional programs are critical but challenging elements in ensuring continuity of care, maintaining treatment outcomes achieved in prison, and preventing further viral transmission. This paper describes facilitators and challenges of in-prison care, transitional interventions, and access to and continuity of care in the community in ...

  15. Skill Development for Volunteering in Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Sue; Stirling, Christine; Orpin, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the skills required of volunteers in the voluntary sector organisations that operate in three rural Tasmanian communities. It reports how volunteers acquire those skills and reveals the challenges faced by voluntary sector organisations in rural communities whose industries and, following from this, community members have a…

  16. Promotoras Can Facilitate Use of Recreational Community Resources: The Mi Corazón Mi Comunidad Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcázar, Héctor G; de Heer, Hendrik D; Wise Thomas, Sherrie; Redelfs, Alisha; Rosenthal, E Lee; Burgos, Ximena; Duarte, Maria O

    2016-05-01

    Limited research has documented interventions aimed at promoting use of existing recreational community resources among underserved populations. This study (HEART [Health Education Awareness Research Team] Phase 2) reports findings of an intervention (Mi Corazón Mi Comunidad) where community health workers facilitated use of diet and exercise programming at local recreational facilities among Mexican American border residents. The aim was to evaluate overall attendance rates and to assess which factors predicted higher attendance. The design was a cohort study. From 2009 to 2013, a total of 753 participants were recruited across 5 consecutive cohorts. The intervention consisted of organized physical activity and nutrition programming at parks and recreational facilities and a free YWCA membership. Attendance at all activities was objectively recorded. Regression analyses were used to evaluate whether demographic factors, health status, and health beliefs were associated with attendance. Results Participants included mostly females at high risk for cardiovascular disease (72.4% were overweight/obese and 64% were [pre-]hypertensive). A total of 83.6% of participants attended at least one session. On average, total attendance was 21.6 sessions (range: 19.1-25.2 sessions between the different cohorts), including 16.4 physical activity and 5.2 nutrition sessions. Females (p = .003) and older participants (p < .001) attended more sessions. Participants low in acculturation (vs. high) attended on average seven more sessions (p = .003). Greater self-efficacy (p < .001), perceived benefits (p = .038), and healthy intentions (p = .024) were associated with higher attendance. Conclusions The intervention was successful in promoting use of recreational facilities among border residents at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Findings were similar across five different cohorts. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  17. Adherence to HAART: a systematic review of developed and developing nation patient-reported barriers and facilitators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Mills

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART medication is the greatest patient-enabled predictor of treatment success and mortality for those who have access to drugs. We systematically reviewed the literature to determine patient-reported barriers and facilitators to adhering to antiretroviral therapy. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We examined both developed and developing nations. We searched the following databases: AMED (inception to June 2005, Campbell Collaboration (inception to June 2005, CinAhl (inception to June 2005, Cochrane Library (inception to June 2005, Embase (inception to June 2005, ERIC (inception to June 2005, MedLine (inception to June 2005, and NHS EED (inception to June 2005. We retrieved studies conducted in both developed and developing nation settings that examined barriers and facilitators addressing adherence. Both qualitative and quantitative studies were included. We independently, in duplicate, extracted data reported in qualitative studies addressing adherence. We then examined all quantitative studies addressing barriers and facilitators noted from the qualitative studies. In order to place the findings of the qualitative studies in a generalizable context, we meta-analyzed the surveys to determine a best estimate of the overall prevalence of issues. We included 37 qualitative studies and 47 studies using a quantitative methodology (surveys. Seventy-two studies (35 qualitative were conducted in developed nations, while the remaining 12 (two qualitative were conducted in developing nations. Important barriers reported in both economic settings included fear of disclosure, concomitant substance abuse, forgetfulness, suspicions of treatment, regimens that are too complicated, number of pills required, decreased quality of life, work and family responsibilities, falling asleep, and access to medication. Important facilitators reported by patients in developed nation settings included having a sense of

  18. 75 FR 76617 - Use of Community Development Loans by Community Financial Institutions To Secure Advances...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... community financial institution (CFI) members may pledge to secure Federal Home Loan Bank (Bank) advances to... RIN 2590-AA24 Use of Community Development Loans by Community Financial Institutions To Secure... development financial institutions, FHFA included a technical amendment to the definition of ``CFI''...

  19. Electronic Payment System (EPS - Facilitating the Development and Adoption in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akudo C. Anyanwu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Parties conducting electronic businesses and transactions have usually never seen each other face-to-face, nor exchanged currency or hard copies of documents hand-to-hand. The society at large prefers transactions that involve physical contact of people, cash and cheques to that which is done over a telecommunication network such as the Internet. However, security, trust and convenience are among the major contending factors affecting the adoption of e-payment systems in Nigeria. This paper presents issues on the factors necessary to facilitate the development of EPS in Nigeria and devise ways to enhance its adoption by users.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Facilitate In Vitro Development of Human Preantral Follicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xi; Wang, Tianren; Yin, Tailang; Yan, Liying; Yan, Jie; Lu, Cuilin; Zhao, Liang; Li, Min; Zhang, Yan; Jin, Hongyan; Zhu, Xiaohui; Liu, Ping; Li, Rong; Qiao, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Biological folliculogenesis is a lengthy and complicated process, and follicle growth microenvironment is poorly understood. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to establish a supportive microenvironment for wound repair, autoimmune diseases amelioration, and tumor development. Therefore, this study is aimed to investigate whether MSCs could help to reconstruct a microenvironment to facilitate the in vitro follicle development. Here we show human MSCs significantly promote the survival rates, increase the growth velocity, and improve the viability of preantral follicles in a dose-dependent manner. Further analyses reveal that growth differentiation factor 9 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 in oocytes and inhibin βA and transforming growth factor β1 in granulose cells within the follicles cocultured with MSCs express notably higher than those in the follicles cultured without MSCs. In summary, our findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized function of MSCs in promoting preantral follicle development and provide a useful strategy to optimize fertility preservation and restoration by facilitating in vitro follicle growth.

  1. The local community development and the community-based tourism : a comparative conceptual analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie PARENT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the authors of this paper, mass tourism does not generate the development of local communities but rather their devitalization. This paper presents a cross-literature survey on community-based tourism and local community development. It proposes some links between these two approaches and asserts that community-based tourism can be a strategy to trigger local community development. It address the conditions under which the convergence of these two approaches may allow the launching of development initiatives liable to counter the devitalization and impoverishment process which characterizes certain mass tourism oriented places.

  2. The development of quality indicators for community pharmacy care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bie, J. de; Kijlstra, N.B.; Daemen, B.J.G.; Bouvy, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: To develop a national system of quality indicators for community pharmacy care, reported by community pharmacies. Methods: After preliminary validation, an online consensus study was conducted. Pharmacy practice experts (round 1) and practising pharmacists (round 2) were approached.

  3. 77 FR 37742 - Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... Investments. Service Activities (12 CFR 1806.103(nn)) include Deposit Liabilities, Financial Services, Community Services, Targeted Financial Services, and Targeted Retail Savings/Investment Products. When... Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Funding Opportunity Title: Notice of Funds Availability...

  4. Professional Learning in Unlikely Spaces: Social Media and Virtual Communities as Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen P. King

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this case study, results demonstrate that an individual’s use of social media as professional learning spans understanding, networking, professional identity development, and transformative learning. Specifically, virtual online communities facilitated through social media provide professional networks, social relationships and learning beyond the scope of the individual’s usual experience. Case study method reveals strategies, extent, and impact of learning providing insight into this phenomenon. The significance of the research includes purposefully facilitating professional learning through informal learning contexts, including social media and online communities beyond technology-centric fields. Discussion and recommendations include using social media and virtual communities as instructional strategies for graduate studies and continued learning beyond formal education.

  5. Facilitating the Adjustment to and Participation in the Life of the School and Community by Newly Arrived Puerto Rican Pupils and their Parents. Maxi I Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Margaret A.; Duncan, Nellie R.

    This document describes the planning and implementation of a comprehensive program to facilitate the adjustment of newly arrived Puerto Rican pupils and parents to the school and the surrounding East New York community. The program encompassed the following areas: improvement of school atmosphere, training of teachers and para-professionals, more…

  6. Evaluating the engagement of universities in capacity building for sustainable development in local communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiel, Chris; Leal Filho, Walter; do Paço, Arminda; Brandli, Luciana

    2016-02-01

    Universities have the potential to play a leading role in enabling communities to develop more sustainable ways of living and working however, sustainable communities may only emerge with facilitation, community learning and continual efforts to build their capacities. Elements of programme planning and evaluation on the one hand, and capacity building on the other, are needed. The latter entails approaches and processes that may contribute to community empowerment; universities may either lead such approaches, or be key partners in an endeavour to empower communities to address the challenges posed by the need for sustainable development. Although capacity building and the promotion of sustainable development locally, are on the agenda for universities who take seriously regional engagement, very little is published that illustrates or describes the various forms of activities that take place. Further, there is a paucity of studies that have evaluated the work performed by universities in building capacity for sustainable development at the local level. This paper is an attempt to address this need, and entails an empirical study based on a sample of universities in the United Kingdom, Germany, Portugal and Brazil. The paper examines the extent to which capacity building for sustainable development is being undertaken, suggests the forms that this might take and evaluates some of the benefits for local communities. The paper concludes by reinforcing that universities have a critical role to play in community development; that role has to prioritise the sustainability agenda.

  7. Developing Community Health Conditions for Happiness, Phase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalard Chantarasombat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Complete health of physical, social and intellectual development is an appropriate plan of human development and raises the quality of life in communities. If the development plan is integrated into the local community it will create peace and generosity. Good health is also fundamental to sustainable development which will create a peaceful society where community members are happy and content. Approach: The purpose of this research in Phase 1, is to (1 Identify leaders in communities at village and sub-district level to drive the ongoing research study and development to achieve good community health conditions in all aspects and dimensions. (2 To have the participants and researchers identify the key elements and indicators of health issues that communities feel are most important to their way of life. Results: Village communities were selected by cluster sampling from the provinces of Roi-Et and Maha Sarakham. The developed model for developing community health for living happily in communities is an appropriate and practical method that can be utilized in other communities. Conclusion: The model is in accordance with Participatory Action Research (PAR and the procedures are flexible and the development plans which are the results of Phase 1 can be extended to other communities and backgrounds.

  8. NanoSIP: Developing Community Imaging for Phylogenetic and Functional Characterization Using Cyanobacterial Mats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woebken, D., L.C. Burow, L. Prufert-Bebout, B.M. Bebout, T. M. Hoehler, J. Pett-Ridge, A.M. Spormann; Singer, S W; McMurdie, P J; Weber, P K

    2011-10-01

    This project was to develop and optimize the following technologies: stable isotope probing + NanoSIMS analysis (nanoSIP), FISH, functional gene analysis, H2 production measurements, culturing, and metatranscriptomics for specific use in microbial mat systems. The larger goal was to further develop these methodologies in a way that facilitates their linkage, high fidelity 3-D correlation to location specific environmental change integrating geochemical characterization, such that ability to see and characterize microbial community responses to normal daily fluctuations and further ecological manipulations, in different locations of the mat communities is optimized.

  9. Developing an holistic assessment protocol on a hospice inpatient ward: staff engagement and my role as a practice development facilitator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Lansdell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2014 I received the Richard Tompkins Nurse Development Scholarship, granted through the Foundation of Nursing Studies and including attendance at a five-day International Practice Development Collaborative practice development school, followed by a year’s mentorship. The scholarship aims to foster the delivery of person-centred care, which I hoped to achieve by enhancing holistic nursing assessment on a hospice inpatient ward. Aims: This article is a critical reflection on my learning through the scholarship, specifically related to staff engagement and my role as a practice development facilitator. Conclusions: While the project has not yet reached its conclusion, the learning has been invaluable. I have deepened my understanding of the need for collaboration, inclusion and participation to foster engagement and cultural change. More fundamentally, understanding how different aspects of my role enable change has proved both challenging and constructive, resulting in greater self-awareness and confidence. I remain committed to refining holistic nursing assessment to allow a greater degree of person-centred care in the hospice. Implications for practice: Practice development combines a variety of approaches to realise a shared vision; collaboration, inclusion and participation are central to fostering engagement Balancing different elements of a role (for instance, leader-manager-facilitator has the potential to be confusing and contradictory; awareness of how these elements interrelate promotes effectiveness when introducing change Individuals in a practice development role must ensure they have good sources of support

  10. Irish psychiatric nurses' self-reported barriers, facilitators and skills for developing evidence-based practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yadav, B L

    2012-03-01

    Evidence-based practice places an emphasis on integration of clinical expertise with available best evidence, patient\\'s clinical information and preferences, and with local health resources. This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated the barriers, facilitators and skills in developing evidence-based practice among psychiatric nurses in Ireland. A postal survey was conducted among a random sample of Irish psychiatric nurses and survey data were collected using the Development of Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. Respondents reported that insufficient time to find and read research reports and insufficient resources to change practice were the greatest barriers to the development of evidence-based practice. Practice development coordinators were perceived as the most supportive resource for changing practice. Using the Internet to search for information was the highest-rated skill and using research evidence to change practice was the lowest-rated skill for developing evidence-based practice. Nurses\\' precursor skills for developing evidence-based practice, such as database searching and information retrieval, may be insufficient in themselves for promoting evidence-based practice if they cannot find evidence relating to their particular field of practice or if they do not have the time, resources and supports to develop their practice in response to evidence.

  11. Irish psychiatric nurses' self-reported barriers, facilitators and skills for developing evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, B L; Fealy, G M

    2012-03-01

    Evidence-based practice places an emphasis on integration of clinical expertise with available best evidence, patient's clinical information and preferences, and with local health resources. This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated the barriers, facilitators and skills in developing evidence-based practice among psychiatric nurses in Ireland. A postal survey was conducted among a random sample of Irish psychiatric nurses and survey data were collected using the Development of Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. Respondents reported that insufficient time to find and read research reports and insufficient resources to change practice were the greatest barriers to the development of evidence-based practice. Practice development coordinators were perceived as the most supportive resource for changing practice. Using the Internet to search for information was the highest-rated skill and using research evidence to change practice was the lowest-rated skill for developing evidence-based practice. Nurses' precursor skills for developing evidence-based practice, such as database searching and information retrieval, may be insufficient in themselves for promoting evidence-based practice if they cannot find evidence relating to their particular field of practice or if they do not have the time, resources and supports to develop their practice in response to evidence.

  12. Facilitating the development of agency in first-year students. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem van Schoor

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Open distance learning (ODL requires students to take control of their study processes from the beginning in order to achieve study success. To achieve control, first-year students have to understand what agency requires of them and they have to know what to do to exercise agency. An online program was  developed at the University of South Africa (Unisa to facilitate the development of agency in first-year students and a pilot program was conducted with a group of students who had failed an Economics I course to test the program. The data indicated that time management in a variety of contexts was the major debilitating factor for participants. Feedback from the users indicated that they were generally positive about the program structure and contents, as well as their experience in using it. 

  13. Facilitating climate change adaptation through communication: Insights from the development of a visualization tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaas, Erik; Ballantyne, Anne Gammelgaard; Neset, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Climate change communication on anticipated impacts and adaptive responses is frequently presented as an effective means to facilitate implementation of adaptation to mitigate risks to residential buildings. However, it requires that communication is developed in a way that resonates...... with the context of the target audience, provides intelligible information and addresses perceived barriers to adaptation. In this paper we reflect upon criteria for useful climate change communication gained over a three year development process of a web-based tool - VisAdaptTM – aimed at increasing the adaptive...... capacity among Nordic homeowners. Based on the results from continuous user-testing and focus group interviews we outline lessons learned and key aspects to consider in the design of tools for communicating complex issues such as climate change effects and adaptive response measures....

  14. Autophagy facilitates multidrug resistance development through inhibition of apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W L; Lan, D; Gan, T Q; Cai, Z W

    2015-01-01

    Acquired multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main mechanism of chemotherapeutic drugs resistance. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of MDR are complex and still not very clear. Recently, including our previous study, several studies have revealed that macroautophagy (here referred to as autophagy) induced by anti-cancer drugs in breast cancer cells may facilitate the development of resistance to epirubicin (EPI), paclitaxel (PTX), tamoxifen or herceptin. Whereas there are a few studies on the relationship between autophagy and MDR, especially the studies designed directly employing induced resistant breast cancer cells. Based on previous study, we explored the relationship between autophagy and MDR. The results showed that induced EPI-resistant MCF-7er and SK-BR-3er cells were simultaneously resistant to PTX and vinorelbine (NVB), which demonstrated that the cells obtained MDR phenotype. Furthermore, PTX and NVB could also induce autophagy in MCF-7er and SK-BR-3er cells, and the induced autophagy protected the cells from apoptosis, which facilitated the development of resistance to PTX and NVB. Thus, autophagy promoted the development of MDR in breast cancer cells through inhibition of apoptosis. In addition, we found that P-glycoprotein (Pgp) was overexpressed in MCF-7er and SK-Br-3er cells. And we preliminarily investigated the relationship between autophagy and P-glycoprotein (Pgp). The results showed that the expression of the protein did not obviously change despite the inhibition of autophagy. Therefore, the role of Pgp in the development of MDR might be independent of autophahy. Also this finding implies that autophagy might be a target to overcome MDR in breast cancer cells, and clinical use autophagy inhibitors might be one of the important strategies for overcoming MDR in breast cancer therapy. Autophagy, apoptosis, multidrug resistance, breast cancer, chemotherapy.

  15. Developing a facilitation model to promote organisational development in primary care practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhydderch, S.M.; Edwards, A.; Marshall, M.; Elwyn, G.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relationship between effective organisation of general practices and health improvement is widely accepted. The Maturity Matrix is an instrument designed to assess organisational development in general practice settings and to stimulate quality improvement. It is undertaken by a prac

  16. Developing a facilitation model to promote organisational development in primary care practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhydderch, S.M.; Edwards, A.; Marshall, M.; Elwyn, G.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relationship between effective organisation of general practices and health improvement is widely accepted. The Maturity Matrix is an instrument designed to assess organisational development in general practice settings and to stimulate quality improvement. It is undertaken by a prac

  17. Community Vitality: The Role of Community-Level Resilience Adaptation and Innovation in Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenore Newman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Community level action towards sustainable development has emerged as a key scale of intervention in the effort to address our many serious environmental issues. This is hindered by the large-scale destruction of both urban neighbourhoods and rural villages in the second half of the twentieth century. Communities, whether they are small or large, hubs of experimentation or loci of traditional techniques and methods, can be said to have a level of community vitality that acts as a site of resilience, adaptation and innovation in the face of environmental challenges. This paper outlines how community vitality acts as a cornerstone of sustainable development and suggests some courses for future research. A meta-case analysis of thirty-five Canadian communities reveals the characteristics of community vitality emerging from sustainable development experiments and its relationship to resilience, applied specifically to community development.

  18. Bringing the integrative aspect of sustainable development into community natural resource management: the case of agricultural land use in Limpopo, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Musvoto, Constansia D

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available policies to facilitate integrated decision making, which is pivotal to sustainable development. Sustainable development is an integrative concept with a basis in a ‘whole systems approach’. There are no tools tailored to facilitate integration in community...

  19. Walk together children with no wasted steps: community-academic partnering for equal power in NIH proposal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Karen Jaynes; Cooks, John Mark; May, Marlynn; Peranteau, Jane; Reifsnider, Elizabeth; Hargraves, Martha A

    2010-01-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches equitably involve community members and researchers throughout the research process. A developing literature examines problems in CBPR partnerships, but less is written about community groups using CBPR to access university resources to address community-prioritized health concerns. We sought to examine issues in two stages of a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded CBPR partnership: (1) joint proposal preparation, and (2) grant administration. We used a case study approach to analyze data (partner dialogs, meeting notes, interviews, and press coverage) from a longstanding community-academic partnership. The partnership received NIH Partners in Research Program funding. During joint proposal preparation, issues included (1) learning to practice operating principles, such as "talking in ways that all people can understand," (2) streamlining proposal design to facilitate communication with community members, and (3) addressing inequities inherent in community-academic budget sharing. During the administration phase, issues included (1) community partner struggles with administrative requirements, (2) inequities in indirect cost (IDC) allocations, and (3) the impact of a natural disaster. Separately funded CBPR grants can contribute to community partner development, but make substantive demands on small, grassroots community organizations. Funders should consider taking more responsibility in developing community resources and infrastructure to ensure that grassroots community groups have the power to be equal partners. More accurate accounting of costs and benefits of CBPR to vulnerable communities should be in place to ensure communities receive adequate return on the time they invest in partnering with universities.

  20. Developing Communities: Serving ACE through Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofo, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the focus and practice of Adult and Community Education (ACE) as well as its conceptualization and delivery and to suggest parameters for an approach based on excellence, a balanced scorecard and performance to meet community needs. Design/methodology/approach: The review examines key aspects of the…

  1. Development of an Automated Bone Mineral Density Software Application: Facilitation Radiologic Reporting and Improvement of Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, I-Ta; Tsai, Meng-Yuan; Wu, Ming-Ting; Chen, Clement Kuen-Huang

    2016-06-01

    The conventional method of bone mineral density (BMD) report production by dictation and transcription is time consuming and prone to error. We developed an automated BMD reporting system based on the raw data from a dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanner for facilitating the report generation. The automated BMD reporting system, a web application, digests the DXA's raw data and automatically generates preliminary reports. In Jan. 2014, 500 examinations were randomized into an automatic group (AG) and a manual group (MG), and the speed of report generation was compared. For evaluation of the accuracy and analysis of errors, 5120 examinations during Jan. 2013 and Dec. 2013 were enrolled retrospectively, and the context of automatically generated reports (AR) was compared with the formal manual reports (MR). The average time spent for report generation in AG and in MG was 264 and 1452 s, respectively (p Z scores in AR is 100 %. The overall accuracy of AR and MR is 98.8 and 93.7 %, respectively (p < 0.001). The mis-categorization rate in AR and MR is 0.039 and 0.273 %, respectively (p = 0.0013). Errors occurred in AR and can be grouped into key-in errors by technicians and need for additional judgements. We constructed an efficient and reliable automated BMD reporting system. It facilitates current clinical service and potentially prevents human errors from technicians, transcriptionists, and radiologists.

