WorldWideScience

Sample records for facile synthetic approach

  1. A Facile Synthetic Method for Biphenyltetracarboxylic Dianhydrides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue E WU; Chang Lu GAO; Meng Xian DING; Suo Bo ZHANG; Lian Xun GAO

    2004-01-01

    We report a facile and high-yielding procedure for preparing biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydrides (BPDAs). This method relies on a nickel-catalyzed electroreductive coupling reaction of dimethyl 3-chorophthalate (3-DMCP) and/or dimethyl 4-chorophthalate (4-DMCP) with subsequent hydrolysis of tetra-ester and dehydration of tetra-acid.

  2. Synthetic biology approaches to fluorinated polyketides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuronyi, Benjamin W; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2015-03-17

    The catalytic diversity of living systems offers a broad range of opportunities for developing new methods to produce small molecule targets such as fuels, materials, and pharmaceuticals. In addition to providing cost-effective and renewable methods for large-scale commercial processes, the exploration of the unusual chemical phenotypes found in living organisms can also enable the expansion of chemical space for discovery of novel function by combining orthogonal attributes from both synthetic and biological chemistry. In this context, we have focused on the development of new fluorine chemistry using synthetic biology approaches. While fluorine has become an important feature in compounds of synthetic origin, the scope of biological fluorine chemistry in living systems is limited, with fewer than 20 organofluorine natural products identified to date. In order to expand the diversity of biosynthetically accessible organofluorines, we have begun to develop methods for the site-selective introduction of fluorine into complex natural products by engineering biosynthetic machinery to incorporate fluorinated building blocks. To gain insight into how both enzyme active sites and metabolic pathways can be evolved to manage and select for fluorinated compounds, we have studied one of the only characterized natural hosts for organofluorine biosynthesis, the soil microbe Streptomyces cattleya. This information provides a template for designing engineered organofluorine enzymes, pathways, and hosts and has allowed us to initiate construction of enzymatic and cellular pathways for the production of fluorinated polyketides.

  3. Synthetic biology: Novel approaches for microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Vaca, Felipe; Anaya-Velázquez, Fernando; Franco, Bernardo

    2015-06-01

    In the past twenty years, molecular genetics has created powerful tools for genetic manipulation of living organisms. Whole genome sequencing has provided necessary information to assess knowledge on gene function and protein networks. In addition, new tools permit to modify organisms to perform desired tasks. Gene function analysis is speed up by novel approaches that couple both high throughput data generation and mining. Synthetic biology is an emerging field that uses tools for generating novel gene networks, whole genome synthesis and engineering. New applications in biotechnological, pharmaceutical and biomedical research are envisioned for synthetic biology. In recent years these new strategies have opened up the possibilities to study gene and genome editing, creation of novel tools for functional studies in virus, parasites and pathogenic bacteria. There is also the possibility to re-design organisms to generate vaccine subunits or produce new pharmaceuticals to combat multi-drug resistant pathogens. In this review we provide our opinion on the applicability of synthetic biology strategies for functional studies of pathogenic organisms and some applications such as genome editing and gene network studies to further comprehend virulence factors and determinants in pathogenic organisms. We also discuss what we consider important ethical issues for this field of molecular biology, especially for potential misuse of the new technologies. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  4. A synthetic approach to multiobjective optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Lovison, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    We propose a strategy for approximating Pareto optimal sets based on the global analysis framework proposed by Smale (Dynamical systems, Academic Press, New York (1973) 531--544). We speak about \\emph{synthetic} approach because the optimal set is natively approximated by means of a compound geometrical object, i.e., a simplicial complex, rather than by an unstructured scatter of individual optima. The method distinguishes the hierarchy between singular set, Pareto critical set and stable Pareto critical set. Furthermore, a quadratic convergence result in set wise sense is proven and tested over numerical examples.

  5. A New Synthetic Approach to Elvucitabine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ling-yu; LOU Yuan-yuan; ZHAO Gui-long; ZHANG Lin-shan; CHEN Yan

    2013-01-01

    A new synthetic approach to elvucitabine started from L-xylose via the reactions of 10 steps in an overall yield of 20% was developed.The key steps included trimethylsilyl trifluoromethanesulfonate(TMSOTf)-mediated stereocontrolled β-glycosidation and exquisite choice of chloroacetyl group for the protection of hydroxyl groups as well as the corresponding deprotection under notably mild conditions.The structure of elvucitabine,in particular,the stereochemistry thereof,was unambiguously determined by comparison of the physical properties,such as 1H NMR data and the specific rotation,of the synthesized sample with those reported.

  6. A facile and efficient synthetic method for 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di Feng Wu; Mei Jia Yang; Yang Wang; Guo Wei Gao; Jian Men

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach to the synthesis of 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride has been described. The target compound was synthesized by Pd/Cu catalyzed Sonogashira coupling reaction between phenylacetylene and 4-bromophthalic acid which was for the first time employed as start material, followed by dehydration of 4-phenylethynylphthalic acid. Compared with traditional synthetic routes, this method provides several advantages such as readily available raw materials, convenient manipulation and high yield. The products were characterized by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, MS and elemental analysis, respectively.

  7. [Treatment approaches for synthetic drug addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Ohji

    2015-09-01

    In Japan, synthetic drugs have emerged since late 2000s, and cases of emergency visits and fatal traffic accidents due to acute intoxication have rapidly increased. The synthetic drugs gained popularity mainly because they were cheap and thought to be "legal". The Japanese government restricted not only production and distribution, but also its possession and use in April 2014. As the synthetic drug dependent patients have better social profiles compared to methamphetamine abusers, this legal sanction may have triggered the decrease in the number of synthetic drug dependent patient visits observed at Kanagawa Psychiatric Center since July 2014. Treatment of the synthetic drug dependent patients should begin with empathic inquiry into the motives and positive psychological effects of the drug use. In the maintenance phase, training patients to trust others and express their hidden negative emotions through verbal communications is essential. The recovery is a process of understanding the relationship between psychological isolation and drug abuse, and gaining trust in others to cope with negative emotions that the patients inevitably would face in their subsequent lives.

  8. A new synthetic approach to phosphatidylethanolamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Song; Wei Yuan; Yu Luo; Wei Lu

    2012-01-01

    A new synthetic method for phosphatidylethanolamine head group was developed via ring-opening of cyclic dioxaphospholane 2 with sodium azide and subsequent hydrogenation.The advantage of this strategy included short reaction steps,readily available materials and good yields.

  9. Towards a whole-cell modeling approach for synthetic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Oliver; Jain, Bonny; Karr, Jonathan R.; Covert, Markus W.; Lu, Timothy K.

    2013-06-01

    Despite rapid advances over the last decade, synthetic biology lacks the predictive tools needed to enable rational design. Unlike established engineering disciplines, the engineering of synthetic gene circuits still relies heavily on experimental trial-and-error, a time-consuming and inefficient process that slows down the biological design cycle. This reliance on experimental tuning is because current modeling approaches are unable to make reliable predictions about the in vivo behavior of synthetic circuits. A major reason for this lack of predictability is that current models view circuits in isolation, ignoring the vast number of complex cellular processes that impinge on the dynamics of the synthetic circuit and vice versa. To address this problem, we present a modeling approach for the design of synthetic circuits in the context of cellular networks. Using the recently published whole-cell model of Mycoplasma genitalium, we examined the effect of adding genes into the host genome. We also investigated how codon usage correlates with gene expression and find agreement with existing experimental results. Finally, we successfully implemented a synthetic Goodwin oscillator in the whole-cell model. We provide an updated software framework for the whole-cell model that lays the foundation for the integration of whole-cell models with synthetic gene circuit models. This software framework is made freely available to the community to enable future extensions. We envision that this approach will be critical to transforming the field of synthetic biology into a rational and predictive engineering discipline.

  10. A Moment Matching Approach for Generating Synthetic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogle, Brittany Megan; Mehrotra, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Synthetic data are becoming increasingly important mechanisms for sharing data among collaborators and with the public. Multiple methods for the generation of synthetic data have been proposed, but many have short comings with respect to maintaining the statistical properties of the original data. We propose a new method for fully synthetic data generation that leverages linear and integer mathematical programming models in order to match the moments of the original data in the synthetic data. This method has no inherent disclosure risk and does not require parametric or distributional assumptions. We demonstrate this methodology using the Framingham Heart Study. Existing synthetic data methods that use chained equations were compared with our approach. We fit Cox proportional hazards, logistic regression, and nonparametric models to synthetic data and compared with models fitted to the original data. True coverage, the proportion of synthetic data parameter confidence intervals that include the original data's parameter estimate, was 100% for parametric models when up to four moments were matched, and consistently outperformed the chained equations approach. The area under the curve and accuracy of the nonparametric models trained on synthetic data marginally differed when tested on the full original data. Models were also trained on synthetic data and a partition of original data and were tested on a held-out portion of original data. Fourth-order moment matched synthetic data outperformed others with respect to fitted parametric models but did not always outperform other methods with fitted nonparametric models. No single synthetic data method consistently outperformed others when assessing the performance of nonparametric models. The performance of fourth-order moment matched synthetic data in fitting parametric models suggests its use in these cases. Our empirical results also suggest that the performance of synthetic data generation techniques, including the

  11. Synthetic Approach to the Singularity Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We try to convince the reader that the categorical version of differential geometry, called Synthetic Differential Geometry (SDG), offers valuable tools which can be applied to work with some unsolved problems of general relativity. We do this with respect to the space-time singularity problem. The essential difference between the usual differential geometry and SDG is that the latter enriches the real line by introducing infinitesimal of various kinds. Owing to this geometry acquires a tool to penetrate "infinitesimally small" parts of a given manifold. However, to make use of this tool we must switch from the category of sets to some other suitable category. We try two topoi: the topos ${\\cal G}$ of germ determined ideals and the so-called Basel topos ${\\cal B}$. The category of manifolds is a subcategory of both of them. In ${\\cal G}$, we construct a simple model of a contracting sphere. As the sphere shrinks, its curvature increases, but when the radius of the sphere reaches infinitesimal values, the curv...

  12. 18 CFR 157.212 - Synthetic and liquefied natural gas facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of the Natural Gas Act for Certain Transactions and Abandonment § 157.212 Synthetic and liquefied... liquefied natural gas and that are not “related jurisdictional natural gas facilities” as defined in § 153.2... natural gas facilities. 157.212 Section 157.212 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL...

  13. Synthetic Approach to Controlled Assembly of Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0104 Synthetic Approach to Controlled Assembly of Metal Nanoparticles . So-Jung Park Ewha University-Industry Collaboration...Metal Nanoparticles . 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-15-1-4117 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) So-Jung Park 5d...project is to develop synthetic methods to form well-defined colloidal assemblies of metal nanoparticles and to understand their unique optical

  14. Improvement of FK506 production by synthetic biology approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Li-Feng; Tao, Yang; Jin, Mei-Ying; Jiang, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic biology has been applied to direct improvement of valuable metabolite productions. Tacrolimus (FK506), a clinically used immunosuppressive agent isolated from many Streptomyces, is produced by fermentation in industry. Here we chose FK506 as an example to review recent progress in improving FK506 production, including enhancing transcription levels of biosynthetic genes, accelerating post-translational modification levels of biosynthetic enzymes, increasing activities of rate limiting enzymes, and rational supplement of limited precursors. FK506 production was increased from 25 % to sevenfold by these synthetic biology approaches.

  15. A probability distribution approach to synthetic turbulence time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinhuber, Michael; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Wilczek, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The statistical features of turbulence can be described in terms of multi-point probability density functions (PDFs). The complexity of these statistical objects increases rapidly with the number of points. This raises the question of how much information has to be incorporated into statistical models of turbulence to capture essential features such as inertial-range scaling and intermittency. Using high Reynolds number hot-wire data obtained at the Variable Density Turbulence Tunnel at the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, we establish a PDF-based approach on generating synthetic time series that reproduce those features. To do this, we measure three-point conditional PDFs from the experimental data and use an adaption-rejection method to draw random velocities from this distribution to produce synthetic time series. Analyzing these synthetic time series, we find that time series based on even low-dimensional conditional PDFs already capture some essential features of real turbulent flows.

  16. A facile microwave synthetic route for ferrite nanoparticles with direct impact in magnetic particle hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makridis, A; Chatzitheodorou, I; Topouridou, K; Yavropoulou, M P; Angelakeris, M; Dendrinou-Samara, C

    2016-06-01

    The application of ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in medicine finds its rapidly developing emphasis on heating mediators for magnetic hyperthermia, the ever-promising "fourth leg" of cancer treatment. Usage of MNPs depends largely on the preparation processes to select optimal conditions and effective routes to finely tailor MNPs. Microwave heating, instead of conventional heating offers nanocrystals at significantly enhanced rate and yield. In this work, a facile mass-production microwave hydrothermal synthetic approach was used to synthesize stable ferromagnetic manganese and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with sizes smaller than 14 nm from metal acetylacetonates in the presence of octadecylamine. Prolonging the reaction time from 15 to 60 min, led to ferrites with improved crystallinity while the sizes are slight increased. The high crystallinity magnetic nanoparticles showed exceptional magnetic heating parameters. In vitro application was performed using the human osteosarcoma cell line Saos-2 incubated with manganese ferrite nanoparticles. Hyperthermia applied in a two cycle process, while AC magnetic field remained on until the upper limit of 45 °C was achieved. The comparative results of the AC hyperthermia efficiency of ferrite nanoparticles in combination with the in vitro study coincide with the magnetic features and their tunability may be further exploited for AC magnetic hyperthermia driven applications.

  17. Survey of Approaches to Generate Realistic Synthetic Graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seung-Hwan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lee, Sangkeun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Sarah S [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shankar, Mallikarjun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Imam, Neena [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    A graph is a flexible data structure that can represent relationships between entities. As with other data analysis tasks, the use of realistic graphs is critical to obtaining valid research results. Unfortunately, using the actual ("real-world") graphs for research and new algorithm development is difficult due to the presence of sensitive information in the data or due to the scale of data. This results in practitioners developing algorithms and systems that employ synthetic graphs instead of real-world graphs. Generating realistic synthetic graphs that provide reliable statistical confidence to algorithmic analysis and system evaluation involves addressing technical hurdles in a broad set of areas. This report surveys the state of the art in approaches to generate realistic graphs that are derived from fitted graph models on real-world graphs.

  18. Hybrid Block Copolymers Constituted by Peptides and Synthetic Polymers: An Overview of Synthetic Approaches, Supramolecular Behavior and Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Puiggalí

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid block copolymers based on peptides and synthetic polymers, displaying different types of topologies, offer new possibilities to integrate the properties and functions of biomacromolecules and synthetic polymers in a single hybrid material. This review provides a current status report of the field concerning peptide-synthetic polymer hybrids. The first section is focused on the different synthetic approaches that have been used within the last three years for the preparation of peptide-polymer hybrids having different topologies. In the last two sections, the attractive properties, displayed in solution or in the solid state, together with the potential applications of this type of macromolecules or supramolecular systems are highlighted.

  19. A synthetic biology approach to understanding cellular information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccione, Katherine A; Smith, Robert P; Lee, Anna J; You, Lingchong

    2012-09-21

    The survival of cells and organisms requires proper responses to environmental signals. These responses are governed by cellular networks, which serve to process diverse environmental cues. Biological networks often contain recurring network topologies called "motifs". It has been recognized that the study of such motifs allows one to predict the response of a biological network and thus cellular behavior. However, studying a single motif in complete isolation of all other network motifs in a natural setting is difficult. Synthetic biology has emerged as a powerful approach to understanding the dynamic properties of network motifs. In addition to testing existing theoretical predictions, construction and analysis of synthetic gene circuits has led to the discovery of novel motif dynamics, such as how the combination of simple motifs can lead to autonomous dynamics or how noise in transcription and translation can affect the dynamics of a motif. Here, we review developments in synthetic biology as they pertain to increasing our understanding of cellular information processing. We highlight several types of dynamic behaviors that diverse motifs can generate, including the control of input/output responses, the generation of autonomous spatial and temporal dynamics, as well as the influence of noise in motif dynamics and cellular behavior.

  20. The engineering of artificial cellular nanosystems using synthetic biology approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fan; Tan, Cheemeng

    2014-01-01

    Artificial cellular systems are minimal systems that mimic certain properties of natural cells, including signaling pathways, membranes, and metabolic pathways. These artificial cells (or protocells) can be constructed following a synthetic biology approach by assembling biomembranes, synthetic gene circuits, and cell-free expression systems. As artificial cells are built from bottom-up using minimal and a defined number of components, they are more amenable to predictive mathematical modeling and engineered controls when compared with natural cells. Indeed, artificial cells have been implemented as drug delivery machineries and in situ protein expression systems. Furthermore, artificial cells have been used as biomimetic systems to unveil new insights into functions of natural cells, which are otherwise difficult to investigate owing to their inherent complexity. It is our vision that the development of artificial cells would bring forth parallel advancements in synthetic biology, cell-free systems, and in vitro systems biology. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Conflict of interests: The authors declare that they have no competing financial interests. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Multi element synthetic aperture transmission using a frequency division approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2003-01-01

    can therefore be used for flow imaging, unlike with Hadamard and Golay coding. The frequency division approach increases the SNR by a factor of N2 compared to conventional pulsed synthetic aperture imaging, provided that N transmission centers are used. Simulations and phantom measurements....... The transmitting elements are excited so that N virtual sources are formed. All sources are excited using one subset at a time. The signals can be separated by matched filtration, and the corresponding information is extracted. The individual source information is hence available in every emission and the method...

  2. Indoor experimental facility for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configurations - rail-SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirose, Getachew; Phelan, Brian R.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Koenig, Francois; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing an indoor experimental facility to evaluate and assess airborne synthetic-aperture-radar-(SAR)-based detection capabilities. The rail-SAR is located in a multi-use facility that also provides a base for research and development in the area of autonomous robotic navigation. Radar explosive hazard detection is one key sensordevelopment area to be investigated at this indoor facility. In particular, the mostly wooden, multi-story building houses a two (2) story housing structure and an open area built over a large sandbox. The housing structure includes reconfigurable indoor walls which enable the realization of multiple See-Through-The-Wall (STTW) scenarios. The open sandbox, on the other hand, allows for surface and buried explosive hazard scenarios. The indoor facility is not rated for true explosive hazard materials so all targets will need to be inert and contain surrogate explosive fills. In this paper we discuss the current system status and describe data collection exercises conducted using canonical targets and frequencies that may be of interest to designers of ultra-wideband (UWB) airborne, ground penetrating SAR systems. A bi-static antenna configuration will be used to investigate the effects of varying airborne SAR parameters such as depression angle, bandwidth, and integration angle, for various target types and deployment scenarios. Canonical targets data were used to evaluate overall facility capabilities and limitations. These data is analyzed and summarized for future evaluations. Finally, processing techniques for dealing with RF multi-path and RFI due to operating inside the indoor facility are described in detail. Discussion of this facility and its capabilities and limitations will provide the explosive hazard community with a great airborne platform asset for sensor to target assessment.

  3. The appeasement of Doug: a synthetic approach to enhancer biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Ben J; Estrada, Javier; DePace, Angela H

    2016-04-18

    Genetic approaches have been instrumental in dissecting developmental enhancers by characterizing their transcription factor binding sites. Though some enhancers have been well-studied in this regard, we cannot currently build developmental enhancers from scratch. Reconstitution experiments can provide important complementary tests of our understanding of enhancer function, but these experiments are exceedingly rare in the literature, possibly due to the difficulty of publishing negative results. In this perspective, we argue that the time is right for a synthetic approach to enhancer biology. Focusing primarily on Drosophila enhancers as examples, we review classic and modern methods for dissecting enhancer function as well as computational tools for enhancer design. We include our own negative results from attempts to reconstitute the stripe 2 enhancer from the even-skipped locus and discuss possible ways forward. We believe that with a communal effort in open data sharing, we can make substantial progress toward a complete understanding of enhancer function.

  4. Cognitive neuroscience robotics A synthetic approaches to human understanding

    CERN Document Server

    Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Asada, Minoru; Osaka, Mariko; Fujikado, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive Neuroscience Robotics is the first introductory book on this new interdisciplinary area. This book consists of two volumes, the first of which, Synthetic Approaches to Human Understanding, advances human understanding from a robotics or engineering point of view. The second, Analytic Approaches to Human Understanding, addresses related subjects in cognitive science and neuroscience. These two volumes are intended to complement each other in order to more comprehensively investigate human cognitive functions, to develop human-friendly information and robot technology (IRT) systems, and to understand what kind of beings we humans are. Volume A describes how human cognitive functions can be replicated in artificial systems such as robots, and investigates how artificial systems could acquire intelligent behaviors through interaction with others and their environment.

  5. Copula-Based Approach to Synthetic Population Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deok-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Generating synthetic baseline populations is a fundamental step of agent-based modeling and simulation, which is growing fast in a wide range of socio-economic areas including transportation planning research. Traditionally, in many commercial and non-commercial microsimulation systems, the iterative proportional fitting (IPF) procedure has been used for creating the joint distribution of individuals when combining a reference joint distribution with target marginal distributions. Although IPF is simple, computationally efficient, and rigorously founded, it is unclear whether IPF well preserves the dependence structure of the reference joint table sufficiently when fitting it to target margins. In this paper, a novel method is proposed based on the copula concept in order to provide an alternative approach to the problem that IPF resolves. The dependency characteristic measures were computed and the results from the proposed method and IPF were compared. In most test cases, the proposed method outperformed IPF in preserving the dependence structure of the reference joint distribution. PMID:27490692

  6. Regulatory risk assessment approaches for synthetic mineral fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Paul; Holmes, Philip; Bevan, Ruth; Kamps, Klaus; Levy, Leonard; Greim, Helmut

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to synthetic mineral fibres (SMF) may occur in a number of workplace scenarios. To protect worker health, a number of different organisations worldwide have assessed the health risk of these materials and established workplace exposure limits. This paper outlines the basic principles of risk assessment and the scientific methods used to derive valid (justifiable) occupational exposure limits (OELs) and goes on to show how, for SMF, and particularly for refractory ceramic fibre (otherwise known as aluminosilicate wool, RCF/ASW), the methods used and the associated outcomes differ widely. It is argued that the resulting differences in established OELs prevent consistent and appropriate risk management of SMF worldwide, and that development of a transparent and harmonised approach to fibre risk assessment and limit-setting is required.

  7. New Research Approach to Rebuild Sport Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Raiola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The game court of team sport, part of Sport Centre of Arturo Collana, was closed after structural accident in 2006 and the local administration is now designing the rebuilding of it. For this reason, it has already allocated economical resource to study a partial reconstruction of it to reutilize actual structure. The problem is how can satisfy the customers according to suggesting the old and new solutions. Approach: The aim is to recognize expected demand about the real choice of customers with the proposal for a various architectural aspects. A survey was carries out by using statistical model to correlate a demand of multi game sport relating to various hypotheses, already designed with a different solution. A sample of 100 customers that have submitted questionnaire with the specific parameters about the architecture and engine was taken to apply the qualitative research method to the market research. Results and Conclusion: The result of this study concludes that it is not possible to the partially construct but it is useful the plenty reconstruction of game court. The local organization of Coni (Italian National Olympic Committee designed a new project according to a specific parameter that follows the same characteristic of old game court without searching the other engineer and architectural solutions. Thus the question is a mix of engine and architectural aspects, economical and functional elements of it. The data showed association between demand of multisport and new architectonical hypothesis and the association between demand of single sport and old architectural structure. The percentage of multi sport demand is higher than single sport and this orientation has to follow to design a new sport facilities.

  8. Synthetic lethal approaches for assessing combinatorial efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Rebecca A; Chen, Ee Sin

    2016-06-01

    The recent advances in pharmacogenomics have made personalized medicine no longer a pipedream but a precise and powerful way to tailor individualized cancer treatment strategies. Cancer is a devastating disease, and contemporary chemotherapeutic strategies now integrate several agents in the treatment of some types of cancer, with the intent to block more than one target simultaneously. This constitutes the premise of synthetic lethality, an attractive therapeutic strategy already demonstrating clinical success in patients with breast and ovarian cancers. Synthetic lethal combinations offer the potential to also target the hitherto "undruggable" mutations that have challenged the cancer field for decades. However, synthetic lethality in clinical cancer therapy is very much still in its infancy, and selecting the most appropriate combinations-or synthetic lethal pairs-is not always an intuitive process. Here, we review some of the recent progress in identifying synthetic lethal combinations and their potential for therapy and highlight some of the tools through which synthetic lethal pairs are identified.

  9. Synthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Manferdini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally materials have been associated with a series of physical properties that can be used as inputs to production and manufacturing. Recently we witnessed an interest in materials considered not only as ‘true matter’, but also as new breeds where geometry, texture, tooling and finish are able to provoke new sensations when they are applied to a substance. These artificial materials can be described as synthetic because they are the outcome of various qualities that are not necessarily true to the original matter, but they are the combination of two or more parts, whether by design or by natural processes. The aim of this paper is to investigate the potential of architectural surfaces to produce effects through the invention of new breeds of artificial matter, using micro-scale details derived from Nature as an inspiration.

  10. Towards synthetic biological approaches to resource utilization on space missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Amor A; Cumbers, John; Hogan, John A; Arkin, Adam P

    2015-01-06

    This paper demonstrates the significant utility of deploying non-traditional biological techniques to harness available volatiles and waste resources on manned missions to explore the Moon and Mars. Compared with anticipated non-biological approaches, it is determined that for 916 day Martian missions: 205 days of high-quality methane and oxygen Mars bioproduction with Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum can reduce the mass of a Martian fuel-manufacture plant by 56%; 496 days of biomass generation with Arthrospira platensis and Arthrospira maxima on Mars can decrease the shipped wet-food mixed-menu mass for a Mars stay and a one-way voyage by 38%; 202 days of Mars polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis with Cupriavidus necator can lower the shipped mass to three-dimensional print a 120 m(3) six-person habitat by 85% and a few days of acetaminophen production with engineered Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 can completely replenish expired or irradiated stocks of the pharmaceutical, thereby providing independence from unmanned resupply spacecraft that take up to 210 days to arrive. Analogous outcomes are included for lunar missions. Because of the benign assumptions involved, the results provide a glimpse of the intriguing potential of 'space synthetic biology', and help focus related efforts for immediate, near-term impact.

  11. Polymersomes: A Synthetic Biological Approach to Encapsulation and Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massignani, Marzia; Lomas, Hannah; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    Compartmentalization, i.e. the ability to create controlled volumes and separate molecules one from another is possibly the most important requisite for complex manipulations. Indeed, compartmentalization has been the first step to isolate the building blocks of life and ensure the dynamic nature that today makes the complexity of any living system. For decades scientists have tried using many synthetic approaches to imitate such ability and one the most successful comes from mimicking the biological component responsible for the compartmentalization: the phospholipid. We are now able to synthesize macromolecular analogues of the phospholipid using advanced co-polymerization techniques. Copolymers that comprise hydrophilic and hydrophobic components (i.e. amphiphilic) can be designed to self assemble into membrane enclosed structures. The simplest of those is represented by a sac resulting from the enclosure of a membrane into a sphere: the vesicle. Vesicles made of amphiphilic copolymers are commonly known as polymersomes and are now one of the most important nanotechnological tool for many applications spanning from drug delivery, gene therapy, medical imaging, electronics and nanoreactors. Herein we review the molecular properties, the fabrication processes and the most important applications of polymersomes.

  12. Synthetic DNA approach to cytomegalovirus vaccine/immune therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Stephan J; Villarreal, Daniel O; Shedlock, Devon J; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    There is no licensed vaccine or cure for human cytomegalovirus (CMV), a ubiquitous β-herpes virus that infects 60-95 % of adults worldwide. Infection is a major cause of congenital abnormalities in newborns, contributes to development of childhood cerebral palsy and medulloblastoma, can result in severe disease in immunocompromised patients, and is a major impediment during successful organ transplantation. While CMV has been increasingly associated with numerous inflammatory diseases and cancers, only recently has it been correlated with increased risk of heart disease in adults, the number-one killer in the USA. These data, among others, suggest that subclinical CMV infection, or microinfection, in healthy individuals may play more of a causative role than an epiphenomenon in development of CMV-associated pathologies. Due to the myriad of diseases and complications associated with CMV, an efficacious vaccine would be highly valuable in reducing human morbidity and mortality as well as saving billions of dollars in annual health-care costs and disability adjusted life years (DALY) in the developing world. Therefore, the development of a safe efficacious CMV vaccine or immune therapy is paramount to the public health. This review aims to provide a brief overview on aspects of CMV infection and disease and focuses on current vaccine strategies. The use of new synthetic DNA vaccines might offer one such approach to this difficult problem.

  13. Safeguards Approaches for Black Box Processes or Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Marcano, Helly; Gitau, Ernest TN; Hockert, John; Miller, Erin; Wylie, Joann

    2013-09-25

    The objective of this study is to determine whether a safeguards approach can be developed for “black box” processes or facilities. These are facilities where a State or operator may limit IAEA access to specific processes or portions of a facility; in other cases, the IAEA may be prohibited access to the entire facility. The determination of whether a black box process or facility is safeguardable is dependent upon the details of the process type, design, and layout; the specific limitations on inspector access; and the restrictions placed upon the design information that can be provided to the IAEA. This analysis identified the necessary conditions for safeguardability of black box processes and facilities.

  14. An integrated lean-methods approach to hospital facilities redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, John

    2012-01-01

    Lean production methods for eliminating waste and improving processes in manufacturing are now being applied in healthcare. As the author shows, the methods are appropriate for redesigning hospital facilities. When used in an integrated manner and employing teams of mostly clinicians, the methods produce facility designs that are custom-fit to patient needs and caregiver work processes, and reduce operational costs. The author reviews lean methods and an approach for integrating them in the redesign of hospital facilities. A case example of the redesign of an emergency department shows the feasibility and benefits of the approach.

  15. Synthetic Approaches to the Lamellarins—A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Imbri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present review discusses the known synthetic routes to the lamellarin alkaloids published until 2014. It begins with syntheses of the structurally simpler type-II lamellarins and then focuses on the larger class of the 5,6-saturated and -unsaturated type-I lamellarins. The syntheses are grouped by the strategy employed for the assembly of the central pyrrole ring.

  16. The Utility of Synthetic-based Approach of Writing among Iranian EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Derakhshandeh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study intends to examine the utility of synthetic-based approach versus traditional approaches of writing among Iranian EFL learners. To achieve this end, ninety students at Upper-Intermediate level were randomly chosen from the English population of Kish and Gooyesh English Institutes. The students were divided into three groups. Group1 was asked to do a writing task based on product-based approach. A writing task based on process-oriented approach was administered to Group2; later on, Group 3 was invited to write a composition to assess their performance based on synthetic-based approach. The result of the t test and two-way ANOVA revealed that the students performed better in writing using synthetic approach rather than traditional approaches to writing.

  17. Routine Ocean Monitoring With Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery Obtained From the Alaska Satellite Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichel, W. G.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Li, X.; Friedman, K.; Monaldo, F.; Thompson, D.; Wackerman, C.; Scott, C.; Jackson, C.; Beal, R.; McGuire, J.; Nicoll, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) has been processing synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data for research and for near-real-time applications demonstrations since shortly after the launch of the European Space Agency's ERS-1 satellite in 1991. The long coastline of Alaska, the vast extent of ocean adjacent to Alaska, a scarcity of in-situ observations, and the persistence of cloud cover all contribute to the need for all-weather ocean observations in the Alaska region. Extensive experience with SAR product processing algorithms and SAR data analysis techniques, and a growing sophistication on the part of SAR data and product users have amply demonstrated the value of SAR instruments in providing this all-weather ocean observation capability. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has been conducting a near-real-time applications demonstration of SAR ocean and hydrologic products in Alaska since September 1999. This Alaska SAR Demonstration (AKDEMO) has shown the value of SAR-derived, high-resolution (sub kilometer) ocean surface winds to coastal weather forecasting and the understanding of coastal wind phenomena such as gap winds, barrier jets, vortex streets, and lee waves. Vessel positions and ice information derived from SAR imagery have been used for management of fisheries, protection of the fishing fleet, enforcement of fisheries regulations, and protection of endangered marine mammals. Other ocean measurements, with potentially valuable applications, include measurement of wave state (significant wave height, dominant wave direction and wavelength, and wave spectra), mapping of oil spills, and detection of shallow-water bathymetric features. In addition to the AKDEMO, ASF-processed SAR imagery is being used: (1) in the Gulf of Mexico for hurricane wind studies, and post-hurricane oil-spill and oil-platform analyses (the latter employing ship-detection algorithms for detection of changes in oil-platform locations); (2) in the North Pacific

  18. Characteristic and Synthetic Approach of Molecularly Imprinted Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Ho Row

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP exhibiting high selectivity and affinity tothe predetermined molecule (template are now seeing a fast growing research. However,optimization of the imprinted products is difficult due to the fact that there are manyvariables to consider, some or all of which can potentially impact upon the chemical,morphological and molecular recognition properties of the imprinted materials. This reviewpresent a summary of the principal synthetic considerations pertaining to good practice in thepolymerization aspects of molecular imprinting, and is primarily aimed at researcher familiarwith molecular imprinting methods but with little or no prior experience in polymersynthesis. The synthesis, characteristic, effect of molecular recognition and differentpreparation methods of MIP in recent few years are discussed in this review, unsolvedproblems and possible developments of MIP were also been briefly discussed.

  19. Advances in synthetic approach to and antifungal activity of triazoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Sharma

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Several five membered ring systems, e.g., triazole, oxadiazole dithiazole and thiadiazole with three heteroatoms at symmetrical or asymmetrical positions have been studied because of their interesting pharmacological properties. In this article our emphasis is on synthetic development and pharmacological activity of the triazole moiety which exhibit a broad spectrum of pharmacological activity such as antifungal, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and anticancer etc. Triazoles have increased our ability to treat many fungal infections, for example, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, aspergillosis etc. However, mortality due to these infections even with antifungal therapy is still unacceptably high. Therefore, the development of new antifungal agents targeting specific fungal structures or functions is being actively pursued. Rapid developments in molecular mycology have led to a concentrated search for more target antifungals. Although we are entering a new era of antifungal therapy in which we will continue to be challenged by systemic fungal diseases, the options for treatment will have greatly expanded.

  20. Engineering Approaches for Understanding Osteogenesis: Hydrogels as Synthetic Bone Microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, J M; Oyen, M L

    2016-11-01

    The microenvironment, which can be considered the sum of all the components and conditions surrounding a particular cell, is critical to moderating cellular behavior. In bone, interactions with the microenvironment can influence osteogenic differentiation, and subsequent extracellular matrix deposition, mineralization, and bone growth. Beyond regenerative medicine purposes, tissue engineering tools, namely cell-scaffold constructs, can be used as models of the bone microenvironment. Hydrogels, which are hydrophilic polymer networks, are popularly used for cell culture constructs due to their substantial water content and their ability to be tailored for specific applications. As synthetic microenvironments, a level of control can be exerted on the hydrogel structure and material properties, such that individual contributions from the scaffold on cellular behavior can be observed. Both biochemical and mechanical stimuli have been shown to modulate cellular behaviors. Hydrogels can be modified to present cell-interactive ligands, include osteoinductive moieties, vary mechanical properties, and be subject to external mechanical stimulation, all of which have been shown to affect osteogenic differentiation. Following "bottom-up" fabrication methods, levels of complexity can be introduced to hydrogel systems, such that the synergistic effects of multiple osteogenic cues can be observed. This review explores the utility of hydrogel scaffolds as synthetic bone microenvironments to observe both individual and synergistic effects from biochemical and mechanical signals on osteogenic differentiation. Ultimately, a better understanding of how material properties can influence cellular behavior will better inform design of tissue engineering scaffolds, not just for studying cell behavior, but also for regenerative medicine purposes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. A minimalist fragment approach for the design of natural-product-like synthetic scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genis, Dmitry; Kirpichenok, Mikhail; Kombarov, Roman

    2012-11-01

    Chemistry groups involved in drug discovery continue to devote their efforts to improving compound design with the aim of identifying new drug candidates. Many crucial factors must be considered, including: chemical stability, synthetic difficulty, chemical complexity and diversity, ADMET properties, cost, chemical novelty and intellectual property issues, and 'biological appropriateness'. With regard to the latter point, natural products offer an outstanding source of biologically active molecules that provide many useful features that enable us to design innovative, biologically biased, synthetic compounds. This article outlines the recent approaches in this area and suggests a simple metric to assess synthetic compounds for natural product likeness.

  2. SYNTHETIC APPROACH ON INTERNAL AND INTERNATIONAL ROAD TRANSPORT LOGISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LĂPĂDUŞI MIHAELA LOREDANA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Road freight transport is one of the main activities involved in the operation and development of an economyand its practice and organization emphasizes its importance from two points of view: one as it is the necessary tool forthe establishment and functioning of national and international markets and two because international freight becamea more significant modern sector in industrialized countries; in many countries as Switzerland or Germanytransportation is a professional occupation.I think that the theme in achieving this article is useful, permanent, necessary, timely and appropriate. Usefulbecause the results of this research lead to improved performance in carrying out road freight transport, permanent asthe theme of the article highlights the fact that road freight transport is a permanent factor promoting and stimulatingthe economic growth, necessary because without efficient logistics for road freight transport, moving them by landwould be poor, timely because the dynamics of transport logistics development focus increasingly more on themovement of goods and products in space with motor vehicles and towed resources, and appropriate as the continuousimprovement of road freight transport is source of income both from the point of view of firms and in terms of state.The article aims to highlight a number of synthetic issues related to road freight transport logistics, myapproach in this research leaves room for future additions that will certainly help performance improvement intransportation logistics.

  3. Influenza Neuraminidase Inhibitors: Synthetic Approaches, Derivatives and Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Laborda

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite being a common viral disease, influenza has very negative consequences, causing the death of around half a million people each year. A neuraminidase located on the surface of the virus plays an important role in viral reproduction by contributing to the release of viruses from infected host cells. The treatment of influenza is mainly based on the administration of neuraminidase inhibitors. The neuraminidase inhibitors zanamivir, laninamivir, oseltamivir and peramivir have been commercialized and have been demonstrated to be potent influenza viral neuraminidase inhibitors against most influenza strains. In order to create more potent neuraminidase inhibitors and fight against the surge in resistance resulting from naturally-occurring mutations, these anti-influenza drugs have been used as templates for the development of new neuraminidase inhibitors through structure-activity relationship studies. Here, we review the synthetic routes to these commercial drugs, the modifications which have been performed on these structures and the effects of these modifications on their inhibitory activity.

  4. Facile synthetic route towards nanostructured Fe–TiO2(B), used as negative electrode for Li-ion batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Grosjean, Remi; Fehse, Marcus; Pigeot-Remy, Stéphanie; Stievano, Lorenzo; Monconduit, Laure; Cassaignon, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    International audience; We present here a novel simple method for the synthesis of highly pure TiO2(B). The fast microwave-assisted synthetic route allows facile scale-up of the process. Aiming at an application of the titania polymorph as negative electrode for Li-ion batteries, we have prepared a Fe-containing TiO2(B) and tested the electrochemical performances of both pure and Fe-containing materials. Fe insertion in TiO2(B) allows enhancing capacity and rate capability.

  5. The Current Case of Quinolones: Synthetic Approaches and Antibacterial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Naeem

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Quinolones are broad-spectrum synthetic antibacterial drugs first obtained during the synthesis of chloroquine. Nalidixic acid, the prototype of quinolones, first became available for clinical consumption in 1962 and was used mainly for urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and other pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Recently, significant work has been carried out to synthesize novel quinolone analogues with enhanced activity and potential usage for the treatment of different bacterial diseases. These novel analogues are made by substitution at different sites—the variation at the C-6 and C-8 positions gives more effective drugs. Substitution of a fluorine atom at the C-6 position produces fluroquinolones, which account for a large proportion of the quinolones in clinical use. Among others, substitution of piperazine or methylpiperazine, pyrrolidinyl and piperidinyl rings also yields effective analogues. A total of twenty six analogues are reported in this review. The targets of quinolones are two bacterial enzymes of the class II topoisomerase family, namely gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Quinolones increase the concentration of drug-enzyme-DNA cleavage complexes and convert them into cellular toxins; as a result they are bactericidal. High bioavailability, relative low toxicity and favorable pharmacokinetics have resulted in the clinical success of fluoroquinolones and quinolones. Due to these superior properties, quinolones have been extensively utilized and this increased usage has resulted in some quinolone-resistant bacterial strains. Bacteria become resistant to quinolones by three mechanisms: (1 mutation in the target site (gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV of quinolones; (2 plasmid-mediated resistance; and (3 chromosome-mediated quinolone resistance. In plasmid-mediated resistance, the efflux of quinolones is increased along with a decrease in the interaction of the drug with gyrase (topoisomerase IV. In the case of

  6. The Current Case of Quinolones: Synthetic Approaches and Antibacterial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Abdul; Badshah, Syed Lal; Muska, Mairman; Ahmad, Nasir; Khan, Khalid

    2016-03-28

    Quinolones are broad-spectrum synthetic antibacterial drugs first obtained during the synthesis of chloroquine. Nalidixic acid, the prototype of quinolones, first became available for clinical consumption in 1962 and was used mainly for urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli and other pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Recently, significant work has been carried out to synthesize novel quinolone analogues with enhanced activity and potential usage for the treatment of different bacterial diseases. These novel analogues are made by substitution at different sites--the variation at the C-6 and C-8 positions gives more effective drugs. Substitution of a fluorine atom at the C-6 position produces fluroquinolones, which account for a large proportion of the quinolones in clinical use. Among others, substitution of piperazine or methylpiperazine, pyrrolidinyl and piperidinyl rings also yields effective analogues. A total of twenty six analogues are reported in this review. The targets of quinolones are two bacterial enzymes of the class II topoisomerase family, namely gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Quinolones increase the concentration of drug-enzyme-DNA cleavage complexes and convert them into cellular toxins; as a result they are bactericidal. High bioavailability, relative low toxicity and favorable pharmacokinetics have resulted in the clinical success of fluoroquinolones and quinolones. Due to these superior properties, quinolones have been extensively utilized and this increased usage has resulted in some quinolone-resistant bacterial strains. Bacteria become resistant to quinolones by three mechanisms: (1) mutation in the target site (gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV) of quinolones; (2) plasmid-mediated resistance; and (3) chromosome-mediated quinolone resistance. In plasmid-mediated resistance, the efflux of quinolones is increased along with a decrease in the interaction of the drug with gyrase (topoisomerase IV). In the case of chromosome

  7. Analytical and statistical approaches in the characterization of synthetic polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimzon, I.K.

    2015-01-01

    Polymers vary in terms of the monomer/s used; the number, distribution and type of linkage of monomers per molecule; and the side chains and end groups attached. Given this diversity, traditional single-technique approaches to characterization often give limited and inadequate information about a

  8. Towards Self-Assembled Hybrid Artificial Cells: Novel Bottom-Up Approaches to Functional Synthetic Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea, Roberto J.; Hardy, Michael D.; Devaraj, Neal K.

    2015-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in utilizing bottom-up approaches to develop synthetic cells. A popular methodology is the integration of functionalized synthetic membranes with biological systems, producing “hybrid” artificial cells. This Concept article covers recent advances and the current state-of-the-art of such hybrid systems. Specifically, we describe minimal supramolecular constructs that faithfully mimic the structure and/or function of living cells, often by controlling the assembly of highly ordered membrane architectures with defined functionality. These studies give us a deeper understanding of the nature of living systems, bring new insights into the origin of cellular life, and provide novel synthetic chassis for advancing synthetic biology. PMID:26149747

  9. New Synthetic Approaches to Multifunctional Phenazinium Salt Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir N. Silnikov

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Two different approaches are offered for the synthesis under mild conditions of disubstituted phenazinium and benzo[a]phenazinium salts. Direct nucleophilic substitutions by primary and secondary amines in quaternary phenazinium salts containing an additional positive charge in the aliphatic part of the molecule were carried out. The substitution proceeds successively in positions 2 and 7, which allows selective introduction of different substituents into the heterocycle. Direct nucleophilic substitution in quaternary 2-N-alkyl-acetamidophenazinium and 5-alkoxy-benzo[a]phenazinium salts with different amines can also serve as a convenient method for the introduction of two different substituents.

  10. A Capacitated Facility Location Approach for the Tanker Employment Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Depot (MD) Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) ......................................... 14 2.5 Capacitated Facility Location Problem (CFLP) with Sole...service receiver groups. In this sense the problem can be viewed as a multi-depot vehicle routing problem . Anchor points are two stationary points...for future research. 2.4 Multi-Depot (MD) Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP) Another approach to the Tanker Employment Problem is to model it as a VRP

  11. A Kirigami Approach to Forming a Synthetic Buckliball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen Lin; Xie, Yi Min; Li, Qing; Huang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Shiwei

    2016-09-01

    The shape transformation of some biological systems inspires scientists to create sophisticated structures at the nano- and macro- scales. However, to be useful in engineering, the mechanics of governing such a spontaneous, parallel and large deformation must be well understood. In this study, a kirigami approach is used to fold a bilayer planar sheet featuring a specific pattern into a buckliball under a certain thermal stimulus. Importantly, this prescribed spherical object can retract into a much smaller sphere due to constructive buckling caused by radially inward displacement. By minimizing the potential strain energy, we obtain a critical temperature, below which the patterned sheet exhibits identical principal curvatures everywhere in the self-folding procedure and above which buckling occurs. The applicability of the theoretical analysis to the self-folding of sheets with a diversity of patterns is verified by the finite element method.

  12. Synthetic biology approaches in cancer immunotherapy, genetic network engineering, and genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Deboki; Cho, Jang Hwan; Weinberg, Benjamin H; Wong, Nicole M; Wong, Wilson W

    2016-04-18

    Investigations into cells and their contents have provided evolving insight into the emergence of complex biological behaviors. Capitalizing on this knowledge, synthetic biology seeks to manipulate the cellular machinery towards novel purposes, extending discoveries from basic science to new applications. While these developments have demonstrated the potential of building with biological parts, the complexity of cells can pose numerous challenges. In this review, we will highlight the broad and vital role that the synthetic biology approach has played in applying fundamental biological discoveries in receptors, genetic circuits, and genome-editing systems towards translation in the fields of immunotherapy, biosensors, disease models and gene therapy. These examples are evidence of the strength of synthetic approaches, while also illustrating considerations that must be addressed when developing systems around living cells.

  13. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New TRU Fuel Fabrication Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, Philip C.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Boyer, Brian; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This second report in a series of three reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication processes to be deployed at AFCF – specifically, the ceramic TRU (MOX) fuel fabrication line and the metallic (pyroprocessing) line. The most common TRU fuel has been fuel composed of mixed plutonium and uranium dioxide, referred to as “MOX”. However, under the Advanced Fuel Cycle projects custom-made fuels with higher contents of neptunium, americium, and curium may also be produced to evaluate if these “minor actinides” can be effectively burned and transmuted through irradiation in the ABR. A third and final report in this series will evaluate and review the advanced safeguards approach options for the ABR. In reviewing and developing the advanced safeguards approach for the new TRU fuel fabrication processes envisioned for AFCF, the existing international (IAEA) safeguards approach at the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) and the conceptual approach planned for the new J-MOX facility in Japan have been considered as a starting point of reference. The pyro-metallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication process at EBR-II near Idaho Falls also provided insight for safeguarding the additional metallic pyroprocessing fuel fabrication line planned for AFCF.

  14. Commissioning of a 3,500 ton/year synthetic gasoline facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Using technologies developed by CAS researchers, a demo facility of coal-to-oil conversion with an annual capacity up to 3,500 tons was successfully commissioned on 11 December, 2007 at the Yunnan Jiehua Chem Group (JH Group) in Southwest China's Yunnan Province, producing qualified Ron 93 petrol.

  15. A Synthetic Approach to the Transfer Matrix Method in Classical and Quantum Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, O.; Perez, J. P.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a synthetic approach to the transfer matrix method in classical and quantum physics. This method is an efficient tool to deal with complicated physical systems of practical importance in geometrical light or charged particle optics, classical electronics, mechanics, electromagnetics and quantum physics. Teaching…

  16. A Synthetic Approach to the Transfer Matrix Method in Classical and Quantum Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, O.; Perez, J. P.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a synthetic approach to the transfer matrix method in classical and quantum physics. This method is an efficient tool to deal with complicated physical systems of practical importance in geometrical light or charged particle optics, classical electronics, mechanics, electromagnetics and quantum physics. Teaching…

  17. A Statistical Approach For Modeling Tropical Cyclones. Synthetic Hurricanes Generator Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasqualini, Donatella [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-11

    This manuscript brie y describes a statistical ap- proach to generate synthetic tropical cyclone tracks to be used in risk evaluations. The Synthetic Hur- ricane Generator (SynHurG) model allows model- ing hurricane risk in the United States supporting decision makers and implementations of adaptation strategies to extreme weather. In the literature there are mainly two approaches to model hurricane hazard for risk prediction: deterministic-statistical approaches, where the storm key physical parameters are calculated using physi- cal complex climate models and the tracks are usually determined statistically from historical data; and sta- tistical approaches, where both variables and tracks are estimated stochastically using historical records. SynHurG falls in the second category adopting a pure stochastic approach.

  18. Regulatory approaches for addressing dissolved oxygen concerns at hydropower facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cada, Glenn F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sale, Michael J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eddlemon, Gerald K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations are a common water quality problem downstream of hydropower facilities. At some facilities, structural improvements (e.g. installation of weir dams or aerating turbines) or operational changes (e.g., spilling water over the dam) can be made to improve DO levels. In other cases, structural and operational approaches are too costly for the project to implement or are likely to be of limited effectiveness. Despite improvements in overall water quality below dams in recent years, many hydropower projects are unable to meet state water quality standards for DO. Regulatory agencies in the U.S. are considering or implementing dramatic changes in their approach to protecting the quality of the Nation’s waters. New policies and initiatives have emphasized flexibility, increased collaboration and shared responsibility among all parties, and market-based, economic incentives. The use of new regulatory approaches may now be a viable option for addressing the DO problem at some hydropower facilities. This report summarizes some of the regulatory-related options available to hydropower projects, including negotiation of site-specific water quality criteria, use of biological monitoring, watershed-based strategies for the management of water quality, and watershed-based trading. Key decision points center on the health of the local biological communities and whether there are contributing impacts (i.e., other sources of low DO effluents) in the watershed. If the biological communities downstream of the hydropower project are healthy, negotiation for site-specific water quality standards or biocriteria (discharge performance criteria based on characteristics of the aquatic biota) might be pursued. If there are other effluent dischargers in the watershed that contribute to low DO problems, watershed-scale strategies and effluent trading may be effective. This report examines the value of regulatory approaches by reviewing their use in

  19. Directional synthetic aperture flow imaging using a dual stage beamformer approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ye; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    A new method for directional synthetic aperture flow imaging using a dual stage beamformer approach is presented. The velocity estimation is angle independent and the amount of calculations is reduced compared to full synthetic aperture, but still maintains all the advantages at the same time....... In the second stage, focal points are considered as virtual sources and data is beamformed along the flow direction. Then the velocities are estimated by finding the spatial shift between two signals. In the experimental measurements the angle between the transmit beam and flow vessel was 70 and a laminar flow...... with a parabolic profile was generated by a flow rig. The flow with a peak velocity of 0.1 m/s was sampled at a pulse repetition frequency of 4 kHz. The signals were transmitted and received by the experimental scanner SARUS (Synthetic Aperture Realtime Ultrasound System). A relative standard deviation of 2...

  20. Environmentally based siting assessment for synthetic-liquid-fuels facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    A detailed assessment of the major environmental constraints to siting a synthetic fuels industry and the results of that assessment are used to determine on a regional basis the potential for development of such an industry with minimal environmental conflicts. Secondly, the ability to mitigate some of the constraining impacts through alternative institutional arrangements, especially in areas that are judged to have a low development potential is also assessed. Limitations of the study are delineated, but specifically, the study is limited geographically to well-defined boundaries that include the prime coal and oil shale resource areas. The critical factors used in developing the framework are air quality, water availability, socioeconomic capacity, ecological sensitivity, environmental health, and the management of Federally owned lands. (MCW)

  1. Final Report: Detection and Characterization of Underground Facilities by Stochastic Inversion and Modeling of Data from the New Generation of Synthetic Aperture Satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxall, W; Cunningham, C; Mellors, R; Templeton, D; Dyer, K; White, J

    2012-02-27

    ability to detect evidence for an underground facility using InSAR depends on the displacement sensitivity and spatial resolution of the interferogram, as well as on the size and depth of the facility and the time since its completion. The methodology development described in this report focuses on the exploitation of synthetic aperture radar data that are available commercially from a number of satellite missions. Development of the method involves three components: (1) Evaluation of the capability of InSAR to detect and characterize underground facilities ; (2) inversion of InSAR data to infer the location, depth, shape and volume of a subsurface facility; and (3) evaluation and selection of suitable geomechanical forward models to use in the inversion. We adapted LLNL's general-purpose Bayesian Markov Chain-Monte Carlo procedure, the 'Stochastic Engine' (SE), to carry out inversions to characterize subsurface void geometries. The SE performs forward simulations for a large number of trial source models to identify the set of models that are consistent with the observations and prior constraints. The inverse solution produced by this kind of stochastic method is a posterior probability density function (pdf) over alternative models, which forms an appropriate input to risk-based decision analyses to evaluate subsequent response strategies. One major advantage of a stochastic inversion approach is its ability to deal with complex, non-linear forward models employing empirical, analytical or numerical methods. However, while a geomechanical model must incorporate adequate physics to enable sufficiently accurate prediction of surface displacements, it must also be computationally fast enough to render the large number of forward realizations needed in stochastic inversion feasible. This latter requirement prompted us first to investigate computationally efficient empirical relations and closed-form analytical solutions. However, our evaluation revealed

  2. Systems and synthetic biology approaches to alter plant cell walls and reduce biomass recalcitrance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Udaya C; Yin, Hengfu; Yang, Xiaohan; Davison, Brian H

    2014-12-01

    Fine-tuning plant cell wall properties to render plant biomass more amenable to biofuel conversion is a colossal challenge. A deep knowledge of the biosynthesis and regulation of plant cell wall and a high-precision genome engineering toolset are the two essential pillars of efforts to alter plant cell walls and reduce biomass recalcitrance. The past decade has seen a meteoric rise in use of transcriptomics and high-resolution imaging methods resulting in fresh insights into composition, structure, formation and deconstruction of plant cell walls. Subsequent gene manipulation approaches, however, commonly include ubiquitous mis-expression of a single candidate gene in a host that carries an intact copy of the native gene. The challenges posed by pleiotropic and unintended changes resulting from such an approach are moving the field towards synthetic biology approaches. Synthetic biology builds on a systems biology knowledge base and leverages high-precision tools for high-throughput assembly of multigene constructs and pathways, precision genome editing and site-specific gene stacking, silencing and/or removal. Here, we summarize the recent breakthroughs in biosynthesis and remodelling of major secondary cell wall components, assess the impediments in obtaining a systems-level understanding and explore the potential opportunities in leveraging synthetic biology approaches to reduce biomass recalcitrance. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A new approach to compensate the geometric distortion in the synthetic aperture ultrasonic imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaonian; Liu, Weixiang; Chen, Siping; Qin, Zhengdi

    2015-01-01

    In the field of ultrasonic imaging technology, the problem of geometric distortion is often encountered, especially in the ultrasonic near-field. In this study, a new approach is proposed to compensate for geometric distortion in the synthetic aperture ultrasonic imaging system. This approach is based on the synthetic aperture ultrasonic holographic B-scan (UHB) imaging system, which is a combination of ultrasonic holography based on the backward propagation principle and the conventional B-scan technique. To solve the geometric distortion problem, the operation of the spatial compression and resampling in the frequency domain are introduced. The main advantage of the approach is that the real holographic value can be calculated without distortion by using the spatial interpolation function after the spatial frequency compression. After the compensation for geometric distortion is performed, the synthetic aperture technique based on the backward propagation principle is then applied in the process of the two-dimensional numerical imaging reconstruction. Both the simulation and measurement experiment show that the approach is promising. The geometric distortion that is dependent on the wave front angle can be effectively compensated. The spatial resolution is practically uniform throughout the depth range and close to the theoretical limit in the experiments.

  4. ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY SYNTHETIC APPROACHES TO β CARBOXY-α-METHYLENE-γ-BUTYROLACTONE ETHYL ESTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwenaëlle Liberge

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative synthetic approaches to a variety of β substituted and carboxylated α-methylene-γ-butyrolactones have been developed. In the first approach the mandatory methylene unit was incorporated on precursor compounds at early stage of the synthesis on reliance with Horner-Emmons protocol. In the alternative approach which further tolerates multifarious substituents at γ-position of the lactone template the unsaturated moiety α to the lactone carbonyl group is connected at a later stage through a deprotonation / methoxymethylation / elimination sequence.

  5. Computational approaches to metabolic engineering utilizing systems biology and synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Stephen S

    2014-08-01

    Metabolic engineering modifies cellular function to address various biochemical applications. Underlying metabolic engineering efforts are a host of tools and knowledge that are integrated to enable successful outcomes. Concurrent development of computational and experimental tools has enabled different approaches to metabolic engineering. One approach is to leverage knowledge and computational tools to prospectively predict designs to achieve the desired outcome. An alternative approach is to utilize combinatorial experimental tools to empirically explore the range of cellular function and to screen for desired traits. This mini-review focuses on computational systems biology and synthetic biology tools that can be used in combination for prospective in silico strain design.

  6. Synthetic studies on hemicalide: development of a convergent approach toward the C1-C25 fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorin, Geoffroy; Fleury, Etienne; Tran, Christine; Prost, Elise; Molinier, Nicolas; Sautel, François; Massiot, Georges; Specklin, Simon; Meyer, Christophe; Cossy, Janine; Lannou, Marie-Isabelle; Ardisson, Janick

    2013-09-20

    Synthetic studies on hemicalide, a recently isolated marine natural product displaying highly potent antiproliferative activity and a unique mode of action, have highlighted a reliable Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons olefination to create the C6-C7 alkene and a remarkable efficient Suzuki-Miyaura coupling to form the C15-C16 bond, resulting in the development of a convergent approach toward the C1-C25 fragment.