  2. Developing Interactive Video Resource Materials for Community Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Claire; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the creation of a series of interactive video modules on dental hygiene at Luzerne County Community College. These modules are intended to supplement instruction in a community dentistry and health education course and to guide students in an assignment to develop and implement dental health projects in their community. (MBR)

  3. Theoretical versus Grass-Roots Development of a Community Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escandon, Socorro

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine Bracht, Kingbury, and Rissel's five-stage community development model as applied to a grass-roots community action group. The sample consisted of low-income, predominantly Hispanic women in a community action group in a Southwestern barrio, some of whom were experiencing domestic violence. The…

  4. An exploration of tripartite collaboration in developing a strategic approach to the facilitation of practice learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Pauline; Jones, Kerry

    2005-01-01

    Pre-registration nurse education in United Kingdom has to be delivered within a complex system. Theoretical components are delivered by a Higher Education Institution and the practice components, facilitated and assessed by clinical practitioners within a health service provider institution. The previous decade witnessed a gradual divorce between these two institutions, leading to a confidence and competence deficit in the newly qualified practitioner. The new national agenda for pre-registration nursing was set out in the fitness for practice document, [UKCC, London, 1999]. It required a refocus on the practice aspects of nurse education. It identified the need to strengthen the links between higher education providers and service providers to ensure the delivery of a seamless curriculum. The report recommended closer collaborative working to bridge the theory-practice gap and develop nurses that were competent and fit for purpose at the end of the course. Several pilot sites were identified throughout the country to deliver the new practice focussed curriculum; The University of Wolverhampton was one of these. The focus of this paper will identify the multifaceted developments that facilitate effective practice learning for students, which have been achieved through partnership working and will include the following areas; creation of new practice support roles, communication systems, modes of learning (technology supported learning, problem based learning, experiential learning and simulation), the learning environment, learning opportunities and resources. It is clear that practice learning has many influences, which can either enhance or undermine the student's ability to assimilate knowledge and experience into personal, professional practice. We acknowledge that there are still many areas to be developed and anticipate that these will be informed by the findings of research currently being undertaken within the University and NHS service providers.

  5. Educating the Engineer for Sustainable Community Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    More than ever before, we are confronting the challenges of limited resources (water, food, energy and mineral), while also facing complex challenges with the environment and related social unrest. Resource access problems are exacerbated by multi-scale geopolitical instability. We seek a balance that will allow profit but also leave a world fit for our children to inherit. Many are working with small groups to make positive change through finding solutions that address these challenges. In fact, some say that in sum, it is the largest human movement that has ever existed. In this talk I will share our experiences to alleviate vulnerabilities for populations of humans in need while working with students, corporate entities and non governmental organizations. Our main focus is to educate a new cadre of engineers that have an enhanced awareness of and better communication skills for a different cultural environment than the one in which they were raised and are hungry to seek new opportunities to serve humanity at a basic level. The results of a few of the more than forty humanitarian engineering projects completed since 2003 will be superimposed on a theoretical framework for sustainable community development. This will be useful information to those seeking a social corporate position of responsibility and a world that more closely approaches a sustainable equilibrium.

  6. Evaluating the effects of pollinator-mediated interactions using pollen transfer networks: evidence of widespread facilitation in south Andean plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur, C; Sáez, A; Traveset, A; Aizen, M A

    2016-05-01

    Information about the relative importance of competitive or facilitative pollinator-mediated interactions in a multi-species context is limited. We studied interspecific pollen transfer (IPT) networks to evaluate quantity and quality effects of pollinator sharing among plant species on three high-Andean communities at 1600, 1800 and 2000 m a.s.l. To estimate the sign of the effects (positive, neutral or negative), the relation between conspecific and heterospecific pollen deposited on stigmas was analysed with GLMMs. Network analyses showed that communities were characterised by the presence of pollen hub-donors and receptors. We inferred that facilitative and neutral pollinator-mediated interactions among plants prevailed over competition. Thus, the benefits from pollinator sharing seem to outweigh the costs (i.e. heterospecific deposition and conspecific pollen loss). The largest proportion of facilitated species was found at the highest elevation community, suggesting that under unfavourable conditions for the pollination service and at lower plant densities facilitation can be more common.

  7. Developing a community multiple sclerosis nursing service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Debbie; Adams, John

    2014-05-20

    Reforms to the NHS following the passing of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 have created new purchaser organisations with responsibility for planning the configuration of healthcare services in their geographic areas. If a community multiple sclerosis (MS) nursing service is to survive in this environment, it must demonstrate its ability to contribute to achieving the purchaser organisations' objectives. Evaluation data, such as hospital admission avoidance and patient satisfaction, will be crucial in demonstrating the community MS nursing service's clinical and economic effectiveness. A strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis of the issues facing a community MS service in this environment is provided.

  8. Role of Local Elected Leaders in Community Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Alam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on the role of local elected leaders in community development at union council Katti Garhi, District Mardan. To collect the relevant data the researcher selected 60 community members and 12 elected union council members including Nazim and Niab Nazim of the area through purposive sampling basis. Questionnaire was used for the educated while interview schedule was used for un-educated respondents for data collection. The study indicates the role of local elected leaders in establishment of community organizations, mobilization of the community for community development, monitoring program for community development, provision of social services, sanitation, street pavements, streetlights, health facilities, education facilities (Free books, uniform and scholarships etc., adult education, provision of technical skill and vocational training center in the area. Community members mentioned that they are in need of public parks, playgrounds, public latrines, fire brigade, and waiting rooms for the passengers, pavement of roadsides and improvement in drinking and irrigation water.

  9. Epistemic Communities, Situated Learning and Open Source Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper

    2001-01-01

    This paper analyses open source software (OSS) development as an epistemic community where each individual project is perceived as a single epistemic community. OSS development is a learning process where the involved parties contribute to, and learn from the community. It is discovered that theory...... of epistemic communities does indeed contribute to the understanding of open source software development. But, the important learning process of open source software development is not readily explained. The paper then introduces situated learning and legitimate peripheral participation as theoretical...

  10. Rural electrification, climate change, and local economies: Facilitating communication in development policy and practice on Nicaragua's Atlantic Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, Christian E.

    I explore the role of information and communication in the world of institution-led development. Through a series of case studies from the Atlantic Coast of Nicaragua, I present several projects and their implications for uncovering information that may lead to greater local benefit from externally-planned development projects. In order to construct policies and implement projects, development institutions collect, analyze, and simplify information, collapsing messy physical and social realities into narrow sets of metrics. In addition, local stakeholders often aren't privy to the analysis and assumptions of the "expert" planners. An evolved set of methods for dialogue and planning, which focus on sharing available information, can help facilitate outcomes that are more beneficial for targeted groups. Carbon abatement cost curves provide a clear example where the relations of complex social, economic, and environmental systems are reduced to a narrow set of metrics, specifically the cost of carbon mitigation and the total tons reduced. When the carbon abatement cost curve is applied to the community level, it reveals information and allows for conclusions obscured by aggregated national level studies. I show that there are opportunities for augmenting the limited metrics of these cost curves to include those that relate to welfare, beginning to highlight how costs and savings are distributed among stakeholders. In particular, the benefits to the most marginalized groups are heavily dependent on planners taking a pro-poor approach. However, planners typically remain blind to the priorities, capabilities, and values of the target stakeholders. There is a dearth of methods that effectively open up the development expert's black box of project designs, allowing their proposed solutions to be transparent to the target beneficiaries. I address this challenge through the presentation of a participatory modeling process that was utilized with groups of artisanal fishers

  11. Human finger-prick induced pluripotent stem cells facilitate the development of stem cell banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hong-Kee; Toh, Cheng-Xu Delon; Ma, Dongrui; Yang, Binxia; Liu, Tong Ming; Lu, Jun; Wong, Chee-Wai; Tan, Tze-Kai; Li, Hu; Syn, Christopher; Tan, Eng-Lee; Lim, Bing; Lim, Yoon-Pin; Cook, Stuart A; Loh, Yuin-Han

    2014-05-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from somatic cells of patients can be a good model for studying human diseases and for future therapeutic regenerative medicine. Current initiatives to establish human iPSC (hiPSC) banking face challenges in recruiting large numbers of donors with diverse diseased, genetic, and phenotypic representations. In this study, we describe the efficient derivation of transgene-free hiPSCs from human finger-prick blood. Finger-prick sample collection can be performed on a "do-it-yourself" basis by donors and sent to the hiPSC facility for reprogramming. We show that single-drop volumes of finger-prick samples are sufficient for performing cellular reprogramming, DNA sequencing, and blood serotyping in parallel. Our novel strategy has the potential to facilitate the development of large-scale hiPSC banking worldwide.

  12. Development of the EMAP tool facilitating existential communication between general practitioners and cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assing Hvidt, Elisabeth; Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Ammentorp, Jette

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practice recognizes the existential dimension as an integral part of multidimensional patient care alongside the physical, psychological and social dimensions. However, general practitioners (GPs) report substantial barriers related to communication with patients about...... existential concerns. OBJECTIVES: To describe the development of the EMAP tool facilitating communication about existential problems and resources between GPs and patients with cancer. METHODS: A mixed-methods design was chosen comprising a literature search, focus group interviews with GPs and patients (n...... dimension. The tool utilized the acronym and mnemonic EMAP (existential communication in general practice) indicating the intention of the tool: to provide a map of possible existential problems and resources that the GP and the patient can discuss to find points of reorientation in the patient's situation...

  13. The Contribution of Innovation Strategy Development and Implementation in Active Facilitation of Pharmaceutical Front End Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Annabeth

    2012-01-01

    Front end innovation (FEI) represents the first building blocks of product development, but is often regarded as a weak link in innovation literature. Various theorists emphasize that a firm’s innovation can benefit substantially by improving the front end of innovation process (Reinertsen, 1999......, Steven & Burly, 2003, and Vernorn et al., 2008) and that innovation strategies play a central role in optimization of innovation (Clark & Wheelwright, 1995; Cottam et al., 2001; Morgan & Berthon, 2008). Innovation strategies are suggested in literature (e.g. Page, 1993; Oke, 2002; Adams et al., 2006......; Igartua, 2010) as a facilitator of innovation and may therefore also be targeted at FEI support. The pharmaceutical industry has experienced a worldwide decline in the number of applications for new molecular entities to regulatory agencies since 1997. Therefore high pressures are put on pharmaceutical...

  14. 24 CFR 570.415 - Community Development Work Study Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Community Development Work Study... Grants § 570.415 Community Development Work Study Program. (a) Applicability and objectives. HUD makes... students who participate in a work study program while enrolled in full-time graduate programs in...

  15. Initiatives for Sustainable Community Development in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamara, John M.; Kargbo, Stephen B.

    1999-01-01

    In Sierra Leone, two church-sponsored programs are focused on sustainable development. The Wesleyan Development Education and Awareness Programme trains people to initiate community projects. Women's Loan Scheme encourages development of small-scale enterprises. (SK)

  16. Development of a robotic device for facilitating learning by children who have severe disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Albert M; Meng, Max Q H; Gu, Jason J; Howery, Kathy

    2002-09-01

    This paper presents technical aspects of a robot manipulator developed to facilitate learning by young children who are generally unable to grasp objects or speak. The severity of these physical disabilities also limits assessment of their cognitive and language skills and abilities. The CRS robot manipulator was adapted for use by children who have disabilities. Our emphasis is on the technical control aspects of the development of an interface and communication environment between the child and the robot arm. The system is designed so that each child has user control and control procedures that are individually adapted. Control interfaces include large push buttons, keyboards, laser pointer, and head-controlled switches. Preliminary results have shown that young children who have severe disabilities can use the robotic arm system to complete functional play-related tasks. Developed software allows the child to accomplish a series of multistep tasks by activating one or more single switches. Through a single switch press the child can replay a series of preprogrammed movements that have a development sequence. Children using this system engaged in three-step sequential activities and were highly responsive to the robotic tasks. This was in marked contrast to other interventions using toys and computer games.

  17. Facilitating factors and barriers to malaria research utilization for policy development in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwendera, Chikondi A; de Jager, Christiaan; Longwe, Herbert; Phiri, Kamija; Hongoro, Charles; Mutero, Clifford M

    2016-10-19

    Research on various determinants of health is key in providing evidence for policy development, thereby leading to successful interventions. Utilization of research is an intricate process requiring an understanding of contextual factors. The study was conducted to assess enhancing factors and barriers of research utilization for malaria policy development in Malawi. Qualitative research approach was used through in-depth interviews with 39 key informants that included malaria researchers, policy makers, programme managers, and key stakeholders. Purposive sampling and snowballing techniques were used in identifying key informants. Interview transcripts were entered in QSR Nvivo 11 software for coding and analysis. Respondents identified global efforts as key in advancing knowledge translation, while local political will has been conducive for research utilization. Other factors were availability of research, availability of diverse local researchers and stakeholders supporting knowledge translation. While barriers included: lack of platforms for researcher-public engagement, politics, researchers' lack of communication skills, lack of research collaborations, funder driven research, unknown World Health Organization policy position, and the lack of a malaria research repository. Overall, the study identified facilitating factors to malaria research utilization for policy development in Malawi. These factors need to be systematically coordinated to address the identified barriers and improve on malaria research utilization in policy development. Malaria research can be key in the implementation of evidence-based interventions to reduce the malaria burden and assist in the paradigm shift from malaria control to elimination in Malawi.

  18. Professional Learning in Unlikely Spaces: Social Media and Virtual Communities as Professional Development

    OpenAIRE

    King, Kathleen P.

    2011-01-01

    In this case study, results demonstrate that an individual’s use of social media as professional learning spans understanding, networking, professional identity development, and transformative learning. Specifically, virtual online communities facilitated through social media provide professional networks, social relationships and learning beyond the scope of the individual’s usual experience. Case study method reveals strategies, extent, and impact of learning providing insight into this phe...

  19. Bacterial community development in experimental gingivitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kistler, James O; Booth, Veronica; Bradshaw, David J; Wade, William G

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities...

  20. Influence of Leadership Styles on Community Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    Data were analysed using descriptive and Pearson's Product Moment Correlation. ... forces to plan and take actions regarding community problems. They ... leadership traits. ... focus of group processes, as a matter of personality, as a matter of.

  1. Development and early experience from an intervention to facilitate teamwork between general practices and allied health providers: the Team-link study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwar Nick

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes the development and implementation of an intervention to facilitate teamwork between general practice and outside allied and community health services and providers. Methods A review of organizational theory and a qualitative study of 9 practices was used to design an intervention which was applied in four Divisions of General Practice and 26 urban practices. Clinical record review and qualitative interviews with participants were used to determine the key lessons from its implementation. Results Facilitating teamwork across organizational boundaries was very challenging. The quality of the relationship between professionals was of key importance. This was enabled by joint education and direct communication between providers. Practice nurses were key links between general practices and allied and community health services. Conclusions Current arrangements for Team Care planning provide increased opportunities for access to allied health. However the current paper based system is insufficient to build relationships or effectively share roles as part of a patient care team. Facilitation is feasible but constrained by barriers to communication and trust.

  2. Development and early experience from an intervention to facilitate teamwork between general practices and allied health providers: the Team-link study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mark F; Chan, Bibiana C; Daniel, Christopher; Wan, Qing; Zwar, Nick; Davies, Gawaine Powell

    2010-04-27

    This paper describes the development and implementation of an intervention to facilitate teamwork between general practice and outside allied and community health services and providers. A review of organizational theory and a qualitative study of 9 practices was used to design an intervention which was applied in four Divisions of General Practice and 26 urban practices. Clinical record review and qualitative interviews with participants were used to determine the key lessons from its implementation. Facilitating teamwork across organizational boundaries was very challenging. The quality of the relationship between professionals was of key importance. This was enabled by joint education and direct communication between providers. Practice nurses were key links between general practices and allied and community health services. Current arrangements for Team Care planning provide increased opportunities for access to allied health. However the current paper based system is insufficient to build relationships or effectively share roles as part of a patient care team. Facilitation is feasible but constrained by barriers to communication and trust.

  3. Using Collaborative Technology in CS Education to facilitate Cross-Site Software Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Devlin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available With offshore computing becoming more prevalent, it is essential that we increase our students' employability by providing new and relevant experiences in software development and project management; giving them valuable skills that are essential in an ever-increasing and changing global market. What is new about the work we discuss here is how collaborative technologies have facilitated a year-long cross-site software engineering project between Durham University and Newcastle University students. Our use of various collaboration technologies such as online discussion forums, video-conferencing, company repositories, version control software etc., as part of the collaborative team project has not only encouraged students to develop technical 'transferable' skills but also gain an understanding, through realistic experiences, of how the use of these technologies involves more than just learning their technical aspects and operation, but that it is essential to develop and implement the soft processes and skills required to use them successfully and effectively and hence optimize their cross-site working partnerships and productivity. In this paper we describe the project, the technologies employed by the student teams and the results and anecdotal evidence of staff and students that show the successes and, it must be admitted, occasional failures of this work. We discuss how we have tried to manage the expectations of the students throughout the project, how the technologies we have provided have affected the students' experience of cross-site collaboration and the impact of crosssite collaboration on our assessment strategies and curriculum design.

  4. Family Group Decision Making (FGDM) with Lakota families in two tribal communities: tools to facilitate FGDM implementation and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcynyszyn, Lyscha A; Bear, Pete Small; Geary, Erin; Conti, Russ; Pecora, Peter J; Day, Priscilla A; Wilson, Stephen T

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an adapted Family Group Decision Making (FGDM) practice model for Native American communities, the FGDM family and community engagement process, and FGDM evaluation tools as one example for other native communities. Challenges and successes associated with the implementation and evaluation of these meetings are also described in the context of key historical and cultural factors, such as intergenerational grief and trauma, as well as past misuse of data in native communities.

  5. Effects of Stakeholder Conflicts on Community Development Projects in Kenyase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Gyan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the effects of stakeholder conflicts on community development. In particular, it analyzes the negative repercussions these conflicts have on projects drawing on primary research in Kenyase, one of the major mining communities in Ghana where community development processes are more structured. Using qualitative research methods, the research sought evidence of the negative effects stakeholder conflicts have on projects. This study revealed that financial and technical investments without adequate social capital have the potential of retarding community development projects. It was therefore recommended that project managers pay attention to stakeholder relationships in project initiation, design, and implementation.

  6. Community health centers and community development financial institutions: joining forces to address determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelchuck, Ronda; Lowenstein, Daniel; Tobin, Jonathan N

    2011-11-01

    Community health centers and community development financial institutions share similar origins and missions and are increasingly working together to meet community needs. Addressing the social and economic determinants of health is a common focus. The availability of new federal grants and tax credits has led these financial institutions to invest in the creation and expansion of community health centers. This article reviews the most recent trends in these two sectors and explores opportunities for further collaboration to transform the health and well-being of the nation's low-income communities.

  7. Facilitating Changes in College Teaching Practices: Instructional Reform, Identity Conflict and Professional Community in a K-20 Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olitsky, Stacy

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, I explain variation in the adoption of student-centred teaching practices among college faculty members in a program designed to promote K-20 instructional reform. I analyze data from a qualitative study of a Math and Science Partnership in order to understand why some faculty members had undergone extensive changes to their practices whereas others had not, even though both groups had demonstrated changes in their beliefs. Findings show that when collective identities focused on reform become more salient than the role identities associated with their teaching positions, faculty members are able to persist through the loss of self-efficacy that results from struggles with new student-centred practices. This study demonstrates how professional communities can enhance "collective efficacy", thereby affecting whether the cognitive dissonance that accompanies professional development leads to instructional change rather than disengagement from reform initiatives.

  8. Community Forestry and Sustainable Development in Rural Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    After analysis on the current situation of international forestry, this paper proposes that integration, coordination and sustainable development will be the general developing trend of forest in China, and commercial forest, ecological forest and community forest should be organically combined with integrative development and sustainable development in rural areas. This paper focuses especially on clarifying the importance of community forest to the social development or rural areas, and emphasizes tha...

  9. Community Development with Immigrant Women. A Resource Kit for Community Education and Organizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Veronica; Persad, Judy Vashti

    The primary objective of the kit is to present a model to assist Canadian community workers in developing a workshop or a course on community development working with or intending to work with immigrant women. The booklet provides a guide through the stages of needs assessment, outreach, selection of participants, program design, implementation,…

  10. A Community of Narratives: Developing Transracialized Selves through a Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughter, Judson; Han, Keonghee Tao; King, Donna; Madhuri, Marga; Nayan, Rohany; Williams, Toni

    2015-01-01

    The story presented here developed from a study group where we found space to explore and analyze ourselves and each other. In recounting our development from a Community of Interest to a Community of Practice (CoP), we first introduce a guiding theoretical framework building on a foundation of two concepts: "CoP" and…

  11. The Development and Implementation of a Community Pharmacy Practice Clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Fred G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A clerkship at the University of Southern California School of Pharmacy was developed to provide students with (1) experience in the identification, development,, implementation, and evaluation of patient care services in community pharmacies and (2) the skills required to successfully operate a community pharmacy on a day-to-day basis.…

  12. The Development of Community Competence in the Teacher Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobber, Marjolein; Vandyck, Inne; Akkerman, Sanne; Graaff, Rick de; Beishuizen, Jos; Pilot, Albert; Verloop, Nico; Vermunt, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Teachers are expected to frequently collaborate within teacher communities in schools. This requires teacher education to prepare student teachers by developing the necessary community competence. The present study empirically investigates the extent to which teacher education programmes pay attention to and aim to stimulate the development of…

  13. The Development of Social Presence in Online Arabic Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Andrea; Herrington, Jan

    2010-01-01

    An effective online learning community requires the development of social presence, as this helps learners to project themselves online and feel a sense of community. A literature review found that cultural preferences are important in developing relationships online, which may explain why some learners in international contexts may not…

  14. The Development of Community Competence in the Teacher Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobber, Marjolein; Vandyck, Inne; Akkerman, Sanne; Graaff, Rick de; Beishuizen, Jos; Pilot, Albert; Verloop, Nico; Vermunt, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Teachers are expected to frequently collaborate within teacher communities in schools. This requires teacher education to prepare student teachers by developing the necessary community competence. The present study empirically investigates the extent to which teacher education programmes pay attention to and aim to stimulate the development of…

  15. Developing a grounded theory for interprofessional collaboration acquisition using facilitator and actor perspectives in simulated wilderness medical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Heather A; Reade, Maurianne; Marr, Marion; Jeeves, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Interprofessional collaboration is a complex process that has the potential to transform patient care for the better in urban, rural and remote healthcare settings. Simulation has been found to improve participants' interprofessional competencies, but the mechanisms by which interprofessionalism is learned have yet to be understood. A rural wilderness medicine conference (WildER Med) in northern Ontario, Canada with simulated medical scenarios has been demonstrated to be effective in improving participants' collaboration without formal interprofessional education (IPE) curriculum. Interprofessionalism may be taught through rural and remote medical simulation, as done in WildER Med where participants' interprofessional competencies improved without any formal IPE curriculum. This learning may be attributed to the informal and hidden curriculum. Understanding the mechanism by which this rural educational experience contributed to participants' learning to collaborate requires insight into the events before, during and after the simulations. The authors drew upon feedback from facilitators and patient actors in one-on-one interviews to develop a grounded theory for how collaboration is taught and learned. Sharing emerged as the core concept of a grounded theory to explain how team members acquired interprofessional collaboration competencies. Sharing was enacted through the strategies of developing common goals, sharing leadership, and developing mutual respect and understanding. Further analysis of the data and literature suggests that the social wilderness environment was foundational in enabling sharing to occur. Medical simulations in other rural and remote settings may offer an environment conducive to collaboration and be effective in teaching collaboration. When designing interprofessional education, health educators should consider using emergency response teams or rural community health teams to optimize the informal and hidden curriculum contributing to

  16. 75 FR 29560 - Identifying Unmet Public Health Needs and Facilitating Innovation in Medical Device Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ... No. FDA-2010-N-0237] Identifying Unmet Public Health Needs and Facilitating Innovation in Medical...) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``Identifying Unmet Public Health Needs and Facilitating... identify the most important unmet public health needs, the barriers to innovative medical...

  17. Developing Reading Comprehension Modules to Facilitate Reading Comprehension among Malaysian Secondary School ESL Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Javed

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to develop a set of 6 Reading Comprehension Modules (RCMs for Malaysian ESL teachers to facilitate different reading abilities of ESL students effectively. Different skill categories were selected for developing the RCMs. This article describes how and why diverse texts of varying length were adopted and adapted from various authentic sources for ESL students having different reading abilities/bands. It also discusses how literal, reorganisation, and inferential questions were constructed appropriately based on the texts selected in the RCMs. Five experienced content/language experts validated the RCMs while eighty ESL students selected through purposive sampling from a secondary school from Penang, Malaysia participated in the pilot study for determining the reliability of the RCMs. The results of the pilot study revealed that the participants improved their scores gradually. Kuder and Richardson Formula 20 (KR-20 was employed to determine the internal consistency of the RCMs. The calculated values of RCMs ranged between 0.804 and 0.923 that indicate high reliability. The RCMs were standardised through a rigorous developmental process by using the Pebble in the Pond Model (Merril, 2002. We hope that the standardised RCMs would act as indicators for the ESL teachers to enhance ESL students’ performance in reading comprehension

  18. Rural Community Development Strategy beyond the Access to Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akther, Farzana

    2012-01-01

    Telecenters is one of the promising models recognized by the United Nations (UN) to achieve the global access of ICTs. This paper provides insight in the role and usages of Information and Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) projects with a specific focus of telecenters in developing...... for development with impact analysis of ICT4D project. The understanding of community capability building is addressed by identifying core capabilities of ICT for the rural community, and highlighting the relationship between the ICT and development. The study also demonstrates how ICT may bridge the gap between...... the policy and actual practices of rural community with respect of ICT development....

  19. Interprofessional Education and Practice Guide No. 1: developing faculty to effectively facilitate interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Leslie Walter; Zierler, Brenda K

    2015-01-01

    With the growth of interprofessional education (IPE) and practice in health professional schools, faculty members are being asked to assume new roles in leading or delivering interprofessional curriculum. Many existing faculty members feel ill-prepared to face the challenges of this curricular innovation. From 2012-2013, University of Missouri - Columbia and University of Washington partnered with six additional academic health centers to pilot a faculty development course to prepare faculty leaders for IPE. Using a variety of techniques, including didactic teaching, small group exercises, immersion participation in interprofessional education, local implementation of new IPE projects, and peer learning, the program positioned each site to successfully introduce an interprofessional innovation. Participating faculty confirmed the value of the program, and suggested that more widespread similar efforts were worthwhile. This guide briefly describes this faculty development program and identifies key lessons learned from the initiative. Peer learning arising from a faculty development community, adaptation of curricula to fit local context, experiential learning, and ongoing coaching/mentoring, especially as it related to actual participation in IPE activities, were among the key elements of this successful faculty development activity.

  20. Influence of Leadership Styles on Community Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    the quality of life in the community in terms of economy, social, culture, spiritual ... leadership as an interaction between two or more members of a group that often ... focus of group processes, as a matter of personality, as a matter of inducing ...

  1. Voluntary Community Organisations in Metropolitan Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    While short-term enrolling of citizens in urban regeneration projects often has proven quite successful, permanent embedding of projects in voluntary community-based settings seems to be much more difficult to obtain. This has implications for long term sustainability of urban regeneration projec...

  2. Where Is Community Development Going in Latin America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Frances

    1994-01-01

    Reviews community development in Latin America (self-help local improvement projects, popular education, nongovernmental organizations). Identifies challenges--increasing the participation of all levels, reorganizing priorities, and supporting the development of economic democracy. (SK)

  3. Where Is Community Development Going in Latin America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Frances

    1994-01-01

    Reviews community development in Latin America (self-help local improvement projects, popular education, nongovernmental organizations). Identifies challenges--increasing the participation of all levels, reorganizing priorities, and supporting the development of economic democracy. (SK)

  4. Interactive Development of Community Education and Migrant Workers’ Continuing Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning; WANG

    2015-01-01

    Community education is an essential carrier of continuing education and plays a positive role in promoting continuing education of migrant workers. On the one hand,it can raise employment quality and labor skills of migrant workers; on the other hand,it manifests function of serving society of community education. Besides,it is also an important measure for building learning society and lifelong learning system.From the perspective of interactive development,it discusses interactive relationship between community education and migrant workers’ continuing education,analyzes their interactive mechanism,and comes up with recommendations for developing community education and migrant workers’ continuing education.

  5. Promoting Coordinated Development of Community-Based Information Standards for Modeling in Biology: The COMBINE Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucka, Michael; Nickerson, David P; Bader, Gary D; Bergmann, Frank T; Cooper, Jonathan; Demir, Emek; Garny, Alan; Golebiewski, Martin; Myers, Chris J; Schreiber, Falk; Waltemath, Dagmar; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The Computational Modeling in Biology Network (COMBINE) is a consortium of groups involved in the development of open community standards and formats used in computational modeling in biology. COMBINE's aim is to act as a coordinator, facilitator, and resource for different standardization efforts whose domains of use cover related areas of the computational biology space. In this perspective article, we summarize COMBINE, its general organization, and the community standards and other efforts involved in it. Our goals are to help guide readers toward standards that may be suitable for their research activities, as well as to direct interested readers to relevant communities where they can best expect to receive assistance in how to develop interoperable computational models.

  6. SU-E-T-213: Development of a Web Wrapper to Facilitate Radiotherapy Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkerts, M; Graves, Y; Gautier, Q; Kim, G; Jia, X; Jiang, S

    2012-06-01

    Researchers write many computer programs with unique implementations, usually requiring a great amount of effort for other researchers to learn how to install, configure, and use. Some programs require specialized hardware platforms such as GPU workstation or CPU cluster, which may not readily available for many researchers. This work develops a general web platform to 'wrap' radiotherapy software tools into a user friendly, browser-based interface. We developed a web wrapper based on existing technologies (e.g. HTML5, JavaScript, PHP, Python, XML) to interface with command line-based research tools. This wrapper enables users to easily perform various tasks in any modern web browser, while underlying tools are launched remotely. Visitors can upload data, configure settings, process data remotely, then view, share, and download results with minimal effort. This web wrapper is developer friendly; new tools are easily integrated by editing XML configuration files. As a test case, we have successfully wrapped a set of command line tools, developed by our group, into a single web app, providing fluence map generation, CT image processing, and GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation. The result is a web-based quality assurance tool. With this tool, users can upload compressed DICOM-RT files, recompute dose using the MC method, and evaluate the results by viewing dose distribution, 3D gamma index distribution and DVH curves. The entire work-flow can be completed within 2 minutes provided users have a reasonable Internet connection speed. We have developed an web wrapper to increase the accessibility of radiotherapy tools and reduce users' learning curve through a friendly web-based interface. This work also allows quick and easy deployment and distribution of software tools developed by researchers to the whole community. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Community Strategic Relationship and Marketing to Foster the Development of communities and the sustainability of organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Juárez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to define community strategic relationship and marketing (CSRM as a relevant tool to foster the development of communities and the sustainability of organizations. The method was rationalist, theoretical, and conceptual; it comprised the analysis of a propositional structure. Articulated propositions provided a framework for analysis, discussion, and conclusions. After giving a definition of CSRM, several analyses were conducted that determined the uniqueness and usefulness of this approach. These analyses were: 1 the usefulness of the community concepts and strategies in CSRM, 2 the existence of a community approach to different strategic areas or marketing, and 3 the relevance of the use of community concepts and strategies to foster the development of communities and the sustainability of organizations. The conclusion was that CSRM and the use of these concepts and strategies have the potential to be a fruitful research and strategic approach in marketing and in all of organization activities

  8. Translating Evidence to Facilitate Shared Decision Making: Development and Usability of a Consult Decision Aid Prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Dawn; Légaré, France; Lyddiatt, Anne; Giguere, Anik M C; Yoganathan, Manosila; Saarimaki, Anton; Pardo, Jordi Pardo; Rader, Tamara; Tugwell, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to translate evidence from Cochrane Reviews into a format that can be used to facilitate shared decision making during the consultation, namely patient decision aids. A systematic development process (a) established a stakeholder committee; (b) developed a prototype according to the International Patient Decision Aid Standards; (c) applied the prototype to a Cochrane Review and used an interview-guided survey to evaluate acceptability/usability; (d) created 12 consult decision aids; and (e) used a Delphi process to reach consensus on considerations for creating a consult decision aid. The 1-page prototype includes (a) a title specifying the decision; (b) information on the health condition, options, benefits/harms with probabilities; (c) an explicit values clarification exercise; and (d) questions to screen for decisional conflict. Hyperlinks provide additional information on definitions, probabilities presented graphically, and references. Fourteen Cochrane Consumer Network members and Cochrane Editorial Unit staff participated. Thirteen reported that it would help patient/clinician discussions and were willing to use and/or recommend it. Seven indicated the right amount of information, six not enough, and one too much. Changes to the prototype were more links to definitions, more white space, and details on GRADE evidence ratings. Creating 12 consult decision aids took about 4 h each. We identified ten considerations when selecting Cochrane Reviews for creating consult decision aids. Using a systematic process, we developed a consult decision aid prototype to be populated with evidence from Cochrane Reviews. It was acceptable and easy to apply. Future studies will evaluate implementation of consult decision aids.

  9. Facilitating the development of moral insight in practice: teaching ethics and teaching virtue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Ann M

    2006-10-01

    Abstract The teaching of ethics is discussed within the context of insights gleaned from ancient Greek ethics, particularly Aristotle and Plato and their conceptions of virtue (arete, meaning excellence). The virtues of excellence of character (moral virtue) and excellence of intelligence (intellectual virtue), particularly practical wisdom and theoretical wisdom, are considered. In Aristotelian ethics, a distinction is drawn between these intellectual virtues: experience and maturity is needed for practical wisdom, but not for theoretical wisdom. In addition to this, excellence of character is acquired through habitual practice, not instruction. This suggests that there is a need to teach more than theoretical ethics and that the ethics teacher must also facilitate the acquisition of practical wisdom and excellence of character. This distinction highlights a need for various educational approaches in cultivating these excellences which are required for a moral life. It also raises the question: is it possible to teach practical wisdom and excellence of character? It is suggested that virtue, conceived of as a type of knowledge, or skill, can be taught, and people can, with appropriate experience, habitual practice, and good role models, develop excellence of character and become moral experts. These students are the next generation of exemplars and they will educate others by example and sustain the practice of nursing. They need an education which includes theoretical ethics and the nurturing of practical wisdom and excellence of character. For this purpose, a humanities approach is suggested.

  10. Whole plastome sequences from five ginger species facilitate marker development and define limits to barcode methodology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin N Vaughn

    Full Text Available Plants from the Zingiberaceae family are a key source of spices and herbal medicines. Species identification within this group is critical in the search for known and possibly novel bioactive compounds. To facilitate precise characterization of this group, we have sequenced chloroplast genomes from species representing five major groups within Zingiberaceae. Generally, the structure of these genomes is similar to the basal angiosperm excepting an expansion of 3 kb associated with the inverted repeat A region. Portions of this expansion appear to be shared across the entire Zingiberales order, which includes gingers and bananas. We used whole plastome alignment information to develop DNA barcodes that would maximize the ability to differentiate species within the Zingiberaceae. Our computation pipeline identified regions of high variability that were flanked by highly conserved regions used for primer design. This approach yielded hitherto unexploited regions of variability. These theoretically optimal barcodes were tested on a range of species throughout the family and were found to amplify and differentiate genera and, in some cases, species. Still, though these barcodes were specifically optimized for the Zingiberaceae, our data support the emerging consensus that whole plastome sequences are needed for robust species identification and phylogenetics within this family.

  11. Discussing underrepresentation as a means to facilitating female students' physics identity development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Robynne M.; Hazari, Zahra

    2016-12-01

    Despite the fact that approximately half of high school physics students are female, only 21% of physics bachelor's degrees are awarded to women. In a previous study, drawn from a national survey of college students in introductory English courses, five factors commonly proposed to positively impact female students' choice of a physical science career were tested using multivariate matching methods. The only factor found to have a positive effect was the explicit discussion of the underrepresentation of women in physics. In order to explore this further, a case study of the classes of one teacher reported to discuss the underrepresentation of women was conducted. Two classroom underrepresentation discussions were recorded, students and teacher were interviewed, and relevant student work was collected. Analyzing the case study data using a figured worlds framework, we found that discussing the underrepresentation of women in science explicitly creates an opportunity for students' figured worlds of professional and school science to change, and facilitates challenging their own implicit assumptions about how the world functions. Subsequently, the norms in students' figured worlds may change or become less rigid allowing for a new openness to physics identity development amongst female students.

  12. Pharmacometrics: a multidisciplinary field to facilitate critical thinking in drug development and translational research settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jeffrey S; Fossler, Michael J; Cadieu, K David; Gastonguay, Marc R

    2008-05-01

    Pharmacometrics has evolved beyond quantitative analysis methods used to facilitate decision making in drug development, although the application of the discipline in this arena continues to represent the primary emphasis of scientists calling themselves pharmacometricians. While related fields populate and interface with pharmacometrics, there is a natural synergy with clinical pharmacology due to common areas of research and the decision-making expectation with respect to evolving conventional and translational research paradigms. Innovative and adaptable training programs and resources are essential in this regard as both disciplines promise to be key elements of the clinical research workplace of the future. The demand for scientists with pharmacometrics skills has risen substantially. Likewise, the salary garnered by those with these skills appears to be surpassing their counterparts without such backgrounds. Given the paucity of existing training programs, available training materials, and academic champions, a virtual faculty and online curriculum would allow students to matriculate into one of several programs associated with their advisor but take instruction from faculty at multiple institutions, including instructors in both industrial and regulatory settings. Flexibility in both the curriculum and the governance of the degree would provide the greatest hope of addressing the short supply of trained pharmacometricians.

  13. Chronic consumption of trans fat can facilitate the development of hyperactive behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pase, C S; Roversi, Kr; Trevizol, F; Kuhn, F T; Dias, V T; Roversi, K; Vey, L T; Antoniazzi, C T; Barcelos, R C S; Bürger, M E

    2015-02-01

    In recent decades, the increased consumption of processed foods, which are rich in hydrogenated vegetable fat (HVF), has led to a decreased consumption of fish and oilseed, rich in omega-3 fatty acids. This eating habit provides an increased intake of trans fatty acids (TFA), which may be related to neuropsychiatric conditions, including inattention and hyperactivity. In this study, we evaluated the potential connection between prolonged trans fat consumption and development of hyperactivity-like symptoms in rats using different behavioral paradigms. Trans fat intake for 10 months (Experiment 1), as well as during pregnancy and lactation across two sequential generations of rats, (Experiment 4) induced active coping in the forced swimming task (FST). In addition, HVF supplementation was associated with increased locomotion before and after amphetamine (AMPH) administration (Experiment 2). Similarly, HVF supplementation during pregnancy and lactation were associated with increased locomotion in both young and adult rats (Experiment 3). Furthermore, trans fat intake across two sequential generations increased locomotor and exploratory activities following stressors (Experiment 4). From these results, we suggest that chronic consumption of trans fat is able to enhance impulsiveness and reactivity to novelty, facilitating hyperactive behaviors.

  14. α-Mangostin disrupts the development of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and facilitates its mechanical removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong Thi Mai; Falsetta, Megan L; Hwang, Geelsu; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Koo, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    α-Mangostin (αMG) has been reported to be an effective antimicrobial agent against planktonic cells of Streptococcus mutans, a biofilm-forming and acid-producing cariogenic organism. However, its anti-biofilm activity remains to be determined. We examined whether αMG, a xanthone purified from Garcinia mangostana L grown in Vietnam, disrupts the development, acidogenicity, and/or the mechanical stability of S. mutans biofilms. Treatment regimens simulating those experienced clinically (twice-daily, 60 s exposure each) were used to assess the bioactivity of αMG using a saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (sHA) biofilm model. Topical applications of early-formed biofilms with αMG (150 µM) effectively reduced further biomass accumulation and disrupted the 3D architecture of S. mutans biofilms. Biofilms treated with αMG had lower amounts of extracellular insoluble and intracellular iodophilic polysaccharides (30-45%) than those treated with vehicle control (Pbiofilm, facilitating its removal from the sHA surface when subjected to a constant shear stress of 0.809 N/m2 (>3-fold biofilm detachment from sHA vs. vehicle-treated biofilms; Pbiofilms was disrupted following αMG treatments (vs. vehicle-control, Pbiofilms, at least in part via inhibition of key enzymatic systems associated with exopolysaccharide synthesis and acidogenicity. αMG could be an effective anti-virulence additive for the control and/or removal of cariogenic biofilms.

  15. Sustainable development goals for global health: facilitating good governance in a complex environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffeld, Just

    2013-11-01

    Increasing complexity is following in the wake of rampant globalization. Thus, the discussion about Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) requires new thinking that departs from a critique of current policy tools in exploration of a complexity-friendly approach. This article argues that potential SDGs should: treat stakeholders, like states, business and civil society actors, as agents on different aggregate levels of networks; incorporate good governance processes that facilitate early involvement of relevant resources, as well as equitable participation, consultative processes, and regular policy and programme implementation reviews; anchor adoption and enforcement of such rules to democratic processes in accountable organizations; and include comprehensive systems evaluations, including procedural indicators. A global framework convention for health could be a suitable instrument for handling some of the challenges related to the governance of a complex environment. It could structure and legitimize government involvement, engage stakeholders, arrange deliberation and decision-making processes with due participation and regular policy review, and define minimum standards for health services. A monitoring scheme could ensure that agents in networks comply according to whole-systems targets, locally defined outcome indicators, and process indicators, thus resolving the paradox of government control vs. local policy space. A convention could thus exploit the energy created in the encounter between civil society, international organizations and national authorities.

  16. Developing a conceptual model for facilitating the issuing of digital badges in a resource constrained environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Salerno, S

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available for the issuing, managing and receiving of digital badges in connected environments. These Mozilla Badges are issued to learners by facilitators or organisational representatives acting as a form of accreditation for the skills said individual has learnt...

  17. The development, facilitation and initial evaluation of a mindfulness group for a clinical psychology training course

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Paul; Hemanth, P

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an evaluation of a Mindfulness group facilitate for trainee and qualified psychologists working in a university psychology clinic. the group was shown to have both personal and professional benefits for participants, but further evaluation is required.

  18. Gnosall Primary Care Memory Clinic: Eldercare facilitator role description and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Ian; Greaves, Nicola; Walker, Elaine; Greening, Lesley; Benbow, Susan Mary; Jolley, David

    2015-07-01

    The Gnosall Primary Care Memory Clinic has been operating since 2006 and adds the skills of a specialist old age psychiatrist to the extensive skills and knowledge available in primary care. Key to the organisation and function of the clinic is the eldercare facilitator, a new role situated in primary care and linking with the specialist and a wide range of other agencies and people. In order to facilitate replication of the model elsewhere, the function, role and competencies of existing and previous eldercare facilitators in the clinic have been reviewed, clarified and related to a competency framework and to similar initiatives in the literature. The selection and training of people with the attributes and skills required to become an eldercare facilitator will determine whether extension of the model is successful elsewhere.

  19. Managing Dynamics of Power and Learning in Community Development: A Case Study of Iowan Farmers in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Lauer; Owusu, Francis Y.

    2015-01-01

    Extension professionals facilitate community development through the strategic manipulation of learning and power in peer-to-peer learning partnerships. We discuss the relationship between empowerment and power, highlight relevant literature on the difficulties power presents to learning and the efficacy of service learning tools to facilitate…

  20. The Contribution of Innovation Strategy Development and Implementation in Active Facilitation of Pharmaceutical Front End Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Annabeth

    2012-01-01

    ; Igartua, 2010) as a facilitator of innovation and may therefore also be targeted at FEI support. The pharmaceutical industry has experienced a worldwide decline in the number of applications for new molecular entities to regulatory agencies since 1997. Therefore high pressures are put on pharmaceutical......-oriented longitudinal case study of a Danish pharmaceutical company. The findings and key learnings from the study are presented as propositions of how innovation strategies can be applied to actively facilitate FEI and with measurable results....