  7. Prioritization of Revenue Management Factors:A Synthetic Extent Analysis Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Emre GULER

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents a novel approach for revealing the success factors of revenue management practices in hospitality industry. Our study aims to point out the favorably contributing ‘ingredients’ of a successful revenue management application. We investigate what revenue managers have learned from their past experience by using real empirical data and fuzzy synthetic evaluation procedure. Researchers and practitioners may regard this work as a functional benchmark analyzing a functi...

  8. Facile Synthetic Method and Crystal Structure of 2, 3, 3', 4'-Biphenyltetracarboxylic Dianhydride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Shi-xu; GAO Guo-wei; YANG Mei-jia; CHEN Hua; WU Di-feng; MEN Jian

    2012-01-01

    A facile method for the synthesis of 2,3,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride(a-BPDA)was reported,which comprises the steps of the dehalogenative coupling of dimethyl 4-chlorophthalate(4-DMCP)and dimethyl3-chlorophthalate(3-DMCP)catalyzed by low-cost(Ph3P)2NiCl2,the hydrolysis of tetra-ester and the dehydration of tetra-acid.In contrast to the conventional methods,this method has the advantage of low cost,convenient manipulation,available condition,high purity and good overall yield.Moreover,the single crystal structure of a-BPDA was analyzed by X-ray diffraction method.The X-ray data suggest that a-BPDA is a rigid,non-coplanar and non-linear structure.It contains three crystallographically independent molecules,in which the dihedral angles of the two linked phenyl rings are 44.75(4)°,46.37(3)° and 42.32(3)°,respectively.The title molecule is governed by a stronger intermolecular interaction in contrast to van der Waals interaction because of the special positions of anhydride groups.

  9. Fifteen Years of Synthetic Aperture Radar Calibration Using Trihedral Reflectors at the Alaska Satellite Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, W.; Atwood, D.; Lawlor, O. S.; Utley, P.; Slater, C.

    2006-12-01

    For the past 15 years, the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) has provided calibration support for singly polarized SAR datasets in C-band (ERS-1, ERS-2, and RADARSAT-1 and L-Band (JERS-1. Passive point targets like trihedral corner reflectors offer a reliable and well established means to perform radiometric, geometric, and impulse response measurements for SAR calibration. Routine support of an array of corner reflectors in interior Alaska has permitted ASF an opportunity to monitor satellite health, calibrate SAR processors, and experiment with new reflector designs. Corner reflectors offer the advantages of low maintenance and low cost compared to active devices such as transponders. In order to maintain radar cross section, as the microwave wavelength get longer, so too does the size of the reflector. Increased size means decreased portability, exacerbating the difficulty of providing calibration support in remote locations. In response, ASF is developing low cost, light weight corner reflectors that can be deployed with minimal effort and no maintenance. These efforts will help to extend our present calibration efforts to more remote locations. But more importantly, these designs are expected to play an important role in Permanent Scatterer InSAR (PS-InSAR) methodology. The use of corner reflector arrays in support PS-InSAR may provide new means for monitoring terrain displacements in regions of heavy vegetation. This paper presents some long term measurements from ASF's array of corner reflectors, outlines improvements performed on trihedral corner reflectors, and describes current efforts at ASF to support the next generation of SAR missions and techniques.

  10. A Probabilistic, Facility-Centric Approach to Lightning Strike Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, Lisa L.; Roeder, William p.; Merceret, Francis J.

    2012-01-01

    A new probabilistic facility-centric approach to lightning strike location has been developed. This process uses the bivariate Gaussian distribution of probability density provided by the current lightning location error ellipse for the most likely location of a lightning stroke and integrates it to determine the probability that the stroke is inside any specified radius of any location, even if that location is not centered on or even with the location error ellipse. This technique is adapted from a method of calculating the probability of debris collisionith spacecraft. Such a technique is important in spaceport processing activities because it allows engineers to quantify the risk of induced current damage to critical electronics due to nearby lightning strokes. This technique was tested extensively and is now in use by space launch organizations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Future applications could include forensic meteorology.

  11. Target Specific Tactics in Olefin Metathesis: Synthetic Approach to cis-syn-cis-Triquinanes and -Propellanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, Sambasivarao; Aswar, Vikas R

    2016-04-15

    A concise and simple synthetic approach to cis-syn-cis-triquinanes and -propellanes has been demonstrated via olefin metathesis starting with exo-nadic anhydride. This approach involves a ring-opening and ring-closing metathesis sequence of norbornene derivatives using Grubb's catalyst. Early-stage diallylation of norbornene derivatives is demonstrated followed by ring-closing metathesis that delivers propellanes exclusively. Surprisingly, ring-opening metathesis, late-stage diallylation, followed by ring-closing metathesis delivers triquinane as well as propellane derivatives.

  12. Change Detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar Images Using a Multiscale-Driven Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaniyi A. Ajadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the significant progress that was achieved throughout the recent years, to this day, automatic change detection and classification from synthetic aperture radar (SAR images remains a difficult task. This is, in large part, due to (a the high level of speckle noise that is inherent to SAR data; (b the complex scattering response of SAR even for rather homogeneous targets; (c the low temporal sampling that is often achieved with SAR systems, since sequential images do not always have the same radar geometry (incident angle, orbit path, etc.; and (d the typically limited performance of SAR in delineating the exact boundary of changed regions. With this paper we present a promising change detection method that utilizes SAR images and provides solutions for these previously mentioned difficulties. We will show that the presented approach enables automatic and high-performance change detection across a wide range of spatial scales (resolution levels. The developed method follows a three-step approach of (i initial pre-processing; (ii data enhancement/filtering; and (iii wavelet-based, multi-scale change detection. The stand-alone property of our approach is the high flexibility in applying the change detection approach to a wide range of change detection problems. The performance of the developed approach is demonstrated using synthetic data as well as a real-data application to wildfire progression near Fairbanks, Alaska.

  13. Synthetic-aperture based photoacoustic re-beamforming (SPARE) approach using beamformed ultrasound data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haichong K.; Bell, Muyinatu A. Lediju; Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun Jae; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been developed for various clinical and pre-clinical applications, and acquiring pre-beamformed channel data is necessary to reconstruct these images. However, accessing these pre-beamformed channel data requires custom hardware to enable parallel beamforming, and is available for a limited number of research ultrasound platforms. To broaden the impact of clinical PA imaging, our goal is to devise a new PA reconstruction approach that uses ultrasound post-beamformed radio frequency (RF) data rather than raw channel data, because this type of data is readily available in both clinical and research ultrasound systems. In our proposed Synthetic-aperture based photoacoustic re-beamforming (SPARE) approach, post-beamformed RF data from a clinical ultrasound scanner are considered as input data for an adaptive synthetic aperture beamforming algorithm. When receive focusing is applied prior to obtaining these data, the focal point is considered as a virtual element, and synthetic aperture beamforming is implemented assuming that the photoacoustic signals are received at the virtual element. The resolution and SNR obtained with the proposed method were compared to that obtained with conventional delay-and-sum beamforming with 99.87% and 91.56% agreement, respectively. In addition, we experimentally demonstrated feasibility with a pulsed laser diode setup. Results indicate that the post-beamformed RF data from any commercially available ultrasound platform can potentially be used to create PA images. PMID:27570697

  14. Ultrasensitive Negative Feedback Control: A Natural Approach for the Design of Synthetic Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montefusco, Francesco; Akman, Ozgur E.; Soyer, Orkun S.; Bates, Declan G.

    2016-01-01

    Many of the most important potential applications of Synthetic Biology will require the ability to design and implement high performance feedback control systems that can accurately regulate the dynamics of multiple molecular species within the cell. Here, we argue that the use of design strategies based on combining ultrasensitive response dynamics with negative feedback represents a natural approach to this problem that fully exploits the strongly nonlinear nature of cellular information processing. We propose that such feedback mechanisms can explain the adaptive responses observed in one of the most widely studied biomolecular feedback systems—the yeast osmoregulatory response network. Based on our analysis of such system, we identify strong links with a well-known branch of mathematical systems theory from the field of Control Engineering, known as Sliding Mode Control. These insights allow us to develop design guidelines that can inform the construction of feedback controllers for synthetic biological systems. PMID:27537373

  15. Facilities intelligence and evaluation: A multi-criteria assessment approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhen [School of the Built Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Riccarton, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    This paper presents a novel method for evaluating facilities in regard to their designed intelligence. Facilities intelligence is defined as the designed capacity of a facility to acquire and process data and information to perform its adaptability to lifecycle circumstance changes in terms of people's requirements of wellbeing and energy efficiency. This definition is then formulated to quantify the Index of Facilities Intelligence, the level of facilities intelligence, and the reliability of facilities evaluation. STEEP (social, technical, economic, environmental, and political) criteria and their sub-criteria are used to set up an ANP (analytic network process) model, and ANP result such as synthesized priority weights is then used to calculate those parameters related to facilities intelligence. An experimental case study is given to prove the effectiveness of applying the proposed method to evaluate the intelligence of facilities in practice. (author)

  16. A fast and facile synthetic route toward the preparation of nanoparticles of polythiophene and its derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozukova, Dimitriya, E-mail: d_bozukova@abv.bg; Jerome, Robert, E-mail: rjerome@ulg.ac.be; Jerome, Christine, E-mail: c.jerome@ulg.ac.be [Center for Education and Research on Macromolecules (CERM), University of Liege (Belgium)

    2013-04-15

    A novel photochemical water-based approach for the preparation of nanoparticles of polymerized thiophene (Th), thiophene methanol (ThM), or their mixtures (Th-co/or-ThM) was developed. The influence of 3-[(2-acryloyloxy)methyl] thiophene (ATh) as cross-link agent on the stability of the nanoparticles and on their performances was investigated. The occurrence of a polymerization process was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), UV and fluorescence emission spectroscopies. Nanoparticles with very narrow size distribution (0.0092-0.105 ATh cross-linked, 0.0635-0.272 uncross-linked) and ideal spherical shape (radius 35-47 nm ATh cross-linked, 49-109 nm uncross-linked) were obtained whatever the reaction composition. The size of the particles was found to depend strongly on the level of ATh-stabilization and to diminish upon increase of the ATh content. In contrast, in the same order, their thermal stability shifted toward higher temperatures. Thermal decomposition of the nanoparticles led to formation of carbon-nanoobjects, as observed by transmission electron microscopy, FT-IR, and RAMAN spectroscopies. The re-dispersibility of the dry Th-co/or-ThM nanoparticles in some conventional monomers and solvents has been estimated.Graphical Abstract.

  17. Final Report: Detection and Characterization of Underground Facilities by Stochastic Inversion and Modeling of Data from the New Generation of Synthetic Aperture Satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foxall, W; Cunningham, C; Mellors, R; Templeton, D; Dyer, K; White, J

    2012-02-27

    ability to detect evidence for an underground facility using InSAR depends on the displacement sensitivity and spatial resolution of the interferogram, as well as on the size and depth of the facility and the time since its completion. The methodology development described in this report focuses on the exploitation of synthetic aperture radar data that are available commercially from a number of satellite missions. Development of the method involves three components: (1) Evaluation of the capability of InSAR to detect and characterize underground facilities ; (2) inversion of InSAR data to infer the location, depth, shape and volume of a subsurface facility; and (3) evaluation and selection of suitable geomechanical forward models to use in the inversion. We adapted LLNL's general-purpose Bayesian Markov Chain-Monte Carlo procedure, the 'Stochastic Engine' (SE), to carry out inversions to characterize subsurface void geometries. The SE performs forward simulations for a large number of trial source models to identify the set of models that are consistent with the observations and prior constraints. The inverse solution produced by this kind of stochastic method is a posterior probability density function (pdf) over alternative models, which forms an appropriate input to risk-based decision analyses to evaluate subsequent response strategies. One major advantage of a stochastic inversion approach is its ability to deal with complex, non-linear forward models employing empirical, analytical or numerical methods. However, while a geomechanical model must incorporate adequate physics to enable sufficiently accurate prediction of surface displacements, it must also be computationally fast enough to render the large number of forward realizations needed in stochastic inversion feasible. This latter requirement prompted us first to investigate computationally efficient empirical relations and closed-form analytical solutions. However, our evaluation revealed

  18. LLRW disposal facility siting approaches: Connecticut`s innovative volunteer approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forcella, D.; Gingerich, R.E. [Connecticut Hazardous Waste Management Service, Hartford, CT (United States); Holeman, G.R. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Connecticut Hazardous Waste Management Service (CHWMS) has embarked on a volunteer approach to siting a LLRW disposal facility in Connecticut. This effort comes after an unsuccessful effort to site a facility using a step-wise, criteria-based site screening process that was a classic example of the decide/announce/defend approach. While some of the specific features of the CHWMS` volunteer process reflect the unique challenge presented by the state`s physical characteristics, political structure and recent unsuccessful siting experience, the basic elements of the process are applicable to siting LLRW disposal facilities in many parts of the United States. The CHWMS` volunteer process is structured to reduce the {open_quotes}outrage{close_quotes} dimension of two of the variables that affect the public`s perception of risk. The two variables are the degree to which the risk is taken on voluntarily (voluntary risks are accepted more readily than those that are imposed) and the amount of control one has over the risk (risks under individual control are accepted more readily than those under government control). In the volunteer process, the CHWMS will only consider sites that have been been voluntarily offered by the community in which they are located and the CHWMS will share control over the development and operation of the facility with the community. In addition to these elements which have broad applicability, the CHWMS has tailored the volunteer approach to take advantage of the unique opportunities made possible by the earlier statewide site screening process. Specifically, the approach presents a {open_quotes}win-win{close_quotes} situation for elected officials in many communities if they decide to participate in the process.

  19. Analysing the Effects of Flood-Resilience Technologies in Urban Areas Using a Synthetic Model Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Schinke

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Flood protection systems with their spatial effects play an important role in managing and reducing flood risks. The planning and decision process as well as the technical implementation are well organized and often exercised. However, building-related flood-resilience technologies (FReT are often neglected due to the absence of suitable approaches to analyse and to integrate such measures in large-scale flood damage mitigation concepts. Against this backdrop, a synthetic model-approach was extended by few complementary methodical steps in order to calculate flood damage to buildings considering the effects of building-related FReT and to analyse the area-related reduction of flood risks by geo-information systems (GIS with high spatial resolution. It includes a civil engineering based investigation of characteristic properties with its building construction including a selection and combination of appropriate FReT as a basis for derivation of synthetic depth-damage functions. Depending on the real exposition and the implementation level of FReT, the functions can be used and allocated in spatial damage and risk analyses. The application of the extended approach is shown at a case study in Valencia (Spain. In this way, the overall research findings improve the integration of FReT in flood risk management. They provide also some useful information for advising of individuals at risk supporting the selection and implementation of FReT.

  20. Nanoparticles-chemistry, new synthetic approaches, gas phase clustering and novel applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Sreekumaran Nair; Chandramouli Subramaniam; M J Rosemary; Renjis T Tom; V R Rajeev Kumar; D M David Jeba Singh; Jobin Cyriac; Prashant Jain; K A Kalesh; Shreya Bhattacharya; T Pradeep

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, an overview of the synthesis, chemistry and applications of nanosystems carried out in our laboratory is presented. The discussion is divided into four sections, namely (a) chemistry of nanoparticles, (b) development of new synthetic approaches, (c) gas phase clusters and (d) device structures and applications. In `chemistry of nanoparticles' we describe a novel reaction between nanoparticles of Ag and Au with halocarbons. The reactions lead to the formation of various carbonaceous materials and metal halides. In `development of new synthetic approaches' our one-pot methodologies for the synthesis of core-shell nanosystems of Au, Ag and Cu protected with TiO2 and ZrO2 as well as various polymers are discussed. Some results on the interaction of nanoparticles with biomolecules are also detailed in this section. The third section covers the formation of gas phase aggregates/clusters of thiol-protected sub-nanoparticles. Laser desorption of H2MoO4, H2WO4, MoS2, and WS2 giving novel clusters is discussed. The fourth section deals with the development of simple devices and technologies using nanomaterials described above.

  1. Imaging approach for airborne stepped-frequency synthetic aperture radar in the squinted mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rengli; Wang, Yanfei

    2017-01-01

    For synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging, a stepped-frequency chirp signal is widely used to obtain ultrahigh range resolution. There are mainly two challenges in the stepped-frequency SAR imaging. One is the subbands synthesis, and the other is the estimation and compensation of amplitude and phase errors of the subbands caused by the radar system and the propagation. An imaging approach for the airborne squinted sliding-spotlight SAR with stepped-frequency chirps is proposed to achieve ultrahigh two-dimensional (2-D) resolution. Due to the squint angle, a Doppler centroid shift is introduced and then a modified space-variant compensation method for the range difference between the subbands is realized via multiplying a phase ramp in the 2-D frequency domain. Moreover, a range-dependent phase gradient autofocus algorithm based on raw data is proposed to estimate and compensate the residual phase error after the internal calibration. Afterward, the frequency-domain synthetic bandwidth method is used to complete the bandwidth synthesis. Finally, the extended Omega-K algorithm is applied to focus the synthesized data. The simulation results and the real data processing results prove the validity of the proposed approach.

  2. Motion error correction approach for high-resolution synthetic aperture radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Gaowei; Chang, Wenge; Li, Xiangyang

    2014-01-01

    An innovative data-based motion compensation approach is proposed for the high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The main idea is to extract the displacements in line-of-sight direction and the range-dependent phase errors from raw data, based on an instantaneous Doppler rate estimate. The approach is implemented by a two-step process: (1) the correction of excessive range cell migration; (2) the compensation of range-dependent phase errors. Experimental results show that the proposed method is capable of producing high-resolution SAR imagery with a spatial resolution of 0.17×0.2 m2 (range×azimuth) in Ku band.

  3. An alternative synthetic approach for efficient catalytic conversion of syngas to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Hairong; Ma, Xinbin; Gong, Jinlong

    2014-05-20

    Ethanol is an attractive end product and a versatile feedstock because a widespread market exists for its commercial use as a fuel additive or a potential substitute for gasoline. Currently, ethanol is produced primarily by fermentation of biomass-derived sugars, particularly those containing six carbons, but coproducts 5-carbon sugars and lignin remain unusable. Another major process for commercial production of ethanol is hydration of ethylene over solid acidic catalysts, yet not sustainable considering the depletion of fossil fuels. Catalytic conversion of synthetic gas (CO + H2) could produce ethanol in large quantities. However, the direct catalytic conversion of synthetic gas to ethanol remains challenging, and no commercial process exists as of today although the research has been ongoing for the past 90 years, since such the process suffers from low yield and poor selectivity due to slow kinetics of the initial C-C bond formation and fast chain growth of the C2 intermediates. This Account describes recent developments in an alternative approach for the synthesis of ethanol via synthetic gas. This process is an integrated technology consisting of the coupling of CO with methanol to form dimethyl oxalate and the subsequent hydrogenation to yield ethanol. The byproduct of the second step (methanol) can be separated and used in circulation as the feedstock for the coupling step. The coupling reaction of carbon monoxide for producing dimethyl oxalate takes place under moderate reaction conditions with high selectivity (∼95%), which ideally leads to a self-closing, nonwaste, catalytic cycling process. This Account also summarizes the progress on the development of copper-based catalysts for the hydrogenation reaction with remarkable efficiencies and stability. The unique lamellar structure and the cooperative effect between surface Cu(0) and Cu(+) species are responsible for the activity of the catalyst with high yield of ethanol (∼91%). The understanding of

  4. Using Method of Instruction to Predict the Skills Supporting Initial Reading Development: Insight from a Synthetic Phonics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeown, Sarah P.; Medford, Emma

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the skills predicting early reading development when children were taught by a synthetic phonics approach. Eighty five children taught to read by systematic synthetic phonics were assessed on reading and cognitive assessments prior to reading instruction (average age 4 years, 7 months), 6 months later (5 years, 1 month), and 73…

  5. Recent Progress on Systems and Synthetic Biology Approaches to Engineer Fungi As Microbial Cell Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amores, Gerardo Ruiz; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Arruda, Letícia Magalhães; Silva-Rocha, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Filamentous fungi are remarkable organisms naturally specialized in deconstructing plant biomass and this feature has a tremendous potential for biofuel production from renewable sources. The past decades have been marked by a remarkable progress in the genetic engineering of fungi to generate industry-compatible strains needed for some biotech applications. In this sense, progress in this field has been marked by the utilization of high-throughput techniques to gain deep understanding of the molecular machinery controlling the physiology of these organisms, starting thus the Systems Biology era of fungi. Additionally, genetic engineering has been extensively applied to modify wellcharacterized promoters in order to construct new expression systems with enhanced performance under the conditions of interest. In this review, we discuss some aspects related to significant progress in the understating and engineering of fungi for biotechnological applications, with special focus on the construction of synthetic promoters and circuits in organisms relevant for industry. Different engineering approaches are shown, and their potential and limitations for the construction of complex synthetic circuits in these organisms are examined. Finally, we discuss the impact of engineered promoter architecture in the single-cell behavior of the system, an often-neglected relationship with a tremendous impact in the final performance of the process of interest. We expect to provide here some new directions to drive future research directed to the construction of high-performance, engineered fungal strains working as microbial cell factories.

  6. Mapping dominant runoff processes: an evaluation of different approaches using similarity measures and synthetic runoff simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonetti, Manuel; Buss, Rahel; Scherrer, Simon; Margreth, Michael; Zappa, Massimiliano

    2016-07-01

    The identification of landscapes with similar hydrological behaviour is useful for runoff and flood predictions in small ungauged catchments. An established method for landscape classification is based on the concept of dominant runoff process (DRP). The various DRP-mapping approaches differ with respect to the time and data required for mapping. Manual approaches based on expert knowledge are reliable but time-consuming, whereas automatic GIS-based approaches are easier to implement but rely on simplifications which restrict their application range. To what extent these simplifications are applicable in other catchments is unclear. More information is also needed on how the different complexities of automatic DRP-mapping approaches affect hydrological simulations. In this paper, three automatic approaches were used to map two catchments on the Swiss Plateau. The resulting maps were compared to reference maps obtained with manual mapping. Measures of agreement and association, a class comparison, and a deviation map were derived. The automatically derived DRP maps were used in synthetic runoff simulations with an adapted version of the PREVAH hydrological model, and simulation results compared with those from simulations using the reference maps. The DRP maps derived with the automatic approach with highest complexity and data requirement were the most similar to the reference maps, while those derived with simplified approaches without original soil information differed significantly in terms of both extent and distribution of the DRPs. The runoff simulations derived from the simpler DRP maps were more uncertain due to inaccuracies in the input data and their coarse resolution, but problems were also linked with the use of topography as a proxy for the storage capacity of soils. The perception of the intensity of the DRP classes also seems to vary among the different authors, and a standardised definition of DRPs is still lacking. Furthermore, we argue not to use

  7. PREditOR: a synthetic biology approach to removing heterochromatin from cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Oscar; Carmena, Mar; Maudlin, Isabella E; Earnshaw, William C

    2016-12-01

    It is widely accepted that heterochromatin is necessary to maintain genomic stability. However, direct experimental evidence supporting this is slim. Previous studies using either enzyme inhibitors, gene knockout or knockdown studies all are subject to the caveat that drugs may have off-target effects and enzymes that modify chromatin proteins to support heterochromatin formation may also have numerous other cellular targets as well. Here, we describe PREditOR (protein reading and editing of residues), a synthetic biology approach that allows us to directly remove heterochromatin from cells without either drugs or global interference with gene function. We find that removal of heterochromatin perturbs mitotic progression and causes a dramatic increase in chromosome segregation defects, possibly as a result of interfering with the normal centromeric localization of the chromosomal passenger complex.

  8. Environmental sensing of heavy metals through whole cell microbial biosensors: a synthetic biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereza-Malcolm, Lara Tess; Mann, Gülay; Franks, Ashley Edwin

    2015-05-15

    Whole cell microbial biosensors are offering an alternative means for rapid, on-site heavy metal detection. Based in microorganisms, biosensing constructs are designed and constructed to produce both qualitative and quantitative outputs in response to heavy metal ions. Previous microbial biosensors designs are focused on single-input constructs; however, development of multiplexed systems is resulting in more flexible designs. The movement of microbial biosensors from laboratory based designs toward on-site, functioning heavy metal detectors has been hindered by the toxic nature of heavy metals, along with the lack of specificity of heavy metals promoter elements. Applying a synthetic biology approach with alternative microbial chassis may increase the robustness of microbial biosensors and mitigate these issues. Before full applications are achieved, further consideration has to be made regarding the risk and regulations of whole cell microbial biosensor use in the environment. To this end, a standard framework for future whole cell microbial biosensor design and use is proposed.

  9. Microbial production of amino acids and derived chemicals: synthetic biology approaches to strain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendisch, Volker F

    2014-12-01

    Amino acids are produced at the multi-million-ton-scale with fermentative production of l-glutamate and l-lysine alone being estimated to amount to more than five million tons in the year 2013. Metabolic engineering constantly improves productivities of amino acid producing strains, mainly Corynebacterium glutamicum and Escherichia coli strains. Classical mutagenesis and screening have been accelerated by combination with intracellular metabolite sensing. Synthetic biology approaches have allowed access to new carbon sources to realize a flexible feedstock concept. Moreover, new pathways for amino acid production as well as fermentative production of non-native compounds derived from amino acids or their metabolic precursors were developed. These include dipeptides, α,ω-diamines, α,ω-diacids, keto acids, acetylated amino acids and ω-amino acids.

  10. Goodness of Fit of Skills Assessment Approaches: Insights from Patterns of Real vs. Synthetic Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Behzad; Desmarais, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the issue of the goodness of fit of different skills assessment models using both synthetic and real data. Synthetic data is generated from the different skills assessment models. The results show wide differences of performances between the skills assessment models over synthetic data sets. The set of relative performances…

  11. Merging facility and financial planning: a new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, R; Hoffman, S

    1988-01-01

    This article seeks to help hospital administrators and boards (especially planning and finance committees) balance facility and financial aspects of a construction project by planning for each concurrently. It recommends that the process start with formal strategic plans, and that facility and capital plans be advanced interactively, thus maintaining flexibility to ensure that the hospital's objectives can be met within manageable financial limits. The authors suggest that the project thus delivered will be the most effective and efficient project possible within defined constraints. And, once planned, the project will be ready for implementation--false starts will be eliminated.

  12. The p-median Facility Location Problem and Solution Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet BASTI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In today’s globalized and increasingly competitive environment, organizations’ need to implement successful strategies for supply chain management has become indispensable. Transportation costs within the supply chain comprise an important part of the organizations’ expenses. For this reason, the strategic selection of location is an issue that directly affects supply chain performance and costs. At this stage, it becomes very important to apply the latest and the best methods to the facility location problem. The focus of this study is the p-median problem and its solution techniques, one of the location allocation problems aimed at minimizing the costs arising from shipments between facilities and demand points.

  13. MinION™ nanopore sequencing of environmental metagenomes: a synthetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Mick; Minot, Samuel S.; Rivera, Maria C.; Franklin, Rima B.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Environmental metagenomic analysis is typically accomplished by assigning taxonomy and/or function from whole genome sequencing or 16S amplicon sequences. Both of these approaches are limited, however, by read length, among other technical and biological factors. A nanopore-based sequencing platform, MinION™, produces reads that are ≥1 × 104 bp in length, potentially providing for more precise assignment, thereby alleviating some of the limitations inherent in determining metagenome composition from short reads. We tested the ability of sequence data produced by MinION (R7.3 flow cells) to correctly assign taxonomy in single bacterial species runs and in three types of low-complexity synthetic communities: a mixture of DNA using equal mass from four species, a community with one relatively rare (1%) and three abundant (33% each) components, and a mixture of genomic DNA from 20 bacterial strains of staggered representation. Taxonomic composition of the low-complexity communities was assessed by analyzing the MinION sequence data with three different bioinformatic approaches: Kraken, MG-RAST, and One Codex. Results: Long read sequences generated from libraries prepared from single strains using the version 5 kit and chemistry, run on the original MinION device, yielded as few as 224 to as many as 3497 bidirectional high-quality (2D) reads with an average overall study length of 6000 bp. For the single-strain analyses, assignment of reads to the correct genus by different methods ranged from 53.1% to 99.5%, assignment to the correct species ranged from 23.9% to 99.5%, and the majority of misassigned reads were to closely related organisms. A synthetic metagenome sequenced with the same setup yielded 714 high quality 2D reads of approximately 5500 bp that were up to 98% correctly assigned to the species level. Synthetic metagenome MinION libraries generated using version 6 kit and chemistry yielded from 899 to 3497 2D reads with lengths

  14. A Change Management Approach to Enhance Facility Maintenance Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    preventive maintenance, condition-based maintenance, and reliability-centered maintenance (Dotzlaf, 2009; Sapp , 2013; Sullivan et al., 2010; Bevilacqua...versus corrective) maintenance” ( Sapp , 2013:1). A 12 common understanding of PM exists with personal vehicle maintenance where the manufacturer...Technique. Principles of forecasting, (pp. 125-144). Springer US. Sapp , D. (2013, 10 4). Facilities Operations & Maintenance. Retrieved January 3, 2014

  15. The p-median Facility Location Problem and Solution Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    BASTI, MEHMET

    2012-01-01

    In today’s globalized and increasingly competitive environment, organizations’ need to implement successful strategies for supply chain management has become indispensable. Transportation costs within the supply chain comprise an important part of the organizations’ expenses. For this reason, the strategic selection of location is an issue that directly affects supply chain performance and costs. At this stage, it becomes very important to apply the latest and the best methods to the facility...

  16. Regional security assessments : a strategic approach to securing federal facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Consolini, Todd

    2009-01-01

    CHDS State/Local The 18 critical infrastructure sectors identified by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security form a vast and complex network of interdependent assets that supports the functioning of nearly every aspect of business, government, and commerce. The disruption of even one critical infrastructure sector by a terrorist attack or natural or manmade disaster is likely to have cascading effects on other sectors. As the Sector-Specific Agency for the Government Facilities Sector, t...

  17. Enhanced Flight Vision Systems and Synthetic Vision Systems for NextGen Approach and Landing Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Ellis, Kyle K. E.; Williams, Steven P.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic Vision Systems and Enhanced Flight Vision System (SVS/EFVS) technologies have the potential to provide additional margins of safety for aircrew performance and enable operational improvements for low visibility operations in the terminal area environment with equivalent efficiency as visual operations. To meet this potential, research is needed for effective technology development and implementation of regulatory standards and design guidance to support introduction and use of SVS/EFVS advanced cockpit vision technologies in Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) operations. A fixed-base pilot-in-the-loop simulation test was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center that evaluated the use of SVS/EFVS in NextGen low visibility approach and landing operations. Twelve crews flew approach and landing operations in a simulated NextGen Chicago O'Hare environment. Various scenarios tested the potential for using EFVS to conduct approach, landing, and roll-out operations in visibility as low as 1000 feet runway visual range (RVR). Also, SVS was tested to evaluate the potential for lowering decision heights (DH) on certain instrument approach procedures below what can be flown today. Expanding the portion of the visual segment in which EFVS can be used in lieu of natural vision from 100 feet above the touchdown zone elevation to touchdown and rollout in visibilities as low as 1000 feet RVR appears to be viable as touchdown performance was acceptable without any apparent workload penalties. A lower DH of 150 feet and/or possibly reduced visibility minima using SVS appears to be viable when implemented on a Head-Up Display, but the landing data suggests further study for head-down implementations.

  18. Development of CFD Approaches for Modeling Advanced Concepts of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Test Facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project will be developing a CFD approach that can handle the additional complexities needed in a NTP testing facility when modeling the combustion processes in...

  19. A hydrostratigraphical approach to support environmentally safe siting of a mining waste facility at Rautuvaara, Finland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howett, Peter J.; Salonen, Veli-Pekka; Hyttinen, Outi

    2015-01-01

    A hydrostratigraphical approach to support environmentally safe siting of a mining waste facility at Rautuvaara, Finland Based on the construction of a detailed sedimentological model, hydrostratigraphy and local groundwater/surface water flows, this paper analyses the Niesajoki river valley...

  20. Concept of Staged Approach for International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Sugimoto, M; Takeuchi, H

    2000-01-01

    The intense neutron source for development of fusion materials planned by international collaboration makes a new step to clarify the technical issues for realizing the 40 MeV, 250 mA deuteron beam facility. The baseline concept employs two identical 125 mA linac modules whose beams are combined at the flowing lithium target. Recent work for reducing the cost loading concerns the staged deployment of the full irradiation capability in three steps. The Japanese activity about the design and development study about IFMIF accelerator in this year is presented and the schedule of next several years is overviewed.

  1. An Asymmetric Synthetic Approach to the A-ring of the Taxol Family of Anti-Cancer Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Marin

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available A synthetic route developed for the preparation of the A-ring of Taxol family of molecules is reported. By means of an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction an asymmetric approach to this ring has been accomplished. Also, initial studies to prepare the A ring using an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction have been successful.

  2. Synthetic biology approaches to improve biocatalyst identification in metagenomic library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Ward, Richard John

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing demand for enzymes with improved catalytic performance or tolerance to process-specific parameters, and biotechnology plays a crucial role in the development of biocatalysts for use in industry, agriculture, medicine and energy generation. Metagenomics takes advantage of the wealth of genetic and biochemical diversity present in the genomes of microorganisms found in environmental samples, and provides a set of new technologies directed towards screening for new catalytic activities from environmental samples with potential biotechnology applications. However, biased and low level of expression of heterologous proteins in Escherichia coli together with the use of non-optimal cloning vectors for the construction of metagenomic libraries generally results in an extremely low success rate for enzyme identification. The bottleneck arising from inefficient screening of enzymatic activities has been addressed from several perspectives; however, the limitations related to biased expression in heterologous hosts cannot be overcome by using a single approach, but rather requires the synergetic implementation of multiple methodologies. Here, we review some of the principal constraints regarding the discovery of new enzymes in metagenomic libraries and discuss how these might be resolved by using synthetic biology methods.

  3. A different 'spin' on rhenium chemistry. synthetic approaches and perspectives of 17-electron rhenium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobi, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    Transition metal complexes of rhenium and technetium find wide application in nuclear medicine and the chemistry of these elements is still the focus of intense research efforts. For therapeutic and diagnostic applications, currently much attention is dedicated to the development of new targeting strategies aimed at appending the metal complexes to biological vectors (e.g. a peptide) for a site-specific delivery of the radionuclides. Advancements in radiopharmacy, however, will not only arise from the development of new targeted strategies but also from the exploration of the chemistry of these elements in their unusual oxidation states. In this respect the even number oxidation states of Re and Tc (i.e. +II, +IV and +VI) are relatively poorly understood. In particular, stable and substitutionally labile mononuclear 17-electron species of the elements (+II, d(5)) are a rarely encountered class of complexes. In this review we present our recent developments in the field of rhenium (II) chemistry with emphasis on the novel synthetic strategies we have recently introduced. We will also describe how the unique chemical and electronic properties of Re(II)-based complexes may provide a potentially new approach for applications in inorganic medicinal chemistry.

  4. Biophysical approach to studies of cap-eIF4E interaction by synthetic cap analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiecka, Anna; Stepinski, Janusz; Antosiewicz, Jan M; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Stolarski, Ryszard

    2007-01-01

    Specific recognition of mRNA 5' cap by eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4E is a rate-limiting step in the translation initiation. Structural determination of the eIF4E-cap complexes, as well as complexes of eIF4E with other proteins regulating its activity, requires complementary experiments that allow for energetic and dynamic aspects of formation and stability of the complexes. Such a combined approach provides information on the binding mechanisms and, hence, may lead to mechanistic models of eIF4E functioning and regulation on the molecular level. This chapter summarizes in detail the method of experiments used to probe the cap-binding center of eIF4E, steady state and stopped-flow fluorescence, and microcalorimetry. The studies were performed with a wide class of synthetic, structurally modified cap analogs that resembles in some respect an application of site directed mutagenesis of the protein. The chapter presents a general recipe as to how to investigate protein-ligand interactions if the protein has no enzymatic activity and both the protein and the ligand absorb and emit UV/VIS radiation in the same spectral ranges.

  5. Synthetic biology & human health: some initial thoughts on the ethical questions and how we ought to approach them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Meulen, Ruud; Calladine, Alex

    2010-01-01

    The emerging field of synthetic biology aims to move beyond our current state of being able to read and manipulate genetic code to being able to write it. Drawing on the other disciplines such as engineering it will allow scientists to create new artificial biological systems as well as modify and redesign systems which already exist in nature. This is likely to result in a range of new and innovative applications. This essay has three aims. First, it provides a brief introduction to synthetic biology, explains what it is, some of the ways in which it has been defined and some of its possible future applications. Second, the essay considers some of the ethical questions which synthetic biology may raise. Finally, the essay reflects on how we ought to answer these sorts of questions and suggests a more reflective, philosophical approach.

  6. Generating synthetic wave climates for coastal modelling: a linear mixed modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C.; Lark, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    (spherical) model, it cuts off at a temporal range. Having fitted the model, multiple realisations were generated; the random effects were simulated by specifying a covariance matrix for the simulated values, with the estimated parameters. The Cholesky factorisation of the covariance matrix was computed and realizations of the random component of the model generated by pre-multiplying a vector of iid standard Gaussian variables by the lower triangular factor. The resulting random variate was added to the mean value computed from the fixed effects, and the result back-transformed to the original scale of the measurement. Realistic simulations result from approach described above. Background exploratory data analysis was undertaken on 20-day sets of 30-minute buoy data, selected from days 5-24 of months January, April, July, October, 2011, to elucidate daily to weekly variations, and to keep numerical analysis tractable computationally. Work remains to be undertaken to develop suitable models for synthetic directional data. We suggest that the general principles of the method will have applications in other geomorphological modelling endeavours requiring time series of stochastically variable environmental parameters.

  7. Tunable synthetic approaches for the optimization of nanostructured fuel cell catalysts: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bönnemann H.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly active nanostructured pluri-metal catalysts for fuel cell applications can be obtained by designing synthetic protocol where the particle size, metal composition and morphology can be readily tailored. Tunable synthesis relates to combining the various synthetic methodologies available for generating nanostructured metal catalysts with desired catalytic properties. Herein, we discuss some of these synthetic methodologies which were developed to combine the advantages of each pathway in generating efficient fuel cell catalysts and to learn how the composition and morphology of the metals be fine tuned.

  8. Development of Modeling Approaches for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel R.; Allgood, Daniel C.; Nguyen, Ke

    2014-01-01

    High efficiency of rocket propul-sion systems is essential for humanity to venture be-yond the moon. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is a promising alternative to conventional chemical rock-ets with relatively high thrust and twice the efficiency of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. NASA is in the pro-cess of developing a new NTP engine, and is evaluat-ing ground test facility concepts that allow for the thor-ough testing of NTP devices. NTP engine exhaust, hot gaseous hydrogen, is nominally expected to be free of radioactive byproducts from the nuclear reactor; how-ever, it has the potential to be contaminated due to off-nominal engine reactor performance. Several options are being investigated to mitigate this hazard potential with one option in particular that completely contains the engine exhaust during engine test operations. The exhaust products are subsequently disposed of between engine tests. For this concept (see Figure 1), oxygen is injected into the high-temperature hydrogen exhaust that reacts to produce steam, excess oxygen and any trace amounts of radioactive noble gases released by off-nominal NTP engine reactor performance. Water is injected to condense the potentially contaminated steam into water. This water and the gaseous oxygen (GO2) are subsequently passed to a containment area where the water and GO2 are separated into separate containment tanks.

  9. Synthetic approaches to peptides containing the L-Gln-L-Val-D(S)-Dmt motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suaifan, Ghadeer A R Y; Arafat, Tawfiq; Threadgill, Michael D

    2007-05-15

    The pseudoprolines S-Dmo (5,5-dimethyl-4-oxaproline) and R-Dmt (5,5-dimethyl-4-thiaproline) have been used to study the effects of forcing a fully cis conformation in peptides. Synthesis of peptides containing these (which have the same configuration as L-Pro) is straightforward. However, synthesis of peptides containing S-Dmt is difficult, owing to the rapid cyclisation of L-Aaa-S-Dmt amides and esters to form the corresponding diketopiperazines (DKP); thus the intermediacy of L-Aaa-S-Dmt amides and esters must be avoided in the synthetic sequence. Peptides containing the L-Gln-L-Val-D(S)-Dmt motif are particularly difficult, owing to the insolubility of coupling partners containing Gln. Introduction of Gln as N-Boc-pyroglutamate overcame the latter difficulty and the dipeptide active ester BocPygValOC(6)F(5) coupled in good yield with S-DmtOH. BocPygVal-S- DmtNH(CH(2))(2)C(6)H(4)NO(2) was converted quantitatively to BocGlnVal-S-DmtNH(CH(2))(2)C(6)H(4)NO(2) with ammonia, demonstrating the utility of this approach. Two peptide derivatives (CbzSerLysLeuGlnVal-S-DmtNH(CH(2))(2)C(6)H(4)NO(2) and CbzSerSerLysLeuGlnVal-S- DmtNH(CH(2))(2)C(6)H(4)NO(2)) were assembled, using these new methods of coupling a dipeptide acid active ester with S-DmtOH and introduction of Gln as Pyg, followed by conventional peptide couplings. The presence of the Val caused these peptides to be cleaved very slowly by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at Leu Gln, rather than the expected Gln Val.

  10. Mechanics and energetics in tool manufacture and use: a synthetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyu; Brodbeck, Luzius; Iida, Fumiya

    2014-11-06

    Tool manufacture and use are observed not only in humans but also in other animals such as mammals, birds and insects. Manufactured tools are used for biomechanical functions such as effective control of fluids and small solid objects and extension of reaching. These tools are passive and used with gravity and the animal users' own energy. From the perspective of evolutionary biology, manufactured tools are extended phenotypes of the genes of the animal and exhibit phenotypic plasticity. This incurs energetic cost of manufacture as compared to the case with a fixed tool. This paper studies mechanics and energetics aspects of tool manufacture and use in non-human beings. Firstly, it investigates possible mechanical mechanisms of the use of passive manufactured tools. Secondly, it formulates the energetic cost of manufacture and analyses when phenotypic plasticity benefits an animal tool maker and user. We take a synthetic approach and use a controlled physical model, i.e. a robot arm. The robot is capable of additively manufacturing scoop and gripper structures from thermoplastic adhesives to pick and place fluid and solid objects, mimicking primates and birds manufacturing tools for a similar function. We evaluate the effectiveness of tool use in pick-and-place and explain the mechanism for gripper tools picking up solid objects with a solid-mechanics model. We propose a way to formulate the energetic cost of tool manufacture that includes modes of addition and reshaping, and use it to analyse the case of scoop tools. Experiment results show that with a single motor trajectory, the robot was able to effectively pick and place water, rice grains, a pebble and a plastic box with a scoop tool or gripper tools that were manufactured by itself. They also show that by changing the dimension of scoop tools, the energetic cost of tool manufacture and use could be reduced. The work should also be interesting for engineers to design adaptive machines.

  11. A facile synthetic route to diazepinone derivatives via ring closing metathesis and its application for human cytidine deaminase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minkyoung; Gajulapati, Kondaji; Kim, Chorong; Jung, Hwa Young; Goo, Jail; Lee, Kyeong; Kaur, Navneet; Kang, Hyo Jin; Chung, Sang J; Choi, Yongseok

    2012-12-04

    A variety of diazepinone derivatives were prepared from α-amino acids and amino alcohols by a new synthetic methodology based on ring closing metathesis as a key step. The diazepinones were coupled with ribose derivatives to afford novel diazepinone nucleosides. Among them, (4R)-1-ribosyl-4-methyl-3,4-dihydro-1H-1,3-diazepin-2(7H)-one (3) showed a potent inhibitory effect (K(i) = 145.97 ± 4.87 nM) against human cytidine deaminase.

  12. Improving the drug delivery characteristics of graphene oxide based polymer nanocomposites through the “one-pot” synthetic approach of single-electron-transfer living radical polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Peng; Liu, Meiying; Tian, Jianwen; Deng, Fengjie [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wang, Ke [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu, Dazhuang [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Liu, Liangji [Affiliated Hospital of Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanchang 330006 (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyongzhang1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wei, Yen, E-mail: weiyen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and the Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Graphical abstract: The PEGylated graphene oxides with high water dispersibility, good biocompatibility as well as high drug loading capability were fabricated via “one-pot” SET-LRP. - Highlights: • Surface modification of graphene oxide with polymers. • One-pot single-electron-transfer living radical polymerization. • Improving drug delivery characteristics. • The synthetic approach is rather simple, universal and effective. - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO) based polymer nanocomposites have attracted extensive research interest recently for their outstanding physicochemical properties and potential applications. However, surface modification of GO with synthetic polymers has demonstrated to be trouble for most polymerization procedures are occurred under non-aqueous solution, which will in turn lead to the restacking of GO. In this work, a facile and efficient “one-pot” strategy has been developed for surface modification of GO with synthetic polymers through single-electron-transfer living radical polymerization (SET-LRP). The GO based polymer nanocomposites were obtained via SET-LRP in aqueous solution using poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) as the monomer and 11-bromoundecanoic acid as the initiator, which could be effectively adsorbed on GO through hydrophobic interaction. The successful preparation of GO based polymer nanocomposites was confirmed by a series of characterization techniques such as {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The resultant products exhibit high water disperisibility, excellent biocompatibility and high efficient drug loading capability, making these PEGylated GO nanocomposites promising candidates for biomedical applications.

  13. Optimization of Physiochemical Parameters during Bioremediation of Synthetic Dye by Marasmius cladophyllus UMAS MS8 Using Statistical Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Fatin Nur Sufinas Shuib; Ahmad Husaini; Azham Zulkharnain; Hairul Azman Roslan; Tay Meng Guan

    2016-01-01

    In many industrial areas such as in food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, printing, and textile, the use of synthetic dyes has been integral with products such as azo dye, anthrax, and dyestuffs. As such, these industries produce a lot of waste by-products that could contaminate the environment. Bioremediation, therefore, has become an important emerging technology due to its cost-sustainable, effective, natural approach to cleaning up contaminated groundwater and soil via the use of microorganisms...

  14. New Approaches in Modeling Multiphase Flows and Dispersion in Turbulence, Fractal Methods and Synthetic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolleau, FCGA; Redondo, J-M

    2012-01-01

    This book contains a collection of the main contributions from the first five workshops held by Ercoftac Special Interest Group on Synthetic Turbulence Models (SIG42. It is intended as an illustration of the sig's activities and of the latest developments in the field. This volume investigates the use of Kinematic Simulation (KS) and other synthetic turbulence models for the particular application to environmental flows. This volume offers the best syntheses on the research status in KS, which is widely used in various domains, including Lagrangian aspects in turbulence mixing/stirring, partic

  15. Boundary-projection acceleration: A new approach to synthetic acceleration of transport calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, M.L.; Martin, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    We present a new class of synthetic acceleration methods which can be applied to transport calculations regardless of geometry, discretization scheme, or mesh shape. Unlike other synthetic acceleration methods which base their acceleration on P1 equations, these methods use acceleration equations obtained by projecting the transport solution onto a coarse angular mesh only on cell boundaries. We demonstrate, via Fourier analysis of a simple model problem as well as numerical calculations of various problems, that the simplest of these methods are unconditionally stable with spectral radius less than or equal toc/3 (c being the scattering ratio), for several different discretization schemes in slab geometry. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Designing Multi Objective Facility Location Models Based on Multiple Type Facility Dispersion and Data Envelopment Analysis Using Fuzzy Goal Programing Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdi Karbasian1; Mahdi Dashti

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, four different multiple-type dispersion facilities location modeling formulations have been developed, which utilize efficiency measures of Data Envelopment Analysis to find optimal and efficient facility location patterns. While the problems studied previously do not clearly indicate which candidate is elected by a unit, simultaneous DEA approach has been used for analysis. In these models, existing facilities are considered. These models with two objectives, considerabely mat...

  17. [Effects of strong reductive approach on remediation of degraded facility vegetable soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong-Bin; Meng, Tian-Zhu; Zhang, Jin-Bo; Cai, Zu-Cong

    2013-09-01

    High application rate of chemical fertilizers and unreasonable rotation in facility vegetable cultivation can easily induce the occurrence of soil acidification, salinization, and serious soil-borne diseases, while to quickly and effectively remediate the degraded facility vegetable soil can considerably increase vegetable yield and farmers' income. In this paper, a degraded facility vegetable soil was amended with 0, 3.75, 7.50, and 11.3 t C x hm(-2) of air-dried alfalfa and flooded for 31 days to establish a strong reductive environment, with the variations of soil physical and chemical properties and the cucumber yield studied. Under the reductive condition, soil Eh dropped quickly below 0 mV, accumulated soil NO3(-) was effectively eliminated, soil pH was significantly raised, and soil EC was lowered, being more evident in higher alfalfa input treatments. After treated with the strong reductive approach, the cucumber yield in the facility vegetable field reached 53.3-57.9 t x hm(-2), being significantly higher than that in un-treated facility vegetable field in last growth season (10.8 t x hm(-2)). It was suggested that strong reductive approach could effectively remediate the degraded facility vegetable soil in a short term.

  18. Synthetic Applications of Asymmetric Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons Condensations: Approaches to Marine Natural Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tullis, Joshua S.; Helquist, Paul; Rein, Tobias

    1999-01-01

    Asymmetric HWE condensations of meso-dialdehyde 1 with chiral phosphonates containing 8-phenylmenthol very directly generate chiral moieties that are seen in a number of cytotoxic natural products. The HWE reactions proceed in good yields with synthetically useful geometric and diastereoselectivi...

  19. Preliminary Experimental Verification of Synthetic Aperture Flow Imaging Using a Dual Stage Beamformer Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ye; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    A dual stage beamformer method for synthetic aperture flow imaging has been developed. The motivation is to increase the frame rate and still maintain a beamforming quality sufficient for flow estimation that is possible to implement in a commercial scanner. With the new method high resolution im...

  20. From essential to persistent genes: a functional approach to constructing synthetic life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G.; Fang, Gang; Schmidt, Markus

    2013-01-01

    A central undertaking in synthetic biology (SB) is the quest for the ‘minimal genome’. However, ‘minimal sets’ of essential genes are strongly context-dependent and, in all prokaryotic genomes sequenced to date, not a single protein-coding gene is entirely conserved. Furthermore, a lack...

  1. In Situ Decommissioning (ISD) Concepts and Approaches for Excess Nuclear Facilities Decommissioning End State - 13367

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrato, Michael G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Musall, John C.; Bergren, Christopher L. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) currently has numerous radiologically contaminated excess nuclear facilities waiting decommissioning throughout the Complex. The traditional decommissioning end state is complete removal. This commonly involves demolishing the facility, often segregating various components and building materials and disposing of the highly contaminated, massive structures containing tons of highly contaminated equipment and piping in a (controlled and approved) landfill, at times hundreds of miles from the facility location. Traditional demolition is costly, and results in significant risks to workers, as well as risks and costs associated with transporting the materials to a disposal site. In situ decommissioning (ISD or entombment) is a viable alternative to demolition, offering comparable and potentially more protective protection of human health and the environment, but at a significantly reduced cost and worker risk. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has completed the initial ISD deployment for radiologically contaminated facilities. Two reactor (P and R Reactors) facilities were decommissioned in 2011 using the ISD approach through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The SRS ISD approach resolved programmatic, regulatory and technical/engineering issues associated with avoiding the potential hazards and cost associated with generating and disposing of an estimated 124,300 metric tons (153,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated debris per reactor. The DOE Environmental Management Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering, through the Savannah River National Laboratory, is currently investigating potential monitoring techniques and strategies to assess ISD effectiveness. As part of SRS's strategic planning, the site is seeking to leverage in situ decommissioning concepts, approaches and facilities to conduct research, design end states, and assist in regulatory interactions in broad national and

  2. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular response to biophysical cues using synthetic biology approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Denise; Roos, Wouter H

    2016-09-02

    The use of synthetic surfaces and materials to influence and study cell behavior has vastly progressed our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in cellular response to physicochemical and biophysical cues. Reconstituting cytoskeletal proteins and interfacing them with a defined microenvironment has also garnered deep insight into the engineering mechanisms existing within the cell. This review presents recent experimental findings on the influence of several parameters of the extracellular environment on cell behavior and fate, such as substrate topography, stiffness, chemistry and charge. In addition, the use of synthetic environments to measure physical properties of the reconstituted cytoskeleton and their interaction with intracellular proteins such as molecular motors is discussed, which is relevant for understanding cell migration, division and structural integrity, as well as intracellular transport. Insight is provided regarding the next steps to be taken in this interdisciplinary field, in order to achieve the global aim of artificially directing cellular response.

  3. Biotechnology and synthetic biology approaches for metabolic engineering of bioenergy crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Patrick M; Liang, Yan; Loqué, Dominique

    2016-07-01

    The Green Revolution has fuelled an exponential growth in human population since the mid-20th century. Due to population growth, food and energy demands will soon surpass supply capabilities. To overcome these impending problems, significant improvements in genetic engineering will be needed to complement breeding efforts in order to accelerate the improvement of agronomical traits. The new field of plant synthetic biology has emerged in recent years and is expected to support rapid, precise, and robust engineering of plants. In this review, we present recent advances made in the field of plant synthetic biology, specifically in genome editing, transgene expression regulation, and bioenergy crop engineering, with a focus on traits related to lignocellulose, oil, and soluble sugars. Ultimately, progress and innovation in these fields may facilitate the development of beneficial traits in crop plants to meet society's bioenergy needs.

  4. Mineralization of Synthetic Polymer Scaffolds: A Bottom-upApproach for the Development of Artificial Bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jie; Viengkham, Malathong; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2004-09-27

    The controlled integration of organic and inorganic components confers natural bone with superior mechanical properties. Bone biogenesis is thought to occur by templated mineralization of hard apatite crystals by an elastic protein scaffold, a process we sought to emulate with synthetic biomimetic hydrogel polymers. Crosslinked polymethacrylamide and polymethacrylate hydrogels were functionalized with mineral-binding ligands and used to template the formation of hydroxyapatite. Strong adhesion between the organic and inorganic materials was achieved for hydrogels functionalized with either carboxylate or hydroxy ligands. The mineral-nucleating potential of hydroxyl groups identified here broadens the design parameters for synthetic bone-like composites and suggests a potential role for hydroxylated collagen proteins in bone mineralization.

  5. A synthetic biology approach to self-regulatory recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragosits Martin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant protein production is a process of great industrial interest, with products that range from pharmaceuticals to biofuels. Since high level production of recombinant protein imposes significant stress in the host organism, several methods have been developed over the years to optimize protein production. So far, these trial-and-error techniques have proved laborious and sensitive to process parameters, while there has been no attempt to address the problem by applying Synthetic Biology principles and methods, such as integration of standardized parts in novel synthetic circuits. Results We present a novel self-regulatory protein production system that couples the control of recombinant protein production with a stress-induced, negative feedback mechanism. The synthetic circuit allows the down-regulation of recombinant protein expression through a stress-induced promoter. We used E. coli as the host organism, since it is widely used in recombinant processes. Our results show that the introduction of the self-regulatory circuit increases the soluble/insoluble ratio of recombinant protein at the expense of total protein yield. To further elucidate the dynamics of the system, we developed a computational model that is in agreement with the observed experimental data, and provides insight on the interplay between protein solubility and yield. Conclusion Our work introduces the idea of a self-regulatory circuit for recombinant protein products, and paves the way for processes with reduced external control or monitoring needs. It demonstrates that the library of standard biological parts serves as a valuable resource for initial synthetic blocks that needs to be further refined to be successfully applied in practical problems of biotechnological significance. Finally, the development of a predictive model in conjunction with experimental validation facilitates a better understanding of the underlying dynamics and can be

  6. Semi-Natural And Synthetic Chiral Cycloketo-Porphyrin Systems - Approaching Novel Photosensitizers

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Several semi-natural and synthetic cycloketo-porphyrins were synthesized and their properties and usability for different applications was subjected to detailed investigations. It was dealt with porphyrin systems with an exocyclic connection of a meso-position or -substituent to a beta-pyrrolic position of the macrocycle formally originating from an acylation reaction to give a ketone functionality. Such systems can be found in nature amongst the chlorophylls. Thus, derivatives of chlorophyll...

  7. A spectral domain approach to modelling of EM scattering for Synthetic Aperture Radar target recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabry, R.; Vachon, P. W.

    2005-08-01

    A Fourier-based technique for electromagnetic (EM) wave reconstruction with application to polarimetric airborne and spaceborne radar data exploitation is presented. The method is different from conventional modelling techniques for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) applications as a result of the full electromagnetic treatment of field interactions with the scatterer, the possibility of introducing new and controllable feature classes for target classification, and accurate decomposition of the source impulse response function that avoids potential errors (e.g. loss of coherent information) associated with the spherical phase approximations. The capability of extracting scatterer information such as the coherent radar cross section (RCS) is explored.

  8. An expeditious synthetic approach towards the synthesis of Bis-Schiff bases (aldazines) using ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Khalid M; Jamil, Waqas; Ambreen, Nida; Taha, Muhammad; Perveen, Shahnaz; Morales, Guillermo A

    2014-05-01

    Aldazines (Bis-Schiff bases) 1-24 were synthesized using aromatic aldehydes (heterocyclic and benzaldehydes) and hydrazine hydrate under reflux using conventional heating and/or via ultrasound irradiation using BiCl3 as catalyst. Ultrasonication conditions with cat. BiCl3 proved to be an effective, environmentally friendly synthetic procedure. This methodology is robust in the presence of electron donating and electron withdrawing groups affording desired products with high yields (>95%) in just a couple of minutes vs. hours using conventional heating.

  9. Synthetic Approaches to Heterocyclic Ligands for Gd-Based MRI Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Ballesteros

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI methods are currently used in the clinic for the non invasive detection and characterization of a wide variety of pathologies. Increases in the diagnostic efficiency of MRI have been helped by both the design of dedicated MR sequences revealing specific aspects of the pathology and by the development of more sensitive and selective Contrast Agents (CAs, capable of more precisely delineating the borderline regions. In the present review we focus on the synthetic strategies used to obtain MRI CAs containing heterocyclic rings.

  10. Computer/information security design approaches for Complex 21/Reconfiguration facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunteman, W.J.; Zack, N.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Safeguards Systems Group; Jaeger, C.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Surety/Dismantlement Dept.

    1993-12-31

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories have been designated the technical lead laboratories to develop the design of the computer/information security, safeguards, and physical security systems for all of the DOE Complex 21/Reconfiguration facilities. All of the automated information processing systems and networks in these facilities will be required to implement the new DOE orders on computer and information security. The planned approach for a highly integrated information processing capability in each of the facilities will require careful consideration of the requirements in DOE Orders 5639.6 and 1360.2A. The various information protection requirements and user clearances within the facilities will also have a significant effect on the design of the systems and networks. Fulfilling the requirements for proper protection of the information and compliance with DOE orders will be possible because the computer and information security concerns are being incorporated in the early design activities. This paper will discuss the computer and information security issues being addressed in the integrated design effort for the tritium, uranium/lithium, plutonium, plutonium storage, and high explosive/assembly facilities.

  11. Computer/information security design approaches for Complex 21/Reconfiguration facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunteman, W.J.; Zack, N.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Jaeger, C.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories have been designated the technical lead laboratories to develop the design of the computer/information security, safeguards, and physical security systems for all of the DOE Complex 21/Reconfiguration facilities. All of the automated information processing systems and networks in these facilities will be required to implement the new DOE orders on computer and information security. The planned approach for a highly integrated information processing capability in each of the facilities will require careful consideration of the requirements in DOE Orders 5639.6 and 1360.2A. The various information protection requirements and user clearances within the facilities will also have a significant effect on the design of the systems and networks. Fulfilling the requirements for proper protection of the information and compliance with DOE orders will be possible because the computer and information security concerns are being incorporated in the early design activities. This paper will discuss the computer and information security addressed in the integrated design effort, uranium/lithium, plutonium, plutonium high explosive/assembly facilities.

  12. A New Hybrid Approach for Augmented Reality Maintenance in Scientific Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Martínez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance in scientific facilities is a difficult issue, especially in large and hazardous facilities, due to the complexity of tasks and equipment. Augmented reality is a technology that has already shown great promise in the maintenance field. With the help of augmented reality applications, maintenance tasks can be carried out faster and more safely. The problem with current applications is that they are small-scale prototypes that do not easily scale to large facility maintenance applications. This paper presents a new hybrid approach that enables the creation of augmented reality maintenance applications for large and hazardous scientific facilities. In this paper, a new augmented reality marker and the algorithm for its recognition is proposed. The performance of the algorithm is verified in three test cases, showing promising results in two of them. Improvements in robustness in the third test case in which the camera is moving quickly or when light conditions are extreme are subject to further studies. The proposed new approach will be integrated into an existing augmented reality maintenance system.

  13. Open source approaches to establishing Roseobacter clade bacteria as synthetic biology chassis for biogeoengineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanika Borg

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The nascent field of bio-geoengineering stands to benefit from synthetic biologists’ efforts to standardise, and in so doing democratise, biomolecular research methods. Roseobacter clade bacteria comprise 15–20% of oceanic bacterio-plankton communities, making them a prime candidate for establishment of synthetic biology chassis for bio-geoengineering activities such as bioremediation of oceanic waste plastic. Developments such as the increasing affordability of DNA synthesis and laboratory automation continue to foster the establishment of a global ‘do-it-yourself’ research community alongside the more traditional arenas of academe and industry. As a collaborative group of citizen, student and professional scientists we sought to test the following hypotheses: (i that an incubator capable of cultivating bacterial cells can be constructed entirely from non-laboratory items, (ii that marine bacteria from the Roseobacter clade can be established as a genetically tractable synthetic biology chassis using plasmids conforming to the BioBrickTM standard and finally, (iii that identifying and subcloning genes from a Roseobacter clade species can readily by achieved by citizen scientists using open source cloning and bioinformatic tools. Method. We cultivated three Roseobacter species, Roseobacter denitrificans, Oceanobulbus indolifexand Dinoroseobacter shibae. For each species we measured chloramphenicol sensitivity, viability over 11 weeks of glycerol-based cryopreservation and tested the effectiveness of a series of electroporation and heat shock protocols for transformation using a variety of plasmid types. We also attempted construction of an incubator-shaker device using only publicly available components. Finally, a subgroup comprising citizen scientists designed and attempted a procedure for isolating the cold resistance anf1 gene from Oceanobulbus indolifexcells and subcloning it into a BioBrickTM formatted plasmid. Results. All

  14. Open source approaches to establishing Roseobacter clade bacteria as synthetic biology chassis for biogeoengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Yanika; Grigonyte, Aurelija Marija; Boeing, Philipp; Wolfenden, Bethan; Smith, Patrick; Beaufoy, William; Rose, Simon; Ratisai, Tonderai; Zaikin, Alexey; Nesbeth, Darren N

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The nascent field of bio-geoengineering stands to benefit from synthetic biologists' efforts to standardise, and in so doing democratise, biomolecular research methods. Roseobacter clade bacteria comprise 15-20% of oceanic bacterio-plankton communities, making them a prime candidate for establishment of synthetic biology chassis for bio-geoengineering activities such as bioremediation of oceanic waste plastic. Developments such as the increasing affordability of DNA synthesis and laboratory automation continue to foster the establishment of a global 'do-it-yourself' research community alongside the more traditional arenas of academe and industry. As a collaborative group of citizen, student and professional scientists we sought to test the following hypotheses: (i) that an incubator capable of cultivating bacterial cells can be constructed entirely from non-laboratory items, (ii) that marine bacteria from the Roseobacter clade can be established as a genetically tractable synthetic biology chassis using plasmids conforming to the BioBrick(TM) standard and finally, (iii) that identifying and subcloning genes from a Roseobacter clade species can readily by achieved by citizen scientists using open source cloning and bioinformatic tools. Method. We cultivated three Roseobacter species, Roseobacter denitrificans, Oceanobulbus indolifexand Dinoroseobacter shibae. For each species we measured chloramphenicol sensitivity, viability over 11 weeks of glycerol-based cryopreservation and tested the effectiveness of a series of electroporation and heat shock protocols for transformation using a variety of plasmid types. We also attempted construction of an incubator-shaker device using only publicly available components. Finally, a subgroup comprising citizen scientists designed and attempted a procedure for isolating the cold resistance anf1 gene from Oceanobulbus indolifexcells and subcloning it into a BioBrick(TM) formatted plasmid. Results. All species were stable

  15. Simple and facile approach to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles and assessment of their effects on blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotica, Luiz F., E-mail: lfcotica@pq.cnpq.br [Department of Physics, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Maringa, PR 87020900 (Brazil); Freitas, Valdirlei F.; Dias, Gustavo S.; Santos, Ivair A. [Department of Physics, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Maringa, PR 87020900 (Brazil); Vendrame, Sheila C.; Khalil, Najeh M.; Mainardes, Rubiana M. [Department of Pharmacy, Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste, Guarapuava, PR 85040080 (Brazil); Staruch, Margo; Jain, Menka [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    In this paper, a very simple and facile approach for the large scale synthesis of uniform and size-controllable single-domain magnetite nanoparticles is reported. These magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized via thermal decomposition of a ferric nitrate/ethylene glycol solution. The structural and morphological properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were carefully studied. Nearly spherical nanoparticles with inverted spinel structure and average particle and crystallite sizes smaller than 20 nm were obtained. The magnetic measurements revealed that magnetite nanoparticles have a magnetic saturation value near that of the bulk magnetite. The erythrocyte cytotoxicity assays showed no hemolytic potential of the samples containing magnetite nanoparticles, indicating no cytotoxic activity on human erythrocytes, which makes these interesting for biotechnological applications. - Highlights: > Simple and facile approach to large scale synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles. > Erythrocyte cytotoxicity assays showed no hemolytic potential of nanoparticles. > Saturation magnetization of nanoparticles reached near that of the bulk magnetite.

  16. Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches driving isoprenoid production in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chonglong; Zada, Bakht; Wei, Gongyuan; Kim, Seon-Won

    2017-10-01

    Isoprenoids comprise the largest family of natural organic compounds with many useful applications in the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and industrial fields. Rapid developments in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology have facilitated the engineering of isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways in Escherichia coli to induce high levels of production of many different isoprenoids. In this review, the stem pathways for synthesizing isoprene units as well as the branch pathways deriving diverse isoprenoids from the isoprene units have been summarized. The review also highlights the metabolic engineering efforts made for the biosynthesis of hemiterpenoids, monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, diterpenoids, carotenoids, retinoids, and coenzyme Q10 in E. coli. Perspectives and future directions for the synthesis of novel isoprenoids, decoration of isoprenoids using cytochrome P450 enzymes, and secretion or storage of isoprenoids in E. coli have also been included. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimization of Soil Hydraulic Model Parameters Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Data: An Integrated Multidisciplinary Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauwels, Valentijn; Balenzano, Anna; Satalino, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    It is widely recognized that Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data are a very valuable source of information for the modeling of the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere. During the last couple of decades, most of the research on the use of SAR data in hydrologic applications has...... been focused on the retrieval of land and biogeophysical parameters (e.g., soil moisture contents). One relatively unexplored issue consists of the optimization of soil hydraulic model parameters, such its, for example, hydraulic conductivity, values, through remote sensing. This is due to the fact...... that no direct relationships between the remote-sensing observations, more specifically radar backscatter values, and the parameter values can be derived. However, land surface models can provide these relationships. The objective of this paper is to retrieve a number of soil physical model parameters through...

  18. Development of GRAS strains for nutraceutical production using systems and synthetic biology approaches: advances and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Long; Guan, Ningzi; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Nutraceuticals are food substances with medical and health benefits for humans. Limited by complicated procedures, high cost, low yield, insufficient raw materials, resource waste, and environment pollution, chemical synthesis and extraction are being replaced by microbial synthesis of nutraceuticals. Many microbial strains that are generally regarded as safe (GRAS) have been identified and developed for the synthesis of nutraceuticals, and significant nutraceutical production by these strains has been achieved. In this review, we systematically summarize recent advances in nutraceutical research in terms of physiological effects on health, potential applications, drawbacks of traditional production processes, characteristics of production strains, and progress in microbial fermentation. Recent advances in systems and synthetic biology techniques have enabled comprehensive understanding of GRAS strains and its wider applications. Thus, these microbial strains are promising cell factories for the commercial production of nutraceuticals.

  19. Scene estimation from speckled synthetic aperture radar imagery: Markov-random-field approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankoande, Ousseini; Hayat, Majeed M; Santhanam, Balu

    2006-06-01

    A novel Markov-random-field model for speckled synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery is derived according to the physical, spatial statistical properties of speckle noise in coherent imaging. A convex Gibbs energy function for speckled images is derived and utilized to perform speckle-compensating image estimation. The image estimation is formed by computing the conditional expectation of the noisy image at each pixel given its neighbors, which is further expressed in terms of the derived Gibbs energy function. The efficacy of the proposed technique, in terms of reducing speckle noise while preserving spatial resolution, is studied by using both real and simulated SAR imagery. Using a number of commonly used metrics, the performance of the proposed technique is shown to surpass that of existing speckle-noise-filtering methods such as the Gamma MAP, the modified Lee, and the enhanced Frost.

  20. From essential to persistent genes: a functional approach to constructing synthetic life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G; Fang, Gang; Schmidt, Markus; Ussery, David W; Danchin, Antoine

    2013-05-01

    A central undertaking in synthetic biology (SB) is the quest for the 'minimal genome'. However, 'minimal sets' of essential genes are strongly context-dependent and, in all prokaryotic genomes sequenced to date, not a single protein-coding gene is entirely conserved. Furthermore, a lack of consensus in the field as to what attributes make a gene truly essential adds another aspect of variation. Thus, a universal minimal genome remains elusive. Here, as an alternative to defining a minimal genome, we propose that the concept of gene persistence can be used to classify genes needed for robust long-term survival. Persistent genes, although not ubiquitous, are conserved in a majority of genomes, tend to be expressed at high levels, and are frequently located on the leading DNA strand. These criteria impose constraints on genome organization, and these are important considerations for engineering cells and for creating cellular life-like forms in SB.

  1. A FUZZY LOGIC-BASED APPROACH FOR THE DETECTION OF FLOODED VEGETATION BY MEANS OF SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tsyganskaya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an algorithm designed to map flooded vegetation from synthetic aperture radar (SAR imagery is introduced. The approach is based on fuzzy logic which enables to deal with the ambiguity of SAR data and to integrate multiple ancillary data containing topographical information, simple hydraulic considerations and land cover information. This allows the exclusion of image elements with a backscatter value similar to flooded vegetation, to significantly reduce misclassification errors. The flooded vegetation mapping procedure is tested on a flood event that occurred in Germany over parts of the Saale catchment on January 2011 using a time series of high resolution TerraSAR-X data covering the time interval from 2009 to 2015. The results show that the analysis of multi-temporal X-band data combined with ancillary data using a fuzzy logic-based approach permits the detection of flooded vegetation areas.

  2. a Fuzzy Logic-Based Approach for the Detection of Flooded Vegetation by Means of Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyganskaya, V.; Martinis, S.; Twele, A.; Cao, W.; Schmitt, A.; Marzahn, P.; Ludwig, R.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper an algorithm designed to map flooded vegetation from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery is introduced. The approach is based on fuzzy logic which enables to deal with the ambiguity of SAR data and to integrate multiple ancillary data containing topographical information, simple hydraulic considerations and land cover information. This allows the exclusion of image elements with a backscatter value similar to flooded vegetation, to significantly reduce misclassification errors. The flooded vegetation mapping procedure is tested on a flood event that occurred in Germany over parts of the Saale catchment on January 2011 using a time series of high resolution TerraSAR-X data covering the time interval from 2009 to 2015. The results show that the analysis of multi-temporal X-band data combined with ancillary data using a fuzzy logic-based approach permits the detection of flooded vegetation areas.

  3. Air Dispersion Modeling for the INL Application for a Synthetic Minor Sitewide Air Quality Permit to Construct with a Facility Emission Cap Component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sondrup, Andrus Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is applying for a synthetic minor, Sitewide, air quality permit to construct (PTC) with a facility emission cap (FEC) component from the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) for Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to limit its potential to emit to less than major facility limits for criteria air pollutants (CAPs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) regulated under the Clean Air Act. This document is supplied as an appendix to the application, Idaho National Laboratory Application for a Synthetic Minor Sitewide Air Quality Permit to Construct with a Facility Emissions Cap Component, hereafter referred to as “permit application” (DOE-ID 2015). Air dispersion modeling was performed as part of the permit application process to demonstrate pollutant emissions from the INL will not cause a violation of any ambient air quality standards. This report documents the modeling methodology and results for the air dispersion impact analysis. All CAPs regulated under Section 109 of the Clean Air Act were modeled with the exception of lead (Pb) and ozone, which are not required to be modeled by DEQ. Modeling was not performed for toxic air pollutants (TAPs) as uncontrolled emissions did not exceed screening emission levels for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic TAPs. Modeling for CAPs was performed with the EPA approved AERMOD dispersion modeling system (Version 14134) (EPA 2004a) and five years (2000-2004) of meteorological data. The meteorological data set was produced with the companion AERMET model (Version 14134) (EPA 2004b) using surface data from the Idaho Falls airport, and upper-air data from Boise International Airport supplied by DEQ. Onsite meteorological data from the Grid 3 Mesonet tower located near the center of the INL (north of INTEC) and supplied by the local National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) office was used for surface wind directions and wind speeds. Surface data (i

  4. Avian fatalities at wind energy facilities in North America: A comparison of recent approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Douglas H.; Loss, Scott R.; Smallwood, K. Shawn; Erickson, Wallace P.

    2016-01-01

    Three recent publications have estimated the number of birds killed each year by wind energy facilities at 2012 build-out levels in the United States. The 3 publications differ in scope, methodology, and resulting estimates. We compare and contrast characteristics of the approaches used in the publications. In addition, we describe decisions made in obtaining the estimates that were produced. Despite variation in the 3 approaches, resulting estimates were reasonably similar; about a quarter- to a half-million birds are killed per year by colliding with wind turbines.

  5. Multiscale approach to the predictability of earthquakes and of synthetic SOC sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peresan, A.; Panza, G. F.

    2003-04-01

    The power-law scaling expressed by the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) law is the main argument in favour of the Self-Organised Criticality (SOC) of seismic phenomena. Nevertheless the limits of validity of the GR law and the phenomenology reproduced by the SOC models, as well as their consequences for earthquake predictability, still remain quite undefined. According to the Multiscale Seismicity (MS) model, the GR law describes adequately only the ensemble of earthquakes that are geometrically small with respect to the dimensions of the analysed region. The MS model and its implications for intermediate-term medium-range earthquake predictions are thus examined, considering both the seismicity observed in the Italian territory and the synthetic sequences of events generated by a SOC model. The predictability of the large events is evaluated by means of the algorithms CN and M8, based on a quantitative analysis of the seismic flow within a delimited region, which allow for the prediction of the earthquakes with magnitude greater than a fixed threshold Mo. Considering the application of CN and M8 to the Italian territory, we show that, in agreement with the MS model, these algorithms make use of the information carried by small and moderate earthquakes, following the GR law, to predict the strong earthquakes, which are infrequent and often arbitrarily considered characteristic events inside the regions delimited for prediction purposes. Similarly, the application of the algorithm CN for the prediction of the largest events in the synthetic SOC sequences, indicates that a certain predictability can be attained, when the MS model is taken into account. These results suggest that the similarity between the seismic flow and the SOC sequences goes beyond the average features of scale-invariance. In fact, while the GR law describes an average feature of seismicity, CN algorithm is checking for the deviations from such trend, which may characterise the sequence of events before the

  6. Stakeholder opinions on the use of the added value approach in siting radioactive waste management facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojo, Matti [University of Tampere, School of ManagementTampere (Finland); Richardson, Phil [Galson Sciences Ltd, Oakham (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    In some countries nuclear waste facility siting programs include social and economic benefits, compensation, local empowerment and motivation measures and other incentives for the potential host community. This can generally be referred to as an 'added value approach'. Demonstration of the safety of a repository is seen as a precondition of an added value approach. Recently much focus has been placed on studying and developing public participation approaches but less on the use of such incentive and community benefit packages, although they are becoming a more common element in many site selection strategies for nuclear waste management facilities. The primary objective of this paper is to report on an ongoing study of stakeholders' opinions of the use of an added value approach in siting a radioactive waste facility in the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovenia. The paper argues that an added value approach should adapt to the interests and needs of stakeholders during different stages of a siting process. The main question posed in the study is as follows: What are the measures which should be included in 'added value approach' according to the stakeholders? The research data consists of stakeholders' responses to a survey focusing on the use of added value (community benefits) and incentives in siting nuclear waste management facilities. The survey involved use of a questionnaire developed as part of the EU-funded IPPA* project in three countries: the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovenia. (* Implementing Public Participation Approaches in Radioactive Waste Disposal, FP7 Contract Number: 269849). The target audiences for the questionnaires were the stakeholders represented in the national stakeholder groups established to discuss site selection for a nuclear waste repository in their country. A total of 105 questionnaires were sent to the stakeholders between November 2011 and January 2012. 44 questionnaires were returned, resulting in a

  7. Synthetic approaches, functionalization and therapeutic potential of quinazoline and quinazolinone skeletons: the advances continue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imtiaz; Ibrar, Aliya; Ahmed, Waqas; Saeed, Aamer

    2015-01-27

    The presence of N-heterocycles as an essential structural motif in a variety of biologically active substances has stimulated the development of new strategies and technologies for their synthesis. Among the various N-heterocyclic scaffolds, quinazolines and quinazolinones form a privileged class of compounds with their diverse spectrum of therapeutic potential. The easy generation of complex molecular diversity through broadly applicable, cost-effective, practical and sustainable synthetic methods in a straightforward fashion along with the importance of these motifs in medicinal chemistry, received significant attention from researchers engaged in drug design and heterocyclic methodology development. In this perspective, the current review article is an effort to recapitulate recent developments in the eco-friendly and green procedures for the construction of highly challenging and potentially bioactive quinazoline and quinazolinone compounds in order to help medicinal chemists in designing and synthesizing novel and potent compounds for the treatment of different disorders. The key mechanistic insights for the synthesis of these heterocycles along with potential applications and manipulations of the products have also been conferred. This article also aims to highlight the promising future directions for the easy access to these frameworks in addition to the identification of more potent and specific products for numerous biological targets.

  8. Nanocrystalline TiO2 by three different synthetic approaches: A comparison

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T V Anuradha; S Ranganathan

    2007-06-01

    A comparison of the efficiency of three different synthetic routes viz. sol–gel method involving templating, mechanochemical synthesis and combustion synthesis for the production of nanostructured TiO2, is reported. In the sol–gel method, nanocrystalline TiO2 is produced when titanium tetraisopropoxide is templated onto dodecylamine which forms the liquid crystalline hexagonal structure and the template is then extracted using 1 : 1 solution of ethanol–hydrochloric acid mixture. Mechanochemical synthesis of nanocrystalline TiO2 involved mechanical milling of stoichiometric amounts of titanium and cupric oxide in a planetary ball mill using stainless steel vial with wear resistant stainless steel balls. Nanocrystalline TiO2 is produced by the combustion reaction involving titanyl nitrate and fuels like glycine and citric acid. Nanostructured TiO2 with an average particle size of ∼ 14 nm is produced by the sol–gel method whereas the mechanochemical reaction between titanium and cupric oxide resulted in the formation of nanocrystalline TiO2 with an average particle size of ∼ 20 nm after 12 h of milling. On the other hand, combustion synthesis resulted in the formation of nanocrystalline TiO2 with an average particle size of less than ∼ 50 nm. The microstructures of nanocrystalline TiO2 produced by the above three methods are analysed.

  9. Efficient imaging approach for spaceborne sliding spotlight synthetic aperture radar with a small squint angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Peng; Chen, Yanmei; Sun, Weifeng; Wan, Yong; Dai, Yongshou

    2015-01-01

    Several existing algorithms for squinted sliding spotlight synthetic aperture radar (SAR) suffer from low efficiency, despite their good focusing abilities. Their low speeds are primarily due to the use of wave-number domain (Omega-K) processing after spectrum unfolding in the azimuth frequency domain. Omega-K processing is chosen in these algorithms due to its focusing ability at large squint angles. However, in most scenarios, spaceborne SARs operate with small squint angles that are generally not greater than 5 deg. In these scenarios, Omega-K processing is not necessary and is not preferred due to its computational burden. Thus, in this study, we extend a classic, two-step algorithm based on the chirp z-transformation for the efficient processing of SAR data acquired in spaceborne sliding spotlight mode at a small squint angle. The modified azimuth-filtering and focusing processing is used to compensate for the additional Doppler bandwidth caused by the antenna squinting and is described in detail. The simulation results show the good focusing ability of the proposed algorithm and validate the improvement in computational efficiency.

  10. Solid waste facilities location using of analytical network process and data envelopment analysis approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadivi, M R; Fatemi Ghomi, S M T

    2012-06-01

    Selection of the appropriate site for solid waste facilities is a complex problem and requires an extensive evaluation process, because it is very difficult to develop a selection criterion that can precisely describe the preference of one location over another. Therefore selection of these sites can be viewed as a multiple criteria decision-making or multiple attributes decision-making problem. For this purpose, we propose a technique that can effectively take managerial preferences and subjective data into consideration, along with quantitative factors. The tool proposed here relies on the use of the analytical network process (ANP) and to help integrate managerial evaluations into a more quantitatively based decision tool, data envelopment analysis (DEA) is applied. In this paper, a location selection procedure is presented to construct an undesirable facility applying ANP and DEA approaches in two stages. In the first stage ANP approach is used, results of this stage are inputs for the second stage. In this stage, DEA is applied to select the best location. Finally, to illustrate the proposed framework, at "Results and discussion" section, a total of four undesirable facility locations are evaluated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A facile approach towards amino-coated polyethersulfone particles for the removal of toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xin; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Weifeng; Sun, Shudong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2017-01-01

    The removal of toxins is important due to the damage to aquatic environment. In this work, a facile and green approach based on mussel-inspired coatings was used to fabricate amino-coated particles via the reaction between amine and catechol, using hexanediamine as the representative amine. The particles were characterized by Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The particles showed selective adsorption capability to Congo red (CR) and the adsorption process fitted the pseudo-second-order model, the intraparticle diffusion model, the Langmuir isotherm, the Freundlich isotherm and the Sips isotherm well. Furthermore, this approach was verified to have applicability to various amines such as diethylenetriamine (DETA), triethylenetetramine (TETA) and tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), and the amino-coated particles exhibited diverse adsorption capacities to CR, Cu(2+) and bilirubin. Considering that the approach is easy to operate and the whole preparation process is in an aqueous solution, it is believed that the facile, green and economical approach has great potential to prepare particles for wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tracing the transcriptomic changes in synthetic Trigenomic allohexaploids of Brassica using an RNA-Seq approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Zhao

    Full Text Available Polyploidization has played an important role in plant evolution and speciation, and newly formed allopolyploids have experienced rapid transcriptomic changes. Here, we compared the transcriptomic differences between a synthetic Brassica allohexaploid and its parents using a high-throughput RNA-Seq method. A total of 35,644,409 sequence reads were generated, and 32,642 genes were aligned from the data. Totals of 29,260, 29,060, and 29,697 genes were identified in Brassicarapa, Brassicacarinata, and Brassica allohexaploid, respectively. We compared 7,397 differentially expressed genes (DEGs between Brassica hexaploid and its parents, as well as 2,545 nonadditive genes of Brassica hexaploid. We hypothesized that the higher ploidy level as well as secondary polyploidy might have influenced these changes. The majority of the 3,184 DEGs between Brassica hexaploid and its paternal parent, B. rapa, were involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, plant-pathogen interactions, photosynthesis, and circadian rhythm. Among the 2,233 DEGs between Brassica hexaploid and its maternal parent, B. carinata, several played roles in plant-pathogen interactions, plant hormone signal transduction, ribosomes, limonene and pinene degradation, photosynthesis, and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. There were more significant differences in gene expression between the allohexaploid and its paternal parent than between it and its maternal parent, possibly partly because of cytoplasmic and maternal effects. Specific functional categories were enriched among the 2,545 nonadditive genes of Brassica hexaploid compared with the additive genes; the categories included response to stimulus, immune system process, cellular process, metabolic process, rhythmic process, and pigmentation. Many transcription factor genes, methyltransferases, and methylation genes showed differential expression between Brassica hexaploid and its parents. Our results demonstrate that the

  13. Synthetic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    What a living organism looks like and how it works and what are its components-all this is encoded on DNA, the genetic blueprint. Consequently, the way to change an organism is to change its genetic information. Since the first pieces of recombinant DNA have been used to transform cells in the 1970s, this approach has been enormously extended. Bigger and bigger parts of the genetic information have been exchanged or added over the years. Now we are at a point where the construction of entire chromosomes becomes a reachable goal and first examples appear. This development leads to fundamental new questions, for example, about what is possible and desirable to build or what construction rules one needs to follow when building synthetic chromosomes. Here we review the recent progress in the field, discuss current challenges and speculate on the appearance of future synthetic chromosomes.

  14. Synthetic biology and therapeutic strategies for the degenerating brain: Synthetic biology approaches can transform classical cell and gene therapies, to provide new cures for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín-Pavón, Carmen; Isalan, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging engineering discipline that attempts to design and rewire biological components, so as to achieve new functions in a robust and predictable manner. The new tools and strategies provided by synthetic biology have the potential to improve therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, synthetic biology will help design small molecules, proteins, gene networks, and vectors to target disease-related genes. Ultimately, new intelligent delivery systems will provide targeted and sustained therapeutic benefits. New treatments will arise from combining 'protect and repair' strategies: the use of drug treatments, the promotion of neurotrophic factor synthesis, and gene targeting. Going beyond RNAi and artificial transcription factors, site-specific genome modification is likely to play an increasing role, especially with newly available gene editing tools such as CRISPR/Cas9 systems. Taken together, these advances will help develop safe and long-term therapies for many brain diseases in human patients. © 2014 The Authors. Bioessays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Designing Multi Objective Facility Location Models Based on Multiple Type Facility Dispersion and Data Envelopment Analysis Using Fuzzy Goal Programing Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Karbasian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, four different multiple-type dispersion facilities location modeling formulations have been developed, which utilize efficiency measures of Data Envelopment Analysis to find optimal and efficient facility location patterns. While the problems studied previously do not clearly indicate which candidate is elected by a unit, simultaneous DEA approach has been used for analysis. In these models, existing facilities are considered. These models with two objectives, considerabely match the real world problems. Since these four models are multiobjective, a fuzzy goal programming approach has been applied to solve the four problems. In this paper, after introducing the proposed models, an example, with the results of numerical calculations has been presented.

  16. Synthetic approaches towards new polymer systems by the combination of living carbocationic and anionic polymerizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldthusen, Jesper; Ivan, Bela; Muller, Axel. H.E.

    1996-01-01

    to incomplete lithiation of this chain end.In another approach a new functionalization method was developed by end-quenching living polyisobutylene with 1,1-diphenylethylene. After transformation of the groups into 2,2-diphenylvinyl end groups and lithiation polymers were synthesized from protected acrylate...

  17. The evolution and functions of laughter and humor: a synthetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Matthew; Wilson, David Sloan

    2005-12-01

    A number of recent hypotheses have attempted to explain the ultimate evolutionary origins of laughter and humor. However most of these have lacked breadth in their evolutionary frameworks while neglecting the empirical existence of two distinct types of laughter--Duchenne and non-Duchenne--and the implications of this distinction for the evolution of laughter as a signal. Most of these hypotheses have also been proposed in relative isolation of each other and remain disjointed from the relevant empirical literature. Here we attempt to remedy these shortcomings through a synthesis of previous laughter and humor research followed by (i) a reevaluation of this research in light of theory and data from several relevant disciplines, and (ii) the proposal of a synthetic evolutionary framework that takes into account phylogeny and history as well as proximate mechanisms and adaptive significance. We consider laughter to have been a preadaptation that was gradually elaborated and co-opted through both biological and cultural evolution. We hypothesize that Duchenne laughter became fully ritualized in early hominids between 4 and 2 mya as a medium for playful emotional contagion. This mechanism would have coupled the emotions of small hominid groups and promoted resource-building social play during the fleeting periods of safety and satiation that characterized early bipedal life. We further postulate that a generalized class of nonserious social incongruity would have been a reliable indicator of such safe times and thereby came to be a potent distal elicitor of laughter and playful emotion. This class of stimuli had its origins in primate social play and was the foundation for formal human humor. Within this framework, Duchenne laughter and protohumor were well established in the hominid biobehavioral repertoire when more cognitively sophisticated traits evolved in the hominid line between 2 mya and the present. The prior existence of laughter and humor allowed them to be

  18. Urban Biomining: Biological Extraction of Metals and Materials from Electronics Waste Using a Synthetic Biology Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina-Navarrete, J.; Rothschild, L.

    2016-12-01

    End-of-life electronics waste (e-waste) containing toxic and valuable materials is a rapidly progressing human health and environmental issue. Using synthetic biology tools, we have developed a recycling method for e-waste. Our innovation is to use a recombinant version of a naturally-occurring silica-degrading enzyme to depolymerize the silica in metal- and glass- containing e-waste components, and subsequently, to use engineered bacterial surfaces to bind and separate metals from a solution. The bacteria with bound metals can then be used as "bio-ink" to print new circuits using a novel plasma jet electronics printing technology. Here, we present the results from our initial studies that focus on the specificity of metal-binding motifs for a cognate metal. The candidate motifs that show high affinity and specificity will be engineered into bacterial surfaces for downstream applications in biologically-mediated metal recycling. Since the chemistry and role of Cu in metalloproteins is relatively well-characterized, we are using Cu as a proxy to elucidate metal and biological ligand interactions with various metals in e-waste. We assess the binding parameters of 3 representative classes of Cu-binding motifs using isothermal titration calorimetry; 1) natural motifs found in metalloproteins, 2) consensus motifs, and 3) rationally designed peptides that are predicted, in silico, to bind Cu. Our results indicate that naturally-occurring motifs have relative high affinity and specificity for Cu (association constant for Cu Ka 104 M-1, Zn Ka 103 M-1) when competing ions are present in the aqueous milieu. However, motifs developed through rational design by applying quantum mechanical methods that take into account complexation energies of the elemental binding partners and molecular geometry of the cognate metal, not only show high affinity for the cognate metal (Cu Ka 106 M-1), but they show specificity and discrimination against other metal ions that would be

  19. Summary report : direct approaches for recycling carbon dioxide into synthetic fuel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ambrosini, Andrea; Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Miller, James Edward; Gelbard, Fred; Evans, Lindsey R.

    2009-01-01

    The consumption of petroleum by the transportation sector in the United States is roughly equivalent to petroleum imports into the country, which have totaled over 12 million barrels a day every year since 2004. This reliance on foreign oil is a strategic vulnerability for the economy and national security. Further, the effect of unmitigated CO{sub 2} releases on the global climate is a growing concern both here and abroad. Independence from problematic oil producers can be achieved to a great degree through the utilization of non-conventional hydrocarbon resources such as coal, oil-shale and tarsands. However, tapping into and converting these resources into liquid fuels exacerbates green house gas (GHG) emissions as they are carbon rich, but hydrogen deficient. Revolutionary thinking about energy and fuels must be adopted. We must recognize that hydrocarbon fuels are ideal energy carriers, but not primary energy sources. The energy stored in a chemical fuel is released for utilization by oxidation. In the case of hydrogen fuel the chemical product is water; in the case of a hydrocarbon fuel, water and carbon dioxide are produced. The hydrogen economy envisions a cycle in which H{sub 2}O is re-energized by splitting water into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, by electrolysis for example. We envision a hydrocarbon analogy in which both carbon dioxide and water are re-energized through the application of a persistent energy source (e.g. solar or nuclear). This is of course essentially what the process of photosynthesis accomplishes, albeit with a relatively low sunlight-to-hydrocarbon efficiency. The goal of this project then was the creation of a direct and efficient process for the solar or nuclear driven thermochemical conversion of CO{sub 2} to CO (and O{sub 2}), one of the basic building blocks of synthetic fuels. This process would potentially provide the basis for an alternate hydrocarbon economy that is carbon neutral, provides a pathway to energy independence, and is

  20. A New Approach for Analyzing the Reliability of the Repair Facility in a Series System with Vacations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renbin Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the renewal process theory we develop a decomposition method to analyze the reliability of the repair facility in an n-unit series system with vacations. Using this approach, we study the unavailability and the mean replacement number during (0,t] of the repair facility. The method proposed in this work is novel and concise, which can make us see clearly the structures of the facility indices of a series system with an unreliable repair facility, two convolution relations. Special cases and numerical examples are given to show the validity of our method.

  1. A facile hydrothermal approach for construction of carbon coating on TiO2 nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Olurode, Kehinde; Neelgund, Gururaj M.; Oki, Aderemi; Luo, Zhiphing

    2011-01-01

    Herein a facile hydrothermal approach is used to construct carbon coated TiO2 nanoparticles employing dextrose as the source of carbon. The procedure is operated at a low temperature of 200 °C. Fourier infrared spectroscopy demonstrated the successful coating of carbon on TiO2 nanoparticles. The phase composition of TiO2 and carbon coated TiO2 nanoparticles were studied using X-ray diffraction and the surface morphology was analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The existe...

  2. Production of Useful Terpenoids by Higher-Fungus Cell Factory and Synthetic Biology Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Han; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Higher fungi with greater than 70000 species are regarded as a rich source of various natural compounds including terpenoids, the production of which represents a wide range of interest in pharmaceutical and healthcare industries. This review summarizes the current knowledge of terpenoids synthesized by higher fungi, and highlights the current state-of-the-art regarding genetic manipulation of higher fungi. As the focus, this article will discuss the most recent approaches enabling native hosts and heterologous microbes to efficiently produce various terpenoids, especially with regard to the construction of 'smart' higher-fungus cell factories. The merits and demerits of heterologous versus native hosts as cell factories will also be debated.

  3. A facile, versatile approach to hydroxyl-anchored metal oxides with high Cr(VI) adsorption performance in water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ji; Zuo-Jiang, SiZhi; He, Yunhao; Sun, Qinglei; Wang, Yunguo; Liu, Wei; Sun, Shuangshuang; Chen, Kezheng

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a facile and versatile urea-assisted approach was proposed to synthesize Chinese rose-like NiO, pinecone-like ZnO and sponge-like CoO adsorbents. The presence of urea during syntheses endowed these adsorbents with high concentration of surface hydroxyl groups, which was estimated as 1.83, 1.32 and 4.19 mmol [OH-] g-1 for NiO, ZnO and CoO adsorbents, respectively. These surface hydroxyl groups would facilitate the adsorption of Cr(vi) species (e.g. HCrO4-, Cr2O72- and CrO42-) from wastewater by exchanging with hydroxyl protons or hydroxide ions, and hence result in extremely high maximum adsorbed amounts of Cr(vi), being 2974, 14 256 and 408 mg g-1 for NiO, ZnO and CoO adsorbents in the pH range of 5.02-5.66 at 298 K, respectively. More strikingly, the maximum adsorbed amounts of Cr(vi) would be greatly enhanced as the adsorbing temperature is increased, and even amount to 23 411 mg g-1 for ZnO adsorbents at 323 K. Based on the kinetics and equilibrium studies of adsorptive removal of Cr(vi) from wastewater, our synthetic route will greatly improve the adsorptivity of the as-synthesized metal-oxide adsorbents, and hence it will shed new light on the development of high-performance adsorbents.

  4. Direct Preparation of 2-Benzothiazolylzinc Bromide and its Applications: A Facile Synthetic Route to the Preparation of 2-Substituted Benzothiazole Derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sooyoul [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyuhyuk; Kim, Seunghoi [Dankook Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    We have developed a novel approach for the direct preparation of 2-benzothiazolylzinc bromide and its application in organic synthesis. This protocol is a new tool for the convenient synthesis of 2-substituted benzothiazole derivatives. The resulting products obtained from this work can be utilized for further applications in the synthesis of many biologically active compounds. The benzothiazole moiety has been found in a variety of natural products and pharmaceuticals and demonstrates efficient biological activities. Specifically, 2-substituted benzothiazole derivatives have attracted considerable attention in a wide spectrum of chemical applications due to their unique structural properties. Therefore, the diversity of synthetic protocols has been an extensively discussed topic among scientists involved in organic synthesis for the past decades. In general, to build up the 2-substituted benzothiazole complexes, the strategic tools can be categorized as shown in Scheme 1: cross-coupling of benzothiazolylmetallic complexes (method A), coupling reaction of benzothiazole via direct oxidative C-H activation, cross-coupling of organometallic with halobenzothiazole, and ring-construction of N and S-containing compounds with the appropriate substrates.

  5. From porous gold nanocups to porous nanospheres and solid particles - A new synthetic approach

    KAUST Repository

    Ihsan, Ayesha

    2015-05-01

    We report a versatile approach for the synthesis of porous gold nanocups, porous gold nanospheres and solid gold nanoparticles. Gold nanocups are formed by the slow reduction of gold salt (HAuCl4{dot operator}3H2O) using aminoantipyrene (AAP) as a reducing agent. Adding polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) to the gold salt followed by reduction with AAP resulted in the formation of porous gold nanospheres. Microwave irradiation of both of these porous gold particles resulted in the formation of slightly smaller but solid gold particles. All these nanoparticles are thoroughly characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and bright-field tomography. Due to the larger size, porous nature, low density and higher surface area, these nanomaterials may have interesting applications in catalysis, drug delivery, phototherapy and sensing.

  6. Identifying Potential Areas for Siting Interim Nuclear Waste Facilities Using Map Algebra and Optimization Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Liu, Cheng [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Tuttle, Mark A [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The renewed interest in siting new nuclear power plants in the United States has brought to the center stage, the need to site interim facilities for long-term management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). In this paper, a two-stage approach for identifying potential areas for siting interim SNF facilities is presented. In the first stage, the land area is discretized into grids of uniform size (e.g., 100m x 100m grids). For the continental United States, this process resulted in a data matrix of about 700 million cells. Each cell of the matrix is then characterized as a binary decision variable to indicate whether an exclusion criterion is satisfied or not. A binary data matrix is created for each of the 25 siting criteria considered in this study. Using map algebra approach, cells that satisfy all criteria are clustered and regarded as potential siting areas. In the second stage, an optimization problem is formulated as a p-median problem on a rail network such that the sum of the shortest distance between nuclear power plants with SNF and the potential storage sites from the first stage is minimized. The implications of obtained results for energy policies are presented and discussed.

  7. Synthetic biology, inspired by synthetic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, V; Nallani, M; Meier, W P; Sinner, E K

    2012-07-16

    The topic synthetic biology appears still as an 'empty basket to be filled'. However, there is already plenty of claims and visions, as well as convincing research strategies about the theme of synthetic biology. First of all, synthetic biology seems to be about the engineering of biology - about bottom-up and top-down approaches, compromising complexity versus stability of artificial architectures, relevant in biology. Synthetic biology accounts for heterogeneous approaches towards minimal and even artificial life, the engineering of biochemical pathways on the organismic level, the modelling of molecular processes and finally, the combination of synthetic with nature-derived materials and architectural concepts, such as a cellular membrane. Still, synthetic biology is a discipline, which embraces interdisciplinary attempts in order to have a profound, scientific base to enable the re-design of nature and to compose architectures and processes with man-made matter. We like to give an overview about the developments in the field of synthetic biology, regarding polymer-based analogs of cellular membranes and what questions can be answered by applying synthetic polymer science towards the smallest unit in life, namely a cell.

  8. Validation of an entirely in vitro approach for rapid prototyping of DNA regulatory elements for synthetic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, James; Jensen, Kirsten; Freemont, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    A bottleneck in our capacity to rationally and predictably engineer biological systems is the limited number of well-characterized genetic elements from which to build. Current characterization methods are tied to measurements in living systems, the transformation and culturing of which are inherently time-consuming. To address this, we have validated a completely in vitro approach for the characterization of DNA regulatory elements using Escherichia coli extract cell-free systems. Importantly, we demonstrate that characterization in cell-free systems correlates and is reflective of performance in vivo for the most frequently used DNA regulatory elements. Moreover, we devise a rapid and completely in vitro method to generate DNA templates for cell-free systems, bypassing the need for DNA template generation and amplification from living cells. This in vitro approach is significantly quicker than current characterization methods and is amenable to high-throughput techniques, providing a valuable tool for rapidly prototyping libraries of DNA regulatory elements for synthetic biology. PMID:23371936

  9. Computational and synthetic approaches for developing Lavendustin B derivatives as allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agharbaoui, Fatima E.; Hoyte, Ashley C.; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Fuchs, James R.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; De Luca, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Through structure-based virtual screening and subsequent activity assays of selected natural products, Lavendustin B was previously identified as an inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase (IN) interaction with its cognate cellular cofactor, lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). In order to improve the inhibitory potency we have employed in silico-based approaches. Particularly, a series of new analogues was designed and docked into the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV-1 IN. To identify promising leads we used the Molecular Mechanics energies combined with the Generalized Born and Surface Area continuum solvation (MM-GBSA) method, molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of hydrogen bond occupancies. On the basis of these studies, six analogues of Lavendustine B, containing the benzylamino-hydroxybenzoic scaffold, were selected for synthesis and structure activity-relationship (SAR) studies. Our results demonstrated a good correlation between computational and experimental data, and all six analogues displayed an improved potency for inhibiting IN binding to LEDGF/p75 in vitro to respect to the parent compound Lavendustin B. Additionally, these analogs show to inhibit weakly LEDGF/p75-independent IN catalytic activity suggesting a multimodal allosteric mechanism of action. Nevertheless, for the synthesized compounds similar profiles for HIV-1 inhibition and cytoxicity were highlighted. Taken together, our studies elucidated the mode of action of Lavendustin B analogs and provided a path for their further development as a new promising class of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. PMID:27517812

  10. Computational and synthetic approaches for developing Lavendustin B derivatives as allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agharbaoui, Fatima E; Hoyte, Ashley C; Ferro, Stefania; Gitto, Rosaria; Buemi, Maria Rosa; Fuchs, James R; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; De Luca, Laura

    2016-11-10

    Through structure-based virtual screening and subsequent activity assays of selected natural products, Lavendustin B was previously identified as an inhibitor of HIV-1 integrase (IN) interaction with its cognate cellular cofactor, lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75). In order to improve the inhibitory potency we have employed in silico-based approaches. Particularly, a series of new analogues was designed and docked into the LEDGF/p75 binding pocket of HIV-1 IN. To identify promising leads we used the Molecular Mechanics energies combined with the Generalized Born and Surface Area continuum solvation (MM-GBSA) method, molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of hydrogen bond occupancies. On the basis of these studies, six analogues of Lavendustine B, containing the benzylamino-hydroxybenzoic scaffold, were selected for synthesis and structure activity-relationship (SAR) studies. Our results demonstrated a good correlation between computational and experimental data, and all six analogues displayed an improved potency for inhibiting IN binding to LEDGF/p75 in vitro to respect to the parent compound Lavendustin B. Additionally, these analogs show to inhibit weakly LEDGF/p75-independent IN catalytic activity suggesting a multimodal allosteric mechanism of action. Nevertheless, for the synthesized compounds similar profiles for HIV-1 inhibition and cytoxicity were highlighted. Taken together, our studies elucidated the mode of action of Lavendustin B analogs and provided a path for their further development as a new promising class of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

  11. Safety performance assessment of food industry facilities using a fuzzy approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Barreca

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The latest EU policies focus on the issue of food safety with a view to assuring adequate and standard quality levels for the food produced and/or consumed within the EC. To that purpose, the environment where agricultural products are manufactured and processed plays a crucial role in achieving food hygiene. As a consequence, it is of the utmost importance to adopt proper building solutions which meet health and hygiene requirements and to use suitable tools to measure the levels achieved. Similarly, it is necessary to verify and evaluate the level of safety and welfare of the workers in their working environment. The safety of the workers has not only an ethical and social value but also an economic implication, since possible accidents or environmental stressors are the major causes of the lower efficiency and productivity of workers. However, the technical solutions adopted in the manufacturing facilities in order to achieve adequate levels of safety and welfare of the workers are not always consistent with the solutions aimed at achieving adequate levels of food hygiene, even if both of them comply with sectoral rules which are often unconnected with each other. Therefore, it is fundamental to design suitable models of analysis that allow assessing buildings as a whole, taking into account both health and hygiene safety as well as the safety and welfare of workers. Hence, this paper proposes an evaluation model that, based on an established study protocol and on the application of a fuzzy logic procedure, allows evaluating the global safety level of a building. The proposed model allows to obtain a synthetic and global value of the building performance in terms of food hygiene and safety and welfare of the workers as well as to highlight possible weaknesses. Though the model may be applied in either the design or the operational phase of a building, this paper focuses on its application to certain buildings already operational in a specific

  12. A divergent synthetic approach to diverse molecular scaffolds: assessment of lead-likeness using LLAMA, an open-access computational tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer, Ignacio; Empson, Christopher J; Craven, Philip; Owen, Zachary; Doveston, Richard G; Churcher, Ian; Marsden, Stephen P; Nelson, Adam

    2016-06-07

    Complementary cyclisation reactions of hex-2-ene-1,6-diamine derivatives were exploited in the synthesis of alternative molecular scaffolds. The value of the synthetic approach was analysed using LLAMA, an open-access computational tool for assessing the lead-likeness and novelty of molecular scaffolds.

  13. Life in the Clouds of Venus? An Experimental Synthetic Biology Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, L. J.; Paulino-Lima, I. G.; Amatya, D.; Bajar, B.; Geilich, B.; Hu, J.; Jackson, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    The surface of Venus constitutes the most hellish and biologically inhospitable planetary surface in our solar system, boasting a pH of 0, blistering winds that can melt lead, and pressures of 60 atm. However, during the earlier years of the solar system, without the runaway greenhouse effect that has plagued the planet, Venus potentially housed oceans and perhaps even life. There is a possibility that microbes could have retreated into hospitable niches in the atmosphere, as suggested by Carl Sagan as early as 1967 [1]. For example, 50 km above the raging hell of the Venusian surface, exists a relatively temperate environment that might serve as reservoir for life. This astrobiology project seeks to explore life at the extremes and to theorize whether microbial communities could not only survive but also reproduce in the Venusian atmosphere. Specifically, we ask: are aerosols viable microbial environments? But before we can test for life in the clouds, we have to develop a proper reporter to visualize cell growth in situ. For this purpose, we aimed to develop cell-growth dependent reporters to serve as remote biosensors for cell growth. We developed two using the polA promoter, a DNA-replication dependent promoter, and nrd operon promoter, a cell-cycle dependent promoter. Using these cell-growth reporters, the next step is to aerosolize microbes expressing these reporters in a suspension chamber adapted from a Millikan Drop Apparatus to assay reproduction in an aerosolized environment. Better yet is to test the reproduction of microbes in a microgravity regime such as on ISS.Approach: We engineered two cell-cycle dependent genetic reporters. One was the polA promoter which codes for DNA Polymerase I, a gene active in DNA replication [2]. The other was the nrdP. The activation of ribonucleotide reductase reduces ribonucleotides into deoxyribonucleotides and is involved in the bacterial cell cycle [3]. This promoter began activation during the initiation of DNA

  14. Integration of a synthetic vision system with airborne laser range scanner-based terrain referenced navigation for precision approach guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uijt de Haag, Maarten; Campbell, Jacob; van Graas, Frank

    2005-05-01

    Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) provide pilots with a virtual visual depiction of the external environment. When using SVS for aircraft precision approach guidance systems accurate positioning relative to the runway with a high level of integrity is required. Precision approach guidance systems in use today require ground-based electronic navigation components with at least one installation at each airport, and in many cases multiple installations to service approaches to all qualifying runways. A terrain-referenced approach guidance system is envisioned to provide precision guidance to an aircraft without the use of ground-based electronic navigation components installed at the airport. This autonomy makes it a good candidate for integration with an SVS. At the Ohio University Avionics Engineering Center (AEC), work has been underway in the development of such a terrain referenced navigation system. When used in conjunction with an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and a high accuracy/resolution terrain database, this terrain referenced navigation system can provide navigation and guidance information to the pilot on a SVS or conventional instruments. The terrain referenced navigation system, under development at AEC, operates on similar principles as other terrain navigation systems: a ground sensing sensor (in this case an airborne laser scanner) gathers range measurements to the terrain; this data is then matched in some fashion with an onboard terrain database to find the most likely position solution and used to update an inertial sensor-based navigator. AEC's system design differs from today's common terrain navigators in its use of a high resolution terrain database (~1 meter post spacing) in conjunction with an airborne laser scanner which is capable of providing tens of thousands independent terrain elevation measurements per second with centimeter-level accuracies. When combined with data from an inertial navigator the high resolution terrain database and

  15. Efficient Syntheses of 1,2,3-Triazoloamide Derivatives Using Solid- and Solution-Phase Synthetic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doohyun Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Efficient synthetic routes for the preparation of secondary and tertiary 1,2,3-triazoloamide derivatives were developed. A secondary α-1,2,3-triazoloamide library was constructed and expanded by a previously developed solid-phase synthetic route and a tertiary 1,2,3-triazoloamide library was constructed by a parallel solution-phase synthetic route. The synthetic routes rely on amide formation with secondary amines and chloro-acid chlorides; SN2 reaction with sodium azide; and the selective [3 + 2] Hüisgen cycloaddition with appropriate terminal alkynes. The target secondary and tertiary 1,2,3-triazoloamide derivatives were obtained with three-diversity points in excellent overall yields and purities using the reported solid- and solution-phase synthetic routes, respectively.

  16. DYNAMIC RELOCATION OF PLANT/WAREHOUSE FACILITIES:A FAST COMPACT GENETIC ALGORITHM APPROACH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shugang; Wu Zhiming; Pang Xiaohong

    2004-01-01

    The problem of dynamic relocation and phase-out of combined manufacturing plant and warehousing facilities in the supply chain are concerned.A multiple time/multiple objective model is proposed to maximize total profit during the time horizon, minimize total access time from the plant/warehouse facilities to its suppliers and customers and maximize aggregated local incentives during the time horizon.The relocation problem keeps the feature of NP-hard and with the traditional method the optimal result cannot be got easily.So a compact genetic algorithm (CGA) is introduced to solve the problem.In order to accelerate the convergence speed of the CGA, the least square approach is introduced and a fast compact genetic algorithm (fCGA) is proposed.Finally, simulation results with the fCGA are compared with the CGA and classical integer programming (IP).The results show that the fCGA proposed is of high efficiency for Pareto optimality problem.

  17. A facile approach for imprinting protein on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ren; Sha, Mo; Jiang, Sisi; Luo, Jing; Liu, Xiaoya

    2014-03-01

    This study describes a green, facile and low cost approach for imprinting protein on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) using papain as the template, dopamine as the functional monomer. By simply mixing MWNTs, dopamine, template protein in weak alkaline aqueous solution, a thin adherent polydopamine (PDA) film imprinted with protein was spontaneously obtained on the surface of MWNTs to produce the imprinted nanomaterials (MWNTs@MIPs). The obtained MWNTs@MIPs were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adsorption process of the MWNTs@MIPs towards template protein was investigated in detail. The effects of the concentration of the monomer and template, polymerization time, extraction process were optimized. The prepared MWNTs@MIPs show fast binding kinetics, high binding capacity and acceptable specific recognition behavior towards template proteins. Furthermore, the stability and regeneration were also investigated, which indicated that the MWNTs@MIPs had good reusability. The good recognizing behavior coupled to the low cost and facile one-step preparation make the MWNTs@MIPs attractive for separation and specific protein recognition.

  18. Optimization of Physiochemical Parameters during Bioremediation of Synthetic Dye by Marasmius cladophyllus UMAS MS8 Using Statistical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuib, Fatin Nur Sufinas

    2016-01-01

    In many industrial areas such as in food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, printing, and textile, the use of synthetic dyes has been integral with products such as azo dye, anthrax, and dyestuffs. As such, these industries produce a lot of waste by-products that could contaminate the environment. Bioremediation, therefore, has become an important emerging technology due to its cost-sustainable, effective, natural approach to cleaning up contaminated groundwater and soil via the use of microorganisms. The use of microorganisms in bioremediation requires the optimisation of parameters used in cultivating the organism. Thus the aim of the work was to assess the degradation of Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR) dye on soil using Plackett-Burman design by the basidiomycete, M. cladophyllus UMAS MS8. Biodegradation analyses were carried out on a soil spiked with RBBR and supplemented with rice husk as the fungus growth enhancer. A two-level Plackett-Burman design was used to screen the medium components for the effects on the decolourization of RBBR. For the analysis, eleven variables were selected and from these four parameters, dye concentration, yeast extract concentration, inoculum size, and incubation time, were found to be most effective to degrade RBBR with up to 91% RBBR removal in soil after 15 days. PMID:27803944

  19. Optimization of Physiochemical Parameters during Bioremediation of Synthetic Dye by Marasmius cladophyllus UMAS MS8 Using Statistical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatin Nur Sufinas Shuib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In many industrial areas such as in food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, printing, and textile, the use of synthetic dyes has been integral with products such as azo dye, anthrax, and dyestuffs. As such, these industries produce a lot of waste by-products that could contaminate the environment. Bioremediation, therefore, has become an important emerging technology due to its cost-sustainable, effective, natural approach to cleaning up contaminated groundwater and soil via the use of microorganisms. The use of microorganisms in bioremediation requires the optimisation of parameters used in cultivating the organism. Thus the aim of the work was to assess the degradation of Remazol Brilliant Blue R (RBBR dye on soil using Plackett-Burman design by the basidiomycete, M. cladophyllus UMAS MS8. Biodegradation analyses were carried out on a soil spiked with RBBR and supplemented with rice husk as the fungus growth enhancer. A two-level Plackett-Burman design was used to screen the medium components for the effects on the decolourization of RBBR. For the analysis, eleven variables were selected and from these four parameters, dye concentration, yeast extract concentration, inoculum size, and incubation time, were found to be most effective to degrade RBBR with up to 91% RBBR removal in soil after 15 days.

  20. Synthetic and DFT studies towards a unified approach to phlegmarine alkaloids: aza-Michael intramolecular processes leading to 5-oxodecahydroquinolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Ben; Luque-Corredera, Carlos; Saborit, Gisela; Cativiela, Carlos; Dorel, Ruth; Bo, Carles; Bonjoch, Josep

    2013-10-04

    A diastereoselective synthesis of cis-5-oxodecahydroquinolines is described in which three stereocenters are generated in a one-pot reaction. The reaction involves a lithium hydroxide-promoted Robinson annulation/intramolecular aza-Michael domino process from an achiral acyclic tosylamine-tethered β-keto ester. The development and scope of this reaction was facilitated through the use of DFT-based mechanistic studies, which enabled the observed diastereodivergent course of the azacyclization to be rationalized. The varying stereochemistry and stability of the resulting decahydroquinolines was found to depend on whether a β-keto ester or ketone were embedded in the substrates undergoing aminocyclization. This synthetic approach gave access not only to both diastereomeric cis-decahydroquinolines from the same precursor, but also to the corresponding trans isomers, through an epimerization processes of the corresponding N-unsubstituted cis-5-oxodecahydroquinolines. The described methodology provides advanced building-blocks with the three relative stereochemistries required for the total synthesis of phlegmarine alkaloids.

  1. A Modular Approach to a Library of Semi-Synthetic Fucosylated Chondroitin Sulfate Polysaccharides with Different Sulfation and Fucosylation Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laezza, Antonio; Iadonisi, Alfonso; Pirozzi, Anna V A; Diana, Paola; De Rosa, Mario; Schiraldi, Chiara; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Bedini, Emiliano

    2016-12-12

    Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (fCS)-a glycosaminoglycan (GAG) found in sea cucumbers-has recently attracted much attention owing to its biological properties. In particular, a low molecular mass fCS polysaccharide has very recently been suggested as a strong candidate for the development of an antithrombotic drug that would be safer and more effective than heparin. To avoid the use of animal sourced drugs, here we present the chemical transformation of a microbial sourced unsulfated chondroitin polysaccharide into a small library of fucosylated (and sulfated) derivatives thereof. To this aim, a modular approach based on the different combination of only five reactions was employed, with an almost unprecedented polysaccharide branching by O-glycosylation as the key step. The library was differentiated for sulfation patterns and/or positions of the fucose branches, as confirmed by detailed 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis. These semi-synthetic polysaccharides will allow a wider and more accurate structure-activity relationship study with respect to those reported in literature to date.