  1. Austin Community College Video Game Development Certificate

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoldrick, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The Video Game Development program is designed and developed by leaders in the Austin video game development industry, under the direction of the ACC Video Game Advisory Board. Courses are taught by industry video game developers for those who want to become video game developers. The program offers a comprehensive approach towards learning what's…

  2. Transitions to Care in the Community for Prison Releasees with HIV: a Qualitative Study of Facilitators and Challenges in Two States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammett, Theodore M; Donahue, Sara; LeRoy, Lisa; Montague, Brian T; Rosen, David L; Solomon, Liza; Costa, Michael; Wohl, David; Rich, Josiah D

    2015-08-01

    One in seven people living with HIV in the USA passes through a prison or jail each year, and almost all will return to the community. Discharge planning and transitional programs are critical but challenging elements in ensuring continuity of care, maintaining treatment outcomes achieved in prison, and preventing further viral transmission. This paper describes facilitators and challenges of in-prison care, transitional interventions, and access to and continuity of care in the community in Rhode Island and North Carolina based on qualitative data gathered as part of the mixed-methods Link Into Care Study of prisoners and releasees with HIV. We conducted 65 interviews with correctional and community-based providers and administrators and analyzed the transcripts using NVivo 10 to identify major themes. Facilitators of effective transitional systems in both states included the following: health providers affiliated with academic institutions or other entities independent of the corrections department; organizational philosophy emphasizing a patient-centered, personal, and holistic approach; strong leadership with effective "champions"; a team approach with coordination, collaboration and integration throughout the system, mutual respect and learning between corrections and health providers, staff dedicated to transitional services, and effective communication and information sharing among providers; comprehensive transitional activities and services including HIV, mental health and substance use services in prisons, timely and comprehensive discharge planning with specific linkages/appointments, supplies of medications on release, access to benefits and entitlements, case management and proactive follow-up on missed appointments; and releasees' commitment to transitional plans. These elements were generally present in both study states but their absence, which also sometimes occurred, represent ongoing challenges to success. The qualitative findings on the

  3. Reference Communities: Applying the Community of Practice Concept to Development of Reference Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robin E.

    2011-01-01

    Communities of practice offer reference librarians a conceptual model through which to develop and maintain general and subject specific knowledge. Reference librarians acquire general and subject-specific knowledge in many ways, sometimes independently and sometimes collaboratively. Applying the concept of the "community of practice" to reference…

  4. Keys to the Community : A multiple case study into professional legitimation in community development practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradener, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how community development professionals obtain a sense of legitimacy in their work with local communities. In a comparative study derived from field research in Chelsea (USA), Amsterdam (The Netherlands ) and Doornkop (South Africa) the building blocks of their sense of

  5. Keys to the Community : A multiple case study into professional legitimation in community development practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradener, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how community development professionals obtain a sense of legitimacy in their work with local communities. In a comparative study derived from field research in Chelsea (USA), Amsterdam (The Netherlands ) and Doornkop (South Africa) the building blocks of their sense of legitimac

  6. Developing communities of interprofessional practice: using a communities of practice framework for interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrett, Susan E; Hawkins, Susan R; Hertweck, Mark L; Schreiber, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    Development of interprofessional education programs that meet new Interprofessional Education Collaborative competencies is a challenge for faculty and administrators. This article describes a curricular design that places students in learning communities over a 2-year period with a plan for 5 learning sessions. Communities of practice is the theoretical framework of the curricular design, creating interprofessional clinicians capable of effective collaborative practice.

  7. Keys to the Community : A multiple case study into professional legitimation in community development practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradener, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how community development professionals obtain a sense of legitimacy in their work with local communities. In a comparative study derived from field research in Chelsea (USA), Amsterdam (The Netherlands ) and Doornkop (South Africa) the building blocks of their sense of legitimac

  8. Community Psychology in South Africa: Origins, Developments, and Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedat, Mohamed; Lazarus, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    This article represents a South African contribution to the growing international body of knowledge on histories of community psychology. We trace the early antecedents of social-community psychology interventions and describe the social forces and academic influences that provided the impetus for the emergence and development of community…

  9. A Career Development Plan for Community Action Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, Alan; Jones, Nina

    A system for career advancement in the community action agency must be based on the fundamental principle that it is the responsibility of the community action agency to develop the full potential of the nonprofessional staff. The agency must take the initiative on several aspects of its policy and program. Nonprofessional employees must be able…

  10. It Comes from the People: Community Development and Local Theology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinsdale, Mary Ann; And Others

    The closing of local mines and factories collapsed the economic and social structure of Ivanhoe, Virginia, a small rural town once considered a dying community. This book is a case study that tells how the people of Ivanhoe organized to revitalize their town. It documents the community development process--a process that included hard work, a…

  11. A Process-Discursive Approach to Community Economic Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, G. R.

    2003-01-01

    When market-based growth fails to improve community economic development, an alternative approach to economic analysis is a process-discursive method, which considers the roles of human agents and importance of information about reality as experienced by individuals. The process model of community-sensitive transformation is participatory and can…

  12. Christianity and Community development in Igboland, 1960-2000

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FEN

    will always be a force sensitive to issues, questions, problems and needs of the masses ... community development vis-à-vis Christianity in Igboland, this paper seeks to examine ... of life, a community could be urban or rural – hence the concepts urban ..... Through the radio and .... Indian missiological Review (Delhi), 30-38.

  13. Local alternative energy futures: developing economies/building communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totten, M.; Glass, B.; Freedberg, M.; Webb, L.

    1980-12-01

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the three parts of the conference. A sufficient range of information is presented to enable interested parties to explore the viable alternatives for community self-sufficiency. The parts are entitled: Financial Incentives and Funding Sources; Standards, Regulations, Mandates, Ordinances, Covenants; and Community/Economic Development. (MCW)

  14. Theoretical basis of the community effect in development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuttler Celine

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically identical cells often show significant variation in gene expression profile and behaviour even in the same physiological condition. Notably, embryonic cells destined to the same tissue maintain a uniform transcriptional regulatory state and form a homogeneous cell group. One mechanism to keep the homogeneity within embryonic tissues is the so-called community effect in animal development. The community effect is an interaction among a group of many nearby precursor cells, and is necessary for them to maintain tissue-specific gene expression and differentiate in a coordinated manner. Although it has been shown that the cell-cell communication by a diffusible factor plays a crucial role, it is not immediately obvious why a community effect needs many cells. Results In this work, we propose a model of the community effect in development, which consists in a linear gene cascade and cell-cell communication. We examined the properties of the model theoretically using a combination of stochastic and deterministic modelling methods. We have derived the analytical formula for the threshold size of a cell population that is necessary for a community effect, which is in good agreement with stochastic simulation results. Conclusions Our theoretical analysis indicates that a simple model with a linear gene cascade and cell-cell communication is sufficient to reproduce the community effect in development. The model explains why a community needs many cells. It suggests that the community's long-term behaviour is independent of the initial induction level, although the initiation of a community effect requires a sufficient amount of inducing signal. The mechanism of the community effect revealed by our theoretical analysis is analogous to that of quorum sensing in bacteria. The community effect may underlie the size control in animal development and also the genesis of autosomal dominant diseases including tumorigenesis.

  15. Community-based Services that Facilitate Interoperability and Inter-comparison Between Precipitation Data Sets from Multiple Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Kempler, S. J.; Teng, W. L.; Leptoukh, G. G.; Ostrenga, D.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past 12 years, large volumes of precipitation data have been generated from space-based observatories (e.g., TRMM), merging of data products (e.g., gridded 3B42), models (e.g., GMAO), climatologies (e.g., Chang SSM/I derived rain indices), field campaigns, and ground-based measuring stations. The science research, applications, and education communities have greatly benefited from the unrestricted availability of these data from the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) and, in particular, the services tailored toward precipitation data access and usability. In addition, tools and services that are responsive to the expressed evolving needs of the precipitation data user communities have been developed at the Precipitation Data and Information Services Center (PDISC) (http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/precipitation or google NASA PDISC), located at the GES DISC, to provide users with quick data exploration and access capabilities. In recent years, data management and access services have become increasingly sophisticated, such that they now afford researchers, particularly those interested in multi-data set science analysis and/or data validation, the ability to homogenize data sets, in order to apply multi-variant, comparison, and evaluation functions. Included in these services is the ability to capture data quality and data provenance. These interoperability services can be directly applied to future data sets, such as those from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. This presentation describes the data sets and services at the PDISC that are currently used by precipitation science and applications researchers, and which will be enhanced in preparation for GPM and associated multi-sensor data research. Specifically, the GES-DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (Giovanni) will be illustrated. Giovanni enables scientific exploration of Earth science data without researchers having to

  16. A model for the development of virtual communities for people with long-term, severe physical disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Tilley

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This paper reports results of an investigation into the needs of persons with disabilities wanting to participate in the use of virtual communities. The aim was to investigate 'how virtual communities for persons with long-term, severe physical disabilities can best be facilitated'? Method. A Grounded Theory approach was adopted to inform the investigation. In- depth interviews were conducted with twelve persons with paraplegia, quadriplegia or other severe, long-term physical or mobility disabilities and six health care professionals, service providers, information personnel and policy advisers who were involved in their well-being. Analysis. Rich explanations were derived about the information and communication technology (ICT usage and the technologies' contributions towards restoration of sense of control over their lives. Results. The primary outcome of the investigation is a theory regarding the character of virtual communities for the disabled. The theory is represented as a Virtual Community Model. The model identifies: the need for 'a sense of control' as the foundation element of virtual communities for the disabled; the key domains in which disabled people participate in virtual communities; and the barriers and enablers to their participation. Conclusion. The model provides a framework which can be used by interest groups and other organizations to facilitate the development of virtual communities for persons with severe physical disabilities. The six key types of community need to be represented in such virtual communities if a full 'sense of control' is to be achieved by disabled persons.

  17. Action video game play facilitates the development of better perceptual templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejjanki, Vikranth R; Zhang, Ruyuan; Li, Renjie; Pouget, Alexandre; Green, C Shawn; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Bavelier, Daphne

    2014-11-25

    The field of perceptual learning has identified changes in perceptual templates as a powerful mechanism mediating the learning of statistical regularities in our environment. By measuring threshold-vs.-contrast curves using an orientation identification task under varying levels of external noise, the perceptual template model (PTM) allows one to disentangle various sources of signal-to-noise changes that can alter performance. We use the PTM approach to elucidate the mechanism that underlies the wide range of improvements noted after action video game play. We show that action video game players make use of improved perceptual templates compared with nonvideo game players, and we confirm a causal role for action video game play in inducing such improvements through a 50-h training study. Then, by adapting a recent neural model to this task, we demonstrate how such improved perceptual templates can arise from reweighting the connectivity between visual areas. Finally, we establish that action gamers do not enter the perceptual task with improved perceptual templates. Instead, although performance in action gamers is initially indistinguishable from that of nongamers, action gamers more rapidly learn the proper template as they experience the task. Taken together, our results establish for the first time to our knowledge the development of enhanced perceptual templates following action game play. Because such an improvement can facilitate the inference of the proper generative model for the task at hand, unlike perceptual learning that is quite specific, it thus elucidates a general learning mechanism that can account for the various behavioral benefits noted after action game play.

  18. Talk the Walk: Does Socio-Cognitive Resource Reallocation Facilitate the Development of Walking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Geva

    Full Text Available Walking is of interest to psychology, robotics, zoology, neuroscience and medicine. Human's ability to walk on two feet is considered to be one of the defining characteristics of hominoid evolution. Evolutionary science propses that it emerged in response to limited environmental resources; yet the processes supporting its emergence are not fully understood. Developmental psychology research suggests that walking elicits cognitive advancements. We postulate that the relationship between cognitive development and walking is a bi-directional one; and further suggest that the initiation of novel capacities, such as walking, is related to internal socio-cognitive resource reallocation. We shed light on these notions by exploring infants' cognitive and socio-communicative outputs prospectively from 6-18 months of age. Structured bi/tri weekly evaluations of symbolic and verbal development were employed in an urban cohort (N = 9 for 12 months, during the transition from crawling to walking. Results show links between preemptive cognitive changes in socio-communicative output, symbolic-cognitive tool-use processes, and the age of emergence of walking. Plots of use rates of lower symbolic play levels before and after emergence of new skills illustrate reductions in use of previously attained key behaviors prior to emergence of higher symbolic play, language and walking. Further, individual differences in age of walking initiation were strongly related to the degree of reductions in complexity of object-use (r = .832, p < .005, along with increases, counter to the general reduction trend, in skills that serve recruitment of external resources [socio-communication bids before speech (r = -.696, p < .01, and speech bids before walking; r = .729, p < .01]. Integration of these proactive changes using a computational approach yielded an even stronger link, underscoring internal resource reallocation as a facilitator of walking initiation (r = .901, p<0

  19. The use of a Virtual Community to Complement the MS PHD'S Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, I. U.; Brown, D. C.; Bailey, K.; Easley, R.; Johnson, A.; Ithier, W.; Powell, J. M.; Whitney, V. W.; Pyrtle, A. J.

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Sciencer Professional Development Program (MS PHD'S PDP) is to provide professional and mentoring experiences that facilitate the advancement of minorities committed to achieving outstanding Earth system science and engineering careers. The MS PHD'S PDP is structured in three phases that are connected by engagement in virtual community building activities, allowing for continuous peer to peer and mentor to mentee interactions. These activities occur through the use of the MSPHD'S website forum and web cam dialogues. In addition, the virtual community provides the personal and professional support necessary to ensure the success of the students. Examples of interactions within the MSPHD'S PDP virtual community will be presented.

  20. Development of Community Forest in South Kalimantan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti Syahrany Noor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of the development of community forests in South Kalimantan and information about the properties and benefits of community forest timber, the hopes community forests timber can be developed into a source of raw materials of natural forest wood substitute that can support the development of the wood processing industry in South Kalimantan. The result showed that Community forest proved to be very useful both for the owner, the community and the environment as well as for the government especially in order to meet the timber supply for local. Until the year 2011 the community forest area that was developed by the government in South Kalimantan has reached 2,895 ha, and the most widely are the Tanah Laut district covering 935 ha. The wood species that developed is sengon, jati, mahoni, karet, petai, akasia, galam, kemiri. The properties of the wood need to be understood and known before the relevant timber used both as a building material or as raw material for the industry, because these properties are basically determining the quality of wood products that will be produced. Technically private community forest wood can be used for building materials, components boat/ship and industrial raw materials.

  1. Gay Rights and School Policy: A Case Study in Community Factors that Facilitate or Impede Educational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgillivray, Ian K.

    2004-01-01

    This article highlights factors that either facilitated or hampered the work of a local Safe Schools Coalition in advocating adoption and implementation of their school district's policies that include sexual orientation. Non-discrimination policies that include sexual orientation and gender identity are needed to help stop anti-gay peer abuse…

  2. Connecting youth violence prevention, positive youth development, and community mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kevin W; Edmonds, Torey; Wilson, Karen; Pope, Michell; Farrell, Albert D

    2011-09-01

    Several disconnects serve to weaken the use of evidence based programming in community settings. Communities face the need to address the challenges of multiple risk behaviors faced by adolescents in their communities, but must also work to support successful transitions to adulthood and the broader positive development of their youth. The stronger integration of positive youth development and prevention of youth risk at the community level may offer an opportunity to support the implementation and ongoing development of evidence-based practices (EBPs). This article provides an overview of the VCU Clark-Hill Institute for Positive Youth Development Institute's community mobilization effort in Richmond, Virginia and reports preliminary findings from our integrated mobilization efforts. First, we review the role of our Community Advisory Council in their collaborative work to support positive youth development and reduce risk for youth violence. Next, we present examples of institute efforts in providing technical assistance relevant to supporting the use and development of EBPs. We then discuss the adaptation of an evidence-based program to target positive youth development. We also present overviews from qualitative investigations examining barriers and supports that inform and are relevant to the implementation of EBPs. Finally, we consider ways in which community efforts inform and shape institute efforts to develop EPBs. Taken together, these activities provide examples of how community-based mobilization efforts can integrate and inform the implementation of EBPs and the role and use of prevention science as a tool in supporting effective programming to promote positive youth development and prevent youth violence.

  3. Tourism and rural community development in Namibia: policy issues review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erling Kavita

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available During the past decades, the tourism sector has become an increasing important issue for governments and regional agencies searching for socio-economic development. Especially in the Global South the increasing tourism demand has been seen highly beneficial as evolving tourism can create direct and indirect income and employment effects to the host regions and previously marginalised communities, with potential to aid with the poverty reduction targets. This research note reviews the existing policy and planning frameworks in relation to tourism and rural development in Namibia. Especially the policy aims towards rural community development are overviewed with focus on Community-Based Tourism (CBT initiatives. The research note involves a retrospective review of tourism policies and rural local development initiatives in Namibia where the Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET initiated a community-based tourism policy. The policy emphasises structures and processes helping local communities to benefit from the tourism sector, and the active and coordinating involvement of communities, especially, is expected to ensure that the benefits of tourism trickle down to the local level where tourist activities take place. However, it is noted that in addition to public policy-makers also other tourism developers and private business environment in Namibia need to recognize the full potential of rural tourism development in order to meet the created politically driven promises at the policy level. In this respect, a national tourism policy could provide an enabling framework, integrating the tourism sector’s development aims to rural and community development needs in future. In addition, there is a need to coordinate a comprehensive vision of what type of rural tourism development or tourism in rural environments holds the most potential to benefit both local communities and the mainstream sector.

  4. Model Youth Programs: A Key Strategy for Developing Community-University Partnerships Using a Community Youth Development Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Anyon

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Universities across the nation face the charge of enhancing their intellectual capital as a learning institution while also contributing to the greater social good. While there is great potential for university-community partnerships to generate lessons for youth workers and policy makers, create powerful new knowledge for the academic field, and provide transformative experiences for community members, partnerships often fail to produce such meaningful results. In the San Francisco Bay Area, community residents who have been involved in such unsuccessful initiatives frequently perceived that university partners spent insufficient time learning about the community context, prioritized research objectives over community needs and did not make long-term commitments. Despite these challenges, community-university partnerships can be useful strategies for advancing the field of youth development by strengthening research and practice in local contexts. This paper presents how the design and implementation of model youth programs served as an effective strategy in developing a partnership between a university-based center and two local communities over a 5-year period. It also describes essential lessons that other communities, research institutions or universities may use to launch, implement, expand and sustain their own successful partnerships to build local capacity to implement youth development practices, promote positive outcomes for young people, and generate knowledge about the impact of youth development approaches.

  5. Editorial Introduction. After the Carnival: Tourism and Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovel, Hermione; Feuerstein, Marie-Therese

    1992-01-01

    Considers the following questions: How is tourism linked to community development? Who benefits economically? What is the impact on the environment? Does tourism promote respect for other cultures, or does it trivialize cultural differences? (SK)

  6. The Role of Local Leaders in Community Development Programmes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Madukwe

    community development in the area constituted about 78% of the perceived roles and .... properly used due to corruption and lack of transparency. This has .... Leaders should therefore ensure that they gain the credibility of their subjects and.

  7. The Role of Local Leaders in Community Development Programmes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Role of Local Leaders in Community Development Programmes in Ideato Local Government ... (= 3.80); monitoring and evaluation of projects (= 3.78); and fund raising for projects (= 3.76). ... It was concluded that for sustained success to

  8. Neighborhoods, comm development communities, Published in 2006, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Neighborhoods dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is described as 'comm development communities'. Data...

  9. Involvement of Women In Community Development Process In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Involvement of Women In Community Development Process In Ikeduru Local Government Area Of Imo State. ... between 31 and 40 years majority (47%) had primary education, majority (73.64%) were not involved in decision making process ...

  10. AKRO/SF: Community Development Quota (CDQ) System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Western Alaska Community Development Quota (CDQ) Program allocates a percentage of all Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands quotas for groundfish, prohibited species,...

  11. Virtual Professional Learning Communities: Teachers' Perceptions of Virtual Versus Face-to-Face Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Tom J.; Parker, Joyce M.; Eberhardt, Jan; Koehler, Matthew J.; Lundeberg, Mary A.

    2013-06-01

    Research suggests that professional development that engages teachers in instructional inquiry over an extended time through collaborative professional learning communities (PLCs) is effective in improving instruction and student achievement. Still, most professional development is offered as short-duration workshops that are not effective in changing practice. Barriers to the implementation of PLCs include lack of shared meeting time and a shortage of teachers who share the same subject areas or common goals and interests. Convening teachers from multiple districts can alleviate this problem, but teachers are reluctant to travel for meetings due to time and cost restraints. Video-conferencing software offers a solution to these barriers while serving to foster the sense of community needed for PLCs to be effective. The researchers describe the use of Virtual PLCs in which two groups of teachers met monthly for one school year to collaboratively analyze evidence collected as part of their teacher inquiry plans. With help from a facilitator, these groups developed a relationship similar to other groups meeting face-to-face as part of the same professional development program. Analysis of the reflections of teacher-participants and facilitators revealed that teachers prefer face-to-face meetings, but that the virtual and face-to-face meetings provided teachers with similar social interactions in the PLC experience. The findings suggest that teachers perceive videoconferencing as an effective tool for facilitating PLCs when distance and time are practical barriers to face-to-face meetings. Practical considerations for developing and facilitating virtual PLCs are also discussed.