  2. A Facile Approach to the Synthesis of Gold Nanoshells with Near Infrared Responsive Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shunying; LIANG Zhongshi; GAO Feng; YU Jiahui; LUO Shufang; CALATA Jesus N.; LU Guoquan

    2009-01-01

    A very detailed study of the most important parameters that involved in the preparation of gold nanosheils with near infrared (NIR) absorption properties is reported. The importance of this work lies in the deep understanding of how each parameter contributes to the formation of gold nanoshells in terms of size, shell thickness, optical prop-erty and particle stability, which have not been emphasized in the literatures. Through detailed characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, a fac-ile approach to synthesize nanoshells with optimal optical properties in the NIR region was obtained. The amount of reagents, the ratio and condition of reagents, the reaction time, all played important roles in the formation of stable,narrow-size distributed gold nanoshells with NIR absorption properties, which have significant applications to pho-tothermal therapy of cancers in biomedical area.

  3. Comparative approaches to siting low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newberry, W.F.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes activities in nine States to select site locations for new disposal facilities for low-level radioactive waste. These nine States have completed processes leading to identification of specific site locations for onsite investigations. For each State, the status, legal and regulatory framework, site criteria, and site selection process are described. In most cases, States and compact regions decided to assign responsibility for site selection to agencies of government and to use top-down mapping methods for site selection. The report discusses quantitative and qualitative techniques used in applying top-down screenings, various approaches for delineating units of land for comparison, issues involved in excluding land from further consideration, and different positions taken by the siting organizations in considering public acceptance, land use, and land availability as factors in site selection.

  4. Evaluation of a Virtual Citizen Science Facility: A Comprehensive Mixed-Methods Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracey, G.

    2014-07-01

    The CosmoQuest Virtual Citizen Science Facility allows the public to participate in scientific research, learning opportunities, and community activities. Evaluation efforts include an online survey of users' attitudes about and use of the CosmoQuest website and their motivations for participation. Pre/post-participation assessments examine learning of science content. Along with these quantitative assessments we seek a deeper level of understanding through qualitative methods. Formative and summative evaluations use semi-structured interviews and open-ended survey questions. Participant responses are analyzed using an iterative process of open coding, allowing patterns to emerge inductively from the data. Triangulation of data increases the validity of findings. This approach gives a more rigorous look at the motivations, behaviors, and learning of participants, and a more complete and in-depth understanding of project impact.

  5. Facile synthetic approach for 5-aryl-9-hydroxypyrano [3,2-f] indole-2(8H-one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An appropriate method for the synthesis of 5-aryl-9-hydroxypyrano[3,2-f]indole-2(8H-one was described. The targeted compounds were obtained starting from vanillin via nine steps. Interestingly, in the final cyclization step, the intermediate 4-(2-halogeno phenyl-7-methoxy-1H-indole-6-yl propiolate could convert directly into the final product in one step reaction using PtCl4 or Pd(PPh34/trifluoroacetic acid as catalysts. The possible catalytic mechanism for PtCl4 and Pd(PPh34/trifluoroacetic acid was discussed.

  6. Synthetic Biology and Metabolic Engineering Approaches and Its Impact on Non-Conventional Yeast and Biofuel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raveendran Sindhu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The increasing fossil fuel scarcity has led to an urgent need to develop alternative fuels. Currently microorganisms have been extensively used for the production of first-generation biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. Yeast is the efficient producer of bioethanol among all existing biofuels option. Tools of synthetic biology have revolutionized the field of microbial cell factories especially in the case of ethanol and fatty acid production. Most of the synthetic biology tools have been developed for the industrial workhorse Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The non-conventional yeast systems have several beneficial traits like ethanol tolerance, thermotolerance, inhibitor tolerance, genetic diversity, etc., and synthetic biology have the power to expand these traits. Currently, synthetic biology is slowly widening to the non-conventional yeasts like Hansenula polymorpha, Kluyveromyces lactis, Pichia pastoris, and Yarrowia lipolytica. Herein, we review the basic synthetic biology tools that can apply to non-conventional yeasts. Furthermore, we discuss the recent advances employed to develop efficient biofuel-producing non-conventional yeast strains by metabolic engineering and synthetic biology with recent examples. Looking forward, future synthetic engineering tools’ development and application should focus on unexplored non-conventional yeast species.

  7. Synthetic Approaches to TAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-05

    classical urotropine synthesis in - 32 - the presence of Ac 2 .0, AcOH, Cs+ as catalyst, and with 8- and y- cyclodextrins employing the molecular... encapsulation technique. 2) Extending the Kadowaki procedure of cyclic ureas to dimethalurea. 3) Extending the cyclic ureide synthesis to methylenebisacetamide

  8. Mimicking/extracting structure and functions of natural products: synthetic approaches that address unexplored needs in chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Go

    2015-04-01

    Natural products are often attractive and challenging targets for synthetic chemists, and many have interesting biological activities. However, synthetic chemists need to be more than simply suppliers of compounds to biologists. Therefore, we have been seeking ways to actively apply organic synthetic methods to chemical biology studies of natural products and their activities. In this personal review, I would like to introduce our work on the development of new biologically active compounds inspired by, or extracted from, the structures of natural products, focusing on enhancement of functional activity and specificity and overcoming various drawbacks of the parent natural products.

  9. A user-friendly approach to cost accounting in laboratory animal facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David G

    2011-08-19

    Cost accounting is an essential management activity for laboratory animal facility management. In this report, the author describes basic principles of cost accounting and outlines steps for carrying out cost accounting in laboratory animal facilities. Methods of post hoc cost accounting analysis for maximizing the efficiency of facility operations are also described.

  10. Evaluation of users' satisfaction on pedestrian facilities using pair-wise comparison approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainol, R.; Ahmad, F.; Nordin, N. A.; Aripin, A. W. M.

    2014-02-01

    Global climate change issues demand people of the world to change the way they live today. Thus, current cities need to be redeveloped towards less use of carbon in their day to day operations. Pedestrianized environment is one of the approaches used in reducing carbon foot print in cities. Heritage cities are the first to be looked into since they were built in the era in which motorized vehicles were minimal. Therefore, the research explores users' satisfaction on assessment of physical attributes of pedestrianization in Melaka Historical City, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It aims to examine users' satisfaction on pedestrian facilities provided within the study area using pair wise questionnaire comparison approach. A survey of 200 respondents using random sampling was conducted in six different sites namely Jonker Street, Church Street, Kota Street, Goldsmith Street, Merdeka Street to Taming Sari Tower and Merdeka Street to River Cruise terminal. The survey consists of an assessment tool based on a nine-point scale of users' satisfaction level of pathway properties, zebra pedestrian crossing, street furniture, personal safety, adjacent to traffic flow, aesthetic and amenities. Analytical hierarchical process (AHP) was used to avoid any biasness in analyzing the data collected. Findings show that Merdeka Street to Taming Sari Tower as the street that scores the highest satisfaction level that fulfils all the required needs of a pedestrianized environment. Similar assessment elements can be used to evaluate existing streets in other cities and these criteria should also be used in planning for future cities.

  11. In situ growth of carbon nanotubes on Ni/MgO: a facile preparation of efficient catalysts for the production of synthetic natural gas from syngas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, M T; Lin, J D; Zhang, H B; Liao, D W

    2015-11-07

    Ni/MgO-CNTs catalysts are prepared by in situ chemical vapor deposition growth of CNTs on Ni/MgO. These catalysts exhibit an improved performance for the production of synthetic natural gas from syngas, which is attributed to the formation of highly catalytic active interfaces among Ni, CNTs and MgO.

  12. Approaches to consider covers and liners in a low-level waste disposal facility performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, Roger [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Phifer, Mark [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Suttora, Linda [USDOE, Office of Environmental Management, Germantown, MD (United States)

    2015-03-17

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several USDOE sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These disposal cells are typically regulated by States and/or the USEPA in addition to having to comply with requirements in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. One task completed by the working group addressed approaches for considering the performance of covers and liners/leachate collection systems in the context of a performance assessment (PA). A document has been prepared which provides recommendations for a general approach to address covers and liners/leachate collection systems in a PA and how to integrate assessments with defense-in-depth considerations such as design, operations and waste acceptance criteria to address uncertainties. Specific information and references are provided for details needed to address the evolution of individual components of cover and liner/leachate collection systems. This information is then synthesized into recommendations for best practices for cover and liner system design and examples of approaches to address the performance of covers and liners as part of a performance assessment of the disposal system.

  13. Feasibility Assessment of an ISS Artificial Gravity Conditioning Facility by Means of Multi-Body Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toso, Mario; Baldesi, Gianluigi; Moratto, Claudio; De Wilde, Don; Bureo Dacal, Rafael; Castellsaguer, Joaquim

    2012-07-01

    Even though human exploration of Mars is a distant objective, it is well understood that, for human space voyages of several years duration, crews would be at risk of catastrophic consequences should any of the systems that provide adequate air, water, food, or thermal protection fail. Moreover, crews will face serious health and/or safety risks resulting from severe physiologic deconditioning associated with prolonged weightlessness. The principal ones are related to physical and functional deterioration of the regulation of the blood circulation, decreased aerobic capacity, impaired musculo-skeletal systems, and altered sensory- motor system performance. As the reliance of future space programmes on virtual modelling, simulation and justification has substantially grown together with the proto-flight hardware development approach, a range of simulation capabilities have become increasingly important in the requirements specification, design, verification, testing, launch and operation of new space systems. In this frame, multibody software is a key tool in providing a more coordinated and consistent approach from the preliminary development phases of the most complex systems. From a scientific prospective, an artificial gravity facility, such as the one evaluated in this paper, would be the first in-flight testing of the effectiveness and acceptability of short radius centrifuge as a countermeasure to human deconditioning on orbit. The ISS represents a unique opportunity to perform this research. From an engineering point of view, the preliminary assessment described in this paper, highlights the difficult engineering challenges of such a facility. The outcome proves that a human can be accommodated in the available volume, while respecting the human ergonomic basic requirements and preserving the global structural integrity of the hosting ISS module. In particular, analysis shows that, although the load capacity of the structural interfaces imposes a very low

  14. A Facile Approach to Evaluate Thermal Insulation Performance of Paper Cups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudi Kuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper cups are ubiquitous in daily life for serving water, soup, coffee, tea, and milk due to their convenience, biodegradability, recyclability, and sustainability. The thermal insulation performance of paper cups is of significance because they are used to supply hot food or drinks. Using an effective thermal conductivity to accurately evaluate the thermal insulation performance of paper cups is complex due to the inclusion of complicated components and a multilayer structure. Moreover, an effective thermal conductivity is unsuitable for evaluating thermal insulation performance of paper cups in the case of fluctuating temperature. In this work, we propose a facile approach to precisely analyze the thermal insulation performance of paper cups in a particular range of temperature by using an evaluation model based on the MISO (Multiple-Input Single-Output technical theory, which includes a characterization parameter (temperature factor and a measurement apparatus. A series of experiments was conducted according to this evaluation model, and the results show that this evaluation model enables accurate characterization of the thermal insulation performance of paper cups and provides an efficient theoretical basis for selecting paper materials for paper cups.

  15. Microstructured surfaces engineered using biological templates: a facile approach for the fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUSAN LOSIC

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of microstructured surfaces using biological templates was investigated with the aim of exploring of a facile and low cost approach for the fabrication of structured surfaces with superhydrophobic properties. Two soft lithographic techniques, i.e., replica moulding and nano-imprinting, were used to replicate the surfaces of a biological substrate. Leaves of the Agave plant (Agave attenuate, a cost-free biological template, were used as a model of a biosurface with superhydrophobic properties. The replication process was performed using two polymers: an elastomeric polymer, poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS, and a polyurethane (PU based, UV-curable polymer (NOA 60. In the first replication step, negative polymer replicas of the surface of leaves were fabricated, which were used as masters to fabricate positive polymer replicas by moulding and soft imprinting. The pattern with micro and nanostructures of the surface of the leaf possesses superhydrophobic properties, which was successfully replicated into both polymers. Finally, the positive replicas were coated with a thin gold film and modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs to verify the importance of the surface chemistry on the hydrophobic properties of the fabricated structures. Wetting (contact angle and structural (light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy characterisation was performed to confirm the hydrophobic properties of the fabricated surfaces (> 150°, as well as the precision and reproducibility of the replication process.

  16. A facile template-free approach to magnetodriven, multifunctional artificial cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Jaakko V I; Johans, Christoffer; Kontturi, Kyösti; Walther, Andreas; Ikkala, Olli; Ras, Robin H A

    2010-08-01

    Flexible and magnetic artificial cilia were grown on various substrates by a facile bottom-up approach based on template-free magnetic assembly. The magnetic cilia formed spontaneously from a suspension of micrometer-sized ferromagnetic particles and elastomeric polymer in a liquid solvent when dried in an external magnetic field. The cilia mimics were mechanically stable even in the absence of an external magnetic field and a solvent due to the polymer, which acted as "glue" holding the particles together and connecting the cilia to the substrate. The length of the magnetic cilia was in the millimeter range, that is, two to three orders of magnitude times the length of typical biological cilia. The aspect ratio reached values over 100 and was tunable with the magnetic field gradient and the size of the ferromagnetic particles. The cilia mimics responded to an external magnetic field by reversibly bending along the field. The bending actuation was sufficiently powerful to allow two functions: to translate macroscopic nonmagnetic objects placed over the cilia mimics and to mix liquids of even high viscosity. The mechanical properties of the magnetic cilia could be easily tuned by changing the impregnating polymer. The particularly simple template-free construction and fixation on various surfaces suggest applications as an externally controllable surface.

  17. A GIS Based Integrated Approach to Measure the Spatial Equity of Community Facilities of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meher Nigar Neema

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of public facilities and their spatial equity is an important matter to be considered while planning public facilities. However, most of the studies in the literature have taken into consideration only a single type of facility while leaving other facilities unconsidered. In this paper an integrated spatial index for public facilities has been developed integrating GIS and spatial analysis models. The index measures the spatial equity based on the accessibility of 6 different types of public facilities for 5247 unions and 476 sub-districts of Bangladesh. Spatial autocorrelation techniques have been applied to understand the spatial pattern of accessibility. In fact it helps to understand the characteristics of spatial equity both for disaggregated and aggregated levels. It has been found that variation accessibilities to the facilities across the space are significant. Distribution of some facilities are spatially clustered to some particular areas means those areas are in an advantageous position in terms of accessibility while other areas are in a backward condition. The proposed index and the spatial autocorrelation will help to identify which areas should receive more priority in allocating particular types of public facilities in the future.

  18. A New Approach for Removal of Nitrogen Oxides from Synthetic Gas-streams under High Concentration of Oxygen in Biofilters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Bin HUANG; Ju Guang ZHANG; He Ping HU; Yue SITU

    2005-01-01

    The potential of using denitrifying and nitrifying concurrent biofilters for the removal of nitrogen oxides from synthetic gas streams was studied under the condition of high oxygen concentration. It was found that more than 85% of nitric oxide was removed from synthetic combustion gas-streams which contained 20% oxygen and 350 μL/L NO, with a residence time of60 seconds. In the process, it was found that the existing of oxygen showed no evident negative effect on the efficiency of nitrogen removal.

  19. An improved Lagrangian relaxation and dual ascent approach to facility location problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jörnsten, Kurt; Klose, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    method for optimizing both the semi-Lagrangian dual function as well as its simplified form for the case of a generic discrete facility location problem and apply the method to the uncapacitated facility location problem. Our computational results show that the method generally only requires a very few...

  20. Open questions in origin of life: experimental studies on the origin of nucleic acids and proteins with specific and functional sequences by a chemical synthetic biology approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamala, K.; Anella, F.; Wieczorek, R.

    2014-01-01

    In this mini-review we present some experimental approaches to the important issue in the origin of life, namely the origin of nucleic acids and proteins with specific and functional sequences. The formation of macromolecules on prebiotic Earth faces practical and conceptual difficulties. From...... sequences among a vast array of possible ones, the huge "sequence space", leading to the question "why these macromolecules, and not the others?" We have recently addressed these questions by using a chemical synthetic biology approach. In particular, we have tested the catalytic activity of small peptides...

  1. The global, centralized approach of the GAIN Premix Facility has made oil fortification in Indonesia more affordable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallier, Vincent; Guyondet, Christophe; Provent, Adeline; Laillou, Arnaud; Soekirman; Moench-Pfanner, Regina

    2013-06-01

    Access to high-grade micronutrients is a recurring challenge that often threatens the long-term sustainability of food fortification programs. To assess the efficiency of the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) Premix Facility in procuring quality, affordable vitamin A for fortification of edible oil in Indonesia. A global approach to procurement of standard items was used by combining volumes across various demand streams in order to reduce the total cost of acquisition through economies of scale. The GAIN Premix Facility undertook a detailed analysis of vitamin A requirements across its existing customer base, which served as a basis for developing a reliable demand forecast. A consolidated, competitive tender was launched that resulted in the setting up of a long-term commercial agreement with the selected supplier to lock in the most competitive price for a given period of time. The direct benefit to oil manufacturers of fortifying with vitamin A is that the cost of fortification went down significantly compared with prices they would have been offered had they ordered vitamin A individually. In Indonesia, this consolidated procurement approach has allowed a 14.5% decrease in the unit price of vitamin A. The GAIN Premix Facility demonstrated its effectiveness in acting as a global procurement platform by aggregating demand across different customers and leveraging improved prices through increased volumes. Building on the success of this effort, the GAIN Premix Facility is replicating this global approach for procurement of other standard items being procured across fortification programs worldwide.

  2. Photoacoustic reflection artifact reduction using photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound: comparison between plane-wave and element-by-element synthetic backpropagation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mithun Kuniyil Ajith; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-01-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities constitute a major problem in epi-mode biomedical photoacoustic imaging. Photoacoustic transients from the skin and superficial optical absorbers traverse into the tissue and reflect off echogenic structures to generate reflection artifacts. These artifacts cause difficulties in the interpretation of images and reduce contrast and imaging depth. We recently developed a method called PAFUSion (photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound) to circumvent the problem of reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging. We already demonstrated that the photoacoustic signals can be backpropagated using synthetic aperture pulse-echo data for identifying and reducing reflection artifacts in vivo. In this work, we propose an alternative variant of PAFUSion in which synthetic backpropagation of photoacoustic signals is based on multi-angled plane-wave ultrasound measurements. We implemented plane-wave and synthetic aperture PAFUSion in a handheld ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging system and demonstrate reduction of reflection artifacts in phantoms and in vivo measurements on a human finger using both approaches. Our results suggest that, while both approaches are equivalent in terms of artifact reduction efficiency, plane-wave PAFUSion requires less pulse echo acquisitions when the skin absorption is the main cause of reflection artifacts. PMID:28736669

  3. Modelling pedestrian travel time and the design of facilities: a queuing approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalidur Rahman

    Full Text Available Pedestrian movements are the consequence of several complex and stochastic facts. The modelling of pedestrian movements and the ability to predict the travel time are useful for evaluating the performance of a pedestrian facility. However, only a few studies can be found that incorporate the design of the facility, local pedestrian body dimensions, the delay experienced by the pedestrians, and level of service to the pedestrian movements. In this paper, a queuing based analytical model is developed as a function of relevant determinants and functional factors to predict the travel time on pedestrian facilities. The model can be used to assess the overall serving rate or performance of a facility layout and correlate it to the level of service that is possible to provide the pedestrians. It has also the ability to provide a clear suggestion on the designing and sizing of pedestrian facilities. The model is empirically validated and is found to be a robust tool to understand how well a particular walking facility makes possible comfort and convenient pedestrian movements. The sensitivity analysis is also performed to see the impact of some crucial parameters of the developed model on the performance of pedestrian facilities.

  4. Modelling pedestrian travel time and the design of facilities: a queuing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Khalidur; Ghani, Noraida Abdul; Kamil, Anton Abdulbasah; Mustafa, Adli; Kabir Chowdhury, Md Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Pedestrian movements are the consequence of several complex and stochastic facts. The modelling of pedestrian movements and the ability to predict the travel time are useful for evaluating the performance of a pedestrian facility. However, only a few studies can be found that incorporate the design of the facility, local pedestrian body dimensions, the delay experienced by the pedestrians, and level of service to the pedestrian movements. In this paper, a queuing based analytical model is developed as a function of relevant determinants and functional factors to predict the travel time on pedestrian facilities. The model can be used to assess the overall serving rate or performance of a facility layout and correlate it to the level of service that is possible to provide the pedestrians. It has also the ability to provide a clear suggestion on the designing and sizing of pedestrian facilities. The model is empirically validated and is found to be a robust tool to understand how well a particular walking facility makes possible comfort and convenient pedestrian movements. The sensitivity analysis is also performed to see the impact of some crucial parameters of the developed model on the performance of pedestrian facilities.

  5. Nanoporous Silver Film Fabricated by Oxygen Plasma: A Facile Approach for SERS Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chaoxiong; Trujillo, Michael J; Camden, Jon P

    2016-09-14

    Nanoporous metal films are promising substrates for surfaced-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurement, owing to their homogeneity, large surface area, and abundant hot-spots. Herein, a facile procedure was developed to fabricate nanoporous Ag film on various substrate surfaces. Thermally deposited Ag film was first treated with O2 plasma, resulting in porous Ag/AgxO film (AgxO-NF) with nanoscale feature. Sodium citrate was then used to reduce AgxO to Ag, forming nanoporous Ag film (AgNF) with similar morphology. The AgNF substrate demonstrates 30-fold higher Raman intensity than Ag film over polystyrene nanospheres (d = 600 nm) using 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA) as the sensing molecule. Comparing with ordinary Raman measurement on 4-MBA solution, an enhancement factor of ∼6 × 10(6) was determined for AgNF. The AgNF substrate was evaluated for benzoic acid, 4-nitrophenol, and 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate, showing high SERS sensitivity for chemicals that bind weakly to Ag surface and molecules with relatively small Raman cross section at micromolar concentration. In addition to its simplicity, the procedure can be applied to various materials such as transparency film, filter paper, hard polystyrene film, and aluminum foil, revealing similar Raman sensitivity. By testing the durability of the substrate, we found that the AgxO films can be stored in ambient conditions for more than 90 days and still deliver the same SERS intensity if the films are treated with sodium citrate before use. These results demonstrate the advantage of the proposed approach for mass production of low-cost, sensitive, and durable SERS substrates. The transferable nature of these AgNF to different flexible surfaces also allows their easy integration with other sensing schemes.

  6. Access to Mammography Facilities and Detection of Breast Cancer by Screening Mammography: A GIS Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Selina; Price, James H; Dignan, Mark; Rahman, Saleh; Lindquist, Peter S; Jordan, Timothy R

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to examine the association between access to mammography facilities and utilization of screening mammography in an urban population. METHODS: Data on female breast cancer cases were obtained from an extensive mammography surveillance project. Distance to mammography facilities was measured by using GIS, which was followed by measuring geographical access to mammography facilities using Floating Catchment Area (FCA) method (considering all available facilities within an arbitrary radius from the woman's residence by using Arc GIS 9.0 software). RESULTS: Of 2,024 women, 91.4% were Caucasian; age ranged from 25 to 98 years; most (95%) were non-Hispanic in origin. Logistic regression found age, family history, hormone replacement therapy, physician recommendation, and breast cancer stage at diagnosis to be significant predictors of having had a previous mammogram. Women having higher access to mammography facilities were less likely to have had a previous mammogram compared to women who had low access, considering all the facilities within 10 miles (OR=0.41, CI=0.22-0.76), 30 miles (OR=0.52, CI=0.29-0.91) and 40 miles (OR=0.51, CI=0.28-0.92) radiuses. CONCLUSIONS: Physical distance to mammography facilities does not necessarily predict utilization of mammogram and greater access does not assure greater utilizations, due to constraints imposed by socio economic and cultural barriers. Future studies should focus on measuring access to mammography facilities capturing a broader dimension of access considering qualitative aspect of facilities, as well as other travel impedances.

  7. Classifying substance use disorder treatment facilities with co-located mental health services: A latent class analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Pia M; Furr-Holden, C Debra; Strain, Eric C; Crum, Rosa M; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2016-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act calls for increased integration and coordination of behavioral health services, as people with co-occurring disorders (CODs), meeting criteria for both substance use and psychiatric disorders, are overrepresented in treatment samples. Nationwide estimates of mental health (MH) service co-location in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment facilities are needed. We empirically derived a multiple-indicator categorization of services for CODs in SUD treatment facilities. We used latent class analysis to categorize 14,037 SUD treatment facilities in the United States and territories included in the 2012 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services. Latent class indicators included MH screening and diagnosis, MH support services, psychiatric medications, groups for CODs, and psychosocial approaches. Multinomial logistic regression compared facility-identified primary focus (i.e., SUD, MH, mix of SUD-MH, and general/other) and other facility characteristics across classes. A four-class solution was chosen with the following classes: Comprehensive MH/COD Services (25%), MH without COD Services (25%), MH Screening Services (21%), and Limited MH Services (29%). The former two classes with co-located MH services were less likely to report a SUD-primary focus than the latter classes reporting only MH screening or Limited MH Services. Only the Comprehensive MH/COD Services class also had a high probability of providing special groups for CODs. Approximately half of SUD treatment facilities were in classes with co-located mental health services, but only a quarter provided comprehensive COD services. Future studies should assess differences in patient experiences and treatment outcomes across facilities with and without COD services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Node Routing Problem with Intermediate Facilities: A Managerial Approach Based on a Heuristic Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Nafezi, Nima

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation, we discussed a type of vehicle routing problem called vehicle routing problem with intermediate facilities with consideration of the impact of adding intermediate facilities to the problem. To study how IFs change the result of the problem, we firstly present a simple model based on clustering algorithm along with finding the shortest route between clusters, implementing Clarke and Wright’s algorithm within each cluster. Then we determine a set of design of experiments w...

  9. Precipitation evidences on X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery: an approach for quantitative detection and estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Saverio; Marzano, Frank S.; Montopoli, Mario; Pulvirenti, Luca; Pierdicca, Nazzareno

    2017-04-01

    Spaceborne synthetic aperture radars (SARs) operating at L-band and above are nowadays a well-established tool for Earth remote sensing; among the numerous civil applications we can indicate flood areas detection and monitoring, earthquakes analysis, digital elevation model production, land use monitoring and classification. Appealing characteristics of this kind of instruments is the high spatial resolution ensured in almost all-weather conditions and with a reasonable duty cycle and coverage. This result has achieved by the by the most recent generation of SAR missions, which moreover allow polarimetric observation of the target. Nevertheless, atmospheric clouds, in particular the precipitating ones, can significantly affect the signal backscattered from the ground surface (e.g. Ferrazzoli and Schiavon, 1997), on both amplitude and phase, with effects increasing with the operating frequency. In this respect, proofs are given by several recent works (e.g. Marzano et al., 2010, Baldini et al., 2014) using X-Band SAR data by COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) and TerraSAR-X (TSX) missions. On the other hand, this sensitivity open interesting perspectives towards the SAR observation, and eventually quantification, of precipitations. In this respect, a proposal approach for X-SARs precipitation maps production and cloud masking arise from our work. Cloud masking allows detection of precipitation compromised areas. Respect precipitation maps, satellite X-SARs offer the unique possibility to ingest within flood forecasting model precipitation data at the catchment scale. This aspect is particularly innovative, even if work has been done the late years, and some aspects need to still address. Our developed processing framework allows, within the cloud masking stage, distinguishing flooded areas, precipitating clouds together with permanent water bodies, all appearing dark in the SAR image. The procedure is mainly based on image segmentation techniques and fuzzy logic (e.g. Pulvirenti et

  10. Facile approach to synthesize uniform Au@mesoporous SnO{sub 2} yolk–shell nanoparticles and their excellent catalytic activity in 4-nitrophenol reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ya [Changchun University of Science and Technology, School of Chemistry & Environmental Engineering (China); Li, Lu; Wang, Chungang, E-mail: wangcg925@nenu.edu.cn [Northeast Normal University, Faculty of Chemistry (China); Wang, Tingting, E-mail: wangtt@cust.edu.cn [Changchun University of Science and Technology, School of Chemistry & Environmental Engineering (China)

    2016-01-15

    Monodispersed and uniform Au@mesoporous SnO{sub 2} yolk–shell nanoparticles (Au@mSnO{sub 2} yolk–shell NPs) composed of the moveable Au NP cores and mSnO{sub 2} shells have been successfully fabricated via a facile and reproducible approach. The outside mSnO{sub 2} shells of Au@mSnO{sub 2} yolk–shell NPs not only prevent Au NPs from aggregating and corroding by the reaction solution but also allow the Au NPs to contact with reactant molecules easily through the mesoporous channels. The obtained Au@mSnO{sub 2} yolk–shell NPs are characterized by means of transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectrum, and UV–vis absorption spectroscopy. The synthesized materials exhibit excellent catalytic performance and high stability towards the reduction of 4-nitrophenol with NaBH{sub 4} as a reducing agent, which may be ascribed to their high specific surface area and unique mesoporous structure. Moreover, the synthetic strategy reported in this paper can be extended to fabricate a series of multifunctional noble metal@metal oxide yolk–shell nanocomposite materials with unique properties for various applications.

  11. A green and facile hydrothermal approach for the synthesis of high-quality semi-conducting Sb2S3 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Gong, Yongshuai; Li, Zhilin; Dou, Meiling; Wang, Feng

    2016-11-01

    High-quality semi-conducting antimony sulfide (Sb2S3) thin films were directly deposited on the indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates by a green and facile one-step approach based on a hydrothermal reaction and post-annealing process without any assistance of complexing agents. The obtained Sb2S3 films possessed a relatively ideal S/Sb atomic ratio and a compact and continuous surface as the grain size of Sb2S3 was increased by high temperature annealing. The Sb2S3 film annealed at 450 °C exhibited the improved optical and electrical performances, with a narrow band gap of 1.63 eV, an electrical resistivity of 1.3 × 104 Ω cm, a carrier concentration of 7.3 × 1013 cm-3 and a carrier mobility of 6.4 cm2 V-1 s-1. This environmentally friendly synthetic route is promising for the preparation of high-quality Sb2S3 films to be used as absorber layer materials for high-performance solar cells.

  12. Improving the drug delivery characteristics of graphene oxide based polymer nanocomposites through the "one-pot" synthetic approach of single-electron-transfer living radical polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Liu, Meiying; Tian, Jianwen; Deng, Fengjie; Wang, Ke; Xu, Dazhuang; Liu, Liangji; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2016-08-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) based polymer nanocomposites have attracted extensive research interest recently for their outstanding physicochemical properties and potential applications. However, surface modification of GO with synthetic polymers has demonstrated to be trouble for most polymerization procedures are occurred under non-aqueous solution, which will in turn lead to the restacking of GO. In this work, a facile and efficient "one-pot" strategy has been developed for surface modification of GO with synthetic polymers through single-electron-transfer living radical polymerization (SET-LRP). The GO based polymer nanocomposites were obtained via SET-LRP in aqueous solution using poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) as the monomer and 11-bromoundecanoic acid as the initiator, which could be effectively adsorbed on GO through hydrophobic interaction. The successful preparation of GO based polymer nanocomposites was confirmed by a series of characterization techniques such as 1H nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The resultant products exhibit high water disperisibility, excellent biocompatibility and high efficient drug loading capability, making these PEGylated GO nanocomposites promising candidates for biomedical applications.

  13. Adsorption of Uranyl ions on Amine-functionalization of MIL-101(Cr) Nanoparticles by a Facile Coordination-based Post-synthetic strategy and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Yong; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Linjuan; Fang, Yongzheng; Deng, Wei; Yu, Ming; Wang, Ziqiang; Li, Lina; Liu, Xiyan; Li, Jingye

    2015-09-10

    By a facile coordination-based post-synthetic strategy, the high surface area MIL-101(Cr) nanoparticles was functionallized by grafting amine group of ethylenediamine (ED) on coordinatively unsaturated Cr(III) centers, yielding a series of ED-MIL-101(Cr)-based adsorbents and their application for adsorption of U(VI) from aqueous solution were also studied. The obtained ED-functionallized samples with different ED contents were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), FTIR, elemental analysis (EA) and N2 adsorption and desorption isothermal. Compared with the pristine MIL-101(Cr) sorbents, the ED-functionallized MIL-101(Cr) exhibits significantly higher adsorption capacity for U(VI) ions from water with maximum adsorption capacities as high as 200 mg/g (corresponding to 100% extraction rate) at pH of 4.5 with ED/Cr ratio of 0.68 and the sorbed U(VI) ions can easily be desorbed at lower pH (pH ≤ 2.0). The adsorption mode of U(VI) ions and effects of grafted ED on the MIL-101(Cr) frameworks were also been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). We believe that this work establishes a simple and energy efficient route to a novel type of functional materials for U(VI) ions extraction from solution via the post-synthetic modification (PSM) strategy.

  14. Technical Approach and Plan for Transitioning Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities to the Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-10-06

    This document describes the approach and process in which the 100-K Area Facilities are to be deactivated and transitioned over to the Environmental Restoration Program after spent nuclear fuel has been removed from the K Basins. It describes the Transition Project's scope and objectives, work breakdown structure, activity planning, estimated cost, and schedule. This report will be utilized as a planning document for project management and control and to communicate details of project content and integration.

  15. Monitoring System for Storm Readiness and Recovery of Test Facilities: Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Morris, Jon; Turowski, Mark; Franzl, Richard; Walker, Mark; Kapadia, Ravi; Venkatesh, Meera; Schmalzel, John

    2010-01-01

    Severe weather events are likely occurrences on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. It is important to rapidly diagnose and mitigate the effects of storms on Stennis Space Center's rocket engine test complex to avoid delays to critical test article programs, reduce costs, and maintain safety. An Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) approach and technologies are employed to integrate environmental (weather) monitoring, structural modeling, and the suite of available facility instrumentation to provide information for readiness before storms, rapid initial damage assessment to guide mitigation planning, and then support on-going assurance as repairs are effected and finally support recertification. The system is denominated Katrina Storm Monitoring System (KStorMS). Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) describes a comprehensive set of capabilities that provide insight into the behavior the health of a system. Knowing the status of a system allows decision makers to effectively plan and execute their mission. For example, early insight into component degradation and impending failures provides more time to develop work around strategies and more effectively plan for maintenance. Failures of system elements generally occur over time. Information extracted from sensor data, combined with system-wide knowledge bases and methods for information extraction and fusion, inference, and decision making, can be used to detect incipient failures. If failures do occur, it is critical to detect and isolate them, and suggest an appropriate course of action. ISHM enables determining the condition (health) of every element in a complex system-of-systems or SoS (detect anomalies, diagnose causes, predict future anomalies), and provide data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) to control systems for safe and effective operation. ISHM capability is achieved by using a wide range of technologies that enable anomaly detection, diagnostics, prognostics, and advise for control: (1

  16. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  17. A discussion of regulatory requirements and air dispersion modeling approaches applicable to U.S. chemical demilitarization facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, B W; Robbins, L B; Litynski, J

    1998-09-01

    Owners of hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, and certain major air pollution sources, must conduct several separate ambient air dispersion modeling analyses before beginning construction of new facilities or modifying existing facilities. These analyses are critical components of the environmental permitting and facility certification processes and must be completed to the satisfaction of federal, state, and local regulatory authorities. The U.S. Army has conducted air dispersion modeling for its proposed chemical agent disposal facilities to fulfill the following environmental regulatory and risk management requirements: (1) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act human health and ecological risk assessment analysis for the hazardous waste treatment and storage permit applications, (2) Quantitative Risk Assessment to support the site-specific risk management programs, and (3) Prevention of Significant Deterioration ambient air impact analysis for the air permit applications. The purpose of these air dispersion modeling studies is to show that the potential impacts on human health and the environment, due to operation of the chemical agent disposal facilities, are acceptable. This paper describes and compares the types of air dispersion models, modeling input data requirements, modeling algorithms, and approaches used to satisfy the three environmental regulatory and risk management requirements listed above. Although this paper discusses only one industry (i.e., chemical demilitarization), the information it contains could help those in other industries who need to communicate to the public the purpose and objectives of each modeling analysis. It may also be useful in integrating the results of each analysis into an overarching summary of compliance and potential risks.

  18. A new approach to the determination of the synthetic or natural origin of red pigments through spectroscopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franquelo, Maria Luisa; Perez-Rodriguez, Jose Luis

    2016-09-01

    This work suggests a way of differentiation between the natural or synthetic origin of inorganic materials that were historically used in the Cultural Heritage field. An exhaustive review of different reported procedures of synthesis of pigments was conducted, as well as a review of the accompanying minerals in case of natural pigments. The natural or synthetic origin of the pigments studied in this work was performed through the characterization of the accompanying minerals, in the case of the natural pigments, or the trace elements that are present as part of synthesis by-products or washing/purifying reagents and/or reactants that have only been partly removed in the final steps of these processes. This work characterized red pigments due to their wide variety, complexity and possibility of use in different mixtures. The following pigments were studied: cinnabar-vermilion, red lead and iron pigments. Also mixtures of these pigments between them and with red lake were also studied. Natural cinnabar was accompanied by silicon oxide (opal, chalcedony or quartz), calcite, clay minerals and, sometimes, pyrite. K together with S indicated a synthetic pigment (vermilion) obtained through the wet method. Nevertheless, K has not been found in layers containing only vermilion in our samples. The presence of Sn in some cases indicated vermilion that came from the dry process. K from the synthesis always appeared in the red lead pigment. The red natural ochre was confirmed by presence of clay minerals and iron. It should be said that Ca and S, and sometimes Al and K, were usually found in Mars red pigment. The presence of Al and Ca allowed the identification of carmine lake.

  19. An analytic network process approach for locating undesirable facilities: an example from Istanbul, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzkaya, Gülfem; Onüt, Semih; Tuzkaya, Umut R; Gülsün, Bahadir

    2008-09-01

    Locating an undesirable facility is a sophisticated problem, for the evaluation procedures involve several objectives and the solution to the problem calls for some compromises to be made between probable conflicting criteria. This paper addresses the problem of undesirable facility location selection using the analytic network process (ANP), a multi-criteria decision-making technique. The ANP technique enables us to consider both qualitative and quantitative criteria as well as the interdependencies and feedbacks. A number of criteria (benefits, opportunities, costs and risks) and their sub-criteria are considered for siting a new facility with which this study has dealt. The questions of what criteria would be considered and what the interdependencies between these criteria and their weights would be were discussed and determined via interviews with some competent authorities of the Istanbul Municipality and of two environmental organizations. Four representative locations were evaluated and the most convenient one was selected. This was followed by the sensitivity analyses of the results.

  20. Remote Internet access to advanced analytical facilities: a new approach with Web-based services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, N; Qin, J; Fuller, M Suominen; Xie, Y; Mola, O; Bauer, M; McIntyre, N S; Maxwell, D; Liu, D; Matias, E; Armstrong, C

    2012-09-04

    Over the past decade, the increasing availability of the World Wide Web has held out the possibility that the efficiency of scientific measurements could be enhanced in cases where experiments were being conducted at distant facilities. Examples of early successes have included X-ray diffraction (XRD) experimental measurements of protein crystal structures at synchrotrons and access to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and NMR facilities by users from institutions that do not possess such advanced capabilities. Experimental control, visual contact, and receipt of results has used some form of X forwarding and/or VNC (virtual network computing) software that transfers the screen image of a server at the experimental site to that of the users' home site. A more recent development is a web services platform called Science Studio that provides teams of scientists with secure links to experiments at one or more advanced research facilities. The software provides a widely distributed team with a set of controls and screens to operate, observe, and record essential parts of the experiment. As well, Science Studio provides high speed network access to computing resources to process the large data sets that are often involved in complex experiments. The simple web browser and the rapid transfer of experimental data to a processing site allow efficient use of the facility and assist decision making during the acquisition of the experimental results. The software provides users with a comprehensive overview and record of all parts of the experimental process. A prototype network is described involving X-ray beamlines at two different synchrotrons and an SEM facility. An online parallel processing facility has been developed that analyzes the data in near-real time using stream processing. Science Studio and can be expanded to include many other analytical applications, providing teams of users with rapid access to processed results along with the means for detailed

  1. Fenton and photo-Fenton treatment of a synthetic tannin used in leather tannery: a multi-approach study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofrano, G; Meriç, S; Belgiorno, V; Nikolaou, A; Napoli, R M A

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the behaviour of Fenton and photo-Fenton (UV-A, UV-C) processes to treat synthetic tannin (syntan) used in leather tannery which is one of the most polluting industries, releasing many xenobiotics. Both oxidation processes were performed at pH 3.0 and temperature 40-45 degrees C, which is the original temperature of the re-tanning process, in synthetic solutions containing 100 and 300 mg/L of COD equivalent of syntan. The efficiency of the applied oxidation processes was monitored by chemical oxygen demand (COD), oxidation redox potential (ORP) and aromaticity (UV280) and double bond (UV254) absorbance measurements. Acute toxicity test on Daphnia magna was performed to monitor toxicity in untreated and treated syntan solution. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was applied to identify by-products of partial oxidation occurring in treated samples. The effective ratio of H2O2/FeSO4 for photo-Fenton processes was found to be feasible in terms of reagents used in the process.

  2. Acid mine drainage risks - A modeling approach to siting mine facilities in Northern Minnesota USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Tom

    2016-02-01

    Most watershed-scale planning for mine-caused contamination concerns remediation of past problems while future planning relies heavily on engineering controls. As an alternative, a watershed scale groundwater fate and transport model for the Rainy Headwaters, a northeastern Minnesota watershed, has been developed to examine the risks of leaks or spills to a pristine downstream watershed. The model shows that the risk depends on the location and whether the source of the leak is on the surface or from deeper underground facilities. Underground sources cause loads that last longer but arrive at rivers after a longer travel time and have lower concentrations due to dilution and attenuation. Surface contaminant sources could cause much more short-term damage to the resource. Because groundwater dominates baseflow, mine contaminant seepage would cause the most damage during low flow periods. Groundwater flow and transport modeling is a useful tool for decreasing the risk to downgradient sources by aiding in the placement of mine facilities. Although mines are located based on the minerals, advance planning and analysis could avoid siting mine facilities where failure or leaks would cause too much natural resource damage. Watershed scale transport modeling could help locate the facilities or decide in advance that the mine should not be constructed due to the risk to downstream resources.

  3. Approach to a Facile and Selective Benzyl-Protection of Carbohydrates Based on Silyl Migration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG,Wei; LI,Xiao-Liu; ZHANG,Ping-Zhu; CHEN,Hua

    2008-01-01

    A convenient and selective benzyl protection of carbohydrates has been investigated on the basis of the silyl migration under the conventional benzylation conditions, developing a facile and short synthesis of methyl 2,3,6-tri-O-benzyl-a-D-glucopyranoside.

  4. Synthetic biology and genetic causation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oftedal, Gry; Parkkinen, Veli-Pekka

    2013-06-01

    Synthetic biology research is often described in terms of programming cells through the introduction of synthetic genes. Genetic material is seemingly attributed with a high level of causal responsibility. We discuss genetic causation in synthetic biology and distinguish three gene concepts differing in their assumptions of genetic control. We argue that synthetic biology generally employs a difference-making approach to establishing genetic causes, and that this approach does not commit to a specific notion of genetic program or genetic control. Still, we suggest that a strong program concept of genetic material can be used as a successful heuristic in certain areas of synthetic biology. Its application requires control of causal context, and may stand in need of a modular decomposition of the target system. We relate different modularity concepts to the discussion of genetic causation and point to possible advantages of and important limitations to seeking modularity in synthetic biology systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Model prodrugs designed for the intestinal peptide transporter. A synthetic approach for coupling of hydroxy-containing compounds to dipeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, G M; Nielsen, C U; Steffansen, B

    2001-01-01

    The human peptide transporter, hPepT1, situated in the small intestine, may be exploited to increase absorption of drugs or model drugs by attaching them to a dipeptide, which is recognised by hPepT1. A synthetic protocol for this kind of model prodrugs was developed, in which model drugs...... intestine and be converted to the parent drug during or after transport into the blood circulation. Therefore, we investigated the influence of the electronegativity of the substituent in the 4-position of the phenyl ring on stability in aqueous solution at pH 6.0 and 7.4, corresponding to pH in jejunum...... and blood, respectively. In addition, the influence of the electronegativity of the substituent on stability upon storage was examined. Model prodrugs containing electron donating substituents in the 4-position of the phenyl ring decomposed upon storage, while model prodrugs containing no substituents...

  6. Synthetic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, George E.; Cain, Joel M.

    1996-02-01

    The Advanced Distributed Simulation (ADS) Synthetic Environments Program seeks to create robust virtual worlds from operational terrain and environmental data sources of sufficient fidelity and currency to interact with the real world. While some applications can be met by direct exploitation of standard digital terrain data, more demanding applications -- particularly those support operations 'close to the ground' -- are well-served by emerging capabilities for 'value-adding' by the user working with controlled imagery. For users to rigorously refine and exploit controlled imagery within functionally different workstations they must have a shared framework to allow interoperability within and between these environments in terms of passing image and object coordinates and other information using a variety of validated sensor models. The Synthetic Environments Program is now being expanded to address rapid construction of virtual worlds with research initiatives in digital mapping, softcopy workstations, and cartographic image understanding. The Synthetic Environments Program is also participating in a joint initiative for a sensor model applications programer's interface (API) to ensure that a common controlled imagery exploitation framework is available to all researchers, developers and users. This presentation provides an introduction to ADS and the associated requirements for synthetic environments to support synthetic theaters of war. It provides a technical rationale for exploring applications of image understanding technology to automated cartography in support of ADS and related programs benefitting from automated analysis of mapping, earth resources and reconnaissance imagery. And it provides an overview and status of the joint initiative for a sensor model API.

  7. A New Optimization via Simulation Approach for Dynamic Facility Layout Problem with Budget Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parham Azimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new efficient heuristic algorithm has been developed for the dynamic facility layout problem with budget constraint (DFLPB using optimization via simulation technique. The heuristic integrates integer programming and discrete event simulation to address DFLPB. In the proposed algorithm, the nonlinear model of the DFLP has been changed to a pure integer programming (PIP model. Then, the optimal solution of the PIP model has been used in a simulation model that has been designed in a similar manner as the DFLP for determining the probability of assigning a facility to a location. After a sufficient number of runs, the simulation model obtains near optimum solutions. Finally, to test the performance of the algorithm, several test problems have been taken from the literature and solved. The results show that the proposed algorithm is more efficient in terms of speed and accuracy than other heuristic algorithms presented in previous works.

  8. Synthetic foldamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichard, Gilles; Huc, Ivan

    2011-06-07

    Foldamers are artificial folded molecular architectures inspired by the structures and functions of biopolymers. This highlight focuses on important developments concerning foldamers produced by chemical synthesis and on the perspectives that these new self-organized molecular scaffolds offer. Progress in the field has led to synthetic objects that resemble small proteins in terms of size and complexity yet that may not contain any α-amino acids. Foldamers have introduced new tools and concepts to develop biologically active substances, synthetic receptors and novel materials.

  9. High direct drive illumination uniformity achieved by multi-parameter optimization approach: a case study of Shenguang III laser facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chao; Chen, Jia; Zhang, Bo; Shan, Lianqiang; Zhou, Weimin; Liu, Dongxiao; Bi, Bi; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Weiwu; Zhang, Baohan; Gu, Yuqiu

    2015-05-04

    The uniformity of the compression driver is of fundamental importance for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). In this paper, the illumination uniformity on a spherical capsule during the initial imprinting phase directly driven by laser beams has been considered. We aim to explore methods to achieve high direct drive illumination uniformity on laser facilities designed for indirect drive ICF. There are many parameters that would affect the irradiation uniformity, such as Polar Direct Drive displacement quantity, capsule radius, laser spot size and intensity distribution within a laser beam. A novel approach to reduce the root mean square illumination non-uniformity based on multi-parameter optimizing approach (particle swarm optimization) is proposed, which enables us to obtain a set of optimal parameters over a large parameter space. Finally, this method is applied to improve the direct drive illumination uniformity provided by Shenguang III laser facility and the illumination non-uniformity is reduced from 5.62% to 0.23% for perfectly balanced beams. Moreover, beam errors (power imbalance and pointing error) are taken into account to provide a more practical solution and results show that this multi-parameter optimization approach is effective.

  10. Synthetic studies towards bottromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Ackermann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Thio-Ugi reactions are described as an excellent synthetic tool for the synthesis of sterically highly hindered endothiopeptides. S-Methylation and subsequent amidine formation can be carried out in an inter- as well as in an intramolecular fashion. The intramolecular approach allows the synthesis of the bottromycin ring system in a straightforward manner.

  11. A synthetic ice core approach to estimate ion relocation in an ice field site experiencing periodical melt; a case study on Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Vega

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical and chemical properties of four different ice cores (LF-97, LF-08, LF-09 and LF-11 drilled at Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard, were compared to investigate the effects of meltwater percolation on the chemical and physical stratigraphy of these records. A synthetic ice core approach was employed as reference record to estimate the ionic relocation and meltwater percolation length at this site during the period 2007–2010. Using this method, the ion elution sequence obtained for Lomonosovfonna was SO42- > NO3- > NH4+ > Mg2+ > Cl-, K+ > Na+ > Ca2+, with acidic ions being the most mobile within the snowpack. The relocation length of most of the ions was in the order of 1 m, with the exception of SO42- showing relocation lengths > 2 m during this period. In addition, by using both a positive degree day (PDD and a snow-energy model approaches to estimate the percentage of melt at Lomonosovfonna, we have calculated a melt percentage (MP of the total annual accumulation within the range between 48 and 70 %, for the period between 2007 and 2010 which is above the MP range suggested by the ion relocation evidenced in the LF-syn core (i.e. MP = 30 %. Using a firn-densification model to constrain the melt range, a MP of 30 % was found over the same period which is consistent with the results of the synthetic ice core approach, and a 45 % of melt for the last 60 years. Considering the ionic relocation lengths and annual melt percentages, we estimate that the atmospheric ionic signal remains preserved in recently drilled Lomonosovfonna ice cores at an annual or bi-annual resolution.

  12. A synthetic ice core approach to estimate ion relocation in an ice field site experiencing periodical melt: a case study on Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Carmen P.; Pohjola, Veijo A.; Beaudon, Emilie; Claremar, Björn; van Pelt, Ward J. J.; Pettersson, Rickard; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Martma, Tõnu; Schwikowski, Margit; Bøggild, Carl E.

    2016-05-01

    Physical and chemical properties of four different ice cores (LF-97, LF-08, LF-09 and LF-11) drilled at Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard, were compared to investigate the effects of meltwater percolation on the chemical and physical stratigraphy of these records. A synthetic ice core approach was employed as reference record to estimate the ionic relocation and meltwater percolation length at this site during the period 2007-2010. Using this method, a partial ion elution sequence obtained for Lomonosovfonna was NO3- > SO42-, Mg2+, Cl-, K+, Na+ with nitrate being the most mobile within the snowpack. The relocation length of most of the ions was on the order of 1 m during this period. In addition, by using both a positive degree day (PDD) and a snow-energy model approaches to estimate the percentage of melt at Lomonosovfonna, we have calculated a melt percentage (MP) of the total annual accumulation within the range between 48 and 70 %, for the period between 2007 and 2010, which is above the MP range suggested by the ion relocation evidenced in the LF-syn core (i.e., MP = 30 %). Using a firn-densification model to constrain the melt range, a MP of 30 % was found over the same period, which is consistent with the results of the synthetic ice core approach, and a 45 % of melt for the last 60 years. Considering the ionic relocation lengths and annual melt percentages, we estimate that the atmospheric ionic signal remains preserved in recently drilled Lomonosovfonna ice cores at an annual or bi-annual resolution when weather conditions were similar to those during the 2007-2010 period.

  13. A synthetic ice core approach to estimate ion relocation in an ice field site experiencing periodical melt; a case study on Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, C. P.; Pohjola, V. A.; Beaudon, E.; Claremar, B.; van Pelt, W. J. J.; Pettersson, R.; Isaksson, E.; Martma, T.; Schwikowski, M.; Bøggild, C. E.

    2015-09-01

    Physical and chemical properties of four different ice cores (LF-97, LF-08, LF-09 and LF-11) drilled at Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard, were compared to investigate the effects of meltwater percolation on the chemical and physical stratigraphy of these records. A synthetic ice core approach was employed as reference record to estimate the ionic relocation and meltwater percolation length at this site during the period 2007-2010. Using this method, the ion elution sequence obtained for Lomonosovfonna was SO42- > NO3- > NH4+ > Mg2+ > Cl-, K+ > Na+ > Ca2+, with acidic ions being the most mobile within the snowpack. The relocation length of most of the ions was in the order of 1 m, with the exception of SO42- showing relocation lengths > 2 m during this period. In addition, by using both a positive degree day (PDD) and a snow-energy model approaches to estimate the percentage of melt at Lomonosovfonna, we have calculated a melt percentage (MP) of the total annual accumulation within the range between 48 and 70 %, for the period between 2007 and 2010 which is above the MP range suggested by the ion relocation evidenced in the LF-syn core (i.e. MP = 30 %). Using a firn-densification model to constrain the melt range, a MP of 30 % was found over the same period which is consistent with the results of the synthetic ice core approach, and a 45 % of melt for the last 60 years. Considering the ionic relocation lengths and annual melt percentages, we estimate that the atmospheric ionic signal remains preserved in recently drilled Lomonosovfonna ice cores at an annual or bi-annual resolution.

  14. Enzyme engineering: A synthetic biology approach for more effective library generation and automated high-throughput screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Maximilian C. C. J. C.; Mugford, Paul F.; Pelletier, Joelle N.

    2017-01-01

    The Golden Gate strategy entails the use of type IIS restriction enzymes, which cut outside of their recognition sequence. It enables unrestricted design of unique DNA fragments that can be readily and seamlessly recombined. Successfully employed in other synthetic biology applications, we demonstrate its advantageous use to engineer a biocatalyst. Hot-spots for mutations were individuated in three distinct regions of Candida antarctica lipase A (Cal-A), the biocatalyst chosen as a target to demonstrate the versatility of this recombination method. The three corresponding gene segments were subjected to the most appropriate method of mutagenesis (targeted or random). Their straightforward reassembly allowed combining products of different mutagenesis methods in a single round for rapid production of a series of diverse libraries, thus facilitating directed evolution. Screening to improve discrimination of short-chain versus long-chain fatty acid substrates was aided by development of a general, automated method for visual discrimination of the hydrolysis of varied substrates by whole cells. PMID:28178357

  15. Facile Hydrothermal Approach to ZnO Nanorods at Mild Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, ZnO nanorods are obtained through a facile hydrothermal route. The structure and morphology of the resultant products are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The experimental results indicated that the as-synthesized ZnO nanorods have an average diameter of approximate 100 nm. A possible growth mechanism for ZnO nanorods was proposed based on the experimental results and found that Zn powder plays a critical role for the morphology of the products. Room temperature photoluminescence property of ZnO nanorods shows an ultraviolet emission peak at 390 nm.

  16. Synthetic Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. And what about the limits for life? Can we create organisms that expand the envelope for life? In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  17. Synthetic Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - has the potential to transform fields from pharmaceuticals to fuels. Our lab has focused on the potential of synthetic biology to revolutionize all three major parts of astrobiology: Where do we come from? Where are we going? and Are we alone? For the first and third, synthetic biology is allowing us to answer whether the evolutionary narrative that has played out on planet earth is likely to have been unique or universal. For example, in our lab we are re-evolving the biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids and developing techniques for the recovery of metals from spent electronics on other planetary bodies. In the future synthetic biology will play an increasing role in human activities both on earth, in fields as diverse as human health and the industrial production of novel bio-composites. Beyond earth, we will rely increasingly on biologically-provided life support, as we have throughout our evolutionary history. In order to do this, the field will build on two of the great contributions of astrobiology: studies of the origin of life and life in extreme environments.

  18. Imaging with Synthetic Aperture Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Massonnet, Didier

    2008-01-01

    Describing a field that has been transformed by the recent availability of data from a new generation of space and airborne systems, the authors offer a synthetic geometrical approach to the description of synthetic aperture radar, one that addresses physicists, radar specialists, as well as experts in image processing.  

  19. Boron in nuclear medicine: New synthetic approaches to PET and SPECT. Progress report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabalka, G.W.

    1994-02-01

    New methods based on reactive organometallic precursors containing organic functional groups that are generally responsible for physiologic responses are being exploited for preparation of radiopharmaceutials. This program focuses on the design of new chemistry (molecular architecture) and technology as opposed to the application of known reactions to the synthesis of specific radiopharmaceutical. The new technology which is often based on organoborane chemistry is then utilized in nuclear medicine research at the UT Biomedical Imaging Center and in collaboration with colleagues at other DOE. facilities such as Brookhaven National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. New radiopharmaceutical are evaluated preclinically by colleagues at UT, Emory University and The University of Pennsylvania, and by Nova Screen.

  20. An approach to radiation safety department benchmarking in academic and medical facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Richard P

    2015-02-01

    Based on anecdotal evidence and networking with colleagues at other facilities, it has become evident that some radiation safety departments are not adequately staffed and radiation safety professionals need to increase their staffing levels. Discussions with management regarding radiation safety department staffing often lead to similar conclusions. Management acknowledges the Radiation Safety Officer (RSO) or Director of Radiation Safety's concern but asks the RSO to provide benchmarking and justification for additional full-time equivalents (FTEs). The RSO must determine a method to benchmark and justify additional staffing needs while struggling to maintain a safe and compliant radiation safety program. Benchmarking and justification are extremely important tools that are commonly used to demonstrate the need for increased staffing in other disciplines and are tools that can be used by radiation safety professionals. Parameters that most RSOs would expect to be positive predictors of radiation safety staff size generally are and can be emphasized in benchmarking and justification report summaries. Facilities with large radiation safety departments tend to have large numbers of authorized users, be broad-scope programs, be subject to increased controls regulations, have large clinical operations, have significant numbers of academic radiation-producing machines, and have laser safety responsibilities.

  1. Tissue Harmonic Synthetic Aperture Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joachim

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for tissue harmonic synthetic aperture imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of synthetic aperture imaging in ultrasound, which has shown great potentials in the clinic. Suggestions for synthetic aperture tissue...... system complexity compared to conventional synthetic aperture techniques. In this project, SASB is sought combined with a pulse inversion technique for 2nd harmonic tissue harmonic imaging. The advantages in tissue harmonic imaging (THI) are expected to further improve the image quality of SASB...... harmonic techniques have been made, but none of these methods have so far been applicable for in-vivo imaging. The basis of this project is a synthetic aperture technique known as synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB). The technique utilizes a two step beamforming approach to drastically reduce...

  2. Facile SILAR approach to air-stable naked silver and gold nanoparticles supported by alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamplecoskie, Kevin G; Manser, Joseph S

    2014-10-22

    A synthetically convenient and scalable SILAR (successive ion layer adsorption and reaction) method is used to make air-stable films of silver and gold nanoparticles supported on alumina scaffolds. This solution-based deposition technique yields particles devoid of insulating capping agents or ligands. The optical properties of the nanoparticle films were investigated using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. A linear absorption arising from intraband excitation (775 nm laser pulse) is seen only for Au nanoparticles at low intensity. However, both Au and Ag particles exhibit plasmon resonance responses at high excitation intensity via two photon absorption of the 775 nm pump pulse. The difference in optical response to near-IR laser excitation is rationalized based on the known density of states for each metal. To demonstrate the potential applications of these films, alumina-supported Ag nanoparticles were utilized as substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, resulting in a 65-fold enhancement in the Raman signal of the probe molecule rhodamine 6G. The exceptional stability and scalability of these SILAR films opens the door for further optical and photocatalytic studies and applications, particularly with ligand-free Ag nanoparticles that typically oxidize under ambient conditions. Additionally, isolating plasmonic and interband electronic excitations in stable AgNP under visible light irradiation could enable elucidation of the mechanisms that drive noble metal-assisted photocatalytic processes.

  3. OPEN QUESTIONS IN ORIGIN OF LIFE: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON THE ORIGIN OF NUCLEIC ACIDS AND PROTEINS WITH SPECIFIC AND FUNCTIONAL SEQUENCES BY A CHEMICAL SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Adamala

    2014-02-01

    We have recently addressed these questions by using a chemical synthetic biology approach. In particular, we have tested the catalytic activity of small peptides, like Ser-His, with respect to peptide- and nucleotides-condensation, as a realistic model of primitive organocatalysis. We have also set up a strategy for exploring the sequence space of random proteins and RNAs (the so-called “never born biopolymer” project with respect to the production of folded structures. Being still far from solved, the main aspects of these “open questions” are discussed here, by commenting on recent results obtained in our groups and by providing a unifying view on the problem and possible solutions. In particular, we propose a general scenario for macromolecule formation via fragment-condensation, as a scheme for the emergence of specific sequences based on molecular growth and selection.

  4. Facile synthesis of La2Mo2O9 nanoparticles via an EDTA complexing approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Hua; WANG Hongen; LI Liang; LU Zhouguang; QIAN Dong

    2008-01-01

    A facile EDTA (ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid) complexing technique has been successfully employed to prepare La2Mo2O9 nanoparticles.The as-synthesized products are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),transmission electron microscopy (TEM),and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).The results show that a homogeneous transparent gel can be obtained with EDTA as the organic complexing reagent under the pH value of 3.0.Further thermal decomposition of the as-synthesized transparent gel by increasing the temperature up to 600℃ for 3 h results in the formation of La2Mo2O9 nanoparticles with a crystal size of about 30 nm.Moreover,the nanoparticles tend to form micrometer-sized aggregates with a three-dimensional network structure,which shows promising applications in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC),catalysts and so on.

  5. Facile approach in fabricating superhydrophobic SiO{sub 2}/polymer nanocomposite coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Hengzhen [Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001 (China); Zhang Xia, E-mail: zhangxia0307@yahoo.com.cn [Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001 (China); Zhang Pingyu; Zhang Zhijun [Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorine-free superhydrophobic SiO{sub 2}/polymer composite coatings are fabricated by a simple spin-coating method without any surface chemical modification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SiO{sub 2}/polymer coatings show long-term stability in the condition of continuous contact with corrosive water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The coating can be fabricated on various metal substrates to prevent metal from corrosion. - Abstract: We have developed a facile spin-coating method to prepare water-repellent SiO{sub 2}/polymer composite coating without any surface chemical modification. The wettability can be adjusted by controlling the content of SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. The coating demonstrates sustainable superhydrophobicity in the condition of continuous contact with corrosive liquids. Importantly, the coating can be fabricated on various metal substrates to prevent metal from corrosion.

  6. A facile approach towards fabrication of super hydrophobic surface from functionalized silica particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, M.; Jalil, M.; Zulfiqar, U.; Husain, S. W.

    2016-08-01

    A facile and cost effective method for fabrication of super hydrophobic surface on a glass substrate is studied. The surface is fabricated from surface functionalized silica particles, synthesized by sol-gel process with the average size of 200±10nm. These particles were functionalized with stearic acid to induce hydrophobicity followed by coating on a glass substrate. After coating, substrate was dried to remove excess solvent. The drying temperature was optimized and its effect on contact angle of hydrophobic surface was studied. It was observed that surface exhibits higher contact angle with increased drying temperature till the decomposition temperature of Stearic acid. Silica particles were characterized by using Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermal analysis was performed with Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) while the coated surface was studied using SEM and Contact Angle (CA) measurement.

  7. A combined approach of simulation and analytic hierarchy process in assessing production facility layouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Razamin; Cheng, Kok-Min

    2014-07-01

    One of the important areas of concern in order to obtain a competitive level of productivity in a manufacturing system is the layout design and material transportation system (conveyor system). However, changes in customers' requirements have triggered the need to design other alternatives of the manufacturing layout for existing production floor. Hence, this paper discusses effective alternatives of the process layout specifically, the conveyor system layout. Subsequently, two alternative designs for the conveyor system were proposed with the aims to increase the production output and minimize space allocation. The first proposed layout design includes the installation of conveyor oven in the particular manufacturing room based on priority, and the second one is the one without the conveyor oven in the layout. Simulation technique was employed to design the new facility layout. Eventually, simulation experiments were conducted to understand the performance of each conveyor layout design based on operational characteristics, which include predicting the output of layouts. Utilizing the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), the newly and improved layout designs were assessed before the final selection was done. As a comparison, the existing conveyor system layout was included in the assessment process. Relevant criteria involved in this layout design problem were identified as (i) usage of space of each design, (ii) operator's utilization rates, (iii) return of investment (ROI) of the layout, and (iv) output of the layout. In the final stage of AHP analysis, the overall priority of each alternative layout was obtained and thus, a selection for final use by the management was made based on the highest priority value. This efficient planning and designing of facility layout in a particular manufacturing setting is able to minimize material handling cost, minimize overall production time, minimize investment in equipment, and optimize utilization of space.

  8. Synthetic biology: lessons from the history of synthetic organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Brian J; Lim, Wendell A

    2007-09-01

    The mid-nineteenth century saw the development of a radical new direction in chemistry: instead of simply analyzing existing molecules, chemists began to synthesize them--including molecules that did not exist in nature. The combination of this new synthetic approach with more traditional analytical approaches revolutionized chemistry, leading to a deep understanding of the fundamental principles of chemical structure and reactivity and to the emergence of the modern pharmaceutical and chemical industries. The history of synthetic chemistry offers a possible roadmap for the development and impact of synthetic biology, a nascent field in which the goal is to build novel biological systems.

  9. Synthetic approaches, structure activity relationship and biological applications for pharmacologically attractive pyrazole/pyrazoline-thiazolidine-based hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrylyuk, Dmytro; Roman, Olexandra; Lesyk, Roman

    2016-05-04

    The features of the chemistry of 4-thiazolidinone and pyrazole/pyrazolines as pharmacologically attractive scaffolds were described in a number of reviews in which the main approaches to the synthesis of mentioned heterocycles and their biological activity were analyzed. However, the pyrazole/pyrazoline-thiazolidine-based hybrids as biologically active compounds is poorly discussed in the context of pharmacophore hybrid approach. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to summarize the data about the synthesis and modification of heterocyclic systems with thiazolidine and pyrazoline or pyrazole fragments in molecules as promising objects of modern bioorganic and medicinal chemistry. The description of biological activity was focused on SAR analysis and mechanistic insights of mentioned hybrids.

  10. Thermoplastic biodegradable elastomers based on ε-caprolactone and L-lactide block co-polymers: a new synthetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipik, Vitali T; Kong, Jen Fong; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Widjaja, Leonardus K; Liow, Sing S; Venkatraman, Subbu S; Abadie, Marc J M

    2010-11-01

    Although biodegradable polymers have found extensive application in medical devices, there are very few commercially available elastomeric biodegradable polymers. In this work, starting with the well-known monomers L-lactide and ε-caprolactone, we developed elastomers using a multiblock co-polymer approach. This ensures that the degradation products of such elastomers are also acceptable from a cytotoxicity standpoint. A series of polymers with various structures was synthesized utilizing a design of experiment approach. The basic structure is that of a diblock, with each block being modified by the addition of co-monomer. The synthesized polymers exhibited a range of mechanical properties from a typical thermoplastic polymer to that approaching a good thermoplastic elastomer. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, size exclusion chromatography and differential scanning calorimetry measurements have been utilized to relate the observed range of mechanical properties to the structure. In addition, the elastomeric nature has been established with the use of creep and recovery measurements. Such elastomers may find a variety of biomedical applications, ranging from stent coatings to atrial septal defect occluders.

  11. Facile and selective synthesis of oligothiophene-based sensitizer isomers: an approach toward efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Quanyou; Zhang, Qian; Lu, Xuefeng; Wang, Hong; Zhou, Gang; Wang, Zhong-Sheng

    2013-09-25

    Two sets of isomeric organic dyes with n-hexyl (DH and AH) or 2-ethylhexyl (DEH and AEH) groups substituted at the spacer part have been designed and straightforwardly synthesized via a facile and selective synthetic route. The structure difference between the isomers stands at the position of the incorporated alkyl chains which are introduced into the terthiophene spacer close to the donor (D) or anchor (A) side. The relationship between the isomeric structures and the optoelectronic properties are systematically investigated. It is found that, in the D series dyes, the alkyl group is much closer to the aromatic donor moiety, which brings about strong steric hindrance and therefore causes a remarkable twist in the molecular skeleton. In contrast, a more planar chemical structure and more effective π-conjugation are realized in the A series dye isomers. Consequently, the A series isomeric dyes demonstrate bathochromically shifted absorption bands, resulting in the improved light-harvesting capability and enhanced photo-generated current. However, the D series isomeric dyes with more twisted molecular skeleton have suppressed the intermolecular interactions and retarded the charge recombination more efficiently, which induces higher open-circuit photovoltage. Combining the two effects on the performance of the fabricated dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC), the influence from the short-circuit photocurrent plays a more significant role on the power conversion efficiency (η). As a result, isomer AEH-based DSSC with quasi-solid-state electrolyte displays the highest η of 7.10% which remained at 98% of the initial value after continuous light soaking for 1000 h. Promisingly, a η of 8.66% has been achieved for AEH-based DSSC with liquid electrolyte containing Co(II)/(III) redox couple. This work presents the crucial issue of molecular engineering and paves a way to design organic sensitizers for highly efficient and stable DSSCs.

  12. Using a contingent valuation approach for improved solid waste management facility: evidence from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afroz, Rafia; Masud, Muhammad Mehedi

    2011-04-01

    This study employed contingent valuation method to estimate the willingness to pay (WTP) of the households to improve the waste collection system in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The objective of this study is to evaluate how household WTP changes when recycling and waste separation at source is made mandatory. The methodology consisted of asking people directly about their WTP for an additional waste collection service charge to cover the costs of a new waste management project. The new waste management project consisted of two versions: version A (recycling and waste separation is mandatory) and version B (recycling and waste separation is not mandatory). The households declined their WTP for version A when they were asked to separate the waste at source although all the facilities would be given to them for waste separation. The result of this study indicates that the households were not conscious about the benefits of recycling and waste separation. Concerted efforts should be taken to raise environmental consciousness of the households through education and more publicity regarding waste separation, reducing and recycling.

  13. Wayfinding: a quality factor in human design approach to healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Nord, R

    1999-01-01

    The specific aim of this paper is the systematic analysis of interactions and reciprocal conditions existing between the physical space of hospital buildings and the different categories of individuals that come in contact with them. The physical and environmental facilities of hospital architecture often influence the therapeutic character of space and the employees. If the values of the individual are to be safeguarded in this context, priority needs to be given to such factors as communication, privacy, etc. This would mean the involvement of other professional groups such as psychologists, sociologists, ergonomists, etc. at the hospital building planning stage. This paper will outline the result of some research conducted at the University Research Center "TESIS" of Florence to provide better understanding of design strategies applied to reduce the pathology of spaces within the healthcare environment. The case studies will highlight the parameters and the possible architectural solutions to wayfinding and the humanization of spaces, with particular emphasis on lay-outs, technologies, furniture and finishing design.

  14. A Family of Highly Efficient CuI-Based Lighting Phosphors Prepared by a Systematic, Bottom-up Synthetic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Fang, Yang; Wei, George Z; Teat, Simon J; Xiong, Kecai; Hu, Zhichao; Lustig, William P; Li, Jing

    2015-07-29

    Copper(I) iodide (CuI)-based inorganic-organic hybrid materials in the general chemical formula of CuI(L) are well-known for their structural diversity and strong photoluminescence and are therefore considered promising candidates for a number of optical applications. In this work, we demonstrate a systematic, bottom-up precursor approach to developing a series of CuI(L) network structures built on CuI rhomboid dimers. These compounds combine strong luminescence due to the CuI inorganic modules and significantly enhanced thermal stability as a result of connecting individual building units into robust, extended networks. Examination of their optical properties reveals that these materials not only exhibit exceptionally high photoluminescence performance (with internal quantum yield up to 95%) but also that their emission energy and color are systematically tunable through modification of the organic component. Results from density functional theory calculations provide convincing correlations between these materials' crystal structures and chemical compositions and their optophysical properties. The advantages of cost-effective, solution-processable, easily scalable and fully controllable synthesis as well as high quantum efficiency with improved thermal stability, make this phosphor family a promising candidate for alternative, RE-free phosphors in general lighting and illumination. This solution-based precursor approach creates a new blueprint for the rational design and controlled synthesis of inorganic-organic hybrid materials.

  15. Bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaics from water-processable nanomaterials and their facile fabrication approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subianto, Surya; Dutta, Naba; Andersson, Mats; Choudhury, Namita Roy

    2016-09-01

    Organic thin film photovoltaics based on bulk-heterojunction donor-acceptor combinations have received significant interest due to their potential for low-cost, large-scale solution processing. However, current state-of-the-art cells utilise materials soluble mainly in halogenated solvents which pose processing challenges due to their toxicity and thus environmental hazards. In this contribution, we look at various nanomaterials, and alternative processing of these solar cells using environmentally friendly solvents, and review recently reported different strategies and approaches that are making inroads in this field. Specifically, we focus on the use of water-dispersible donors and acceptors, use of aqueous solvents for fabrication and discuss the merits of the two main approaches of water-processable solar cells; namely, through the use of water-soluble materials and the use of aqueous dispersion rather than a solution, as well as review some of the recent advances in alternative fabrication techniques.

  16. A facile approach to fabricate boron carbonitride microspheres via precursor pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Sifan; Feng, Wanlin; Luo, Heng; Tan, Yongqiang; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Haibin; Zhang, Tao; Peng, Shuming

    2017-04-01

    Bulk quantity Boron Carbonitride (BCN) microspheres were successfully synthesized via an organic precursor pyrolysis approach. The organic precursor was synthesized at 90 °C by the polymerization reaction of boron trichloride,aniline and ethylenediamine with a molar ratio of 1:1:1. All particles presented uniform spherical structure with the size of 2 μm. The products have oxidation starting temperature at 624 °C much higher than graphene (404 °C).

  17. Integrative approach for wastewater treatment facilities with biomass transformation into energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anker Yaakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Current industrial environmental regulations favor processes with Integrative Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC. While several systems are regarded by different international directives as IPPC Best Available Techniques or Technologies (BAT, none of these systems are capable handling various pollutants of both gaseous and aquatic effluents. Additional hinder to a BAT-IPPC complete procedure are hazardous or uneconomical byproducts of the IPPC processes and significant auxiliary costs for consumables and energy. The current research and subsequent projects are aimed to the development of a Biological Integrative Pollution Prevention and Control (Bio-IPPC system. Such system can be incorporated in various industrial processes, in a way that the byproduct is without hazardous potential and may be used as an economical raw material. The main initiative and heart of these systems is a micro-algae reactor, which is capable of treating various types of industrial pollutants both in the gaseous and aquatic phases. The algae nutrition is through thin-film circulation of the aquatic effluent and the reactor atmosphere is enriched by flue gases. The excessive algal biomass may be utilized for economic purposes starting with animal feedstock, through organic fertilizer and as industrial raw material for biofuels production or direct energy production. The first industrial project is a wastewater (WW polishing stage to an industry zone WW treatment facility, which ensures high level effluent purification and assimilation of greenhouse gases, which are released during the WW bioremediation process. The second industrial application aims to treat aquatic and gaseous effluents from coal propelled power plants. The raw algal material from both projects although very different, is used for the development of new efficient scheme for bioethanol production. In summary, the system presented is an actual Bio-IPPC that can interactively treat several industrial

  18. Synthetic Approach for (Mn,Fe)2(Si,P) Magnetocaloric Materials: Purity, Structural, Magnetic, and Magnetocaloric Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Allan; Svitlyk, Volodymyr; Mozharivskyj, Yurij

    2017-03-06

    A conventional solid-state approach has been developed for the synthesis of phase-pure magnetocaloric Mn2-xFexSi0.5P0.5 materials (x = 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9). Annealing at high temperatures followed by dwelling at lower temperatures is essential to obtain pure samples with x = 0.7, 0.8, and 0.9. Structural features of the samples with x = 0.6 and 0.9 were analyzed as a function of temperature via synchrotron powder diffraction. The Curie temperature, temperature hysteresis, and magnetic entropy change were established from the magnetic measurements. According to the diffraction and magnetization data, all samples undergo a first-order magnetostructural transition, but the first-order nature becomes less pronounced for samples that are more Mn rich.

  19. A protocol for an individualised, facilitated and sustainable approach to implementing current evidence in preventing falls in residential aged care facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Keith

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls are common adverse events in residential care facilities. Commonly reported figures indicate that at least 50% of residents fall in a 12 month period, and that this figure is substantially higher for residents with dementia. This paper reports the protocol of a project which aims to implement evidence based falls prevention strategies in nine residential aged care facilities (RACFs in Australia. The facilities in the study include high and low care, small and large facilities, metropolitan and regional, facilities with a specific cultural focus, and target groups recognised as being more challenging to successful implementation of falls prevention practice (e.g. residents with dementia. Methods The project will be conducted from November 2007-November 2009. The project will involve baseline scoping of existing falls rates and falls prevention activities in each facility, an action research process, interactive falls prevention training, individual falls risk assessments, provision of equipment and modifications, organisation based steering committees, and an economic evaluation. In each RACF, staff will be invited to join an action research group that will lead the process of developing and implementing interventions designed to facilitate an evidence based approach to falls management in their facility. In all RACFs a pre/post design will be adopted with a range of standardised measures utilised to determine the impact of the interventions. Discussion The care gap in residential aged care that will be addressed through this project relates to the challenges in implementing best practice falls prevention actions despite the availability of best practice guidelines. There are numerous factors that may limit the uptake of best practice falls prevention guidelines in residential aged care facilities. A multi-factorial individualised (to the specific requirements of each facility approach will be used to develop and

  20. Open questions in origin of life: experimental studies on the origin of nucleic acids and proteins with specific and functional sequences by a chemical synthetic biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamala, Katarzyna; Anella, Fabrizio; Wieczorek, Rafal; Stano, Pasquale; Chiarabelli, Cristiano; Luisi, Pier Luigi

    2014-01-01

    In this mini-review we present some experimental approaches to the important issue in the origin of life, namely the origin of nucleic acids and proteins with specific and functional sequences. The formation of macromolecules on prebiotic Earth faces practical and conceptual difficulties. From the chemical viewpoint, macromolecules are formed by chemical pathways leading to the condensation of building blocks (amino acids, or nucleotides) in long-chain copolymers (proteins and nucleic acids, respectively). The second difficulty deals with a conceptual problem, namely with the emergence of specific sequences among a vast array of possible ones, the huge "sequence space", leading to the question "why these macromolecules, and not the others?" We have recently addressed these questions by using a chemical synthetic biology approach. In particular, we have tested the catalytic activity of small peptides, like Ser-His, with respect to peptide- and nucleotides-condensation, as a realistic model of primitive organocatalysis. We have also set up a strategy for exploring the sequence space of random proteins and RNAs (the so-called "never born biopolymer" project) with respect to the production of folded structures. Being still far from solved, the main aspects of these "open questions" are discussed here, by commenting on recent results obtained in our groups and by providing a unifying view on the problem and possible solutions. In particular, we propose a general scenario for macromolecule formation via fragment-condensation, as a scheme for the emergence of specific sequences based on molecular growth and selection.

  1. A facile approach to derive binder protective film on high voltage spinel cathode materials against high temperature degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wei-Yu; Jin, Yi-Chun; Duh, Jenq-Gong; Lu, Cheng-Zhang; Liao, Shih-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    The electrochemical performance of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode combined with different binders at elevated temperature is firstly investigated. The water soluble binder, such as sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and sodium alginate (SA), is compared with the polyvinylidene difluoride (PVdF) binder used in non-aqueous process. The aqueous process can meet the need of Li-ion battery industry due to environmental-friendly and cost effectiveness by replacing toxic organic solvent, such as N-methyl-pyrrolidone (NMP). In this study, a significantly improved high temperature cycling performance is successfully obtained as compared to the traditional PVdF binder. The aqueous binder can serve as a protective film which inhibits the serious Ni and Mn dissolution especially at elevated temperature. Our result demonstrates a facile approach to solve the problem of capacity fading for high voltage spinel cathodes.

  2. An integrated approach to risk-based remediation of a former bulk fuel storage facility adjacent a marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, L.; Hers, I. [Golder Associates Ltd., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    An integrated approach to risk-based remediation of a former bulk fuel storage facility adjacent to a marine environment was discussed. The presentation provided an introduction and illustration to the site location and history, located close to Skagway, Alaska and northwestern British Columbia. The site investigation and conceptual model were also presented. The remedial approach was also described with reference to a risk-based action approach, remedial objectives, soil vapour extraction (SVE)-bioventing, and air sparging-biosparging. The objectives were to minimize potential exposure to aquatic receptors by minimizing non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) mobility and dissolved transport of petroleum hydrocarbons. Groundwater modeling to assess the attenuation rate and to determine remedial targets was also discussed. Model validation and results of groundwater modeling as well as remediation system details and performance were then provided. It was determined that significant attenuation is occurring and that effective mass removal and concentrations have been decreasing over time. It was demonstrated that risk-based remedial goals and hydrogeology can change with land use/development. tabs., figs.

  3. Synthetic Cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Brooke; Yepes, Andres; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs), also known under the brand names of "Spice," "K2," "herbal incense," "Cloud 9," "Mojo" and many others, are becoming a large public health concern due not only to their increasing use but also to their unpredictable toxicity and abuse potential. There are many types of SCBs, each having a unique binding affinity for cannabinoid receptors. Although both Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and SCBs stimulate the same receptors, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), studies have shown that SCBs are associated with higher rates of toxicity and hospital admissions than is natural cannabis. This is likely due to SCBs being direct agonists of the cannabinoid receptors, whereas THC is a partial agonist. Furthermore, the different chemical structures of SCBs found in Spice or K2 may interact in unpredictable ways to elicit previously unknown, and the commercial products may have unknown contaminants. The largest group of users is men in their 20s who participate in polydrug use. The most common reported toxicities with SCB use based on studies using Texas Poison Control records are tachycardia, agitation and irritability, drowsiness, hallucinations, delusions, hypertension, nausea, confusion, dizziness, vertigo and chest pain. Acute kidney injury has also been strongly associated with SCB use. Treatment mostly involves symptom management and supportive care. More research is needed to identify which contaminants are typically found in synthetic marijuana and to understand the interactions between different SBCs to better predict adverse health outcomes.

  4. Natural - synthetic - artificial!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life.......The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life....

  5. Introduction to the symposium: responses of organisms to climate change: a synthetic approach to the role of thermal adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Michael W; Angilletta, Michael J

    2011-11-01

    On a global scale, changing climates are affecting ecological systems across multiple levels of biological organization. Moreover, climates are changing at rates unprecedented in recent geological history. Thus, one of the most pressing concerns of the modern era is to understand the biological responses to climate such that society can both adapt and implement measures that attempt to offset the negative impacts of a rapidly changing climate. One crucial question, to understand organismal responses to climate, is whether the ability of organisms to adapt can keep pace with quickly changing environments. To address this question, a syntheses of knowledge from a broad set of biological disciplines will be needed that integrates information from the fields of ecology, behavior, physiology, genetics, and evolution. This symposium assembled a diverse group of scientists from these subdisciplines to present their perspectives regarding the ability of organisms to adapt to changing climates. Specifically, the goals of this symposia were to (1) highlight what each discipline brings to a discussion of organismal responses to climate, (2) to initiate and foster a discussion to break barriers in the transfer of knowledge across disciplines, and (3) to synthesize an approach to address ongoing issues concerning biological responses to climate.

  6. Synthetic River Valleys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2011-12-01

    The description of fluvial form has evolved from anecdotal descriptions to artistic renderings to 2D plots of cross section or longitudinal profiles and more recently 3D digital models. Synthetic river valleys, artificial 3D topographic models of river topography, have a plethora of potential applications in fluvial geomorphology, and the earth sciences in general, as well as in computer science and ecology. Synthetic river channels have existed implicitly since approximately the 1970s and can be simulated from a variety of approaches spanning the artistic and numerical. An objective method of synthesizing 3D stream topography based on reach scale attributes would be valuable for sizing 3D flumes in the physical and numerical realms, as initial input topography for morphodynamic models, stream restoration design, historical reconstruction, and mechanistic testing of interactions of channel geometric elements. Quite simply - simulation of synthetic channel geometry of prescribed conditions can allow systematic evaluation of the dominant relationships between river flow and geometry. A new model, the control curve method, is presented that uses hierarchically scaled parametric curves in over-lapping 2D planes to create synthetic river valleys. The approach is able to simulate 3D stream geometry from paired 2D descriptions and can allow experimental insight into form-process relationships in addition to visualizing past measurements of channel form that are limited to two dimension descriptions. Results are presented that illustrate the models ability to simulate fluvial topography representative of real world rivers as well as how channel geometric elements can be adjusted. The testing of synthetic river valleys would open up a wealth of knowledge as to why some 3D attributes of river channels are more prevalent than others as well as bridging the gap between the 2D descriptions that have dominated fluvial geomorphology the past century and modern, more complete, 3D

  7. Facile approach to prepare Pt decorated SWNT/graphene hybrid catalytic ink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayavan, Sundar, E-mail: sundarmayavan@cecri.res.in [Centre for Innovation in Energy Research, CSIR–Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006, Tamil Nadu (India); Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Mandalam, Aditya; Balasubramanian, M. [Centre for Innovation in Energy Research, CSIR–Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006, Tamil Nadu (India); Sim, Jun-Bo [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sung-Min, E-mail: sungmin@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Pt NPs were in situ synthesized onto CNT–graphene support in aqueous solution. • The as-prepared material was used directly as a catalyst ink without further treatment. • Catalyst ink is active toward methanol oxidation. • This approach realizes both scalable and greener production of hybrid catalysts. - Abstract: Platinum nanoparticles were in situ synthesized onto hybrid support involving graphene and single walled carbon nanotube in aqueous solution. We investigate the reduction of graphene oxide, and platinum nanoparticle functionalization on hybrid support by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The as-prepared platinum on hybrid support was used directly as a catalyst ink without further treatment and is active toward methanol oxidation. This work realizes both scalable and greener production of highly efficient hybrid catalysts, and would be valuable for practical applications of graphene based fuel cell catalysts.

  8. Prior Knowledge Aided Two Dimensional Autofocus Approach for Synthetic Aperture Radar%基于先验知识的SAR两维自聚焦算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛新华; 曹海洋; 朱岱寅; 朱兆达

    2013-01-01

    Conventional two dimensional (2D)autofocus algorithms didn’t take advantage of the priori information on the structure of phase error .They often suffered from lack of redundancy to accurately estimate the 2D phase error .In this paper ,a knowledge aided(KA)2D autofocus approach is presented ,which is based on exploiting the priori knowledge on the phase error structure .First ,as a prerequisite for the proposed KA method ,the analytical structure of residual 2D phase error in SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar )imagery is investigated in the polar format algorithm framework .Then ,by incorporating this prior information ,a 2D autofocus approach is proposed .The new method only requires an estimate of azimuth 1D phase error ,while the 2D phase errors can then be computed directly from the estimated azimuth phase error .Experimental results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed method .%传统的SAR(Synthetic Aperture Radar )两维自聚焦算法没有充分挖掘残留相位误差所特有的内部结构信息,是对残留相位误差的一种盲估计,实际应用时在估计精度和计算效率等方面还受到一定限制。本文以极坐标格式算法为例,详细分析了成像算法处理后残留两维相位误差的解析结构,并利用这种先验辅助知识,提出了一种基于一维估计/两维校正的自聚焦算法。算法只需直接估计方位一维相位误差,然后利用两维相位误差内部所特有的结构信息,将一维相位误差映射得到两维相位误差,从而实现精确的两维自聚焦。实测数据处理结果验证了本文算法的有效性。

  9. Synthetic Brainbows

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Brainbow is a genetic engineering technique that randomly colorizes cells. Biological samples processed with this technique and imaged with confocal microscopy have distinctive colors for individual cells. Complex cellular structures can then be easily visualized. However, the complexity of the Brainbow technique limits its applications. In practice, most confocal microscopy scans use different florescence staining with typically at most three distinct cellular structures. These structures are often packed and obscure each other in rendered images making analysis difficult. In this paper, we leverage a process known as GPU framebuffer feedback loops to synthesize Brainbow-like images. In addition, we incorporate ID shuffing and Monte-Carlo sampling into our technique, so that it can be applied to single-channel confocal microscopy data. The synthesized Brainbow images are presented to domain experts with positive feedback. A user survey demonstrates that our synthetic Brainbow technique improves visualizations of volume data with complex structures for biologists.

  10. A Facile Approach for Constructing Conductive Polymer Patterns for Application in Electrochromic Devices and Flexible Microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dabum; Kim, Jeonghun; Ko, Youngsang; Shim, Kyubin; Kim, Jung Ho; You, Jungmok

    2016-12-07

    We developed a novel strategy for fabricating poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) patterns on various substrates, including hydrogels, via sequential solution procedure without multistep chemical etching or lift-off processes. First, PEDOT nanothin films were prepared on a glass substrate by solution phase monomer casting and oxidative polymerization. As a second step, after UV-induced poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) photolithography at the PEDOT/PEG interface through a photomask, the hydrogel was peeled away from the PEDOT-coated glass substrate to detach the UV-exposed PEDOT region, which left the UV nonexposed PEDOT region intact on the glass substrate, resulting in PEDOT patterns. In a final step, the PEDOT patterns were cleanly transferred from the glass to a flexible hydrogel substrate by a direct-transfer process based on a second round of gelation process. Using this strategy, PEDOT patterns on ITO glass or ITO film were used to successfully fabricate an electrochromic (EC) device that exhibited stable electrochromic switching as a function of applied potential. Furthermore, PEDOT patterns on hydrogel were used to fabricate all organic, flexible microelectrodes with good electrical properties and excellent mechanical flexibility. Importantly, the conductivity of PEDOT patterns on hydrogel (ca. 235 S cm(-1)) described here is significantly higher than that previously reported (ca. 20-70 S cm(-1)). This approach can be easily integrated into various technological fabrication steps for the development of next-generation bioelectronics systems.

  11. Facile identification of dual FLT3-Aurora A inhibitors: a computer-guided drug design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang Hsu, Yung; Ke, Yi-Yu; Shiao, Hui-Yi; Lee, Chieh-Chien; Lin, Wen-Hsing; Chen, Chun-Hwa; Yen, Kuei-Jung; Hsu, John T-A; Chang, Chungming; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang

    2014-05-01

    Computer-guided drug design is a powerful tool for drug discovery. Herein we disclose the use of this approach for the discovery of dual FMS-like receptor tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3)-Aurora A inhibitors against cancer. An Aurora hit compound was selected as a starting point, from which 288 virtual molecules were screened. Subsequently, some of these were synthesized and evaluated for their capacity to inhibit FLT3 and Aurora kinase A. To further enhance FLT3 inhibition, structure-activity relationship studies of the lead compound were conducted through a simplification strategy and bioisosteric replacement, followed by the use of computer-guided drug design to prioritize molecules bearing a variety of different terminal groups in terms of favorable binding energy. Selected compounds were then synthesized, and their bioactivity was evaluated. Of these, one novel inhibitor was found to exhibit excellent inhibition of FLT3 and Aurora kinase A and exert a dramatic antiproliferative effect on MOLM-13 and MV4-11 cells, with an IC50 value of 7 nM. Accordingly, it is considered a highly promising candidate for further development.

  12. Facile approach to synthesize magnesium oxide nanoparticles by using Clitoria ternatea—characterization and in vitro antioxidant studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Sushma, N.; Prathyusha, D.; Swathi, G.; Madhavi, T.; Deva Prasad Raju, B.; Mallikarjuna, K.; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-03-01

    Facile approach to synthesize the metal oxide nanoparticles is getting an increased attention in various biomedical applications such as, to treat antibiotic resistant diseases. Magnesium oxide nanoparticles (MgO·NPs) were synthesized by using Clitoria ternatea as the stabilizer in a green synthesis approach. The preliminary screening of MgO·NPs in the presence of C. ternatea extract was observed by UV-visible spectrophotometer. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern have proved the crystalline nature of the MgO·NPs; Photoluminescence (PL) measurement studies are used to identify the quality and defects in the crystal structure. FE-SEM with EDS has showed the size of 50-400 nm with specific binding energies. FT-IR has revealed the functional groups present in the plant extract and the peak at 521 cm-1 indicated the characteristic absorption bands of MgO·NPs. The DPPH activity and reducing power assay of biologically synthesized MgO·NPs could reach 65 % at a concentration of 150 µg/ml, respectively. From the results it was concluded that the biologically synthesized MgO·NPs exhibit good antioxidant activity.

  13. Harmonization between a Framework of Multilateral Approaches to Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities and Bilateral Nuclear Cooperation Agreements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Tazaki

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available One of primary challenges for ensuring effective and efficient functions of the multilateral nuclear approaches (MNA to nuclear fuel cycle facilities is harmonization between a MNA framework and existing nuclear cooperation agreements (NCA. A method to achieve such harmonization is to construct a MNA framework with robust non-proliferation characteristics, in order to obtain supplier states’, especially the US’s prior consents for non-supplier states’ certain activities including spent fuel reprocessing, plutonium storages and retransfers of plutonium originated in NCAs. Such robust characteristics can be accomplished by MNA member states’ compliances with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA Safeguards, regional safeguards agreements, international conventions, guidelines and recommendations on nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear security, safety, and export control. Those provisions are to be incorporated into an MNA founding agreement, as requirements to be MNA members in relation to NCAs. Furthermore, if an MNA facility is, (1 owned and operated jointly by all MNA member states, (2 able to conclude bilateral NCAs with non-MNA/supplier states as a single legal entity representing its all member states like an international organization, and (3 able to obtain necessary prior consents, stable, smooth, and timely supplies of nuclear fuel and services can be assured among MNA member states. In this paper, the authors will set out a general MNA framework and then apply it to a specific example of Europe Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM and then consider its applicability to the Asian region, where an establishment of an MNA framework is expected to be explored.

  14. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-06-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action site (CAS) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-41-03, EMAD Facility This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 25-41-03. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for CAS 25-41-03. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of corrective actions will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The CAS will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 25-41-03. The following text summarizes the SAFER

  15. The Ethics of Synthetic Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Andreas

    The dissertation analyses and discusses a number of ethical issues that have been raised in connection with the development of synthetic biology. Synthetic biology is a set of new techniques for DNA-level design and construction of living beings with useful properties. The dissertation especially......) popular responsesto them succeed, and whether the objections are ultimately persuasive.2. Given that synthetic biology is a new technology, there is a certain degree of uncertainty about its ultimate effects, and many perceive the technology as risky. I discuss two common approaches in risk regulation...

  16. Synthetic biology for therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abil, Zhanar; Xiong, Xiong; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-02-02

    Synthetic biology is a relatively new field with the key aim of designing and constructing biological systems with novel functionalities. Today, synthetic biology devices are making their first steps in contributing new solutions to a number of biomedical challenges, such as emerging bacterial antibiotic resistance and cancer therapy. This review discusses some synthetic biology approaches and applications that were recently used in disease mechanism investigation and disease modeling, drug discovery and production, as well as vaccine development and treatment of infectious diseases, cancer, and metabolic disorders.

  17. The Ethics of Synthetic Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Andreas

    The dissertation analyses and discusses a number of ethical issues that have been raised in connection with the development of synthetic biology. Synthetic biology is a set of new techniques for DNA-level design and construction of living beings with useful properties. The dissertation especially......) popular responsesto them succeed, and whether the objections are ultimately persuasive.2. Given that synthetic biology is a new technology, there is a certain degree of uncertainty about its ultimate effects, and many perceive the technology as risky. I discuss two common approaches in risk regulation...

  18. Synthetic Plant Defense Elicitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin eBektas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To defend themselves against invading pathogens plants utilize a complex regulatory network that coordinates extensive transcriptional and metabolic reprogramming. Although many of the key players of this immunity-associated network are known, the details of its topology and dynamics are still poorly understood. As an alternative to forward and reverse genetic studies, chemical genetics-related approaches based on bioactive small molecules have gained substantial popularity in the analysis of biological pathways and networks. Use of such molecular probes can allow researchers to access biological space that was previously inaccessible to genetic analyses due to gene redundancy or lethality of mutations. Synthetic elicitors are small drug like molecules that induce plant defense responses, but are distinct from known natural elicitors of plant immunity. While the discovery of the some synthetic elicitors had already been reported in the 1970s, recent breakthroughs in combinatorial chemical synthesis now allow for inexpensive high-throughput screens for bioactive plant defense-inducing compounds. Along with powerful reverse genetics tools and resources available for model plants and crop systems, comprehensive collections of new synthetic elicitors will likely allow plant scientists to study the intricacies of plant defense signaling pathways and networks in an unparalleled fashion. As synthetic elicitors can protect crops from diseases, without the need to be directly toxic for pathogenic organisms, they may also serve as promising alternatives to conventional biocidal pesticides, which often are harmful for the environment, farmers and consumers. Here we are discussing various types of synthetic elicitors that have been used for studies on the plant immune system, their modes-of-action as well as their application in crop protection.

  19. Dual-domain mass-transfer parameters from electrical hysteresis: theory and analytical approach applied to laboratory, synthetic streambed, and groundwater experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Martin; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Ong, John B.; Harvey, Judson W.; Lane, Jr., John W.

    2014-01-01

    Models of dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) are used to explain anomalous aquifer transport behavior such as the slow release of contamination and solute tracer tailing. Traditional tracer experiments to characterize DDMT are performed at the flow path scale (meters), which inherently incorporates heterogeneous exchange processes; hence, estimated “effective” parameters are sensitive to experimental design (i.e., duration and injection velocity). Recently, electrical geophysical methods have been used to aid in the inference of DDMT parameters because, unlike traditional fluid sampling, electrical methods can directly sense less-mobile solute dynamics and can target specific points along subsurface flow paths. Here we propose an analytical framework for graphical parameter inference based on a simple petrophysical model explaining the hysteretic relation between measurements of bulk and fluid conductivity arising in the presence of DDMT at the local scale. Analysis is graphical and involves visual inspection of hysteresis patterns to (1) determine the size of paired mobile and less-mobile porosities and (2) identify the exchange rate coefficient through simple curve fitting. We demonstrate the approach using laboratory column experimental data, synthetic streambed experimental data, and field tracer-test data. Results from the analytical approach compare favorably with results from calibration of numerical models and also independent measurements of mobile and less-mobile porosity. We show that localized electrical hysteresis patterns resulting from diffusive exchange are independent of injection velocity, indicating that repeatable parameters can be extracted under varied experimental designs, and these parameters represent the true intrinsic properties of specific volumes of porous media of aquifers and hyporheic zones.

  20. Facile syntheses of dissymmetric ferrocene-functionalized Lewis acids and acid-base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Ian R; Di Paolo, Angela; Vidovic, Dragoslav; Fallis, Ian A; Aldridge, Simon

    2009-12-21

    A facile synthetic approach is reported for the synthesis of dissymmetric 1,2-ferrocenediyl Lewis acids and mixed acid-base pairs including the first example of a 1-phosphino-2-borylferrocene; the use of non-racemic electrophiles allows for the isolation of single diastereomer products.

  1. Approaches to hybrid synthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vivek

    All living creatures are made up of cells that have the ability to replicate themselves in a repetitive process called cell division. As these cells mature and divide into two there is an extensive movement of cellular components. In order to perform this essential task that sustains life, cells have evolved machines composed of proteins. Biological motors, such as kinesin, transport intracellular cargo and position organelles in eukaryotic cells via unidirectional movement on cytoskeletal tracts called microtubules. Biomolecular motor proteins have the potential to be used as 'nano-engines' for switchable devices, directed self assembly, controlled bioseparations and powering nano- and microelectromechanical systems. However, engineering such systems requires fabrication processes that are compatible with biological materials such as kinesin motor proteins and microtubules. The first objective of the research was to establish biocompatibility between protein systems and nanofabrication. The second objective was to use current micro- and nanofabrication techniques for patterning proteins at specific locations and to study role of casein in supporting the operation of surface bound kinesin. The third objective was to link kinesin and microtubule system to cellulose nanowhiskers. The effects of micro- and nanofabrication processing chemicals and resists on the functionality of casein, kinesin, and microtubule proteins are systematically examined to address the important missing link of the biocompatibility of micro- and nanofabrication processes needed to realize hybrid system fabrication. It was found that both casein, which is used to prevent motor denaturation on surfaces, and kinesin motors are surprisingly tolerant of most of the processing chemicals examined. Microtubules, however, are much more sensitive. Exposure to the processing chemicals leads to depolymerization, which is partially attributed to the pH of the solutions examined. When the chemicals were diluted in aqueous buffers, a subset of them no longer depolymerized microtubules and in their diluted forms still worked as resist removers. Electron beam nanolithography process was used for patterning kinesin motor proteins on glass. This process was then used to fabricate discontinuous kinesin tracks to study the directionality of microtubule movement under the exclusive influence of surface bound patterned kinesin. To study casein and kinesin interactions, a series of microtubule motility assays were performed where whole milk casein, or its alphas1 and alphas2, beta or kappa subunits, were introduced or omitted at various steps of the motility assay. In addition, a series of epifluorescence and total internal reflection microscopy (TIRF) experiments were conducted where fluorescently labeled casein was introduced at various steps of the motility assay to assess casein-casein and casein-glass binding dynamics. From these experiments it is concluded that casein forms a bi-layer which supports the operation of kinesin. The first tightly bound layer of casein mainly performs the function of anchoring the kinesin while the second more loosely bound layer of casein positions the head domain of the kinesin to more optimally interact with microtubules. Studies on individual casein subunits indicate that beta casein is most effective in supporting kinesin functionality while kappa casein is the least effective. Kinesin and microtubules self assemble in vitro to form asters that are envisioned to be linked to cellulose fibers. This can be used for creating percolated reinforcing structures that can be used to fabricate composites with reduced fiber content. Technological advances are required to create cellulose orientation during papermaking to reduce the content of fiber while maintaining the paper quality. Microtubule aster assembly can be used as a template to create and study the mechanical properties of percolated cellulose nanowhisker systems. Reducing the fiber content to half will save around 2 billion trees from being used for paper making. We successfully hydrolyzed cotton cellulose using concentrated sulfuric acid and analyzed it by scanning electron microscopy. The whiskers obtained were 400 nm to few micrometers long. Cellulose whiskers were successfully biotinylated and linked to biotinylated microtubules. This study lays down a method to align cellulose nanowhiskers using self assembly of microtubules to create highly percolated cellulose structures using lesser cellulose fiber content.

  2. New Synthetic Approaches to TAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-16

    in the 6th Interim Report, namely to perform simple 1W-ureidoalkylation (cf. H. Petersen, Synthesis 1973, 2431 to obtain dioxotetrazocanes, or to...by amines: ill N)c/ Furthermore, the easy introduction of bridging units employing cyclo-1.2- diketones ---- can offer a considerable stabilization

  3. Synthetic Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2017-01-01

    "Are we alone?" is one of the primary questions of astrobiology, and whose answer defines our significance in the universe. Unfortunately, this quest is hindered by the fact that we have only one confirmed example of life, that of earth. While this is enormously helpful in helping to define the minimum envelope for life, it strains credulity to imagine that life, if it arose multiple times, has not taken other routes. To help fill this gap, our lab has begun using synthetic biology - the design and construction of new biological parts and systems and the redesign of existing ones for useful purposes - as an enabling technology. One theme, the "Hell Cell" project, focuses on creating artificial extremophiles in order to push the limits for Earth life, and to understand how difficult it is for life to evolve into extreme niches. In another project, we are re-evolving biotic functions using only the most thermodynamically stable amino acids in order to understand potential capabilities of an early organism with a limited repertoire of amino acids.

  4. Synthetic nacre by predesigned matrix-directed mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Li-Bo; Gao, Huai-Ling; Yao, Hong-Bin; Liu, Lei; Cölfen, Helmut; Liu, Gang; Chen, Si-Ming; Li, Shi-Kuo; Yan, You-Xian; Liu, Yang-Yi; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-10-01

    Although biomimetic designs are expected to play a key role in exploring future structural materials, facile fabrication of bulk biomimetic materials under ambient conditions remains a major challenge. Here, we describe a mesoscale “assembly-and-mineralization” approach inspired by the natural process in mollusks to fabricate bulk synthetic nacre that highly resembles both the chemical composition and the hierarchical structure of natural nacre. The millimeter-thick synthetic nacre consists of alternating organic layers and aragonite platelet layers (91 weight percent) and exhibits good ultimate strength and fracture toughness. This predesigned matrix-directed mineralization method represents a rational strategy for the preparation of robust composite materials with hierarchically ordered structures, where various constituents are adaptable, including brittle and heat-labile materials.

  5. Microbial synthetic biology for human therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aastha; Bhatia, Pooja; Chugh, Archana

    2012-06-01

    The emerging field of synthetic biology holds tremendous potential for developing novel drugs to treat various human conditions. The current study discusses the scope of synthetic biology for human therapeutics via microbial approach. In this context, synthetic biology aims at designing, engineering and building new microbial synthetic cells that do not pre-exist in nature as well as re-engineer existing microbes for synthesis of therapeutic products. It is expected that the construction of novel microbial genetic circuitry for human therapeutics will greatly benefit from the data generated by 'omics' approaches and multidisciplinary nature of synthetic biology. Development of novel antimicrobial drugs and vaccines by engineering microbial systems are a promising area of research in the field of synthetic biology for human theragnostics. Expression of plant based medicinal compounds in the microbial system using synthetic biology tools is another avenue dealt in the present study. Additionally, the study suggest that the traditional medicinal knowledge can do value addition for developing novel drugs in the microbial systems using synthetic biology tools. The presented work envisions the success of synthetic biology for human therapeutics via microbial approach in a holistic manner. Keeping this in view, various legal and socio-ethical concerns emerging from the use of synthetic biology via microbial approach such as patenting, biosafety and biosecurity issues have been touched upon in the later sections.

  6. A Facile Approach to Fabricate Water-soluble Au-Fe3O4 Nanoparticle for Liver Cancer Cells Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁重时; 吴献荣; 谢叶归; 刘顺英

    2012-01-01

    Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles were widely used as nanoplatforms for biologic applications through readily further functionalization. Dopamine (DA)-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles (DA@Fe3O4) have been successfully synthesized using a one-step process by modified coprecipitation method. Then 2--3 nm gold nanoparticles were easily conjugated to DA@Fe3O4 nanoparticles by the electrostatic force between gold nanoparti- cles and amino groups of dopamine to afford water-soluble Au-Fe3O4 hybrid nanoparticles. A detailed investigation by dynamic light scatting (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were performed in order to characterize the physicochemical properties of the hybrid nanoparticles. The hybrid nanoparticles were easily functionalized with a targeted small peptide A54 (AGKGTPSLETTP) and fluorescence probe fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) for liver cancer cell BEL-7402 imaging. This simple approach to prepare hybrid nanoparticles provides a facile nanoplatform for muti-functional derivations and may be extended to the immobilization of other metals or bimolecular on SPIO surface.

  7. Facile, Low-Cost, UV-Curing Approach to Prepare Highly Conductive Composites for Flexible Electronics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fucheng; Chen, Shilong; Wei, Yong; Liu, Konghua; Lin, Yong; Liu, Lan

    2016-07-01

    We present a facile approach to prepare high-performance ultraviolet (UV)-curable polyurethane-acrylate-based flexible electrical conductive adhesive (PUA-FECA) for flexible electronics applications. PUA is employed as the polymer matrix so that the ECA is flexible and UV-curable at room temperature in just a few minutes. The effects of the PUA-FECA formulation and curing procedure on the electrical properties have been studied. Very low volume resistivity (5.08 × 10-4 Ω cm) is obtained by incorporating 70 wt.% microsized Ag-coated Cu flakes. Moreover, by simply standing the PUA-FECA paste for 4 h before exposure to UV light, the bulk resistivity of the PUA-FECA is dramatically decreased to 3.62 × 10-4 Ω cm. This can be attributed to rearrangement of Ag-coated Cu flakes in the matrix while standing. PUA-FECA also presents stable electrical conductivity during rolling and compression, excellent adhesion, and good processability, making it easily scalable to large-scale fabrication and enabling screen-printing on various low-cost flexible substrates such as office paper and polyethylene terephthalate film.

  8. A multi-objective optimization approach for the selection of working fluids of geothermal facilities: Economic, environmental and social aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Gomez, Juan; Peña-Lamas, Javier; Martín, Mariano; Ponce-Ortega, José María

    2017-07-17

    The selection of the working fluid for Organic Rankine Cycles has traditionally been addressed from systematic heuristic methods, which perform a characterization and prior selection considering mainly one objective, thus avoiding a selection considering simultaneously the objectives related to sustainability and safety. The objective of this work is to propose a methodology for the optimal selection of the working fluid for Organic Rankine Cycles. The model is presented as a multi-objective approach, which simultaneously considers the economic, environmental and safety aspects. The economic objective function considers the profit obtained by selling the energy produced. Safety was evaluated in terms of individual risk for each of the components of the Organic Rankine Cycles and it was formulated as a function of the operating conditions and hazardous properties of each working fluid. The environmental function is based on carbon dioxide emissions, considering carbon dioxide mitigation, emission due to the use of cooling water as well emissions due material release. The methodology was applied to the case of geothermal facilities to select the optimal working fluid although it can be extended to waste heat recovery. The results show that the hydrocarbons represent better solutions, thus among a list of 24 working fluids, toluene is selected as the best fluid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Recovery-Oriented Care Approach: Weighing the Pros and Cons of a Newly Built Mental Health Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Catherine Clark; Bieling, Peter; McKinnon, Margaret C; McNeely, Heather E; Langstaff, Karen

    2016-02-01

    The current study adopted a recovery-oriented care approach by emphasizing patients' perspectives and experiences regarding changes to a newly built mental health facility. The inpatient entrance, or "portal," intended to balance the aims of recovery-oriented care with minimizing risk. A mixed-methods study of the portal's pros and cons was conducted, according to four themes: (a) autonomy versus inconvenience; (b) safety and security versus stigma; (c) unit door versus portal operating costs; and (d) privacy versus community integration. Focus groups engaging with patients (N = 39) indicated that the design effectively supported recovery-oriented care. Patients did not find the portal to be stigmatizing or triggering and valued the safety and privacy it created, and visitors also generally had a positive experience. Survey responses (N = 101) from portal users were also positive about the new design. The study findings suggest that the pros outweighed the cons of the new design. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(2), 39-48.].

  10. Synthetic biology and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, K K

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology, application of synthetic chemistry to biology, is a broad term that covers the engineering of biological systems with structures and functions not found in nature to process information, manipulate chemicals, produce energy, maintain cell environment and enhance human health. Synthetic biology devices contribute not only to improve our understanding of disease mechanisms, but also provide novel diagnostic tools. Methods based on synthetic biology enable the design of novel strategies for the treatment of cancer, immune diseases metabolic disorders and infectious diseases as well as the production of cheap drugs. The potential of synthetic genome, using an expanded genetic code that is designed for specific drug synthesis as well as delivery and activation of the drug in vivo by a pathological signal, was already pointed out during a lecture delivered at Kuwait University in 2005. Of two approaches to synthetic biology, top-down and bottom-up, the latter is more relevant to the development of personalized medicines as it provides more flexibility in constructing a partially synthetic cell from basic building blocks for a desired task. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Efficient automated one-step synthesis of 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethylcholine for clinical imaging: optimized reaction conditions and improved quality controls of different synthetic approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asti, Mattia [Nuclear Medicine Department, Santa Maria Nuova Hospital, Reggio Emilia (Italy)], E-mail: asti.mattia@asmn.re.it; Farioli, Daniela; Iori, Michele; Guidotti, Claudio; Versari, Annibale; Salvo, Diana [Nuclear Medicine Department, Santa Maria Nuova Hospital, Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline analogues, such as 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethylcholine ({sup 18}FECH), have suggested to be a new class of choline derivatives highly useful for the imaging of prostate and brain tumours. In fact, tumour cells with enhanced proliferation rate usually exhibit an improved choline uptake due to the increased membrane phospholipids biosynthesis. The aim of this study was the development of a high yielding synthesis of {sup 18}FECH. The possibility of shortening the synthesis time by reacting all the reagents in a convenient and rapid one-step reaction was specially considered. Methods: {sup 18}FECH was synthesized by reacting [{sup 18}F]fluoride with 1,2-bis(tosyloxy)ethane and N,N-dimethylaminoethanol. The synthesis was carried out using both a one- and a two-step reaction in order to compare the two procedures. The effects on the radiochemical yield and purity by using different [{sup 18}F]fluoride phase transfer catalysts, reagents amounts and purification methods were assessed. Quality controls on the final products were performed by means of radio-thin-layer chromatography, gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with conductimetric, ultraviolet and radiometric detectors. Results: In the optimized experimental conditions, {sup 18}FECH was synthesized with a radiochemical yield of 43{+-}3% and 48{+-}1% (not corrected for decay) when the two-step or the one-step approach were used, respectively. The radiochemical purity was higher than 99% regardless of the different synthetic pathways or purification methods adopted. The main chemical impurity was due to N,N-dimethylmorpholinium. The identity of this impurity in {sup 18}FECH preparations was not previously reported. Conclusion: An improved two-step and an innovative one-step reaction for synthesizing {sup 18}FECH in a high yield were reported. The adaptation of a multistep synthesis to a single step process, opens further possibilities for simpler and more

  12. Synthetic biology in plastids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharff, Lars B; Bock, Ralph

    2014-06-01

    Plastids (chloroplasts) harbor a small gene-dense genome that is amenable to genetic manipulation by transformation. During 1 billion years of evolution from the cyanobacterial endosymbiont to present-day chloroplasts, the plastid genome has undergone a dramatic size reduction, mainly as a result of gene losses and the large-scale transfer of genes to the nuclear genome. Thus the plastid genome can be regarded as a naturally evolved miniature genome, the gradual size reduction and compaction of which has provided a blueprint for the design of minimum genomes. Furthermore, because of the largely prokaryotic genome structure and gene expression machinery, the high transgene expression levels attainable in transgenic chloroplasts and the very low production costs in plant systems, the chloroplast lends itself to synthetic biology applications that are directed towards the efficient synthesis of green chemicals, biopharmaceuticals and other metabolites of commercial interest. This review describes recent progress with the engineering of plastid genomes with large constructs of foreign or synthetic DNA, and highlights the potential of the chloroplast as a model system in bottom-up and top-down synthetic biology approaches.

  13. Is synthetic biology mechanical biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Sune

    2015-12-01

    A widespread and influential characterization of synthetic biology emphasizes that synthetic biology is the application of engineering principles to living systems. Furthermore, there is a strong tendency to express the engineering approach to organisms in terms of what seems to be an ontological claim: organisms are machines. In the paper I investigate the ontological and heuristic significance of the machine analogy in synthetic biology. I argue that the use of the machine analogy and the aim of producing rationally designed organisms does not necessarily imply a commitment to mechanical biology. The ideal of applying engineering principles to biology is best understood as expressing recognition of the machine-unlikeness of natural organisms and the limits of human cognition. The paper suggests an interpretation of the identification of organisms with machines in synthetic biology according to which it expresses a strategy for representing, understanding, and constructing living systems that are more machine-like than natural organisms.

  14. Porous organic polymers with anchored aldehydes: A new platform for post-synthetic amine functionalization en route for enhanced CO2 adsorption properties

    KAUST Repository

    Guillerm, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    A novel porous organic polymer has been synthesized using the molecular building block approach to deliberately encompass aldehyde functionalities amenable to post functionalization. The resultant porous framework allows a facile, one-step quantitative and post-synthetic functionalization by amines, permitting enhanced CO2 sorption properties. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. A facile approach for cupric ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine/PMMA core-shell fluorescent nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Shuizhu; Su, Junhua; Zhao, Jianqing; Tong, Zhen

    2009-09-01

    A facile approach was developed to produce a dye-doped core-shell nanoparticle chemosensor for detecting Cu2+ in aqueous media. The core-shell nanoparticle sensor was prepared by a one-step emulsifier-free polymerization, followed by the doping of the fluorescent dye Nile red (9-diethylamino- 5H-benzo[alpha] phenoxazine-5-one, NR) into the particles. For the nanoparticles, the hydrophilic polyethyleneimine (PEI) chain segments serve as the shell and the hydrophobic polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) constitutes the core of the nanoparticles. The non-toxic and biocompatible PEI chain segments on the nanoparticle surface exhibit a high affinity for Cu2+ ions in aqueous media, and the quenching of the NR fluorescence is observed upon binding of Cu2+ ions. This makes the core-shell nanoparticle system a water-dispersible chemosensor for Cu2+ ion detection. The quenching of fluorescence arises through intraparticle energy transfer (FRET) from the dye in the hydrophobic PMMA core to the Cu2+/PEI complexes on the nanoparticle surface. The energy transfer efficiency for PEI/PMMA particles with different diameters was determined, and it is found that the smaller nanoparticle sample exhibits higher quenching efficiency, and the limit for Cu2+ detection is 1 µM for a nanoparticle sample with a diameter of ~30 nm. The response of the fluorescent nanoparticle towards different metal ions was investigated and the nanoparticle chemosensor displays high selectivity and antidisturbance for the Cu2+ ion among the metal ions examined (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Zn2+, Hg2+, Mn2+, Fe2+, Ni2+, Co2+ and Pb2+). This emulsifier-free, biocompatible and sensitive fluorescent nanoparticle sensor may find applications in cupric ion detection in the biological and environmental areas.