  12. The Vulnerability of Community Capitals as a Threat to Orang Kuala Community Development in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Amir Zal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Community development emphasizes the utilization of community resources, also known as community capitals. However, it is often difficult for the community to access these resources; this difficulty retards development. Such is the predicament faced by the Orang Kuala, for whom coastal changes have resulted in greater difficulty in accessing their community resources. Nor is that the only threat that they face. For affirmation of these threats, this article lists two objectives, that is, to identify the accessibility of marine resources and to explain the types of threats faced by the Orang Kuala. To achieve these objectives, a study was conducted involving 51 household heads and 5 Orang Kuala informants, all of whom are residents of Sungai Layau village in Johor, Malaysia. This study uses a mixed-method approach, the concurrent embedded design, and also interview-based questionnaires and in-depth interviews simultaneously. For the first objective, the results show that the Orang Kuala can still attain community resources in the form of marine products. However, the Orang Kuala faced three types of threats: trends, shocks, and seasonal changes. The most significant threat to the Orang Kuala is the trend, that is, cost of living and social problems. These threats can reduce their chances of acquiring benefits from these community resources. This condition is called “vulnerability of community capitals.” The objective of this article is to put forth proposals on how to increase the capacity of community resources for the Orang Kuala so that their community can attain sustainable development. This proposal is based on the reality that the threats facing the Orang Kuala are at a critical level and that they are ready to accept changes.

  13. An online practice and educational networking system for technical skills: learning experience in expert facilitated vs. independent learning communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, David; Cheung, Jeffrey J H; Weber, Bryce; Kapralos, Bill; Carnahan, Heather; Bägli, Darius J; Dubrowski, Adam

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the activities of trainees learning technical skills using an educational networking tool with and without expert facilitation. Medical students (participants) were video-recorded practicing suturing and knot tying techniques and the resulting videos were uploaded to an educational networking site. Participants were then divided into two groups (one group containing an expert facilitator while the other group did not) and encouraged to comment on the videos within their group. We monitored the number of logins and comments posted and all participants completed an exit survey. There were no differences between the activities the two groups (p = 0.387). We conclude that the presence of an expert within collaborative Internet environments in not necessary to promote interactivity amongst the learners.

  14. Developing and Launching an Online Hub to Facilitate the Exchange of Research Knowledge in Education: The Case of the OERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuters, Stephanie; Read, Robyn; Harris, Shasta Carr; Anwar, Arif; Levin, Ben

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the process by which the Ontario Education Research Exchange (OERE), part of the Knowledge Network of Applied Education Research, developed and launched an online hub of education research summaries to facilitate greater use of research by stakeholders in the field of education. The project is an effort in knowledge…

  15. Supporting Accomplished Facilitation: Examining the Use of Sppreciative Inquiry to Inform the Development of Learning Resources for Medical Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Paul; Freeth, Della; Berridge, Emma Jane

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the use of appreciative inquiry (AI) to guide development of web-based learning resources for medical educators who facilitate simulation-based learning experiences for doctors-in-training. AI can be viewed as a positive form of action research, which seeks to avoid deficit-based analyses and solutions, and commonly associated…

  16. Parents' Translations of Child Gesture Facilitate Word Learning in Children with Autism, Down Syndrome and Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Nevena; Özçaliskan, Seyda; Adamson, Lauren B.

    2016-01-01

    Typically-developing (TD) children frequently refer to objects uniquely in gesture. Parents translate these gestures into words, facilitating children's acquisition of these words (Goldin-Meadow et al. in "Dev Sci" 10(6):778-785, 2007). We ask whether this pattern holds for children with autism (AU) and with Down syndrome (DS) who show…

  17. Community Radio in Political Theory and Development Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    zeleza

    development problems, as part of development projects communication strategy, and ... community radio stations citizens and non-citizens can develop their political ..... Radio has the power to reach people in rural settings, people who may not ... Sandip Das notes that in India, radio reaches 90 percent of India's population.

  18. Learning community and teachers professional development

    OpenAIRE

    Škodnik, Ana Mari

    2017-01-01

    We live in a time of many social, economic and technological changes, there is a variety of new novelties, various introduction of innovations. All this is reflected in the schools which requires changes both in the teaching of teachers and in their own learning and professional development. The learning organization represents a good response to the demands of teacher continuing learning, as it is the basis for promoting professional development and thus quality teaching of teachers. School...

  19. Interactive painting. An evolving study to facilitate reduced exclusion from classical music concerts for the deaf community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Tony

    2005-01-01

    Exclusion from the joy of experiencing music, especially in concert venues, is especially applicable to those with an auditory impairment. There have been limited investigations into how to reduce the exclusion for this community in attending classical orchestra music concerts. Through utilizing...

  20. The Cultivation of a Prosocial Value Orientation through Community Service: An Examination of Organizational Context, Social Facilitation, and Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Aaron S.

    2012-01-01

    Community service is widely regarded as a fundamental experience in preparation for good citizenship, but it remains unclear whether common variants of service are consequential for civic outcomes. This study examines changes in the relative importance assigned to prosocial and egoistic values associated with service through different types of…

  1. Mediating Community Participation: Practice of Support Workers in Initiating, Facilitating or Disrupting Encounters between People with and without Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigby, Christine; Wiesel, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    Promoting community participation for people with intellectual disability through encounter with strangers is an integral part of the mission of disability support workers. This paper offers detailed micro-level analysis of the practices of support workers when they accompany a person with intellectual disability outside their home and explores…

  2. Neighborhood adversity, child health, and the role for community development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutte, Douglas P; Miller, Jennifer L; Erickson, David J

    2015-03-01

    Despite medical advances, childhood health and well-being have not been broadly achieved due to rising chronic diseases and conditions related to child poverty. Family and neighborhood living conditions can have lasting consequences for health, with community adversity affecting health outcomes in significant part through stress response and increased allostatic load. Exposure to this "toxic stress" influences gene expression and brain development with direct and indirect negative consequences for health. Ensuring healthy child development requires improving conditions in distressed, high-poverty neighborhoods by reducing children's exposure to neighborhood stressors and supporting good family and caregiver functioning. The community development industry invests more than $200 billion annually in low-income neighborhoods, with the goal of improving living conditions for residents. The most impactful investments have transformed neighborhoods by integrating across sectors to address both the built environment and the social and service environment. By addressing many facets of the social determinants of health at once, these efforts suggest substantial results for children, but health outcomes generally have not been considered or evaluated. Increased partnership between the health sector and community development can bring health outcomes explicitly into focus for community development investments, help optimize intervention strategies for health, and provide natural experiments to build the evidence base for holistic interventions for disadvantaged children. The problems and potential solutions are beyond the scope of practicing pediatricians, but the community development sector stands ready to engage in shared efforts to improve the health and development of our most at-risk children.

  3. User community vs. producer innovation development efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hienerth, Christoph; von Hippel, Eric; Jensen, Morten Berg

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we report upon a first empirical exploration of the relative efficiency of innovation development by product users vs. product producers. In a study of over 50 years of product innovation in the whitewater kayaking field, we find users in aggregate were approximately 3× more efficient...... at developing important kayaking product innovations than were producers in aggregate. We speculate that this result is driven by what we term “efficiencies of scope” in problem-solving. These can favor an aggregation of many user innovators, each spending a little, over fewer producer innovators benefitting...... from higher economies of scale in product development. We also note that the present study explores only one initial point on what is likely to be a complex efficiency landscape....

  4. 77 FR 21995 - Trade Facilitation in the East African Community: Recent Developments and Potential Benefits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-12

    ... ). The media should contact Margaret O'Laughlin, Office of External Relations (202-205-1819 or margaret... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE... agreements, such as those between the United States and the Philippines, the United States and Uruguay, and...

  5. Guidelines for Facilitating the Development of Learning Communities in Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, J.; Kim, C.

    2014-01-01

    Online learning has grown exponentially in recent years; however, dropout problem remains challenging for some online programmes. The dropout problem can be attributed to a number of reasons, with a lack of interaction between learners and the instructor constituting one of the main reasons. The lack of interaction also leads to learners'…

  6. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane De Steven; Rebecca R. Sharitz

    2007-01-01

    Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous...

  7. Development of lichen-rich communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketner-Oostra, R.; Sparrius, L.B.; Sýkora, K.V.; Fanta, J.; Siepel, H.

    2010-01-01

    The pioneer vegetation of inland dunes is known for its lichen diversity. The development of lichen-rich vegetation may take several decades after the first pioneer stage with Corynephorus canescens and Polytrichum piliferum. The neophytic moss Campylopus introflexus and atmospheric nitrogen deposit

  8. Developing a Virtual Engineering Management Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Bill; Kidd, Moray; Smith, Robin; Wearne, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews the lessons of planning and running an "Engineering Management" practitioner development programme in a partnership between BP and the University of Manchester. This distance-learning programme is for professional engineers in mid-career experienced in the engineering and support activities for delivering safe,…

  9. Why STEM Learning Communities Work: The Development of Psychosocial Learning Factors through Social Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrino, Stephanie Sedberry; Gerace, William J.

    2016-01-01

    STEM learning communities facilitate student academic success and persistence in science disciplines. This prompted us to explore the underlying factors that make learning communities successful. In this paper, we report findings from an illustrative case study of a 2-year STEM-based learning community designed to identify and describe these…

  10. Using case studies and videotaped vignettes to facilitate the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Barbara L

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking skills are an essential component of nursing and crucial to nursing practice. Case studies with videotaped vignettes were used to help facilitate the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses. Results revealed a statistically significant increase (p = .041) on the overall Health Sciences Reasoning Test score. It is essential for educators to be aware of educational strategies that can affect the development of critical thinking skills.

  11. Theory-guided Therapeutic Function of Music to facilitate emotion regulation development in preschool-aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly eSena Moore

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Emotion regulation is an umbrella term to describe interactive, goal-dependent explicit and implicit processes that are intended to help an individual manage and shift an emotional experience. The primary window for appropriate emotion regulation development occurs during the infant, toddler, and preschool years. Atypical emotion regulation development is considered a risk factor for mental health problems and has been implicated as a primary mechanism underlying childhood pathologies. Current treatments are predominantly verbal- and behavioral-based and lack the opportunity to practice in-the-moment management of emotionally charged situations. There is also an absence of caregiver-child interaction in these treatment strategies. Based on behavioral and neural support for music as a therapeutic mechanism, the incorporation of intentional music experiences, facilitated by a music therapist, may be one way to address these limitations. Musical Contour Regulation Facilitation is an interactive therapist-child music-based intervention for emotion regulation development practice in preschoolers. The Musical Contour Regulation Facilitation intervention uses the deliberate contour and temporal structure of a music therapy session to mirror the changing flow of the caregiver-child interaction through the alternation of high arousal and low arousal music experiences. The purpose of this paper is to describe the Therapeutic Function of Music, a theory-based description of the structural characteristics for a music-based stimulus to musically facilitate developmentally appropriate high arousal and low arousal in-the-moment emotion regulation experiences. The Therapeutic Function of Music analysis is based on a review of the music theory, music neuroscience, and music development literature and provides a preliminary model of the structural characteristics of the music as a core component of the Musical Contour Regulation Facilitation intervention.

  12. Locomotor Dysfunction after Long-duration Space Flight and Development of Countermeasures to Facilitate Faster Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Wood, Scott; Cohen, Helen; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2012-07-01

    immediate compensatory strategic response. The learning rate over the six trials of the postflight test days (macro curve) was used to characterize the longer-term plastic response. Adaptation to space flight led to a 52% increase in TCC one day after landing. Recovery to pre-flight scores took an average of two weeks after landing. Subjects showed both strategic and plastic recovery patterns based on the slopes obtained from the micro and macro curves compared to preflight. A regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between the slope values of the macro and micro curves indicating a relationship between strategic and plastic recovery processes. Results showed that both strategic and plastic motor learning processes play a role in postflight restoration of functional mobility and showed a dynamic interplay between these two mechanisms during postflight recovery. These results suggest that gait adaptability training programs which are being developed to facilitate adaptive transition to planetary environments, coupled with low levels of electrical stimulation of the vestibular system, can be optimized to engage both strategic and plastic processes to facilitate rapid restoration of postflight functional mobility.

  13. Local Development Agents' Training for Sustainable and Endogenous Development: A Participatory Development Project among Mayan Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Margarita Rosales; Salgado, Margarita Ines Zarco

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the capacity building of "local partnership" members or leaders as development agents in their Mayan communities. It relates to an education/training process started in 1995 in four different regions of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, which was carried out by Non Governmental Organizations (NGO) and academic…

  14. Motivation and sustainability of care facilitators engaged in a community home-based HIV/AIDS program in Masvingo Province, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Eri; Kodama, Tomoko; Kundishora, Emma

    2010-07-01

    Community home-based HIV/AIDS programs with care facilitators (CFs) are key interventions for dealing with both the shortage of health professionals (e.g., physicians, nurses, midwives, etc.) and the current HIV/AIDS epidemic in many parts of Africa. Zimbabwe, one of the sub-Saharan countries is not an exception. The Zimbabwe Red Cross Society started a community home-based HIV/AIDS program with CFs in 1992. This paper describes the results of a cross-sectional study conducted to examine the factors influencing the motivational outcome and self-assessed performance of CFs from one province involved in this program. Self-administered questionnaires provided to CFs were analyzed by chi-square test and multiple liner regression. The response rate was 71.7% (15 male, 104 female). Results showed that 46.8% of CFs in rural area had worked more than five years whilst only 18.5% of CFs in urban area did (pmotivational outcome and self-assessed performance of CFs were significantly associated with perception toward family and community environment (beta=0.462, SE=0.092, pmotivational outcome. These findings suggest that organization need to create the policy consistent with community need and provide clear goal and instruction to improve to motivation and performance of CFs.

  15. South Coastal Community Development: Issues and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imamudin Yuliadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reality show that Indonesia is one country that have longest beach in the world. This fact give implication that economic potential of people life at the beach is important factor to indoors economic growth for improving walfare and equity economic development both national and regional scope. Research method that applied is desriptive investigative for obtain the fact about the economic problem of people at the beach especially beach potential economy for improving people economic welfare. Analitical methode at this research is location quotion (LQ, shift-share, and typology klassen. The output of this research is making the planning model of promotion system and integrated investment to realize the equality of development economic at beach are in Yogyakarta.

  16. 78 FR 38361 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Rural Capacity Building for Community Development and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Rural Capacity Building for Community... organizations with expertise in rural housing and community development to enhance the capacity and ability of local governments, Indian tribes, housing development organizations, rural community...

  17. Youth Empowerment in Higher Education for Sustainable Development of Developing Communities in Cross River State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpiken, William E.; Ukpabio, Godfrey U.

    2015-01-01

    This paper was an attempt to examine youth empowerment in higher education for sustainable development of developing communities in Cross River State in Nigeria. In Cross River State developing communities, youths are in the majority and form a very strong formidable force in the society we live, study, but are not empowered while in school nor…

  18. Professional Learning Communities Facilitator's Guide Handouts for the What Works Clearinghouse™ Practice Guide: Teaching Academic Content and Literacy to English Learners in Elementary and Middle School. REL 2015-105

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimino, Joseph A.; Taylor, Mary Jo; Morris, Joan

    2015-01-01

    These handouts, which are meant to accompany the facilitator's guide, are designed to assist professional learning communities (PLCs) in applying evidence-based strategies to help K-8 English learners acquire the language and literacy skills needed to succeed academically. The facilitator's guide uses a five-step process for collaborative…

  19. Novel statistical tools for management of public databases facilitate community-wide replicability and control of false discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosset, Saharon; Aharoni, Ehud; Neuvirth, Hani

    2014-07-01

    Issues of publication bias, lack of replicability, and false discovery have long plagued the genetics community. Proper utilization of public and shared data resources presents an opportunity to ameliorate these problems. We present an approach to public database management that we term Quality Preserving Database (QPD). It enables perpetual use of the database for testing statistical hypotheses while controlling false discovery and avoiding publication bias on the one hand, and maintaining testing power on the other hand. We demonstrate it on a use case of a replication server for GWAS findings, underlining its practical utility. We argue that a shift to using QPD in managing current and future biological databases will significantly enhance the community's ability to make efficient and statistically sound use of the available data resources. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  20. The development of permafrost bacterial communities under submarine conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzscherling, Julia; Winkel, Matthias; Winterfeld, Maria; Horn, Fabian; Yang, Sizhong; Grigoriev, Mikhail N.; Wagner, Dirk; Overduin, Pier P.; Liebner, Susanne

    2017-07-01

    Submarine permafrost is more vulnerable to thawing than permafrost on land. Besides increased heat transfer from the ocean water, the penetration of salt lowers the freezing temperature and accelerates permafrost degradation. Microbial communities in thawing permafrost are expected to be stimulated by warming, but how they develop under submarine conditions is completely unknown. We used the unique records of two submarine permafrost cores from the Laptev Sea on the East Siberian Arctic Shelf, inundated about 540 and 2500 years ago, to trace how bacterial communities develop depending on duration of the marine influence and pore water chemistry. Combined with geochemical analysis, we quantified total cell numbers and bacterial gene copies and determined the community structure of bacteria using deep sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. We show that submarine permafrost is an extreme habitat for microbial life deep below the seafloor with changing thermal and chemical conditions. Pore water chemistry revealed different pore water units reflecting the degree of marine influence and stages of permafrost thaw. Millennia after inundation by seawater, bacteria stratify into communities in permafrost, marine-affected permafrost, and seabed sediments. In contrast to pore water chemistry, the development of bacterial community structure, diversity, and abundance in submarine permafrost appears site specific, showing that both sedimentation and permafrost thaw histories strongly affect bacteria. Finally, highest microbial abundance was observed in the ice-bonded seawater unaffected but warmed permafrost of the longer inundated core, suggesting that permafrost bacterial communities exposed to submarine conditions start to proliferate millennia after warming.

  1. Creating Synergies: Local Government Facilitating Learning and Development through Partnerships--Support Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Peter; Virgona, Crina; Brown, Richard

    2006-01-01

    This research sought to document and better understand four evolving learning communities in Victoria. It was based upon an earlier study by the Victorian Local Governance Association (VLGA) (Snelling, 2003). The study was qualitative in nature, based on face-to-face interviews and case studies. This supporting document provides the literature…

  2. Developing a Comprehensive Learning Community Program: Implementing a Learning Community Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Jamie L.; Redington, Lyn

    2016-01-01

    This is the second of a three-part series which will share information about how a mid-size, comprehensive university developed a learning community program, including a residential curriculum. Through intentional collaboration and partnerships, the team, comprised of faculty and staff throughout the university, developed a "multi-year plan…

  3. Facilitating the development of a shared purpose in a university department: the first stage towards developing a culture of shared governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian McGowan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and context: The structure of higher education departments tends to be hierarchical or, at the other extreme, characterised as ‘a galaxy of individual stars’ (Handy, 1993 p 190. Ours was no exception. However, changes in the way nursing education was provided, internal growth and development followed by a period of austerity, presented our school with an unprecedented opportunity. We found ourselves in a position where we had the possibility to change. Aims: The aim of the paper is to share our reflections on the process and outcomes to date of a culture change project in a university department. The purpose of this opening part of the project was to enable creative and collegial opportunities to work together. Conclusions: An inclusive culture can make a difference to peoples’ lives and reflect the underpinning principles of person-centred practice. This project has enabled us to define our shared purpose, clarify our values, make commitments and set standards. Overall, though it has allowed us to see each other as people who have emerged from behind a faceless organisational structure. Implications for practice: The values of inclusiveness, integrity and professionalism are important for a shared understanding and effective collaborative functioning within university departments internationally, especially those that espouse person-centredness Staff teams can be structured around professional and personal development needs but these also provide a direct link to both departmental and organisational purposes aligned to education Managerial support, staff participation and an experienced facilitator are vital for successful cultural change. Our project has been UK based but we believe these experiences to be transferable and of interest to university departments elsewhere that aspire to create cultures that enable staff, and therefore students and the wider community, to flourish

  4. Facilitating Transfers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    as the implosion of the euro‐ and later on Western‐centric world has increased the pluralistic structural setup of contemporary world society. The contemporary world is at the same a community of common destiny and a world which consists of many worlds insofar as the globe is characterised by a multiplicity...... of contextual societal orders (societies, communities, regimes etc.) with some of them being state‐based and some of the falling outside the category of statehood. This development, acting as the central structural driving force for the emergence of regulatory governance frameworks, can be traced back...... to specific logics of temporalisation and spatial expansion of a diverse set of social processes in relation to, for example, the economy, politics, science and the mass media. On this background, the paper will more concretely develop a conceptual framework for classifying different contextual orders...

  5. Development of a Community Pharmacy Management Elective Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgarrick, David P.; Talluto, Beverly A.

    1997-01-01

    Midwestern University-Chicago College of Pharmacy has developed a five-week elective community pharmacy management rotation in partnership with local pharmacies. Students work directly with district and pharmacy managers, covering a list of topics developed by faculty and preceptors and performing one major project and several smaller ones.…

  6. Developing a Community through Its Marketplace. Partnership Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Manuel Alcazar

    1999-01-01

    A partnership of nongovernmental organizations developed a model of integrated community development centers (CDICs) to address the lack of services and affordable basic necessities in poor barrios surrounding many Latin American cities. A CDIC in a Guayaquil (Ecuador) barrio provides wholesale goods and credit to barrio shopkeepers and…

  7. Development and Maintenance of Identity in Aging Community Music Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, William Leonard

    2016-01-01

    This ethnographic study contextualized identity development and maintenance within the field of community music through case studies of four performing groups and interviews with seven current members. The underlying question guiding this research was how does participatory music making contribute to the development and maintenance of identity in…

  8. Grant Proposal Development a la FLC (Faculty Learning Community) Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Pollyanne S.