  16. Molecular and immunological approaches in quantifying the air-borne food allergen tropomyosin in crab processing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Sandip D; Thomassen, Marte R; Saptarshi, Shruti R; Nguyen, Hong M X; Aasmoe, Lisbeth; Bang, Berit E; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-09-01

    Tropomyosin is a cross-reactive allergenic protein present in ingested shellfish species. Exposure and sensitization to this protein via inhalation is particularly important in the crustacean processing industry where workers are continuously exposed to the aerosolized form of this allergen. The aim of this study was to develop an antibody-based immunoassay to enable the specific and sensitive quantification of aerosolized tropomyosin present in the environment of two crab processing facilities. Anti-tropomyosin antibody was generated in rabbits against tropomyosins from four different crustacean species. These antibodies were purified using recombinant tropomyosin using an immuno-affinity column. The recombinant tropomyosin was also used as an allergen standard for the sandwich ELISA. In order to quantify aerosolized tropomyosin, air collection was performed in the personal breathing zone of 80 workers during two crab processing activities, edible crab (Cancer pagurus) and king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) using polytetrafluoroethylene filters. The purified antibody was able to detect tropomyosin selectively from different crustaceans but not from vertebrate sources. The limit of detection (LOD) for the developed sandwich ELISA was 60 picogram/m(3) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) 100 picogram/m(3). Immunoassay validation was based on linearity (R(2) 0.999), matrix interference test (78.8±6.5%), intra-assay CV (9.8%) and inter-assay CV (11%). The novel immunoassay was able to successfully identify working activities, which generated low, medium or high concentrations of the aerosolized food allergen. We describe an IgG antibody-based immunoassay for quantification of the major food allergen tropomyosin, with high sensitivity and specificity. This modified immunological approach can be adapted for the detection of other aerosolized food allergens, assisting in the identification of high-risk allergen exposure areas in the food industry.

  17. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, MaryJoe K.; Ruder, Warren C.

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  18. Tracking the emergence of synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Philip; Kwon, Seokbeom; Youtie, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging domain that combines biological and engineering concepts and which has seen rapid growth in research, innovation, and policy interest in recent years. This paper contributes to efforts to delineate this emerging domain by presenting a newly constructed bibliometric definition of synthetic biology. Our approach is dimensioned from a core set of papers in synthetic biology, using procedures to obtain benchmark synthetic biology publication records, extract keywords from these benchmark records, and refine the keywords, supplemented with articles published in dedicated synthetic biology journals. We compare our search strategy with other recent bibliometric approaches to define synthetic biology, using a common source of publication data for the period from 2000 to 2015. The paper details the rapid growth and international spread of research in synthetic biology in recent years, demonstrates that diverse research disciplines are contributing to the multidisciplinary development of synthetic biology research, and visualizes this by profiling synthetic biology research on the map of science. We further show the roles of a relatively concentrated set of research sponsors in funding the growth and trajectories of synthetic biology. In addition to discussing these analyses, the paper notes limitations and suggests lines for further work.

  19. Synthetic collective intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Ricard; Amor, Daniel R; Duran-Nebreda, Salva; Conde-Pueyo, Núria; Carbonell-Ballestero, Max; Montañez, Raúl

    2016-10-01

    Intelligent systems have emerged in our biosphere in different contexts and achieving different levels of complexity. The requirement of communication in a social context has been in all cases a determinant. The human brain, probably co-evolving with language, is an exceedingly successful example. Similarly, social insects complex collective decisions emerge from information exchanges between many agents. The difference is that such processing is obtained out of a limited individual cognitive power. Computational models and embodied versions using non-living systems, particularly involving robot swarms, have been used to explore the potentiality of collective intelligence. Here we suggest a novel approach to the problem grounded in the genetic engineering of unicellular systems, which can be modified in order to interact, store memories or adapt to external stimuli in collective ways. What we label as Synthetic Swarm Intelligence defines a parallel approach to the evolution of computation and swarm intelligence and allows to explore potential embodied scenarios for decision making at the microscale. Here, we consider several relevant examples of collective intelligence and their synthetic organism counterparts.

  20. Using a qualitative approach for understanding hospital-affiliated integrated clinical and fitness facilities: characteristics and members' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingzhen; Kingsbury, Diana; Nichols, Matthew; Grimm, Kristin; Ding, Kele; Hallam, Jeffrey

    2015-06-19

    With health care shifting away from the traditional sick care model, many hospitals are integrating fitness facilities and programs into their clinical services in order to support health promotion and disease prevention at the community level. Through a series of focus groups, the present study assessed characteristics of hospital-affiliated integrated facilities located in Northeast Ohio, United States and members' experiences with respect to these facilities. Adult members were invited to participate in a focus group using a recruitment flyer. A total of 6 focus groups were conducted in 2013, each lasting one hour, ranging from 5 to 12 participants per group. The responses and discussions were recorded and transcribed verbatim, then analyzed independently by research team members. Major themes were identified after consensus was reached. The participants' average age was 57, with 56.8% currently under a doctor's care. Four major themes associated with integrated facilities and members' experiences emerged across the six focus groups: 1) facility/program, 2) social atmosphere, 3) provider, and 4) member. Within each theme, several sub-themes were also identified. A key feature of integrated facilities is the availability of clinical and fitness services "under one roof". Many participants remarked that they initially attended physical therapy, becoming members of the fitness facility afterwards, or vice versa. The participants had favorable views of and experiences with the superior physical environment and atmosphere, personal attention, tailored programs, and knowledgeable, friendly, and attentive staff. In particular, participants favored the emphasis on preventive care and the promotion of holistic health and wellness. These results support the integration of wellness promotion and programming with traditional medical care and call for the further evaluation of such a model with regard to participants' health outcomes.

  1. Testing for Multivariate Normality in Mass Spectrometry Imaging Data: A Robust Statistical Approach for Clustering Evaluation and the Generation of Synthetic Mass Spectrometry Imaging Data Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Alex; Race, Alan M; Styles, Iain B; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-11-15

    Spatial clustering is a powerful tool in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) and has been demonstrated to be capable of differentiating tumor types, visualizing intratumor heterogeneity, and segmenting anatomical structures. Several clustering methods have been applied to mass spectrometry imaging data, but a principled comparison and evaluation of different clustering techniques presents a significant challenge. We propose that testing whether the data has a multivariate normal distribution within clusters can be used to evaluate the performance when using algorithms that assume normality in the data, such as k-means clustering. In cases where clustering has been performed using the cosine distance, conversion of the data to polar coordinates prior to normality testing should be performed to ensure normality is tested in the correct coordinate system. In addition to these evaluations of internal consistency, we demonstrate that the multivariate normal distribution can then be used as a basis for statistical modeling of MSI data. This allows the generation of synthetic MSI data sets with known ground truth, providing a means of external clustering evaluation. To demonstrate this, reference data from seven anatomical regions of an MSI image of a coronal section of mouse brain were modeled. From this, a set of synthetic data based on this model was generated. Results of r(2) fitting of the chi-squared quantile-quantile plots on the seven anatomical regions confirmed that the data acquired from each spatial region was found to be closer to normally distributed in polar space than in Euclidean. Finally, principal component analysis was applied to a single data set that included synthetic and real data. No significant differences were found between the two data types, indicating the suitability of these methods for generating realistic synthetic data.

  2. [A new approach to the evaluation of the state of the microcirculatory system in patients presenting with chronic atrophic pharyngitis and treated with a synthetic neuropeptide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldyreva, O V; Burenkov, G I; Toropova, L A

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the mechanisms of development of chronic atrophic pharyngitis. A method is proposed for studying microcirculation in the mucous membrane at the posterior pharyngeal wall of the patients with this condition using laser Doppler flowmetry. The role of chronic somatic pathology in the development of pharyngeal dystrophy is demonstrated. It is shown that therapy with the synthetic neuropeptide is highly efficacious for the treatment of chronic atrophic pharyngitis.

  3. Stochastic model of the NASA/MSFC ground facility for large space structures with uncertain parameters: The maximum entropy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Wei-Shen

    1987-01-01

    A stochastic control model of the NASA/MSFC Ground Facility for Large Space Structures (LSS) control verification through Maximum Entropy (ME) principle adopted in Hyland's method was presented. Using ORACLS, a computer program was implemented for this purpose. Four models were then tested and the results presented.

  4. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed.

  5. Plant synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wusheng; Stewart, C Neal

    2015-05-01

    Plant synthetic biology is an emerging field that combines engineering principles with plant biology toward the design and production of new devices. This emerging field should play an important role in future agriculture for traditional crop improvement, but also in enabling novel bioproduction in plants. In this review we discuss the design cycles of synthetic biology as well as key engineering principles, genetic parts, and computational tools that can be utilized in plant synthetic biology. Some pioneering examples are offered as a demonstration of how synthetic biology can be used to modify plants for specific purposes. These include synthetic sensors, synthetic metabolic pathways, and synthetic genomes. We also speculate about the future of synthetic biology of plants.

  6. Synthetic Cathinones ("Bath Salts")

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A recent study found that 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), a common synthetic cathinone, affects the brain in ... but is at least 10 times more powerful. MDPV is the most common synthetic cathinone found in ...

  7. What Are Synthetic Cannabinoids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dried plant materials. Chemical tests show that their active ingredients are man-made cannabinoid compounds. Synthetic cannabinoid users report some effects similar to those produced by marijuana: elevated mood relaxation altered perception symptoms of psychosis Synthetic cannabinoids can ...

  8. Approaches towards a regional, shared electronic patient record for health care facilities of different health care organizations--IT-strategy and first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabetsberger, Thomas; Gross, Erich; Haux, Reinhold; Lechleitner, Georg; Pellizzari, Thomas; Schindelwig, Klaus; Stark, Christian; Vogl, Raimund; Wilhelmy, Immanuel

    2004-01-01

    Today, information processing in healthcare facilities is usually primarily directed towards the information needs of the respective institution. This stands in apparent contradiction to the fact that patients may not be solely treated in one general practice or hospital. More information processing towards patient-centered, shared care would better support high quality as well as efficient health care. We developed a stepwise approach transforming trans-institutional information system architectures (TISAs) from an inefficient state caused by redundancy and media cracks towards a state which better supports patient centered, shared care. In a total of three steps we want to establish electronic communication between existing information systems of different healthcare facilities for transmission of discharge summaries and diagnostic results. In further stages we plan to expand this communication solution to a regional comprehensive and consistent electronic patient record for multiple hospitals and general practices in Tyrol, Austria. In addition, two related approaches towards supporting shared care have been compared with our approach. The aim of this paper is to report on our approach and first experiences.

  9. Variation and Synthetic Speech

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, C; Massey, N; Miller, Corey; Karaali, Orhan; Massey, Noel

    1997-01-01

    We describe the approach to linguistic variation taken by the Motorola speech synthesizer. A pan-dialectal pronunciation dictionary is described, which serves as the training data for a neural network based letter-to-sound converter. Subsequent to dictionary retrieval or letter-to-sound generation, pronunciations are submitted a neural network based postlexical module. The postlexical module has been trained on aligned dictionary pronunciations and hand-labeled narrow phonetic transcriptions. This architecture permits the learning of individual postlexical variation, and can be retrained for each speaker whose voice is being modeled for synthesis. Learning variation in this way can result in greater naturalness for the synthetic speech that is produced by the system.

  10. Facility based cross-sectional study of self stigma among people with mental illness: towards patient empowerment approach

    OpenAIRE

    Girma, Eshetu; Tesfaye,Markos; Froeschl, Guenter; Moeller-Leimkuehler, Anne Maria; Dehning, Sandra; Mueller, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self stigma among people with mental illness results from multiple cognitive and environmental factors and processes. It can negatively affect adherence to psychiatric services, self esteem, hope, social integration and quality of life of people with mental illness. The purpose of this study was to measure the level of self stigma and its correlates among people with mental illness at Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Psychiatry clinic in southwest Ethiopia. Methods: Facility...

  11. Development Approach for the Accommodation of Materials Science Research for the Materials Science Research Facility on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, D. A.; Cobb, S. D.; Szofran, F. R.

    2000-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) is a modular facility comprised of autonomous Materials Science Research Racks (MSRR's) for research in the microgravity environment afforded by the International Space Station (ISS). The initial MSRF concept consists of three Materials Science Research Racks (MSRR-1, MSRR-2, and MSRR-3) which will be developed for a phased deployment beginning on the third Utilization Flight (UF-3). The facility will house materials processing apparatus and common subsystems required for operating each device. Each MSRR is a stand alone autonomous rack and will be comprised of either on-orbit replaceable Experiment Modules, Module Inserts, investigation unique apparatus, and/or multiuser generic processing apparatus. Each MSRR will support a wide range of materials science themes in the NASA research program and will use the ISS Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS). MSRF is being developed for the United States Laboratory Module and will provide the apparatus for satisfying near-term and long-range Materials Science Discipline goals and objectives.

  12. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  13. Synthetic biology: programming cells for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörner, Maximilian; Reischmann, Nadine; Weber, Wilfried

    2012-01-01

    The emerging field of synthetic biology is a novel biological discipline at the interface between traditional biology, chemistry, and engineering sciences. Synthetic biology aims at the rational design of complex synthetic biological devices and systems with desired properties by combining compatible, modular biological parts in a systematic manner. While the first engineered systems were mainly proof-of-principle studies to demonstrate the power of the modular engineering approach of synthetic biology, subsequent systems focus on applications in the health, environmental, and energy sectors. This review describes recent approaches for biomedical applications that were developed along the synthetic biology design hierarchy, at the level of individual parts, of devices, and of complex multicellular systems. It describes how synthetic biological parts can be used for the synthesis of drug-delivery tools, how synthetic biological devices can facilitate the discovery of novel drugs, and how multicellular synthetic ecosystems can give insight into population dynamics of parasites and hosts. These examples demonstrate how this new discipline could contribute to novel solutions in the biopharmaceutical industry.

  14. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  15. A Facile and Green Synthesis of Sulforaphane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Jian DING; Ling ZHOU; Xiao Ping CAO

    2006-01-01

    The compound sulforaphane (SFN, 1) has been synthesized via a facile and green synthetic strategy based on the modification of previous methods. Because of its high bioactivities and rare content in nature, the present work is of great important significance.

  16. US Competitiveness in Synthetic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging technical field that aims to make biology easier to engineer; the field has applications in strategically important sectors for the US economy. While the United States currently leads in synthetic biology R&D, other nations are heavily investing in order to boost their economies, which will inevitably diminish the US leadership position. This outcome is not entirely negative—additional investments will expand markets—but it is critical that the US government take steps to remain competitive: There are applications from which the US population and economy may benefit; there are specific applications with importance for national defense; and US technical leadership will ensure that US experts have a leading role in synthetic biology governance, regulation, and oversight. Measures to increase competitiveness in S&T generally are broadly applicable for synthetic biology and should be pursued. However, the US government will also need to take action on fundamental issues that will affect the field's development, such as countering anti-GMO (genetically modified organism) sentiments and anti-GMO legislation. The United States should maintain its regulatory approach so that it is the product that is regulated, not the method used to create a product. At the same time, the United States needs to ensure that the regulatory framework is updated so that synthetic biology products do not fall into regulatory gaps. Finally, the United States needs to pay close attention to how synthetic biology applications may be governed internationally, such as through the Nagoya Protocol of the Convention on Biological Diversity, so that beneficial applications may be realized. PMID:26690379

  17. US Competitiveness in Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronvall, Gigi Kwik

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging technical field that aims to make biology easier to engineer; the field has applications in strategically important sectors for the US economy. While the United States currently leads in synthetic biology R&D, other nations are heavily investing in order to boost their economies, which will inevitably diminish the US leadership position. This outcome is not entirely negative--additional investments will expand markets--but it is critical that the US government take steps to remain competitive: There are applications from which the US population and economy may benefit; there are specific applications with importance for national defense; and US technical leadership will ensure that US experts have a leading role in synthetic biology governance, regulation, and oversight. Measures to increase competitiveness in S&T generally are broadly applicable for synthetic biology and should be pursued. However, the US government will also need to take action on fundamental issues that will affect the field's development, such as countering anti-GMO (genetically modified organism) sentiments and anti-GMO legislation. The United States should maintain its regulatory approach so that it is the product that is regulated, not the method used to create a product. At the same time, the United States needs to ensure that the regulatory framework is updated so that synthetic biology products do not fall into regulatory gaps. Finally, the United States needs to pay close attention to how synthetic biology applications may be governed internationally, such as through the Nagoya Protocol of the Convention on Biological Diversity, so that beneficial applications may be realized.

  18. Scaled Facility Design Approach for Pool-Type Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Small Modular Reactor Utilizing Natural Circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sangrok; Shin, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Jueun; Hwang, Il Soon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In low carbon era, nuclear energy is the most prominent energy source of electricity. For steady ecofriendly nuclear energy supply, Generation IV reactors which are future nuclear reactor require safety, sustainability, economics and non-proliferation as four criteria. Lead cooled fast reactor (LFR) is one of these reactor type and Generation IV international forum (GIF) adapted three reference LFR systems which are a small and movable systems with long life without refueling, intermediate size and huge electricity generation system for power grid. NUTRECK (Nuclear Transmutation Energy Center of Korea) has been designed reactor called URANUS (Ubiquitous, Rugged, Accident-forgiving, Non-proliferating, and Ultra-lasting Sustainer) which is small modular reactor and using lead-bismuth eutectic coolant. To prove natural circulation capability of URANUS and analyze design based accidents, scaling mock-up experiment facility will be constructed. In this paper, simple specifications of URANUS will be presented. Then based on this feature, scaling law and scaled facility design results are presented. To validate safety feature and thermodynamics characteristic of URANUS, scaled mockup facility of URANUS is designed based on the scaling law. This mockup adapts two area scale factors, core and lower parts of mock-up are scaled for 3D flow experiment. Upper parts are scaled different size to reduce electricity power and LBE tonnage. This hybrid scaling method could distort some thermal-hydraulic parameters, however, key parameters for experiment will be matched for up-scaling. Detailed design of mock-up will be determined through iteration for design optimization.

  19. Scheduling of Inbound Trucks at a Cross-Docking Facility: Bi-Objective VS Bi-Level Modeling Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Golias, Mihalis M.; Saharidis, Georgios K.D.; Maria Boile; Sotirios Theofanis

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the problem of scheduling of inbound trucks to the inbound doors at a cross-docking facility. The authors optimize for two conflicting objectives: minimize the total service time for all the inbound trucks and minimize the delayed completion of service for a subset of the inbound trucks, which are considered as preferential customers. The problem is formulated as a bi-objective and as a bi-level mixed integer problem. Due to the nature of the former and the complexity of t...

  20. Space Synthetic Biology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David; Roman, Monsi; Mansell, James (Matt)

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an effort to make genetic engineering more useful by standardizing sections of genetic code. By standardizing genetic components, biological engineering will become much more similar to traditional fields of engineering, in which well-defined components and subsystems are readily available in markets. Specifications of the behavior of those components and subsystems can be used to model a system which incorporates them. Then, the behavior of the novel system can be simulated and optimized. Finally, the components and subsystems can be purchased and assembled to create the optimized system, which most often will exhibit behavior similar to that indicated by the model. The Space Synthetic Biology project began in 2012 as a multi-Center effort. The purpose of this project was to harness Synthetic Biology principals to enable NASA's missions. A central target for application was to Environmental Control & Life Support (ECLS). Engineers from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) ECLS Systems Development Branch (ES62) were brought into the project to contribute expertise in operational ECLS systems. Project lead scientists chose to pursue the development of bioelectrochemical technologies to spacecraft life support. Therefore, the ECLS element of the project became essentially an effort to develop a bioelectrochemical ECLS subsystem. Bioelectrochemical systems exploit the ability of many microorganisms to drive their metabolisms by direct or indirect utilization of electrical potential gradients. Whereas many microorganisms are capable of deriving the energy required for the processes of interest (such as carbon dioxide (CO2) fixation) from sunlight, it is believed that subsystems utilizing electrotrophs will exhibit smaller mass, volume, and power requirements than those that derive their energy from sunlight. In the first 2 years of the project, MSFC personnel conducted modeling, simulation, and conceptual design efforts to assist the

  1. Experimental and field approach to the hydraulics of nature-like pool-type fish migration facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang R.W.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nature-like fish migration facilities have gradually become a common type to ensure longitudinal connectivity of fish movements in running waters. This article presents verification on hydraulic and geometric parameters of nature-like pool-type fish passes via experimental and field investigations. The experiment verified that the maximum streamwise velocity near a slot ranged from 0.8–1.0 time of the theoretical maximum velocity. Large vertical recirculations presented below sills, moved downstream with the increase in discharge, and were likely to vanish or to change the rotation direction with high flow conditions. High turbulent kinetic energy distributed immediately downstream from boulder sills instead of along the water jet. Fieldwork was conducted at a full-width ramp in Kolbermoor and a partial-width ramp in Leitner in Bavaria under low, mean and high flow conditions to investigate the flow and geometry characteristics in real constructions and under various hydrologic conditions. The results for velocity show confidence in the method to obtain the maximum value around a slot by measuring at one depth only. Instead of flow velocity, water depth played a more critical role in the performance of a nature-like fishway, in particular under low flow conditions, and so did the arrangement of boulders along a sill. A detailed hydraulic/geometric investigation, together with biological monitoring, should be conducted to identify appropriate criteria on assessment of fish free passage at nature-like fish migration facilities.

  2. MRS Action Plan Task B report: Analyses of alternative designs and operating approaches for a Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, W.D.; Jowdy, A.K.; Keehn, C.H.; Gale, R.M.; Smith, R.I.

    1988-12-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPAA) instituted a number of changes in the DOE commercial nuclear waste management system. After passage of the Act, the DOE initiated a number of systems studies to reevaluate the role of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) within the federal waste management system. This report summarizes the results of a study to determine the schedules and costs of developing those MRS facilities needed under a number of scenarios, with differing functions allocated to the MRS and/or different spent fuel acceptance schedules. Nine cases were defined for the system study, seven of which included an MRS Facility. The study cases or scenarios evaluated varied relative to the specific functions to be performed at the MRS. The scenarios ranged in magnitude from storage and shipment of bare, intact spent fuel to consolidating the spent fuel into repository emplacement containers prior to storage and shipment. Each scenario required specific modifications to be made to the design developed for the MRS proposal to Congress (the Conceptual Design Report). 41 figs., 326 tabs.

  3. A new approach to control noise from entertainment facilities: Active control and measurement of amplified community noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppin, Richard J.; Casamajó, Joan

    2003-04-01

    While traffic noise is perhaps the most pervasive of community noises, much of the contribution now comes from amplified sound: live music, discos, theme parks, and exercise studios. Those producing the sound or music want it loud and those not interested want to be protected against noise. Noise limits at the receiving or producing property line must be met for the minimum community acceptance. However the time-, and perhaps the spatially-, varying sound in entertainment facilities is often constantly modified (and maybe monitored) near the source of the sound. Hence it is hard to relate and to control the sound at the property line. This paper presents a unique noise control device. It is based on the octave band ``transfer function'' between the sound produced in the entertainment area and the noise received at the property line. The overall insulation can be measured and is input to the instrument. When a noise level limit is exceeded at the receiver, due to the amplified interior noise at the facility, the sound output of the device is automatically controlled to reduce the noise. The paper provides details of the design and possible abatement scenarios with examples.

  4. Developing a Signature Based Safeguards Approach for the Electrorefiner and Salt Cleanup Unit Operations in Pyroprocessing Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Chantell Lynne-Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-27

    Traditional nuclear materials accounting does not work well for safeguards when applied to pyroprocessing. Alternate methods such as Signature Based Safeguards (SBS) are being investigated. The goal of SBS is real-time/near-real-time detection of anomalous events in the pyroprocessing facility as they could indicate loss of special nuclear material. In high-throughput reprocessing facilities, metric tons of separated material are processed that must be accounted for. Even with very low uncertainties of accountancy measurements (<0.1%) the uncertainty of the material balances is still greater than the desired level. Novel contributions of this work are as follows: (1) significant enhancement of SBS development for the salt cleanup process by creating a new gas sparging process model, selecting sensors to monitor normal operation, identifying safeguards-significant off-normal scenarios, and simulating those off-normal events and generating sensor output; (2) further enhancement of SBS development for the electrorefiner by simulating off-normal events caused by changes in salt concentration and identifying which conditions lead to Pu and Cm not tracking throughout the rest of the system; and (3) new contribution in applying statistical techniques to analyze the signatures gained from these two models to help draw real-time conclusions on anomalous events.

  5. Simultaneous determination of propranolol and amiloride in synthetic binary mixtures and pharmaceutical dosage forms by synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy: a multivariate approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, O.; Shinde, Mandakini

    2013-07-01

    A multivariate calibration model for the simultaneous estimation of propranolol (PRO) and amiloride (AMI) using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic data has been presented in this paper. Two multivariate techniques, PCR (Principal Component Regression) and PLSR (Partial Least Square Regression), have been successfully applied for the simultaneous determination of AMI and PRO in synthetic binary mixtures and pharmaceutical dosage forms. The SF spectra of AMI and PRO (calibration mixtures) were recorded at several concentrations within their linear range between wavelengths of 310 and 500 nm at an interval of 1 nm. Calibration models were constructed using 32 samples and validated by varying the concentrations of AMI and PRO in the calibration range. The results indicated that the model developed was very robust and able to efficiently analyze the mixtures with low RMSEP values.

  6. A synthetic mammalian electro-genetic transcription circuit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weber, Wilfried; Luzi, Stefan; Karlsson, Maria; Sanchez-Bustamante, Carlota Diaz; Frey, Urs; Hierlemann, Andreas; Fussenegger, Martin

    .... Using a synthetic biology approach to assemble electronic parts with genetic control units engineered into mammalian cells, we designed an electric power-adjustable transcription control circuit able...

  7. An efficient approach to obtaining water-compatible and stimuli-responsive molecularly imprinted polymers by the facile surface-grafting of functional polymer brushes via RAFT polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Guoqing; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Xianzhi; Li, Chenxi; Zhang, Huiqi

    2010-11-15

    A new and efficient approach to obtaining molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with both pure water-compatible (i.e., applicable in the pure aqueous environments) and stimuli-responsive binding properties is described, whose proof-of-principle is demonstrated by the facile modification of the preformed MIP microspheres via surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm). The presence of poly(NIPAAm) (PNIPAAm) brushes on the obtained MIP microspheres was confirmed by FT-IR as well as the water dispersion and static contact angle experiments, and some quantitative information including the molecular weights and polydispersities of the grafted polymer brushes, the thickness of the polymer brush layers, and their grafting densities was provided. In addition, the binding properties of the ungrafted and grafted MIPs/NIPs in both methanol/water (4/1, v/v) and pure water solutions were also investigated. The introduction of PNIPAAm brushes onto the MIP microspheres has proven to significantly improve their surface hydrophilicity and impart stimuli-responsive properties to them, leading to their pure water-compatible and thermo-responsive binding properties. The application of the facile surface-grafting approach, together with the versatility of RAFT polymerization and the availability of many different functional monomers, makes the present methodology a general and promising way to prepare water-compatible and stimuli-responsive MIPs for a wide range of templates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthetic biology meets tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jamie A; Cachat, Elise

    2016-06-15

    Classical tissue engineering is aimed mainly at producing anatomically and physiologically realistic replacements for normal human tissues. It is done either by encouraging cellular colonization of manufactured matrices or cellular recolonization of decellularized natural extracellular matrices from donor organs, or by allowing cells to self-organize into organs as they do during fetal life. For repair of normal bodies, this will be adequate but there are reasons for making unusual, non-evolved tissues (repair of unusual bodies, interface to electromechanical prostheses, incorporating living cells into life-support machines). Synthetic biology is aimed mainly at engineering cells so that they can perform custom functions: applying synthetic biological approaches to tissue engineering may be one way of engineering custom structures. In this article, we outline the 'embryological cycle' of patterning, differentiation and morphogenesis and review progress that has been made in constructing synthetic biological systems to reproduce these processes in new ways. The state-of-the-art remains a long way from making truly synthetic tissues, but there are now at least foundations for future work. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  9. Photochromic dithienylethene-containing triarylborane derivatives: facile approach to modulate photochromic properties with multi-addressable functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Chun-Ting; Lam, Wai Han; Wong, Hok-Lai; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah

    2015-01-26

    A series of dithienylethene-containing triarylboranes has been designed, synthesized, and characterized. The electrochemistry, photophysics, and photochromic behavior have also been studied. The photophysical and photochromic properties could be facilely tuned in this system by varying the thiophene spacers (thiophene, thienothiophene, and bithiophene) between the dithienylethene and the dimesitylboron (BMes2 ) or the position of the BMes2 substitution in the thiophene spacers. The absorption of closed form has been found to be more sensitive towards the structural modification upon incorporation of the BMes2 unit. Moreover, multi-addressable photochromic reactivity is obtained upon addition of Lewis base (F(-) ), which is due to the formation of boron-Lewis base adduct. The dependence of the photophysical and photochromic properties on the thiophene spacers and the position of the BMes2 substitution has been further supported by computational studies.

  10. A hybrid CS-SA intelligent approach to solve uncertain dynamic facility layout problems considering dependency of demands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslemipour, Ghorbanali

    2017-07-01

    This paper aims at proposing a quadratic assignment-based mathematical model to deal with the stochastic dynamic facility layout problem. In this problem, product demands are assumed to be dependent normally distributed random variables with known probability density function and covariance that change from period to period at random. To solve the proposed model, a novel hybrid intelligent algorithm is proposed by combining the simulated annealing and clonal selection algorithms. The proposed model and the hybrid algorithm are verified and validated using design of experiment and benchmark methods. The results show that the hybrid algorithm has an outstanding performance from both solution quality and computational time points of view. Besides, the proposed model can be used in both of the stochastic and deterministic situations.

  11. A facile approach for the construction of the oxetane ring from 5α-acyloxy-△4(20)-taxoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU, Rui-Wu; YIN, Da-Li; GUO, Ji-Yu; LIANG, Xiao-Tian

    2000-01-01

    An oxetane ring can be constructed from 5α-acyloxy-△4(20)taxoids. Tne facile intramolecular acyl migration from 5- to 20-postion under slightly basic conditions enabled the const-uction of the oxetane ring in a convenient short cut, whereas the acyl migration from 2- to 20-position left the 2-hydroxyl ~~ble to a later benzoylation. An unexpected five-membered 4-O, 20-O sulfite ring was formed in the attempted construction of the oxetane ring with 5α-trifiate as a leaving group. After the construction of the oxetane ring, treatment with strong base LiHMDS and acetyl chloride gave the expected 4-O-acetate while treatment with acetic anhydride and DMAP gave a 4- O-acetoacetate.

  12. [From synthetic biology to synthetic humankind].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouvel, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an historical survey of the expression "synthetic biology" in order to identify its main philosophical components. The result of the analysis is then used to investigate the meaning of the notion of "synthetic man". It is shown that both notions share a common philosophical background that can be summed up by the short but meaningful assertion: "biology is technology". The analysis allows us to distinguish two notions that are often confused in transhumanist literature: the notion of synthetic man and the notion of renewed man. The consequences of this crucial distinction are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Cell-free biology: exploiting the interface between synthetic biology and synthetic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, D Calvin; Jewett, Michael C

    2012-10-01

    Just as synthetic organic chemistry once revolutionized the ability of chemists to build molecules (including those that did not exist in nature) following a basic set of design rules, cell-free synthetic biology is beginning to provide an improved toolbox and faster process for not only harnessing but also expanding the chemistry of life. At the interface between chemistry and biology, research in cell-free synthetic systems is proceeding in two different directions: using synthetic biology for synthetic chemistry and using synthetic chemistry to reprogram or mimic biology. In the coming years, the impact of advances inspired by these approaches will make possible the synthesis of nonbiological polymers having new backbone compositions, new chemical properties, new structures, and new functions.

  14. Knowledge-making distinctions in synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Maureen A; Powell, Alexander; Davies, Jonathan F; Calvert, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an increasingly high-profile area of research that can be understood as encompassing three broad approaches towards the synthesis of living systems: DNA-based device construction, genome-driven cell engineering and protocell creation. Each approach is characterized by different aims, methods and constructs, in addition to a range of positions on intellectual property and regulatory regimes. We identify subtle but important differences between the schools in relation to their treatments of genetic determinism, cellular context and complexity. These distinctions tie into two broader issues that define synthetic biology: the relationships between biology and engineering, and between synthesis and analysis. These themes also illuminate synthetic biology's connections to genetic and other forms of biological engineering, as well as to systems biology. We suggest that all these knowledge-making distinctions in synthetic biology raise fundamental questions about the nature of biological investigation and its relationship to the construction of biological components and systems.

  15. Synthetic biology platform technologies for antimicrobial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braff, Dana; Shis, David; Collins, James J

    2016-10-01

    The growing prevalence of antibiotic resistance calls for new approaches in the development of antimicrobial therapeutics. Likewise, improved diagnostic measures are essential in guiding the application of targeted therapies and preventing the evolution of therapeutic resistance. Discovery platforms are also needed to form new treatment strategies and identify novel antimicrobial agents. By applying engineering principles to molecular biology, synthetic biologists have developed platforms that improve upon, supplement, and will perhaps supplant traditional broad-spectrum antibiotics. Efforts in engineering bacteriophages and synthetic probiotics demonstrate targeted antimicrobial approaches that can be fine-tuned using synthetic biology-derived principles. Further, the development of paper-based, cell-free expression systems holds promise in promoting the clinical translation of molecular biology tools for diagnostic purposes. In this review, we highlight emerging synthetic biology platform technologies that are geared toward the generation of new antimicrobial therapies, diagnostics, and discovery channels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A new approach to assess occupational exposure to airborne fungal contamination and mycotoxins of forklift drivers in waste sorting facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Carla; Faria, Tiago; de Oliveira, Ana Cebola; Caetano, Liliana Aranha; Carolino, Elisabete; Quintal-Gomes, Anita; Twarużek, Magdalena; Kosicki, Robert; Soszczyńska, Ewelina; Viegas, Susana

    2017-07-20

    The waste management industry is an important employer, and exposure of waste-handling workers to microorganisms is considered an occupational health problem. Besides fungal contamination, it is important to consider the co-occurrence of mycotoxins in this setting. Forklifts with closed cabinet and air conditioner are commonly used in waste industry to transport waste and other products within the facilities, possibly increasing the risk of exposure under certain conditions. The aim of this study was to assess the fungal contamination and mycotoxin levels in filters from the air conditioning system of forklift cabinets, as an indicator to assess occupational exposure of the drivers working in a waste sorting facility. Cytotoxicity was also assessed to understand and characterize the toxicity of the complex mixtures as present in the forklift filters. Aqueous extracts of filters from 11 vehicles were streaked onto 2% malt extract agar (MEA) with chloramphenicol (0.05 g/L) media, and in dichloran glycerol (DG18) agar-based media for morphological identification of the mycobiota. Real-time quantitative PCR amplification of genes from Aspergillus sections Fumigati, Flavi, Circumdati, and Versicolores was also performed. Mycotoxins were analyzed using LC-MS/MS system. Cytotoxicity of filter extracts was analyzed by using a MTT cell culture test. Aspergillus species were found most frequently, namely Aspergillus sections Circumdati (MEA 48%; DG18 41%) and Nigri (MEA 32%; DG18 17.3%). By qPCR, only Aspergillus section Fumigati species were found, but positive results were obtained for all assessed filters. No mycotoxins were detected in aqueous filter extracts, but most extracts were highly cytotoxic (n = 6) or medium cytotoxic (n = 4). Although filter service life and cytotoxicity were not clearly correlated, the results suggest that observing air conditioner filter replacement frequency may be a critical aspect to avoid worker's exposure. Further research is

  17. Grand challenges in space synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Amor A; Montague, Michael G; Cumbers, John; Hogan, John A; Arkin, Adam P

    2015-12-06

    Space synthetic biology is a branch of biotechnology dedicated to engineering biological systems for space exploration, industry and science. There is significant public and private interest in designing robust and reliable organisms that can assist on long-duration astronaut missions. Recent work has also demonstrated that such synthetic biology is a feasible payload minimization and life support approach as well. This article identifies the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead in the field of space synthetic biology, while highlighting relevant progress. It also outlines anticipated broader benefits from this field, because space engineering advances will drive technological innovation on Earth.

  18. Maintenance of residual activity of Bt toxin by using natural and synthetic dyes: a novel approach for sustainable mosquito vector control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekhar, Patil; Rahul, Suryawanshi; Hemant, Borase; Chandrakant, Narkhede; Bipinchandra, Salunke; Satish, Patil

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito control protein from Bacillus thuringiensis gets inactivated with exposure to sunlight. To address this issue, the potential of synthetic and natural dye was investigated as sunlight protectants. Bt SV2 in absence of dyes when exposed to sunlight showed reduced effectiveness against the fourth instars of mosquito larvae. Whereas acriflavin, congo red and violacein were able to maintain 86.4%, 91.6% and 82.2% mosquito larvicidal efficacy of Bt SV2 against IVth instars larvae of Anopheles stephensi Meigen after exposure to sunlight. Similarly, beetroot dye, acriflavin, congo red and violacein maintained 98.4%, 97.1%, 90.8% and 70.7% larvicidal activities against Aedes aegypti Linnaeus after sunlight exposure. Prodigiosin was found to be the best photo-protectant by simultaneously protecting and enhancing Bt activity by 6.16% and 22.16% against A. stephensi and A. aegypti, respectively. Combination of dyes with Bt formulations can be a good strategy for mosquito control programmes in tropical and sub-tropical regions.

  19. Interdisciplinary Team Functioning: A Case Team Approach to Habilitation in a Residential Facility for the Mentally Retarded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, Herbert M.

    Detailed are the functions, structure, and relationship to data gathering systems of an interdisciplinary team habilitation approach in a residential center for mentally retarded persons. Deficiencies of the system currently in operation at Willowbrook Developmental Center (New York) are reviewed. It is explained that suggested reorganization is…

  20. Designing synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapakis, Christina M

    2014-03-21

    Synthetic biology is frequently defined as the application of engineering design principles to biology. Such principles are intended to streamline the practice of biological engineering, to shorten the time required to design, build, and test synthetic gene networks. This streamlining of iterative design cycles can facilitate the future construction of biological systems for a range of applications in the production of fuels, foods, materials, and medicines. The promise of these potential applications as well as the emphasis on design has prompted critical reflection on synthetic biology from design theorists and practicing designers from many fields, who can bring valuable perspectives to the discipline. While interdisciplinary connections between biologists and engineers have built synthetic biology via the science and the technology of biology, interdisciplinary collaboration with artists, designers, and social theorists can provide insight on the connections between technology and society. Such collaborations can open up new avenues and new principles for research and design, as well as shed new light on the challenging context-dependence-both biological and social-that face living technologies at many scales. This review is inspired by the session titled "Design and Synthetic Biology: Connecting People and Technology" at Synthetic Biology 6.0 and covers a range of literature on design practice in synthetic biology and beyond. Critical engagement with how design is used to shape the discipline opens up new possibilities for how we might design the future of synthetic biology.

  1. Photocatalytic degradation of organic contaminants under solar light using carbon dot/titanium dioxide nanohybrid, obtained through a facile approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Deepshikha; Karak, Niranjan

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, a novel, simple and green method was developed to synthesize highly luminescent nitrogen containing carbon dot (CD) using carbon resources like bio-based citric acid and glycerol in the presence of cost free cow urine. The as-synthesized CD showed exciting wavelength dependent down- and up-conversion flourescence properties. To utilize the advantage of up-conversion flourescence, a nanohybrid (CD@TiO2) was synthesized from the above carbon resources and titanium butoxide through a facile one pot single step hydrothermal protocol. Nanomaterials like bare TiO2 and nanohybrid of TiO2 in presence of CD (CD/TiO2) were also synthesized for comparison purpose. The optical properties and structural characteristics of the prepared CD, bare TiO2, CD@TiO2 and CD/TiO2 were examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopic, scanning electron microscopic (SEM), transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The elemental compositions of bare CD and CD@TiO2 nanohybrid were obtained from EDX analyses. The poor crystalline nature and narrow distribution of spherical CD and anatase form of TiO2 were confirmed from XRD and TEM studies. Amongst the studied nanomaterials, CD@TiO2 exhibited the most promising photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants like benzene and phenol as well as an anthrogenic pesticide under sunlight.

  2. Facility based cross-sectional study of self stigma among people with mental illness: towards patient empowerment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girma, Eshetu; Tesfaye, Markos; Froeschl, Guenter; Möller-Leimkühler, Anne Maria; Dehning, Sandra; Müller, Norbert

    2013-09-03

    Self stigma among people with mental illness results from multiple cognitive and environmental factors and processes. It can negatively affect adherence to psychiatric services, self esteem, hope, social integration and quality of life of people with mental illness. The purpose of this study was to measure the level of self stigma and its correlates among people with mental illness at Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Psychiatry clinic in southwest Ethiopia. Facility based cross-sectional study was conducted on 422 consecutive samples of people with mental illness using interviewer administered and pretested internalized stigma of mental illness (ISMI) scale. Data was entered using EPI-DATA and analysis was done using STATA software. Bivariate and multivariate linear regressions were done to identify correlates of self stigma. On a scale ranging from 1 to 4, the mean self stigma score was 2.32 (SD = 0.30). Females had higher self stigma (std. β = 0.11, P mental illness (std. β = 0.16, P mental illness were associated with higher self stigma. Drug side effects and perceived signs of mental illness were correlated with increased self stigma while education and self esteem decreased self stigma among people with mental illness. Patient empowerment psychosocial interventions and strategies to reduce drug side effects can be helpful in reducing self stigma among people with mental illnesses.

  3. A facile approach to fabricate Au nanoparticles loaded SiO{sub 2} microspheres for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Mingyi, E-mail: mingyitjucu@163.com [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China); Huang, Guanbo, E-mail: gbhuang2007@hotmail.com [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li, Xianxian; Pang, Xiaobo [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China); Qiu, Haixia [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Hydrophilic and biocompatible macromolecules were used to improve and simplify the process for the fabrication of core/shell SiO{sub 2}@Au composite particles. The influence of polymers on the morphology of SiO{sub 2}@Au particles with different size of SiO{sub 2} cores was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The optical property of the SiO{sub 2}@Au particles was studied with UV–Vis spectroscopy. The results indicate that the structure and composition of macromolecules affect the morphology of Au layers on SiO{sub 2} microspheres. The SiO{sub 2}@Au particles prepared in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) have thin and complete Au nanoshells owing to their inducing act in preferential growth of Au nanoparticles along the surface of SiO{sub 2} microspheres. SiO{sub 2}@Au particles can be also prepared from SiO{sub 2} microspheres modified with 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane in the presence of PVA or PVP. This offers a simple way to fabricate a Au layer on SiO{sub 2} or other microspheres. The SiO{sub 2}@Au particles demonstrated high catalytic activity in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. - Highlights: • Facile direct deposition method for Au nanoparticles on silica microspheres. • Influence of different types of macromolecule on the formation of Au shell. • High catalytic performance of Au nanoparticles on silica microspheres.

  4. Facile and green approach to prepare fluorescent carbon dots: Emergent nanomaterial for cell imaging and detection of vitamin B2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Aniruddha; Nandi, Sudipta; Das, Pradip; Nandi, Arun K

    2016-04-15

    Carbon dots (CDs) are a new representative in carbonaceous family and have initiated remarkable research interests over the past one decade in a large variety of fields. Herein, we have utilized a facile, one-step carbonization method to prepare fluorescent carbon dots using poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) both as a carbon source and as a surface passivating agent. The as prepared CDs emit bright blue fluorescence under ultraviolet illumination. The structure and optical properties of the CDs are thoroughly investigated by several methods such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy; dynamic light scattering; UV-vis, fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The CDs exhibit excellent water solubility and demonstrate average hydrodynamic diameter of 11.3 nm, holding great promise for biological applications. The biocompatibility evaluation and in vitro imaging study reveals that the synthesized CDs can be used as effective fluorescent probes in bio-imaging without noticeable cytotoxicity. In addition, a unique sensor for the detection of vitamin B2 in aqueous solution is proposed on the basis of spontaneous fluorescence resonance energy transfer from CD to vitamin B2. These findings therefore suggest that the CDs can find potential applications in cellular imaging along with sensing of vitamin B2.

  5. A facile one-step approach to functionalized graphene oxide-based hydrogels used as effective adsorbents toward anionic dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xinpeng; Liu, Zhiming [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and SATCM Third Grade Laboratory of Chinese Medicine and Photonics Technology, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510631 (China); Ye, Xiangping; Hu, Kun [National Testing Center for Optical Radiation Safety of Photoelectric Products, Huizhou, Guangdong 516003 (China); Zhong, Huiqing; Yu, Jianfeng; Jin, Mei [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and SATCM Third Grade Laboratory of Chinese Medicine and Photonics Technology, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510631 (China); Guo, Zhouyi, E-mail: ann@scnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and SATCM Third Grade Laboratory of Chinese Medicine and Photonics Technology, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510631 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Herein, we used a facile method mainly through self-assemble, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interaction to synthesize poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)/graphene oxide (PDDA/GO) hydrogels, which can be easily used as adsorbents to eliminate anionic dyes. The as-prepared PDDA/GO hydrogels were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy. In order to research the adsorption kinetics for the removal of anion dyes from water pollution, we further investigated that the effect of concentration, temperature, pH, ionic strength or cycle number on the removal process. The results indicated that due to the strong π–π stacking and anion–cation interaction, there were high removal efficiencies for both ponceau S (PS) and trypan blue (TB). The equilibrium time of adsorption is 30 min and 120 min for PS and TB, respectively, at which the solution could be decolorized to nearly colorless. Meanwhile, the adsorption process was more according with the pseudo-second-order model than the pseudo-first-order model. The hydrogels exhibited high removal efficiency for those two anionic dyes after four repeated adsorption and desorption treatments. It was demonstrated that PDDA/GO hydrogels would have great potential as a freestanding and reusable adsorbent for the practical application in water purification.

  6. Grand challenges in space synthetic biology

    OpenAIRE

    Menezes, Amor A.; Montague, Michael G.; Cumbers, John; Hogan, John A.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    Space synthetic biology is a branch of biotechnology dedicated to engineering biological systems for space exploration, industry and science. There is significant public and private interest in designing robust and reliable organisms that can assist on long-duration astronaut missions. Recent work has also demonstrated that such synthetic biology is a feasible payload minimization and life support approach as well. This article identifies the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead in the...

  7. Somatic embryogenesis and synthetic seed production--a biotechnological approach for true-to-type propagation and in vitro conservation of an ornamental bulbaceous plant Drimiopsis kirkii Baker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Sk Moquammel; Ghosh, Biswajit

    2014-04-01

    An efficient plant regeneration protocol through indirect somatic embryogenesis pathway via callus had been developed from the leaf explant of an ornamental bulbaceous plant Drimiopsis kirkii. Optimum friable calli were induced on Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal medium supplemented with 3.0 mg/l of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 1.0 mg/l of α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA). On subculturing the callus on MS medium supplemented with 2.5 mg/l of thidiazuron (TDZ), 73.3 % of the cultures responded with 20.4 ± 0.3 somatic embryos (SEs) per 500 mg callus at different stages of development after 6 weeks of culture. The highest response of 86.7 % with 28.3 ± 0.5 embryos per 500 mg callus was observed on MS medium supplemented with 2.5 mg/l TDZ and 1.0 mg/l NAA. SEs were encapsulated in calcium alginate beads for the production of synthetic seeds (SSs) and their storability was investigated. The highest SS germination (93.3 %) was observed in 1.0 % sodium alginate followed by 86.7 % germination with 2.5 % sodium alginate. The SSs were stored at three different temperatures (4, 15, and 24 ºC) up to 6 months. The SSs kept at 15 °C showed 64.4 % germinability even after 4 months of storage. Both nonencapsulated and encapsulated SE-derived plants were successfully transferred to soil with 93.3 and 88.3 % survival rate accordingly. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis revealed that there were no somaclonal variations among the plants produced via somatic embryogenesis and they are true-to-type to their parental plant. These results confirmed the most reliable methods, which can be further used for genetic transformation studies as well as for mass propagation of ornamental D. kirkii at a commercial level.

  8. Structural health monitoring of engineered structures using a space-borne synthetic aperture radar multi-temporal approach: from cultural heritage sites to war zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milillo, Pietro; Tapete, Deodato; Cigna, Francesca; Perissin, Daniele; Salzer, Jacqueline; Lundgren, Paul; Fielding, Eric; Burgmann, Roland; Biondi, Filippo; Milillo, Giovanni; Serio, Carmine

    2016-10-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) of engineered structures consists of an automated or semi-automated survey system that seeks to assess the structural condition of an anthropogenic structure. The aim of an SHM system is to provide insights into possible induced damage or any inherent signals of deformation affecting the structure in terms of detection, localization, assessment, and prediction. During the last decade there has been a growing interest in using several remote sensing techniques, such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR), for SHM. Constellations of SAR satellites with short repeat time acquisitions permit detailed surveys temporal resolution and millimetric sensitivity to deformation that are at the scales relevant to monitoring large structures. The all-weather multi-temporal characteristics of SAR make its products suitable for SHM systems, especially in areas where in situ measurements are not feasible or not cost effective. To illustrate this capability, we present results from COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) and TerraSAR-X SAR observations applied to the remote sensing of engineered structures. We show how by using multiple-geometry SAR-based products which exploit both phase and amplitude of the SAR signal we can address the main objectives of an SHM system including detection and localization. We highlight that, when external data such as rain or temperature records are available or simple elastic models can be assumed, the SAR-based SHM capability can also provide an interpretation in terms of assessment and prediction. We highlight examples of the potential for such imaging capabilities to enable advances in SHM from space, focusing on dams and cultural heritage areas.

  9. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  10. A facile approach to prepare silicon-based Pt-Ag tubular dendritic nano-forests (tDNFs) for solar-light-enhanced methanol oxidation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Ting; Shiao, Ming-Hua; Chang, Mao-Nan; Chu, Nancy; Chen, Yu-Wei; Peng, Yu-Hsuan; Liao, Bo-Huei; Huang, Hung Ji; Hsiao, Chien-Nan; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a facile two-step Galvanic replacement reaction (GRR) is proposed to prepare Pt-Ag tubular dendritic nano-forests (tDNFs) in ambient condition for enhancing methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) under solar illumination. In the first GRR, a homogeneous layer of silver dendritic nano-forests (DNFs) with 10 μm in thickness was grown on Si wafer in 5 min in silver nitride (AgNO3) and buffer oxide etchant (BOE) solution. In the second GRR, we utilized chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) as the precursor for platinum (Pt) deposition to further transform the prepared Ag DNFs into Pt-Ag tDNFs. The catalytic performance and solar response of the Pt-Ag tDNFs toward methanol electro-oxidation are also studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). The methanol oxidation current was boosted by 6.4% under solar illumination on the Pt-Ag tDNFs due to the induced localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) on the dendritic structure. Current results provide a cost-effective and facile approach to prepare solar-driven metallic electrodes potentially applicable to photo-electro-chemical fuel cells.

  11. Technical Approach for Determining Key Parameters Needed for Modeling the Performance of Cast Stone for the Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabusaki, Steven B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rockhold, Mark L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Guohui [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) and its contractors at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are conducting a development program to develop / refine the cementitious waste form for the wastes treated at the ETF and to provide the data needed to support the IDF PA. This technical approach document is intended to provide guidance to the cementitious waste form development program with respect to the waste form characterization and testing information needed to support the IDF PA. At the time of the preparation of this technical approach document, the IDF PA effort is just getting started and the approach to analyze the performance of the cementitious waste form has not been determined. Therefore, this document looks at a number of different approaches for evaluating the waste form performance and describes the testing needed to provide data for each approach. Though the approach addresses a cementitious secondary aqueous waste form, it is applicable to other waste forms such as Cast Stone for supplemental immobilization of Hanford LAW. The performance of Cast Stone as a physical and chemical barrier to the release of contaminants of concern (COCs) from solidification of Hanford liquid low activity waste (LAW) and secondary wastes processed through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) is of critical importance to the Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) total system performance assessment (TSPA). The effectiveness of cementitious waste forms as a barrier to COC release is expected to evolve with time. PA modeling must therefore anticipate and address processes, properties, and conditions that alter the physical and chemical controls on COC transport in the cementitious waste forms over time. Most organizations responsible for disposal facility operation and their regulators support an iterative hierarchical safety/performance assessment approach with a general philosophy that modeling provides

  12. Facility Microgrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  13. Stochastic modeling and control system designs of the NASA/MSFC Ground Facility for large space structures: The maximum entropy/optimal projection approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Wei-Shen

    1986-01-01

    In the Control Systems Division of the Systems Dynamics Laboratory of the NASA/MSFC, a Ground Facility (GF), in which the dynamics and control system concepts being considered for Large Space Structures (LSS) applications can be verified, was designed and built. One of the important aspects of the GF is to design an analytical model which will be as close to experimental data as possible so that a feasible control law can be generated. Using Hyland's Maximum Entropy/Optimal Projection Approach, a procedure was developed in which the maximum entropy principle is used for stochastic modeling and the optimal projection technique is used for a reduced-order dynamic compensator design for a high-order plant.

  14. Poly(furfuryl alcohol) nanospheres: a facile synthesis approach based on confinement effect of polymer and a template for synthesis of metal oxide hollow nanospheres

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wei-Zhi Wang; Zhi-Qiang Li; Kong-Lin Wu; Ya-Jing Lu; Ya-Fei Xu; Xin-Jie Song

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a facile hydrothermal approach to the large-scale synthesis of well-dispersed poly(furfuryl alcohol) (PFA) nanospheres with an average diameter of 350 nm in the presence of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP). Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies showed that different morphologies of PFA could be obtained by adjusting the ratio of PVP and furfuryl alcohol (FA). As a whole, the results demonstrate that PVP plays a key role in controlling the polymerization process of FA. The confinement effect of PVP is proposed to explain the formation process of PFA nanospheres. Furthermore, the as-prepared PFA nanospheres have a functional surface that allow them to act as an ideal template for fabricating metal oxide hollow nanospheres.

  15. A Hybrid Approach Using an Artificial Bee Algorithm with Mixed Integer Programming Applied to a Large-Scale Capacitated Facility Location Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Cabrera G.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a hybridization of two different approaches applied to the well-known Capacitated Facility Location Problem (CFLP. The Artificial Bee algorithm (BA is used to select a promising subset of locations (warehouses which are solely included in the Mixed Integer Programming (MIP model. Next, the algorithm solves the subproblem by considering the entire set of customers. The hybrid implementation allows us to bypass certain inherited weaknesses of each algorithm, which means that we are able to find an optimal solution in an acceptable computational time. In this paper we demonstrate that BA can be significantly improved by use of the MIP algorithm. At the same time, our hybrid implementation allows the MIP algorithm to reach the optimal solution in a considerably shorter time than is needed to solve the model using the entire dataset directly within the model. Our hybrid approach outperforms the results obtained by each technique separately. It is able to find the optimal solution in a shorter time than each technique on its own, and the results are highly competitive with the state-of-the-art in large-scale optimization. Furthermore, according to our results, combining the BA with a mathematical programming approach appears to be an interesting research area in combinatorial optimization.

  16. Open questions in origin of life: experimental studies on the origin of nucleic acids and proteins with specific and functional sequences by a chemical synthetic biology approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adamala, K.; Anella, F.M.; Wieczorek, R.; Stano, P.; Chiarabelli, C.; Luisi, P.L.

    2014-01-01

    In this mini-review we present some experimental approaches to the important issue in the origin of life, namely the origin of nucleic acids and proteins with specific and functional sequences. The formation of macromolecules on prebiotic Earth faces practical and conceptual difficulties. From the c

  17. Photocatalytic degradation of organic contaminants under solar light using carbon dot/titanium dioxide nanohybrid, obtained through a facile approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazarika, Deepshikha; Karak, Niranjan, E-mail: karakniranjan@gmail.com

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Nitrogen containing carbon dot and carbon dot/TiO{sub 2} nanohybrid (CD@TiO{sub 2}) are synthesized without any additional doping of passivating agent. • The photocatalytic efficacy of CD@TiO{sub 2} is found to be the best as compared to the bare TiO{sub 2}, CD and nanohybrid of TiO{sub 2} in presence of carbon dot. • Up-conversion luminescence of CD promotes the degradation activity of synthesized CD@TiO{sub 2} under visible light. • The hazardous contaminants like phenol, benzene and pesticide are efficiently degraded by CD@TiO{sub 2} under normal sunlight. - Abstract: In the present study, a novel, simple and green method was developed to synthesize highly luminescent nitrogen containing carbon dot (CD) using carbon resources like bio-based citric acid and glycerol in the presence of cost free cow urine. The as-synthesized CD showed exciting wavelength dependent down- and up-conversion flourescence properties. To utilize the advantage of up-conversion flourescence, a nanohybrid (CD@TiO{sub 2}) was synthesized from the above carbon resources and titanium butoxide through a facile one pot single step hydrothermal protocol. Nanomaterials like bare TiO{sub 2} and nanohybrid of TiO{sub 2} in presence of CD (CD/TiO{sub 2}) were also synthesized for comparison purpose. The optical properties and structural characteristics of the prepared CD, bare TiO{sub 2}, CD@TiO{sub 2} and CD/TiO{sub 2} were examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopic, scanning electron microscopic (SEM), transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The elemental compositions of bare CD and CD@TiO{sub 2} nanohybrid were obtained from EDX analyses. The poor crystalline nature and narrow distribution of spherical CD and anatase form of TiO{sub 2} were confirmed from XRD and TEM studies. Amongst the studied nanomaterials, CD@TiO{sub 2} exhibited the most promising photocatalytic degradation of organic

  18. Synthetic cathinone abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capriola M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael Capriola Thomasville Medical Center, Thomasville, NC, USA Abstract: The abuse of synthetic cathinones, widely known as bath salts, has been increasing since the mid-2000s. These substances are derivatives of the naturally occurring compound cathinone, which is the primary psychoactive component of khat. The toxicity of synthetic cathinones includes significant sympathomimetic effects, as well as psychosis, agitation, aggression, and sometimes violent and bizarre behavior. Mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone are currently the predominantly abused synthetic cathinones. Keywords: designer drugs/chemistry, street drugs/pharmacology, substance-related disorders/epidemiology, alkaloids/poisoning

  19. Synthetic Base Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M.; Fotheringham, J. D.; Hoyes, T. J.; Mortier, R. M.; Orszulik, S. T.; Randles, S. J.; Stroud, P. M.