    2013-01-01

    Although the Faculty Learning Community is not a new structure or initiative in the higher education arena, adapting this model for faculty development focused on grant proposal writing is relatively new. This article describes how the concept developed by Milt Cox of Miami University has been successfully modified and implemented twice on the…

  9. Factors That Develop Effective Professional Learning Communities in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peiying; Lee, Che-Di; Lin, Hongda; Zhang, Chun-Xi

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the key factors of developing effective professional learning communities (PLCs) within the Taiwanese context. Four constructs--supportive and shared leadership, shared visions, collegial trust, and shared practices--were adopted and developed into an instrument for measuring PLC function. A stratified random…

  10. Developing a Comprehensive Learning Community Program: Providing a Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Jamie L.; Redington, Lyn

    2015-01-01

    This is the first of a three-part series which will share information about how a mid-size, comprehensive university developed a learning community program, including a residential curriculum. Through intentional collaboration and partnerships, the team, comprised of faculty and staff throughout the university, developed a "multi-year plan…

  11. Developing a Community through Its Marketplace. Partnership Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Manuel Alcazar

    1999-01-01

    A partnership of nongovernmental organizations developed a model of integrated community development centers (CDICs) to address the lack of services and affordable basic necessities in poor barrios surrounding many Latin American cities. A CDIC in a Guayaquil (Ecuador) barrio provides wholesale goods and credit to barrio shopkeepers and…

  12. Communities in Action: Lifelong Learning for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Fumiko; Guevara, Jose Roberto; Yorozu, Rika

    2015-01-01

    This handbook identifies principles and policy mechanisms to advance community-based learning for sustainable development based on the commitments endorsed by the participants of the "Kominkan-CLC International Conference on Education for Sustainable Development," which took place in Okayama City, Japan, in October 2014. To inform…

  13. Can sustainable development save the rural coastal community?

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Jennifer E., 1982-

    2011-01-01

    The research is presented as the final component of a Master’s Degree in Natural Resource Management with a specialty in Coastal and Marine Management from the University of Akureyri in conjunction with the University of the Westfjords. It serves to answer if the theories of sustainable development can be used to assess the degree of sustainable development taking place in a rural coastal community in a meaningful way. Through the development of a Sustainable Development Assessment Tool for R...

  14. Diversity-oriented synthesis-facilitated medicinal chemistry: toward the development of novel antimalarial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Eamon; Beaudoin, Jennifer A; Kato, Nobutaka; Fitzgerald, Mark E; Heidebrecht, Richard W; Lee, Maurice duPont; Masi, Daniela; Mercier, Marion; Mulrooney, Carol; Muncipinto, Giovanni; Rowley, Ann; Crespo-Llado, Keila; Serrano, Adelfa E; Lukens, Amanda K; Wiegand, Roger C; Wirth, Dyann F; Palmer, Michelle A; Foley, Michael A; Munoz, Benito; Scherer, Christina A; Duvall, Jeremy R; Schreiber, Stuart L

    2014-10-23

    Here, we describe medicinal chemistry that was accelerated by a diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) pathway, and in vivo studies of our previously reported macrocyclic antimalarial agent that derived from the synthetic pathway. Structure-activity relationships that focused on both appendage and skeletal features yielded a nanomolar inhibitor of P. falciparum asexual blood-stage growth with improved solubility and microsomal stability and reduced hERG binding. The build/couple/pair (B/C/P) synthetic strategy, used in the preparation of the original screening library, facilitated medicinal chemistry optimization of the antimalarial lead.

  15. Facilitating superior chronic disease management through a knowledge-based systems development model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Nilmini S; Goldberg, Steve

    2008-01-01

    To date, the adoption and diffusion of technology-enabled solutions to deliver better healthcare has been slow. There are many reasons for this. One of the most significant is that the existing methodologies that are normally used in general for Information and Communications Technology (ICT) implementations tend to be less successful in a healthcare context. This paper describes a knowledge-based adaptive mapping to realisation methodology to traverse successfully from idea to realisation rapidly and without compromising rigour so that success ensues. It is discussed in connection with trying to implement superior ICT-enabled approaches to facilitate superior Chronic Disease Management (CDM).

  16. Community Development Strategic Planning with a Focus on Social Variables, Case study: Tollab Community of Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mafi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended abstract1- IntroductionThe world has encountered an urban revolution in the past 200 years. In 1800, the cities were a small island in rural ocean, now in 2000; half of world populations were living in cities. It has been stated that it reaches to 65 percent in 2025, While they occupied just 2 percent of the earth, and upon UN forecast, 80 percent of next decade population growth take place in cities, 90 percent from this rate will occur in cities of developing countries. Urbanization is growing fast in our countries and upon 1385 year census results, over 68 percent are civic, while just 10 percent of country population were living in cities in last century. However, the opportunities, sources and facilities do not distributed appropriate to improve human requirements in cities. Consequent to these changes in urban planning domain could be cited transition from comprehensive rational planning and related to it, detailed planning to strategic urban planning and transition from comprehensive plan to detailed plan, transition from modern urban and modern planning to post modern once. Therefore, this article tries to use new form of planning by stakeholder participation and exerting strategic planning in neighborhood scale. So, the aims are:-Recognizing Tollab strategic position-Recognizing pros and cons, opportunities and threats related to this neighborhood development-Reaching appropriate strategies to neighborhood development in Tollab community2-Theoretical bases2-1-Strategic PlanningGrowing urbanism and new scales of urban growth have caused current city and urbanism encounter new challenges in recent decades. For the wideness of dimensions and changes in urban problems essence, considering various aspects and dimensions of problem to stable solving is inevitable. In the late 1960s after change in management concept and spread of systemic theory, theoretical basics of traditional planning (executive planning have changed generally

  17. Old and Young Dogs Teaching Each Other Tricks: The Importance of Developing Agency for Community Partners in Community Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    This article covers the importance of creating and developing agency in community partners when engaging in community-based learning. Often when faculty incorporate service- or community-based learning into their classes, we measure the "learning" part but not the "service" or "community." Focusing more on the latter involves working "with"…

  18. Place, Purpose, and Role in Rural Community Development Outreach: Lessons from the West Virginia Community Design Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plein, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This essay examines how the social construction of community may influence faculty perceptions, roles, and actions in rural community development outreach. Special attention is given to the social construction of rural communities and how disciplinary perspective and popular culture influence these perceptions of community. The essay considers how…

  19. Developing a virtual engineering management community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Bill; Kidd, Moray; Smith, Robin; Wearne, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    The paper reviews the lessons of planning and running an Engineering Management practitioner development programme in a partnership between BP and the University of Manchester. This distance-learning programme is for professional engineers in mid-career experienced in the engineering and support activities for delivering safe, compliant and reliable projects and operations worldwide. The programme concentrates on the why and how of leadership and judgement in managing the engineering of large and small projects and operational support. Two intensive residential weeks are combined with a virtual learning environment over one year. Assessed assignments between and after the residential weeks provide opportunities for individual reflective learning for each delegate through applying concepts and the lessons of case studies to their experience, current challenges and expected responsibilities. This successful partnership between a major global company and a university rich in research and teaching required a significant dedication of intellectual and leadership effort by all concerned. The rewards for both parties and most importantly for the engineers themselves are extensive.

  20. Community-Academic Partnerships: Developing a Service-Learning Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Heather C; Mathews, Launa Rae; Fossen, Traci; Scott, Ginger; Schaefer, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Academic partnerships with hospitals and health care agencies for authentic clinical learning have become a major focus of schools of nursing and professional nursing organizations. Formal academic partnerships in community settings are less common despite evolving models of care delivery outside of inpatient settings. Community-Academic partnerships are commonly developed as a means to engage nursing students in service-learning experiences with an emphasis on student outcomes. The benefit of service-learning projects on community partners and populations receiving the service is largely unknown primarily due to the lack of structure for identifying and measuring outcomes specific to service-learning. Nursing students and their faculty engaged in service-learning have a unique opportunity to collaborate with community partners to evaluate benefits of service-learning projects on those receiving the service. This article describes the development of a service-learning framework as a first step toward successful measurement of the benefits of undergraduate nursing students' service-learning projects on community agencies and the people they serve through a collaborative community-academic partnership. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Facilitating appreciation of anatomical variation and development of teamwork skills in the gross anatomy laboratory using a cadaver reassignment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprunger, Leslie K

    2008-01-01

    Developing a mental map of the body in three dimensions incorporating normal anatomical variations is a challenge for students of gross anatomy. Acquisition of this ability is facilitated by frequently reassigning students to work on different specimens in gross anatomy laboratories, a significant departure from traditional teaching strategies. This article analyzes student and faculty experiences with a reassignment system over a six-year period, including effects on early professional development and students' attitudes toward the cadavers. Students were strongly supportive of the method, noting that specimen reassignments facilitated learning, encouraged dissection skill building, and fostered collaborative interactions. Students' perception of the value of the contribution of each cadaver to their education was preserved and, for many, enhanced. Frequent specimen reassignments offer an opportunity to model public accountability for work and some aspects of the relationships between multiple health care teams caring for a patient.

  2. Portraiture of constructivist parental involvement: A model to develop a community of practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignam, Christopher Anthony

    This qualitative research study addressed the problem of the lack of parental involvement in secondary school science. Increasing parental involvement is vital in supporting student academic achievement and social growth. The purpose of this emergent phenomenological study was to identify conditions required to successfully construct a supportive learning environment to form partnerships between students, parents, and educators. The overall research question in this study investigated the conditions necessary to successfully enlist parental participation with students during science inquiry investigations at the secondary school level. One hundred thirteen pairs of parents and students engaged in a 6-week scientific inquiry activity and recorded attitudinal data in dialogue journals, questionnaires, open-ended surveys, and during one-one-one interviews conducted by the researcher between individual parents and students. Comparisons and cross-interpretations of inter-rater, codified, triangulated data were utilized for identifying emergent themes. Data analysis revealed the active involvement of parents in researching with their child during inquiry investigations, engaging in journaling, and assessing student performance fostered partnerships among students, parents, and educators and supported students' social skills development. The resulting model, employing constructivist leadership and enlisting parent involvement, provides conditions and strategies required to develop a community of practice that can help effect social change. The active involvement of parents fostered improved efficacy and a holistic mindset to develop in parents, students, and teachers. Based on these findings, the interactive collaboration of parents in science learning activities can proactively facilitate a community of practice that will assist educators in facilitating social change.

  3. The Economic Impact of Community College Capacity Development in Developing Countries: A Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndorf, Darryl M., Jr.; Glass, Chris R.

    2017-01-01

    Developing countries have significantly expanded efforts to import more flexible short-cycle institutions based on the United States community college model. The U.S. community college model addresses human capital needs of the labor market in developing countries by increasing access to an affordable education. However, there is limited research…

  4. Ecotourism and community development: case studies from Hainan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Mike; Wall, Geoffrey

    2004-01-01

    The connections between people, parks, and tourism have received significant attention in recent years, recognizing the potential for mutually beneficial relationships. Ecotourism has been promoted and widely adopted as a strategy for funding conservation initiatives, while at the same time contributing to the socioeconomic development of host communities and providing for quality tourism experiences. Parks are among the most common ecotourism destinations. Employing interviews, observations and secondary sources, this study assesses the current status of ecotourism at two protected areas in Hainan, China, where it is being promoted as a strategy for balancing regional economic growth and conservation objectives. Through an evaluation of the existing tourism-park-community relationships, opportunities and constraints are identified. Ecotourism development was found to be at an early stage at both study sites. Socioeconomic benefits for the local communities have been limited and tourism activity has not contributed revenues towards conservation to date. Community residents, nevertheless, generally support conservation and are optimistic that tourism growth will yield benefits. In light of the study findings and the salient literature, planning direction is offered with the intention of enhancing the capacity of ecotourism to generate benefits for both communities and the parks, and thus contribute to the sustainable development of the region more generally. Lessons derived have broad applicability for ecotourism destinations elsewhere.

  5. Professional Development For Community College Faculty: Lessons Learned From Intentional Mentoring Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. R.; Charlevoix, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Geoscience Workforce Development Initiative at UNAVCO supports attracting, training, and professionally developing students, educators, and professionals in the geosciences. For the past 12 years, UNAVCO has managed the highly successful Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS) program, with the goal of increasing the diversity of students entering the geosciences. Beginning in 2015, UNAVCO added Geo-Launchpad (GLP), a summer research preparation internship for Colorado community college students to prepare them for independent research opportunities, facilitate career exploration in the geosciences, and provide community college faculty with professional development to facilitate effective mentoring of students. One core element of the Geo-Launchpad program is UNAVCO support for GLP faculty mentors. Each intern applies to the program with a faculty representative (mentor) from his or her home institution. This faculty mentor is engaged with the student throughout the summer via telephone, video chat, text message, or email. At the end of each of the past two summers, UNAVCO has hosted four GLP faculty mentors in Boulder for two days of professional development focused on intentional mentoring of students. Discussions focused on the distinction between mentoring and advising, and the array of career and professional opportunities available to students. Faculty mentors also met with the external evaluator during the mentor training and provided feedback on both their observations of their intern as well as the impact on their own professional experience. Initial outcomes include re-energizing the faculty mentors' commitment to teaching, as well as the opportunity for valuable networking activities. This presentation will focus on the ongoing efforts and outcomes of the novel faculty mentor professional development activities, and the impact these activities have on community college student engagement in the geosciences.

  6. Navy Community of Practice for Programmers and Developers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    design and sustainment of a Navy CoP for programmers and developers ? D. BENEFITS OF STUDY Organizations that have instituted well-designed and effective...Navy CoP for programmers and developers in order to make the Navy more combat effective. 5 E. ORGANIZATION OF STUDY Chapter II introduces...will refer to individuals who engage in this practice as programmers and developers . 9 Communities of Practice may self- organize or be sponsored

  7. 12 CFR 25.25 - Community development test for wholesale or limited purpose banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... development loans, and community development services that benefit areas outside the bank's assessment area(s... loans and other community development loan data provided by the bank, such as data on loans outstanding... investments, community development loans, and community development services that benefit areas within...

  8. Mediating Community Participation: Practice of Support Workers in Initiating, Facilitating or Disrupting Encounters between People with and without Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigby, Christine; Wiesel, Ilan

    2015-07-01

    Promoting community participation for people with intellectual disability through encounter with strangers is an integral part of the mission of disability support workers. This paper offers detailed micro-level analysis of the practices of support workers when they accompany a person with intellectual disability outside their home and explores the subtle differences which make some staff practices more effective than others in promoting more convivial encounters with strangers. Based on 160 h of observations of twenty-six adults with intellectual disability in a variety of public places, and interviews and focus groups with their support workers, the paper points to some of the critical judgements support workers need to make when considering whether, when and how to initiate or intervene in such encounters.

  9. Qualitative meta-synthesis of barriers and facilitators that influence the implementation of community pharmacy services: perspectives of patients, nurses and general medical practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Lutfun N; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando; Luckett, Tim; Moullin, Joanna C; Durks, Desire; Franco-Trigo, Lucia; Benrimoj, Shalom I; Sabater-Hernández, Daniel

    2017-09-05

    The integration of community pharmacy services (CPSs) into primary care practice can be enhanced by assessing (and further addressing) the elements that enable (ie, facilitators) or hinder (ie, barriers) the implementation of such CPSs. These elements have been widely researched from the perspective of pharmacists but not from the perspectives of other stakeholders who can interact with and influence the implementation of CPSs. The aim of this study was to synthesise the literature on patients', general practitioners' (GPs) and nurses' perspectives of CPSs to identify barriers and facilitators to their implementation in Australia. A meta-synthesis of qualitative studies was performed. A systematic search in PubMed, Scopus and Informit was conducted to identify studies that explored patients', GPs' or nurses' views about CPSs in Australia. Thematic synthesis was performed to identify elements influencing CPS implementation, which were further classified using an ecological approach. Twenty-nine articles were included in the review, addressing 63 elements influencing CPS implementation. Elements were identified as a barrier, facilitator or both and were related to four ecological levels: individual patient (n=14), interpersonal (n=24), organisational (n=16) and community and healthcare system (n=9). It was found that patients, nurses and GPs identified elements reported in previous pharmacist-informed studies, such as pharmacist's training/education or financial remuneration, but also new elements, such as patients' capability to follow service's procedures, the relationships between GP and pharmacy professional bodies or the availability of multidisciplinary training/education. Patients, GPs and nurses can describe a large number of elements influencing CPS implementation. These elements can be combined with previous findings in pharmacists-informed studies to produce a comprehensive framework to assess barriers and facilitators to CPS implementation. This framework

  10. The concept of ‘smart cities’. Towards community development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Stratigea

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The value of ICTs in support of a variety of functions in urban environments, serving people, businesses and governmental institutions is nowadays greatly acknowledged. The concept of ‘smart’ cities has emerged, where local innovation systems, largely supported by digital networks and their applications, are contributing to the: diffusion of knowledge and information, knowledgeable decision making, network cooperation, efficient interaction among various actors and intelligence gathering. The aim of the paper is to indulge in the concept of ‘smart’ cities for inclusive community development. The first part elaborates on the concept of ‘smart’ city, by exploring its various meanings, key dimensions, and potential for community development. In the second part, the Greek experience is presented, by means of a prominent example of a Greek ‘smart’ city, developing city-specific ICTs applications for inclusive community development. Finally, in the last part, some conclusions and future prospects of the concept of ‘smart’ cities for community development in Greece are drawn.

  11. Developing and implementing the community nursing research strategy for Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenkre, Joyce; Wallace, Carolyn; Davies, Robyn; Bale, Sue; Thomas, Sue

    2013-11-01

    In order to obtain the best patient outcomes in community nursing, practice needs to be underpinned by robust research-based evidence. This article describes a Community Nursing Research Strategy developed and implemented in Wales to provide the nursing profession with the evidence to support future organisational and professional change in achieving excellence in the community. This was developed in partnership with education, research, health services, workforce planning and Government using consensus methodology (specifically, a nominal group technique). Consequently, the process was inclusive and included three steps: escalating presentation of ideas, topic debate and topic rating. The result was a strategy with four implementation strands, including a virtual network, research portfolio, application to practice and leadership.

  12. Community Capacity Development in Universities: Empowering Communities through Education Management Programmes in Strathmore University (A Pilot Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitawi, Alfred Kirigha

    2014-01-01

    This research examined the issue of community capacity development in a university. The main way communities were empowered was through the education management programmes offered at Strathmore University in Nairobi, Kenya. The research is among the first to examine the issue of community capacity development through university programmes. The…

  13. Evaluation of clinical teaching and professional development in a problem and community-based nursing module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C de Villiers

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa the main focus is on primary health care. This affects the education and training of nurses, and training schools must respond by developing appropriate teaching modules. A school of nursing developed, implemented and revised a problem- and community- based learning module over a period of three years (1996-1998. This student-centered module focuses on students’ needs, active participation, collaboration, accountability, self-assessment, self-study, life-long learning and appropriate skills. In the formal clinical teaching environment PBL was the main approach. However, this approach was also supported by a variety of strategies, for example group discussions and scenarios. The knowledge, attitudes and professional development skills acquired in the PBL approach were then applied informally in the community setting (CBE. The purpose of the study was to evaluate a first year clinical teaching module as part of an extensive programme. A quantitative research method, a descriptive design, and a variety of data collection techniques were used. Conclusions were that clinical teaching was effective within the problem- (PBL and community-based (CBE approaches; 78% of respondents were positive about the clinical learning environment; 61 % stated that expectations were met; 81% preferred group activities, and 67% indicated that they had developed professional skills. Facilitators agreed that clinical teaching met the requirements of PBL & CBE. The pass rate also improved.

  14. Transformational Learning and Community Development: Early Reflections on Professional and Community Engagement at Macquarie University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings-Sanaei, Felicity; Sachs, Judyth

    2014-01-01

    Professional and Community Engagement (PACE) at Macquarie University offers undergraduate students experiential learning opportunities with local, regional, and international partners. In PACE projects, students work toward meeting the partner's organizational goals while they develop their capabilities, learn through the process of engagement,…

  15. Partnership Among Peers: Lessons Learned From the Development of a Community Organization-Academic Research Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett-Tennant, Jeri; Collins, Cyleste; Matloub, Jacqueline; Patrick, Alison; Chupp, Mark; Werner, James J; Borawski, Elaine A

    2016-01-01

    Community engagement and rigorous science are necessary to address health issues. Increasingly, community health organizations are asked to partner in research. To strengthen such community organization-academic partnerships, increase research capacity in community organizations, and facilitate equitable partnered research, the Partners in Education Evaluation and Research (PEER) program was developed. The program implements an 18-month structured research curriculum for one mid-level employee of a health-focused community-based organization with an organizational mentor and a Case Western Reserve University faculty member as partners. The PEER program was developed and guided by a community-academic advisory committee and was designed to impact the research capacity of organizations through didactic modules and partnered research in the experiential phase. Active participation of community organizations and faculty during all phases of the program provided for bidirectional learning and understanding of the challenges of community-engaged health research. The pilot program evaluation used qualitative and quantitative data collection techniques, including experiences of the participants assessed through surveys, formal group and individual interviews, phone calls, and discussions. Statistical analysis of the change in fellows' pre-test and post-test survey scores were conducted using paired sample t tests. The small sample size is recognized by the authors as a limitation of the evaluation methods and would potentially be resolved by including more cohort data as the program progresses. Qualitative data were reviewed by two program staff using content and narrative analysis to identify themes, describe and assess group phenomena and determine program improvements. The objective of PEER is to create equitable partnerships between community organizations and academic partners to further research capacity in said organizations and develop mutually beneficial research

  16. Cooperation and development in local communities of Spain and Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Quevedo Alejos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the world faces a scenario of growing competition between companies and territories. The challenges of globalization requires cities and regions to propose strategies that stimulate the processes of capital accumulation by the diffusion of innovation and knowledge, the adoption of more flexible forms of production organization and the development of economies of urbanization, between others. Therefore, in this paper three experiences of endogenous development represented by the Spanish Development Agency Iraurgi Lantzen (Spain, Finca Peru (Peruvian civil non-profit organization and the Rural Community of Cullpe (Peru will be analysed, in order to identify and compare the various aspects related to the autonomous development of communities. The dynamics of development in each region or city is directly related to investment decisions and the attractions of the dependent territories. For Iraurgi Lantzen improvement is reported in the region 1, medium 2 Urola with the construction of a new road, which encourages municipalities in the area to look for a consensus to help generate employment and wealth in line with the interests for development and promotion of the valley. On the other hand, the case of Finca Peru shows a joint initiative to foster progress and development in the hardest hit by poverty and subversion regions, as the provinces of Huancavelica and Ayacucho were, in the Peruvian Andes. This organization ensures the socio-economic improvement of the population, particularly women, through the creation of community bank, acting on the basis of three pillars: human development, credit and savings. Finally, the case of the Rural Community of Cullpe shows an example of social leadership, innovation, ability to call and ethical-moral principles resuscitating a community stricken by poverty and limited resources, creating comparative advantages and opportunities for development rural. In conclusion, the case studies

  17. Microbial community succession on developing lesions on human enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lino Torlakovic

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is one of the most common diseases in the world. However, our understanding of how the microbial community composition changes in vivo as caries develops is lacking.An in vivo model was used in a longitudinal cohort study to investigate shifts in the microbial community composition associated with the development of enamel caries.White spot lesions were generated in vivo on human teeth predetermined to be extracted for orthodontic reasons. The bacterial microbiota on sound enamel and on developing carious lesions were identified using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM, which permits the detection of about 300 of the approximate 600 predominant bacterial species in the oral cavity.After only seven weeks, 75% of targeted teeth developed white spot lesions (8 individuals, 16 teeth. The microbial community composition of the plaque over white spot lesions differed significantly as compared to sound enamel. Twenty-five bacterial taxa, including Streptococcus mutans, Atopobium parvulum, Dialister invisus, and species of Prevotella and Scardovia, were significantly associated with initial enamel lesions. In contrast, 14 bacterial taxa, including species of Fusobacterium, Campylobacter, Kingella, and Capnocytophaga, were significantly associated with sound enamel.The bacterial community composition associated with the progression of enamel lesions is specific and much more complex than previously believed. This investigation represents one of the first longitudinally-derived studies for caries progression and supports microbial data from previous cross-sectional studies on the development of the disease. Thus, the in vivo experiments of generating lesions on teeth destined for extraction in conjunction with HOMIM analyses represent a valid model to study succession of supragingival microbial communities associated with caries development and to study efficacy of prophylactic and restorative treatments.