    The chemical nature and technology of the main synthetic lubricant base fluids is described, covering polyalphaolefins, alkylated aromatics, gas-to-liquid (GTL) base fluids, polybutenes, aliphatic diesters, polyolesters, polyalkylene glycols or PAGs and phosphate esters.Other synthetic lubricant base oils such as the silicones, borate esters, perfluoroethers and polyphenylene ethers are considered to have restricted applications due to either high cost or performance limitations and are not considered here.Each of the main synthetic base fluids is described for their chemical and physical properties, manufacture and production, their chemistry, key properties, applications and their implications when used in the environment.

  20. Preparation of conjugated dienoates with Bestmann ylide: Towards the synthesis of zampanolide and dactylolide using a facile linchpin approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Bestmann ylide [(triphenylphosphoranylideneketene] acts as a chemical linchpin that links nucleophilic entities, such as alcohols or amines, with carbonyl moieties to produce unsaturated esters and amides, respectively. In this work, the formation of α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated esters (dienoates is achieved through the coupling of Bestmann ylide, an alcohol and an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde. Primary and secondary alcohols, including allylic alcohols, are suitable substrates; the newly formed alkene has an E-geometry. Strategically, this represents a highly efficient route to unsaturated polyketide derivatives. A linchpin approach to the synthesis of a major fragment of the natural products zampanolide and dactylolide is investigated using Bestmann ylide to link the C16–C20 alcohol with the C3–C8 aldehyde fragment.

  1. Synthetic Studies on Bioactive Natural Polyketides: Intramolecular Nitrile Oxide-Olefin Cycloaddition Approach for Construction of a Macrolactone Skeleton of Macrosphelide B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Mann Paek

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the synthesis of macrosphelide B via an intramolecular nitrile oxide-olefin cycloaddition (INOC is described. In particular, an asymmetric INOC approach using phase transfer catalysts seems to be a potentially efficient and versatile procedure for the construction of the macrolactone skeleton of macrosphelide B in terms of facial selectivity. Our preliminary and unprecedented stereoselective procedure is anticipated to be usefully applied through further studies for the synthesis of the macrosphelide family.

  2. Analysis of Synthetic Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reviews techniques for the characterization and analysis of synthetic polymers, copolymers, and blends. Includes techniques for structure determination, separation, and quantitation of additives and residual monomers; determination of molecular weight; and the study of thermal properties including degradation mechanisms. (MVL)

  3. Philosophy of Systems and Synthetic Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Sara

    2017-01-01

    This entry aims to clarify how systems and synthetic biology contribute to and extend discussions within philosophy of science. Unlike fields such as developmental biology or molecular biology, systems and synthetic biology are not easily demarcated by a focus on a specific subject area or level...... of organization. Rather, they are characterized by the development and application of mathematical, computational, and synthetic modeling strategies in response to complex problems and challenges within the life sciences. Proponents of systems and synthetic biology often stress the necessity of a perspective...... that goes beyond the scope of molecular biology and genetic engineering, respectively. With the emphasis on systems and interaction networks, the approaches explicitly engage in one of the oldest philosophical discussions on the relationship between parts and wholes, or between reductionism and holism...

  4. A facile pollutant-free approach toward a series of nutritionally effective calcium phosphate nanomaterials for food and drink additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieru; Chen, Xiaoyi; Yang, Xianyan; Xu, Sanzhong; Zhang, Xinli; Gou, Zhongru

    2011-03-01

    Micronutrient malnutrition is widespread and constitutes one of the main nutritional problems worldwide. Vitamins, amino acids, carbohydrates and Ca-phosphate (CaP) minerals are important to human health and disease prevention. Herein we developed a simple wet-chemical method to prepare multinary nutrients-containing CaP nanomaterials in diluted apple, orange, and grape juices. The scanning electron microscopy observation shows that these nanomaterials are short plate-like CaP nanocrystals of 500 nm in length. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, thermogravimetric analyses confirm the different specific surface area and organic nutrient contents. The Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction analyses indicate there exist similar organic groups (i.e., COO-, HN-CO) but different CaP species in the precipitates. The dissolution test in vitro simulated stomach juice pH condition indicates that these inorganic-organic nanohybrid materials are multidoped by micronutrients (such as Zn, Sr, Mg, K, vitamin c) and can be readily dissolved in the weak acidic aqueous solutions. This highly efficient utilization of fruit juice to produce CaP-based micronutrient composites may minimize the adverse side effect, so that the nanomaterials are promising as functional food/drink additives. Thus, this novel approach is environmentally and biologically friendly to produce edible nutrients while production cost is attained.

  5. Facile production of nanostructured cellulose from Elaeis guineensis empty fruit bunch via one pot oxidative-hydrolysis isolation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You Wei; Lee, Hwei Voon; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2017-02-10

    Cellulose in nanostructures was successfully isolated from empty fruit bunch biomass via a novel one-pot oxidative-hydrolysis technique. The physicochemical properties of nanocellulose prepared via one-pot process have shown comparable characteristics as products isolated via conventional multistep purification approach (namely dewaxing, chlorite bleaching process, alkalization, and acid hydrolysis). The chemical composition study indicated that the one-pot oxidative-hydrolysis process successfully extracted cellulose (91.0%), with the remaining minority being hemicellulose and lignin (∼6%) in the final product. Crystallinity profile of one-pot treated product (80.3%) was higher than that of multistep isolated nanocellulose (75.4%), which indicated that the disorder region (amorphous) in cellulose fibers was successfully removed. In additional to that, the morphology study demonstrated that nanocellulose prepared by one-pot process rendered spider-web-like network nanostructure, with an average diameter of fibers at a range of 51.6±15.4nm. The nanocellulose product showed high thermal stability (320°C), which was ready for nanocomposite application. One-pot oxidative-hydrolysis technique is a simple and versatile route for the preparation of nanocellulose from complex biomass within 90°C and 6h period, with minimum wastewater as compared to the multistep process.

  6. Facile and scalable fabrication engineering of fullerenol nanoparticles by improved alkaline-oxidation approach and its antioxidant potential in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-yang; Xiong, Feng-xia; Fan, Yi-kang; Li, Juan; Wang, He-zhong; Xing, Geng-mei; Yan, Feng-ming; Tai, Fu-ju; He, Rui

    2016-11-01

    A feasible in operation, labor-saving and low-cost one-step technology to fabricate fullerenol nanoparticles (FNPs) up to 10 g in laboratory was developed by improved alkaline-oxidation approach using moderately concentrated sodium hydroxide solution as the hydroxylation agent and o-dichlorobenzene as the solvent. This strategy paves the avenue for industrial-scale bulk production of FNPs. The resulted product, [C60(OH)22·8H2O]n, were characterized by various measurements including matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, high-resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectrophotometer, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic light scattering analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and electron spin resonance spectrometer. Radical scavenging assay in vitro confirmed the high efficiency of water-soluble [C60(OH)22·8H2O]n as a novel radical scavenger. Furthermore, [C60(OH)22·8H2O]n as an excellent candidate has the potential to serve as the plant defense stimulation agent in maize.

  7. Diversity-Oriented Approaches to Polycyclics and Bioinspired Molecules via the Diels-Alder Strategy: Green Chemistry, Synthetic Economy, and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotha, Sambasivarao; Chavan, Arjun S; Goyal, Deepti

    2015-05-11

    We describe diverse approaches to various dienes and their utilization in the Diels-Alder reaction to produce a variety of polycycles. The dienes covered here are prepared by simple alkylation reaction or via the Claisen rearrangement or by enyne metathesis of alkyne or enyne building blocks. Here, we have also included the Diels-Alder chemistry of dendralenes, a higher analog of cross-conjugated dienes. The present article is inclusive of o-xylylene derivatives that are generated in situ starting with benzosultine or benzosulfone derivatives. The Diels-Alder reaction of these dienes with various dienophiles gave diverse polycyclic systems and biologically important targets.

  8. Synthetic Studies in Phytochrome Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Peter A; Adel Odeh, Imad M; Buddhu, Subhas C; Cai, Guolin; Rajeswari, Sundaramoorthi; Fry, Douglas; Zheng, Wanjun; Desimone, Robert W; Guo, Jiasheng; Coutts, Lisa D; Hauck, Sheila I; Leung, Sam H; Ghosh, Indranath; Pippin, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    An account is given of the author's several approaches to the synthesis of the parent chromophore of phytochrome (1), a protein-bound linear tetrapyrrole derivative that controls photomorphogenesis in higher plants. These studies culminated in enantioselective syntheses of both 2R- and 2S-phytochromobilin (4), as well as several (13)C-labeled derivatives designed to probe the site of Z,E-isomerization during photoexcitation. When reacted in vitro, synthetic 2R-4 and recombinant-derived phytochrome apoprotein N-C produced a protein-bound chromophore with identical difference spectra to naturally occurring 1.

  9. A facile approach for the synthesis of magnetic separable Fe3O4@TiO2, core-shell nanocomposites as highly recyclable photocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tiejun; Ma, Mingliang; Zhang, Hepeng; Gu, Junwei; Wang, Shuangjie; Liu, Mengjiao; Zhang, Qiuyu

    2014-01-01

    A facile and efficient approach for the fabrication of Fe3O4@TiO2 nanocomposites with a good core-shell structure has been demonstrated. The approach employed involved the coating of successive titania shell on Fe3O4 core using a mixed solvent method with the catalysis of ammonia followed by the crystallization of TiO2 through solvothermal method. The as-obtained core-shell structure was composed of a central Fe3O4 core with a strong response to external fields, whereas the outer titanium oxide coating was useful for the degradation of organic contaminants. The results showed that Fe3O4@TiO2 nanocomposites exhibited high degree of crystallinity, excellent magnetic properties at room temperature. Furthermore, the as-prepared Fe3O4@TiO2 nanocomposites exhibited good photocatalytic activity toward the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) solution, which meant that they can be used as efficient and conveniently recoverable photocatalysts. In addition, the mechanism of coating by ammonia catalysis was also investigated.

  10. A facile and specific assay for quantifying microRNA by an optimized RT-qPCR approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Mei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The spatiotemporal expression patterns of microRNAs (miRNAs are important to the verification of their predicted function. RT-qPCR is the accepted technique for the quantification of miRNA expression; however, stem-loop RT-PCR and poly(T-adapter assay, the two most frequently used methods, are not very convenient in practice and have poor specificity, respectively. RESULTS: We have developed an optimal approach that integrates these two methods and allows specific and rapid detection of tiny amounts of sample RNA and reduces costs relative to other techniques. miRNAs of the same sample are polyuridylated and reverse transcribed into cDNAs using a universal poly(A-stem-loop RT primer and then used as templates for SYBR® Green real-time PCR. The technique has a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude with a sensitivity of up to 0.2 fM miRNA or as little as 10 pg of total RNA. Virtually no cross-reaction is observed among the closely-related miRNA family members and with miRNAs that have only a single nucleotide difference in this highly specific assay. The spatial constraint of the stem-loop structure of the modified RT primer allowed detection of miRNAs directly from cell lysates without laborious total RNA isolation, and the poly(U tail made it possible to use multiplex RT reactions of mRNA and miRNAs in the same run. CONCLUSIONS: The cost-effective RT-qPCR of miRNAs with poly(A-stem-loop RT primer is simple to perform and highly specific, which is especially important for samples that are precious and/or difficult to obtain.

  11. A Facile Bottom-Up Approach to Construct Hybrid Flexible Cathode Scaffold for High-Performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arnab; Manjunatha, Revanasiddappa; Kumar, Rajat; Mitra, Sagar

    2016-12-14

    Lithium-sulfur batteries mostly suffer from the low utilization of sulfur, poor cycle life, and low rate performances. The prime factors that affect the performance are enormous volume change of the electrode, soluble intermediate product formation, poor electronic and ionic conductivity of S, and end discharge products (i.e., Li2S2 and Li2S). The attractive way to mitigate these challenges underlying in the fabrication of a sulfur nanocomposite electrode consisting of different nanoparticles with distinct properties of lithium storage capability, mechanical reinforcement, and ionic as well as electronic conductivity leading to a mechanically robust and mixed conductive (ionic and electronic conductive) sulfur electrode. Herein, we report a novel bottom-up approach to synthesize a unique freestanding, flexible cathode scaffold made of porous reduced graphene oxide, nanosized sulfur, and Mn3O4 nanoparticles, and all are three-dimensionally interconnected to each other by hybrid polyaniline/sodium alginate (PANI-SA) matrix to serve individual purposes. A capacity of 1098 mAh g(-1) is achieved against lithium after 200 cycles at a current rate of 2 A g(-1) with 97.6% of initial capacity at a same current rate, suggesting the extreme stability and cycling performance of such electrode. Interestingly, with the higher current density of 5 A g(-1), the composite electrode exhibited an initial capacity of 1015 mA h g(-1) and retained 71% of the original capacity after 500 cycles. The in situ Raman study confirms the polysulfide absorption capability of Mn3O4. This work provides a new strategy to design a mechanically robust, mixed conductive nanocomposite electrode for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries and a strategy that can be used to develop flexible large power storage devices.

  12. Sustainable Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Elle, Morten; Hoffmann, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    The Danish public housing sector has more than 20 years of experience with sustainable facilities management based on user involvement. The paper outlines this development in a historical perspective and gives an analysis of different approaches to sustainable facilities management. The focus...... is on the housing departments and strateies for the management of the use of resources. The research methods used are case studies based on interviews in addition to literature studies. The paper explores lessons to be learned about sustainable facilities management in general, and points to a need for new...

  13. Synthetic biology analysed tools for discussion and evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a dynamic, young, ambitious, attractive, and heterogeneous scientific discipline. It is constantly developing and changing, which makes societal evaluation of this emerging new science a challenging task, prone to misunderstandings. Synthetic biology is difficult to capture, and confusion arises not only regarding which part of synthetic biology the discussion is about, but also with respect to the underlying concepts in use. This book offers a useful toolbox to approach this complex and fragmented field. It provides a biological access to the discussion using a 'layer' model that describes the connectivity of synthetic or semisynthetic organisms and cells to the realm of natural organisms derived by evolution. Instead of directly reviewing the field as a whole, firstly our book addresses the characteristic features of synthetic biology that are relevant to the societal discussion. Some of these features apply only to parts of synthetic biology, whereas others are relevant to synthetic bi...

  14. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117: Area 26 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada With Errata Sheets, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pat Matthews

    2007-09-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117, Pluto Disassembly Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 117 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), CAS 26-41-01, located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 26-41-01. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 117 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before finalizing the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary following SAFER activities. This will be presented in a Closure Report that will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for review and approval. The site will be investigated to meet the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 27, 2007, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 26-41-01 in CAU 117.

  15. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 118: Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Strand

    2006-09-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 118, Area 27 Super Kukla Facility, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 118 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), 27-41-01, located in Area 27 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Site 27-41-01 consists of the following four structures: (1) Building 5400A, Reactor High Bay; (2) Building 5400, Reactor Building and access tunnel; (3) Building 5410, Mechanical Building; and (4) Wooden Shed, a.k.a. ''Brock House''. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing the CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and site confirmation data collected in 2005 and 2006 to recommend closure of CAU 118 using the SAFER process. The Data Quality Objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure option: closure in place with use restrictions. This expected closure option was selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine the nature of contaminants of concern in environmental media or potential source material that could impact human health or the environment. Decision II is to determine whether or not sufficient information has been obtained to confirm that closure objectives were met. This decision includes determining whether the extent of any contamination remaining on site has been defined, and whether actions have been taken to eliminate exposure pathways.

  16. An Approach for a Synthetic CTL Vaccine Design against Zika Flavivirus Using Class I and Class II Epitopes Identified by Computer Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edecio Cunha-Neto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The threat posed by severe congenital abnormalities related to Zika virus (ZKV infection during pregnancy has turned development of a ZKV vaccine into an emergency. Recent work suggests that the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response to infection is an important defense mechanism in response to ZKV. Here, we develop the rationale and strategy for a new approach to developing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL vaccines for ZKV flavivirus infection. The proposed approach is based on recent studies using a protein structure computer model for HIV epitope selection designed to select epitopes for CTL attack optimized for viruses that exhibit antigenic drift. Because naturally processed and presented human ZKV T cell epitopes have not yet been described, we identified predicted class I peptide sequences on ZKV matching previously identified DNV (Dengue class I epitopes and by using a Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC binding prediction tool. A subset of those met the criteria for optimal CD8+ attack based on physical chemistry parameters determined by analysis of the ZKV protein structure encoded in open source Protein Data File (PDB format files. We also identified candidate ZKV epitopes predicted to bind promiscuously to multiple HLA class II molecules that could provide help to the CTL responses. This work suggests that a CTL vaccine for ZKV may be possible even if ZKV exhibits significant antigenic drift. We have previously described a microsphere-based CTL vaccine platform capable of eliciting an immune response for class I epitopes in mice and are currently working toward in vivo testing of class I and class II epitope delivery directed against ZKV epitopes using the same microsphere-based vaccine.

  17. The Synthetic Cannabinoids Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karila, Laurent; Benyamina, Amine; Blecha, Lisa; Cottencin, Olivier; Billieux, Joël

    2016-01-01

    « Spice » is generally used to describe the diverse types of herbal blends that encompass synthetic cannabinoids on the market. The emergence of smokable herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids, which mimic the effects of cannabis, appears to become increasingly popular, in the new psychoactive substances landscape. In 2014, the existence of 134 different types of synthetic cannabinoids were reported by the European Union Early Warning System. These drugs are mainly sold online as an alternative to controlled and regulated psychoactive substances. They appear to have a life cycle of about 1-2 years before being replaced by a next wave of products. Legislation controlling these designer drugs has been introduced in many countries with the objective to limit the spread of existing drugs and control potential new analogs. The majority of the synthetic cannabinoids are full agonists at the CB1 receptor and do not contain tobacco or cannabis. They are becoming increasingly popular in adolescents, students and clubbers as an abused substance. Relatively high incidence of adverse effects associated with synthetic cannabinoids use has been documented in the literature. Numerous fatalities linked with their use and abuse have been reported. In this paper, we will review the available data regarding the use and effects of synthetic cannabinoids in humans in order to highlight their impact on public health. To reach this objective, a literature search was performed on two representative databases (Pubmed, Google Scholar), the Erowid Center website (a US non-profit educational organization that provides information about psychoactive plants and chemicals), and various governmental websites. The terms used for the database search were: "synthetic cannabinoids", "spice", "new psychoactive substances", and/or "substance use disorder", and/or "adverse effects", and/or "fatalities". The search was limited to years 2005 to 2016 due to emerging scientific literature at

  18. An optimization-based approach for facility energy management with uncertainties, and, Power portfolio optimization in deregulated electricity markets with risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun

    Topic 1. An Optimization-Based Approach for Facility Energy Management with Uncertainties. Effective energy management for facilities is becoming increasingly important in view of the rising energy costs, the government mandate on the reduction of energy consumption, and the human comfort requirements. This part of dissertation presents a daily energy management formulation and the corresponding solution methodology for HVAC systems. The problem is to minimize the energy and demand costs through the control of HVAC units while satisfying human comfort, system dynamics, load limit constraints, and other requirements. The problem is difficult in view of the fact that the system is nonlinear, time-varying, building-dependent, and uncertain; and that the direct control of a large number of HVAC components is difficult. In this work, HVAC setpoints are the control variables developed on top of a Direct Digital Control (DDC) system. A method that combines Lagrangian relaxation, neural networks, stochastic dynamic programming, and heuristics is developed to predict the system dynamics and uncontrollable load, and to optimize the setpoints. Numerical testing and prototype implementation results show that our method can effectively reduce total costs, manage uncertainties, and shed the load, is computationally efficient. Furthermore, it is significantly better than existing methods. Topic 2. Power Portfolio Optimization in Deregulated Electricity Markets with Risk Management. In a deregulated electric power system, multiple markets of different time scales exist with various power supply instruments. A load serving entity (LSE) has multiple choices from these instruments to meet its load obligations. In view of the large amount of power involved, the complex market structure, risks in such volatile markets, stringent constraints to be satisfied, and the long time horizon, a power portfolio optimization problem is of critical importance but difficulty for an LSE to serve the

  19. Mechanism-based approach using a biomarker response to evaluate tocilizumab subcutaneous injection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with an inadequate response to synthetic DMARDs (MATSURI study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shuji; Tsuru, Tomomi; Terao, Kimio; Mogi, Seiji; Suzaki, Midori; Shono, Eisuke; Ishida, Yoshimasa; Tarumi, Eriko; Imai, Masato

    2014-01-01

    A multicenter, open-label, dose-escalation phase 1/2 study was undertaken to evaluate the optimal subcutaneous tocilizumab dose that would result in exposure comparable to the intravenous tocilizumab 8-mg/kg approved dose in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. A pharmacokinetic and biomarker approach was used to estimate the clinical optimal dose regimen of subcutaneous tocilizumab. Safety and efficacy of subcutaneous tocilizumab were assessed as secondary end points. Patients received subcutaneous tocilizumab at 81 mg every 2 weeks (q2w) (n = 8), 162 mg q2w (n = 12), or 162 mg weekly (qw) (n = 12) for 24 weeks. 88% of 162-mg q2w patients and 100% of 162-mg qw patients maintained mean serum trough tocilizumab concentrations of ≥1 µg/mL, and had exposure comparable with the approved intravenous tocilizumab dose of 8 mg/kg; this resulted in normalized C-reactive protein levels and improvement in ACR20/50/70 responses. The most common adverse events were abnormal laboratory results, which were mild in severity. Anti-tocilizumab antibodies were detected in a few patients in the 81-mg q2w and 162-mg qw groups. In conclusion, coupled with efficacy and tolerability results, the appropriate dose of subcutaneous tocilizumab was determined to be 162 mg q2w for Japanese patients. © 2013 The Authors. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  20. Synthetic biology era: Improving antibiotic's world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Trampe, Silvia; Ceapa, Corina D; Manzo-Ruiz, Monserrat; Sánchez, Sergio

    2017-06-15

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogen microorganisms is problematic in the context of the current spectrum of available medication. The poor specificity and the high toxicity of some available molecules have made imperative the search for new strategies to improve the specificity and to pursue the discovery of novel compounds with increased bioactivity. Using living cells as platforms, synthetic biology has counteracted this problem by offering novel pathways to create synthetic systems with improved and desired functions. Among many other biotechnological approaches, the advances in synthetic biology have made it possible to design and construct novel biological systems in order to look for new drugs with increased bioactivity. Advancements have also been made in the redesigning of RNA and DNA molecules in order to engineer antibiotic clusters for antibiotic overexpression. As for the production of these antibacterial compounds, yeasts and filamentous fungi as well as gene therapy are utilized to enhance protein solubility. Specific delivery is achieved by creating chimeras using plant genes into bacterial hosts. Some of these synthetic systems are currently in clinical trials, proving the proficiency of synthetic biology in terms of both pharmacological activities as well as an increase in the biosafety of treatments. It is possible that we may just be seeing the tip of the iceberg, and synthetic biology applications will overpass expectations beyond our present knowledge. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Towards developing algal synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaife, Mark Aden; Smith, Alison Gail

    2016-06-15

    The genetic, physiological and metabolic diversity of microalgae has driven fundamental research into photosynthesis, flagella structure and function, and eukaryotic evolution. Within the last 10 years these organisms have also been investigated as potential biotechnology platforms, for example to produce high value compounds such as long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, pigments and antioxidants, and for biodiesel precursors, in particular triacylglycerols (TAGs). Transformation protocols, molecular tools and genome sequences are available for a number of model species including the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, although for both species there are bottlenecks to be overcome to allow rapid and predictable genetic manipulation. One approach to do this would be to apply the principles of synthetic biology to microalgae, namely the cycle of Design-Build-Test, which requires more robust, predictable and high throughput methods. In this mini-review we highlight recent progress in the areas of improving transgene expression, genome editing, identification and design of standard genetic elements (parts), and the use of microfluidics to increase throughput. We suggest that combining these approaches will provide the means to establish algal synthetic biology, and that application of standard parts and workflows will avoid parallel development and capitalize on lessons learned from other systems.

  2. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Burmeister

    2009-08-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-41-03, EMAD Facility • 25-99-20, EMAD Facility Exterior Releases This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of a corrective action of clean closure will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data

  3. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-12-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C (TCC) Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 116 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (as amended February 2008) and consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping; and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 is described in the FFACO as the TCC Facility but actually includes Building 3210 and attached concrete shield wall only. CAU 116 will be closed by demolishing Building 3210, the attached concrete shield wall, and the nuclear furnace piping. In addition, as a best management practice (BMP), Building 3211 (moveable shed) will be demolished due to its close proximity to Building 3210. This will aid in demolition and disposal operations. Radiological surveys will be performed on the demolition debris to determine the proper disposal pathway. As much of the demolition debris as space allows will be placed into the Building 3210 basement structure. After filling to capacity with demolition debris, the basement structure will be mounded or capped and closed with administrative controls. Prior to beginning demolition activities and according to an approved Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), representative sampling of surface areas that are known, suspected, or have the potential to contain hazardous constituents such as lead or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) will be performed throughout all buildings and structures. Sections 2.3.2, 4.2.2.2, 4.2.2.3, 4.3, and 6.2.6.1 address the methodologies employed that assure the solid debris placed in the basement structure will not contain contaminants of concern (COCs) above hazardous waste levels. The anticipated post

  4. Broadband synthetic aperture geoacoustic inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bien Aik; Gerstoft, Peter; Yardim, Caglar; Hodgkiss, William S

    2013-07-01

    A typical geoacoustic inversion procedure involves powerful source transmissions received on a large-aperture receiver array. A more practical approach is to use a single moving source and/or receiver in a low signal to noise ratio (SNR) setting. This paper uses single-receiver, broadband, frequency coherent matched-field inversion and exploits coherently repeated transmissions to improve estimation of the geoacoustic parameters. The long observation time creates a synthetic aperture due to relative source-receiver motion. This approach is illustrated by studying the transmission of multiple linear frequency modulated (LFM) pulses which results in a multi-tonal comb spectrum that is Doppler sensitive. To correlate well with the measured field across a receiver trajectory and to incorporate transmission from a source trajectory, waveguide Doppler and normal mode theory is applied. The method is demonstrated with low SNR, 100-900 Hz LFM pulse data from the Shallow Water 2006 experiment.

  5. Synthetic guide star generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Stephen A [Castro Valley, CA; Page, Ralph H [Castro Valley, CA; Ebbers, Christopher A [Livermore, CA; Beach, Raymond J [Livermore, CA

    2008-06-10

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  6. Azide-alkyne cycloaddition for universal post-synthetic modifications of nucleic acids and effective synthesis of bioactive nucleic acid conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu-Chih; Lo, Yu-Lun; Hwang, Chi-Ching; Wang, Li-Fang; Wu, Min Hui; Wang, Eng-Chi; Wang, Yun-Ming; Wang, Tzu-Pin

    2014-09-14

    The regioselective post-synthetic modifications of nucleic acids are essential to studies of these molecules for science and applications. Here we report a facile universal approach by harnessing versatile phosphoramidation reactions to regioselectively incorporate alkynyl/azido groups into post-synthetic nucleic acids primed with phosphate at the 5' termini. With and without the presence of copper, the modified nucleic acids were subjected to azide-alkyne cycloaddition to afford various nucleic acid conjugates including a peptide-oligonucleotide conjugate (POC) with high yield. The POC was inoculated with human A549 cells and demonstrated excellent cell-penetrating ability despite cell deformation caused by a small amount of residual copper chelated to the POC. The combination of phosphoramidation and azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions thus provides a universal regioselective strategy to post-synthetically modify nucleic acids. This study also explicated the toxicity of residual copper in synthesized bioconjugates destined for biological systems.

  7. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary 'build to apply' and 'build to understand' approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia.

  8. A facile approach to fabricate flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors based on MnFe2O4/graphene hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weihua; Lai, Ting; Dai, Wanlin; Ye, Jianshan

    2014-06-01

    A critical challenge for the construction of flexible electrochemical capacitors is the preparation of flexible electrodes with large specific capacitance and robust mechanical strength. Here, we demonstrate a facile approach to make high performance and flexible electrodes by dropping MnFe2O4/graphene hybrid inks onto flexible graphite sheets (as current collectors and substrates) and drying under an infrared lamp. MnFe2O4/graphene hybrid inks are synthesized by immobilizing the MnFe2O4 microspheres on the graphene nanosheets via a simple solvothermal route. Electrochemical studies show that MnFe2O4/graphene exhibits a high capacitance of 300 F g-1 at a current density of 0.3 A g-1. In addition, the excellent electrochemical performance of a supercapacitor consisting of a sandwich structure of two pieces of MnFe2O4/graphene hybrids modified electrodes separated by polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-H2SO4 gel electrolyte is further explored. Our studies reveal that the flexible supercapacitor device with 227 μm thickness can achieve a maximum specific capacitance of 120 F g-1 at a current density of 0.1 A g-1 and excellent cycle performance retaining 105% capacitance after 5000 cycles. This research may offer a method for the fabrication of lightweight, stable, flexible and high performance energy storage devices.

  9. A facile synthesis approach and impact of shell formation on morphological structure and luminescent properties of aqueous dispersible NaGdF4:Yb/Er upconversion nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Anees A.; Yadav, Ranvijay; Rai, S. B.

    2016-12-01

    A general facile synthesis approach was used for fabrication of highly emissive aqueous dispersible hexagonal phase upconversion luminescent NaGdF4:Yb/Er nanorods (core NRs) through metal complex decomposition process. An inert NaGdF4 and porous silica layers were grafted surrounding the surface of each and every NRs to enhance their luminescence efficiency and colloidal dispersibility in aqueous environment. Optical properties in terms of band gap energy of core, core/shell, and silica-coated core/shell/SiO2 nanorods were observed to investigate the influence of surface coating, which was gradually decreased after surface coating because of increase crystalline size after growth of inert and silica shells. The inert shell formation before silica surface grafting, upconversion luminescence intensity was greatly improved by about 20 times, owing to the effective surface passivation of the seed core and, therefore, protection of Er3+ ion in the core from the nonradiative decay caused by surface defects. Moreover, after silica coating, core/shell nanorods shows strong upconversion luminescence property similar to the hexagonal upconversion core NRs. It is expected that these NaGdF4:Yb/Er@NaGdF4@SiO2 (core/shell/SiO2) NRs including highly upconversion emissive and aqueous dispersible properties make them an ideal materials for various photonic-based potential applications such as in upconversion luminescent bioimaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and photodynamic therapy.

  10. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  11. Biodegradable synthetic bone composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2013-01-01

    The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

  12. Synthetic growth reference charts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanussen, Michael; Stec, Karol; Aßmann, Christian; Meigen, Christof; Van Buuren, Stef

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To reanalyze the between-population variance in height, weight, and body mass index (BMI), and to provide a globally applicable technique for generating synthetic growth reference charts. Methods: Using a baseline set of 196 female and 197 male growth studies published since 1831, common

  13. Synthetic cornea: biocompatibility and optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Kaminski, Stefan; Fernandez, Viviana; Alfonso, E.; Lamar, Peggy; Lacombe, Emmanuel; Duchesne, Bernard; Dubovy, Sander; Manns, Fabrice; Rol, Pascal O.

    2002-06-01

    Purpose. Experimentally find a method to provide a safe surgical technique and an inexpensive and long lasting mesoplant for the restoration of vision in patients with bilateral corneal blindness due to ocular surface and stromal diseases. Methods. Identify the least invasive and the safest surgical technique for synthetic cornea implantation. Identify the most compatible biomaterials and the optimal shape a synthetic cornea must have to last a long time when implanted in vivo. Results. Penetrating procedures were deemed too invasive, time consuming, difficult and prone to long term complications. Therefore a non-penetrating delamination technique with central trephination was developed to preserve the integrity of Descemet's membrane and the anterior segment. Even though this approach limits the number of indications, it is acceptable since the majority of patients only have opacities in the stroma. The prosthesis was designed to fit in the removed tissue plane with its skirt fitted under the delaminated stroma. To improve retention, the trephination wall was made conical with the smallest opening on the anterior surface and a hat-shaped mesoplant was made to fit. The skirt was perforated in its perimeter to allow passage of nutrients and tissues ingrowths. To simplify the fabrication procedure, the haptic and optic were made of the same polymer. The intrastromal biocompatibility of several hydrogels was found superior to current clinically used PMMA and PTFE materials. Monobloc mesoplants made of 4 different materials were implanted in rabbits and followed weekly until extrusion occurred. Some remained optically clear allowing for fundus photography. Conclusions. Hydrogel synthetic corneas can be made to survive for periods longer than 1 year. ArF excimer laser photoablation studies are needed to determine the refractive correction potential of these mesoplants. A pilot FDA clinical trial is needed to assess the mesoplant efficacy and very long-term stability.

  14. Enzymes go big: surface hydrolysis and functionalization of synthetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guebitz, Georg M; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2008-01-01

    Enzyme technology has progressed from the biotransformation of small substrates to biotransformation of synthetic polymers. Important breakthroughs have been the isolation and design of novel enzymes with enhanced activity on synthetic polymer substrates. These were made possible by efficient screening procedures and genetic engineering approaches based on an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms of enzymes on synthetic polymers. Enhancement of the hydrophilicity of synthetic polymers is a key requirement for many applications, ranging from electronics to functional textile production. This review focuses on enzymes that hydrolyse polyalkyleneterephthalates, polyamides or polyacrylonitriles, specifically on the polymer surface thereby replacing harsh chemical processes currently used for hydrophilisation.

  15. Synthetic multicellular oscillatory systems: controlling protein dynamics with genetic circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koseska, Aneta [Interdisciplinary Center for Dynamics of Complex Systems, University of Potsdam, D-14469 Potsdam (Germany); Volkov, Evgenii [Department of Theoretical Physics, Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninskii 53, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kurths, Juergen, E-mail: akoseska@uni-potsdam.de [Institute of Physics, Humboldt University Berlin, D-10099 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Synthetic biology is a relatively new research discipline that combines standard biology approaches with the constructive nature of engineering. Thus, recent efforts in the field of synthetic biology have given a perspective to consider cells as 'programmable matter'. Here, we address the possibility of using synthetic circuits to control protein dynamics. In particular, we show how intercellular communication and stochasticity can be used to manipulate the dynamical behavior of a population of coupled synthetic units and, in this manner, finely tune the expression of specific proteins of interest, e.g. in large bioreactors.

  16. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  17. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  18. Canyon Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  19. Tunable promoters in synthetic and systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehli, Tore; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic and systems biologists need standardized, modular and orthogonal tools yielding predictable functions in vivo. In systems biology such tools are needed to quantitatively analyze the behavior of biological systems while the efficient engineering of artificial gene networks is central...... in synthetic biology. A number of tools exist to manipulate the steps in between gene sequence and functional protein in living cells, but out of these the most straight-forward approach is to alter the gene expression level by manipulating the promoter sequence. Some of the promoter tuning tools available...

  20. Tunable promoters in synthetic and systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehli, Tore; Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2012-01-01

    in synthetic biology. A number of tools exist to manipulate the steps in between gene sequence and functional protein in living cells, but out of these the most straight-forward approach is to alter the gene expression level by manipulating the promoter sequence. Some of the promoter tuning tools available......Synthetic and systems biologists need standardized, modular and orthogonal tools yielding predictable functions in vivo. In systems biology such tools are needed to quantitatively analyze the behavior of biological systems while the efficient engineering of artificial gene networks is central...

  1. Synthetic immunology: modulating the human immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geering, Barbara; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Humans have manipulated the immune system to dampen or boost the immune response for thousands of years. As our understanding of fundamental immunology and biotechnological methodology accumulates, we can capitalize on this combined knowledge to engineer biological devices with the aim of rationally manipulating the immune response. We address therapeutic approaches based on the principles of synthetic immunology that either ameliorate disorders of the immune system by interfering with the immune response, or improve diverse pathogenic conditions by exploiting immune cell effector functions. We specifically highlight synthetic proteins investigated in preclinical and clinical trials, summarize studies that have used engineered immune cells, and finish with a discussion of possible future therapeutic concepts.

  2. Functional mining of transporters using synthetic selections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bali, Anne Pihl; Petersen, Søren Dalsgård;

    2016-01-01

    -responsive biosensor systems that enable selective growth of cells only if they encode a ligand-specific importer. We developed such a synthetic selection system for thiamine pyrophosphate and mined soil and gut metagenomes for thiamine-uptake functions. We identified several members of a novel class of thiamine...... transporters, PnuT, which is widely distributed across multiple bacterial phyla. We demonstrate that with modular replacement of the biosensor, we could expand our method to xanthine and identify xanthine permeases from gut and soil metagenomes. Our results demonstrate how synthetic-biology approaches can...

  3. Semi-synthetic artemisinin: a model for the use of synthetic biology in pharmaceutical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddon, Chris J; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in synthetic biology, combined with continued progress in systems biology and metabolic engineering, have enabled the engineering of microorganisms to produce heterologous molecules in a manner that was previously unfeasible. The successful synthesis and recent entry of semi-synthetic artemisinin into commercial production is the first demonstration of the potential of synthetic biology for the development and production of pharmaceutical agents. In this Review, we describe the metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches that were used to develop this important antimalarial drug precursor. This not only demonstrates the incredible potential of the available technologies but also illuminates how lessons learned from this work could be applied to the production of other pharmaceutical agents.

  4. A New Synthetic Approach to Coumestan Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG, Deng-Huang; LI, Chao-Zhong; YUAN, Cheng-Ye

    2001-01-01

    A new method for the preparation of coumestan derivatives was described involving an intramolecular palladium-catalyzed ring closure reaction of coumarins obtained from condensation of substituted o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and o-hydroxybenzaldehyde.

  5. Synthetic biological approaches to natural product biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Jaclyn M; Tang, Yi

    2012-10-01

    Small molecules produced in Nature possess exquisite chemical diversity and continue to be an inspiration for the development of new therapeutic agents. In their host organisms, natural products are assembled and modified using dedicated biosynthetic pathways. By rationally reprogramming and manipulating these pathways, unnatural metabolites containing enhanced structural features that were otherwise inaccessible can be obtained. Additionally, new chemical entities can be synthesized by developing the enzymes that carry out these complicated chemical reactions into biocatalysts. In this review, we will discuss a variety of combinatorial biosynthetic strategies, their technical challenges, and highlight some recent (since 2007) examples of rationally designed metabolites, as well as platforms that have been established for the production and modification of clinically important pharmaceutical compounds.

  6. Synthetic approaches to the 2011 new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong X; Liu, Kevin K-C; Sakya, Subas M; Flick, Andrew C; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2013-06-01

    New drugs are introduced to the market every year and each represents a privileged structure for its biological target. These new chemical entities (NCEs) provide insights into molecular recognition and also serve as leads for designing future new drugs. This review covers the synthesis of 26 NCEs that were launched in the world in 2011.

  7. Synthetic approaches to the 2012 new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong X; Leverett, Carolyn A; Kyne, Robert E; Liu, Kevin K-C; Sakya, Subas M; Flick, Andrew C; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2014-04-01

    New drugs introduced to the market every year represent a privileged structure for a particular biological target. These new chemical entities (NCEs) provide insights into molecular recognition and also serve as leads for designing future new drugs. This review covers the synthesis of twenty-six NCEs that were launched or approved worldwide in 2012 and two additional drugs which were launched at the end of 2011.

  8. Synthetic approaches to the 2014 new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flick, Andrew C; Ding, Hong X; Leverett, Carolyn A; Kyne, Robert E; Liu, Kevin K-C; Fink, Sarah J; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    New drugs introduced to the market every year represent privileged structures for particular biological targets. These new chemical entities (NCEs) provide insight into molecular recognition and also serve as leads for designing future new drugs. This annual review covers the synthesis of thirty-seven NCEs that were approved for the first time in 2014 and one drug which was approved in 2013 and was not covered in a previous edition of this review.

  9. Synthetic approaches to the 2013 new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong X; Leverett, Carolyn A; Kyne, Robert E; Liu, Kevin K-C; Fink, Sarah J; Flick, Andrew C; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2015-05-01

    New drugs introduced to the market every year represent privileged structures for particular biological targets. These new chemical entities (NCEs) provide insight into molecular recognition and also serve as leads for designing future new drugs. This annual review covers the synthesis of twenty-four NCEs that were approved for the first time in 2013 and two 2012 drugs which were not covered during the previous edition of this review.

  10. The emerging age of cell-free synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark Thomas; Wilding, Kristen M; Hunt, Jeremy M; Bennett, Anthony M; Bundy, Bradley C

    2014-08-25

    The engineering of and mastery over biological parts has catalyzed the emergence of synthetic biology. This field has grown exponentially in the past decade. As increasingly more applications of synthetic biology are pursued, more challenges are encountered, such as delivering genetic material into cells and optimizing genetic circuits in vivo. An in vitro or cell-free approach to synthetic biology simplifies and avoids many of the pitfalls of in vivo synthetic biology. In this review, we describe some of the innate features that make cell-free systems compelling platforms for synthetic biology and discuss emerging improvements of cell-free technologies. We also select and highlight recent and emerging applications of cell-free synthetic biology. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Science and Technology Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonen, Jean-Marie; Buono, Nicolas; Handfield, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    These four articles relate to science and technology infrastructure for secondary and tertiary institutions. The first article presents a view on approaches to teaching science in school and illustrates ideal science facilities for secondary education. The second piece reports on work underway to improve the Science Complex at the "Universite…

  12. These Synthetic Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIT GILLET

    2008-01-01

    @@ Already slated to be one of the most important cultural events in the buildup to this summer's Olympic games, Synthetic Times-Media Art China 2008 will feature the works of more than 30 artists from around the world. Upwards of 40 media art installations will be exhibited in the National Art Museum of China alone, along with performances, workshops, presentations, and discussion panels focusing on the art works and the growth of media art as a discipline.

  13. A Facile Synthetic Route to L-Phosphinothricin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Song XU; Han Bing TENG; Guo Fu QIU; Shu Cai LIANG; Xian Ming HU

    2006-01-01

    A convenient and effective method for synthesis of L-phosphinothricin was described.The highlight was involved in a simple access to the key intermediate L-2-amino-4-chlorobutyric acid derivative from the inexpensive L-methionine.

  14. Synthetic gases production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazaud, J.P.

    1996-06-01

    The natural gas or naphtha are the main constituents used for the production of synthetic gases. Several production ways of synthetic gases are industrially used as for example the natural gas or naphtha catalytic reforming, the selective oxidation of natural gas or heavy fuels and the coal oxy-vapo-gasification. The aim of this work is to study the different steps of production and treatment of the synthetic gases by the way of catalytic reforming. The first step is the desulfurization of the hydrocarbons feedstocks. The process used in industry is described. Then is realized the catalytic hydrocarbons reforming process. After having recalled some historical data on the catalytic reforming, the author gives the reaction kinetics and thermodynamics. The possible reforming catalysts, industrial equipments and furnaces designs are then exposed. The carbon dioxide is a compound easily obtained during the reforming reactions. It is a wasteful and harmful component which has to be extracted of the gaseous stream. The last step is then the gases de-carbonation. Two examples of natural gas or naphtha reforming reactions are at last given: the carbon monoxide conversion by steam and the carbon oxides reactions with hydrogen (methanization). (O.M.). 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Synthetic biology of minimal living cells: primitive cell models and semi-synthetic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Pasquale

    2010-09-01

    This article summarizes a contribution presented at the ESF 2009 Synthetic Biology focused on the concept of the minimal requirement for life and on the issue of constructive (synthetic) approaches in biological research. The attempts to define minimal life within the framework of autopoietic theory are firstly described, and a short report on the development of autopoietic chemical systems based on fatty acid vesicles, which are relevant as primitive cell models is given. These studies can be used as a starting point for the construction of more complex systems, firstly being inspired by possible origins of life scenarioes (and therefore by considering primitive functions), then by considering an approach based on modern biomacromolecular-encoded functions. At this aim, semi-synthetic minimal cells are defined as those man-made vesicle-based systems that are composed of the minimal number of genes, proteins, biomolecules and which can be defined as living. Recent achievements on minimal sized semi-synthetic cells are then discussed, and the kind of information obtained is recognized as being distinctively derived by a constructive approach. Synthetic biology is therefore a fundamental tool for gaining basic knowledge about biosystems, and it should not be confined at all to the engineering side.

  16. Synthetic biology: a utilitarian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    I examine the positive and negative features of synthetic biology ('SynBio') from a utilitarian ethical perspective. The potential beneficial outcomes from SynBio in the context of medicine are substantial; however it is not presently possible to predict precise outcomes due to the nascent state of the field. Potential negative outcomes from SynBio also exist, including iatrogenesis and bioterrorism; however it is not yet possible to quantify these risks. I argue that the application of a 'precautionary' approach to SynBio is ethically fraught, as is the notion that SynBio-associated knowledge ought to be restricted. I conclude that utilitarians ought to support a broadly laissez-faire stance in respect of SynBio.

  17. Synthetic biology of antimicrobial discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakeri, Bijan; Lu, Timothy K.

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic discovery has a storied history. From the discovery of penicillin by Sir Alexander Fleming to the relentless quest for antibiotics by Selman Waksman, the stories have become like folklore, used to inspire future generations of scientists. However, recent discovery pipelines have run dry at a time when multidrug resistant pathogens are on the rise. Nature has proven to be a valuable reservoir of antimicrobial agents, which are primarily produced by modularized biochemical pathways. Such modularization is well suited to remodeling by an interdisciplinary approach that spans science and engineering. Herein, we discuss the biological engineering of small molecules, peptides, and non-traditional antimicrobials and provide an overview of the growing applicability of synthetic biology to antimicrobials discovery. PMID:23654251

  18. Synthetic ice - keeping blue lines out of the red

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R.

    1987-06-01

    A skating rink in Long Island has achieved considerable energy cost savings by eliminating the refrigerated ice and using synthetic ice. Called Glice, the synthetic material is made of a high-density polyethylene laid down on plywood panels and coated with a silicone compound. The surface is slightly slower to skate upon than real ice, and is easy and inexpensive to maintain (ca $2,000 per month compared with up to $75,000/y for refrigerated ice). Synthetic ice also offers advantages in training skaters, because of its frictional properties. Synthetic ice rinks are expected to find a good market in the southern USA, due to the absence of good skating facilities and the low operating costs. In Canada, installation of plastic rinks is currently being held up because of lack of approval from various hockey associations. 3 figs.

  19. A VO-seeded Approach for the Growth of Star-shaped VO2 and V2O5 Nanocrystals: Facile Synthesis Structural Characterization and Elucidation of Electronic Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Whittaker; J Velazquez; S Banerjee

    2011-12-31

    Obtaining shape and size control of strongly correlated materials is imperative to obtain a fundamental understanding of the influence of finite size and surface restructuring on electronic instabilities in the proximity of the Fermi level. We present here a novel synthetic approach that takes advantage of the intrinsic octahedral symmetry of rock-salt-structured VO to facilitate the growth of six-armed nanocrystallites of related, technologically important binary vanadium oxides VO2 and V2O5. The prepared nanostructures exhibit clear six-fold symmetry and most notably show remarkable retention of electronic structure. The latter has been evidenced through extensive X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements.

  20. Opportunities in plant synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Charis; Martin, Lisa; Bastow, Ruth

    2014-05-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging field uniting scientists from all disciplines with the aim of designing or re-designing biological processes. Initially, synthetic biology breakthroughs came from microbiology, chemistry, physics, computer science, materials science, mathematics, and engineering disciplines. A transition to multicellular systems is the next logical step for synthetic biologists and plants will provide an ideal platform for this new phase of research. This meeting report highlights some of the exciting plant synthetic biology projects, and tools and resources, presented and discussed at the 2013 GARNet workshop on plant synthetic biology.

  1. Synthetic cannabis and respiratory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinwala, Felecia N; Gupta, Mayank

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, synthetic cannabis use has been increasing in appeal among adolescents, and its use is now at a 30 year peak among high school seniors. The constituents of synthetic cannabis are difficult to monitor, given the drug's easy accessibility. Currently, 40 U.S. states have banned the distribution and use of some known synthetic cannabinoids, and have included these drugs in the Schedule I category. The depressive respiratory effect in humans caused by synthetic cannabis inhalation has not been thoroughly investigated in the medical literature. We are the first to report, to our knowledge, two cases of self-reported synthetic cannabis use leading to respiratory depression and necessary intubation.

  2. Synthetic Biology-The Synthesis of Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausländer, Simon; Ausländer, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Synthetic biology concerns the engineering of man-made living biomachines from standardized components that can perform predefined functions in a (self-)controlled manner. Different research strategies and interdisciplinary efforts are pursued to implement engineering principles to biology. The "top-down" strategy exploits nature's incredible diversity of existing, natural parts to construct synthetic compositions of genetic, metabolic, or signaling networks with predictable and controllable properties. This mainly application-driven approach results in living factories that produce drugs, biofuels, biomaterials, and fine chemicals, and results in living pills that are based on engineered cells with the capacity to autonomously detect and treat disease states in vivo. In contrast, the "bottom-up" strategy seeks to be independent of existing living systems by designing biological systems from scratch and synthesizing artificial biological entities not found in nature. This more knowledge-driven approach investigates the reconstruction of minimal biological systems that are capable of performing basic biological phenomena, such as self-organization, self-replication, and self-sustainability. Moreover, the syntheses of artificial biological units, such as synthetic nucleotides or amino acids, and their implementation into polymers inside living cells currently set the boundaries between natural and artificial biological systems. In particular, the in vitro design, synthesis, and transfer of complete genomes into host cells point to the future of synthetic biology: the creation of designer cells with tailored desirable properties for biomedicine and biotechnology. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Chromatin regulation at the frontier of synthetic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keung, Albert J.; Joung, J. Keith; Khalil, Ahmad S.; Collins, James J.

    2016-01-01

    As synthetic biology approaches are extended to diverse applications throughout medicine, biotechnology and basic biological research, there is an increasing need to engineer yeast, plant and mammalian cells. Eukaryotic genomes are regulated by the diverse biochemical and biophysical states of chromatin, which brings distinct challenges, as well as opportunities, over applications in bacteria. Recent synthetic approaches, including `epigenome editing', have allowed the direct and functional dissection of many aspects of physiological chromatin regulation. These studies lay the foundation for biomedical and biotechnological engineering applications that could take advantage of the unique combinatorial and spatiotemporal layers of chromatin regulation to create synthetic systems of unprecedented sophistication. PMID:25668787

  4. Exploratory comparative study on the diffusion of synthetic cannabinoids and synthetic cathinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, Cynthia L; Owens, Darlene; Madeja, Cheryl; DeAngelis, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The use of synthetic cannabinoids and cathinones in southeastern Michigan was explored using Roger's Diffusion of Innovation theory. A mixed methods approach after specific synthetic cannabinoids and cathinone compounds were scheduled was used that included analysis of treatment admissions for two years, surveys of 15 substance abuse treatment providers, and qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of 24 participants. The participant system norm supported trying new drugs, and both drugs were confirmed to have been easier to access than traditional drugs. The participants had negative views of synthetic cathinones due to one sensational news story without counterbalancing positive experiences in their social environment. Although synthetic cannabinoids were also linked to a sensational news story, it was counterbalanced by positive personal experiences. These differences contributed to greater use of synthetic cannabinoids compared to synthetic cathinones as evidenced by admissions, providers' reports, and participants' reports. All participants expressed a preference for traditional drugs, indicating that novel drugs had no relative advantage over other drugs of abuse. Diffusion of Innovation theory can provide a framework for understanding the differential use of novel drugs.

  5. Do Physical Proximity and Availability of Adequate Infrastructure at Public Health Facility Increase Institutional Delivery? A Three Level Hierarchical Model Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rachana; Ladusingh, Laishram

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the inter-district and inter-village variation of utilization of health services for institutional births in EAG states in presence of rural health program and availability of infrastructures. District Level Household Survey-III (2007-08) data on delivery care and facility information was used for the purpose. Bivariate results examined the utilization pattern by states in presence of correlates of women related while a three-level hierarchical multilevel model illustrates the effect of accessibility, availability of health facility and community health program variables on the utilization of health services for institutional births. The study found a satisfactory improvement in state Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Orissa, importantly, in Bihar and Uttaranchal. The study showed that increasing distance from health facility discouraged institutional births and there was a rapid decline of more than 50% for institutional delivery as the distance to public health facility exceeded 10 km. Additionally, skilled female health worker (ANM) and observed improved public health facility led to significantly increase the probability of utilization as compared to non-skilled ANM and not-improved health centers. Adequacy of essential equipment/laboratory services required for maternal care significantly encouraged deliveries at public health facility. District/village variables neighborhood poverty was negatively related to institutional delivery while higher education levels in the village and women's residing in more urbanized districts increased the utilization. "Inter-district" variation was 14 percent whereas "between-villages" variation for the utilization was 11 percent variation once controlled for all the three-level variables in the model. This study suggests that the mere availability of health facilities is necessary but not sufficient condition to promote utilization until the quality of service is inadequate and inaccessible considering

  6. Asian Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahata, M.

    2011-04-01

    Asian underground facilities are reviewed. The YangYang underground Laboratory in Korea and the Kamioka observatory in Japan are operational and several astrophysical experiments are running. Indian Neutrino Observatory(INO) and China JinPing Underground Laboratory (CJPL) are under construction and underground experiments are being prepared. Current activities and future prospects at those underground sites are described.

  7. On Constrained Facility Location Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Lin Li; Peng Zhang; Da-Ming Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Given m facilities each with an opening cost, n demands, and distance between every demand and facility,the Facility Location problem finds a solution which opens some facilities to connect every demand to an opened facility such that the total cost of the solution is minimized. The k-Facility Location problem further requires that the number of opened facilities is at most k, where k is a parameter given in the instance of the problem. We consider the Facility Location problems satisfying that for every demand the ratio of the longest distance to facilities and the shortest distance to facilities is at most w, where w is a predefined constant. Using the local search approach with scaling technique and error control technique, for any arbitrarily small constant ∈ > 0, we give a polynomial-time approximation algorithm for the ω-constrained Facility Location problem with approximation ratio 1 + √ω + 1 + ∈, which significantly improves the previous best known ratio (ω + 1)/α for some 1 ≤α≤ 2, and a polynomial-time approximation algorithm for the ω-constrained κ-Facility Location problem with approximation ratio ω + 1 + ∈. On the aspect of approximation hardness, we prove that unless NP (C) DTIME(nO(loglogn)), the ω-constrained Facility Location problem cannot be approximated within 1 + √ω-1,which slightly improves the previous best known hardness result 1.243 + 0.316 ln(ω - 1). The experimental results on the standard test instances of Facility Location problem show that our algorithm also has good performance in practice.

  8. Biopolymers Versus Synthetic Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina Adriana Cziple

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper present an overview of important synthetic and natural polymers with emphasis on polymer structure, the chemistry of polymer formation. an introduction to polymer characterization. The biodegradation process can take place aerobically and anaerobically with or without the presence of light. These factors allow for biodegradation even in landfill conditions which are normally inconducive to any degradation. The sheeting used to make these packages differs significantly from other “degradable plastics” in the market as it does not attempt to replace the current popular materials but instead enhances them by rendering them biodegradable.

  9. CASH vs. SYNTHETIC CDOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviu Eduard Dinca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, in the recent post-crisis aftermath, global asset managers are constantly searching new ways to optimize their investment portfolios while financial and banking institutions around the world are exploring new alternatives to better secure their financing and refinancing demands altogether with the enhancement of their risk management capabilities. We will exhibit herewith a comparison between the true-sale and synthetic CDO securitizations as financial markets-based funding, investment and risks mitigation techniques, highlighting certain key structuring and implementation specifics on each of them.

  10. Freedom and Responsibility in Synthetic Genomics: The Synthetic Yeast Project

    OpenAIRE

    Sliva, Anna; Yang, Huanming; Boeke, Jef D.; Debra J. H. Mathews

    2015-01-01

    First introduced in 2011, the Synthetic Yeast Genome (Sc2.0) Project is a large international synthetic genomics project that will culminate in the first eukaryotic cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with a fully synthetic genome. With collaborators from across the globe and from a range of institutions spanning from do-it-yourself biology (DIYbio) to commercial enterprises, it is important that all scientists working on this project are cognizant of the ethical and policy issues associated with...

  11. Forecasting elections in Europe: Synthetic models

    OpenAIRE

    Michael S. Lewis-Beck; Ruth Dassonneville

    2015-01-01

    Scientific work on national election forecasting has become most developed for the United States case, where three dominant approaches can be identified: Structuralists, Aggregators, and Synthesizers. For European cases, election forecasting models remain almost exclusively Structuralist. Here we join together structural modeling and aggregate polling results, to form a hybrid, which we label a Synthetic Model. This model contains a political economy core, to which poll numbers are added (to ...

  12. The major synthetic evolutionary transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    Evolution is marked by well-defined events involving profound innovations that are known as ‘major evolutionary transitions'. They involve the integration of autonomous elements into a new, higher-level organization whereby the former isolated units interact in novel ways, losing their original autonomy. All major transitions, which include the origin of life, cells, multicellular systems, societies or language (among other examples), took place millions of years ago. Are these transitions unique, rare events? Have they instead universal traits that make them almost inevitable when the right pieces are in place? Are there general laws of evolutionary innovation? In order to approach this problem under a novel perspective, we argue that a parallel class of evolutionary transitions can be explored involving the use of artificial evolutionary experiments where alternative paths to innovation can be explored. These ‘synthetic’ transitions include, for example, the artificial evolution of multicellular systems or the emergence of language in evolved communicating robots. These alternative scenarios could help us to understand the underlying laws that predate the rise of major innovations and the possibility for general laws of evolved complexity. Several key examples and theoretical approaches are summarized and future challenges are outlined. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The major synthetic evolutionary transitions’. PMID:27431528

  13. Life after the synthetic cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Nature asked eight synthetic-biology experts about the implications for science and society of the “synthetic cell” made by the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). The institute's team assembled, modified and implanted a synthesized genome into a DNA-free bacterial shell to make a self-replicating ......Nature asked eight synthetic-biology experts about the implications for science and society of the “synthetic cell” made by the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). The institute's team assembled, modified and implanted a synthesized genome into a DNA-free bacterial shell to make a self...

  14. Synthetic biology and occupational risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John; Murashov, Vladimir; Schulte, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging interdisciplinary field of biotechnology that involves applying the principles of engineering and chemical design to biological systems. Biosafety professionals have done an excellent job in addressing research laboratory safety as synthetic biology and gene editing have emerged from the larger field of biotechnology. Despite these efforts, risks posed by synthetic biology are of increasing concern as research procedures scale up to industrial processes in the larger bioeconomy. A greater number and variety of workers will be exposed to commercial synthetic biology risks in the future, including risks to a variety of workers from the use of lentiviral vectors as gene transfer devices. There is a need to review and enhance current protection measures in the field of synthetic biology, whether in experimental laboratories where new advances are being researched, in health care settings where treatments using viral vectors as gene delivery systems are increasingly being used, or in the industrial bioeconomy. Enhanced worker protection measures should include increased injury and illness surveillance of the synthetic biology workforce; proactive risk assessment and management of synthetic biology products; research on the relative effectiveness of extrinsic and intrinsic biocontainment methods; specific safety guidance for synthetic biology industrial processes; determination of appropriate medical mitigation measures for lentiviral vector exposure incidents; and greater awareness and involvement in synthetic biology safety by the general occupational safety and health community as well as by government occupational safety and health research and regulatory agencies.

  15. Life after the synthetic cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Steen

    2010-01-01

    Nature asked eight synthetic-biology experts about the implications for science and society of the “synthetic cell” made by the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). The institute's team assembled, modified and implanted a synthesized genome into a DNA-free bacterial shell to make a self-replicating ......Nature asked eight synthetic-biology experts about the implications for science and society of the “synthetic cell” made by the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI). The institute's team assembled, modified and implanted a synthesized genome into a DNA-free bacterial shell to make a self...

  16. Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the use of synthetic aperture (SA) imaging in medical ultrasound. SA imaging is a radical break with today's commercial systems, where the image is acquired sequentially one image line at a time. This puts a strict limit on the frame rate and the possibility of acquiring...... a sufficient amount of data for high precision flow estimation. These constrictions can be lifted by employing SA imaging. Here data is acquired simultaneously from all directions over a number of emissions, and the full image can be reconstructed from this data. The talk will demonstrate the many benefits...... of SA imaging. Due to the complete data set, it is possible to have both dynamic transmit and receive focusing to improve contrast and resolution. It is also possible to improve penetration depth by employing codes during ultrasound transmission. Data sets for vector flow imaging can be acquired using...

  17. Computational synthetic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bokowski, Jürgen

    1989-01-01

    Computational synthetic geometry deals with methods for realizing abstract geometric objects in concrete vector spaces. This research monograph considers a large class of problems from convexity and discrete geometry including constructing convex polytopes from simplicial complexes, vector geometries from incidence structures and hyperplane arrangements from oriented matroids. It turns out that algorithms for these constructions exist if and only if arbitrary polynomial equations are decidable with respect to the underlying field. Besides such complexity theorems a variety of symbolic algorithms are discussed, and the methods are applied to obtain new mathematical results on convex polytopes, projective configurations and the combinatorics of Grassmann varieties. Finally algebraic varieties characterizing matroids and oriented matroids are introduced providing a new basis for applying computer algebra methods in this field. The necessary background knowledge is reviewed briefly. The text is accessible to stud...

  18. Transionospheric synthetic aperture imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Gilman, Mikhail; Tsynkov, Semyon

    2017-01-01

    This landmark monograph presents the most recent mathematical developments in the analysis of ionospheric distortions of SAR images and offers innovative new strategies for their mitigation. As a prerequisite to addressing these topics, the book also discusses the radar ambiguity theory as it applies to synthetic aperture imaging and the propagation of radio waves through the ionospheric plasma, including the anisotropic and turbulent cases. In addition, it covers a host of related subjects, such as the mathematical modeling of extended radar targets (as opposed to point-wise targets) and the scattering of radio waves off those targets, as well as the theoretical analysis of the start-stop approximation, which is used routinely in SAR signal processing but often without proper justification. The mathematics in this volume is clean and rigorous – no assumptions are hidden or ambiguously stated. The resulting work is truly interdisciplinary, providing both a comprehensive and thorough exposition of the field,...

  19. Synthetic Aperture Compound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Munk

    Medical ultrasound imaging is used for many purposes, e.g. for localizing and classifying cysts, lesions, and other processes. Almost any mass is first observed using B-mode imaging and later classified using e.g. color flow, strain, or attenuation imaging. It is therefore important that the B....... The method is investigated using simulations and through measurements using both phased array and convex array transducers. The images all show an improved contrast compared to images without compounding, and by construction, imaging using an improved frame rate is possible. Using a phased array transducer...... and the limiting factor is the amount of memory IO resources available. An equally high demand for memory throughput is found in the computer gaming industry, where a large part of the processing takes place on the graphics processing unit (GPU). Using the GPU, a framework for synthetic aperture imaging...

  20. Emission Facilities - Erosion & Sediment Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — An Erosion and Sediment Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control program. The following sub-facility types related to...

  1. Dengue fever virus and Japanese encephalitis virus synthetic peptides, with motifs to fit HLA class I haplotypes prevalent in human populations in endemic regions, can be used for application to skin Langerhans cells to prime antiviral CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTLs)--a novel approach to the protection of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Y

    1994-09-01

    Flaviviruses were reported to induce CD8+ cytotoxic T cells in infected individuals, indicating that nonapeptides, proteolytic cleavage products of the viral precursor protein, enter the endoplasmic reticulum in infected cells and interact with HLA class I molecules. The assembled HLA class I molecules are transported to the plasma membrane and prime CD8+ T cells. Current knowledge of the interaction of viral peptides with HLA molecules is reviewed. Based on this review, an idea is presented to use synthetic flavivirus peptides with an amino acid motif to fit with the HLA class I peptide binding group of HLA haplotypes prevalent in a given population in an endemic area. These synthetic viral peptides may be introduced into the human skin using a lotion containing the peptides ("Peplotion") together with substances capable of enhancing the penetration of these peptides into the skin to reach Langerhans cells. The peptide-treated Langerhans cells, professional antigen-presenting cells, may bind the synthetic viral peptides by their HLA class I peptide-binding grooves. Antigens carrying Langerhans cells are able to migrate and induce the cellular immune response in the lymph nodes. This approach to the priming of antiviral CD8+ cytotoxic T cells may provide cellular immune protection from flavivirus infection without inducing the humoral immune response, which can lead to the shock syndrome in Dengue fever patients. To be able to develop anti-Dengue virus synthetic peptides for populations with different HLA class I haplotypes, it is necessary to develop computational studies to design HLA class I Dengue virus synthetic peptides with motifs to fit the HLA haplotypes of the population living in an endemic region for Dengue fever. Experiments to study Dengue virus and Japanese encephalitis peptides vaccines and their effectiveness in protection against Dengue fever and Japanese encephalitis are needed. The development of human antiviral vaccines for application of viral

  2. Synthetic aperture radar autofocus via semidefinite relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuang-Hung; Wiesel, Ami; Munson, David C

    2013-06-01

    The autofocus problem in synthetic aperture radar imaging amounts to estimating unknown phase errors caused by unknown platform or target motion. At the heart of three state-of-the-art autofocus algorithms, namely, phase gradient autofocus, multichannel autofocus (MCA), and Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus (FMCA), is the solution of a constant modulus quadratic program (CMQP). Currently, these algorithms solve a CMQP by using an eigenvalue relaxation approach. We propose an alternative relaxation approach based on semidefinite programming, which has recently attracted considerable attention in other signal processing problems. Experimental results show that our proposed methods provide promising performance improvements for MCA and FMCA through an increase in computational complexity.

  3. Engineered, harnessed, and hijacked: synthetic uses for cytoskeletal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Brian S; Derr, Nathan D; Reck-Peterson, Samara L

    2012-12-01

    Synthetic biology re-imagines existing biological systems by designing and constructing new biological parts, devices, and systems. In the arena of cytoskeleton-based transport, synthetic approaches are currently used in two broad ways. First, molecular motors are harnessed for non-physiological functions in cells. Second, transport systems are engineered in vitro to determine the biophysical rules that govern motility. These rules are then applied to synthetic nanotechnological systems. We review recent advances in both of these areas and conclude by discussing future directions in engineering the cytoskeleton and its motors for transport.

  4. Clinical and Research Activities at the CATANA Facility of INFN-LNS: From the Conventional Hadrontherapy to the Laser-Driven Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe A. P. Cirrone

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The CATANA proton therapy center was the first Italian clinical facility making use of energetic (62 MeV proton beams for the radioactive treatment of solid tumors. Since the date of the first patient treatment in 2002, 294 patients have been successful treated whose majority was affected by choroidal and iris melanomas. In this paper, we report on the current clinical and physical status of the CATANA facility describing the last dosimetric studies and reporting on the last patient follow-up results. The last part of the paper is dedicated to the description of the INFN-LNS ongoing activities on the realization of a beamline for the transport of laser-accelerated ion beams for future applications. The ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical and multidisciplinary applications project is introduced and the main scientific aspects will be described.

  5. Synthetic biology for pharmaceutical drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trosset JY

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Yves Trosset,1 Pablo Carbonell2,3 1Bioinformation Research Laboratory, Sup’Biotech, Villejuif, France; 2Faculty of Life Sciences, SYNBIOCHEM Centre, Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; 3Department of Experimental and Health Sciences (DCEXS, Research Programme on Biomedical Informatics (GRIB, Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Synthetic biology (SB is an emerging discipline, which is slowly reorienting the field of drug discovery. For thousands of years, living organisms such as plants were the major source of human medicines. The difficulty in resynthesizing natural products, however, often turned pharmaceutical industries away from this rich source for human medicine. More recently, progress on transformation through genetic manipulation of biosynthetic units in microorganisms has opened the possibility of in-depth exploration of the large chemical space of natural products derivatives. Success of SB in drug synthesis culminated with the bioproduction of artemisinin by microorganisms, a tour de force in protein and metabolic engineering. Today, synthetic cells are not only used as biofactories but also used as cell-based screening platforms for both target-based and phenotypic-based approaches. Engineered genetic circuits in synthetic cells are also used to decipher disease mechanisms or drug mechanism of actions and to study cell–cell communication within bacteria consortia. This review presents latest developments of SB in the field of drug discovery, including some challenging issues such as drug resistance and drug toxicity. Keywords: metabolic engineering, plant synthetic biology, natural products, synthetic quorum sensing, drug resistance

  6. Multi-objective Mixed Integer Programming approach for facility layout design by considering closeness ratings, material handling, and re-layout cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnomo, Muhammad Ridwan Andi; Satrio Wiwoho, Yoga

    2016-01-01

    Facility layout becomes one of production system factor that should be managed well, as it is designated for the location of production. In managing the layout, designing the layout by considering the optimal layout condition that supports the work condition is essential. One of the method for facility layout optimization is Mixed Integer Programming (MIP). In this study, the MIP is solved using Lingo 9.0 software and considering quantitative and qualitative objectives to be achieved simultaneously: minimizing material handling cost, maximizing closeness rating, and minimizing re-layout cost. The research took place in Rekayasa Wangdi as a make to order company, focusing on the making of concrete brick dough stirring machine with 10 departments involved. The result shows an improvement in the new layout for 333,72 points of objective value compared with the initial layout. As the conclusion, the proposed MIP is proven to be used to model facility layout problem under multi objective consideration for a more realistic look.

  7. Engineering Ecosystems and Synthetic Ecologies#

    OpenAIRE

    Mee, Michael T.; Wang, Harris H.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial ecosystems play an important role in nature. Engineering these systems for industrial, medical, or biotechnological purposes are important pursuits for synthetic biologists and biological engineers moving forward. Here, we provide a review of recent progress in engineering natural and synthetic microbial ecosystems. We highlight important forward engineering design principles, theoretical and quantitative models, new experimental and manipulation tools, and possible applications of ...

  8. Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2012-11-16

    Metabolic engineering emerged 20 years ago as the discipline occupied with the directed modification of metabolic pathways for the microbial synthesis of various products. As such, it deals with the engineering (design, construction, and optimization) of native as well as non-natural routes of product synthesis, aided in this task by the availability of synthetic DNA, the core enabling technology of synthetic biology. The two fields, however, only partially overlap in their interest in pathway engineering. While fabrication of biobricks, synthetic cells, genetic circuits, and nonlinear cell dynamics, along with pathway engineering, have occupied researchers in the field of synthetic biology, the sum total of these areas does not constitute a coherent definition of synthetic biology with a distinct intellectual foundation and well-defined areas of application. This paper reviews the origins of the two fields and advances two distinct paradigms for each of them: that of unit operations for metabolic engineering and electronic circuits for synthetic biology. In this context, metabolic engineering is about engineering cell factories for the biological manufacturing of chemical and pharmaceutical products, whereas the main focus of synthetic biology is fundamental biological research facilitated by the use of synthetic DNA and genetic circuits.

  9. Holographically Correcting Synthetic Aperture Aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    Malacara (20:105-148). The synthetic aperture was aligned in accordance with the synthetic-aperture alignment technique of Gill (8:61-64). The...1987. 20. Malacara , Daniel, ed. Optical Shop Testing. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1978. 21. Marciniak, Capt Michael. Tutorial Presentation of mV

  10. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the uni

  11. Apparatus and method for velocity estimation in synthetic aperture imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The invention relates to an apparatus for flow estimation using synthetic aperture imaging. The method uses a Synthetic Transmit Aperture, but unlike previous approaches a new frame is created after every pulse emission. In receive mode parallel beam forming is implemented. The beam formed RF data......). The update signals are used in the velocity estimation processor (8) to correlate the individual measurements to obtain the displacement between high-resolution images and thereby determine the velocity....

  12. The Use of Legally-Imposed and Locally-Negotiated Incentive Approaches in the Siting of Nuclear Waste Management Facilities: Comparing Stakeholders' Views in the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovenia - 13534

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojo, Matti [School of Management, 33014 University of Tampere (Finland); Richardson, Phil [Galson Sciences Ltd, Oakham, Rutland (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    The purpose here is to contribute to the discussion surrounding the use of community benefits (also known as added value) in radioactive waste facility siting programmes. These are becoming more widely used following a series of programme failures around the world, due in the main to a lack of local involvement. A number of different models for the use of community benefits and why they may or may not assist a siting process exist in the literature, based on either a voluntary market approach or one involving coercion by a state authority or developer. Review of real-life examples suggests that two main approaches to the use of benefits exist, a 'legally-mandated' approach where details are laid down in legislation, and a 'locally-negotiated' approach where the details are agreed by the parties through discussions. As part of the European Commission supported IPPA project (Implementing Public Participation Approaches in Radioactive Waste Disposal), stakeholder groups in three participant countries, the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovenia, all of which currently utilise the 'legally-mandated' approach to the provision of community benefits, were invited to respond to a series of questions designed to explore their attitudes and thoughts about the two approaches and related issues such as trust in the institutions and the legal framework. Some initial results and conclusions are presented, although this work is continuing and will be reported at the end of the IPPA project in 2013. (authors)

  13. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other facilities...

  14. Theme: Laboratory Facilities Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Glen M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Laboratory Facilities Improvement" (Miller); "Remodeling Laboratories for Agriscience Instruction" (Newman, Johnson); "Planning for Change" (Mulcahy); "Laboratory Facilities Improvement for Technology Transfer" (Harper); "Facilities for Agriscience Instruction" (Agnew et al.); "Laboratory Facility Improvement" (Boren, Dwyer); and…

  15. Engineering microbes with synthetic biology frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Effendi; Nielsen, David; Solomon, Kevin; Prather, Kristala Jones

    2008-12-01

    Typically, the outcome of biologically engineered unit operations cannot be controlled a priori due to the incorporation of ad hoc design into complex natural systems. To mitigate this problem, synthetic biology presents a systematic approach to standardizing biological components for the purpose of increasing their programmability and robustness when assembled with the aim to achieve novel biological functions. A complex engineered biological system using only standardized biological components is yet to exist. Nevertheless, current attempts to create and to implement modular, standardized biological components pave the way for the future creation of highly predictable artificial biological systems. Although synthetic biology frameworks can be applied to any biological engineering endeavor, this article will focus on providing a brief overview of advances in the field and its recent utilization for the engineering of microbes.

  16. Molecular Imaging in Synthetic Biology, and Synthetic Biology in Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilad, Assaf A; Shapiro, Mikhail G

    2017-06-01

    Biomedical synthetic biology is an emerging field in which cells are engineered at the genetic level to carry out novel functions with relevance to biomedical and industrial applications. This approach promises new treatments, imaging tools, and diagnostics for diseases ranging from gastrointestinal inflammatory syndromes to cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. As these cellular technologies undergo pre-clinical and clinical development, it is becoming essential to monitor their location and function in vivo, necessitating appropriate molecular imaging strategies, and therefore, we have created an interest group within the World Molecular Imaging Society focusing on synthetic biology and reporter gene technologies. Here, we highlight recent advances in biomedical synthetic biology, including bacterial therapy, immunotherapy, and regenerative medicine. We then discuss emerging molecular imaging approaches to facilitate in vivo applications, focusing on reporter genes for noninvasive modalities such as magnetic resonance, ultrasound, photoacoustic imaging, bioluminescence, and radionuclear imaging. Because reporter genes can be incorporated directly into engineered genetic circuits, they are particularly well suited to imaging synthetic biological constructs, and developing them provides opportunities for creative molecular and genetic engineering.

  17. Ecotoxicology of synthetic pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maund, S J; Campbell, P J; Giddings, J M; Hamer, M J; Henry, K; Pilling, E D; Warinton, J S; Wheeler, J R

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter we review the ecotoxicology of the synthetic pyrethroids (SPs). SPs are potent, broad-spectrum insecticides. Their effects on a wide range of nontarget species have been broadly studied, and there is an extensive database available to evaluate their effects. SPs are highly toxic to fish and aquatic invertebrates in the laboratory, but effects in the field are mitigated by rapid dissipation and degradation. Due to their highly lipophilic nature, SPs partition extensively into sediments. Recent studies have shown that toxicity in sediment can be predicted on the basis of equilibrium partitioning, and whilst other factors can influence this, organic carbon content is a key determining variable. At present for SPs, there is no clear evidence for adverse population-relevant effects with an underlying endocrine mode of action. SPs have been studied intensively in aquatic field studies, and their effects under field conditions are mitigated from those measured in the laboratory by their rapid dissipation and degradation. Studies with a range of test systems have shown consistent aquatic field endpoints across a variety of geographies and trophic states. SPs are also highly toxic to bees and other nontarget arthropods in the laboratory. These effects are mitigated in the field through repellency and dissipation of residues, and recovery from any adverse effects tends to be rapid.

  18. Spicing thing up: Synthetic cannabinoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaderna, Max; Addy, Peter H; D’Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Recently, products containing synthetic cannabinoids, collectively referred to as Spice, are increasingly being used recreationally. Objectives The availability, acute subjective effects—including self-reports posted on Erowid—laboratory detection, addictive potential, and regulatory challenges of the Spice phenomenon are reviewed. Results Spice is sold under the guise of potpourri or incense. Unlike THC, the synthetic cannabinoids present in Spice are high-potency, high-efficacy, cannabinoid-receptor full agonists. Since standard urine toxicology does not test for the synthetic cannabinoids in Spice, it is often used by those who want to avoid detection of drug use. These compounds have not yet been subjected to rigorous testing in humans. Acute psychoactive effects include changes in mood, anxiety, perception, thinking, memory, and attention. Adverse effects include anxiety, agitation, panic, dysphoria, psychosis, and bizarre behavior. Psychosis outcomes associated with Spice provide additional data linking cannabinoids and psychosis. Adverse events necessitating intervention by Poison Control Centers, law enforcement, emergency responders, and hospitals are increasing. Despite statutes prohibiting the manufacture, distribution, and sale of Spice products, manufacturers are replacing banned compounds with newer synthetic cannabinoids that are not banned. Conclusions There is an urgent need for better research on the effects of synthetic cannabinoids to help clinicians manage adverse events and to better understand cannabinoid pharmacology in humans. The reported psychosis outcomes associated with synthetic cannabinoids contribute to the ongoing debate on the association between cannabinoids and psychosis. Finally, drug-detection tests for synthetic cannabinoids need to become clinically available. PMID:23836028

  19. Synthetic biology: advancing biological frontiers by building synthetic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Advances in synthetic biology are contributing to diverse research areas, from basic biology to biomanufacturing and disease therapy. We discuss the theoretical foundation, applications, and potential of this emerging field. PMID:22348749

  20. Synthetic biology: advancing biological frontiers by building synthetic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yvonne Yu-Hsuan; Galloway, Kate E; Smolke, Christina D.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in synthetic biology are contributing to diverse research areas, from basic biology to biomanufacturing and disease therapy. We discuss the theoretical foundation, applications, and potential of this emerging field.

  1. Nonhydrolytic sol-gel approach to facile creation of surface-bonded zirconia organic-inorganic hybrid coatings for sample preparation. Ι. Capillary microextraction of catecholamine neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhendal, Abdullah; Mengis, Stephanie; Matthews, Jacob; Malik, Abdul

    2016-10-14

    Nonhydrolytic sol-gel (NHSG) route was used for the creation of novel zirconia-polypropylene oxide (ZrO2-PPO) sol-gel hybrid sorbents in the form of surface coatings for the extraction and preconcentration of catecholamine neurotransmitters and molecules structurally related to their deaminated metabolites. In comparison to other sorbents made of inorganic transition metal oxides, the presented hybrid organic-inorganic sorbents facilitated reversible sorption properties that allowed for efficient desorption of the extracted analytes by LC-MS compatible mobile phases. The presented sol-gel hybrid sorbents effectively overcame the major drawbacks of traditional silica- or polymer-based sorbents by providing superior pH stability (pH range: 0-14), and a variety of intermolecular interactions. Nonaqueous sol-gel treatment of PPO with ZrCl4 was employed for the derivatization of the terminal hydroxyl groups on PPO, providing zirconium trichloride-containing end groups characterized by enhanced sol-gel reactivity. NHSG ZrO2-PPO sorbent provided excellent microextraction performance for catecholamines, low detection limits (5.6-9.6pM), high run-to-run reproducibility (RSD 0.6-5.1%), high desorption efficiency (95.0-99.5%) and high enrichment factors (∼1480-2650) for dopamine and epinephrine, respectively, extracted from synthetic urine samples. The presented sol-gel sorbents provided effective alternative to conventional extraction media providing unique physicochemical characteristics and excellent extraction capability.

  2. Queueing-Based Synchronization and Entrainment for Synthetic Gene Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, William; Butzin, Nicholas; Hochendoner, Philip; Ogle, Curtis

    Synthetic gene oscillators have been a major focus of synthetic biology research since the beginning of the field 15 years ago. They have proven to be useful both for biotechnological applications as well as a testing ground to significantly develop our understanding of the design principles behind synthetic and native gene oscillators. In particular, the principles governing synchronization and entrainment of biological oscillators have been explored using a synthetic biology approach. Our work combines experimental and theoretical approaches to specifically investigate how a bottleneck for protein degradation, which is present in most if not all existing synthetic oscillators, can be leveraged to robustly synchronize and entrain biological oscillators. We use both the terminology and mathematical tools of queueing theory to intuitively explain the role of this bottleneck in both synchronization and entrainment, which extends prior work demonstrating the usefulness of queueing theory in synthetic and native gene circuits. We conclude with an investigation of how synchronization and entrainment may be sensitive to the presence of multiple proteolytic pathways in a cell that couple weakly through crosstalk. This work was supported by NSF Grant #1330180.

  3. Synthetic biology: ethical ramifications 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinow, Paul; Bennett, Gaymon

    2009-12-01

    During 2007 and 2008 synthetic biology moved from the manifesto stage to research programs. As of 2009, synthetic biology is ramifying; to ramify means to produce differentiated trajectories from previous determinations. From its inception, most of the players in synthetic biology agreed on the need for (a) rationalized design and construction of new biological parts, devices, and systems as well as (b) the re-design of natural biological systems for specified purposes, and that (c) the versatility of designed biological systems makes them suitable to address such challenges as renewable energy, the production of inexpensive drugs, and environmental remediation, as well as providing a catalyst for further growth of biotechnology. What is understood by these goals, however, is diverse. Those assorted understandings are currently contributing to different ramifications of synthetic biology. The Berkeley Human Practices Lab, led by Paul Rabinow, is currently devoting its efforts to documenting and analyzing these ramifications as they emerge.

  4. Programming languages for synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh, P; Naveen, F; Rao, Chanchala Uma Maheswara; Nair, Achuthsankar S

    2010-12-01

    In the backdrop of accelerated efforts for creating synthetic organisms, the nature and scope of an ideal programming language for scripting synthetic organism in-silico has been receiving increasing attention. A few programming languages for synthetic biology capable of defining, constructing, networking, editing and delivering genome scale models of cellular processes have been recently attempted. All these represent important points in a spectrum of possibilities. This paper introduces Kera, a state of the art programming language for synthetic biology which is arguably ahead of similar languages or tools such as GEC, Antimony and GenoCAD. Kera is a full-fledged object oriented programming language which is tempered by biopart rule library named Samhita which captures the knowledge regarding the interaction of genome components and catalytic molecules. Prominent feature of the language are demonstrated through a toy example and the road map for the future development of Kera is also presented.

  5. Synthetic Biology for Specialty Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Kelly A; Alper, Hal S

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we address recent advances in the field of synthetic biology and describe how those tools have been applied to produce a wide variety of chemicals in microorganisms. Here we classify the expansion of the synthetic biology toolbox into three different categories based on their primary function in strain engineering-for design, for construction, and for optimization. Next, focusing on recent years, we look at how chemicals have been produced using these new synthetic biology tools. Advances in producing fuels are briefly described, followed by a more thorough treatment of commodity chemicals, specialty chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. Throughout this review, an emphasis is placed on how synthetic biology tools are applied to strain engineering. Finally, we discuss organism and host strain diversity and provide a future outlook in the field.

  6. Biologic and synthetic skin substitutes: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Ahmad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The current trend of burn wound care has shifted to more holistic approach of improvement in the long-term form and function of the healed burn wounds and quality of life. This has demanded the emergence of various skin substitutes in the management of acute burn injury as well as post burn reconstructions. Skin substitutes have important roles in the treatment of deep dermal and full thickness wounds of various aetiologies. At present, there is no ideal substitute in the market. Skin substitutes can be divided into two main classes, namely, biological and synthetic substitutes. The biological skin substitutes have a more intact extracellular matrix structure, while the synthetic skin substitutes can be synthesised on demand and can be modulated for specific purposes. Each class has its advantages and disadvantages. The biological skin substitutes may allow the construction of a more natural new dermis and allow excellent re-epithelialisation characteristics due to the presence of a basement membrane. Synthetic skin substitutes demonstrate the advantages of increase control over scaffold composition. The ultimate goal is to achieve an ideal skin substitute that provides an effective and scar-free wound healing.

  7. Synthetic biology for pharmaceutical drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosset, Jean-Yves; Carbonell, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic biology (SB) is an emerging discipline, which is slowly reorienting the field of drug discovery. For thousands of years, living organisms such as plants were the major source of human medicines. The difficulty in resynthesizing natural products, however, often turned pharmaceutical industries away from this rich source for human medicine. More recently, progress on transformation through genetic manipulation of biosynthetic units in microorganisms has opened the possibility of in-depth exploration of the large chemical space of natural products derivatives. Success of SB in drug synthesis culminated with the bioproduction of artemisinin by microorganisms, a tour de force in protein and metabolic engineering. Today, synthetic cells are not only used as biofactories but also used as cell-based screening platforms for both target-based and phenotypic-based approaches. Engineered genetic circuits in synthetic cells are also used to decipher disease mechanisms or drug mechanism of actions and to study cell-cell communication within bacteria consortia. This review presents latest developments of SB in the field of drug discovery, including some challenging issues such as drug resistance and drug toxicity.

  8. Agent-based modelling in synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorochowski, Thomas E

    2016-11-30

    Biological systems exhibit complex behaviours that emerge at many different levels of organization. These span the regulation of gene expression within single cells to the use of quorum sensing to co-ordinate the action of entire bacterial colonies. Synthetic biology aims to make the engineering of biology easier, offering an opportunity to control natural systems and develop new synthetic systems with useful prescribed behaviours. However, in many cases, it is not understood how individual cells should be programmed to ensure the emergence of a required collective behaviour. Agent-based modelling aims to tackle this problem, offering a framework in which to simulate such systems and explore cellular design rules. In this article, I review the use of agent-based models in synthetic biology, outline the available computational tools, and provide details on recently engineered biological systems that are amenable to this approach. I further highlight the challenges facing this methodology and some of the potential future directions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Developments in the Tools and Methodologies of Synthetic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelwick, Richard; MacDonald, James T.; Webb, Alexander J.; Freemont, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is principally concerned with the rational design and engineering of biologically based parts, devices, or systems. However, biological systems are generally complex and unpredictable, and are therefore, intrinsically difficult to engineer. In order to address these fundamental challenges, synthetic biology is aiming to unify a “body of knowledge” from several foundational scientific fields, within the context of a set of engineering principles. This shift in perspective is enabling synthetic biologists to address complexity, such that robust biological systems can be designed, assembled, and tested as part of a biological design cycle. The design cycle takes a forward-design approach in which a biological system is specified, modeled, analyzed, assembled, and its functionality tested. At each stage of the design cycle, an expanding repertoire of tools is being developed. In this review, we highlight several of these tools in terms of their applications and benefits to the synthetic biology community. PMID:25505788

  10. Developments in the tools and methodologies of synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eKelwick

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology is principally concerned with the rational design and engineering of biologically based parts, devices or systems. However, biological systems are generally complex and unpredictable and are therefore intrinsically difficult to engineer. In order to address these fundamental challenges, synthetic biology is aiming to unify a ‘body of knowledge’ from several foundational scientific fields, within the context of a set of engineering principles. This shift in perspective is enabling synthetic biologists to address complexity, such that robust biological systems can be designed, assembled and tested as part of a biological design cycle. The design cycle takes a forward-design approach in which a biological system is specified, modeled, analyzed, assembled and its functionality tested. At each stage of the design cycle an expanding repertoire of tools is being developed. In this review we highlight several of these tools in terms of their applications and benefits to the synthetic biology community.

  11. SYNTHETIC SLING FAILURE - EVALUATIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY TC; HENDERSON CS

    2009-10-26

    The information and evaluations provided in this report were compiled to address the recurring problem of synthetic sling failure. As safety is the number one priority in all work aspects, a solution must be devised to prevent accidents from occurring. A total of thirteen cases regarding synthetic sling failure were evaluated in order to determine their causes, effects, and preventative measures. From the collected data, it was found that all cases in which the synthetic sling contacted the edge of its load resulted in sling failure. It is required that adequate synthetic sling protection devices be used to protect slings in any lift where the sling comes in direct contact with the edge or corner of its load. However, there are no consensus codes or standards stating the type, material, or purpose of the type of protective device used to protect the sling from being cut. Numerous industry standards and codes provide vague descriptions on how to protect synthetic slings. Without a clear, concise statement of how to protect synthetic slings, it is common for inadequate materials and sling protection devices to be used in an attempt to meet the intent of these requirements. The use of an inadequate sling protection device is the main cause of synthetic sling failure in all researched cases. Commercial sling protection devices come in many shapes and sizes, and have a variety of names, as well as advertised uses. 'Abrasion pads' and 'wear protectors' are two different names for products with the same intended purpose. There is no distinguishable way to determine the extent of sling protection which these devices will provide, or what specific scenarios they are made for. This creates room for error in a field where error is unacceptable. This report provides a recommended action for hoisting and rigging activities which require synthetic slings to contact a load, as well as recommended changes to industry standards which will benefit overall

  12. Surface-modified Nafion membranes with mesoporous SiO 2 layers via a facile dip-coating approach for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuhan; Li, Haidong; Liu, Changpeng; Xing, Wei; Ji, Xiangling

    In this study, Nafion ® 117 membrane is surface-modified with mesoporous silica layers through in situ surfactant-templated sol-gel reaction. The reaction makes use of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) under acidic condition via dip-coating technique on both sides. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) are employed to characterize the resultant membranes. Proton conductivity and methanol permeability of the membranes are also studied. It is determined that the aging time, along with the number of the silicon dioxide (SiO 2) layer, influence both proton conductivity and methanol permeability. Specifically, double-side modified membrane with 5 min interval of the second layer (S (5)) exhibits optimal properties on the combined criterion of conductivity and permeability. However, the application of mesoporous silica layer in modifying commercial Nafion membranes through dip-coating is proven to be a facile route in improving the said criteria simultaneously.

  13. Evaluation of the quality of foods for special diets produced in a school catering facility within a HACCP-based approach: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzelli, Annalisa; Foglini, Martina; Paolini, Francesca; Framboas, Marisa; Serena Altissimi, M; Naceur Haouet, M; Mangili, Piermario; Osimani, Andrea; Clementi, Francesca; Cenci, Telemaco; Tonucci, Franco

    2014-01-01

    A study was carried out to verify the appropriateness of the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan adopted in a school catering facility. To that end, the microbiological quality of foods, the correct implementation of special diets (lactose- and gluten-free) and the nutritional value of foods were assessed. Thirty-six samples of lactose-free and 87 samples of gluten-free special diet food preparations were subjected to microbiological, chemical, and nutritional analyses. The data collected demonstrate the effectiveness of the HACCP plan in reducing the occurrence of microbial and chemical (lactose and gluten) cross-contamination. The data obtained from the nutritional analyses showed that the dietary intake provided by the meals under study was satisfactory.

  14. A green and facile approach for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles using aqueous extract of Ailanthus excelsa leaves, evaluation of its antibacterial and anticancer efficacy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Vinmathi; S Justin Packia Jacob

    2015-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles possess a wide range of applications especially in the field of medicine and this has stimulated the need for synthesizing them. Conventionally, chemical methods are used, which are hazardous and energy consuming. Therefore an eco-friendly and facile means of synthesizing nanoparticles is needed to replace the chemical method of synthesis. In the present study, silver nanoparticles were synthesized in a cost-effective and environment-friendlymanner using aqueous leaf extract of Ailanthus excelsa—a medicinal tree used in the treatment of asthma, bronchitis, cold, abdominal pain, etc. The leaf extract helped in the bioreduction of silver ions yielding silver nanoparticles. The silver nanoparticles thus biosynthesized were characterized using UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles were also found to exhibit excellent antibacterial effect against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and anticancer effect against MCF-7 cell line.

  15. Guiding Ebola patients to suitable health facilities: an SMS-based approach [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/51l

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad-Ali Trad

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Access to appropriate health services is a fundamental problem in developing countries, where patients do not have access to information and to the nearest health service facility. We propose building a recommendation system based on simple SMS text messaging to help Ebola patients readily find the closest health service with available and appropriate resources. The system will map people’s reported symptoms to likely Ebola case definitions and suitable health service locations. In addition to providing a valuable individual service to people with curable diseases, the proposed system will also predict population-level disease spread risk for infectious diseases using crowd-sourced symptoms from the population. Health workers will be able to better plan and anticipate responses to the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Patients will have improved access to appropriate health care. This system could also be applied in other resource poor or rich settings.

  16. Long lasting perfume--a review of synthetic musks in WWTPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homem, Vera; Silva, José Avelino; Ratola, Nuno; Santos, Lúcia; Alves, Arminda

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic musks have been used for a long time in personal care and household products. In recent years, this continuous input has increased considerably, to the point that they were recognized as emerging pollutants by the scientific community, due to their persistence in the environment, and hazardous potential to ecosystems even at low concentrations. The number of studies in literature describing their worldwide presence in several environmental matrices is growing, and many of them indicate that the techniques employed for their safe removal tend to be ineffective. This is the case of conventional activated sludge treatment plants (WWTPs), where considerable loads of synthetic musks enter mainly through domestic sewage. This review paper compiles and discusses the occurrence of these compounds in the sewage, effluents and sludge, main concentration levels and phase distributions, as well as the efficiency of the different methodologies of removal applied in these treatment facilities. To the present day, it has been demonstrated that WWTPs lack the ability to remove musks completely. This shows a clear need to develop new effective and cost-efficient remediation approaches and foresees potential for further improvements in this field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthetic biology: insights into biological computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Romilde; Urrios, Arturo; Velazquez-Garcia, Silvia; de Nadal, Eulàlia; Posas, Francesc

    2016-04-18

    Organisms have evolved a broad array of complex signaling mechanisms that allow them to survive in a wide range of environmental conditions. They are able to sense external inputs and produce an output response by computing the information. Synthetic biology attempts to rationally engineer biological systems in order to perform desired functions. Our increasing understanding of biological systems guides this rational design, while the huge background in electronics for building circuits defines the methodology. In this context, biocomputation is the branch of synthetic biology aimed at implementing artificial computational devices using engineered biological motifs as building blocks. Biocomputational devices are defined as biological systems that are able to integrate inputs and return outputs following pre-determined rules. Over the last decade the number of available synthetic engineered devices has increased exponentially; simple and complex circuits have been built in bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. These devices can manage and store information, take decisions based on past and present inputs, and even convert a transient signal into a sustained response. The field is experiencing a fast growth and every day it is easier to implement more complex biological functions. This is mainly due to advances in in vitro DNA synthesis, new genome editing tools, novel molecular cloning techniques, continuously growing part libraries as well as other technological advances. This allows that digital computation can now be engineered and implemented in biological systems. Simple logic gates can be implemented and connected to perform novel desired functions or to better understand and redesign biological processes. Synthetic biological digital circuits could lead to new therapeutic approaches, as well as new and efficient ways to produce complex molecules such as antibiotics, bioplastics or biofuels. Biological computation not only provides possible biomedical and

  18. Generation of 3D synthetic breast tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Premkumar; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C.; Wells, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Virtual clinical trials are an emergent approach for the rapid evaluation and comparison of various breast imaging technologies and techniques using computer-based modeling tools. A fundamental requirement of this approach for mammography is the use of realistic looking breast anatomy in the studies to produce clinically relevant results. In this work, a biologically inspired approach has been used to simulate realistic synthetic breast phantom blocks for use in virtual clinical trials. A variety of high and low frequency features (including Cooper's ligaments, blood vessels and glandular tissue) have been extracted from clinical digital breast tomosynthesis images and used to simulate synthetic breast blocks. The appearance of the phantom blocks was validated by presenting a selection of simulated 2D and DBT images interleaved with real images to a team of experienced readers for rating using an ROC paradigm. The average areas under the curve for 2D and DBT images were 0.53+/-.04 and 0.55+/-.07 respectively; errors are the standard errors of the mean. The values indicate that the observers had difficulty in differentiating the real images from simulated images. The statistical properties of simulated images of the phantom blocks were evaluated by means of power spectrum analysis. The power spectrum curves for real and simulated images closely match and overlap indicating good agreement.

  19. Forecasting elections in Europe: Synthetic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Lewis-Beck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific work on national election forecasting has become most developed for the United States case, where three dominant approaches can be identified: Structuralists, Aggregators, and Synthesizers. For European cases, election forecasting models remain almost exclusively Structuralist. Here we join together structural modeling and aggregate polling results, to form a hybrid, which we label a Synthetic Model. This model contains a political economy core, to which poll numbers are added (to tap omitted variables. We apply this model to a sample of three Western European countries: Germany, Ireland, and the United Kingdom. This combinatory strategy appears to offer clear forecasting gains, in terms of lead and accuracy.

  20. The National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, G H; Moses, E I; Wuest, C R

    2004-06-03

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that, when completed in 2008, will contain a 192-beam, 1.8- Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter-diameter target chamber and room for 100 diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system and will provide a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's energetic laser beams will compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. Other NIF experiments will study physical processes at temperatures approaching 10{sup 8} K and 10{sup 11} bar; conditions that exist naturally only in the interior of stars and planets. NIF has completed the first phases of its laser commissioning program. The first four beams of NIF have generated 106 kilojoules in 23-ns pulses of infrared light and over 16 kJ in 3.5- ns pulses at the third harmonic (351 nm). NIF's target experimental systems are being commissioned and experiments have begun. This paper provides a detailed look the NIF laser systems, laser and optical performance, and results from recent laser commissioning shots. We follow this with a discussion of NIF's high-energy-density and inertial fusion experimental capabilities, the first experiments on NIF, and plans for future capabilities of this unique facility.

  1. Knowledge Map of Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nenonen, Suvi; Jensen, Per Anker; Lindahl, Göran

    2014-01-01

    in creating an inventory of knowledge (i.e. the knowledge base) and developing/improving the processes of knowledge sharing in research, education and practice. Theory Knowledge mapping is discussed in terms of knowledge management. The research is connected to knowledge mapping in the facilities management......Purpose This paper aims to draft a knowledge map of the fragmented and multidisciplinary research of and relevant to FM. Facilities management knowledge map is a tool for presenting what relevant data and knowledge, a.k.a. knowledge, resides in different disciplines. Knowledge mapping is a step...... profession, research and education. The knowledge map aims to contrast perspectives on how to map interdisciplinary research. Design/methodology/approach The Knowledge map is based on classification of 83 articles, including volume 2013 of Facilities (40 articles) and of Journal of Facilities Management (21...

  2. Freedom and Responsibility in Synthetic Genomics: The Synthetic Yeast Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliva, Anna; Yang, Huanming; Boeke, Jef D; Mathews, Debra J H

    2015-08-01

    First introduced in 2011, the Synthetic Yeast Genome (Sc2.0) PROJECT is a large international synthetic genomics project that will culminate in the first eukaryotic cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with a fully synthetic genome. With collaborators from across the globe and from a range of institutions spanning from do-it-yourself biology (DIYbio) to commercial enterprises, it is important that all scientists working on this project are cognizant of the ethical and policy issues associated with this field of research and operate under a common set of principles. In this commentary, we survey the current ethics and regulatory landscape of synthetic biology and present the Sc2.0 Statement of Ethics and Governance to which all members of the project adhere. This statement focuses on four aspects of the Sc2.0 PROJECT: societal benefit, intellectual property, safety, and self-governance. We propose that such project-level agreements are an important, valuable, and flexible model of self-regulation for similar global, large-scale synthetic biology projects in order to maximize the benefits and minimize potential harms. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Freedom and Responsibility in Synthetic Genomics: The Synthetic Yeast Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliva, Anna; Yang, Huanming; Boeke, Jef D.; Mathews, Debra J. H.

    2015-01-01

    First introduced in 2011, the Synthetic Yeast Genome (Sc2.0) Project is a large international synthetic genomics project that will culminate in the first eukaryotic cell (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) with a fully synthetic genome. With collaborators from across the globe and from a range of institutions spanning from do-it-yourself biology (DIYbio) to commercial enterprises, it is important that all scientists working on this project are cognizant of the ethical and policy issues associated with this field of research and operate under a common set of principles. In this commentary, we survey the current ethics and regulatory landscape of synthetic biology and present the Sc2.0 Statement of Ethics and Governance to which all members of the project adhere. This statement focuses on four aspects of the Sc2.0 Project: societal benefit, intellectual property, safety, and self-governance. We propose that such project-level agreements are an important, valuable, and flexible model of self-regulation for similar global, large-scale synthetic biology projects in order to maximize the benefits and minimize potential harms. PMID:26272997

  4. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  5. A facile approach for decorating quantum dots deep inside of anodically grown self-organized TiO{sub 2} nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Nabeen K.; Yoon, Seog Joon; Lee, Deok Yeon; Lee, Misun; Lim, Iseul; Sung, MyungMo; Han, Sung-Hwan [Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Haengdang-dong 17, Sungdong-ku, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Heejoon [Department of Fiber and Polymer Engineering, Hanyang University, Haengdang-dong 17, Sungdong-ku, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    We demonstrate here a simple but very effective approach to decorate anodically grown TiO{sub 2} nanotubes (NTs) uniformly with CdS and PbS quantum dots (QDs) deep inside the NT walls. This approach is based on SILAR (successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction) technique assisted with evacuation of the NTs. The basic idea of evacuation is to remove air pockets trapped inside the NTs so as to clear the passage for the penetration of QD precursors down the bottom of the NTs. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Value creating education and the Capability Approach: A comparative analysis of Soka education’s facility to promote well-being and social justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul David Sherman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The relatively unfamiliar pedagogy of Soka (value creating education is analysed for its capacity to promote well-being and social justice, using the well-known Capability Approach (CA as a comparator. Various aspects of Soka education correspond favourably with the CA, indicating its potential as a credible and constructive approach for facilitating improved quality of life for individuals and communities. Diverse practical applications of Soka education illustrate how its principles are actualized in advancing social justice issues. Empirical research on Soka education is suggested to investigate its assertions that the pursuit of value creation leads to happiness and well-being.

  7. Environmental analysis of synthetic liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clusen, Ruth C.

    1979-07-12

    Assuming application of the most effective environmental control technolgies and practices, deployment of synthetic liquids facilities on an accelerated schedule to 1990 appears feasible in terms of current environmental constraints. Yet-to-be-defined regulations, in their stringent forms, could change this finding. These regulations include visibility, short-term nitrogen oxide ambient standard, extension of prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) regulations, hazardous waste standards, toxic product regulations, and occupational safety standards. Any production level requires resolution of a number of institutional constraints, including permitting delays and the acceptability of the facility to the local population and state authorities. The greatest impediments for the first-generation technologies include long time delays, facility size limitations, and unwillingness to change the character of the community. There appears to be no absolute environmentally related constraint identified for any of the first-generation surface conversion technologies; second-generation processes run greater risks of major environmental problems. For in situ processes, the major risk is leaching of hazardous materials into water; for direct liquefaction, concern is potential worker and public exposure to toxic substances. Yet-to-be-defined regulations are perceived by developers as major technology development impediments. These include air quality standards (visibility, short-term nitrogen oxide and new PSD regulations), regulation of hazardous wastes and toxic products, underground injection guidelines, and worker safety regulations. Some risk exists that environmental R and D programs cannot fully satisfy all existing and expected regulatory demands, but these risks should be known by 1985 and it is expected that appropriate control adjustments can be made. (LTN)

  8. The large-volume high-pressure facility at GSECARS: A 'Swiss-army-knife' approach to synchrotron-based experimental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanbin; Rivers, Mark; Sutton, Steve; Nishiyama, Norimasa; Uchida, Takeyuki; Sanehira, Takeshi; (UC)

    2009-06-01

    A number of new techniques have been developed at the large-volume press (LVP) high-pressure facility at the GeoSoilEnviroCARS (GSECARS) sector of the advanced photon source (APS). This article describes the 10 MN (1000 T) and 2.5 MN (250 T) hydraulic presses in the insertion device (ID) and bending magnet (BM) beamlines, respectively, with several apparatus and various diffraction and imaging techniques developed since the inception of the facility. Several Kawai-type high-pressure modules, whose second-stage anvils range from 10 mm to 25.4 mm in edge lengths, are used in the hydraulic presses, with pressure (P) and temperature (T) capabilities up to 30 GPa and 3000 K. A DIA-type apparatus can be compressed in both presses for studies requiring large sample volumes. A deformation DIA (D-DIA) has been developed to allow controlled deformation studies on both crystalline and glass materials, using monochromatic diffraction and imaging, up to 20 GPa and 1800 K. A high-pressure tomography apparatus is available for conducting tomography studies at high P and T, with a typical spatial resolution of a few micrometers. Toroidal anvil modules provide large 2{theta} angles for studies of non-crystalline materials, and a new large D-DIA module is under construction for double-stage megabar pressure generation as well as deformation on large samples with the capability of acoustic emission detection. The flexible design of the monochromator at the BM beamline makes it feasible to switch between monochromatic and white-beam mode during an experiment, ideal for monochromatic imaging studies (e.g., high-P tomography) with energy-dispersive diffraction for pressure measurements. A new angle-dispersive diffraction technique has been developed for high P-T crystallography studies, where a solid-state detector is step-scanned, thereby collecting a large number of angle-dispersive spectra over a wide range of photon energies recorded in the multi-channel analyzer. An ultrasonic

  9. A facile approach for the synthesis of monolithic hierarchical porous carbons – high performance materials for amine based CO2 capture and supercapacitor electrode

    KAUST Repository

    Estevez, Luis

    2013-05-03

    An ice templating coupled with hard templating and physical activation approach is reported for the synthesis of hierarchically porous carbon monoliths with tunable porosities across all three length scales (macro- meso- and micro), with ultrahigh specific pore volumes [similar]11.4 cm3 g−1. The materials function well as amine impregnated supports for CO2 capture and as supercapacitor electrodes.

  10. Cellulose nanofiber/nanocrystal reinforced capsules: a fast and facile approach toward assembly of liquid-core capsules with high mechanical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svagan, Anna J; Musyanovych, Anna; Kappl, Michael; Bernhardt, Max; Glasser, Gunnar; Wohnhaas, Christian; Berglund, Lars A; Risbo, Jens; Landfester, Katharina

    2014-05-12

    Liquid-core capsules of high mechanical stability open up for many solid state-like applications where functionality depending on liquid mobility is vital. Herein, a novel concept for fast and facile improvement of the mechanical properties of walls of liquid-core capsules is reported. By imitating nature's own way of enhancing the mechanical properties in liquid-core capsules, the parenchyma plant cells found in fruits and vegetables, a blend of short cellulose nanofibers (capsule walls. The NFC/CNC blend was prepared from a new version of the classical wood pulp hydrolysis. The capsule shell consisted of a covalently (by aromatic diisocyanate) cross-linked NFC/CNC structure at the outer capsule wall and an inner layer dominated by aromatic polyurea. The mechanical properties revealed an effective capsule elastic modulus of 4.8 GPa at 17 wt % NFC/CNC loading, about six times higher compared to a neat aromatic polyurea capsule (0.79 GPa) and 3 orders of magnitude higher than previously reported capsules from regenerated cellulose (0.0074 GPa). The outstanding mechanical properties are ascribed to the dense nanofiber structure, present in the outer part of the capsule wall, that is formed by oriented NFC/CNC of high average aspect ratio (L/d ∼ 70) and held together by both covalent (urethane bonds) and physical bonds (hydrogen bonds).

  11. Stochastic model of the NASA/MSFC ground facility for large space structures with uncertain parameters: The maximum entropy approach, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Wei Shen

    1989-01-01

    A validated technology data base is being developed in the areas of control/structures interaction, deployment dynamics, and system performance for Large Space Structures (LSS). A Ground Facility (GF), in which the dynamics and control systems being considered for LSS applications can be verified, was designed and built. One of the important aspects of the GF is to verify the analytical model for the control system design. The procedure is to describe the control system mathematically as well as possible, then to perform tests on the control system, and finally to factor those results into the mathematical model. The reduction of the order of a higher order control plant was addressed. The computer program was improved for the maximum entropy principle adopted in Hyland's MEOP method. The program was tested against the testing problem. It resulted in a very close match. Two methods of model reduction were examined: Wilson's model reduction method and Hyland's optimal projection (OP) method. Design of a computer program for Hyland's OP method was attempted. Due to the difficulty encountered at the stage where a special matrix factorization technique is needed in order to obtain the required projection matrix, the program was successful up to the finding of the Linear Quadratic Gaussian solution but not beyond. Numerical results along with computer programs which employed ORACLS are presented.

  12. High saturation magnetization of γ-Fe2O3 nano-particles by a facile one-step synthesis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Derang; Li, Hao; Pan, Lining; Li, Jianan; Wang, Xicheng; Jing, Panpan; Cheng, Xiaohong; Wang, Wenjie; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2016-09-01

    We have demonstrated the synthesis of γ-Fe2O3 nano-particles through a facile and novel calcination process in the air. There is no pH regulation, gas atmosphere, additive, centrifugation or other complicated procedures during the preparing process. A detailed formation process of the nano-particles is proposed, and DMF as a polar solvent may slower the reaction process of calcination. The structures, morphologies, and magnetic properties of γ-Fe2O3 nano-particles were investigated systematically, and the pure γ-Fe2O3 nano-particles obtained at 200 °C display uniform morphology good magnetic property. The saturation magnetization of obtained pure γ-Fe2O3 is about 74 emu/g, which is comparable with bulk material (76 emu/g) and larger than other results. In addition, the photocatalytic activity for degradation of methylene blue is also studied, which shows proper photocatalytic activity.

  13. A facile approach to prepare crumpled CoTMPyP/electrochemically reduced graphene oxide nanohybrid as an efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Juanjuan; Liu, Lin; Chen, Qian; Yang, Min; Wang, Danping; Tong, Zhiwei; Chen, Zhong

    2017-03-01

    Elaborate design and synthesis of efficient and stable non-Pt electrocatalysts for some renewable energy related conversion/storage processes are one of the major goals of sustainable chemistry. Herein, we report a facile method to fabricate Co porphyrin functionalized electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (CoTMPyP/ERGO) thin film by direct assembly of oppositely charged tetrakis(N-methylpyridyl) porphyrinato cobalt (CoTMPyP) and GO nanosheets under mild conditions followed by an electrochemical reduction procedure. STEM analysis confirms that CoTMPyP nanoaggregates are homogeneously distributed over the graphene surface. The electrochemical properties of CoTMPyP/ERGO were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that CoTMPyP/ERGO nanohybrid film can serve as excellent electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution in alkaline solution with high activity and stability. The intimate contact and efficient electron transfer between CoTMPyP and ERGO, as well as the crumpled structure, contribute to the improvement of the electrocatalytic performance.

  14. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  15. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  16. Meeting Report: Synthetic Biology Jamboree for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology (the name is derived from an analogy to synthetic chemistry) has recognized itself as a "field" only since about 2002. Synthetic biology has gotten some high-profile attention recently, but most people are not aware the field even exists. Synthetic biologists apply engineering principles to genomic circuits to…

  17. Meeting Report: Synthetic Biology Jamboree for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology (the name is derived from an analogy to synthetic chemistry) has recognized itself as a "field" only since about 2002. Synthetic biology has gotten some high-profile attention recently, but most people are not aware the field even exists. Synthetic biologists apply engineering principles to genomic circuits to…

  18. An Efficacious Synthetic Strategy for cis-Clerodane Diterpenoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Clerodane diterpenoids are widely distributed in nature and constitute one of the largest and, yet, still rapidly growing family of secondary metabolites. Of the relatively few clerodanes tested for biological activity, many were found to possess interesting antifeedant and medicinal properties and are potentially useful as insecticidal, antitumour, antifungal, antibiotic, anti-peptic ulcer, and psychotropic agents. The structural complexity and biological activity associated with this class of natural products have attracted extensive effort towards their total synthesis. In most of the reported syntheses, the synthetic sequence is specific to the target molecule. We have recently developed a versatile synthetic approach which is applicable to the synthesis of a large number of target molecules with minor modifications. The key operation of this approach is the face-selective Diels-Alder reaction of dienone ester 1. The successful application of this approach has culminated in the total synthesis of several cisclerodane diterpenoids. We have since made considerable improvement on this general synthetic approach, in terms of the overall efficiency, making use of compounds 2 and 3 as dienophiles. This newly developed general synthetic approach towards clerodane diterpenoids will be presented.

  19. An Efficacious Synthetic Strategy for cis-Clerodane Diterpenoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Hsing-Jang

    2001-01-01

    Clerodane diterpenoids are widely distributed in nature and constitute one of the largest and, yet, still rapidly growing family of secondary metabolites. Of the relatively few clerodanes tested for biological activity, many were found to possess interesting antifeedant and medicinal properties and are potentially useful as insecticidal, antitumour, antifungal, antibiotic, anti-peptic ulcer, and psychotropic agents. The structural complexity and biological activity associated with this class of natural products have attracted extensive effort towards their total synthesis. In most of the reported syntheses, the synthetic sequence is specific to the target molecule. We have recently developed a versatile synthetic approach which is applicable to the synthesis of a large number of target molecules with minor modifications. The key operation of this approach is the face-selective Diels-Alder reaction of dienone ester 1. The successful application of this approach has culminated in the total synthesis of several cisclerodane diterpenoids. We have since made considerable improvement on this general synthetic approach, in terms of the overall efficiency, making use of compounds 2 and 3 as dienophiles. This newly developed general synthetic approach towards clerodane diterpenoids will be presented.  ……

  20. Control theory meets synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Domitilla; Dy, Aaron J; Qian, Yili

    2016-07-01

    The past several years have witnessed an increased presence of control theoretic concepts in synthetic biology. This review presents an organized summary of how these control design concepts have been applied to tackle a variety of problems faced when building synthetic biomolecular circuits in living cells. In particular, we describe success stories that demonstrate how simple or more elaborate control design methods can be used to make the behaviour of synthetic genetic circuits within a single cell or across a cell population more reliable, predictable and robust to perturbations. The description especially highlights technical challenges that uniquely arise from the need to implement control designs within a new hardware setting, along with implemented or proposed solutions. Some engineering solutions employing complex feedback control schemes are also described, which, however, still require a deeper theoretical analysis of stability, performance and robustness properties. Overall, this paper should help synthetic biologists become familiar with feedback control concepts as they can be used in their application area. At the same time, it should provide some domain knowledge to control theorists who wish to enter the rising and exciting field of synthetic biology.