  18. The Colorado Gambling Boom: An Experiment in Rural Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokowski, Patricia A.

    1992-01-01

    Three small Colorado towns that faced a declining economy as the mining resource ran out used gambling-based tourism as a strategy for community development. Although economic benefits to the towns have far exceeded expectations, negative social, environmental, and political changes, such as crime alcoholism, traffic problems, and conflicts…

  19. The Development of Indigenous Counseling in Contemporary Confucian Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kwang-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    In view of the limitations of mainstream Western psychology, the necessity of indigenous psychology for the development of global community psychology is discussed in the context of multiculturalism. In addition to this general introduction, four articles underlying a common theme were designed to discuss (a) various types of value conflicts…

  20. Development of Communities of Practice in School Library Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Elizabeth A.; Howard, Jody K.; Kimmel, Sue C.

    2016-01-01

    To properly prepare pre-service school librarians, school library educators in online courses must provide opportunities for collaborative engagement. This collaborative education should also recognize the pedagogical benefit of the organic formation of communities of practice that develop within areas outside of curriculum content. This…

  1. YELL/TELL: Online Community Platform for Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenzi, Ivana; Bortoluzzi, Maria; Kalyani, Rishita

    2016-01-01

    The community platform "Young/Teen English Language Learners" (YELL/ TELL), as mentioned by Bortoluzzi and Marenzi (2014) was "developed to respond to the needs of collaboration and sharing among trainee teachers, school teachers, teacher trainers and researchers in the field of language learning for English [as a Foreign or Second…

  2. Development of Communities of Practice in School Library Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Elizabeth A.; Howard, Jody K.; Kimmel, Sue C.

    2016-01-01

    To properly prepare pre-service school librarians, school library educators in online courses must provide opportunities for collaborative engagement. This collaborative education should also recognize the pedagogical benefit of the organic formation of communities of practice that develop within areas outside of curriculum content. This…

  3. Women, Poverty and Community Development in the Third World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovel, Hermione; Feuerstein, Marie-Therese

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the objectives of this special issue--women, poverty, and community development--and key issues raised by these subjects, including the changing role of the family, generating income through credit and savings, understanding women's fifth world, overcoming poverty and powerlessness, and changing stereotyped roles. (CT)

  4. Linguistic Struggles within and beyond the Southern African Development Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwasi, Mompoloki Mmangaka

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues that the linguistic struggles faced by the Southern African Development Community (the SADC) represent common linguistic struggles found in Africa and the world where some languages are accused of dominating, stifling and suppressing others. However, the language situation within the SADC is interesting because it offers us a…

  5. Youth, Crime and Community Development: A Guide for Collaborative Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, Richard

    This report is designed to help community-based organizations, youth-serving agencies, and the criminal justice and juvenile justice systems recognize their common stake in supporting healthy and positive youth development, both to revitalize their neighborhoods and to control crime. It focuses on: "The Basics: Youth, Crime and Community…

  6. Growing Community Capacity in Energy Development through Extension Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romich, Eric; Bowen-Elzey, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    New energy policy, industry regulation, and market investment are influencing the development of renewable energy technologies, setting the stage for rural America to provide the energy of tomorrow. This article describes how Extension's renewable energy programming was implemented in two Ohio communities to engage elected officials and residents…

  7. The Colorado Gambling Boom: An Experiment in Rural Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokowski, Patricia A.

    1992-01-01

    Three small Colorado towns that faced a declining economy as the mining resource ran out used gambling-based tourism as a strategy for community development. Although economic benefits to the towns have far exceeded expectations, negative social, environmental, and political changes, such as crime alcoholism, traffic problems, and conflicts…

  8. Can community retail pharmacist and diabetes expert support facilitate insulin initiation by family physicians? Results of the AIM@GP randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Stewart B

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limited evidence exists on the effectiveness of external diabetes support provided by diabetes specialists and community retail pharmacists to facilitate insulin-prescribing in family practice. Methods A stratified, parallel group, randomized control study was conducted in 15 sites across Canada. Family physicians received insulin initiation/titration education, a physician-specific ‘report card’ on the characteristics of their type 2 diabetes (T2DM population, and a registry of insulin-eligible patients at a workshop. Intervention physicians in addition received: (1 diabetes specialist/educator consultation support (active diabetes specialist/educator consultation support for 2 months [the educator initiated contact every 2 weeks] and passive consultation support for 10 months [family physician initiated as needed]; and (2 community retail pharmacist support (option to refer patients to the pharmacist(s for a 1-hour insulin-initiation session. The primary outcome was the insulin prescribing rate (IPR per physician defined as the number of insulin starts of insulin-eligible patients during the 12-month strategy. Results Consenting, eligible physicians (n = 151 participated with 15 specialist sites and 107 community pharmacists providing the intervention. Most physicians were male (74%, and had an average of 81 patients with T2DM. Few (9% routinely initiated patients on insulin. Physicians were randomly allocated to usual care (n = 78 or the intervention (n = 73. Intervention physicians had a mean (SE IPR of 2.28 (0.27 compared to 2.29 (0.25 for control physicians, with an estimated adjusted RR (95% CI of 0.99 (0.80 to 1.24, p = 0.96. Conclusions An insulin support program utilizing diabetes experts and community retail pharmacists to enhance insulin prescribing in family practice was not successful. Too few physicians are appropriately intensifying diabetes management through insulin initiation, and

  9. Merging ORS Standards to Facilitate Rapid Development of Reusable Spacecraft Software Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DNet has been actively pursuing strategies for shortening the software development portion of the satellite development life-cycle for some time. We recognized upon...

  10. Human Resource Development to Facilitate Experiential Learning: The Case of Yahoo Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Although work experiences are recognized as important mechanisms for developing leaders in organizations, existing research has focused primarily on work assignments rather than on human resource development (HRD) systems that promote experiential learning of managers. The primary goal of this study was to develop an HRD model for facilitating…

  11. How Research and Development on Educational Roles and Institutional Structures Can Facilitate Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Paul

    1973-01-01

    The objectives of this article, which emanate from a concern for returns on educational research and development investment, are to review and comment on types of research and development efforts to improve educational R&D communication and to indicate roughly the state-of-the-art and some needed developments. (Author/RK)

  12. Human Resource Development to Facilitate Experiential Learning: The Case of Yahoo Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Although work experiences are recognized as important mechanisms for developing leaders in organizations, existing research has focused primarily on work assignments rather than on human resource development (HRD) systems that promote experiential learning of managers. The primary goal of this study was to develop an HRD model for facilitating…

  13. Energy Efficient Community Development in California: Chula Vista Research Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gas Technology Institute

    2009-03-31

    In 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy joined the California Energy Commission in funding a project to begin to examine the technical, economic and institutional (policy and regulatory) aspects of energy-efficient community development. That research project was known as the Chula Vista Research Project for the host California community that co-sponsored the initiative. The researches proved that the strategic integration of the selected and economically viable buildings energy efficiency (EE) measures, photovoltaics (PV), distributed generation (DG), and district cooling can produce significant reductions in aggregate energy consumption, peak demand and emissions, compared to the developer/builder's proposed baseline approach. However, the central power plant emission reductions achieved through use of the EE-DG option would increase local air emissions. The electric and natural gas utility infrastructure impacts associated with the use of the EE and EE-PV options were deemed relatively insignificant while use of the EE-DG option would result in a significant reduction of necessary electric distribution facilities to serve a large-scale development project. The results of the Chula Vista project are detailed in three separate documents: (1) Energy-Efficient Community Development in California; Chula Vista Research Project report contains a detailed description of the research effort and findings. This includes the methodologies, and tools used and the analysis of the efficiency, economic and emissions impacts of alternative energy technology and community design options for two development sites. Research topics covered included: (a) Energy supply, demand, and control technologies and related strategies for structures; (b) Application of locally available renewable energy resources including solar thermal and PV technology and on-site power generation with heat recovery; (c) Integration of local energy resources into district energy systems and existing

  14. Team Building. Baldor Electric Company. [Facilitator Guide and Participant Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Louis Community Coll., MO. Workplace Literacy Services Center.

    This document contains the facilitator and participant guides for a course in team building that was developed by a community college for a St. Louis (Missouri) electric company. The facilitator's guide contains the transparency masters, outlines, learning activities, questionnaires, and other handouts required for two course sessions. The first…

  15. Tourism and Sustainable Development. Implications at Local Community Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Ioan Nechifor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tourism represents an economic activity with a special growth potential and rate that, managed in a proper way, can represent an important means for ensuring a sustainable development and to promote and sustain local communities. During the past period, the development of tourism raised awareness among policy makers, local governments, tourists, etc. about the effect of tourism on the environment, this way the development of a sustainable tourism being a necessity. The present paper aims to outline a series of implications at communities' level that the relationship between tourism and sustainable development may generate, focusing on one of the most representative and important components of sustainable tourism, respectively ecotourism and its particular forms of rural and agrotourism.

  16. Development of Cultural Management and Inheritance by Community Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichayapol Nguanthaisong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Museums were places where all collections, which indicated values of arts and cultural heritages that were useful for learning, were kept. Establishment of museums was successful by having development, systematic management, cultural inheritance, knowledge transferring, participation and support. Approach: This study aimed to study backgrounds of museum development in temples in the area of the lower northeastern, to study current conditions and problems about museum management in temples and cultural management with community participation in the lower northeastern and to study development and management of museum in temples and cultural inheritance by community participation in the lower northeastern. This research was a qualitative research and conducted by literature review and field data collecting with interviewing, observations, focus group discussions and workshops with 170 persons from group of key informants, casual informants and related agencies. Data were analyzed with cultural diffusion theory and presented results in form of descriptive analysis. Results: The study revealed that backgrounds of museum development in temple were initiated by monks, who collected things in old building without systematic exhibition, labeling of donators or source indicating. Most of collections were things in that community such as traditional utensil donated to temple when they were unused and the rest was from other communities. After having many of collections, monks asked community for fund raising to construct museum building in the area of that temple. Moreover, things from discovering of local archeological sites were also kept in museum and there were many visitors. After that an agency of Fine Arts Department came to study and research by using budgets for the second exploring such local archeological sites and then kept in buildings of temple museum. Currently, it was found that; (1 there was a simple management on

  17. A Model for Health Promotion in Rural Communities through the Development of Personal Agency and Intrinsic Empowerment

    OpenAIRE

    Pick Steiner, Susan; UNAM, Instituto Mexicano de Investigación de Familia y Población (IMIFAP); García Rodríguez, Georgina; UNAM, Instituto Mexicano de Investigación de Familia y Población (IMIFAP); Leenen, Iwin; Instituto Mexicano de Investigación de Familia y Población (IMIFAP)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the program “Yo quiero, yo puedo… mejorar mi salud y ejercer mis derechos” [I want to, I can…improve my health and exercise my rights], a pilot model was designed and implemented in three States of Mexico. This model aims to change nutrition and hygiene behaviors in the inhabitants of marginalized communities, through knowledge and psychosocial skills development facilitating personal agency and intrinsic empowerment. Evaluation of the program showed an effect on knowledge, assertive...

  18. Enabling methods for community health mapping in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobsen Kathryn H

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spatial epidemiology is useful but difficult to apply in developing countries due to the low availability of digitized maps and address systems, accurate population distributions, and computational tools. A community-based mapping approach was used to demonstrate that participatory geographic information system (PGIS techniques can provide information helpful for health and community development. Results The PGIS process allowed for the rapid determination of sectional (neighborhood boundaries within the city of Bo, Sierra Leone. When combined with data about hospital laboratory visits, a catchment area for one hospital in Bo could be established. A survey of households from within the catchment area determined that the average population per household (about 6 individuals was similar to that found in the 2004 census. However, we also found that the average house was inhabited by more than one household, for an average of 17.5 inhabitants per residential building, which is critical information to know when estimating population size using remote imagery that can detect and enumerate buildings. Conclusions The methods developed in this paper serve as a model for the involvement of communities in the generation of municipal maps and their application to community and health concerns.

  19. Peer learning leaders: developing employability through facilitating the learning of other students

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Neil; Thackeray, Charlotte; Barnes, Paul; Hendrickx, Katherina

    2015-01-01

    Employability is a key theme in higher education and attitudes towards its development have shifted from a focus on technical skills development to a broader focus on values, intellect, social engagement and performance contributing to graduate identity (Hager and Hodkinson, 2009). Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) and Language Conversation Clubs are both examples of student-led peer learning schemes at Bournemouth University (BU) and are reviewed to explore the development of students employed to...

  20. Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy To Facilitate Problem Solving in Pharmaceutical Research and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangion, Ian; Liu, Yizhou; Reibarkh, Mikhail; Williamson, R Thomas; Welch, Christopher J

    2016-08-19

    As new chemical methodologies driven by single-electron chemistry emerge, process and analytical chemists must develop approaches to rapidly solve problems in this nontraditional arena. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has been long known as a preferred technique for the study of paramagnetic species. However, it is only recently finding application in contemporary pharmaceutical development, both to study reactions and to track the presence of undesired impurities. Several case studies are presented here to illustrate its utility in modern pharmaceutical development efforts.

  1. Win-win for wind and wildlife: a vision to facilitate sustainable development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Kiesecker

    Full Text Available Wind energy offers the potential to reduce carbon emissions while increasing energy independence and bolstering economic development. However, wind energy has a larger land footprint per Gigawatt (GW than most other forms of energy production, making appropriate siting and mitigation particularly important. Species that require large unfragmented habitats and those known to avoid vertical structures are particularly at risk from wind development. Developing energy on disturbed lands rather than placing new developments within large and intact habitats would reduce cumulative impacts to wildlife. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that it will take 241 GW of terrestrial based wind development on approximately 5 million hectares to reach 20% electricity production for the U.S. by 2030. We estimate there are ∼7,700 GW of potential wind energy available across the U.S., with ∼3,500 GW on disturbed lands. In addition, a disturbance-focused development strategy would avert the development of ∼2.3 million hectares of undisturbed lands while generating the same amount of energy as development based solely on maximizing wind potential. Wind subsidies targeted at favoring low-impact developments and creating avoidance and mitigation requirements that raise the costs for projects impacting sensitive lands could improve public value for both wind energy and biodiversity conservation.

  2. Win-Win for Wind and Wildlife: A Vision to Facilitate Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesecker, Joseph M.; Evans, Jeffrey S.; Fargione, Joe; Doherty, Kevin; Foresman, Kerry R.; Kunz, Thomas H.; Naugle, Dave; Nibbelink, Nathan P.; Niemuth, Neal D.

    2011-01-01

    Wind energy offers the potential to reduce carbon emissions while increasing energy independence and bolstering economic development. However, wind energy has a larger land footprint per Gigawatt (GW) than most other forms of energy production, making appropriate siting and mitigation particularly important. Species that require large unfragmented habitats and those known to avoid vertical structures are particularly at risk from wind development. Developing energy on disturbed lands rather than placing new developments within large and intact habitats would reduce cumulative impacts to wildlife. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that it will take 241 GW of terrestrial based wind development on approximately 5 million hectares to reach 20% electricity production for the U.S. by 2030. We estimate there are ∼7,700 GW of potential wind energy available across the U.S., with ∼3,500 GW on disturbed lands. In addition, a disturbance-focused development strategy would avert the development of ∼2.3 million hectares of undisturbed lands while generating the same amount of energy as development based solely on maximizing wind potential. Wind subsidies targeted at favoring low-impact developments and creating avoidance and mitigation requirements that raise the costs for projects impacting sensitive lands could improve public value for both wind energy and biodiversity conservation. PMID:21533285

  3. Research, Development, and Validation of a School Leader's Resource Guide for the Facilitation of Social Media Use by School Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Deanna L.

    2012-01-01

    Many school leaders do not understand their rights and responsibilities to facilitate social media use by their staff in P-12 education. This dissertation was designed to research, develop, and validate a resource guide school leaders can use to facilitate social media use by school staff. "Research, Development, and Validation of a School…

  4. Sustainable development and communities : lessons from Yanacocha, Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, G. [Newmont Mining Corp., Denver, CO (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The implications that the theory of enactment has for the way mining companies relate to communities were discussed with particular reference to Newmont Mining Corporation's experiences with the Yanacocha mine in Peru. The theory of enactment states that 'the environment that the organization worries about is put there by the organization'. Newmont is the world's largest gold company. It is relatively small with a capitalization of about $10 billion. Although company policies are carried out with the highest degree of sensitivity to local concerns, sometimes there is tension between corporate and site visions of reality. The paper referred to an event at Yanacocha mine in which a woman put a small amount of mercury in a glass of drinking water, claiming it had come from her kitchen tap. The event sparked an uprise from 400 members of the community who threatened the mine's administration offices. In another incident, a truck carrying mercury from Cajamarca to Lima accidentally spilled 150 kgs on the road through three communities. Newmont spent US$17 million to replace and repave roads and to bring in health experts, but as months passed, the people of the community were still upset. Tensions began to ease when Co-Development Canada, a small Vancouver-based NGO, got involved by working inside the community to help it identify what the issues were rather than try to fix parts of it.

  5. Theory-guided Therapeutic Function of Music to facilitate emotion regulation development in preschool-aged children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena Moore, Kimberly; Hanson-Abromeit, Deanna

    2015-01-01

    Emotion regulation (ER) is an umbrella term to describe interactive, goal-dependent explicit, and implicit processes that are intended to help an individual manage and shift an emotional experience. The primary window for appropriate ER development occurs during the infant, toddler, and preschool years. Atypical ER development is considered a risk factor for mental health problems and has been implicated as a primary mechanism underlying childhood pathologies. Current treatments are predominantly verbal- and behavioral-based and lack the opportunity to practice in-the-moment management of emotionally charged situations. There is also an absence of caregiver–child interaction in these treatment strategies. Based on behavioral and neural support for music as a therapeutic mechanism, the incorporation of intentional music experiences, facilitated by a music therapist, may be one way to address these limitations. Musical Contour Regulation Facilitation (MCRF) is an interactive therapist-child music-based intervention for ER development practice in preschoolers. The MCRF intervention uses the deliberate contour and temporal structure of a music therapy session to mirror the changing flow of the caregiver–child interaction through the alternation of high arousal and low arousal music experiences. The purpose of this paper is to describe the Therapeutic Function of Music (TFM), a theory-based description of the structural characteristics for a music-based stimulus to musically facilitate developmentally appropriate high arousal and low arousal in-the-moment ER experiences. The TFM analysis is based on a review of the music theory, music neuroscience, and music development literature and provides a preliminary model of the structural characteristics of the music as a core component of the MCRF intervention. PMID:26528171

  6. Impact of Facilitated Asynchronous Distance Education on Clinical Skills Development of International Pharmacy Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Zubin; Dean, Marie Rocchi

    2006-01-01

    The use of distance education for clinical skills development in the health professions has not been extensively described, due in part to the intensive nature of the relationship between the patient and practitioner. In the context of pharmacy practice, there are specific needs to develop new vehicles for clinical skills education due to growing…

  7. Development of a Video Tape Teaching Module To Facilitate the Patient's Understanding of Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernot, Gertrude W.

    A practicum project was conducted to develop a method to enhance the knowledge base of targeted adult cancer patients entering into a treatment plan that included chemotherapy. The educational component necessary for informed consent by the patient had not been consistent; therefore, a videotape was developed containing general information common…

  8. Examining the effects of structured dialogue grounded in socioculturalism as a tool to facilitate professional development in secondary science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Antoinette S.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of professional development characterized by teacher facilitated learning activities as a way to improve teaching practices and learning outcomes. In this study, teachers were provided opportunities to facilitate their own learning by investigating ways to consistently foster the desired learning outcomes for urban students over the course of three semesters. During the first semester, teachers focused on improving test scores and student motivation. By the third semester, teachers opted to extend time for students to complete assignments, and focused on sharing strategies that worked for students. Second, students of teachers who participated in the study group format using the structured dialogue approach demonstrated dramatic gains on the standardized content assessment in chemistry and integrated coordinated science (ICS) over three years. In chemistry, the percent of students scoring at far below basic decreased by 24%, and the percentage of students who scored basic increased 21%. In ICS, the percentage of students that scored far below basic decreased by 14% and the percent of students who scored basic increased 14%. The research findings suggest that using structured dialogue to facilitate teacher discourse in a way that is conducive to establishing positive discourse about student learning and rigorous pedagogy are key factors in improving teachers' ability to foster high academic outcomes from urban students.

  9. Implementing a Community Empowerment Center to Build Capacity for Developing, Implementing, and Sustaining Interventions to Promote Community Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Stacy W; Freedman, Darcy A; Pitner, Ronald O; Sharpe, Patricia A; Cole, Jennie Ann; Hastie, Shanna; Hunter, Brittney

    2015-12-01

    The Community Empowerment Center used a community-engaged approach to build capacity among residents to develop and implement interventions focused on creating a healthier environment. The Center partnered with residents living in a public housing community and adjacent low-income neighborhood and provided support through a mini-grant program. A six-session training program guided community members in mini grant development; 25 individuals attended at least one session. Six grant proposals were submitted; three were awarded $12,000 each for intervention implementation. Findings offer a model for engaging residents from low-resource settings in intervention development, implementation, and sustainability for community health promotion.

  10. Discussion in Religious Education: Developing Dialogic for Community Cohesion and/or Spiritual Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    In the UK and across Europe, rising concern about religion has impacted on religious education (RE), with a new emphasis being placed on dialogue for developing community cohesion. In this article it is suggested that the new emphasis on dialogue for community cohesion in RE also presents an opportunity to improve dialogic pedagogy for spiritual…

  11. Barriers and facilitators of a healthy lifestyle among persons with serious and persistent mental illness: perspectives of community mental health providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibbin, Christine L; Kitchen, Katherine A; Wykes, Thomas L; Lee, Aaron A

    2014-07-01

    The investigators used qualitative methods to examine perspectives of community mental health professionals on obesity management in adults with serious mental illness (SMI). Data from 5 focus groups were subjected to constant comparison analysis and grounded theory. Results showed that influences at individual, social, community, and societal levels impact development and maintenance of obesity. Mental health providers desired a collaborative relationship with health promotion program staff. They also believed that frequent, group-based health promotion should include participation incentives for adults with SMI and should occur over durations of at least 6-months to achieve improved health outcomes for this population.

  12. Partnership Among Peers: Lessons Learned From the Development of a Community Organization–Academic Research Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett-Tennant, Jeri; Collins, Cyleste; Matloub, Jacqueline; Patrick, Alison; Chupp, Mark; Werner, James J.; Borawski, Elaine A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Community engagement and rigorous science are necessary to address health issues. Increasingly, community health organizations are asked to partner in research. To strengthen such community organization–academic partnerships, increase research capacity in community organizations, and facilitate equitable partnered research, the Partners in Education Evaluation and Research (PEER) program was developed. The program implements an 18-month structured research curriculum for one mid-level employee of a health-focused community-based organization with an organizational mentor and a Case Western Reserve University faculty member as partners. Methods The PEER program was developed and guided by a community–academic advisory committee and was designed to impact the research capacity of organizations through didactic modules and partnered research in the experiential phase. Active participation of community organizations and faculty during all phases of the program provided for bidirectional learning and understanding of the challenges of community-engaged health research. The pilot program evaluation used qualitative and quantitative data collection techniques, including experiences of the participants assessed through surveys, formal group and individual interviews, phone calls, and discussions. Statistical analysis of the change in fellows’ pre-test and post-test survey scores were conducted using paired sample t tests. The small sample size is recognized by the authors as a limitation of the evaluation methods and would potentially be resolved by including more cohort data as the program progresses. Qualitative data were reviewed by two program staff using content and narrative analysis to identify themes, describe and assess group phenomena and determine program improvements. Objectives The objective of PEER is to create equitable partnerships between community organizations and academic partners to further research capacity in said organizations and

  13. Improving Video Game Development: Facilitating Heterogeneous Team Collaboration through Flexible Software Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musil, Juergen; Schweda, Angelika; Winkler, Dietmar; Biffl, Stefan

    Based on our observations of Austrian video game software development (VGSD) practices we identified a lack of systematic processes/method support and inefficient collaboration between various involved disciplines, i.e. engineers and artists. VGSD includes heterogeneous disciplines, e.g. creative arts, game/content design, and software. Nevertheless, improving team collaboration and process support is an ongoing challenge to enable a comprehensive view on game development projects. Lessons learned from software engineering practices can help game developers to increase game development processes within a heterogeneous environment. Based on a state of the practice survey in the Austrian games industry, this paper presents (a) first results with focus on process/method support and (b) suggests a candidate flexible process approach based on Scrum to improve VGSD and team collaboration. Results showed (a) a trend to highly flexible software processes involving various disciplines and (b) identified the suggested flexible process approach as feasible and useful for project application.

  14. Collaborative Leadership Learning; Developing Facilitation Skills for Collaborative Learning in Leadership Learning Groups.

    OpenAIRE

    James, Kim; Mann, Jasbir; Creasy, Jane

    2003-01-01

    many organisations working for example, with less hierarchical structures, with cross- organisational partners, or in professional environments. Leadership at all levels must be supported by leaders in top executive positions who develop their own capabilities both as leaders and in their role of leading the learning of leadership throughout their organisations. Their ideas of their role in leading learning will be shaped by their own leadership development experiences. Collaborative learning...

  15. Central Practitioners' Developing Legitimate Peripheral Participation in a Community of Practice for Changing Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, David James

    2015-01-01

    As new technologies continue to shape society, there has been a greater need for communities of practice to facilitate changing teaching and learning practices through technology in schools. Legitimate peripheral participation through these communities of practice has become an essential means to spread and support this technology integration…

  16. Community mental health care worldwide: current status and further developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornicroft, Graham; Deb, Tanya; Henderson, Claire

    2016-10-01

    This paper aims to give an overview of the key issues facing those who are in a position to influence the planning and provision of mental health systems, and who need to address questions of which staff, services and sectors to invest in, and for which patients. The paper considers in turn: a) definitions of community mental health care; b) a conceptual framework to use when evaluating the need for hospital and community mental health care; c) the potential for wider platforms, outside the health service, for mental health improvement, including schools and the workplace; d) data on how far community mental health services have been developed across different regions of the world; e) the need to develop in more detail models of community mental health services for low- and middle-income countries which are directly based upon evidence for those countries; f) how to incorporate mental health practice within integrated models to identify and treat people with comorbid long-term conditions; g) possible adverse effects of deinstitutionalization. We then present a series of ten recommendations for the future strengthening of health systems to support and treat people with mental illness.

  17. Facilitating the Specification Capture and Transformation Process in the Development of Multi-Agent Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Aluzio Haendehen; Caminada, Numo; Haeusler, Edward Hermann; vonStaa, Arndt

    2004-01-01

    To support the development of flexible and reusable MAS, we have built a framework designated MAS-CF. MAS-CF is a component framework that implements a layered architecture based on contextual composition. Interaction rules, controlled by architecture mechanisms, ensure very low coupling, making possible the sharing of distributed services in a transparent, dynamic and independent way. These properties propitiate large-scale reuse, since organizational abstractions can be reused and propagated to all instances created from a framework. The objective is to reduce complexity and development time of multi-agent systems through the reuse of generic organizational abstractions.

  18. Social education, human rights and sustainability in community development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio CARIDE GÓMEZ

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article places its contributions in a reflection of a pedagogical and social nature about the links that are established between social education, human rights and sustainability in community development. In this regard, in a historical and prospective key, it places emphasis on the need to promote educational actions that, being consistent with the principles of equity and justice, make it possible to build a more democratic, inclusive and cohesive local-global society.A future expectation that must be confined to educational theories and practices where local communities assume the role they play in their own development processes, with an alternative vision to the ways of educating people and themselves on a daily basis, respectful of human and ecological rights. A line of action that coincides with the commitments made at the Global Action Programme on Education for Sustainable Development, adopted by UNESCO, and Resolution A/70/1 adopted by the General Assembly in 2015, Transform our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, guaranteeing lifelong learning for all.In this objective beats a decisive, although not explicit, of a pedagogical-social vocation: to train citizens that, individually and collectively being aware of their role in socio-environmental changes, assume the responsibilities inherent to the values that sustain life in all its diversity. Social education and community development that, by projecting initiatives in different times and social spaces, allows formative opportunities to be expanded beyond the school system and its curricular practices. The Environmental Education and the Local Agenda 21 continue being two references main for the reflection-action educational and community.

  19. Principles for establishing trust when developing a substance abuse intervention with a Native American community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, John; Riggs, Cheryl; Henson, Jim

    2011-01-01

    This article traces the development of a research project with a Native American community. Four principles were used to guide the development of the "Community Partnership to Affect Cherokee Adolescent Substance Abuse" project using a community-based participatory research approach. The principles suggest that establishing trust is key when developing and conducting research with a Native American community.

  20. Development of Agile Practices in Romanian Software Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard BUDACU

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Agile Software Development (ASD promotes flexibility to change and emphasis the importance of individuals and interactions in producing software. The study presents the development of agile practices in Romanian software community. A literature review is conducted and the main agile methods are described. The characteristics of Romanian ICT sector is presented in relation with agile methodology. Practices are identified by a survey and an analysis on the groups of interests formed on Meetup website is performed. Future directions and development of agile practices is evaluated.

  1. Wikis to facilitate patient participation in developing information leaflets: first experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belt, T.H. van de; Faber, M.J.; Knijnenburg, J.M.; Duijnhoven, N.T.L. van; Nelen, W.L.D.M.; Kremer, J.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although patients have gained a wealth of experienced based knowledge they are usually not involved in the development of patient information. We sought to determine the technical feasibility of wikis in generating dynamic patient information leaflets with participation from patients and

  2. Facilitating Grounded Online Interactions in Video-Case-Based Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Galvis, Alvaro

    2004-01-01

    The use of interactive video cases for teacher professional development is an emergent medium inspired by case study methods used extensively in law, management, and medicine, and by the advent of multimedia technology available to support online discussions. This paper focuses on Web-based "grounded" discussions--in which the participants base…

  3. Child Welfare Design Teams: An Intervention to Improve Workforce Retention and Facilitate Organizational Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caringi, James C.; Lawson, Hal A.; Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica; McCarthy, Mary; Briar-Lawson, Katharine; Claiborne, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Workforce turnover in public child welfare is a national problem. Individual, supervisory, and organizational factors, individually and in combination, account for some of the turnover. Complex, comprehensive interventions are needed to address these several factors and their interactions. A research and development team is field testing one such…

  4. The EU's role as a facilitator in the development of maritime environmental law in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    This chapter addresses the European Union’s (EU’s) possible role in the development of the Arctic marine environmental governance, focusing on offshore hydrocarbon activities. Marine governance is understood as the interaction between different actors at several levels and in different positions,...

  5. Development of a student rating scale to evaluate teachers' competencies for facilitating reflective learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaub-de Jong, Mirabelle A.; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Dekker, Hanke; Verkerk, Marian; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2011-01-01

    Context Teaching students in reflection calls for specific teacher competencies. We developed and validated a rating scale focusing on Student perceptions of their Teachers' competencies to Encourage Reflective Learning in small Groups (STERLinG). Methods We applied an iterative procedure to reduce

  6. Are business incubators helping? The role of BIs in facilitating tenants development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratinho, Tiago; Harms, Rainer; Groen, Arend J.

    2010-01-01

    Business incubators (BI) are among a variety of initiatives to stimulate economic growth by promoting the creation and development of new companies. The rapid growth of BIs in recent years confirms their importance in the economic fabric. In this study, we conceptualize BIs using insights from

  7. In Search of Facilitating Citizens' Problem Solving: Public Libraries' Collaborative Development of Services with Related Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Nozomi; Tamura, Shunsaku; Miwa, Makiko; Koshizuka, Mika; Saito, Seiichi; Kasai, Yumiko

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The paper attempts to understand value constellations in organising and using the business information service that was recently developed by various stakeholders with libraries who were in pursuit of supporting people's problem solving in Japanese public libraries. Method: In-depth interviews were conducted not only with users and…

  8. Preparation for Life: How the Montessori Classroom Facilitates the Development of Executive Function Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Leanne; Sulak, Tracey N.; Bagby, Janet; Diaz, Cathy; Thompson, LaNette W.

    2013-01-01

    Educational philosophy in elementary and secondary schools has often centered on creating a "product," full of content knowledge and basic skills (Bagby, 2002). However, no longer is academic achievement in the classroom considered the sole gauge of lifelong success. Meltzer (2010) suggested that the development of executive functioning skills…

  9. Dream Interpretation Groups: Facilitating Identity Development of Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joanne

    A systems perspective recognizes the necessity of drawing on numerous resources for strengthening the family. The dream interpretation group method, in some ways an elitist approach, focuses on the transitional individual as the nodal point for building family strengths. The individual experiencing changes in identity development is equipped with…

  10. [Collaborative study on regulatory science for facilitating clinical development of gene therapy products for genetic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Eriko; Igarashi, Yuka; Sato, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy products are expected as innovative medicinal products for intractable diseases such as life-threatening genetic diseases and cancer. Recently, clinical developments by pharmaceutical companies are accelerated in Europe and the United States, and the first gene therapy product in advanced countries was approved for marketing authorization by the European Commission in 2012. On the other hand, more than 40 clinical studies for gene therapy have been completed or ongoing in Japan, most of them are conducted as clinical researches by academic institutes, and few clinical trials have been conducted for approval of gene therapy products. In order to promote the development of gene therapy products, revision of the current guideline and/or preparation of concept paper to address the evaluation of the quality and safety of gene therapy products are necessary and desired to clearly show what data should be submitted before First-in-Human clinical trials of novel gene therapy products. We started collaborative study with academia and regulatory agency to promote regulatory science toward clinical development of gene therapy products for genetic diseases based on lentivirus and adeno-associated virus vectors; National Center for Child Health and Development (NCCHD), Nippon Medical School and PMDA have been joined in the task force. At first, we are preparing pre-draft of the revision of the current gene therapy guidelines in this project.

  11. What Master Teachers Do: A Case Study of Planning, Facilitating, Role Modelling and Developing Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Noraini; Aziz, Azliza Haniem Abdul; Nambiar, Radha M. K.

    2013-01-01

    Teaching is the foundation of our educational system. As such teachers are privileged with the responsibility of nurturing the young and inadvertently, shaping the future. To this end, the Malaysian government is fully cognizant that our future is dependent on the development of a highly skilled and innovative workforce serving as the critical…

  12. Deliberate Laterality Practice Facilitates Sensory-Motor Processing in Developing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The innate ability for typically developing children to attain developmental motor milestones early in life has been a thoroughly researched area of inquiry. Nonetheless, as children grow and are required to perform more complex motor skills in order to experience success in physical activity and sport pursuits, the range of…

  13. OSM-11 facilitates LIN-12 Notch signaling during Caenorhabditis elegans vulval development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Komatsu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Notch signaling is critical for cell fate decisions during development. Caenorhabditis elegans and vertebrate Notch ligands are more diverse than classical Drosophila Notch ligands, suggesting possible functional complexities. Here, we describe a developmental role in Notch signaling for OSM-11, which has been previously implicated in defecation and osmotic resistance in C. elegans. We find that complete loss of OSM-11 causes defects in vulval precursor cell (VPC fate specification during vulval development consistent with decreased Notch signaling. OSM-11 is a secreted, diffusible protein that, like previously described C. elegans Delta, Serrate, and LAG-2 (DSL ligands, can interact with the lineage defective-12 (LIN-12 Notch receptor extracellular domain. Additionally, OSM-11 and similar C. elegans proteins share a common motif with Notch ligands from other species in a sequence defined here as the Delta and OSM-11 (DOS motif. osm-11 loss-of-function defects in vulval development are exacerbated by loss of other DOS-motif genes or by loss of the Notch ligand DSL-1, suggesting that DOS-motif and DSL proteins act together to activate Notch signaling in vivo. The mammalian DOS-motif protein Deltalike1 (DLK1 can substitute for OSM-11 in C. elegans development, suggesting that DOS-motif function is conserved across species. We hypothesize that C. elegans OSM-11 and homologous proteins act as coactivators for Notch receptors, allowing precise regulation of Notch receptor signaling in developmental programs in both vertebrates and invertebrates.

  14. Dream Interpretation Groups: Facilitating Identity Development of Adolescents and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joanne

    A systems perspective recognizes the necessity of drawing on numerous resources for strengthening the family. The dream interpretation group method, in some ways an elitist approach, focuses on the transitional individual as the nodal point for building family strengths. The individual experiencing changes in identity development is equipped with…

  15. A Research into Effectiveness of Comprehension Strategies for Facilitating Reading Performance and Reader Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CuiYali

    2004-01-01

    In looking at reading comprehension and reader development, the traditional assumption in EFL (English as foreign language) teaching is that it is a process in which the reader passively absorbs what the writer has produced and a process of input of knowledge, especially in lexical and syntactical terms. Priority, therefore, has been given to the

  16. Are Business Incubators helping? The role of BIs in facilitating tenants’ development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratinho, Tiago; Harms, Rainer; Groen, Aard

    2010-01-01

    Business incubators (BI) are among a variety of initiatives to stimulate economic growth by promoting the creation and development of new companies. The rapid growth of BIs in recent years confirms their importance in the economic fabric. In this study, we conceptualize BIs using insights from knowl

  17. Mmp25β facilitates elongation of sensory neurons during zebrafish development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Bryan D; Po, Michelle D; Saranyan, Pillai V; Forsberg, Daniel; Schulz, Richard; Pilgrim, Dave B

    2014-10-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a large and complex family of zinc-dependent endoproteinases widely recognized for their roles in remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) during embryonic development, wound healing, and tissue homeostasis. Their misregulation is central to many pathologies, and they have therefore been the focus of biomedical research for decades. These proteases have also recently emerged as mediators of neural development and synaptic plasticity in vertebrates, however, understanding of the mechanistic basis of these roles and the molecular identities of the MMPs involved remains far from complete. We have identified a zebrafish orthologue of mmp25 (a.k.a. leukolysin; MT6-MMP), a membrane-type, furin-activated MMP associated with leukocytes and invasive carcinomas, but which we find is expressed by a subset of the sensory neurons during normal embryonic development. We detect high levels of Mmp25β expression in the trigeminal, craniofacial, and posterior lateral line ganglia in the hindbrain, and in Rohon-Beard cells in the dorsal neural tube during the first 48 h of embryonic development. Knockdown of Mmp25β expression with morpholino oligonucleotides results in larvae that are uncoordinated and insensitive to touch, and which exhibit defects in the development of sensory neural structures. Using in vivo zymography, we observe that Mmp25β morphant embryos show reduced Type IV collagen degradation in regions of the head traversed by elongating axons emanating from the trigeminal ganglion, suggesting that Mmp25β may play a pivotal role in mediating ECM remodeling in the vicinity of these elongating axons.

  18. Developing a community-based flood resilience measurement standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Adriana; Szoenyi, Michael; Chaplowe, Scott; McQuistan, Colin; Campbell, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Given the increased attention to resilience-strengthening in international humanitarian and development work, there has been concurrent interest in its measurement and the overall accountability of "resilience strengthening" initiatives. The literature is reaching beyond the polemic of defining resilience to its measurement. Similarly, donors are increasingly expecting organizations to go beyond claiming resilience programing to measuring and showing it. However, key questions must be asked, in particular "Resilience of whom and to what?". There is no one-size-fits-all solution. The approach to measuring resilience is dependent on the audience and the purpose of the measurement exercise. Deriving a resilience measurement system needs to be based on the question it seeks to answer and needs to be specific. This session highlights key lessons from the Zurich Flood Resilience Alliance approach to develop a flood resilience measurement standard to measure and assess the impact of community based flood resilience interventions, and to inform decision-making to enhance the effectiveness of these interventions. We draw on experience in methodology development to-date, together with lessons from application in two case study sites in Latin America. Attention will be given to the use of a consistent measurement methodology for community resilience to floods over time and place; challenges to measuring a complex and dynamic phenomenon such as community resilience; methodological implications of measuring community resilience versus impact on and contribution to this goal; and using measurement and tools such as cost-benefit analysis to prioritize and inform strategic decision making for resilience interventions. The measurement tool follows the five categories of the Sustainable Livelihoods Framework and the 4Rs of complex adaptive systems - robustness, rapidity, redundancy and resourcefulness -5C-4R. A recent white paper by the Zurich Flood Resilience Alliance traces the

  19. Finite-difference time-domain-based optical microscopy simulation of dispersive media facilitates the development of optical imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Capoglu, Ilker; Li, Yue; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Chandler, John; Spicer, Graham; Subramanian, Hariharan; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2016-06-01

    Combining finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) methods and modeling of optical microscopy modalities, we previously developed an open-source software package called Angora, which is essentially a "microscope in a computer." However, the samples being simulated were limited to nondispersive media. Since media dispersions are common in biological samples (such as cells with staining and metallic biomarkers), we have further developed a module in Angora to simulate samples having complicated dispersion properties, thereby allowing the synthesis of microscope images of most biological samples. We first describe a method to integrate media dispersion into FDTD, and we validate the corresponding Angora dispersion module by applying Mie theory, as well as by experimentally imaging gold microspheres. Then, we demonstrate how Angora can facilitate the development of optical imaging techniques with a case study.

  20. Novel Computational Methods that Facilitate Development of Cyanofactories for Free Fatty Acid Production

    KAUST Repository

    Motwalli, Olaa Amin

    2017-05-28

    Finding a source from which high-energy-density biofuels can be derived at an industrial scale has become an urgent challenge for renewable energy production. Some microorganisms can produce free fatty acids (FFA) as precursors towards such high-energy-density biofuels. In particular, photosynthetic cyanobacteria are capable of directly converting carbon dioxide into FFA. However, current engineered strains need several rounds of engineering to reach the level of FFA production for it to be commercially viable. Thus, new chassis strains that require less engineering are needed. Although more than 140 cyanobacterial genomes are sequenced, the natural potential of these strains for FFA production and excretion has not been systematically estimated. In relation to the above-mentioned problems, we developed the first in silico screening method (FFASC) that evaluates the cyanobacterial strains’ potential for FFA production based on the strains’ proteome, which for the first time allows non-experimental selection of the most promising chassis for cyanofactories. The solution is based on the original problem formulation, optimization and ranking. To provide developers and researchers easy means for evaluation and assessment of the cyanobacterial strains potential for production of FFA, we developed the BioPS platform. In addition to being able to compare capacity for FFA production of any novel strain against 140 pre-valuate strains, BioPS can be used to explore characteristics and assessment rules in play for an individual strain. This is the first tool of this type developed. Finally, we developed a novel generic in silico method (PathDES) for ranking and selection of the most suitable pathways / sets of metabolic reactions, which suggests genetic modifications for improved metabolic productivity. The method heavily relies on optimization and integration of disparate information in a novel manner. It has been successfully used in connection with FFASC for design of